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OOSE RINTS

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Vol. 13 • Issue 5 • October 2015 Just Good News Since 1992

Direct mailed to the residents of Bridgton, Brownfield, Center Lovell, Denmark, Sweden, Lovell, Naples, Raymond, North Bridgton, Stow, Hiram, Porter, Casco, and South Casco

Maine’s largest direct mail community publication company serving nearly 250,000 homes and “It’s All Good” News! Turner Publishing Inc., PO Box 214, Turner, ME 04282 • 207-225-2076 • advertising@turnerpublishing.net • E-Mail: articles@turnerpublishing.net • Web: www.turnerpublishing.net

Oxford County Fair

Ben Reynolds of Weeks Mills, Maine guides Jerry and Charlie, a team from East Hampton, MA, in one of the Horse Pulling contests at the Oxford Fair. Their pull: 410’9” in the 3250 Elimination event. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)

Emily Billings, a Mountain Valley High School junior, trims the hooves of her 6 month old Market Lamb named “Ryder”. The Rumford native was showing at the Oxford County Fair, on her way to The Big E Market Lamb Show in Massachusetts. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)

Herb Gingras of Dover, New Hampshire begins first throw during the Oxford County Fair’s Woodsman Competition. The center of the target, which Gingras hit every time, has a can of soda waiting to be split. And it was! (Photo by Bill Van Tassel). More fair photos on page 2

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PSYCHIC/HEALING FAIR Sunday, November 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

at the Four Seasons Function Center, 187 Main St., South Paris Mediums * Pet Communication * Energy Healing * Crystals * Reflexology * Jewelry * Medical Intuitive * 3 D Aura Photography * Hypno Therapy * Ritual Items * Massage * Much More Admission: $5.00. Free workshops included with the price of admission to the fair. For more information visit www.soulintentions777.com or www.facebook.com/CommunityAwakeningHolisticFair


MOOSE PRINTS Page 2 www.centralmainetoday.com

Mary and Lavonne from Pennsylvania competed in several of the Woodsman Day women’s events. Inset shows the blade Lavonne would use in the Underhand Chop event. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)

October 2015

The 4-H Building was packed full with the many projects the Oxford County youth clubs had worked on. This table was prepared by the Beef and Sheep Club. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)

WE SALUTE OUR VETERANS

Throughout history, their hard work and sacri�ice have kept us safe and protected our freedom. We owe them a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid, and we salute them for their service. We would like you to share with our readers the Veterans that are near and dear to your heart. Fill out the form attached and mail it in along with a photo to Turner Publishing, Inc. at PO Box 214, Turner ME 04282-0214 or email info and photo to articles@turnerpublishing.net Photos will be published free of charge in November. Deadline for submissions is October 30, 2015. Please include self addressed envelope if you would like picture back.

Veterans Ad Form Mail this form to:

Kelli’s Sewing Studio

Veterans Ads - Turner Publishing P.O. Box 214 Turner, ME 04282

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Short Message

Ken Severy of Durham, Maine sees how fast he can cut off three slices with his super-powered chain saw. The saws in this Woodsman Day event run on specially refined fuel and move the chain about five time faster and louder than a normal chain saw. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)

Veteran’s Name Military Title Short message...

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“I opened my sewing business in September 2013 and tried a number of different advertising methods to reach out to potential customers. Of everything I tried, Turner Publishing has been the most successful at connecting me with my customer base and helping me build relationships with a local audience. For the �irst year I was in business, all my customers referenced the advertisement in the Country Courier for the place they found my information. Local advertising works! Kelli Burnham, owner, Kelli’s Sewing Studio

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Thank you very much Turner Publishing!!” The Most Affordable way to Reach your entire local market. Guaranteed! Contact Turner Publishing today 225-2076 advertising@turnerpublishing.net


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MOOSE PRINTS October 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

Business

Page 3

Business

Plan and grow your business with monthly Tips on various subjects such as Taxes, Human Resources, and Marketing.

