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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

TABLE OF CONTENTS What is Linguistics? ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4 About the Major ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 About the Minor ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Course Descriptions ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Course Suggestions Based on Student Interests ......................................................................................................................................16 Sample Plans of Study .........................................................................................................................................................................................17 Sample Plans for the New Major Structure............................................................................................................................................18 Sample Plan for Student Entering Linguistics Major as a Freshman ....................................................................................18 Sample Plan for Student Entering Linguistics Major as a Junior ............................................................................................19 Sample Plans for the Old Major Structure ..............................................................................................................................................20 Sample Plan for Student Entering Linguistics Major as a Freshman ....................................................................................20 Sample Plan for Student Entering Linguistics Major as a Junior ............................................................................................21 New Major Requirements Check-Sheet........................................................................................................................................................22 Old Major Requirements Check-Sheet ..........................................................................................................................................................23 Minor Requirements Check-Sheet..................................................................................................................................................................24 Research Opportunities ......................................................................................................................................................................................25 Departmental Research Labs.......................................................................................................................................................................25 Getting Involved ................................................................................................................................................................................................26 Double Majoring In Linguistics and Another Field ..................................................................................................................................27 Suggested Double Majors with Linguistics ............................................................................................................................................27 Advising and Mentoring .....................................................................................................................................................................................28 Linguistics Advisors and Mentors .............................................................................................................................................................28 going to concerts, and crossword puzzling. ..........................................................................................................................................28 College Advisor ..................................................................................................................................................................................................28 Making an Appointment ................................................................................................................................................................................29 After Graduation ....................................................................................................................................................................................................30 Careers ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................30 Further Education ............................................................................................................................................................................................31 Accelerated Master’s Program .........................................................................................................................................................................32 Program Overview ...........................................................................................................................................................................................32 Application Procedure....................................................................................................................................................................................32 Images Š David Sharp Updated: 9/7/16

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

WHAT IS LINGUISTICS?

How do babies learn language so fast?

Can a computer tell if someone is lying just by looking at what they say? Why do all languages have nouns and verbs? Can all languages say the same things?

Why do people make so many speech errors? What do certain types of brain damage tell us about how language is stored and processed?

Without language, can we still think?

How many

languages go extinct each year? Why do some people say “tomAYto” and others “toMAHto”? Can Linguists help solve crimes? If these questions sound interesting to you, then you just might be a linguist! Linguistics is concerned with the nature of language and communication. It deals both with the study of particular languages and the search for general properties common to all languages or large groups of languages. It includes the following sub-areas:          

Phonetics (speech production & acoustics) Phonology (the patterning of sounds) Morphology (the structure of words) Syntax (the structure of sentences) Semantics (meaning of words and sentences) Pragmatics (language in context and use) Psycholinguistics (language in the mind) Sociolingistics (language and culture) Computational Linguistics (automating language processing) Language Documentation and Revitalization (describing and protecting endangered languages)

The Linguistics Department is a close-knit community—you will be in small classes, which will give your professors a chance to get to know YOU. The major is flexible and can be finished in less than four semesters. Also, you choose most of your classes (with our help), so you can be sure to follow your interests. Finally, there are many ways to get involved in the department, whether by doing research in linguistics labs or participating in outreach programs. Contact the linguistics advisors at ling.ugadv@gmail.com for more information. More detailed contact info is found at the end of the guide.

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

ABOUT THE MAJOR We are currently in transition from one major structure to another. If you are a new student to the University of Arizona and want to major in Linguistics, you will want to pay attention to “The Major Structure as of Fall 2016,� as this is the structure that will apply to you. If you are a student who came to the University of Arizona prior to Fall 2016 and want to major in Linguistics, you have the option of choosing either major structure.

Major Requirements The Major Structure as of Fall 2016

The Linguistics major consists of 36 units, 18 of which must be upper division. The core consists of 15 units of required coursework (5 courses) plus an addition 6 units (2 courses) in one of three concentrations. The five required courses are: LING 201-Introduction to Linguistics, LING 300-Introduction to Syntax, LING 314-Phonetics, LING 315-Introduction to Phonology, and LING 364-Introduction to Formal Semantics. The three concentrations are Psycholinguistics, Native American Linguistics and Documentation, and Computational Linguistics. In addition to the core, students select one of three Tracks to complete the major: General Linguistics, Linguistics and Language, or Academic/Professional Linguistics. Each track includes 15 units, with slightly different requirements for each Track. These 15 units may require up to 6 units of independent studies or directed research, or may allow for up to 9 units of less commonly taught language coursework.

The Major Structure Prior to Fall 2016 The Linguistics major consists of 30 units, 15 of which must be upper division. The core consists of 9 units (3 courses): LING 201-Introduction to Linguistics, LING 300-Introduction to Syntax, and LING 315-Introduction to Phonology. The remaining 21 units are linguistics electives, 12 of which must be Linguistics department courses (anything from pages 6-15 of this guide with LING listed as the home department), and the remaining 9 of which can be any course with a LING prefix (anything from pages 6-15 of this guide). Students have the option of applying up to 9 units of less commonly taught languages to the major.

Horseshoe Bend, outside Page, AZ -5-


DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

ABOUT THE MINOR The Linguistics minor consists of 18 units, 9 of which must be upper division. LING 201 (Introduction to Linguistics) is required, as are two of the following four courses: LING 300 (Syntax), LING 310 (Typology), LING 314 (Phonetics), LING 315 (Phonology), and LING 364 (Semantics). The remaining 9 units are departmental electives (courses housed in the Linguistics department). Three of these units may come from independent study. Please see the Course Descriptions for a list of all our courses, their home departments, and their descriptions.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS The table below is a complete list of all Linguistics courses offered at the University of Arizona. Please note that some cross-listed courses are scheduled by other departments and course availability is variable. Please use the Search function in UAccess to see what is offered in a given semester and, of course, check with your linguistics advisor if you have any questions!

COURSE NUMBER & TITLE

INDV 102 Linguistics for Native American Communities

LING 104A Beginning Navajo

LING 104B Beginning Navajo

LING 114 Learning a Foreign Language

HOME DEPT

KEY TO MAJOR/MINOR REQUIRED COURSES

 ()   

Required for the Major Required for new Major structure only Required for the Minor One of the courses from which students must select two to fulfill the Minor Fulfills a Gen. Ed. requirement

COURSE DESCRIPTION

LING

Introduction to descriptive linguistics for Native American communities. Practical linguistic and social issues in indigenous languages, phonetics and phonology, orthography, dialects and language change.

LING

Study of the sound system and spelling conventions of Navajo, and acquisition of basic oral and literacy skills. Cultural and grammatical informational is conveyed by using situations in Navajo life as topics.

