Issuu on Google+

Administrative and Resource Management Suppor ting the Vision of UC Davis

Annual Report, 2009-2010


Supporting A Vision of Excellence Administrative and Resource Management was created in fall 2009 as part of a large scale reorganization that brought together all the administrative units from the Office of Administration and the Office of Resource Management and Planning under a new name and organizational structure. Our eleven operating units provide leadership and service to the campus. We coordinate and manage the campus budget and statistics; maintain the buildings, gardens and lands; manage human resources; develop the campus as a venue for research, conservation, recreation, conferences, and special events; and provide for the health and safety of the campus community and its guests. The employees of ARM are multidisciplinary, well educated, productive and resourceful. Through organizational changes and budget challenges, the vigor of our commitment to excellence in research, teaching and public service is steadfast. Our goal is to exceed core service expectations and proactively contribute to the strategic vision of the university. This annual report has been designed to demonstrate the ways in which Administrative and Resource Management directly contributes to multiple dimensions of the campus Vision of Excellence.

ARM by the numbers ARM expenditures for 2009-10

2009-10, ARM managed expenditures totaling $204 million from a variety of sources. While State General Funds still make up the largest single source, combined support from multiple self-supporting units is the largest portion, at 40 percent, of ARM activity. (Table 1)

Total = $204 million Other Fund Sources, $27.5 General Funds, $64.3

Self-Supporting Activities, $81.7 Purchased Utilities, $30.3

Table 1. 2009-10 expenditures by source (in millions)

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

1


Trends

General funds support did not increase from 2001 to 2008, even though this time was a period of extraordinary growth in workload. General funds declined in 2009, a trend that is expected to continue. Purchased utilities are a significant expense, and ARM is fending off increases through intensive energy conservation measures, favorable price negotiations and incentives from statewide energy partners. Self supporting units remain the largest proportion of the ARM budget. “Other� funds have doubled since 2008, consisting primarily of dedicated fund sources for uses such as staff professional development, employee support activities, support provided to the UC Davis Medical Center, and the Statewide Energy Partnership funding projects..(Table 2) $120,000,000 $100,000,000 $80,000,000 $60,000,000 $40,000,000 $20,000,000 $Actual 2001-02 Self-Supporting Units

Actual 2008-09 General Funds

Actual 2009-10

Projected 2010-11

Purchased Utilities

Other

Table 2. ARM expenditures

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

2


Foster a Vibrant Community of Learning and Scholarship ‌sustain their enterprise with a superior physical, financial and technologic infrastructure‌ All the great things that happen at UC Davis happen in buildings and landscapes. Administrative and Resource Management is responsible for financing, planning, building and maintaining the physical environment of UC Davis. Our staff actively engage with deans and vice chancellors, principle investigators, academic department managers, students and staff to understand needs so we can create functional, welcoming, sustainable spaces for faculty and students to study and engage in campus life.

Selected Highlights for 2009-10 Streamlined approval process for capital projects

The approval process for capital projects greatly improved in 2009-10 when the UC Davis 10-Year Capital Financial Plan was approved by the UC Regents. This earned the campus delegated authority for the Chancellor to approve projects up to $60 million on the Davis campus. With this authority, many projects to enhance student life moved forward, such as Segundo Services Center, Segundo life safety improvements, the Student Community Center, the Memorial Union Bookstore renovation and the Regan Hall renewal. Stretching the maintenance dollar

9,800,000 9,600,000 9,400,000 9,200,000 9,000,000 8,800,000 8,600,000 8,400,000 8,200,000 8,000,000

$1.90 $1.80 $1.70 $1.60 $1.50 $1.40 $1.30 $1.20 $1.10 $1.00

Gross Square Feet

State OMP support / sq. ft.

Since 2004, UC Davis growth has outpaced building maintenance funding. Building Maintenance Services is currently maintaining 17 percent more space with 25 percent less funding per square foot than in 2004. (Table 3) To make this work, they are prioritizing all work requests. For example, critical repairs to keep building systems operating are often the only repairs made, and cosmetic repairs are not performed. This results in an increasing backlog of building maintenance which leads to a rapidly growing deferred maintenance list.

2004/2005 2005/2006 2006/2007 2007/2008 2008/2009 2009/2010 State OMP Support / sq.ft.

