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Annual Report 2010


Inside Cover

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Several new developments are in the pipeline for the coming years, including two exhibits which will provide not only state-of-the-art facilities for our animals but also rewarding experiences for visitors.


Contents

Chairman’s Report 2 Chairman’s Report 2 CEO’s Report 3 Director’s Report 3 Financial Report 5 Financial Report 5 Animal Report 8 Animal Report 8 Animal Collection 11 Animal Collection 10 Veterinary Report 16 Veterinary Report 15 Conservation Welfare Fund Report Conservation Welfare Report 17

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Education Report 20 Education Report 19 Marketing and PR Report

Marketing and PR Report 21

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Guest Services Report 23 Visitor Services Report 22 Research Report 24 Research Report 23 Estates and Projects Report Sustainability Report 26

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Human Resources and Work Experience 27

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Human Resources and Work Experience

Staff Activities 29 Staff Activities 28 External Representation and Presentation

External Representation and Presentation 30

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Staff List 32 Staff List 31 Wildlife Information Network (WIN) Report TZA Chairman’s Report 32 Wildlife Information Network (WIN) Report

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Vision 33 and Values 34

Contacts 35 Vision and Mission 35 Contacts 36 The paper used for this report is 100% recycled. Photographs kindly supplied MIX by Twycross Zoo, Paper Deborah Bardowicks, Erica Cartmill, Neil Dorman, FSC C022127 Bex Hackney, Craig Lymm, Claire Pipe and Bhav Mistry. TM

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CBPPC0001691706110421

The paper used for this report is 100% recycled. Photographs kindly supplied by Twycross Zoo, Deborah Bardowicks, Erica Cartmill, Neil Dorman, Bex Hackney, Craig Lymm, Claire Pipe, Bhav Mistry and Andy Ward.

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Chairman’s Report

2010 has been an award-winning year at Twycross Zoo, with new species being added to the collection and the opening of two major exhibits. New developments not only provide a platform for increased revenue in the future but also support our considerable contribution in the field of conservation and raising of awareness of pressing environmental issues. ‘Himalaya’, the new visitor welcome centre, was officially opened in May and the celebrations were shared by friends and colleagues of the Zoo from local businesses, academic institutions, and other zoos – as well as staff. It was the culmination of years of planning and many months of hard work, and it is to the credit of the Zoo management team that they went ahead with this very considerable undertaking in a climate of financial restraint, trimming the budget but not the eventual successful outcome. ‘Himalaya’ is an impressive free-standing building, housing key visitor facilities, including a 300-seat restaurant and extensive retail area, which gives a real sense of arrival at the Zoo. The restaurant overlooks a naturalistic Himalayanthemed enclosure, which is home to our two beautiful snow leopards, Suou and Irma, who are proving to be very popular with both visitors and staff alike. There is also a corporate event and private function room, ‘Windows on the Wild’, seating up to 120 people in comfort, with a balcony overlooking a “New England” wetland wading bird exhibit. The space can be hired by outside parties, contributing further to the attraction of the Zoo as a conference facility for commercial organisations – or even as a wedding venue! Attention to detail in ‘Himalaya’ is striking: even the public toilets have a fascinating leaf-cutter ant exhibit. The number of visitors is being boosted by the opening of ‘Himalaya’, which is becoming a destination in itself as entrance to the building is free. July saw the official opening of ‘Uda Walawe’, the Sri Lankanthemed “elephant walkway”, which allows visitors to walk around the entire elephant exhibit. Elephants continue to be one of the Zoo’s most popular animals, and Uda Walawe gives the public wonderful views across the sand paddock, as well as providing information about Sri Lanka. Change and development have been constant themes at Twycross Zoo for a number of years. As well as carrying out their daily roles, each staff member has had the added responsibility of managing those changes – which is never

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easy. They are to be congratulated for the positive way in which they have approached the challenges and for the successes they have achieved. The Zoo’s volunteer force has long been a much valued resource for the Zoo and further development of a volunteering scheme capitalises on its achievements whilst continuing to provide valuable support to the workforce as well as building on the Zoo’s engagement with the local community. Several new developments are in the pipeline for the coming years, including two exhibits which will provide not only state-of-the-art facilities for our animals but also rewarding exhibits for visitors. Planning is underway for a complex to house our chimpanzees, and for an Asian themed rotational exhibit for lions, tigers, dholes and hyaenas. I would like to thank my fellow trustees for their support, and the Directors and Advisory Board for their ongoing work on behalf of the Charity, the staff and volunteers for their hard work and commitment - everyone within the Zoo team contributed significantly to the success of Twycross Zoo in 2010. Finally I thank my predecessor, Mr Ivan Ellis, for his years of dedication to Twycross Zoo, not only as Chairman, but also as a trustee, volunteer, advocate and unfailing supporter of the organisation. His contribution has been significant. David Conner Chairman


2010 has been an award-winning year for Twycross Zoo.

CEO’s Report

Twycross Zoo has had another exciting and successful year during 2010, despite the difficulties faced by visitor attractions during the economic downturn. We were delighted to hold two major events on-site to celebrate the opening of new exhibits, and winning several awards during the year has given recognition to the consistent hard work and high standards of the Zoo staff. Our first major event of the year was the opening of ‘Himalaya’, the new visitor welcome centre. Building work commenced in 2009, and there were some challenging times during the process, not least the loss of £3.5 million invested with Lehmann Brothers, which forced us to reconsider some aspects of the design and specification of Himalaya. Fortunately, these adjustments to the plans did not have any impact on the overall appearance and finish of the building, and the completion of the project was celebrated in an opening ceremony on 20th May. Himalaya was officially opened by Bridget Kendall MBE, BBC Diplomatic Correspondent, and Jeff Moore, Chief Executive of East Midland Development Agency (EMDA), and we were joined by colleagues from other zoos and businesses, local dignitaries, and members of the community. The opening of ‘Himalaya’ is a huge step forward for Twycross Zoo as it provides a focal point for visitors, and is a space that can be enjoyed by all members of the local community owing to it being a free-entry building. The Zoo now has a broader appeal, and we are already seeing an increase in our average visitor spends in both the Catering and Retail departments, thanks to the fantastic facilities on offer within ‘Himalaya’. We have received a great deal of positive feedback on both the visitor facilities and the function room, ‘Windows on the Wild’, which has the unique selling point of overlooking a naturalistic wading bird aviary. This unusual feature has great appeal, and we have already hosted a number of meetings and conferences, and we look forward to the first wedding at Twycross Zoo in 2011. In July we marked the completion of our Sri Lankan themed elephant walkway, ‘Uda Walawe’. The opening event was officiated by His Excellency Justice Nihal Jayasinghe, High Commissioner for Sri Lanka in the United Kingdom, and guests were greeted by a troupe of Kandyan dancers and drummers. As well as providing an inspiring and innovative visitor experience, and helping us to engage with the local Asian community, Uda Walawe is a prime example of our

ongoing commitment to the worldwide conservation effort, as it includes information on the Sri Lankan National Park after which the exhibit is named. 2010 has been an award-winning year for Twycross Zoo. ‘Himalaya’ won the Local Authority Building Control (LABC) Building Excellence East Midlands Region Award for Best Large Commercial Project, and was commended in the category of Best Sustainable Project. Our winning streak continued when ‘Himalaya’ received the Sustainable Development of the Year Award at the ProCon Leicestershire Awards. These accolades have given ‘Himalaya’ the official seal of approval for its standards and sustainable construction and design. Our conservation work was given a real boost when two of our ongoing projects were selected by the European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA) as part of the ‘Ape campaign’, which aims to bring the world’s leading zoos together to make a major contribution to the continued survival of apes and their habitats. As part of our vision to secure the future of five primate species in the wild by 2020, we have supported bonobo and Cao Vit gibbon conservation for a number of years through providing funding and advice on primate care and husbandry to Awely and Fauna and Flora International (FFI) respectively. Both projects are critically important to the conservation of apes in the wild, and it is a great honour that two of the four leading projects selected to receive support from the EAZA Ape Conservation Fund are from Twycross Zoo, the World Primate Centre. 2010 has also been a year of change, as we introduced a new ‘Culture Change’ programme within the organisation. Having conducted a survey in the early stages of the year, it became apparent that some changes could be made to improve the staff experience. The Culture Change programme ran through the latter half of the year, with all permanent staff attending a series of training workshops to instil the Zoo’s values and learn valuable skills such as coaching and people management; this training will also be extended to seasonal staff and will be incorporated into the induction programme for new employees. The staff have been very positive about the whole experience, and recognise that the process will be of real benefit in taking the organisation into the future. We were delighted to welcome the Wildlife Information Network (WIN) into the East Midland Zoological Society in

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Director’s Report

early 2010. WIN had previously been working as an independent charity to provide information on the health and management of free-ranging and captive animals and emerging infectious diseases to wildlife professionals and decision-makers worldwide, through the Wildpro electronic encyclopaedia, but it has now become a department within the Zoo. This is a mutually beneficial move as Wildpro provides a valuable resource on animal care and husbandry, whilst the WIN team can tap into the vast knowledge and experience of the Life Sciences staff. Looking to the future, we plan to build on our recent successes by continuing to raise our standards of animal care and the visitor experience. The snow leopard enclosure in Himalaya includes state-of-the-art animal facilities which enable the keepers to monitor the animals more closely whilst reducing the stress that such procedures could create. This has had a positive effect on the husbandry of these big cats, and is something that we intend to incorporate into all our new developments. We are currently working on the designs for ‘Chimps, Choice and Consequences’, an exhibit that will house all of our chimpanzees and provide facilities for public engagement and observational research, and ‘Kuno’, an Asian-themed rotational exhibit for lions, tigers, dholes, and hyaenas.

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In spring 2011 we aim to launch phase one of the newlydesigned Twycross Zoo website. Although the current website is very popular and well-used, we need to move with the times, and redesigning the website will allow us to incorporate key features such as online ticketing. It will also enable us to capture visitor information so that we can find out what appeals to certain groups of people and tailor our marketing and advertising accordingly. It will give us the opportunity to incorporate the many different elements of the Zoo, such as ‘Himalaya’ and the animal collection, into a single site. This will require a great deal of hard work, with all departments having a say in what goes in to the website, but we will undoubtedly reap the rewards through the projected increase in new and repeat visits that the website will stimulate. I am very proud of our staff, trustees, advisors and supporters, whose hard work and commitment has made a busy and challenging year into a very successful one. Suzanne I Boardman BVMS MRCVS Chief Executive


During 2010 the Zoo welcomed 499,383 visitors.

Financial Report

The 2010 financial year has been an exciting and challenging period for the Zoo as it seeks to develop new and existing income streams after the opening of ‘Himalaya’ and new enclosures such as ‘Uda Walawe’. There is no doubt that ‘Himalaya’ has provided not only a venue that enhances the visitor experience, but also provides the Zoo with a separate business unit that will enhance future revenues. During 2010 the Zoo welcomed 499,383 visitors. While we fell marginally short of the half million mark, the numbers have remained extremely robust considering the effect of both the Himalaya ‘building site’ and the inclement weather at the beginning of the year, which was repeated again at year end. In addition there was poor weather over the key Easter and Whitsun holiday periods which adversely impacted on visitor numbers. However, the fact that visitor numbers were only down by 2% against 2009, and that other outdoor visitor attractions around the UK were down by between 5% and 20%, reflects how strongly the Zoo performed throughout the year. The Zoo’s financial performance was again healthy making a surplus before depreciation of £24k. While the Zoo has been going through a transitional phase to position itself for future development, it has been able to keep a tight handle on costs while moving to maximise income streams in new areas. Zoo Parks (Twycross) Limited has again performed strongly in what has been a period of development, with the new Retail and Catering sections opening within ‘Himalaya’. Zoo Parks made a net surplus of £345k, while £353k will be ‘Gift Aided’ to the Charity. With the Zoo recruiting new employees in all key areas throughout 2010, there is confidence that 2011 will be a strong year not only from a financial perspective, but also the overall visitor experience.

