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Typical Culture Crue: Editor: Zack Dowdy Artist: Connor Getzlaff Addiontal Art: Ryan Salter Web Dudes: Chris McDonald Issac Patterson Video Department: James Truesdale Contributors: Brian Walnum Rhino Greg Zamarripa Christian Ottobre Chris McDonald Chase Cruz Austin Squire Chris LaRue Daniel Bleckley

Issue six Skateboarding in October 2013 - It always feels good to push down the street. Actually better then ever. The heat has died

General Questions Info@TypicalCulture.com

down, but not the hype., The future is unknown. But skate-

Contributors & Advertisors Dowdy@TypicalCulture.com

- 100% percent organic. Not having to wear any costume to

Visit us daily at: www.typicalculture.com Cover:

Chris Coogan, Noseblunt Photos: Another skater

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boarding will always be there for you, Through thick and thin. This kid to the right is pure as they come, not brian-washed be accept, just stoked. Above: Chris Coogan and Brendan Keaveny victory celerbration


Chris Gregson, Fs Boneless in Mammoth. Photo: Greg Zamarripa

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This was a quick mission up to San Fransisco and back. Its rare now that skateboarders go on homie trips without any company funding or backing. But I feel like these trips are normally the best kind. You can meet new skaters and be with your friends, drifting on the road with no set schedule or deadline. Back to the basic days, then the sessions get even better.

Oscar Navarro and Riley Stevens start it off with some doubles, Grasser and a Ollie at Moss Beach D.I.Y.

Gnarly Kyle, Frontside Grind Fakie. Santa Cruz Skatepark.


Skooter and Allen Young mashing right next to each other into this hip/sky jump. For The Boys!

Oscar Navarro, Crailslide.


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Andy Mack, Noseblunt.San Diego Ph: Austin Squire


Pontus Alv and Tom remillard Malmo, sweden. PH DOWDY

trevor ward, half-cab FLIP. sAN diego. PH: CHRIS MCDONALD


Frontside Wall bash. TBS. Malmo, Sweden. Photo: Zack Dowdy 19

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What’s lame about skateparks?

The Scooters and kooks that infest them. Nature? Getting too hammered and not knowing where you tent is, and posion oak. Alcohol? Running out of it Being Young? Tough getting into some bars, along with some heckling. Being Old? Slow Recovery from Slams. Road Trips? Smelling like shit or being injured on them. Fast Food? Everything, starts with a upset stomache, and ends with a explosion in the bathroom. Surfing? I don’t surf Girls? They expect you to love them more then your skateboard. Weed? Burning the last twist. Fishing? Waiting for your catch Instagram? All those douches taking selfless of themselves. Male-model skateboarders? They need to cut there fucking hair and take more slams! Skateboarding? It’s just too blown up, have it die again so everyone who is in it for the wrong reasons leaves to go play football or whatever the next fade is.

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Little Chris, Backside Lipslide fakie. Photo: Nick Weber

Chris LaRue, Fs Nosegrind pop-out. Photo: Austin Squire 21

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Ricky Holderby, Launch up to Bs Boneless in his brothers backyard, while Victor Garibay goes Switch Fs Boneless in a school yard. Photos: Brian Walnum 22


Backside Smith. Ph: Cruz 23

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When did you start drawing and did you go to school or anything like that?

I started drawing early in elementary school. Just drawing like whatever trucks, motorcycles, haha I don’t know why I think thats just what i was in too being young. I never went to school for it, I mean i had art classes and was put in the higher art classes in High School. I was planning on going to art school after but I don’t know I just decided not to go figuring that I didn’t want to be told how to do with art, I’d rather just make my own art. Seems to be working right now. (Laughs) How did you create the rad style of all these illustrations, did you have any other inspirational artist that motivated you? I cant really recall finding my style kinda just fell into place. My art would just keep growing and developing into its own. When you’re starting a piece do you just start doodling or do you already have a visual idea of what the final out-come will be? Starting a face I usually start with the nose then the eyes, etc. Then they just become there own piece. Do you think about skateboarding with drawing or vis versa? I think so. Not for inspiration though just probably out of boredom maybe doing art for a long time then maybe go skate, I don’t know it all works out in the end. Have you done any art for any skateboard companies? Not yet but probably in the near future yes. What’s LBFK all about? Its a Kult that  27 people are in initiated by a tattoo. Is there going to be more another issue of the LBFK zine? Yes! Any fellow artist or people that have helped you out you’d like to thank? Everyone in LBFK and Horfe is dope anyone with a dope style and unique is cool and will get me hyped. that’s all.

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Zander Gabriel, Bs Taiilslide. Photo By: Chris McDonald

Truman Hooker, Fs Grind. Photo By: Austin Squire 28


Interview&Photos: Zack Dowdy

So what’s up with your nickname “BK” is that because of your initials or is there more to the story?