Gross state supportable sq ft

Table 3. Building maintenance expenditures vs. funding per square foot

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

3


The good news, we do more with less

Facilities Management maintained, cleaned and improved more than nine million gross square feet of Davis campus, state-supportable space in 2009-10 at a lower cost than most other benchmarked universities, including all the UCs plus Stanford, USC and Caltech. We are in the middle of the range in terms of energy costs. (Table 4) Overall, UC Davis maintenance, custodial, and utilities costs per square foot are lower than average as compared to benchmark campuses. As with Building Maintenance Services, we are stretching the custodial service dollar. We are collecting trash and cleaning floors less often. To meet customer needs, we are differentiating between basic and enhanced service levels and charging for enhanced service. $8.00 $7.00 $6.00 $5.00 $4.00 $3.00 $2.00 $1.00 $0.00

$7.60

Maintenance Cost/Sq Ft $4.89 $2.49 $1.94 $2.07 $2.13 $2.27 $1.51 $1.68 $1.73 $1.84

UCSB

San Diego

Davis

UCSF

Berkeley Santa Cruz Riverside

Irvine

USC

UCLA

Caltech

Merced

Custodial Cost/Sq Ft

$2.50

$1.50 $0.81

$0.92

$0.99

Davis

Stanford

$1.15

$1.24

$1.25

$1.38

Stanford

$2.19

$2.00

$1.00

$2.92 $3.00

$1.48

$1.49

UCSB

Santa Cruz

$1.59

$1.63

UCLA

Merced

$1.84

$0.50 $0.00 Irvine

Caltech

San Diego Berkeley Riverside

USC

UCSF

Utilities Cost/Sq Ft

$6.00

$5.11

$5.00 $4.00 $3.00

$2.10

$2.36

$2.51

$2.59

$2.69

$2.97

$3.06

USC

Berkeley

$3.33

$3.55

$3.67

$3.81

$3.85

San Diego

Merced

UCLA

UCSF

$2.00 $1.00 $0.00 Stanford

UCSB

Riverside Santa Cruz

Irvine

Davis

Caltech

Table 4. UC Davis maintenance, custodial, and utilities expenses per Davis campus state supportable square foot 2008-09.

Smaller spaces, bigger costs

As building size goes down, maintenance costs go up. Temporary and small buildings (less than 5000 square feet) account for 10 percent of our total square footage and cost as much as six times more to maintain. (Table 5) With 644 small buildings on campus (out of 1107 buildings total), this is a significant challenge.

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

4


$7.00 $6.00 $5.00 $4.00 $3.00 $2.00 $1.00 $-

500 400 300 200 100 >15,000

5,001-15,000

<5,000

Temporary

Annual expenditure / sq. ft.

Number of Buildings

600

Building Size Building Count

Maintenance Expenditures

Table 5. Building size vs. maintenance cost

Controlling energy cost by addressing energy waste

Our approach to address energy costs includes participating in the Statewide Energy Partnership Program. The program provides funds for 74 individual projects that improve energy efficiency, such as heating and cooling upgrades, lighting retrofits, and modernized monitoring and control systems. Many of these projects, such as the lighting energy-reduction initiative, apply technologies developed by UC Davis researchers. Once the program is completed in 2011-12, reductions in annual use of electricity and natural gas are projected to be 33 million kwh and 2.2 million therms, translating to annual cost savings of about $4.8 million. The savings will be used to pay for the campus share of the project costs, with an average payback of six to seven years. PG&E will provide about $10 million for program costs in the form of cash rebates. Fifteen of the 74 projects were completed by the end of 2009-10. Another 32 are scheduled to be completed this year. ARM/academic collaborations:

â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘

More than 25 academic partnerships and 60 faculty members were involved in Arboretum collaborations in 2009-10. With College of Agriculture and Environmental Science, the Arboretum is a founding partner of the California Center for Urban Horticulture which is developing the Arboretum All-Stars program into a state-wide initiative. Arboretum All-Stars are hardy plants for home landscapes that are tested in the Arboretum for drought tolerance, pest resistance and aesthetic beauty. The staff of Putah Creek Riparian Reserve created a grazing trail for cattle managed by the Department of Animal Science. The trail generates benefits for both parties. For the Riparian Reserve, grazing provides weed abatement without fuel or carbon emissions, saves time and labor costs, and reduces the amount of herbicide required. The Department of Animal Science saves money on feed and transport costs and reduces carbon emissions produced in transport.