year, we have repaid £550,000 of the principal sum on the total loan liability. An additional finance facility of £750,000 has also been arranged with Lombard for draw down in 2011. The financing currently being undertaken by the Zoo is a result of our strong credit rating and excellent relationships with both financial institutions. Supporting this, the Zoo gratefully received the first instalment of a £1.2m grant from HSBC towards our Programme for Biodiversity Health. As part of the Zoo’s progression, the Finance department has become a part of the newly formed Resources Directorate, together with Human Resources and Information Technology, enabling cross-utilisation of resources between these departments. The Finance department was structured to support the new directorate and wider Zoo, with a Financial Controller being employed in July 2010. The Finance department is being restructured to offer an improved ‘customer’ focus to all colleagues around the Zoo. It has been heavily involved in the Gift Aid process, assisting with training and understanding, helping Gift Aid revenues reach £552,000 for the year. Finance is also introducing a new purchasing and asset management system which will help to deliver improved purchase processes, enabling tighter budgetary control and project management. It has been very much a transitional year and there is a renewed enthusiasm within the Finance Department as it looks forward to supporting the Zoo in 2011. Thomas Owen MA FCCA Financial Controller

A key deliverable during the year was a detailed 15 month budget to 31st December 2011. The budget was designed to support the strategic aims and stabilise the organisation, making it ‘fit for the future’ while supporting the short-term financial requirements. The budget process enabled Directors and budget holders to participate in and take ownership of their budget for the first time. Taking into consideration the current economic climate and the impact this would have on the Zoo, conservative assumptions were used for all income and expenditure projections. Two loan finance facilities with HSBC totalling £2.3m were drawn down to support the Zoo in its strategy. During the

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Finance Report

Twycross Zoo - East Midland Zoological Society Limited (by guarantee) CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES For the year ended 31st December 2010 Unrestricted Funds

Restricted Funds

Endowment Funds

Total 2010

Total 2009

£ 139,647

£ 494,987

£ -

£ 634,634

£ 2,506,558

Activities for generating funds: Retail and Catering

2,601,964

-

-

2,601,964

2,626,261

Activities for generating funds: Investment Income

644

-

-

644

5,253

5,156,529

-

-

5,156,529

4,087,088

-

-

INCOMING RESOURCES INCOMING RESOURCES FROM GENERATED FUNDS Volutary income: Donations & Gifts

INCOMING RESOURCES FROM CHARITABLE ACTIVITY Animal, Education & Conservation Welfare OTHER VAT Refund TOTAL INCOMING RESOURCES

35,000 7,898,784

494,987

-

8,393,771

9,980,160

-

1,981,380

1,919,253

-

7,006,306

5,568,090

-

73,565

68,885

612,040

-

9,061,251

7,556,228

(117,053)

-

(667,480)

(2,423,932)

-

861

197,511

RESOURCES EXPENDED COSTS OF GENERATING FUNDS Retail and Catering

1,981,380

-

CHARITABLE ACTIVITY Animal, Education & Conservation Welfare GOVERNANCE COSTS TOTAL RESOURCES EXPENDED NET INCOMING RESOURCES

6,394,266 73,565 8,449,211 (550,427)

612,040 -

OTHER RECOGNISED GAINS AND LOSSES Change in Market Value of listed investments

-

(549,566)

(117,053)

(666,691)

(2,621,443)

Fund balances brought forward at 1st January 2010

16,276,302

3,270,826

100,000

19,647,128

17,025,685

Fund balances brought forward at 31st December 2010

15,726,736

3,153,773

100,000

18,980,509

19,647,128

NET MOVEMENT IN FUNDS

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861

-


The Finance department has been heavily involved in the Gift Aid process, helping Gift Aid revenues reach £552,000.

Twycross Zoo - East Midland Zoological Society Limited (by guarantee) CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET For the year ended 31st December 2010 2009

2010

£

£

21,236,376

18,655,082

7,393

-

Stocks

135,360

164,018

Debtors

179,769

404,020

Cash at bank and in hand

185,895

1,477,732

501,024

2,015,770

(1,167,390)

(953,724)

(666,366)

1,062,046

FIXED ASSETS Tangible Assets Investments

CURRENT ASSETS

CREDITORS Amounts falling due within one year NET CURRENT ASSETS

Number of Visitors

TOTAL ASSETS LESS CURRENT LIABILITIES

20,577,403

Increase/Decrease

2009

2010

Number

Percentage

Parties

92,203

89,164

(3,039)

(3.3%)

Adults

247,742

221,548

(26,194)

(10.6%)

Children

111,018

94,592

(16,426)

(14.8%)

OAPs

37,194

31,862

(5,332)

(14.3%)

Family

30,377

25,955

(4,422)

(14.6%)

19,717,128

CREDITORS Amounts falling due within one year

(158,894)

(70,000)

FUNDS Endowment Fund

100,000

100,000

Restricted Funds

3,153,773

3,270,826

Unrestricted Funds: Designated

1,405,008

3,051,202

Unrestricted Funds: Other

14,321,728

13,225,100

Total paying

488,157

463,121

(25,036)

(5.1%)

18,980,509

19,647,128

Vouchers

22,304

20,114

(2,190)

(9.8%)

Total Visitors

510,461

495,547

(14,914)

(2.9%)

The above has been extracted from the Statutory Accounts of Twycross Zoo for the year ended 31st December 2010. A full set is available, upon application, from the Company Secretary.

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Animal Report

Mammals Primates: At the beginning of the year our young male gorilla ‘Matadi’ was transferred to Paignton Zoo to join the bachelor group there and, not long afterwards we received silverback ‘Boulas’ from Belfast Zoo. This was a particularly important move for the gorilla European Endangered Species Breeding Programme (EEP) meaning space was created at Belfast to enable breeding with their genetically important male. As the only holder of bonobos in the UK, we were delighted with the birth of a male offspring to ‘Cheka’ in June. This was followed less than a month later with a female being born to ‘Diatou’. These are welcome and important additions to the EEP. ‘Maringa’ also gave birth in January, and again in November but sadly neither offspring survived. We also saw the births of a male white-cheeked gibbon, a male siamang and a male pileated gibbon. As part of a review of the current groupings of our chimpanzees, a male ‘Flynn’ was moved to one of our larger chimp groups for integration with them. This is the start of several such moves which will continue throughout 2011 to reduce the usage of the original chimp accommodation. With the cooperation of Copenhagen Zoo to help determine the sub-species status of our animals, this will be a fundamental move forward in establishing new groupings in preparation for the start of building work on a new chimp facility, ‘Chimps, Choice and Consequences’, in 2012. We welcomed the birth of a male white-faced saki monkey, the first birth at Twycross since 1995, and a male red-faced spider monkey. With our female being one of only two breeding females in the European population every offspring born is vitally important and when it became apparent that the baby would die without intervention we made the decision to hand-rear him. The priority was to work towards him being reared as a spider monkey and, with the commitment of his keepers, he was fully integrated and living with his parents by the time he was seven months old. Successful births were also recorded for several callitrichid species, a female red titi monkey and two male black howler monkeys. Notable deaths during the year included a male spot-nosed guenon, a female Phayre’s langur (over 30 years old), a female agile gibbon (46 years old) and the female chimp ‘Jilloch’, who at 34 years of age was one of the last Twycross chimps to have appeared in the PG Tips adverts.

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Primates leaving the collection included a female red-ruffed lemur to the Rare Species Conservation Centre in Kent, two male emperor tamarins to Heidelberg and Lisbon Zoos, our lone male red-tailed guenon to the Owl and Monkey Sanctuary on the Isle of Wight, four male woolly monkeys to Dresden and an exchange of male woolly monkeys with Vallée Des Singes, France, to prevent inbreeding with our females. A female variegated spider monkey was also received from Vallée Des Singes. Carnivores: With the exception of several litters of meerkats there has been no notable breeding during 2010. This has partly been due to a number of significant transfers taking place, including the arrival of a young pair of snow leopards at the beginning of the year. A new species for us, we received the male ‘Suou’ from Tokyo Ueno Zoo, Japan, and female ‘Irma’ from Nordens Ark, Sweden, as part of the European and International breeding programme. Following an initial period of quarantine they were moved into their purpose-built enclosure adjacent to the restaurant in our new visitor centre ‘Himalaya’ prior to the Easter holidays. Another new species, two female striped hyaenas, arrived from the Breeding Centre for Endangered Arabian Wildlife in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. As one of a small handful of zoos focusing on the ‘sultana’ subspecies, we will receive an unrelated male as soon as one becomes available, a key focus as part of the management of the European studbook for this species. Elsewhere we exchanged male bat-eared foxes with Szeged Zoo, Hungary, to enable us to continue breeding this species with our two young females. Towards the end of the year, we were particularly pleased to receive a young pair of yellow-throated martens from Munster. Another new species for Twycross Zoo, these animals are also the first representatives of this species in the UK for a number of years and, following quarantine, will reside within our predominantly Asian themed wetlands area. Elephants: Artificial insemination procedures were carried out on two of our Asian elephant females during 2010 with ‘Tara’ being the first recipient in June, to be followed by ‘Minbu’ later in the year. By the end of the year ‘Tara’s’ pregnancy was confirmed, with the calf developing well. Both procedures were carried out by Thomas Hildebrandt and his team from the Institute for Zoo Biology and Wildlife Research (IZW), Berlin, and with the assistance of Woburn Safari Park, whose


At the beginning of the year our young male gorilla ‘Matadi’ was transferred to Paignton Zoo to join the bachelor group there and, not long afterwards we received silverback ‘Boulas’ from Belfast Zoo.

bull ‘Raja’ was the semen donor. Woburn’s close proximity enabled semen collection and insemination within a very short timeframe, a key factor in the success of the procedure. We are indebted to Woburn for their support and cooperation. We also received our British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquaria (BIAZA) elephant audit in August, which ensures that we manage our elephants to the highest possible standard. Focusing on all areas of elephant management, the audit went well with positive comments being received from the auditors, particularly with regards to our plans for the continued management of elephants as part of our long-term collection plan. As part of our commitment to this species, two thirds of the elephant house floor was replaced with one-metre-deep sand floor. Recognised as the preferred substrate to alleviate foot and associated joint and mobility problems, this will also be of major benefit during future elephant births. New hay racks were also installed as part of the upgrade.

sunbitterns in our Tropical House hatched and reared a male chick towards the end of the year. Following on from the success of recent years, the demoiselle, cranes reared two female chicks and we also saw hatchings from the grey peacock pheasants, crested wood partridge, Chinese painted quail and speckled pigeon. With careful management of the eggs laid, we also saw several hatchings of cattle egret, although not as many as in previous years to prevent overcrowding in the aviary. Notable deaths have been few and far between but during the course of the year have included a male Madagascar teal, a bare-faced curassow, an African grey hornbill, a striated heron, a Bali mynah, and a male sulphur-crested cockatoo that had been in the collection in excess of 30 years and had bred on a number of occasions. A male scarlet ibis also died, as did a male grey peacock pheasant.

Ungulates: A female tufted-deer was born at the beginning of April, the second birth of this species for us, and two male vicuña were also born during the year. Early in the year a male Chilean pudu arrived from Paignton Zoo and a female pudu went to Paignton, with a second male going to Halle Zoo Germany. Two male Michie’s tufted-deer went to Berlin Tierpark and Magdeburg respectively and a male vicuña was transferred to Paris, Menagerie du Jardin des Plantes. The decision was made to stop keeping guanaco and our male and three females went to a private collection, making more space available to manage the vicuña. During the first half of the year it became necessary to euthanase our 18-year-old male babirusa due to dental problems, which would have been impractical to attempt to treat considering his age. The remaining female babirusa was transferred to Dudley Zoo to pair with their lone male of a similar age. Disaster struck our pudu group during December with the sudden deaths of our male and two females, which appeared to be the result of rodent-transmitted pox virus (see Veterinary Report). Birds: Notable breeding successes within the bird department during 2010 have included three female striated caracara, four male Chilean lapwings and, in what has been one of our most successful years for the species, five Humboldt penguins. We were also pleased that the relatively new pair of

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Animal Report

In preparation for the completion of the themed wader aviary adjoining the function room in Himalaya, several new bird species were received during the year. Pied avocets arrived from Antwerp Zoo, Rotterdam Zoo and Living Coasts, redshank from Rotterdam and Living Coasts, ringed plover from Dresden Zoo and seven Inca terns, also from Living Coasts. The aviary has been designed to encourage natural behaviours and feeding from the birds, and with the addition of a tidal system and ripple machine it is envisaged that the landscape will evolve with the ebb and flow of the tide. Other arrivals included a pair of white-naped cranes from Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, a pair of Manchurian cranes from Berlin Tierpark and Nuremburg, and two female tawny frogmouths from Chester Zoo; the latter two species both being new to the collection. A number of transfers and exchanges of parrots occurred during the year to maximise the available space that we have for maintaining and breeding the various species that we hold. As such a female, sulphur-crested cockatoo, a female blue-and-gold macaw, a pair of orange-winged Amazon parrots, three male yellow-naped Amazon parrots, three Jardine’s parrots and two male greater vasa parrots went to the Parrot Zoo in Lincolnshire. In exchange, we received two male greater vasa parrots, which are unrelated to our females, and a much-needed female Derbyan parakeet. We also received an additional male vasa parrot from Newquay Zoo to create three pairs of this species.