LING

Study of the sound system and spelling conventions of Navajo, and acquisition of basic oral and literacy skills. Cultural and grammatical informational is conveyed by using situations in Navajo life as topics.

LING

Enables students to anticipate and manage problems in pronunciation, vocabulary building, and sentence formation, as well as culture. Presented in the context of the many languages taught at the university.

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REQUISITES

LING/AIS 104a


DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----COURSE NUMBER & TITLE

LING 123 Introduction to the Mathematics of Linguistics

HOME DEPT

LING

Students will work through concepts like set theory, basic logic, and formal language theory from the ground up to help explore and understand differences like these, which occur in our language (and any other) every day.

LING

Survey of linguistic concepts and methods: communication among animals, physiology of human speech, elementary phonetics, syntax, language and thought, language change, language and the brain.

LING

Freshman colloquium class that introduces the methods and standards of linguistic research, as well as the values that characterize the field of study, advances in the field, societal impacts, and career opportunities.

LING

Freshman colloquium class that focuses on critically evaluating how language is learned, what it is, and how it is used through research exercises which examine our use of language in ordinary situations.

LING

Fundamentals of linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and language acquisition. Provides basis for further study in the field.

PHIL

Truth-functional logic and quantification theory, deductive techniques and translation into symbolic notation.

LING

Continuation of vocabulary development, oral skills enhancement and mastery of Navajo verb paradigms. Native speakers undertake original research and writing in Navajo.

LING

Continuation of vocabulary development, oral skills enhancement and mastery of Navajo verb paradigms. Native speakers undertake original research and writing in Navajo.

LING 150A-1 Language

LING 195A What is Research and Creative Expression: Ling.

LING195B Language In Life: It's what we do

LING 201 Introduction to Linguistics



LING 202 Introduction to Symbolic Logic

LING 204A Intermediate Navajo

LING 204B Intermediate Navajo

COURSE DESCRIPTION

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REQUISITES

LING/AIS 204a


DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----COURSE NUMBER & TITLE

HOME DEPT

COURSE DESCRIPTION

LING

Introduction to linguistic, psychological and social aspects, meaning structures, meaning in the mind and brain, word meaning acquisition, the differences between literal and figurative meaning, metaphors, meaning in social contexts, models of representation.

LING

The fundamentals of syntactic analysis. Central notions of generative grammar. Aspects of the structure of English and other languages.

ANTH

Gender differences in language use among adults and children and their socio-cultural bases.

LING 304 Introduction to Japanese Language and Linguistics

EAS

Sounds, words, grammar, change, writing, variation and use of the Japanese language; provides basis for further study in the field.

LING 307A Elementary O'odham Language

LING

Speaking, reading, writing and oral comprehension in the Tohono O'odham (Papago) language.

LING 307B Elementary O'odham Language

LING

Speaking, reading, writing and oral comprehension in the Tohono O'odham (Papago) language.

LING/AIS 307a

LING

Introduces commonly shared (or typological) features of morphology, syntax, and phonology of the world's languages. Students will be exposed to data from many different languages

LING 201

LING

Familiarizes students with the latest developments in phonetic science, the International Phonetic Alphabet and how to transcribe English words. Students will learn about the prosodic properties of English that are crucial to determining its phonetic structure.

LING 201

LING 211 Meaning in Language and Society

LING 300 Introduction to Syntax



LING 303 Gender and Language

LING 310 Linguistic Typology

LING 314 Phonetics

()

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REQUISITES

LING 201

JPN 201


DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----COURSE NUMBER & TITLE

HOME DEPT

COURSE DESCRIPTION

LING

Considers sound structures from a wide variety of languages to find principles that describe the properties of their sounds and sound patterns in an insightful way. Also introduces students to organizational principles governing the sounds into morphemes, words, and phrases.

LING 320 Language and Social Issues

LING

Focuses on how individuals identify with groups (in part) on the basis of the language or dialect they use. Examines the role of the individual as a language-using being with the problems of selfidentity and of social difference, not only in our multilingualmulticultural country, but in the world as well.

LING 322 The Structure and Meaning of Words

LING

The study of inter-word relationships, meanings, structure of meanings, and etymology of words and information

LING 330 Language and Society in Middle East

MENA

Explores the social and linguistic aspects of the languages and cultures of Middle Eastern countries.

LING 341 Language Development

LING

Introduction to theory and research on language development, with emphasis on word learning and grammatical development.

LING

Introduction to formal linguistic approaches to the study of meaning. Topics include quantifiers, scope, definite descriptions, anaphora, tense and aspect, knowledge of meaning, meta languages and the syntax-semantics interface.

LING 376 Introduction to Philosophy and Language

PHIL

A survey of basic issues in the philosophy of language.

LING 388 Language and Computers

LING

Fundamentals of processing natural language and computational linguistics.

LING 315 Introduction to Phonology



LING364 Introduction to Formal Semantics

()

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REQUISITES

LING 201

LING 300

LING 201


DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----COURSE NUMBER & TITLE

HOME DEPT

COURSE DESCRIPTION

REQUISITES

LING 392A Directed Research in Linguistics

LING

Introductory individual or small group research under the guidance of faculty into an area of linguistic theory, experimentation, or applications.

LING 393E Congressional Staff Internship

GPP

Specialized individual work consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.

LING

In this workshop, we will consider the ways in which linguistic research is conducted. Students will hear from their peers, U of A faculty, and U of A Linguistics alumni about their work, all while developing their own research proposal in order to best prepare for honors thesis work in future semesters.

EAS

Introduction to general issues of gender and language use, specific gender-related differences in the Japanese language, and gender roles in Japan.

JPN 202

LING

An introduction to syntactic theory with an emphasis on data analysis, critical thinking, and theory development. Taught within the generative 'principles and parameters' approach to syntax.

LING 300

LING

Introduction to computer programming as it pertains to collecting and analyzing linguistic data. The particular programming language is chosen at the discretion of the instructor.

LING 300 OR 315

LING

How vision, language comprehension and motor behaviors have constrained and shaped the evolution of writing systems. An underlying theme throughout the course is the impact made on society and individuals by different stages of writing technology.

LING

Investigation of the principles that underlie current phonological theory, concentrating on the representation of sounds and the regular patterns of sound in natural language.

LING 397H Workshop in Linguistics

LING 402 Gender and Language in Japan

LING 403 Foundations of Syntactic Theory I

LING 408 Computational Techniques for Linguists

LING 409 The Psycholinguistics of Writing Systems

LING 410 Foundations of Phonological Theory I

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LING 315


DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----COURSE NUMBER & TITLE

HOME DEPT

COURSE DESCRIPTION

REQUISITES

LING 411 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics

EAS

Phonology, morphology, syntax, pragmatics, and sociolinguistics of the Japanese language.