Union Laws Apply to Non-Union Workplaces:

Non-solicitation and non-distribution policies even where there is no union Submitted by Rebecca Webber No union? Your business still needs to pay attention to the National Labor Relations Act. The issue getting a lot of attention is facebook messages and what can be done about them when employees slam their bosses or employer’s business but there are other issues too, and those apply to nonunionized workplaces as well as places with unions. The Supreme Court has long held that the right of employees to communicate with one another regarding self-organization at the job site is protected by Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act. Section 7 is the part of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) that gives employees the right to self-organization. This part of the NLRA applies to non-unionized workplaces as well as places with unions. Section 8 is the portion of the NLRA that makes it illegal to interfere with the rights set out in Section 7 and describes what are called “unfair labor practices.” Prohibiting union solicitation but allowing other types of solicitation would be called an unfair labor

practice. The right to communicate set out in Section 7 encompasses the right to distribute union literature. The Court has affirmed this right in a variety of settings. See, e.g., Beth Israel Hosp. v. NLRB, 437 U.S. 483, 507 (1978) (holding that a hospital violates Section 8(a)(1) by preventing an employee from distributing union materials “during nonworking time in nonworking areas, where the facility has not justified the prohibition as necessary to avoid disruption of health-care operations or disturbance of the patients”). Limits on distribution policies apply to email as well. An employer may not single out union-related messages for harsher treatment, whether explicitly in its policy or by enforcing a policy only against union communications. For example, if an employer allows employees to send personal messages using company email, it must allow them to send union-related email messages. Similarly, an employer that allows employees to solicit coworkers on behalf of various organizations may not prohibit messages solicit-

ing on behalf of a union. Limits imposed with a union in mind will need to be evaluated in terms of all the non-union solicitation and distribution that often takes place in any workplace. For example, as one court noted, the employer, a hospital, “had permitted use of the cafeteria for other types of solicitation, including fund drives, which, if not to be equated with union solicitation in terms of potential for generating controversy, at least indicates that the hospital regarded the cafeteria as sufficiently commodious to admit solicitation and distribution without disruption.” Beth Israel Hosp. v. N.L.R.B., 437 U.S. at 502-03. The Court did acknowledge that union activity was recognized as possibly generating behavior that was “undesirable in the hospital's cafeteria,” but held that there were “less restrictive means of regulating organizational activity” that were more focused on the precise harm to be avoided. In other words, if the concern is noise, limit noise, but not all union gatherings; if the concern is crowding, limit meetings to less crowded times rather than impose a

blanket prohibition. In another case, the employer allowed a wide variety of solicitations – without discipline – including solicitations at work stations for Girl Scout cookies, ‘beach balm’ suntan lotion, March of Dimes, United Way, Secretary’s Day, and Boss’ Day, and ‘going away’ parties, birthday parties, and other social occasions. In addition, conversation was not limited to just work but included a wide range of subjects unrelated to work, with no resultant counseling. In contrast, an employee soliciting on behalf of a union was disciplined for both discussing and soliciting the signing of a union card. That employer was found in violation of the NLRA. Guidelines: 1. Don’t wait and update/revise/review policies until after union activity has already begun. 2. Decide what the harms are that the policy is intended to prevent: disruption of customer service? Customers seeing disturbing information? Noise? Crowding? Distraction during working times as opposed to breaks or off duty periods? Don’t

suddenly have a concern about noise, though, for example, just at the same time someone first posts a piece of union literature on a bulletin board. 3. Draft a policy that is focused on doing just what is necessary to accomplish those goals and address the identified concerns. 4. Don’t have a policy that allows unlimited exceptions so long as approved by someone in management. 5. Don’t have a policy that forbids union activity, or that is used to discipline an employee for union activity, when other solicitation activity is allowed. 6. Don’t have an access policy that forbids solicitation and distribution in areas where non-union solicitations and distributions have taken place in the past. 7. Do have a policy that limits access solely with respect to the interior of the facility and other working areas; “mixed use” areas or areas that have been used for solicitation in non-union activities cannot be limited in terms of the content of the use by employees and discussion allowed. 8. Do disseminate the