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Having tried in vain for several years to establish a pair of double-wattled cassowary, we have made the decision to stop keeping this species and focus our attention on our Darwin’s rheas. Other birds that have left the collection include five macaroni penguins to Living Coasts and a male sarus crane to Exmoor Zoo. A male purple swamphen and a male striated caracara went to a private collection and two of the female caracara that were reared earlier in the year went to Beekse Bergen Safari Park in the Netherlands. A total of 26 western cattle egret went to Drusilla’s, Cotswold Wildlife Park and Exmoor Zoo. Reptiles: Although not the largest part of the animal department, transfers of note include the departure of three female West African dwarf crocodiles to the Sea Life Centres at Weymouth and the London Aquarium, resulting in this species no longer being represented in the collection. We received a male and two female black-throated monitor lizards from Stapeley Water Gardens. Neil Dorman General Curator


Animal Collection MAMMALS

Common Name DIPROTODONTIA

Scientific Name

Red List Status

Ground cuscus

Phalanger gymnotis

Least Concern

Red-necked wallaby

Macropus rufogriseus

Least Concern

Elephas maximus

Endangered

Choloepus didactylus

Least Concern

Crowned lemur

Eulemur coronatus

Vulnerable

Red-bellied lemur

Eulemur rubriventer

Vulnerable

Ring-tailed lemur

Lemur catta

Near Threatened

Red ruffed lemur

Varecia rubra

Endangered

Black-and-white ruffed lemur

Critically Endangered

Silvery marmoset

Varecia variegata variegata Mico argentatus

White-fronted marmoset

Callithrix geoffroyi

Least Concern

Common marmoset

Callithrix jacchus

Least Concern

Black-eared marmoset Pygmy marmoset

Callithrix penicillata

Least Concern

Cebuella pygmaea

Least Concern

Golden-headed tamarin

Leontopithecus chrysomelas

Endangered

Golden lion tamarin

Leontopithecus rosalia

Endangered

Emperor tamarin

Saguinus imperator subgrisescens

Least Concern

Red-handed tamarin

Saguinus midas

Least Concern

Red titi monkey

Callicebus cupreus cupreus

White-faced saki

Least Concern Least Concern

Black howler

Pithecia pithecia Alouatta caraya

Black-headed spider-monkey

Ateles fusciceps robustus

Critically Endangered

Brown spider-monkey

Ateles hybridus

Critically Endangered

Red-faced spider-monkey

Ateles paniscus

Vulnerable

Brown woolly monkey

Lagothrix lagotricha Allenopithecus nigroviridis

Vulnerable Least Concern

Diana monkey

Cercopithecus ascanius Cercopithecus diana diana

Hamlyn’s guenon

Cercopithecus hamlyni

Vulnerable

Lowe’s guenon

Cercopithecus campbelli ssp. lowei

Least Concern

Lesser spot-nosed monkey

Cercopithecus petaurista

Least Concern

Crowned guenon

Cercopithecus pogonias

Least Concern

Roloway monkey

Cercopithecus diana roloway

Endangered

Eastern black-and-white colobus

Colobus guereza occidentalis

Least Concern

Javan langur

Vulnerable

Francois’ langur

Trachypithecus auratus auratus Trachypithecus francoisi

Dusky langur

Trachypithecus obscurus

Near Threatened

Phayre’s langur Agile gibbon

Trachypithecus phayrei

Endangered

Hylobates agilis

Endangered

Lar gibbon

Hylobates lar

Endangered

Grey gibbon

Hylobates muelleri

Endangered

Pileated gibbon Northern white-cheeked gibbon

Hylobates pileatus Nomascus leucogenys

Critically Endangered

Siamang

Symphalangus syndactylus

Endangered

Western lowland gorilla

Gorilla gorilla gorilla

Critically Endangered

Bonobo

Pan paniscus

Endangered

Chimpanzee

Pan troglodytes

Endangered

Bornean orangutan

Pongo pygmaeus

Endangered

Cynomys ludovicianus

Least Concern

PROBOSCIDAE Asiatic elephant

PILOSA Linne’s two-toed sloth

PRIMATES

Allen’s swamp-monkey Red-tailed guenon

Least Concern

Least Concern

Least Concern Vulnerable

Endangered

Endangered

RODENTIA Black-tailed prairie-dog *= Data deficient/not evaluated

11


Animal Collection MAMMALS

Common Name

Scientific Name

Red List Status

Domestic rat

Rattus norvegicus

(Domestic)

Long-tailed chinchilla

Chinchilla lanigera

Critically Endangered

Domestic guinea-pig

Cavia porcellus

(Domestic)

Patagonian mara

Dolichotis patagonum

Near Threatened

Capybara

Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris

Least Concern

Degu

Octodon degus

Least Concern

Domestic rabbit

Oryctolagus cuniculus

(Domestic)

CHIROPTERA Seba’s short-tailed bat

Carollia perspicillata

Least Concern

CARNIVORA Wild cat

Felis silvestris

Least Concern

Amur leopard

Panthera pardus orientalis

Near Threatened

Snow leopard

Panthera uncia

Endangered

Meerkat

Suricata suricatta

Least Concern

Striped hyaena

Hyaena hyaena

Near Threatened

Aardwolf

Proteles cristata

Least Concern

Dhole

Cuon alpinus

Endangered

Otocyon megalotis

Least Concern

South American sealion

Otaria flavescens

Least Concern

Oriental small-clawed otter

Aonyx cinerea

Vulnerable

Yellow-throated marten

Martes flavigula

Least Concern

Ferret

Mustela putorius furo

(Domestic)

Equus asinus asinus

(Domestic)

Tapirus indicus

Endangered

Tapirus terrestris

Vulnerable

RODENTIA

LAGOMORPHA

Bat-eared fox

PERISSODACTYLA Miniature donkey Malayan tapir Lowland tapir ARTIODACTYLA Hairy babirusa

Animal Collection Babyrousa babyrussa

Vulnerable

Bactrian camel

Camelus ferus

Critically Endangered

Guanaco

Lama guanicoe

Least Concern

Alpaca

Vicugna pacos

*

Vicuña

Vicugna vicugna

Least Concern

Southern pudu

Pudu puda

Vulnerable

Reindeer

Rangifer tarandus

Least Concern

Michie’s tufted-deer

Elaphodus cephalophus michianus

Near Threatened

Giraffe

Giraffa camelopardalis

Least Concern

Pygmy goat

Capra hircus hircus

(Domestic)

BIRDS

Scientific Name

Red List Status

RHEIFORMES Darwin’s rhea

Rhea pennata

*

CASUARIIFORMES Southern cassowary

Casuarius casuarius

Vulnerable

GALLIFORMES Rufous-vented chachalaca

Ortalis ruficauda

Least Concern

Bare-faced curassow

Crax fasciolata

Least Concern

Guineafowl

Numida meleagris

(Domestic)

Domestic turkey

Meleagris gallopavo Coturnix chinensis

(Domestic) Least Concern

Rollulus rouloul Bambusicola fytchii

Near Threatened

Common Name

Blue quail Crested partridge Mountain bamboo-partridge

12

Least Concern *= Data deficient/not evaluated


Animal Collection BIRDS

Common Name

Scientific Name

Red List Status

Satyr tragopan

Tragopan satyra

Near Threatened

Temminck's tragopan

Tragopan temminckii

Least Concern

Domestic chicken

Gallus gallus

(Domestic)

Silver pheasant

Lophura nycthemera

Least Concern

Reeve's pheasant

Syrmaticus reevesii

Vulnerable

Grey peacock pheasant

Polyplectron bicalcaratum

Least Concern

Macaroni penguin

Eudyptes chrysolophus

Vulnerable

Humboldt penguin

Spheniscus humboldti

Vulnerable

Phoenicopterus chilensis

Near Threatened

Black stork

Ciconia nigra

Least Concern

White stork

Ciconia ciconia

Least Concern

Scarlet ibis

Eudocimus ruber

Least Concern

Glossy ibis

Plegadis falcinellus

Least Concern

Puna ibis

Plegadis ridgwayi

Least Concern

Northern bald ibis, waldrapp

Geronticus eremita

Critically Endangered

Little egret

Egretta garzetta

Least Concern

Purple heron

Ardea purpurea

Least Concern

Cattle egret

Bulbulcus ibis

Least Concern

Striated heron

Butorides striata

Least Concern

Black-crowned night-heron

Nycticorax nycticorax

Least Concern

Boat-billed heron

Cochlearius cochlearius

Least Concern

Little bittern

Ixobrychus minutus

Least Concern

Pink-backed pelican

Pelecanus rufescens

Least Concern

Little pied cormorant

Phalacrocorax melanoleucos

Least Concern

GALLIFORMES

ANSERIFORMES

PHOENICOPTERIFORMES Chilean flamingo

CICONIIFORMES

PELICANIFORMES

GRUIFORMES Sunbittern

Eurypyga helias

Least Concern

Purple swamphen

Porphyrio porphyrio

Least Concern

East African grey crowned crane

Balearica regulorum gibbericeps

Vulnerable

Sarus crane

Grus antigone

Vulnerable

White-naped crane

Grus vipio

Vulnerable

Red-crowned crane

Grus japonensis

Endangered

Demoiselle crane

Grus virgo

Least Concern

Pied avocet

Recurvirostra avosetta

Least Concern

Common ringed plover

Charadrius hiaticula

Least Concern

Southern lapwing

Vanellus chilensis cayennensis

Least Concern

Redshank

Tringa totanus

Least Concern

Inca tern

Larosterna inca

Near Threatened

Speckled pigeon

Columba guinea

Least Concern

Green imperial pigeon

Ducula aenea

Least Concern

Pied imperial pigeon

Ducula bicolor

Least Concern

Diamond dove

Geopelia cuneata

Least Concern

Bar-shouldered dove

Geopelia humeralis

Least Concern

Bare-faced ground dove

Metriopelia ceciliae

Least Concern

Black-winged ground dove

Metriopelia melanoptera

Least Concern

CHARADRIIFORMES

COLUMBIFORMES

*= Data deficient/not evaluated

13


Animal Collection BIRDS

Common Name PSITTACIFORMES

Scientific Name

Red List Status

Bourke's parrot

Neopsephotus bourkii

Least Concern

Elegant parrot

Neophema elegans

Least Concern

Turquoise parrot

Neophema pulchella

Least Concern

Budgerigar

Melopsittacus undulatus

Least Concern

Plum-headed parakeet

Psittacula cyanocephala

Least Concern

Derbyan parakeet

Psittacula derbiana

Near Threatened

Nyasa lovebird

Agapornis lilianae

Near Threatened

Black-cheeked lovebird

Agapornis nigrigenis

Vulnerable

Peach-faced lovebird

Agapornis roseicollis

Least Concern

Vasa parrot

Coracopsis vasa

Least Concern

Red-fronted parrot

Poicephalus gulielmi

Least Concern

Blue-and-yellow macaw

Ara ararauna

Least Concern

Red-and-green macaw

Ara chloropterus

Least Concerned

Blue-throated macaw

Ara glaucogularis

Critically Endangered

Military macaw

Ara militaris

Vulnerable

Red-fronted macaw

Ara rubrogenys

Endangered

Thick-billed parrot

Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha pachyrhyncha

Endangered

Orange-winged Amazon

Amazona amazonica

Least Concern

Yellow-naped Amazon

Amazona auropalliata

Least Concern

Yellow-shouldered Amazon

Amazona barbadensis

Vulnerable

Sulphur-crested cockatoo

Cacatua galerita

Least Concern

Tanimbar cockatoo

Cacatua goffiniana

Near Threatened

Tauraco erythrolophus

Least Concern

Southern boobook

Ninox novaeseelandiae

Least Concern

Common scops owl

Otus scops

Least Concern

White-faced scops owl

Otus leucotis

Least Concern

Spectacled owl

Pulsatrix perspicillata

Least Concern

Great grey owl

Strix nebulosa

Least Concern

Rufous-legged owl

Strix rufipes

Least Concern

Ural owl

Strix uralensis

Least Concern

Podargus strigoides

Least Concern

European roller

Coracias garrulus

Near Threatened

Blue-winged kookaburra

Dacelo leachii

Least Concern

African grey hornbill

Tockus nasutus

Least Concern

Silvery-cheeked hornbill

Bycanistes brevis

Least Concern

Abyssinian ground hornbill

Bucorvus abyssinicus

Least Concern

Pied crow

Corvus albus

Least Concern

Common raven

Corvus corax

Least Concern

Bali starling

Leucopsar rothschildi

Critically Endangered

Gouldian finch

Erythrura gouldiae

Endangered

Javan sparrow

Padda oryzivora

Vulnerable

Heck's long-tailed finch

Poephila acuticauda hecki

Least Concern

Australian zebra finch

Taeniopygia castanotis

Least Concern

Montserrat oriole

Icterus oberi

Critically Endangered

CUCULIFORMES Red-crested turaco

STRIGIFORMES

CAPRIMULGIFORMES Tawny frogmouth

CORACIIFORMES

BUCEROTIFORMES

PASSERIFORMES

14

*= Data deficient/not evaluated


Animal Collection ARTHROPODS

Common Name ARACHNIDA

Scientific Name

Red List Status

Red-kneed tarantula

Brachypelma smithi

Near Threatened

Chilean rose tarantula

Grammostola rosea

*

Gromphadorhina portentosa

*

Acromyrmex octospinosus

*

Scientific Name

Red List Status

INSECTA Madagascar hissing cockroach

HYMENOPTERA 8-spined leafcutter ant

FISH

Common Name

CYPRINIFORMES Goldfish

Carassius auratus

(Domestic)