JPN 202

LING 412 Advanced Japanese Linguistics

EAS

Advanced readings in Japanese and English on specific topics in Japanese linguistics.

LING/JPN 411

LING

Acoustic and articulatory properties of sounds and sound patterns that occur in human language. Focus on the significance of sound properties for phonological theory. Psycho-acoustic studies used as evidence for phonological theory.

EAS

Linguistic study of the phonological, morphological, and syntactic systems of modern Chinese, with particular attention to linguistic analysis.

CHN 102

EAS

Linguistic study of the phonological, morphological, and syntactic systems of modern Chinese, with particular attention to linguistic analysis.

LING/ CHN 419

LING

Examines potential ways to avert the massive language endangerment and language death that is occurring in the world. Linguistic documentation, language courses, immersion schools, and the master-apprentice program are all considered.

LING 201

LING 423 Phonetics and Phonology for Teachers of Japanese

EAS

Introduction to the phonetics and phonology of Japanese, and some related topics in morphology. Students develop a sophisticated understanding of some problems encountered by non-native speakers learning Japanese.

LING 426 Introduction to Arabic Linguistics

ARB

The history and structure of the Arabic language in its various forms.

LING 415 Phonological Phonetics

LING 419 Linguistic Structure of Modern Chinese

LING 420 Linguistic Structure of Modern Chinese

LING 421 Language Maintenance, Preservation and Revitalization

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LING 201


DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----COURSE NUMBER & TITLE

HOME DEPT

LING 430A Language and Society in the Middle East

MENA

LING 432 Psychology of Language

LING 436 Japanese Sociolinguistics

LING 438 Computational Linguistics

LING 439 Statistical Natural Language Processing

LING 440 The Bilingual Mind

LING 445A Structure of NonWestern Language

LING 449 Biolinguistics

COURSE DESCRIPTION

REQUISITES

Explores the social and linguistic aspects of Middle Eastern languages and cultures. Introduces students to the correlation between social and linguistic variables.

LING

Introduction to the psychological processes involved in language processing, the comprehension and production of sounds, words and sentences.

LING 150A1 or PSY 101 or LING 201

EAS

Introduction to Japanese sociolinguistics: questionnaire studies, variation analysis, ethnography of communication, conversation analysis, interactional sociolinguistics, and social interaction.

JPN 202

LING

Fundamentals of formal language theory, syntactic and semantic processing, the place of world knowledge in natural language processing.

LING 388

LING

Introduces key concepts underlying statistical natural language processing. Students will learn techniques for the computational modeling of natural language, including n-gram models, smoothing, Hidden Markov models, Bayesian inference, and expectation-maximization.

LING 388/438

LING

Surveys bilingualism from a variety of perspectives: linguistic, cognitive, social, and instructional. Addresses questions about bilingualism and bilingual speakers.

LING

In-depth linguistic analysis of selected phonological, syntactic, and semantic problems in a non-Western language, concentrating on native languages of the Southwest area.

LING 201

LING

The study of language from the perspective of neurolinguistics, psycholinguistics, philosophy of mind and evolutionary theory. Topics include language pathology, genetics, evolution and perspective of the laws of form.

LING 201

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----COURSE NUMBER & TITLE

HOME DEPT

COURSE DESCRIPTION

REQUISITES

LING 452 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

SPAN

General survey of the core fields in linguistics: phonology, phonetics, morphology, syntax, historical linguistics and dialectology. Provides basis for further study in the field. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 425/450

LING 453 Theory of Spanish Morphosyntax

SPAN

An introduction to the current theories of syntax and morphology to describe specific aspects of the structure of Spanish. Central notions of generative grammar.

SPAN 452

LING

Examines the grammatical structure, linguistic usage and sociolinguistic status of a particular language from the Near East. May include varieties of Arabic, Hebrew, Turkish, Persian, and other languages of the region.

LING 201

SPAN

Application of linguistic theory to issues of Spanish language instruction, theories of language acquisition and language teaching methodology.

SPAN 452

FREN

Introduces the study of French from a linguistic point of view. Topics chosen from: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, dialect and social variation, pragmatics and discourse analysis.

FREN 410, 420

LING 454 Structure of a Middle Eastern Language

LING 457 Applied Linguistics

LING 461A French Linguistics

LING 462 Linguistics and the Study of Literature

LING 463 Philosophy of Language

LING 465 Pragmatics

English

PHIL

PHIL

Linguistic methods in the analysis of literature and implications of literary language for linguistic theory, detailed consideration of prosody, metaphor, narrative technique and irony.

Survey of basic issues in the philosophy of language, such as speech acts, reference, meaning, logical form.

Study of language use, its relationship to language structure and context; topics such as speech acts, presupposition, implication, performatives, and conversations.

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----COURSE NUMBER & TITLE

HOME DEPT

COURSE DESCRIPTION

REQUISITES

LING 467 Topics in French Linguistics

FREN

Current topics in the linguistic analysis of French. Taught in French, with readings in French and English.

LING 476 Language in Culture

ANTH

Survey of the nature of the interrelationships between language and other cultural phenomena

ANTH 276

LING

Topics include speech synthesis, speech recognition, and other speech technologies. Gives students background for a career in speech technology industry.

See Catalog

ANTH

Types and mechanisms of linguistic change, language and dialect formation, determination of prehistoric connections, reconstruction of proto-languages and cultures, and their origins in time and space.

ANTH 276

ANTH

Native North American Linguistics: areal and genetic classifications, and how the study of particular languages provides insights into theories of linguistic anthropology and general linguistics.

ANTH 276

LING 492A Directed Research in Linguistics

LING

Intermediate and advanced individual or small group research in linguistic theory, experimentation, or applications, under faculty guidance.

LING 493 Internship

LING

Specialized work consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.

LING

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research about linguistics. Often includes lectures by several different persons.

LING 478 Speech Technology

LING 480 Historical Comparative Linguistics

LING 489 Areal Survey of Native N. American Languages

LING 495A Linguistics

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----COURSE NUMBER & TITLE

HOME DEPT

COURSE DESCRIPTION

LING 496C Topics in Japanese Linguistics

EAS

This course involves the development and exchange of scholarly information on specific topics in the field of linguistics. Course rotates between various topics and may be taken up to four times.

LING 496M Special Topics in Arabic Linguistics

ARB

Scholarly information on topics related to linguistics in the Arab world, particularly the Middle East.