policy to all employees, not just the ones engaging in activities associated with unions. 9. Do have a policy that applies to off-duty employees seeking access to the facility for any purpose (or base the limits on criteria like location and whether interfering with customer service). You can have exceptions that allow access by employees in their capacity not as employees but as customers/patients/visitors themselves with that access simply requiring that employees in those capacities follow the same rules as any other customer/patient/visitor. This article is not legal advice but should be considered as general guidance in the area of employment and corporate law. Rebecca Webber is an employment attorney; others at the firm handle business and other matters. You can contact us at 784-3200 (telephone). Skelton, Taintor & Abbott is a full service law firm providing legal services to individuals, companies, and municipalities throughout Maine. It has been in operation since its founding in 1853. n

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MOOSE PRINTS Page 4 www.centralmainetoday.com John McDonald

The flow of e-mails over the transom here at Storyteller Central has slowed a bit now that our summer visitors‚ (sometimes known affectionately in town as “summer complaints) have packed up and gone home. But people from away are still sending e-mails to me, hoping get answers to one question or another. For example Peter from Virginia e-mailed:

“John, We’ve been staying a few weeks in a nice cottage on the grounds of a resort on the coast. While here we first want you to know how much we enjoyed reading your column in the weekly newspaper. After reading a few of your pieces we thought you’d probably be able to answer a question for us. Several tourist brochures we’ve seen boast that Maine is a four-

season resort‚ yet people we’ve met and talked to, people who live here year-round chuckle, at the idea. Who’s right? Is Maine a four-season resort or isn’t it?” Thanks for the e-mail Peter. I think I’ve seen some of those brochures that boast of our mythical four seasons‚ but after living year-round in Maine for as long as I have I only wonder where these people

Brownfield Lions Halloween Dance The dance will be held on October 31st, 2015 at the Brownfield Lions Den on rtes. 5&113 in Brownfield, ME for adults 21 & older from

8 P.M.-12 A.M. with music by “Hurricane Mountain” band with a country western style. Admission is $15.00/ person and our dances

are B.Y.O.B. Proceeds to benefit Brownfield Lions Community Projects Fund. Costumes are optional for this dance. n

Do You Sudoku

October 2015

Email Flows learned to count. Here in the USA we have freedom of speech and that freedom even extends to our tourist promotion people. You can say - for tourist promotion purposes - that Maine has four seasons. But in fairness you should quickly mention that it is possible to get snowed on in at least three maybe even four of thoe seasons. Then, of course, there’s “mud season,” for which no use has yet to be found. I can hear some of you now: “John, are you serious? Snow in four out of four seasons?” Listen, here in Maine many of us haven’t trusted the weather ever since the infamous winter of 1816, a year still known in these parts as “The year without a summer.” “Are you serious, John, 1816? It’s time to give it a rest - 1816 was over 185 years ago!” I hear some of you saying. Yes it was a while ago, but some of us still enjoy talking about it Here in Maine we learn in history about the year 1816 and how here in

the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada there was a killing frost and bad snow storms in all twelve months. Trying to explain the abnormal weather some quacks‚ of the time - yes, they had quacks back then, too - tried to blame the cold weather on poor Ben Franklin and his slick new invention, the lightening rod, that was being installed on top of barns and houses all over the place. As these quacks saw it, lightening was made up of intense heat, Ben’s new invention was interfering with the life of lightening, therefore Ben and Ben alone was most likely responsible for all the heat being lost. Later, when we learned a little more about this crazy planet, it was thought that the cold weather - more than likely - was caused by a number of large volcanic eruptions that occurred on the other side of the world in 1814-1815 in places like the Philippines and Indonesia. I know it’s a long-

winded answer to a simple question, Peter, but sometimes there’s no way around it. In a related e-mail, Will from Newport writes: “John, we’ve just retired to Maine and will be spending our first fall here. What do people around here do in the fall?” Thanks for the e-mail, Will. Most new arrivals like you spend a lot of time in early fall wondering things like: What ever happened to summer? Once you’ve more or less dealt with that question you can get down to doing what you probably should have been doing in the first place: Wondering if you’ve done everything necessary to get ready for winter, which is bearing down on our state like a runaway freight train. Hope you have a nice fall and are all ready when the first snow arrives, which will most likely be sooner than we think. n