Common carp

Cyprinus carpio

(Domestic)

Golden Ide

Leuciscus idus

(Domestic)

Poecilia reticulata

*

Pterophyllum scalare

*

Common Name ANURA

Scientific Name

Red List Status

Green-and-black poison dart frog

Dendrobates auratus

Least Concern

Oriental fire-bellied toad

Bombina orientalis

Least Concern

White's tree frog

Litoria caerulea

Least Concern

Scientific Name

Red List Status

European pond turtle

Emys orbicularis

Near Threatened

Peninsula cooter

Pseudemys peninsularis

*

Red-eared slider

Trachemys scripta elegans

Least Concern

Aldabra giant tortoise

Geochelone gigantea

Vulnerable

Red-footed tortoise

Chelonoidis carbonaria

Least Concern

African spurred tortoise

Centrochelys sulcata

Vulnerable

Bell's hinge-back tortoise

Kinixys belliana

*

African pancake tortoise

Malacochersus tornieri

Vulnerable

Leopard tortoise

Stigmochelys pardalis

*

Hermann's tortoise

Testudo hermanni

Near Threatened

Central Asian tortoise

Testudo horsfieldii

Vulnerable

Eastern bearded dragon

Pogona barbata

Least Concern

Inland bearded dragon

Pogona vitticeps

*

Green iguana

Iguana iguana

*

Leopard gecko

Eublepharis macularius

*

Standing's day gecko

Phelsuma standingi

Vulnerable

Glass lizard

Pseudopus apodus

*

White-throated monitor

Varanus albigularis

*

Boa constrictor

Boa constrictor

*

Cornsnake/red ratsnake

Elaphe guttata

*

Osteolaemus tetraspis tetraspis

Vulnerable

CYPRINODONTIFORMES Guppy

PERCIFORMES Freshwater angelfish

AMPHIBIANS

REPTILES

Common Name

CHELONIA

SAURIA

SERPENTES

CROCODYLIA West African dwarf crocodile *= Data deficient/not evaluated

15


Veterinary Report

For the first three quarters of 2010, the veterinary services at Twycross were provided by full-time qualified veterinary nurse Bridget Fry and a part-time veterinary surgeon from the International Zoo Veterinary Group (IZVG), mainly Nic Masters. At the end of September 2010 Lesa Longley joined Twycross Zoo in a new role as Head of Veterinary Services. Lesa worked in general practice and universities with ‘exotic’ species for several years. She was previously part of the veterinary team at Edinburgh Zoo, has written two textbooks on exotic pets, lectured both in the UK and internationally, and recently completed a Masters by Research on ‘cognitive ageing’. She obtained the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) Diploma in Zoological Medicine and is an RCVS Recognised Specialist in Zoo and Wildlife Medicine. Lesa’s post is full-time, meaning that the Zoo now has a vet on site almost all the time. Emergency cover out of hours is provided by Lesa and IZVG. Youngsters The white-faced saki monkey ‘Lanza’ gave birth this year, but the baby—a female called ‘Lioni’—was very adventurous and kept moving off her mother and onto her father ‘Bailey’ at only a few weeks old. We suspected that the mother had mastitis and gave her antibiotics, whilst the baby was injected with glucose and fluids. The two were later reunited and they have since made a strong bond. The bonobo ‘Maringa’ had two babies during 2010 which sadly died within hours of birth. She has undergone veterinary checks under anaesthesia and has been given a clean bill of health; we hope she has a successful outcome to her next pregnancy. We have had two successful bonobo births - a male called ‘Winton’ and a female called ‘Malaika’ - in June and July 2010 to other females in the group (‘Cheka’ and ‘Diatou’ respectively). A male red-faced black spider monkey was born to ‘Josie’ and ‘Spike’. The mother was not nursing him and quick intervention was required so that the youngster, ‘Marvin’, would survive. The decision was made to hand-rear him, with the intention of reuniting him with his parents as soon as possible. The keepers hand-reared ‘Marvin’ with some help from the veterinary team, during which time he lived in a specially constructed cage within his parents’ enclosure, so they were able to maintain contact with him throughout the process. A health check under anaesthesia was required when ’Marvin’ showed signs of being ill in October. His blood

16

results showed that his diet was not balanced and the keepers adjusted his food to correct this. After weaning he was gradually moved back in with his parents. We are pleased that he is now doing well in his family group, and appears to be growing well and gaining strength. ‘Ganesh Vijay’ our Asian elephant calf is growing as expected. The keepers weigh him on a weekly basis and his training is developing well. On his birthday he was stung by a wasp in his trunk, but after treatment with anti-inflammatories he was back to his usual playful self within half an hour. In October reproductive specialists from the Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research visited from Germany and performed artificial insemination (AI) on one of our Asian elephant females, ‘Minbu’, but this was unsuccessful. One of the other elephants ‘Tara’ had AI in June and by August we were able to confirm that she is pregnant. The new edition to the herd is expected in Easter 2012. Animal movements The young male gorilla ‘Matadi’ suffered some wounds to his back from our newly introduced silverback ‘Oumbie’. The decision was made to move ‘Matadi’ in with the female gorilla group temporarily, while the curators made plans for his transfer to Paignton Zoo. Moving ‘Matadi’ meant that we could clean his wounds and stitch up a cut on his leg. Peter Kertesz, a human dentist who also specialises in dentistry on zoo animals, was called in to carry out dental work on two other gorillas, ‘Asante’ and ‘Oumbie’. ‘Asante’ had a fractured incisor and ‘Oumbi’ had to have a molar tooth removed. Both dentals were a success, even though ‘Asante’ has a slightly different smile now. Once the snow leopard enclosure was completed, we moved the male and female into their new home. This allowed us to give them both a health check as they required an anaesthetic to be moved. This involved a physical examination - including listening to their heart and lungs - as well as a blood test; all showed that they were both fit and well. They have since settled in well and are enjoying their purpose-built new enclosure. ‘Flynn’ the chimp was anaesthetised to be moved to a new group in November. This enabled us to give him a health check. He is settling into the group, although there have been a few squabbles!


We have had two successful bonobo births—a male called ‘Winton’ and a female called ‘Malaika’

Sad losses Unfortunately we had some unhappy cases in 2010. ‘Toby’’ the babirusa was presented with an abscess on the side of his face, which was associated with a tooth root infection. The abscess was drained under anaesthetic, but it involved his tusk and eventually he lost condition. We sadly had to make the discussion to euthanaze ‘Toby’ in May. He reached 18 years of age and lived a long life with his friend ‘Tiny’, who is now with other babirusas in Dudley Zoo. Our 34-year-old chimp ‘Jilloch’ developed respiratory problems which were linked to heart failure and she had to be euthanased in October. Our group of pudus contracted a fatal pox virus – research is ongoing into the source of this infection.

Bridget is the EEP (European Endangered Species Programme) studbook keeper for siamang gibbons, and Lesa the veterinary advisor. Lesa has a special interest in all aspects of animal health relating to ageing, which is of great importance considering the advancing age of our chimpanzees. The veterinary team continues to be involved in clinical aspects of research and conservation at the Zoo. Lesa Longley MA BVM&S DZooMed (Mammalian) MSc MRCVS RCVS Recognised Specialist in Zoo & Wildlife Medicine Head of Veterinary Services Bridget Fry BSc (Hons) RVN Animal Health and Research Manager

Inspections and students The veterinary services at the Zoo are subject to the same legislation governing other veterinary practices. In November we passed an inspection by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate, which checks that we store and dispense medications appropriately. We also had a preliminary inspection by the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in connection with our teaching of final-year veterinary students at the University of Nottingham – the full inspection is planned for the early part of 2011. May 2010 saw the arrival of our first batch of veterinary students from the University of Nottingham School of Veterinary Medicine and Science. The students complete a two-week rotation at the Zoo and local ‘exotic pet’ practices. During this period they are involved in clinical casework and also complete a dietary review for a species in the collection. These reviews are presented to staff - often with great discussion - and are used as a basis for identifying areas where diets may be improved. More veterinary time The addition of a full-time vet has enabled the Zoo to improve the care provided to animals, minimising the time before ill animals are seen. Many animals also received health checks, which included catching up all of our Humboldt penguins, and new birds arriving at the Zoo during 2010 had blood samples taken to enable them to be sexed. We have also performed several checks on animals arriving at the Zoo and those being transferred to other collections.

17


Conservation Welfare Fund Report

Twycross Zoo’s Conservation Welfare Fund (CWF) has again contributed to a number of in situ projects in 2010. Through the fund, we aim to provide financial aid to projects that have a direct contribution to species conservation or projects that work to increase animal welfare wherever they may be in the world. These projects fall into three different groups – those which we fund through the ‘Five Primates’ initiative, such as those which fall under ‘Bonobo!’, those which we fund through our small grants programme, which can be for any worthy cause related to the conservation and welfare of wild animal species, and those that are funded through our inclusion within a particular breeding programme for a specific collection species or membership to a certain organisation: for instance, we provide a contribution to le Conservatoire pour la Protection des Primates with respect to the conservation of South American titis, via their Proyecto Mono Tocón, as we have red titi (Callicebus cupreus) in our collection. Five Primates The aim of this initiative is to help to secure the future of five primate species in the wild by 2020. Currently, two species are on the list, with two other project groups in discussion. These cover Africa and Southeast Asia. 2010 has seen the continuation of funding for Lola Ya Bonobo, Awely Greencaps and the Cao Vit Gibbon Conservation Programme. Lola Ya Bonobo: Bonobo (Pan paniscus) Lola continues its rehabilitation programme, with bonobos confiscated from markets being taken to their sanctuary. They are also gathering funds for a new nursery facility. Meanwhile, they are in the process of purchasing a new island – Totaka – situated opposite the release site of Ekolo Ya Bonobo. This island will be the release site for bonobos which can’t be put back into the wild, and will act as an educational facility to bring the awareness of the plight of bonobos to people using the river, which is the main transport route to Kinshasa and beyond. This is part of Lola’s wider education programme, looking at how to reduce the impact of the bushmeat trade in the area through development of micro-projects and general education initiatives. In addition, we have news that two bonobos have been born in the wild at Ekolo – this is one step closer to having a fully rehabilitated community of bonobos on the doorstep of Kinshasa.

18

Awely Greencaps : Bonobo Awely Greencaps have had a successful year on many different projects. They have produced an illustrated bilingual booklet (in French and Lingala) to promote biodiversity in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), and highlight the plight of the bonobo in particular. Awely also continue with rolling out a programme of economic development micro-projects for their target groups, whereby they provide livestock management training for former hunters, providing these new farmers with a potential income stream without having to resort to hunting for bushmeat. In addition, the Greencaps have successfully continued their ‘bonobo ambassador’ programme, with most of their target groups now signed up to this: bonobo ambassadors are former hunters who have pledged never to hunt, eat or sell bonobo, which is illegal in DRC. This law is difficult to uphold in such a poor economy, so persuasion through information and providing help on alternative means of obtaining income are important methods of conservation education.