Instructor Consent

PSY

Investigation of research and ideas on a specialized topic within cognitive psychology, including the psychology of language, visual perception and cognitive memory, decision, and learning. The discussion and exchange of scholarly information in a small group setting, papers and student presentations.

PSYC 290a or b

LING 497B Workshop in Linguistics

LING

Workshop to develop materials for language preservation and enhancement, including pedagogical grammars, dictionaries and literacy materials.

LING 498 Senior Capstone

LING

Culminating experience for majors involving a project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major.

LING 498H Honors Thesis

LING

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Ordinarily a two-semester process. The first semester requires research and the student writes the honors thesis in the second semester.

LING 199, 299, 399, or 499 Independent Study

LING

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.

LING 199H, 299H, 399H, or 499H Honors Independent Study

LING

Qualified honors students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.

LING 496F Cognitive Psychology

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REQUISITES


DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

COURSE SUGGESTIONS BASED ON STUDENT INTERESTS Since there is a lot of flexibility built into the linguistics major, sometimes students can feel a little lost as to which courses they should take to fulfill requirements. Though not a replacement for meeting with an advisor, below are some suggestions as to which elective courses a student may want to take based on their interests. Syntax LING 310: Linguistic Typology LING 322: The Structure and Meaning of Words LING 341: Language Development LING 364: Formal Semantics LING 403: Foundations of Syntactic Theory LING 432: Psychology of Language LING 465: Pragmatics Phonology/Phonetics LING 310: Linguistic Typology LING 314: Phonetics LING 341: Language Development LING 409: The Psycholinguistics of Writing Systems LING 410: Foundations of Phonological Theory LING 468: Speech Perception LING 478: Speech Technology Semantics LING 211: Meaning in Language and Society LING 322: The Structure and Meaning of Words LING 364: Formal Semantics LING 388: Language and Computers LING 421: Language Maintenance, Preservation, and Revitalization LING 457: Applied Linguistics LING 465: Pragmatics Psycholinguistics LING 114: Learning a Foreign Language LING 341: Language Development LING 409: Psycholinguistics of Writing Systems LING 432: Psychology of Language LING 440: The Bilingual Mind LING 449A: Biolinguistics LING 468: Speech Perception Computational Linguistics (also see Accelerated Master’s Program information, page 27) LING 364: Formal Semantics LING 388: Language and Computers LING 408: Computational Techniques for Linguists LING 438: Computational Linguistics LING 439: Statistical Natural Language Processing LING 468: Speech Perception LING 478: Speech Technology

Words LING 310: Linguistic Typology LING 314: Phonetics LING 322: The Structure and Meaning of Words LING 409: The Psycholinguistics of Writing Systems LING 440: The Bilingual Mind LING 445A: Structure of a Non-Western Language LING 454: Structure of a Middle Eastern Language LING 465: Pragmatics Linguistic Variety LING 210: American Indian Languages LING 310: Linguistic Typology LING 320: Language and Social Issues LING 409: The Psycholinguistics of Writing Systems LING 421: Language Maintenance, Preservation, and Revitalization LING 445A: Structure of a Non-Western Language LING 454: Structure of a Middle Eastern Language Sociolinguistics LING 211: Meaning in Language and Society LING 303: Gender and Language LING 320: Language and Social Issues LING 402: Gender and Language in Japan LING 430A: Language and Society in the Middle East LING 436: Japanese Sociolinguistics LING 440: The Bilingual Mind Cognitive Science LING 341: Language Development LING 388: Language and Computers LING 376: Introduction to Language and Philosophy LING 432: Psychology of Language LING 449A: Biolinguistics LING 465: Pragmatics LING 468: Speech Perception Native American Languages LING 102: Linguistics for Native American Communities LING 210: American Indian Languages LING 421: Language Maintenance, Preservation, and Revitalization LING 445A: Structure of a Non-Western Language LING 489: Areal Survey of Native American Languages LING 104A/B: Beginning Navajo I/II LING 307A/B: Elementary O’odham I/II

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

SAMPLE PLANS OF STUDY The following pages present sample plans of study. Please note that these are suggestions only! We highly recommend that you meet with a Linguistics Undergraduate Advisor to determine not only what an appropriate plan of study is for your individual situation, but also to help you determine which electives best meet your needs and interests! You can contact an advisor at ling.ugadv@gmail.com. Due to recent changes to the structure of the Linguistics major, plans are provided for first the major structure as of Fall 2016, and then the structure prior to Fall 2016. In both cases, the first plan assumes you declare your major as a freshman and have not yet completed any of your General Education requirements. The second plan assumes you declare your major as a junior, having already completed the majority of your General Education requirements (or your AGEC or Associate’s Degree from a community college). Entering at another point in your education is not a problem – we can simply adapt the plans to fit your needs. An advisor is always available to help you with a customized plan of study!

Queen Butterfly, Tucson, AZ

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----Sample Plans for the Major Structure as of Fall 2016 Sample Plan for Student Entering Linguistics Major as a Freshman FRESHMAN YEAR (29+ units, 0 upper division UD) Fall 20___ First Semester Language Course English 101 First-Year Composition Mathematic Foundation Course Tier 1 INDV General Education Course

   

13-14 units 4-5 3 3 3

Academic Planning Attend the Meet Your Major Fair in the fall to learn more about additional majors on campus Meet with your academic advisor at least once each semester to discuss courses for the following semester and to develop your four year plan Consider possible minors Summer Take courses if necessary

Spring 20___ 16-17 units Second Semester Language Course 4-5 English 102 First-Year Composition 3 Tier 1 TRAD General Education Course* 3 Tier 1 NATS General Education Course 3 Tier 1 INDV General Education Course 3 Career Planning  Meet with a counselor in Career Services  Utilize career and major exploration tools with career assessments  Learn about occupations Summer  Obtain a summer job or volunteer experience to explore your career interests  Update your resume before fall classes begin

SOPHOMORE YEAR (32+ units, 3 UD) (Total 61+, 3 UD) Fall 20___ 16-17 units Third Semester Language Course 4-5 Tier 1 NATS General Education Course 3 Tier 1 TRAD General Education Course* 3 Tier 2 ARTS General Education Course 3 LING 201 3 Academic Planning  Meet with your academic advisor at least once each semester and revise your four year plan  Investigate extracurricular activities such as clubs, internships, research, and study abroad

Spring 20___ 16-17 units Fourth Semester Language Course 4-5 Tier 2 NATS General Education Course 3 Tier 2 HUM General Education Course 3 LING Core Course (300 or 314) 3 (UD) Minor Course 3 Career Planning  Research career options and establish career goals  Attend campus Career Fairs to talk with potential employers Summer  Update resume before the fall semester begins