“Spooktacular” Saturday Night Supper It’s the annual scrumptious and “Spooktacular” Saturday Night Supper at the Casco Village Church United Church of Christ, 941 Meadow Road (Route 121) in Casco! Join us on Saturday, October 24th from 5 to 6 p.m. Dress in

costume and get a treat! (It’ll be a good dress rehearsal for Halloween!) Grand Prize of a gift basket for best adult costume – fun prize for best kid’s costume! It’s all for only $8 adults and $5 children under 8; $21 max for fam-

ilies with young children – and that includes ghostly grog, coffee cauldron & bat-wing bread! Don’t be a scaredy cat. . . join us for the best Saturday Night Supper in the area, & that’s no trick, only treat! n

Veterans Day Dinner The volunteers of the Bridgton Community Center will be hosting a complimentary Veterans Day Dinner to be held at the dining hall of Oriental Masonic Lodge, Route 117, Harrison Road,

Bridgton on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 at 12:00 PM. All veterans and their families are cordially invited to join in a time of feasting (Ham Dinner with all the fixings) and

fellowship as we honor all who have served in our country’s Armed Forces. Please plan to come and connect with old friends and create new ones. FMI call 6473116. n

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MOOSE PRINTS October 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

Page 5

Nutrition Advice for Those With Lyme Disease Jodi Cornelio

Lyme disease – Proper Nutrition Can Help You Feel Better We have all heard the horror story of Lyme disease and hopefully we are all taking preventative precautions to avoid ticks. If you have had an unfortunate run in with a tick and have be affected by this disease there are specific nutritional precautions that you can take to help you feel better and protect and enhance your immune system. Simply put, Lyme disease is a bacterium that impacts your immune system, if caught early enough it can be destroyed with antibiotics and proper nutrition can help. Here are some simple nutrition steps to focus on if diagnosed with Lyme disease. Avoid the following

foods: Glutens – Some bacteria thrive on glutens. Gluten is found in wheat, rye, barley, some processed oats and any food made with these grains. Wheat-based flours, pasta, couscous, bread, flour tortillas, muffins, cereal, crackers, beer, some oats and most pastries commonly contain gluten. Some unexpected foods containing gluten are broths, can soups, bouillon cubes, breadcrumbs, croutons, fried foods, imitation fish, lunch meats, hot dogs, malt, matzo, modified food starch, some seasonings, some salad dressing, soy sauce, pasta. There are many additives that have gluten in them as well. Beware of sauces, gravies and seasoned products and basically foods that are in cans or packages. It is always beneficial to check the label or ingredient list on foods before eating them. The label “wheat-free” does not always mean that the

foods are gluten free. If there are any concerns or questions, contact the manufacturer to be positive that there is no gluten in the food items.

wise choices and, our bodies were not designed to digest these types of manufactured products. Dairy products – Milk

lus and no sugar added. Beware that calcium and lactose bind with the antibiotic making it less effective so you may choose to stay on the

While pure oats are gluten free, many commercially processed oats have been contaminated by wheat products containing gluten. It is often recommended to avoid oats if gluten-free eating is required. Sugars – minimize or avoid sugars especially if on an antibiotic drug. Sugars can hurt good bacteria’s in the body and breed bad bacteria’s. When reading food labels look for words ending in OSE such as sucralose and high fructose corn syrup. Avoid artificial sweeteners as they are just plain not

and cheeses and yogurt contain lactose and some bacteria thrive on that too. If taking an antibiotic the calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc found in these foods and in calcium enrich juices and vitamins can bind to the antibiotic and make it less effective. Read the label or ask your pharmacist for a list when in doubt. Yogurt can fool us. When on an antibiotic we are coached to eat yogurt to avoid yeast infections or other digestive upsets. Make sure it has active digestive cultures such as Acidophi-

safe side and take an acidophilus supplement or a pro-biotic supplement that contains 10 – 25 billion CFU s. Alcohol – A drink a day or one glass of wine may be good for the heart and I hate to be the barer of bad news but the fact is alcohol is converted to sugar in the body and it simply not good at building the immune system in this case. Do’s Now that I have taken all the fun out of foods, what can you eat? The answer is. You can eat whole foods in their nat-