“The aim of this initiative is to help to secure the future of five primate species in the wild by 2020”

Cao Vit Gibbon Conservation Programme (FFI): Cao Vit Gibbon (Nomascus nasutus) Continuing on from last year, the Cao Vit Gibbon Conservation Programme (CVGCP) has now entered a phase of closer collaboration with authorities in China, which they are calling the ‘Transboundary Cao Vit Gibbon Conservation Programme’. With only 110 individuals recorded in the wild, the need to protect this critically endangered species from extinction should be high on everyone’s agenda. FFI are doing an amazing job in getting local villages involved in sustainable practices that help the conservation of this species, in addition to removing their goats and stopping firewood gathering from the protected area. The partnership with one of China’s leading gibbon experts has supported detailed research and observations on what was previously a little-known species. Small Grants Programme In addition to the Five Primates programme, Twycross Zoo has a ‘Small Grants’ programme, offering up to £3,000 for individual projects. 2010 saw the donation of funds to three projects – The Kumbira Forest expedition was led by Michael Mills of BirdLife International, the funding initiative being coordinated by Cotswold Wildlife Park. Kumbira is part of the Gabela Important Bird Area of Angola, and this expedition is thus a very important part of a biological fact-finding mission in an area that has been plagued by conflict until only recently. Three weeks were spent in the field conducting bird and vegetation structure surveys to establish ecological parameters for several threatened endemic bird species of this region. The Snow Leopard Trust project in Mongolia has been provided with money to cover a GPS-satellite collar for one of their snow leopards (Panthera uncia), a vital part of the research on this endangered big cat and close relative of the tiger. This collar will provide information as to the individual’s movements for the next year, which the researchers use to create home range maps for each of the ten study cats, providing a detailed picture of the overlap in their ranges. In addition, the Trust regularly reports back to Twycross Zoo with respect to other elements of their conservation programme in Mongolia, the latest piece of news being their

successful campaign for local communities to protect vital habitat in South Gobi from mining interests. The third successful application for the small grants programme was one submitted by the German Primate Centre (Deutsches Primatenzatrum) in conjunction with their research within the Siberut Conservation Group in the Mentawai Islands, just off Sumatra. We are funding the development of a conservation-based biological database for the critically endangered pig-tailed snub-nosed monkey (Simias concolor). If successful, this database will be used for other species of primate on these islands, each of which is endemic and under threat. The CWF has also continued to support the Uganda Wildlife Education Centre (UWEC) for its subscription to the African Alliance of Zoos and Aquaria (PAAZAB), including some additional support to allow a UWEC member to attend the World Association of Zoos and Aquaria (WAZA) conference, where they presented a paper on the bushmeat crisis in Uganda. Other Funds In addition to the above and various memberships, Twycross Zoo has provided funds through EAZA for l’Association Européenne pour l’Étude et la Conservation des Lémuriens (AEECL) in connection with keeping crowned lemurs in our collection, and has provided money directly to le Conservatoire pour la Protection des Primates for the conservation of South American titis via Proyecto Mono Tocón. The goal of the project is the conservation of the endangered San Martín Titi (Callicebus oenanthe, known locally as el mono tocón). This monkey is one of the three endemic primate species in Perú, and can only be found in the Department of San Martín, north-eastern Perú. Kevin J. Caley BSc (JHons) PhD Research and Conservation Executive

19


Education Report

The Education Department has seen many changes during 2010. With the departure of Alan Bates (Head of Education) in June and Sophie Stevens (Education Officer) in July the staffing of the department has changed considerably. Jo Hardy (Deputy Head of Education) was asked to take over the department as Acting Head of Education. Amy Moore, originally employed as a seasonal Education Officer, has now become a permanent member of staff. The department was also assisted by Ian Martin, an ex-primary school teacher in the Guest Services Department, who was seconded to the Education Department from June until November.

Each themed week highlighted a different educational message. The visitors were asked to donate 50p towards Twycross Zoo’s Conservation Welfare Fund for each activity they participated in. Developments and Projects l

Creation of online education resources for teachers.

l

Continued development of Vet Days from the ‘Catapulting Kids Further’ grant.

Formal Education 2010 saw us pass the milestone of teaching half a million children in Twycross Zoo’s Education Department. On the 22nd of January 2010 Hope Robertson was crowned the 500,000th child taught. Hope and her classmates all received goodie bags and certificates to celebrate the event.

l

Revising all Education Department policies, protocols and risk assessments.

l

Applying and gaining the ‘Learning outside the classroom’ quality badge. Twycross Zoo is one of only thirteen UK collections to achieve this.

The number of people taught by the Education Department rose to a record-breaking 37,948. This was an increase of 17% on 2009 and is the sixth year in a row that the teaching numbers have increased. The greatest increase was in secondary teaching; the number of special educational needs children taught was disappointingly low but this is a particularly small and variable group for teaching.

l

Creation of a training course for staff giving public presentations.

l

Working with Paget High School on the ‘Business in the Classroom’ projects.

l

Removal of the two education porta cabins and the reorganisation of the department’s buildings.

l

Working with Julia Badger from Aston University on her PhD about learning.

During the summer the department undertook a full overhaul of all the educational sessions and resources. This was to bring our sessions in line with changes to the National Curriculum and various syllabi. The installation of a projector and computer in the Zoo Centre has doubled the available teaching slots for GCSE and Post-16 groups. Informal Education There have been two main informal education projects run by the Education Department. The first was the return of Garry Slack, author of the “Learn to sign with Olli” books. These sign safari workshops taught visitors different animal names in British Sign Language and got them signing along to songs and nursery rhymes. The second project was the conversion of the Zoo Centre static display into an interactive craft activity room. During the summer holidays and October half term holiday children could come along to make animal-themed crafts and learn more about animals, conservation and biodiversity.

20


2010 saw the half a millionth child taught by Twycross Zoo’s Education Department.

Training and Professional As with all permanent staff, the Education department have been participating in the leading change workshops at Twycross Zoo. Amy Moore & Ian Martin completed the public presentations training in July 2010. Jo Hardy is the East Midlands regional coordinator for BIAZA’s Education and Training Committee (ETC). She chaired two meetings, one at West Midlands Safari Park and the second at Colchester Zoo. Amy Moore also attended the Colchester Zoo meeting.

As a member of the BIAZA ETC Jo Hardy attended three committee meetings in 2010. She also attended the BIAZA Awards, Communication and Education (ACE) conference at Paignton Zoo in November where she gave a presentation on the sign safari days with Garry Slack. Jo Hardy also attended the Learning Outside the Classroom conference in December. Jo Hardy Acting Head of Education

Formal Education Numbers Age

2009

2010

% Change 2009 to 2010

Primary

16,050

18,386

19%

Secondary

5,590

7,283

33%

Post 16

4,337

5,718

10%

Special Educational Needs

734

277

-220%

Outreach

5,794

6,284

8%

Total number of pupils taught

32,505

37,948

17%

Percentage of visiting schools taught

42.07%

52.05%

9.35%

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Marketing Report

2010 was a busy year for the Marketing Department, with two major events taking place at Twycross Zoo. In May, our new Visitor Welcome Centre ‘Himalaya’ was opened by BBC Diplomatic Correspondent Bridget Kendall. July saw the opening of Uda Walawe, the Sri Lankan themed elephant walkway, by The High Commissioner for Sri Lanka in the United Kingdom, His Excellency Justice Nihal Jayasinghe. Both events were well attended by friends and colleagues of Twycross Zoo from across the UK, and attracted significant interest from both the print and broadcast media.

This resulted in the development of an all-inclusive entry ticket and ‘value for money’ positioning using price comparisons with other attractions.

Following the success of the 2009 television advertising campaign in the Central TV East region, the coverage was increased in 2010 to include Central TV West, which includes the West Midlands, Warwickshire and Staffordshire. This is a significantly larger population area and means that an additional 4.5 million people had the opportunity to see the advert. The commercial retained the same overall format but was updated to include ‘Himalaya’ and ‘Uda Walawe’ and was broadcast both in advance of, and during, all of the main visitor peaks. Customer surveys revealed that 37% of visitors had seen the TV advert, emphasising the success of this campaign.

The TV campaign has an objective of broadening the catchment area of the Zoo but the importance of the local market has also been reflected with a series of door-drops, adverts in community magazines and the development of the close relationship with Hinckley and Bosworth Tourism Partnership. A local press and door-drop campaign was also developed to encourage local people to rediscover Twycross Zoo.

In addition to the inclusion in the TV advert, a dedicated advertising campaign to launch ‘Himalaya’ was conducted including a four-week local press campaign, a leaflet door drop to 42,000 homes, and a week-long AdVan (a mobile 48-sheet poster site) campaign. The development of ‘Himalaya’ has also led to the targeting of a new group of ‘active’ elderly customers - people who have mid-week leisure time. In addition to leaflets and vouchers to attract this target market, we also launched the ‘Eat, Talk, and Walk’ campaign, offering great value food, a daily talk about one of the animal species and an optional mini guided tour of the Zoo. ‘Windows on the Wild’ has also created several new target markets including weddings, conferences and events. Marketing and communication campaigns have been created to address these new markets. As part of our ongoing market research, a project was undertaken within the catchment area of the Zoo to get an understanding of the impact of the economy on visitor attractions. This showed the recession was having an effect on the likelihood of people visiting tourist attractions.

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It was also evident from customer surveys that many of our visitors had not been to the Zoo in recent years, however when they did visit, the majority (85%) said it was much better than their last visit. In all advertising alongside ‘value’ we have emphasised the ‘new’ developments that have happened.

During 2010 there was a concerted push to develop ‘social media’ and to establish a customer database of e-mail addresses. There are now over 1000 ‘followers’ on Twitter and the database has increased in size by more than three fold. Both of these enable us to communicate quickly and frequently with our customers and help us to generate a higher level of engagement with the work of the Zoo. The e-mail database has not only been used for marketing communication, it has also been used for consultation on potential developments such as the Art Strategy. Kevin Bennett Marketing Manager


Another first for Twycross Zoo saw the trial of the new talk package, offering up to 10 informative talks to visitors each day.

Guest Services Report

2010 was a tremendous year for the Guest Services department, which saw considerable development and consisted of an extremely fun and successful summer activity programme. Our ‘Fun Rangers’ were launched with the principal purpose of creating an enhanced atmosphere for our visitors on entry to the Zoo. Head ‘Fun Ranger’, Grace Gardiner, and her team revamped the tedious entry with a more engaging experience, including regular information updates and animal character interaction, giving the Zoo a truly great first impression. Visitor feedback had previously indicated a need for more interaction throughout the visitor journey and, as a result, we received great participation in the new activities introduced during the high season. Story time offered children and families fun interactive book readings by our ‘Fun Rangers’ and ‘Tipsy the Chimp’, inclusive of sign language and a sing-along time. The books used were sold in our ‘Himalaya’ shop and boosted sales over the summer months. In addition to story time, the ‘Fun Rangers’ hosted hide and seek, parachute games, talks, tours and photo opportunity sessions. In September we launched the ‘Eat, Talk and Walk’ promotional campaign aimed at our ‘Himalaya’ visitors, which had a good impact on visitor perception with the tours now commencing on a daily basis (Monday to Friday). The promotion delivered a free animal talk in ‘Himalaya’, scripted by our Visitor Services and Life Sciences departments, followed by the opportunity of a guided whistlestop tour of the Zoo for only £5. This has proved popular with our active elderly visitors looking for a change to the traditional garden centre or tea room afternoon experience.

not only a more versatile department but a shop window for these products for our 500,000 guests passing through each year. The team, headed up by Nicola Barlow and Wes Sutton, will strive to offer the Zoo’s guests a better-than-expected service, taking Twycross Zoo into a new era of customer service and commercial sales run by an enthusiastic, passionate team wanting to go that extra mile to make us truly world class. The new volunteer programme was launched towards the end of the year and welcomed both new and old faces to build a dedicated and skilled volunteer group. We worked hard on studying worldwide volunteer programmes such as the New York - Bronx’s Zoo philosophy to see how our programme could be developed, and are looking at implementing seated interaction around the Zoo for our less mobile volunteer members, and guided walks. Another first for Twycross Zoo saw the trial of the new talk package, offering up to 10 informative talks to visitors each day. This received excellent feedback and put us on an even keel with other zoos within the UK. Halloween was a great success with professional pumpkin carving and interaction taking place with our Chef and his team in ‘Himalaya’ and a spooky train experience at our ‘Little Explorers’ area. The Christmas period was a great end to the year. This brought visitors to our Grotto, ‘Santa’s Ice Cave’, a magical place to meet Santa and his helpers, which gave our young visitors a true taste of Christmas spirit enhanced by the wintery weather and frequent snowfalls that we encountered. Wes Sutton Guest Services Manager