JUNIOR YEAR (30 units, 21 UD) (Total 91+, 24 UD) Fall 20___ 15 units LING Core Course (300 or 314) 3 (UD) LING Core Course (315 or 364) 3 (UD) LING Track-specific Elective 3 Elective Course 3 (UD) Minor Course 3 Academic Planning  Meet with your academic advisor at least once each semester and revise your four year plan  Participate in extracurricular activities such as clubs, internships, and research Summer  Take courses if necessary  Take graduate school admissions test, if applicable

Spring 20___ 15 units LING Core Course (315 or 364) 3 (UD) LING Focused Core Course 3 (UD) LING Track-specific Elective 3 Minor Course 3 (UD) Elective Course 3 (UD) Career Planning  Reassess career goals and develop alternative career plans as needed  Learn employability skills by reviewing information about resumes, interviewing, and job search  Begin to network with professionals in your chosen field  Develop a file of career-related projects and professional references Summer  Obtain career-related experience

SENIOR YEAR (30 units, 18 UD) (Total 121+, 42 UD) Fall 20___ 15 units Spring 20___ 15 units LING Focused Core Course 3 (UD) LING Track-specific Elective 3 LING Track-specific Elective 3 LING Track-specific Elective 3 Minor Course 3 (UD) Minor Course 3 (UD) Minor Course 3 Elective Course 3 (UD) Elective Course 3 (UD) Elective Course 3 (UD) Academic Planning Career Planning  Apply for graduation one semester before you plan to graduate  Participate in the Campus Interviewing Program through Career  Participate in extracurricular activities such as clubs, internships, and Services research  Seek out job opportunities with employers who may not recruit at UA  Apply for graduate programs, if applicable  Develop interviewing skills and practice through a Mock interview Summer appointment  Graduate and attend commencement  Attend Employer Career Fairs to determine what employers are looking  Celebrate your accomplishments with family and friends! for and what types of occupations are offered by employers * 1 Diversity Emphasis course required and may be completed with the completion of another course. – Example: AIS 160A

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----Sample Plan for Student Entering Linguistics Major as a Junior FRESHMAN & SOPHOMORE YEAR / TRANSFER (Total 60+ units)

This sample plan assumes that…   

You are beginning the Linguistics Major in the first semester of your Junior year. All General Education requirements are satisfied (by completion at the UA or transfer from another institution). At least 60 units have been previously completed or transferred. JUNIOR YEAR (30 units, 21 UD) (Total 90+, 21 UD)

Fall 20___ 15 units LING 201 3 LING Focused Core (pick one without pre-req.) 3 (UD) LING Track-specific Elective (pick one without pre-req.) 3 (UD) Minor Course 3 Minor Course 3 (UD) Academic Planning  Meet with your academic advisor at least once each semester and revise your four year plan  Participate in extracurricular activities such as clubs, internships, and research Summer  Take courses if necessary  Take graduate school admissions test, if applicable

Spring 20___ 15 units LING Core Course (300 or 314) 3 (UD) LING Core Course (300 or 314) 3 (UD) LING Focused Core Course 3 (UD) Minor Course 3 Minor Course 3 (UD) Career Planning  Reassess career goals and develop alternative career plans as needed  Learn employability skills by reviewing information about resumes, interviewing, and job search  Begin to network with professionals in your chosen field  Develop a file of career-related projects and professional references Summer  Obtain career-related experience

SENIOR YEAR (30 units, 21 UD) (Total 120+, 42 UD) Fall 20___ 15 units LING Core Course (315 or 364) 3 (UD) LING Core Course (315 or 364) 3 (UD) LING Focused Core Course 3 (UD) Minor Course 3 Elective Course 3 (UD) Academic Planning  Apply for graduation one semester before you plan to graduate  Participate in extracurricular activities such as clubs, internships, and research  Apply for graduate programs, if applicable Summer  Graduate and attend commencement  Celebrate your accomplishments with family and friends!

Spring 20___ LING Track-specific Elective LING Track-specific Elective LING Track-specific Elective Minor Course Elective Course

15 units 3 (UD) 3 3 3 (UD) 3 (UD)

Career Planning Participate in the Campus Interviewing Program through Career Services  Seek out job opportunities with employers who may not recruit at UA  Develop interviewing skills and practice through a Mock interview appointment  Attend Employer Career Fairs to determine what employers are looking for and what types of occupations are offered by employers Summer Take courses if necessary 

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----Sample Plans for the Major Structure Prior to Fall 2016 Sample Plan for Student Entering Linguistics Major as a Freshman FRESHMAN YEAR (29+ units, 0 upper division UD) Fall 20___ First Semester Language Course English 101 First-Year Composition Mathematic Foundation Course Tier 1 INDV General Education Course

   

13-14 units 4-5 3 3 3

Academic Planning Attend the Meet Your Major Fair in the fall to learn more about additional majors on campus Meet with your academic advisor at least once each semester to discuss courses for the following semester and to develop your four year plan Consider possible minors Summer Take courses if necessary

Spring 20___ 16-17 units Second Semester Language Course 4-5 English 102 First-Year Composition 3 Tier 1 TRAD General Education Course* 3 Tier 1 NATS General Education Course 3 Tier 1 INDV General Education Course 3 Career Planning  Meet with a counselor in Career Services  Utilize career and major exploration tools with career assessments  Learn about occupations Summer  Obtain a summer job or volunteer experience to explore your career interests  Update your resume before fall classes begin

SOPHOMORE YEAR (32+ units, 3 UD) (Total 61+, 3 UD) Fall 20___ 16-17 units Third Semester Language Course 4-5 Tier 1 NATS General Education Course 3 Tier 1 TRAD General Education Course* 3 Tier 2 ARTS General Education Course 3 LING 201 3 Academic Planning  Meet with your academic advisor at least once each semester and revise your four year plan  Investigate extracurricular activities such as clubs, internships, research, and study abroad

Spring 20___ 16-17 units Fourth Semester Language Course 4-5 Tier 2 NATS General Education Course 3 Tier 2 HUM General Education Course 3 LING Core Course (300 or 315) 3 (UD) Minor Course 3 Career Planning  Research career options and establish career goals  Attend campus Career Fairs to talk with potential employers Summer  Update resume before the fall semester begins

JUNIOR YEAR (30 units, 21 UD) (Total 91+, 24 UD) Fall 20___ 15 units LING Core Course (300 or 315) 3 (UD) LING Departmental Elective 3 Minor Course 3 Minor Course 3 (UD) Elective Course 3 (UD) Academic Planning  Meet with your academic advisor at least once each semester and revise your four year plan  Participate in extracurricular activities such as clubs, internships, and research Summer  Take courses if necessary  Take graduate school admissions test, if applicable