Cabaret “Fall Feast and Fun”

Faith Lutheran Church’s 6th Annual CABARET “FALL FEAST AND FUN” 5:00 pm on October 24,

2015 @ Faith Lutheran Church 988 Roosevelt Trail, Windham. Dinner & Music will follow. We have 80 tickets available

so don’t delay, call now to reserve yours. Call 207648-4329 or 207- 8299158. Adults: $15.00 and Children: $10.00. n

Windham Hill UCC Holiday Fair

Windham Hill UCC Holiday Fair. 140 Windham Center Rd., Windham, ME. Saturday, Nov. 7th, 9:00 to 3:00. Fair sponsored by Women’s Fellowship n

Casco Calendar The following meetings and events have been announed in Casco: Thursday, November 5: Conservation Commission meeting, 6:30pm, at the Casco Library. Open to public. Monday, November 9: Planning Board meeting, 7pm, at the Casco Community Center. Open to

public. Tuesday, November 10: Selectboard meeting, 6:30pm, at the Casco Community Center. Open to public. Wednesday, November 11: Casco Town Office Closed for Veteran’s Day. Monday, November 16: Zoning Board of Appeals meeting, Casco Communi-

ty Center. Open to public. Monday, November 16: Open Space Commission meeting, 6:30pm, at the Casco Community Center. Open to public. Selectboard meeting dates: November 10th and December 8th. Town of Casco, 6274515, www.cascomaine. org. n

WE WANT YOUR GOOD NEWS! articles@turnerpublishing.net

ural state. Prepare your own food as much as possible. Fresh or frozen vegetables, all meats and good fats like olive oil. Examples of foods to eat are; beans, seeds and nuts in their natural, unprocessed form, fresh eggs, fresh red meats, fish and poultry (not breaded, batter-coated or marinated), all fruits and vegetables. Gluten free flours are; Amaranth, Arrowroot, Buckwheat, Corn and cornmeal, Flax, Rice flour, Potato flour, Hominy, Millet, Quinoa. And as always get plenty of rest, drink plenty of water, exercise everyday moderately and try to avoid stress. Yoga is a good outlet and great for the nervous and immune system. Live Long, Live well. For additional reading and references see: CDC.org, Mainelyme. org, Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons, Vol 14, number 3 Fall 2009., The Lyme Diet by Dr Nicola McFadzean ND. n

Named Turner Business of the Year 2013 by the Androscoggin County Chamber A Product of

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Maine’s largest direct mail community publication company serving nearly 250,000 homes and “It’s All Good” News!

Directly mailed to the Residents of Bridgton, Browneld, Center Lovell, Denmark, Sweden, Fryeburg, Lovell, Naples, Raymond, North Bridgton, Stow, Hiram, Porter, Casco, and South Casco Turner Publishing Inc., PO Box 214, Turner, ME 04282 • 207-225-2076 • Fax: 207-225-5333 • E-Mail: articles@turnerpublishing.net • Web: www.turnerpublishing.net

CEO/Publisher Jodi Cornelio Operations Manager Dede Libby

Senior Designer Michelle Pushard Designer Danielle Pushard Ofϐice/Billing Tom Tardif

Advertising Dede Libby Betsy Brown Michelle Gosselin George McGregor

Writer/Photographer Bill Van Tassel Proof Reader Hal Small

Moose Prints is published by Turner Publishing Inc., P.O. Box 214, Turner, ME 04282-0214. Advertisers and those wishing to submit articles of interest can call, 1-800-400-4076 (within the state of Maine only) or 1-207-225-2076 or fax us at 1-207-225-5333; you can also send e-mail to us at: articles@turnerpublishing.net. Any views expressed within this paper do not necessarily reect those of this paper. This paper assumes no responsibility for typographical errors that may occur, but will reprint, at no additional cost, that part of any advertisement in which the error occurs before the next issue’s deadline. This paper also reserves the right to edit stories and articles submitted for publication. This paper is mailed on a monthly basis, FREE to all postal patrons of Bridgton, Browneld, Center Lovell, Denmark, Fryeburg, Naples, N. Bridgton, Hiram, Casco, S. Casco, Porter, Raymond, Lovell, Sweden, Stow.Founded by Steven Cornelio in 1992.