Yeah I guess it’s just because my initials, and ya Burger King is that. But ya once everyone started calling me that it just stuck. So you’re originally from Florida, how did you migrate to California and how old were you then? I was about 7 year old when I moved out to Valley Center, California. We moved out here for my Dads plant business. You grew up learning how to skate in Valley Center. How did you progress with no skatepark or without any other skaters to motivate you? I just kind of knew there was a lot of skating around me, but not necessary where I was but I knew San Diego was a huge skateboard scene, I just watched a lot of videos and went to the skatepark in Escondido, whenever I could get a ride. I did CASL contest sometimes that helped me progress too. I feel like some skaters are hungry to be successful in skateboarding, for a short time. Then they just do their own thing. But you’ve been putting out video parts that have been only getting gnarlier, How do you stay so hungry? I guess I just enjoy it, it’s fun. I just want to progress, once you start progressing it’s fun, it’s real fun learning new tricks. I always want to get better. Ever since I started skating I was into it consistently. Once I started doing it I just kept doing it, I still played soccer, baseball and other spots but those didn’t stick like skating did. Skating is just more individual and I like that better about it, you can do your own thing. So your Lurkville part just dropped, how long did this part take you to film? All the footage in it is from a pretty long time span, a lot of footage is from before I was even on Lurkville, all the shit I filmed with Eric Bennet which is a pretty good portion of my part. I was filming for it since the birth of Lurkville, which is probably about 3 years now. So I would say it was all filmed in the course of about 4 years total. 29

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Ollie in this gnarly bank to thrid the needle down the bottom. Take note that Chris Cope and Abas rolled into it first. BK would want you to know that.

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Did you have a lot of expectations for yourself, how did you feel about the final outcome? Yeah I had huge expectations for myself, because of how long I had to film for. It was tough to be out for so long on injuries, because i was out for the 2 years I was filming with Brando, Tyrone, and Chase. I was hurt for a really good portion of that. My wrist at first then my foot. So that defiantly played a roll. But there’s only so much you can physically do. Every time I got on a good streak of skating I would get hurt. So it was hard to get all the shit I expected of myself. But I guess you can say they went really met, but you can only do more. What do you think about in your head before you give that one last solid push before rolling up to something you’re terrified of? Probably think about rolling away and/or the worst possible slam that I can try to avoid. I pretty much think about the worse possibly slam before I try anything, just to motivated me more to commit to it fully and not do that slam. It’s impossible to not think about the worst, I try to take advantage of it and try to get away alive with whatever I’m trying to do.

I feel like you have a good idea about how much impact a human body can actually take, have you ever pushed yourself past your own limit? Yeah my foot was to the point where I was like trying to grapes the idea of not being able to skate because it seemed like it might happen. Even now I don’t really know, I’m just trying to take it day to day. Any-day I feel like it could go back to how it was. Backside Nosegrind. Photo: Daniel Bleckley

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Crooked Grind. Photo: Rhino 33

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On that note, how do you start skating huge rails like yourself? Is there a good way to bail, is there a technique I’m not grasping here? I don’t know, not really. You just have to be really stupid I guess and think you can do that. Once you try it and you don’t die or hurt yourself to the point where you can’t try it again. Then eventfully you just get used to bailing on really big rails, there’s never really a go-to way to learn how to skate a big rail. It’s going to be sketchy regardless you just have to go for it and see what happens.

How was the results of that 50-50 slam you took on the double kink rail in the Lurkville Promo, how was that whole experience? The whole experience was pretty shitty I guess, it basically was a huge medical bill because I went to the E-R because i thought I repaired my spleen. But i was actually fine, all I did was brake my rib and I just had to chill for awhile. I never passed out or anything, I just got the wind knocked out of me pretty bad So you’re a delivery truck driver for your family’s business, surely you have some crazy truck war stories you could share? I see crazy shit everyday just being high up in the truck and watching other cars. Because I can only go so fast. In specific I haven’t seen anything that crazy, I almost ran a lady over when turning. It was her fault, she had no lights on her bike or anything. But she was fine, just a few scraps. 35

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Backside Tailslide over the hip. Who motivated you as a kid to skate? I was pretty into Birdhouse as a kid, I thought it was the shit. I liked the video The End a lot. I thought the team was so sick, Hawk, Hitchart, Reynolds, all those guys were so rad. Those were my earliest influences. Favorite skate video? The old Element “World Tour” video, I’m still hyped on that video to this day. It got me really hyped to skate everything really. Doesn’t matter what it is. I don’t really have a “go-to” skate video, I don’t really have to much of the new skates videos. I’m not really one to go online and watch all the new parts. I like being able to pop-in a DVD and watch it.

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What’s the gimmick of skateboarding these days? I feel like it’s all about creating a image, and labeling yourself. Wither it’s Hesh, or Fresh, etc. In-less you don’t want to label yourself. Who would you like to thank? My Mom, she’s been the most supportive. Tyrone Taylor as well. You, you’ve helped me out a lot. Pretty much anyone who has every hooked me up. Chrispin, R.I.P Allied Skate Shop. What’s your go to skate spot in San Diego? I don’t know, I will probably just get in my car and go the bridge if anything. Sometimes I’ll go to memo, but I rather skate W.S.V.T. It’s pretty close to my house. Sponsor shout-out Lurkville, I-Path Footwear, Pig Wheels, Brixton, RAEN, and Theeve Trucks.

No-Comply Frontside Bigspin bank to wall, Home Ave. Photo: Daniel Bleckley 37

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Squints, heelflip. 39

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Issue #6