Spring 20___ LING Departmental Elective LING Departmental Elective LING Free Elective Minor Course Elective Course     

15 units 3 3 (UD) 3 (UD) 3 (UD) 3 (UD)

Career Planning Reassess career goals and develop alternative career plans as needed Learn employability skills by reviewing information about resumes, interviewing, and job search Begin to network with professionals in your chosen field Develop a file of career-related projects and professional references Summer Obtain career-related experience

SENIOR YEAR (30 units, 18 UD) (Total 121+, 42 UD) Fall 20___ 15 units Spring 20___ 15 units LING Departmental Elective 3 (UD) LING Free Elective 3 LING Free Elective 3 (UD) Minor Course (if required) 3 (UD) Minor Course 3 Elective Course 3 Minor Course 3 (UD) Elective Course 3 (UD) Elective Course 3 Elective Course (if required) 3 (UD) Academic Planning Career Planning  Apply for graduation one semester before you plan to graduate  Participate in the Campus Interviewing Program through Career  Participate in extracurricular activities such as clubs, internships, and Services research  Seek out job opportunities with employers who may not recruit at UA  Apply for graduate programs, if applicable  Develop interviewing skills and practice through a Mock interview Summer appointment  Graduate and attend commencement  Attend Employer Career Fairs to determine what employers are looking  Celebrate your accomplishments with family and friends! for and what types of occupations are offered by employers * 1 Diversity Emphasis course required and may be completed with the completion of another course. – Example: AIS 160A

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----Sample Plan for Student Entering Linguistics Major as a Junior FRESHMAN & SOPHOMORE YEAR / TRANSFER (Total 60+ units)

This sample plan assumes that…   

You are beginning the Linguistics Major in the first semester of your Junior year. All General Education requirements are satisfied (by completion at the UA or transfer from another institution). At least 60 units have been previously completed or transferred. JUNIOR YEAR (30 units, 21 UD) (Total 90+, 21 UD)

Fall 20___ 15 units LING 201 3 LING Departmental Elective (pick one without pre-req.) 3 (UD) LING Departmental Elective (pick one without pre-req.) 3 (UD) Minor Course 3 Minor Course 3 (UD) Academic Planning  Meet with your academic advisor at least once each semester and revise your four year plan  Participate in extracurricular activities such as clubs, internships, and research Summer  Take courses if necessary  Take graduate school admissions test, if applicable

Spring 20___ 15 units LING Core Course (300 or 315) 3 (UD) LING Core Course (300 or 315) 3 (UD) LING Departmental Elective 3 (UD) Minor Course 3 Minor Course 3 (UD) Career Planning  Reassess career goals and develop alternative career plans as needed  Learn employability skills by reviewing information about resumes, interviewing, and job search  Begin to network with professionals in your chosen field  Develop a file of career-related projects and professional references Summer  Obtain career-related experience

SENIOR YEAR (30 units, 21 UD) (Total 120+, 42 UD) Fall 20___ 15 units LING Departmental Elective 3 (UD) LING Free Elective 3 LING Free Elective 3 (UD) Minor Course 3 Elective Course 3 (UD) Academic Planning  Apply for graduation one semester before you plan to graduate  Participate in extracurricular activities such as clubs, internships, and research  Apply for graduate programs, if applicable Summer  Graduate and attend commencement  Celebrate your accomplishments with family and friends!

Spring 20___ 15 units LING Free Elective 3 Minor Course 3 (UD) Minor or Elective Course (as required) 3 (UD) Elective Course 3 (UD) Elective Course 3 (UD) Career Planning  Participate in the Campus Interviewing Program through Career Services  Seek out job opportunities with employers who may not recruit at UA  Develop interviewing skills and practice through a Mock interview appointment  Attend Employer Career Fairs to determine what employers are looking for and what types of occupations are offered by employers Summer Take courses if necessary

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CHECK-SHEET AS OF FALL 2016 Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics Name: _________________________________________ Major Requirements

CATEGORY

Core Courses I (Complete 5 courses)

Core Courses II (Complete 6 units from ONE group)

Track-Specific Electives (Complete 15 units)

COURSE

UNITS

LING 201

3

LING 300

3

LING 314

3

LING 315

3

LING 364

3

Psycholinguistics (341, 432, 409, 440, 449a) OR

6

Native American Ling. & Docum. (210, 204a/b, 307a/b, 421) OR

6

Computational (388, 408, 438, 439, 478)

6

See an advisor to discuss requirements and course options for your chosen Track.

SEMESTER/ GRADE

NOTES

15

MINOR Minor

A Minor is required for a BA in Linguistics.

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Additional Requirement At least 18 units must be upper division (300 or higher). General Education Requirements Please see your SBS General Education Advisor in Douglass 210. University Unit Requirement A bachelor’s degree requires a minimum of 120 units. This includes lower division, upper division (minimum of 42 units), major coursework, and minor coursework. You must meet your program requirements as well as the total unit requirement to graduate. The semester before you’re ready to graduate, apply for graduation through UAccess. Following the __________ semester ______/120 units = ______ units needed -22-


DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CHECK-SHEET PRIOR TO FALL 2016 Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics Name: _________________________________________ Major Requirements

CATEGORY

COURSE

UNITS

LING 201

3

LING 300

3

LING 315

3

Departmental Electives (Complete 12 units)

Any course from pp. 6-15 of this guide with LING listed as the home department.

12

Free Electives (Complete 9 units)

Any course from pp. 6-15 of this guide OR Up to 9 units of “Less Commonly Taught” (LCT) language study. Please see an advisor regarding the LCT language option.

9

Core Courses (Complete 3 courses)

SEMESTER/ GRADE

NOTES

MINOR

Minor

A minor is required for a BA in Linguistics

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Additional Requirement At least 18 units must be upper division (300 or higher). General Education Requirements Please see your SBS General Education Advisor in Douglass 210. University Unit Requirement A bachelor’s degree requires a minimum of 120 units. This includes lower division, upper division (minimum of 42 units), major coursework, and minor coursework. You must meet your program requirements as well as the total unit requirement to graduate. The semester before you’re ready to graduate, apply for graduation through UAccess. Following the __________ semester ______/120 units = ______ units needed

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

MINOR REQUIREMENTS CHECK-SHEET Minor in Linguistics Name: _________________________________________ Minor Requirements

CATEGORY Required Course

Additional Core (Select any two of these five courses)

Free Electives (Complete 9 units)

COURSE

UNITS

LING 201

3

LING 300

3

LING 310

3

LING 314

3

LING 315

3

LING 364

3

Any course with a LING prefix. Optionally, 3 units may come from Independent Study with our faculty.