MOOSE PRINTS Page 6 www.centralmainetoday.com

October 2015

The Healthy Geezer

By Fred Cicetti Q. I’ve been seeing lots of references about “restless legs syndrome.� I’ve never heard of this condition. Is it rare? Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) affects about one in ten adults in North America and Europe. RLS is found in both men and women but can begin in children. The percentage of people with RLS increases with age. And, seniors experience symptoms longer and more frequently. Many researchers believe that RLS is underreported. Victims of RLS are often diagnosed as suffering from insomnia, depression or a disorder

of the nerves, muscles or skeleton. RLS is a neurologic movement disorder. It produces uncomfortable sensations that cause an irresistible urge to move the legs. RLS symptoms can be relieved temporarily by movement. Symptoms occur during inactivity and strike most

frequently during the evening. These attacks lead to sleep problems. The Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation says there must be five essential features present for a diagnosis of restless legs syndrome: * You have a strong urge to move your legs (sometimes arms and

Ballroom & Latin Dance

New Sessions Start Tuesday, November 17 *Group Classes *Private Lessons *Wedding Preparation *Parties

trunk), usually accompanied or caused by uncomfortable and unpleasant sensations in the legs. * Your symptoms begin or become worse when you are resting or inactive, such as when lying down or sitting. * Your symptoms get better when you move,

such as when you walk or stretch, at least as long as the activity continues. * Your symptoms are worse in the evening or night than during the day, or only occur in the evening or nighttime hours. * Your symptoms are not solely accounted for by another condition such as leg cramps, positional discomfort, leg swelling or arthritis. RLS may be inherited. About half of patients have a family history of the RLS. Also, there is a lower incidence of RLS in Asia than there is in North America and Europe. There are two forms of RLS—primary and secondary. Primary RLS is unrelated to other disorders; its cause is unknown. Secondary RLS can be brought on by kidney failure, pregnancy, iron deficiency anemia, or some medications. Research has shown that there is a relationship

between RLS and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Most people with RLS also have periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), which causes leg twitching or jerking movements during sleep. There are drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat RLS. These include MirapexÂŽ, RequipÂŽ and NeuproÂŽ. There are also several drugs approved for other conditions that help alleviate RLS symptoms. It is possible to combat the symptoms in other ways. Walking, massage, stretching, hot or cold baths, vibration, acupressure, meditation and yoga can help. Caffeine and alcohol can worsen RLS symptoms. If you would like to ask a question, write to fred@healthygeezer. com. n

Reader Recipe of the Month

Buffalo Chicken/Cheese Fries • 2 Lbs Frozen French Fries (cooked) • 10 oz Frozen Chicken Tenders, cooked and chopped, bite size pieces

       

• 8oz shredded Cheddar Cheese • 8oz shredded Mozzarella Cheese

         

Add a taste of authentic Maine humor to your next banquet, luncheon, conference, convention or company get together. Contact humorist and bestselling Maine author John McDonald

NOW BOOKING FOR FALL AND WINTER Call: 207.899.1868

Email: mainestoryteller@yahoo.com

Preheat oven to 350Âş. On a baking sheet combine fries and chicken. Cover with the cheddar and Mozzarella. Bake 5 minutes, till cheese completely melted. Top with dressing and wing sauce. Serves 4-6. From Stacy Hustus of Farmingdale

• 8oz Blue Cheese dressing • 8oz Buffalo wing sauce, such as Franks Red Hot.