We identified the opportunity to introduce a birthday package at the Zoo and developed the ‘Birthday Barn’, an area dedicated to hosting these events. The product was launched in October with the potential to deliver good revenue over weekends; we received a good stream of bookings and expect it to be a core product for 2011. October saw the long-awaited amalgamation of the Visitor Services and administration teams. The Information Centre was given a fantastic face lift and became the hub of all activity driving the sales of adoptions, memberships, animal feeds and keeper experiences with the aim to increase sales and create

23


Research Report

As in previous years, the Research department has continued to support students and keepers carrying out research projects. This year saw the department combined with conservation under the leadership of Dr Kevin Caley, an ecologist and evolutionary biologist who has been teaching wildlife biology for more than a decade. This has led to a more integrated approach towards research projects with the ultimate aim of having at least one conservation or husbandry goal in their requirements. Whilst primates continue to be a primary focus, we have facilitated the expansion of research to cover as many aspects of Zoo life and the collection as possible, to offer a more holistic approach to zoo-based research, and one that begins to incorporate the knowledge gained from studies in the wild as well as those directly affiliated with collection studies. As in previous years, the majority of student projects are behavioural, a number of which may include some enrichment studies. 2010 also saw the reintroduction of charges for university-level projects, which has been deemed necessary to cover at least some of the costs involved in the administration associated with such applications. Several projects have stood out for their conservation value, for instance the Royal Veterinary College Masters student Ricardo Cesar Castro de Sa, whose project on the behavioural responses of Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) to tiger faeces, their major predator in the wild, goes a long way to understanding the husbandry needs that will be required during the development of a reintroduction programme for this critically endangered big cat. Ricardo was the top wild animal health student and winner of the award for best project within the Wild Animal Health Masters course. Other projects have been important in allowing Twycross to develop new methods of health-screening and their potential benefits. One example is the research project of Carl Regan, under the supervision of Dr Lisa Yon, who was former Head of Research at the Zoo and is now Lecturer in Zoo and Wildlife Medicine at the University of Nottingham’s School of Veterinary Medicine and Science. Carl’s project has incorporated the use of differently coloured glitter to identify the faeces of individual animals (in this case, various New and Old World monkeys) to enable the development of a more accurate map of gut parasite infection within the collection. This method of individual animal identification has since been

24

adopted by one of our keepers, Rachel Pietragallo, in her Masters research project on restructuring meals to stabilise gut transit times and influence selective feeding in lemurs. This year has also seen two interesting Zoo staff perception projects. Alex Murison, a human geography student at the University of Aberystwyth, explored the history of presentation and interpretation of ‘nature’ within the Zoo. Charlotte Dietz, a Masters student in Environment and Development from the University of Edinburgh, compared perception of conservation elements of reintroduction and breeding programmes between UK and Ugandan zoos, which is one of very few studies that look at intercontinental differences and similarities in attitudes within similar institutions. The big initiative in 2010 has been the initiation of the first wave of ‘specialist study streams’, with the first one looking at Big Cat research within the Zoo and its conservation affiliates, which is being coordinated by Bridget Fry. Initial studies have begun to explore how snow leopards use their new enclosure, whilst further studies will be aimed at how we can help the conservation efforts and general husbandry requirements of this endangered species, whilst also setting up a research strategy for Big Cats as a whole. Another study stream involves native biodiversity, coordinated by Kevin Caley and involving Neil Woodward (Estates Manager) and Tom Proctor (Native Species Officer). In addition to the projects listed, a new type of research project began to appear on our books at the start of the autumn season, namely ‘A’ level extended projects, which have been introduced nationally. These projects are providing school and college-level students with the opportunity to experience at first-hand what it takes to set up and carry out a small scientific research project. It will be interesting to see how many of these applications we receive in 2011, and whether this makes a difference to subsequent third-year BSc project designs. Kevin J. Caley BSc (JHons) PhD Research and Conservation Executive


Research Projects University or research institution

Level

Project Title

University of Manchester

BSc

Do primates have control over the ‘play-face’ and do they understand its communicative use?

Keele University

BSc

The effect of food enrichment on the Aldabran tortoise and the spur-thighed tortoise

University of Nottingham

BSc

Environmental enrichment of captive otters

Moulton College

BSc

Chimpanzee social grooming patterns between an alpha male and two subordinates

University of Nottingham

BSc

An investigation of faecal testosterone levels in the male Amur leopard and Amur tiger

University of Porto, Portugal

PhD

Evolution of venom encoding genes

University of Birmingham

Postdoctoral

Determination of visual field parameters in birds

University of Plymouth

Masters

Determining the effects of the social environment on captive giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) behaviour

Roehampton University

Masters

Investigation of the effects of the nearest neighbours’ relative dominance status and witnessing distant conflicts on self-directed behaviours in male and female chimpanzees

Portsmouth University

BSc

Creating a 3D computer model informed by a chimp Facial Action Coding System (FACS)

Institute of Human Genetics, University Clinic Freiburg

Postdoctoral

Evolution of the Y chromosome in mammals

Brooksby Melton College

Foundation

A comparison of the interactions between howler monkeys and their peers and between howler monkeys and their keepers

University of Plymouth

Masters

Personality in zoo-housed primates: Can personality traits be reliably assessed in captive lemur species (ring-tailed lemur and black-and -white ruffed lemur)?

University of Nottingham

BSc

Sloths: a link between metabolism and number of neck bones?

German Primate Centre

PhD

Fragmentation effects on population genetics and behavioural ecology of the brown spider monkey (Ateles hybridus)

Bishop Burton College

BSc

A study looking into the reactions of the Abyssinian ground hornbill and other species of birds to an enriched feeding method, with implications to increase natural behaviours

University of Derby

BSc

The effects of daily temperatures in relation to the closeness of locations within two different Atelidae species at Twycross Zoo

International Zoo Veterinary Group / Royal Veterinary College

Masters

Surviving reintroduction : measurement of behavioural responses of captive Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) to Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) faeces

Royal Veterinary College

Masters

Nutrition of two-toed sloths in captivity

University of Nottingham

Postdoctoral

Validation of measurement of leptin in elephant urine

University of Edinburgh

Masters

An investigation of reintroduction and breeding programme processes in the context of species conservation from the point of view of ‘animal value’: a case study of selected British and Ugandan zoos

University of Nottingham

Postdoctoral

Detection of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpes Virus (EEHV) shedding by healthy elephants

25


Research Projects

30 26

University or research institution

Level

Project Title

University of Nottingham

BSc

A cross-sectional survey of the prevalence of Entamoeba histolytica in non-human primate populations

Leicestershire and Rutland Wildlife Trust

Independent

Local wildlife site survey of wetland creation

University of Aberystwyth

BSc

How is nature socially and culturally constructed within a zoo?

University of Nottingham : Biosciences

BSc

Facial recognition in chimpanzees

Sheffield Hallam University

Masters

The role of zoos and their involvement in conservation education

Anglia Ruskin University

BSc

A behavioural comparison of captive sea-lions (Otaria flavescens and Zalophus californianus)

University of Nottingham : Biosciences

BSc

The effect of environment on the behaviour and enclosure usage of gibbons

University of Nottingham

BSc

Behavioural changes made when the typical environment of prairie dogs changes

University of Leicester

BSc

Social behaviour of rodents (capybara)

University of Nottingham

Masters

The impact of a behavioural enrichment strategy on enclosure usage by snow leopards (Panthera uncia)

University of Nottingham

BSc

Are ectoparasites of Mus musculus domesticus immunoregulatory?

Twycross Zoo

Zoo

Creating a baseline survey protocol for Twycross Zoo: what native species do we have already present?

University of Leicester

BSc

Social behaviour in captive primates

Keele University

BSc

The intra-species relationships of two miniature donkeys and how they interact with a group of goats at Twycross Zoo

University of Leicester

BSc

Social behaviour of captive primates (tamarins and pygmy marmosets)

University of Leicester

BSc

Social behaviour of primates (bonobos)

Keele University

BSc

How biological research can help with the conservation of the western gorilla

Twycross Zoo / Manchester Metropolitan University

Masters

Restructuring meals to stabilise gut transit time and influence selective feeding in black-andwhite ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata) and red-bellied lemurs (Eulemur rubriventer).

University of Nottingham

BSc

Assessment and promotion of pool usage in captive Humboldt penguins

University of Nottingham : Biosciences

BSc

Feeding preferences in group-housed black-andwhite colobus

University of Wolverhampton

BSc

A comparative study of the sociosexual behaviour of a group of captive bonobos

University of Wolverhampton

BSc

Environmental enrichment for Asian elephants

Moulton College

BSc

Space utilisation of green iguana

University of Nottingham : Biosciences

BSc

Social systems in bat-eared foxes

University of Edinburgh

BSc

Preliminary investigation of anthelmintic resistance in cyathostomins in exotic equids in the UK

Keele University

BSc

Interactions of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) with familiar and non-familiar humans


Renewable energy changes are expected to yield a saving in excess of £120,000.

Estates and Projects Report

2010 has been a challenging but successful year for the Estates and Projects team, with a re-organisation of the roles and responsibilities within the directorate and major projects being delivered.

Zoo’s perimeter fencing; and further improvement works to the visitor car parks. The team has continued to work with architects in the development of the Zoo’s fifteen-year Masterplan.

As part of the Zoo’s overall organisational improvements, the Facilities team became Estates & Projects, one of the Zoo’s four Directorates. The team now operates in four divisions: estate management; project planning and delivery; procurement; and health and safety and environmental issues. The positions of Estates Manager and Procurement Manager were created and subsequently filled in July and September respectively. The role of Construction Manager, incorporating facilities responsibilities, was also established as part of the projects division, working alongside the Projects Executive and Projects Administrator.

The Estates division has maintained the Zoo’s land, exhibits and buildings during 2010, which saw one of the hardest winters for many years. The extreme low temperatures affected pathways, heating equipment, pipework, gardens and car parks. In addition to day-to-day maintenance, a comprehensive approach to planned and cyclical maintenance was established, along with a full programme of replanting and enhancement due to start in 2011. The horticulturalists were supported by a team of volunteers who proved invaluable, especially leading up to the opening of ‘Himalaya. The team has continued to maintain the Wetlands in terms of waste water management and also the encouragement and monitoring of native wetlands species, which has included partnership working with Natural England, Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT) and the Leicestershire and Rutland Wildlife Trust.

The major achievement of the year was the opening of ‘Himalaya’, the Zoo’s new visitor centre, which began to receive visitors in March. The opening marked the culmination of over five years’ work in planning, design and construction. The complex brings together retail, catering, animal exhibits, and an excellent function venue all under one green roof. Environmental design was integral to the project, and despite a major re-design due to funding changes linked to the collapse of Lehmann Brothers, the project still achieved its goal of a BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) ‘Excellent’ rating. The project was awarded ‘Best Large Commercial Development’, and highly commended for ‘Best Sustainable Building’, by Local Authority Building Control – East Midlands. It was also awarded ‘Best Sustainable Development’ by ProCon, a non-profit organisation representing the construction industry. The Zoo is indebted to EMDA (East Midlands Development Agency) for its funding support which enabled this development to take place, and benefits to the local economy are already becoming apparent. In July, the second major development was opened, ‘Uda Walawe’, a Sri Lankan-themed elephant walkway. This provides visitors with unique views of our elephants from a ‘classroom’ overlooking their paddock and from across a tranquil waterlily pool. The walkway meanders through lush planting and passes a traditional Mahout (a Sri Lankan elephant handler) hut to join the Mary Brancker Waterways. Our elephants themselves benefited during the year from the replacement of their tiled floor with a deep sand floor and dimmable lighting, both of which improved their welfare enormously. Other notable projects include the ‘Wild Walk’; a disability scooter storage building; the completion of the

Procurement has been rationalised and processes streamlined under the supervision of the Procurement Manager. The Zoo has already benefited from enhanced efficiencies resulting from price negotiation, order collation and scrutiny of supplier selection practices. The establishment of a centralised procurement hub will continue to be developed. A consultancy was appointed to work in partnership with the Zoo to review and update health and safety practices and procedures across the site and Directorates. Their report has resulted in a detailed action plan for all Zoo staff to be involved with and take responsibility for. The size and scope of the site unavoidably entails a high electricity requirement. The appointment of an energy consultant to review the Zoo’s usage and procurement resulted in much improved contract terms and a move to renewable energy. These changes are expected to yield a saving in excess of £120,000. The Estates and Projects Team would like to extend its thanks to all those who have contributed to the successes achieved over the past year. Sandra Cawthra Projects Executive

27


Human Resources and Work Experience

Our Culture Change programme has advanced significantly following the commencement of staff training on 13th September 2010. All members of the team were briefed on the changes and now all permanent members of staff are undergoing extensive training in order to equip them with the skills and knowledge to make the new Twycross Zoo culture a success. We have received positive feedback from staff on the training programme, which according to staff has also helped raise morale.