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

5


Drive Innovation at the Frontiers of Knowledge …create collaborative gathering places that promote both interdisciplinary discourse and a sense of a scholarly community… …increase the efficiency and cost effectiveness of research and extramural accounting administrative systems… The creation of Administrative and Resource Management presented many opportunities to connect administrative operations in new ways that directly deliver on the vision of creating “collaborative gathering places that promote both interdisciplinary discourse and a sense of a scholarly community.” For example, the campus planning function is now integrated with all the operations that directly affect people’s experience of the campus, including Grounds and Landscape Services, Transportation and Parking Services, Conference and Event Services, the Arboretum and the Putah Creek Riparian Reserve. This new unit, Campus Planning and Community Resources, can deploy the resources to maintain the landscape more efficiently and cost effectively than when they were separate units.

Selected highlights for 2009-10 The ultimate collaborative gathering place

UC Davis is building a dynamic mixed-use community where students, faculty and staff will be able to live locally and participate fully in the life of the campus. West Village will put residential, educational and business space within a bike lane of campus. Unlike any other UC Davis housing option, West Village will bring together students, faculty, staff and Davis neighbors in a unique community that also serves as a demonstration site for sustainable technologies developed at UC Davis. Vertical construction began in 2009-10. Breaking new ground on educational partnerships

Sacramento City College and UC Davis are partnering to build the first community college center on a University of California campus. The Sacramento City College Davis Center, which will open to enrollment of more than 2,000 students in spring 2012, will have a permanent home at UC Davis West Village after more than a more than a decade of offering classes in leased space in the city of Davis. The center represents another milestone in a long partnership between the Los Rios Community College District and UC Davis. Extramural award activity

As the campus becomes more productive in generating funds from grants and gifts, Accounting and Financial Services becomes more productive in processing them. A&FS supported a 58 percent growth in gift and endowment income while sustaining a 20 percent budget reduction between 2008 and 2010. (Table 6)

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

6


2007-08 Active sponsored projects Gift/endowment transactions Gift/endowment amounts

2008-09

2009-10

3-yr change

6,050

6,383

6,956

15%

14,562

15,207

15,764

8%

$45,490,929

$43,692,091

$71,838,619

58%

Table 6. Funding growth, 2007-2009, supported by Accounting and Financial Services

Growing income from facility usage

Conference and Event Services generated a 53 percent growth in income from facility rentals in 2009-10. This income is returned to departments.The estimated total attendance at events managed by Conference and Event Services jumped 60 percent. (Table 7) 2008-09

2009-10

% change

Reservations

8,292

7,469

(10%)

Facility uses

39,861

45,803

15%

Estimated total attendance

4,226,632

6,770,461

60%

Departmental earned income

$985,151

$1,509,730

53%

Table 7. Space reservations, utilization, attendance and income

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

7


Nurture a Sustainable Future and Propel Economic Vitality …emphasize sustainability in all its many forms and interpretations… ARM is the administrative home to the campus’s Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability unit which was created in 2008 as part of the campus’s commitment to making sustainability an integral aspect of UC Davis’s future. The office participates in the planning and design of campus building projects, reviews the environmental impacts of these projects, formulates mitigation measures for potential impacts and oversees an ongoing mitigation monitoring program. Leadership in sustainability is not limited to the formal environmental unit. For example, alternative transportation is overseen by Transportation and Parking Services. LEED certification is in Design and Construction Management’s purview. Electronic Document Management is spearheaded by Accounting and Financial Services. Reducing energy waste and improving energy management are priorities for Facilities Management. Zerowaste events are the standard for Conference and Event Services. ARM, with the UC system, leverages purchasing power to make environmentally preferable products affordable. Working with vendors, Materiel Management is developing and expanding programs to divert toner cartridges, electronic waste and other reusable and recyclable materials from landfills. They offer new, energy efficient printers free of charge to departments who voluntarily retire outdated printers. Over the past three years, use of virgin papers has been systematically discontinued. Repro Graphics has even identified a 100 percent recycled content paper that doesn’t jam up in copiers and printers.