9

Additional Requirement At least 9 units must be upper division (300 or higher). Advising Notes:

Following the __________ semester ______/18 units = ______ units needed -24-

SEMESTER/ GRADE

NOTES


DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES Departmental Research Labs

Arizona Center for Theoretical Syntax

uses computing and resource materials for the study of topics in theoretical syntax. Directors: Andrew Carnie, Heidi Harley Affiliated Faculty: Tom Bever, Andrew Barss, Simin Karimi, Janet Nicol, Mary Willie

Arizona Phonological Imaging Lab

uses cutting-edge technology and ultrasound to image the tongue during speech. Director: Diana Archangeli

Language & Cognition Lab studies sentence comprehension, cerebral asymmetries in humans and animals, constraints on learning, spatial cognition, reading, and aesthetics. Director: Thomas Bever

Developmental

Psycholinguistics

Lab

studies language development, especially in children with an emphasis on experimental studies of syntax. Director: Cecile McKee

Douglass Phonetics Lab is outfitted for research and teaching in articulatory phonetics, acoustic phonetics, speech perception, psycholinguistics, and speech technology. Director: Natasha Warner

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----Human Language Technology Lab is a place where students collaborate to develop innovative ways to combine theoretical approaches to language with computational methodology. Director: Sandiway Fong

Endangered Language Revitalization Lab

focuses on the documentation and revitalization of

indigenous languages. Director: Stacey Oberly

Phonological Acquisition Lab (PAL)

works with pre-school age children with typical and atypical language development with an emphasis on phonology. Director: Diane Ohala

Psycholinguistics and Computational Linguistics Lab (PsyCoL) works on issues relating to lexical access, psycholinguistics, computational modeling of language evolution, and electronic resources for linguistic research such as electronic dictionaries. Directors: Adam Ussishkin and Andy Wedel

Psycholinguistics West

conducts psycholinguistics experiments including monitoring eye-movements during reading. Director: Janet Nicol

SPAM Lab studies psychophonology, phonology, and psycholinguistics. Director: Michael Hammond

Tweety Language Development Lab

asks how infants and young children infer aspects of linguistic

structure, including phonology and syntax. Director: LouAnn Gerken

Getting Involved We encourage our students to get involved with lab research, which provides an invaluable experience as well as a better understanding of what Linguistics research looks like. There are several ways to get involved including Independent Studies, Directed Research, Internships, and volunteering. If you are interested in working with a lab, contact the lab director for more information about available opportunities or meet with an advisor.

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

DOUBLE MAJORING IN LINGUISTICS AND ANOTHER FIELD Because the field of linguistics is highly interdisciplinary, it is both easy and practical to double major in linguistics and a related field. Finishing two majors in college gives you a wider range of skills and can make you more appealing on the job market and/or to graduate schools. Some common double majors with linguistics are listed below. If you are interested in double-majoring, we would be happy to help you create of plan of study that would allow you to complete them in four years. Please note that students who double-major do not need a minor. Come see an advisor and we can help you plan out a double major with linguistics and your field of choice!

Suggested Double Majors with Linguistics Anthropology Computer Science English & Creative Writing Law Neuroscience & Cognitive Science Political Science Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences

American Indian Studies East Asian Studies History Middle Eastern and North African Studies Philosophy Psychology Any foreign language

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

ADVISING AND MENTORING The advising and mentoring structure in linguistics is split between advisors and mentors who are part of the Department of Linguistics (Diane, Noah, and Megan) and the advisor for the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences (Jared). For questions about the linguistic major and minor requirements, what linguistics electives to choose, how you can make linguistics a career, how to plan for graduate school and anything else disciplinerelated, please see the Linguistics Advisors and Mentors. If you have questions about general university requirements, particularly General Education requirements, please see the College advisor.

Linguistics Advisors and Mentors Dr. Diane Ohala, Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies I’ve been the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of Linguistics since 2000. Helping you map out your courses, learning about your interests, and helping you choose the right career path is one of the parts of my day that I like best. My professional interests are in language acquisition and phonology, and I routinely teach our undergraduate courses on these topics. I also like reading mysteries, making cards, doing puzzles and building big Lego sets. Noah Nelson, Graduate Student Mentor I'm a fourth year Ph.D. student in Linguistics. My undergraduate degree was in Interdisciplinary Humanities at the University of San Diego. I've lived in Tucson and San Diego for all my life. I have interests in a variety of fields, and am always happy to discuss them with you! In my personal life I enjoy playing pub trivia, tennis, drumming, and brewing my own beers and ciders. I look forward to seeing you in office hours or around campus! Jaycie Ryrholm Martin, Graduate Student Mentor I'm a first year PhD student in Linguistics. I also completed my undergraduate degree in Linguistics here at the University of Arizona, and I just returned to the desert after several years in Chicago. My academic interests include phonology, psycholinguistics, and acquisition. I'm particularly interested in how language is stored and processed in the brain when more than one language is involved. Other things that make me happy are practicing yoga, hiking, going to concerts, and crossword puzzling.

College Advisor Allison Ewing-Cooper, Advising Coordinator, college of Social and Behavioral Sciences Hello! I am the Academic Advising Coordinator for the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences; I love my job because I get to work with so many students to help them achieve their goals and graduate. Originally from San Diego, I am a Wildcat for Life. I graduated from the U of A in 2006 with my M.S. and 2009 with my PhD in Family Studies and Human Development. When not working, I love to spend time with my husband (a 3-time U of A grad) and cats, play board games, and travel to new places. Bear down!

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----Making an Appointment To schedule an Advising Appointment go to https://sbs.arizona.edu/advising/student/login.php. After logging in with your UA NetID, you will be taken to a new page. Under "Step 1," scroll to the "College of Social & Behavioral Sciences". Under “Step 2”, choose either “Linguistics-Major/Minor Advising” or “Linguistics-Gen-Ed Advising”, depending on whether your question is about linguistics, specifically, or about general education requirements. In some cases, you may need to see both a linguistics and a college advisor to get all your questions answered. You can also contact the linguistics advisors by email at ling.ugadv@gmail.com and the college advisor at arewing@email.arizona.edu.