Updates to the HR policies to reflect the new culture have now been drafted and these are undergoing review and sign off before implementation to support the new culture. The four main themes identified in the Employee Experience Survey were: l Communication l Teamwork

Training that has been implemented so far is: l Reward and Policy l Leading change l Respect l Performance management overview l Competencies

The next Employee Survey will be carried out in February 2011 and we hope to have achieved significant improvement in these areas by then.

l Objective setting l Gathering and delivering feedback Training still to be conducted is: l Performance reviews and 1-2-1’s l Coaching for success We have identified a number of non-permanent staff who would benefit from being included in the training programme, and a series of ‘mop-up’ sessions are being planned for 2011. There is also a comprehensive communications plan underway to keep staff up to date with progress. This plan incorporates regular briefings, ‘Breakfast by the stars’, daily briefing and briefing boards. Communication, however, remains the single biggest issue across the Zoo as identified in the Employee Survey and reinforced by continued staff feedback in the training sessions. We are currently scoping a full induction programme for all new employees so that the new culture can be reinforced with every team member who joins Twycross Zoo. The programme will be made up of online interactive modules and tests, as well as classroom training where appropriate. This will enable new employees to settle in quickly and hit the ground running.

28

Restructure In November thirteen roles were put at risk of redundancy across the Zoo. Using selection criteria, ten roles were made redundant following a fourteen-day consultation process. Volunteers Since April 2010 we have been advertising on-line for volunteering opportunities at the Zoo, to work within the Horticulture Team in our Estates Department. In addition, we have recently opened up the volunteering programme to include opportunities in our Guest Services Department. Although we have a small group of volunteers at present, we are developing a robust interview and induction process which means that those taken on are of a very high standard. Work Experience Between January and December 2010 we offered voluntary work placements to 136 students of animal related subjects, from NVQ level 2 to post-graduate study, working alongside the staff in our Animal Keeping Department. We also offered veterinary placements to 13 students (in addition to those from Nottingham Vet School). Karen Clarke HR Manager


Staff Activities Conference,Course or Meeting Details

Location

Participants from Twycross

New Engineering Foundation Awards & Annual Conference

Royal Society, London

Sophie Stevens

British & Irish Association of Zoos & Aquaria (BIAZA) Elephant Workshop

Dublin Zoo

Luke Harvey

BIAZA Education & Training Committee (ETC) Meeting

ZSL London

Jo Hardy

Excel Training

Twycross Zoo

Alma Fox, Amy Hulse, Gaynor Edwards, Jackie Miller, Jan Shakespeare, Jen Spalton, Joanne Quimby, Kirsty Dunn, Phillipa Weston, Sam Lea

NVQ Level 3 Business & Administration

Twycross Zoo/ Stephenson College

Gemma Britton

Event Production Show

Olympia London

Kim Riley

BIAZA Regional Meeting

West Midlands Safari Park

Jo Hardy, Sophie Stevens

International Association of Giraffe Care Professionals

Phoenix, Arizona, USA

Sarah Roffe

Hauser Design Studies Bear Meeting

Perry Beeches School

Jo Hardy

National Exhibition Centre Education Show

NEC Birmingham

Alan Bates, Jo Hardy

BIAZA Presenters Conference

Bristol Zoo

Andy Moore

PA Network Meeting (Speaker: Rosemary Parr)

Twycross Zoo

Amy Hulse, Gaynor Edwards, Jackie Miller, Jan Shakespeare, Jen Spalton, Joanne Quimby, Nicola Barlow, Phillipa Weston, Rachel Cartwright, Sam Lea

Fire Protection/Marshall Training

Twycross Zoo

Adam Dumulo, Denise Green, Fred Chetwynd, Gemma Britton, Jackie Miller, Janet Finch, John Watts, Kim Riley, Martin Allen, Maureen Suttill, Nicola Williscroft, Paul Flynn, Rachel Cartwright, Richard Brownhill, Sarah Roffe

BIAZA Native Species Working Group (NSWG) Conference

ZSL Whipsnade

Tom Proctor

European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA) Mid-Year Great Ape Taxon Advisory Group (TAG) Meeting

Burgers Zoo Netherlands

John Paul Houston

EAZA Mid-year Bird TAG Meeting

Les Epesses, France

Ben Potterton

British Veterinary Zoological Society (BVZS) Spring Meeting

Paignton Zoo

Bridget Fry

BVZS Spring Meeting

Paignton Zoo

Debra Bourne

Animal Behaviour Management Alliance (ABMA) Conference

Pittsburgh

Kris Hern

BIAZA ETC Meeting

ZSL London

Jo Hardy

EAZA Directors' Day & Spring Council Meeting

ZooParc de Beauval, France

Suzanne Boardman

UK Ireland Regional Environmental Enrichment Conference

Marwell Zoo

Debra Bourne, Kris Hern

European Zoo Veterinarians Meeting

Madrid

Debra Bourne

Volunteer Coordinators Conference

Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey

Phillipa Weston

EAZA Plant Working group Meeting

Budapest Zoo

Ben Potterton

Advanced Animal Learning Seminar

Chester Zoo

Kris Hern, Nikki Williscroft

Chartered Institute of Building

Chester Zoo

Jason Savage, Malcolm Eyre, Sandra Cawthra

BIAZA Annual Conference and AGM

Belfast Zoo

Bridget Fry, Sharon Redrobe, Suzanne Boardman

BIAZA Mid-year Mammal Working Group (MWG) Steering Committee Meeting

Belfast Zoo

Neil Dorman

Public Presentation Training

Twycross Zoo

Amy Moore, Ian Martin, Richard Smee, Stefan Hollingsworth, Adam Faulkner, Bethan Ford, Claire Wragg, Grace Gardiner, Jordan Kelly, Kris Hern

Elephant Focus Group Meeting

ZSL Whipsnade

Neil Dorman, Susanne Baumler

BBC Gardeners World

NEC Birmingham

Tom Proctor

VisionXS Conference

Oxford

Rob Bracken, Suzanne Boardman

Hawk Conservancy Trust Evening Event for Disabled

Hawk Conservancy Trust

Kim Riley

29


Staff Activities

30

Conference,Course or Meeting Details

Location

Participants from Twycross

Nutrition Training Seminar

Marwell Zoo

Katie Waller

BIAZA NSWG

Chester Zoo

Neil Woodward, Tom Proctor

Advanced National Certificate in the Management of Zoo Animals (ANCMZA) Year 1

Sparsholt College, Hampshire

Helen Burton, Liz Cubberley, Nikki Williscroft

Advanced National Certificate in the Management of Zoo Animals (ANCMZA) Year 2

Sparsholt College, Hampshire

Katie Waller, Rebecca MacCreath

BIAZA ETC Meeting

ZSL London

Jo Hardy

Human Resources Zoo Group Annual Conference

Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey

Barbara Chawner

European Wildlife Diseases Association Conference

Netherlands

Debra Bourne

BIAZA Plant Working Group

ZSL London

Neil Woodward

ANCMZA Inductions

Dudley Zoo

Jo Hardy

Group Leisure Travel Trade Show

NEC Birmingham

Kim Riley

EAZA Annual Meeting

Verona, Italy

Neil Dorman, Suzanne Boardman

Occupational Enrichment Training

Colchester Zoo

Kris Hern

WildTech Project Meeting

Edinburgh

Jen Spalton

Meeting for CKF Project Leaders

Nottingham

Jo Hardy

BIAZA Regional Meeting

Colchester Zoo

Jo Hardy, Sophie Stevens

Record Keepers Annual Conference

Marwell Zoo

Pat Milham

PA Network Training - Managing Your Boss

Twycross Zoo

Amy Hulse, Gemma Britton, Jen Spalton, Joanne Quimby, Kirsty Dunn, Louise Bhara, Nicola Barlow, Phillipa Weston, Samatha Lea, Sandra Cawthra

BIAZA MWG Meeting

Belfast Zoo

Jenny Meers, Neil Dorman

Nuffield Bursary Awards

Astra Zeneca, Loughborough

Jo Hardy

Conservation Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG) Annual Meeting

Cologne

Suzanne Boardman

World Association of Zoos and Aquaria (WAZA) Annual Conference

Cologne

Suzanne Boardman

Confederation of British Industry (CBI) Interim Meeting

Paget High School, Burton on Trent

Jo Hardy

BIAZA BWG Meeting

Bristol Zoo

Debra Bourne, Neil Dorman, Trevor Barrs

First Aid - Paediatric

Swadlincote

Linda Fisher

BIAZA Parliamentary Reception

The Terrace Pavilion, House of Commons, London

Suzanne Boardman

Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH)

Coventry

Jan Shakespeare

BIAZA Awards, Communication and Education (ACE) Conference

Paignton Zoo

Jo Hardy, Mary Rodger, Suzanne Boardman

BVZS Autumn Meeting

Dudley Zoo

Debra Bourne, Lesa Longley, Sharon Redrobe

Disease Invasion Workshop

ZSL London

Debra Bourne

Avian Egg Incubation Workshop

International Centre for Birds of Prey

Trevor Barrs

Association of British and Irish Animal Keepers (ABWAK) Council Meeting

Edinburgh

Sarah Roffe

Learning Outside the Classroom: Making it Happen Conference

Nottingham

Jo Hardy

Zoological Information Management System (ZIMS) Training

Twycross Zoo

Pat Milham

Veterinary Laboratories Agency (VLA) Conference

University of Warwick

Debra Bourne


External Representation and Presentation

Suzanne Boardman – Chief Executive l Visiting Lecturer, University of Nottingham School of Veterinary Medicine and Science l British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquaria (BIAZA) Veterinary Advisory Group – Member l BIAZA Council - Member l BIAZA Memberships and Licensing Committee - Member l Captive Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG) Species Survival Commission l IUCN – Member l European Association of Zoo and Wildlife Veterinarians (EAZWV) Infectious Diseases Working Group – Member l Hinckley and Bosworth Promotions Board, Leicestershire – Vice Chair l Frozen Ark – Trustee l Parliamentary and Scientific Committee – Member l Leicestershire Strategic Partnership – Board Member l Hinckley and Bosworth Tourism Partnership – Board Member l Hinckley and Bosworth Local Strategic Partnership – Board Member l World Association of Zoos and Aquaria (WAZA) – Member l Wildlife Information Network (WIN) – Scientific Advisor l Veterinary Advisory Group to the Federation of Zoological Gardens of Great Britain and Ireland - Member Neil Dorman – Curator l BIAZA Mammal Working Group – Carnivore Focus Group – Lead Chair l EEP (European Endangered Species Programme) Lowland Tapir Species Committee – Member l EEP Emperor Tamarin Species Committee – Member l EEP Bonobo Species Committee – Member l EEP Dhole Species Committee – Member l EEP Co-ordinator and International Studbook Keeper for Asiatic Lion l European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA) Felid Taxon Advisory Group (TAG) – Member l EEP Woolly Monkey Species Committee – Member l EEP Amur Leopard Species Committee – Member

Sharon Redrobe – Director of Life Sciences l Defra (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) Zoos Forum representing welfare - Member l Secretary of State-appointed Defra List 1 Zoo Inspector l Visiting Lecturer (MSc Wild Animal Health course), University of London l Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons Zoological Medicine Board - Member l BIAZA Veterinary Group - Member l Trustee of Ape Action Africa l Veterinary Advisor to the sandcat and white-faced saki EEPs l Veterinary advisor to the Cebid Taxonomy Advisory Group l Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine – Editorial Board Member Neil Woodward – Estates Manager l BIAZA Native Species Working Group – Member l BIAZA Plant Working Group – Member l EAZA Plant Working Group - Member l Royal Horticultural Society - Member l Gloucester Moth Group - Member l Bristol Natural History Society - Member l Carnivorous Plant Society - Member l International Carnivorous Plant Society - Member l Midlands Moth Group - Member

Publications Redrobe SP, Gakos G, Elliot SC, Saunders R, Martin S, Morgan ER (2010) Comparison of toltrazuril and sulphadimethoxine in the treatment of intestinal coccidiosis in pet rabbits. Veterinary Record 167:287-290 Masters N, Niphuis H, Verschoor E, Breuer J, Quinlivan M, Wawrzynczyk T, Stidworthy M (2010) Debilitating Clinical Disease in a Wild-Born Captive Western Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) Co-Infected with Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) and Simian T-Lymphotropic Virus (STLV). Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 41(4): 713-716.