Selected highlights for 2009-10 West Village Energy Initiative

UC Davis West Village will combine ultra-efficient design with renewable, on-site energy production to become a zero-net-energy community. In 2009-10, the West Village Energy Initiative added $4.5 million in grants from the California Energy Commission and U.S. Department of Energy to $2.5 million previously received from the California Public Utilities Commission to support the zero net energy goal. This collaborative initiative draws on research and expertise from several UC Davis centers and programs, including biodigester technology to convert food scraps into power, solar photovoltaic to generate electricity from the sun, passive solar thermal to pre-heat water, biogas coupled with fuel cells to generate electricity, and advanced battery technologies for energy storage. Saving 100 million gallons of water a year

The Grounds and Landscape division’s irrigation control upgrade, which is now 95 percent complete, and has resulted in annual savings of 100 million gallons of water. It also reduces energy costs associated with well pumping. Water-saving strategies include adding soil amendments to all athletic fields to improve water retention, and performing yearly maintenance on irrigation systems. Campus irrigation systems are now programmed to adjust watering based on weather data.

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

8


Campus greenhouse gas emissions down

Metric Tonnes CO2e

The UC Davis Climate Action Plan provides a roadmap for achieving three key objectives of the UC Policy on Sustainable Practices: 1) Reduce Green House Gas emissions to year 2000 levels by 2014; 2) reduce them to 1990 levels by 2020 and 3) ultimately achieve climate neutrality, meaning a net zero impact on the Earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s climate. UC Davis is already meeting its 2014 target for operations-related emissions, even with increases in gross square footage. (Table 8) 260000

16.00

250000

15.50

240000

15.00

230000

14.50

220000

14.00

210000

13.50

200000 190000

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Outside Gross Square Footage (million SF)

2006

2007

2008

2009

212547

251750

239060

234741

13.94

14.44

15.20

15.49

13.00

Table 8. Greenhouse gas emissions vs. outside gross square footage

Outperforming energy code and policy

For the past 10 years, UC Davis Design and Construction Management projects have consistently performed better than both the California Energy Code (Title 24) and UC systemwide energy policy. UC systemwide policy asks us to outperform Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy code by 20 percent. We have set objectives higher by specifying that our projects beat the state code by 25 percent. Projects completed by UC Davis Design and Construction Management in 2009-10 performed better than California code by 28 percent. Projects scheduled to be completed in 2010-11 are projected to best state code by 30 percent. (Table 9)

25%

PROJECTED

% better than CA Title 24

30%

20% 15% 10%

UC Davis % better than title 24 UC policy % better than title 24

5% 0% 2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

Table 9. UC Davis campus and systemwide energy performance vs. California Title 24 Energy Code

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

9


Energy use down despite campus growth

12,000,000

2,400,000

11,500,000

2,300,000

11,000,000

2,200,000

10,500,000

2,100,000

10,000,000

2,000,000

9,500,000

1,900,000

Building Area (Square Feet) Total Energy Use (MMBTUs)

9,000,000 FY05-06

FY06-07

FY07-08

Energy Use in MMBTUs/Year

Building Area in Square Feet

Overall, total Davis campus energy use is down 12 percent from 2005-06 levels despite an eight percent increase in campus square footage. (Table 10) Adjusted for campus growth, energy has decreased 18 percent since 2005-06. Since 2005-06, campus energy use has decreased even as building square footage has increased. The cost of energy per square foot has decreased from $2.54 to $2.29. (Table 11)

1,800,000 FY08-09

FY09-10

Table 10. Total campus energy use vs. building area, 2005-2010

250,000

$2.54

$2.54

218,500

212,300

$2.67

195,700 200,000

$3.00 $2.54

182,400

$2.29

$2.50

178,800

$2.00 $1.50

150,000 Energy Use (BTUs/Yr/Square Foot) Total Energy Cost ($/Square Foot)

100,000 FY05-06

FY06-07

FY07-08

$1.00 FY08-09

Energy Cost ($/Year/Square Foot)

Energy Use (BTUs/Year/Square Foot)

300,000

FY09-10

Table 11. Energy use vs. cost per square foot

Reducing emissions from the campus fleet

In 2009-10, Fleet Services purchased four PHEVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, two Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) sedans, two biodiesel sedans, and a CNG-powered refuse vehicle. We accepted delivery of four neighborhood electric vehicles and have another seven on order. The UC Davis fleet now has in use 99 CNG-powered vehicles, 63 electric and neighborhood electric vehicles, 53 hybrid sedans and 17 plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) sedans. Approximately 100 campus vehicles run on B20 biodiesel.