Scam Alert Bulletin Board Did you know? A new law can help protect your identity. A security freeze safeguards a person’s credit report and it is one of the most effective ways to protect consumers from identity theft. Without access to this sensitive information, an identity thief is

unable to obtain credit in that person’s name, thereby greatly minimizing the potential damage from the theft. Once the freeze is in place, the consumer has control over who can receive their credit report. As of October 15th, Maine consumers can freeze and unfreeze their credit reports as needed through a unique Personal Identification Number (PIN) at no cost. For any questions or concerns regarding the Security Freeze, you can

contact the Maine Attorney General at (207) 6268800. Be a fraud fighter! If you can spot a scam, you can stop a scam. Contact local law enforcement or the AARP Fraud Watch Network w w w. a a r p . o rg / f r a u d watchnetwork or 1-877908-3360 to report a scam or for more information on scam and fraud prevention. Social Media Post Link: http://wp.me/p2ZEti-ls1. 

Send us photos of your littlest Moose Prints Reader!

articles@turnerpublishing.net


MOOSE PRINTS October 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

Page 7

Grouse Days

V. Paul Reynolds Ahhh, October. Frosty mornings and flaming foliage. Grouse days are upon us. In Maine, next to whitetail deer, there is no other game species that draws as much attention in autumn from hunters, residents and nonresidents alike. Deservedly. Can you think of any other game bird that so challenges a gun dog and a shooter? The bird man himself, John James Audubon, held the grouse-asgame-bird in reverence: “Sometimes, when these birds are found on the side of a steep hill, the moment they start, they dive towards the foot of the declivity, take a turn, and fly off in a direction so different from the one ex-

pected, that unless the sportsman is aware of the trick, he may not see them again that day.” There can be no doubt, either, that our fondness for this fall game bird has something to do with its sweet flesh. They eat well.There is only one way to prepare and cook grouse, no matter what you hear or read in cook books. Cut up the breast in strips a half inch thick. Lightly sautee them in an iron skillet with butter and garnish with a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Don’t overcook. Sportsmen have been known to parboil a partridge breast in a bean pot or smother the overcooked breast with a creamy sherry sauce. This is a sacrilege, a culinary crime of the first order. Drown a woodcock breast in the bean pot if you must, but grouse richly deserve the respect reflected in the cooking adage that less is more. There is an additional reason why the grouse

was standing motionless. The white fan of his tail was lifted a little and his backline was level, the neck craned forward, one foreleg cocked. His flanks were trembling with the nearness of the grouse, and a thin skein of drool hung from his jowels. The dog did not move as he approached, but the brown eyes rolled back until their whites showed, looking for him. “Steady boy,” he called. His throat was tight , the way it always got when Shad was on point, and he had to swallow hard. “Steady, I’m coming.” This time of year, especially this time of year, memories of my “Shad” - a soft-haired English Setter named Sally of Seboeis - take up residence in my daydreams. She was far from a “finished” gun dog, but she wanted to please and took to the hunt with enthusiasm and energy. As a youngster she launched her gundog career at

is the hallowed game bird, why the hunt for ruffed grouse has been the subject of so much attention over the years from sporting artists and legendary outdoor writers. It is the time of year, October, when fall foliage is a feast for the eyes and the air is clear and cool in popple swamps and alder swales. Then there is, for many of us, the main reason to be there picking our way through the thornapples, alder tangles and wire birches, the gun dog: the Setters, the Pointers, the Britts and the German Short Hairs. It is a rare upland bird hunter who doesn’t nurture and treasure a special relationship with his gun dog. Legendary grouse writer Corey Ford captures man’s romance with his gun dog in “The Road to Tinkhamtown. The old man in the story spends his final hours reliving his days in the grouse covers with his beloved Shad. “...Shad

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Sally of Seboeis as a pup with me at camp, circa 2000. a wonderful pheas- your favorite gun dog ant preserve in New can’t be with you. The author is editor of Brunswick and, later, the cornfields of South the Northwoods SportDakota. Regrettably ing Journal. He is also a now, we didn’t hunt Maine Guide, co-host of her as much as she de- a weekly radio program served, but there were “Maine Outdoors.” His some wonderful days e-mail address is paul@ in Maine woodcock and sportingjournal.com . He has two books “A grouse covers. Grouse days are al- Maine Deer Hunter’s ways good, but never Logbook” and his latquite the same when est, “Backtrack.” n

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October 2015

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Page 9

Have a Happy, Healthy & Safe Halloween! Follow these simple tips to keep little ghouls and goblins out of harm’s way on Halloween.