Bridget Fry – Animal Health and Research Manager l EEP Studbook Co-ordinator for the siamang gibbon Jo Hardy – Acting Head of Education l BIAZA Education and Training Committee - Member Tom Proctor – Horticultural Supervisor l BIAZA Native Species Working Group - Member

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Staff List As of 31st December 2010 the Zoo employed the following 125 permanent staff. We also thank the many seasonal and casual workers who helped us during the year. Directors Paul Baxter Suzanne Boardman Rob Bracken Steve Bradbury Sharon Redrobe

Intrim Estates & Projects Director CEO Commercial Director Interim Resources Director Life Sciences Director

Commercial Charlotte Addison Nicola Barlow Mark Bishop Susan Bragington Mandy Colledge Lynne Cook Janet Finch Linda Fisher Alma Fox Hayley Freeman Gareth Harding Kirsty Hatton Amy Hulse Sylvia Jamieson Rachael Macklin Bhav Mistry Emma Nisbet Elizabeth Perry Mary Rodger Natasha Sampson Jan Shakespeare Amy Simcock Maureen Suttill Wes Sutton Glenda Thorpe Barbara Treadwell Dot Turner Helen Wallace Debby Walsh Laura Ward

Conference & Events Co-ordinator Administration Supervisor Team Leader, Little Explorers Team Leader Catering Manager Cook Retail Supervisor Senior Ranger Housekeeper Retail Assistant Sous Chef Admin/Sales Assistant PA to Commercial Director Retail & Gallery Manager Cook Design Officer Administration Assistant Senior Catering Sales Assistant Marketing Executive Cook Compliance Controller Graphic Designer Retail Assistant Guest Services Manager Cook Retail Assistant Senior Catering Sales Assistant Team Leader, Guest Services Team Leader Administration Assistant

Estates & Projects John Beddows

Carpenter & Maintenance Operative

Louise Bhara

Procurement Manager

Gemma Britton

Projects Administration Assistant

Richard Brownhill

Carpenter

Paul Burridge

Plant Driver

Sandra Cawthra

Projects Executive

Fred Chetwynd

Maintenance Operative

Paul Currall

Compound Operative

Adrian Dalton

Driver & Support Operative

Mick Deakin

Painter & Decorator

Mark Ellis

Maintenance Operative

Malcolm Eyre

Facilities Manager

Darren Kelly

Chief Electrician

Daniel Marshall

Electrician

William Millar

Maintenance Operative

Tom Proctor

Horticultural Supervisor

Paul Shepherd

Carpenter

John Thompson

Head Gardener

Neil Woodward

Estates Manager

Life Sciences

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Martin Allen

Animal Keeper

Marcus Barney

Animal Keeper

Lee Barnwell

Animal Keeper

Trevor Barrs

Deputy Section Head: Birds & Tropical

Susanne B채umler

Section Head: Elephants

Debbie Blount

Animal Keeper

Debra Bourne

Senior Veterinary Editor, Wildpro

Gina Boyt

Animal Keeper

April Bradley Helen Burton Dale Busby Sue Butcher Emma Chapman Tanya Clayton Greg Clifton Sally Coates Sophie Cooper Liz Cubberley Sarah Dee Neil Dorman Chris Dunn Carol Fleming Sue Fowmes Bridget Fry Ellie Goucher Joanna Hardy Luke Harvey Ashley Hereford Kris Hern Penny Hopwood Lily Hughes Amy Hughes Arun Idoe Martin Kristen Lisa Langston Keith Lloyd Lesa Longley Craig Lymm Rebecca MacCreath Charlotte Macdonald Jason Mann Rachel Marson Teresa Martin Jenny Meers Pat Milham Amy Moore

Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Deputy Section Head: Asian Apes Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Curator Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Section Head: Asian Apes Animal Health & Research Manager Animal Keeper Deputy Head of Education Deputy Section Head: Elephants Animal Keeper Animal Training Manager Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Acting Section Head: New World Primates Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Head of Veterinary Services Animal Keeper Animal Keeper General Curator Assistant Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Section Head: African Apes Section Head: Old World Primates Animal Records Registrar Education Officer

Rachel Pietragallo Leanne Porter Sean Reid Lorraine Ridsdill Sarah Roffe Nick Rowley Mel Shorthose Chris Simpson Emma Smith Donna Smithson Victoria Snook Rebecca Spalding Jeni Taylor Clare Waite Katie Waller Colin Ward Nikki Williscroft Jenny Wright

Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Section Head: Hooves & Carnivores Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Keeper Animal Manager Animal Keeper Animal Keeper

Resources Matt Allen Louise Andrews Karen Clarke Kirsty Dunn Sean Dunn Michelle Miller Tom Owen Joanne Quimby Jen Spalton Phillipa Weston

IT Assistant Senior Finance Assistant Human Resources Manager Administration Assistant Payroll & Accounts Administrator Senior Accounts Assistant Financial Controller PA to CEO Development Executive Human Resources Assistant


WIN Report

Wildlife Information Network (WIN) had an interesting year in 2010, specifically as the formalities of WIN subsuming in to the East Midland Zoological Society were finalised in April 2010. Although it was planned that the name and brand of WIN should be retained, in practical terms the software brand of Wildpro® Multimedia became clearly paramount. The slogan of Wildpro being “The power behind the worldwide dissemination of scientific and veterinary information” is now the mantra. During the year the scientists, led by Dr Debra Bourne, continued to research, collate and reference scientific information on our on-going projects. The two major modules that are taking priority are WildTech and Bonobos: Health and Management. WildTech is a four-year EU-funded project involving many collaborators both in the UK and Europe, with its main focus to collate information on particular emerging diseases within the European Union. This is a very important and prestigious project as the findings will be used throughout Europe and beyond, but may also open opportunities for further substantial funding in the future.

to attend a specific conference for that reason alone. An example being that I was invited by the Central Zoo Authority of India to attend a veterinary workshop in 2009, and this was followed by a further invitation in February 2010 to speak at another conference hosted by the Madras Veterinary School, Chennai, both of which proved very successful. Finally, I am pleased to report that we are making excellent progress in achieving our long-term goal of putting our information resource into the public domain. Going ‘open access’ has been in the forefront of our minds for a considerable time. We managed to go ‘semi-open access’ in 2008, whena thanks to clever software, we were able to let over 160 countries in the developing world, as identified by The World Bank, gain free access to the Wildpro Website. We are at the point that we can now go totally Open Access and it is only a matter of finalising a few details before we will announce to the world that Wildpro Multimedia is freely available to one and all - what an achievement, and my sincere thanks go to all of our researchers and IT specialists that have made this possible. Iain M W Boardman

The Bonobo project remit is to collate information on these fascinating primates, with a specific aim to consider aspects of communication. This project will inevitably lead to further research on all higher ranking primates, the great apes. This information will be invaluable to both the conservation and academic communities alike. Other projects that are on-going include: “Ferrets: Health and Management”; “Cranes: Health and Management”; “Snow Leopards: Health and Management”; and “Waders & Terns: Health and Management”. There is a strong case that we should consider taking on another researcher as, in addition to the above, a long-promised project for the zoo communities, “Environmental Enrichment”, remains outstanding. Besides research, WIN had representatives attending various conferences and meetings. Attending these scientific meetings is extremely important to WIN and Wildpro as it is here that we have a targeted audience where we raise awareness of the Wildpro information system and volumes that are currently available on-line, and we can also outline the projects that are classified as research in progress. We excel in giving informative papers and often we are asked

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Vision and Values

Vision At a time when the world’s flora and fauna are under such great pressure, TZEMZS is an organisation that cares and will strive to make a significant and meaningful difference. Within five years, we will be recognised as being one of the world’s top fifteen zoos for our contribution in the areas of: l Animal Welfare, Research, Conservation, Education and Sustainability: Sharing our learning on these topics using innovation in technology. l Best business practice: Being efficient, focussed and productive. With close attention paid to planning, ecologically sound design and environmental detail, we will be renowned within the region and country for delivering on market trend. l Outstanding “Value for Money” for all who visit us: Providing fun, entertainment, learning and above all an opportunity to engage and assist us in achieving our vision. A standard bearer of excellent customer service, we will always listen to our visitor feedback, responding and adapting accordingly. l Positive staff experience: We will be an employer of choice for the way we develop and care for our people and the opportunities we provide for them. Our first-class leadership will ensure a fully engaged and happy workforce. Values l Excellence by Design: Pursue excellence at all levels in leadership, planning, animal care and customer service by competing against the highest standards of performance worldwide. l Integrity with Passion: Communicate with honesty and openness. Display enthusiasm and integrity in all our dealings internally and externally. Make ethical decisions by having the courage of our convictions and being open to new ideas. l Financial Success: Generate a surplus in order to achieve our charitable aims by reducing waste, making efficient use of resources and maximising income streams. l Knowledge and Learning: Continuously develop and acquire skills, knowledge and qualifications whilst valuing knowledge and technical expertise in colleagues. Undertake cutting-edge research to make a difference in conservation and encourage innovation and willingness to question the status quo. l Empowerment and Accountability: Encourage individuals to take ownership of their own work by using a robust delegation process to allow people to realise their true and full potential. l Respecting and Caring: Show kindness, consideration and understanding of our colleagues, animals and visitors. Build trust regardless of differences. Care for our local and the world’s environments. Minimise our environmental footprint. Act altruistically and assist other organisations.

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Contacts

Founder Member S N Evans Members of the Council A D Conner BCom, FCA (Chairman) A P F Flint BSc, DSc, FIBiol, PhD (Vice-Chairman) D J Chivers MA, PhD, ScD R E Eifion-Jones A G Greenwood MA, VetMB, FIBiol, Dip ECAMS, FRCVS V J A Manton MBE, MRCVS, CBiol, FIBiol M-L Hughes PhD MBA C Clifford S Bell OBE CEO S I Boardman BVMS, MRCVS Commercial Director R Bracken Interim Resources Director S Bradbury Interim Estates and Projects Director P Baxter Life Sciences Director S Redrobe BSc(Hons) BVetMed CertLAS DZooMed MRCVS Registered Office Norton Grange Norton Juxta Twycross Near Atherstone Warwickshire CV9 3PX Telephone: 0844 4741777 Facsimilie: 0844 4741888 Website: www.twycrosszoo.org Company Registration Number: 1060856 (England) Registered Charity Number: 501841 Auditors Baker Tilly UK Audit LLP St Phillip’s Point, Temple Row, Birmingham, B2 5AF Bankers HSBC Bank Plc, Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands, B72 1PU

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Notes


“

I am very proud of our staff, trustees, advisors and supporters, whose hard work and commitment has made a busy and challenging year into a very successful one. Suzanne I Boardman BVMS MRCVS Chief Executive


“ “

2010 has been an award-winning year for Twycross Zoo.

Several new developments are in the pipeline for the coming years, including two exhibits which will provide not only state-of-the-art facilities for our animals but also rewarding experiences for visitors.

“ “

“During 2010, the Zoo welcomed 499,383 visitors”.

2010 saw the half a millionth child taught by Twycross Zoo’s education department.

Twycross Zoo - East Midland Zoological Society Burton Road (A444), Atherstone, Warwickshire, CV9 3PX Tel 0844 4741777 Fax 0844 4741888 info@twycrosszoo.org www.twycrosszoo.org Twycross Zoo - East Midland Zoological Society is a company limited by guarantee and registered in England and Wales as company number 1060956 and is a registered charity in England and Wales (charity number 501841) The Registered Office is at Twycross Zoo, Burton Road, Atherstone, Warwickshire CV9 3PX


Twycross Zoo Annual Report 2010