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

AFTER GRADUATION Careers Many students who are interested in Linguistics wonder what career options they will have when they graduate. They often have questions about how much education they will need and what classes they should take to be the most competitive for a specific career track. The good news is that there are a wide range of options available both in terms of careers and the courses that will best prepare you for those careers. These courses can even help you sort through the options and narrow down your interests through practical, hands-on experience within the various subfields of Linguistics. Below is a list of careers and their possible course pairings to help get you started. This list is certainly not exhaustive, but will give you an idea of the many possibilities available. All of the careers listed here would benefit from independent studies or directed research in linguistics (LING 1-499 or 392a-492a), and you are strongly encouraged to participate in these opportunities as part of your linguistics curriculum (see also our Independent Studies Brochure). For more information on any of these options or if there’s something else you’re interested in but unsure as to how it pertains to a future career, the undergraduate advisors would love to meet with you and discuss it! Professor/Researcher With a PhD in Linguistics, you can teach at the university level as well as work on cutting edge linguistics research, both experimental and theoretical. As the field is incredibly broad, this career path can take on a multitude of shapes! If you are thinking seriously about this option, plan to do one or more independent studies to get hands– on experience with exciting and current work in the discipline (see also our Independent Studies Brochure & Grad School Brochure). Needed: Ph.D. in Linguistics Related courses: LING 300, 310, 314, 315, 341, 364, 403, 410, 432, 449A

Language Documentation There are many endangered and understudied languages in the world, which creates a need for linguistically trained native speakers and/or professional linguists to document those languages. This career is often achieved through universities or other government or private organizations. Needed: M.A. in linguistics or language revitalization, or B.A. and extensive field training Related courses: LING 104a/b, 210, 300, 307a/b, 310, 314, 315, 320, 421 Education Many linguistics students opt to teach English in another country or get certified to teach ESL here in the U.S. The skills you have acquired are useful in teaching English or a foreign language at any level. Additionally, some students find careers in curriculum development, teacher training, and the creation and improvement of standardized tests. Needed: B.A. plus ESL/TEFL teaching certificate or M.A. in applied linguistics, education, or English. (Sometimes only a B.A. is needed to teach English abroad). Related courses: LING 114, 300, 310, 314, 315, 320, 322, 341

Computational Linguist Computational linguists work for companies that use artificial intelligence, speech recognition technology, sentiment analysis, machine translation, and more to build models and machines that accomplish tasks like these. This is a lucrative and ever growing field within linguistics. If this career path appeals to you, we also have an Accelerated Masters program. Needed: M.S. in Computational Linguistics/HLT/NLP Related courses: LING 178, 300, 314, 315, 388, 408, 438, 439, 478

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE ----Government/Military Many government agencies look to employ linguists, such the CIA, FBI, NSA, Foreign Service, Department of Defense, etc. These careers are often possible with a B.A. in linguistics and/or specific language skills. Once achieved, the government may fund further education, if deemed necessary. Needed: B.A. or higher, depending on position Related courses: LING 114, 300, 310, 314, 315, 320, 341, 432 (see also Computational Linguist)

Translator With a B.A. in Linguistics and perhaps a certification, you can find employment as a translator in a multitude of fields. Often those who are interested in being a translator choose to also focus on a specific language while they’re here and even study abroad. Needed: B.A. in Linguistics or language and very high language proficiency in a foreign language Related courses: LING 114, 300, 310, 314, 315, 322 Speech Therapist If you are interested in speech disorders and impairments and helping those who have them, you can pursue a career as a therapist, either in a clinical or educational setting. Needed: M.A./M.S. in Speech Pathology as well as additional requirements Related courses: LING 300, 314, 315, 341, 432, 409, 449A, 478

Publishing/Journalism/Technical Writing Students with a B.A. in Linguistics are well-equipped to have a career in publishing, journalism, and technical writing as the language and communication skills required for these careers are a part of what you acquire in Linguistics training. If this option appeals to you, you may want to apply for the UA Press Internship. Needed: B.A. in Linguistics or related field Related courses: LING 211, 300, 320, 322, 409, 480

Further Education Whether or not you need further education after you receive your B.A. in Linguistics depends of which type of career you are interested in. Graduate Degree: Most students who want to have a career in academia or industry do need an advanced degree. If you receive a Masters or PhD in Linguistics, you can be a professor or researcher at a university, work in industry (as a computational linguistics, etc) or find a career in a wide range of other options. An advanced degree gives you a lot of possibilities for your future career. For more information about choosing a graduate program that’s right for you, as well as the application process, please see our brochure on Applying to Graduate School. Certificate: If you continue on after your B.A. to receive a certification, you can find a career in teaching English as a second language or working as a translator. Bachelor’s Degree: With a B.A. in Linguistics, you bring a desirable skill set into the workplace. With this education, you will most likely have a career in which knowledge of language and language skills are particularly useful, such as publishing, technical writing, or teaching English abroad, just to name a few. Your options are as broad as the field, no matter what level of education you choose to complete.

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

ACCELERATED MASTER’S PROGRAM Program Overview The department offers an Accelerated Master’s Program in Human Language Technology. The program is a 36 unit Master of Science degree which the student begins during their final undergraduate year and finishes in one additional, graduate year. It is designed so as to give students exposure to a variety of computational techniques and linguistic applications and to equip them to enter the industry workforce immediately upon graduation. The courses required for the program include:      

LING 503 (Syntax) LING 5081 (Comp. Methods for Linguists) LING 538 (Intro Comp. Ling.) LING 539 (Natural Lang. Processing) LING 581 (Adv. Comp. Ling.) 6-9 units of 593A (Internship).

Barrel cactus, Tucson, AZ

Additional electives are taken to make up the rest of the 36 units. The courses taken during the first year of the program (while still enrolled as an undergraduate) are counted toward both the undergraduate degree as well as the Master’s degree.

Application Procedure Students apply for the program during their junior year for entry senior year. They need to have completed 75 units at the time of application (90 units at the time of entry) and have an overall GPA of at least 3.3. Ideally, students who apply have already taken LING 388 (Language and Computers) and while they don’t need to be Linguistics majors, they should be comfortable in Linguistics and/or Computer Science, Math, or Engineering. For more information about the HLT program, see http://linguistics.arizona.edu/master-science-human-languagetechnology-hlt For more information about application, contact the Linguistics Program Coordinator, Shayna Walker at shaynaw@email.arizona.edu. For more information about University Accelerated Master’s Program policies: http://catalog.arizona.edu/201112/policies/AMPpolicies.html

1

508 will likely be taken as 408 and the credits won’t count towards the M.S.

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

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DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM GUIDE -----

The University of Arizona Linguistics Department Communications Bldg. Room 109 P.O. Box 210025 Tucson, AZ 85721 Tel: (520) 621-6897 Fax: (520) 626-9014

Undergraduate Advising Office: Communications Bldg. Room 114G (520) 626-5418 ling.ugadv@gmail.com

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Undergraduate Program Guide in Linguistics