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

10


Champion Health, Education, Access and Opportunity …develop community-based models and resources… …measure the number, quality and availability of professional development resources… As UC Davis researchers move into new frontiers, the infrastructure and services to support them become more complex. Nearly every ARM operating unit is involved in this support, none more so than Safety Services. They support researchers in complying with an ever-growing number of regulatory and accreditation requirements related to biomedical research, animal care and use, and controlled substances. They provide training and medical screening for laboratory personnel and lead the campus emergency preparedness effort. With the campus Police and Fire departments, they help minimize the risk that comes with scientific research and provide safe passage for the campus along the journey from the unknown to the known.

Selected highlights for 2009-10 Safety pays

Injury and illness rates trended downward from 2007 to 2009, resulting in savings of more than $2.8 million over the previous two-year period. Improvements in accident and injury rates have led to steady decreases in the Workers’ Compensation payroll assessment. General, Automobile, and Employment Liability insurance rates are trending upward, but remain, on average, 36.4 percent lower than in 2002. (Table 12) 1 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

Worker's Compensation payroll assessment $/$100 payroll GAEL payroll assessment $/$100 payroll Table 12. Workers Compensation and GAEL payroll assessment trends, 2005-2008

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

11


Supporting employees through stressful times

The Academic and Staff Assistance Program, which offers confidential assessment, intervention, consultation and referral services at no charge to all faculty and staff and their immediate families, has played a significant role in helping campus employees and departments manage the stress and anxiety created by multiple years of budget reductions. The number of campus staff utilizing support services from the Academic and Staff Assistance Program jumped 35 percent in 2008-09. It has declined slightly, but remains 25 percent higher than two years ago. (Table 13) ASAP counselors have seen an increase in overall demand for service, as well as increases associated with economic, legal issues and work-related concerns, and a rise in violence-related issues. (Table 14) 5000 4500 4000 3500 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0

4747

4383

3518

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

Table 13. Utilization of Academic and Staff Assistance Program (ASAP) services

50% 45% 40%

2007-08

35%

2008-09

2009-10

30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Health, Mental or Physical

Personal Relationships

Work Related

Family Concerns

Other

Economic/ Legal

Racial/ Cultural/ Gender

Table 14. Trends in ASAP client concerns

Campus crime down, calls for service up

The overall crime rate on campus on campus was down, in 2009, by 30 percent. (Table 15) Police calls for service (requests for police service in which an officer is dispatched, or incidents found by police officers) rose 48 percent in 2009.(Table 16) The increase in police service calls is related to the many campus protests in 2009-10 as well as having a fully staffed, and therefore more visible, police force.

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

12


Theft (625) Burglary (76) Assault (39) Motor Vehicle Theft (7) Arson (7) Rape (5) Robbery (1) Homicide (0)

Table 15. UC Davis crime types, Davis campus

40000 33760

35000 30000

25811

25000

27441

27786

2007

2008

22976

20000 15000 10000 5000 0 2005

2006

2009

Table 16. UC Davis Police calls for service

Campus and city fire departments join forces

The City of Davis and UC Davis initiated the consolidation of their fire departments in 2009-10. Phase 1 of the consolidation includes sharing the cost of a single fire chief, restructuring administrative support functions and exploring opportunities to leverage resources through joint purchase power. The two departments will also establish a single fire dispatch center and implement standardized training, policies and procedures. Phase I of the consolidation is anticipated to save UC Davis $110,000 per year and the City of Davis $140,000 per year for a total joint annual savings of $250,000. The consolidation plan calls for reinvesting these savings in operational areas to maintain and improve services.

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

13


Cultivate a Culture of Organizational Excellence, Effectiveness and Stewardship …provide an efficient, professional administrative support structure committed to serving and advancing the university’s academic mission… Administrative and Resource Management is the administrative home to the campus Organizational Excellence initiative and, thus, has a leading role in actualizing this dimension of the UC Davis vision. ARM is heading the design and implementation of a shared service center to consolidate and streamline human resources, accounting and IT transactions to ensure the most efficient and cost effective service delivery possible. The formation of ARM itself is a study in organizational excellence. The merger of operating units that created this new division generated one-time savings of $686,250 for 2009-10 and a permanent budget reduction of $915,000. In addition, ARM gained experience in shared services when we consolidated our own HR, IT and accounts payable functions to serve all ARM operating units and also units outside of ARM, such as IET. Major campus-wide technology initiatives housed in ARM units will have a profound impact on how UC Davis does business in the future. The Kuali Financial System, being implemented by Accounting and Financial Services, will replace DaFIS, a legacy system created in the 1990s. The Kuali Coeus research administration system, being implemented by Safety Services, in partnership with the Office of Research, will significantly streamline the way in which UC Davis faculty apply for, manage and account for grants and other resources related to their research. These systems, along with other Kuali systems being implemented by IET, are a critical part of the technology investment required to successfully implement shared service centers on campus.

Selected highlights for 2009-10 Smart metering improves energy service, saves money

The installation of utility meters on campus buildings has been a high priority over the past three years. Now, 80 percent of all the electricity used by the campus is fully metered (up from 36 percent in January 2008). This allows for better accountability in energy delivery and consumption. Automated controls now allow many utility issues to be managed centrally, without deploying field staff. Sometimes it’s just this simple

Simply by moving the paving cycle from fall to spring, Grounds and Landscape Services received better pricing and scheduling to repave campus pathways. This change reduced the cost of one paving cycle by $118,000. Right-sizing, cost avoidance and collaboration

In 2009, parking lot maintenance was moved from a capital project delivery model to a general maintenance delivery model. Parking lots were placed on the same March-April bid schedule as campus roads, and the use of outside contractors for general prep work, such as sealing cracks and patching asphalt, was discontinued in favor of in-house crews. Today, the contractor’s role is limited to seal coating and restriping. These actions cut project soft costs from 30 percent down to 14 percent. By the fall of 2011 more than

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

14


2,000,000 square feet of surface parking will have been repaired, sealed and restriped, and all lots will be on a three-year maintenance cycle. Energy incentive ceiling raised

Working with UCOP and PG&E, UC Davis Utilities successfully persuaded the California Public Utilities Commission to eliminate a long-standing cap that limited the size of rebates the campus could receive for projects in any given year. This will bring $19 million in energy incentives to campus between 2010 and 2012. Eliminating off-campus leases saves millions annually

In 2009-10, the focus on moving units from off-campus leased space back onto campus resulted in more than $500,000 annual cost savings. Ultimately, the campus can achieve $1.35 million in annual savings by discontinuing off-campus leases. Beyond budget savings, locating programs and personnel on campus leads to fuller engagement in campus activities and optimizes use of existing campus facilities. Fleet Services car share program

Campus departments can now save the expense of leasing a dedicated campus vehicle and still have a car when they need it. Fleet Services introduced a car-sharing program, UC Drive, in 2010. The pilot program enables departments to rent a campus vehicle by the hour instead of by the day. Cars are available 24/7, and reservations can be made online. Timely turnaround

Accounting and Financial Servicesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; standard for turnaround times to process purchase orders, travel expenses, accounts payable and student accounts is 10 or fewer business days. In 2007-08, the average turnaround time was less than five days. Mandatory furloughs in 2009-10 increased the turnaround time, but it remained well below the standard, averaging 5.3 days. (Table 17) 10

7.85 8.1

8 6

5.3

4.67

8.3

7.7 4.62 4.63

4.6

4

5.26

4.09

3.5

2 0 2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

Purchase Order

Travel Expense

Accounts Payable

Avg sales outstanding - Student Accounting

Table 17. Accounting and Financial Services transaction turnaround times in number of days

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

15


Facilitating credit card payments

Campus customers expect to be able to pay by credit card, whether they’re buying Aggie apparel in the Bookstore or paying their fees. In 2009-10, more than $100 million came into campus by credit card. Accounting and Financial Services has built a technology infrastructure to manage the accounting, security and compliance requirements of credit card processing using the TouchNet Payment gateway. The system handles thousands of payment-related transactions each day, securely, efficiently, in real time. Travel expense accounting. You’ve got to admit, it’s getting better.

The average cycle times for processing travel expense reports and invoices are nearly half what they were three years ago, despite staffing reductions. This improvement is attributable to policy and procedure changes, adjustments in risk tolerance, and Accounting and Financial Services’ use of post-audit review.

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010

16


Printed on 100% post-consumer recycled paper. Š 2010. Regents of the University of California. All Rights Reserved.


University of California, Davis One Shields Avenue 376 Mrak Hall Davis, California 95616 arm.ucdavis.edu


UC Davis Administrative & Resource Management Annual Report 2010-11