KIDS

• Never trick-or-treat alone. Walk with a group or trusted adult. • Walk from house to house, and look both ways before crossing the street. Don’t run, and use sidewalks and crosswalks wherever possible. • Put reflective tape on your costume or treat bag to make sure drivers can see you in the dark, and carry a flashlight with you. • Examine all of your treats to make sure they are safe and sealed before eating them. • Don’t wear loose costumes or shoes that may cause you to trip, and use nontoxic makeup instead of a mask to make sure you can see clearly. • Make sure costume accessories such as swords or knives are short, soft and flexible. • Don’t approach dark houses when trick-or-treating, and never go inside a stranger’s house. • Don’t approach pets while wearing a Halloween costume. They may not recognize you.

PARENTS • Provide healthier options for trick-or-treaters like low-calorie or low-sugar treats or nonedible items like stickers, erasers, pencils or small toys. • Keep candlelit pumpkins and luminaries away from walkways and doorsteps, and never leave them unattended. • Slow down and be on the lookout for trick-or-treaters when driving. • Never let kids trick-or-treat alone. Go with them if they are under age 12, and make sure older children are with a group of trusted friends. Go over the planned trick-or-treat route with your child, and be sure to set a curfew. • Make sure your porch and walkway are well-lit, and move any potential tripping hazards out of the path of trick-or treaters. • Keep family pets away from trick-or-treaters,even if they are friendly. • Limit the amount of candy your kids eat each day, and encourage them to give away excess candy.

Halloween Coloring Contest Sponsored By Sp

Each Winner Chosen will WIN a 4 pack of Movie Tickets

courtesy of Smitty’s Cinema Mail this to P.O. Box 214 Turner, ME 04282 For a Chance to Win!

Name: Address: City: Email Address:

State: Phone: (

Age:

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MOOSE PRINTS Page 10 www.centralmainetoday.com

October 2015

Genealogy Tourism Becoming Increasingly Popular

By Victor Block Planning a visit to Poland, where his ancestors had lived, Bernard Janicki went online and tracked down the parish priest in the village where his mother had been born. When he arrived, the pastor helped him find church records that traced his grandfather’s lineage to 1819, and the maternal side of his family back to 1751. Thus he became one of an increasing number of people who have made genealogy tourism – combining travel with research to trace their family roots -- one of the fastest growing segments of the tourism industry. The wealth of information available online is a good place to begin a trip down memory lane. A few strokes on a computer keyboard can unearth census records, ship passenger lists, immigration documents and a treasure trove of other data. The National Archives contains a mother lode of information. The Family History Center of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the world’s largest depository, with records from over 100 countries. Ancestry.com, which claims the title of world’s largest online resource for family history information, includes billions of historical records on its websites. But no amount of knowledge can compete with the thrill of making personal contact with relatives you might not have known exist, or visiting places where your forebears lived and your family roots were planted. Tour companies offer both organized group trips and individual visits to states and countries where birth, marriage, death and other sources of

A couple from Los Angeles on an Ancestral Footsteps tour explores the woods in France where the wife’s grandfather fought the Germans during World War II.

A woman on a Family Tree tour trip at the Baptismal Font in the church that her ancestors attended.

School children in Belarus welcome members of a family on an Ancestral Footsteps tour to their ancestral village with a gift of traditional bread.

information await discovery. There even are genealogy cruises for people who prefer to combine a learning experience with the opportunity to take to the high seas. Family Tree Tours takes small groups of travelers to Germany, Poland and Ireland. The company obtains research information from tour members in advance, which is forwarded to researchers on the scene who make contacts and arrange meetings in each family’s village. For more information log onto familytreetours.com. Several firms arrange visits to Salt Lake City, where participants have

access to the voluminous records available at the Family History Center. When not pouring over records or seated before a computer, roots researchers spend free time enjoying extra-curricular activities like attending a rehearsal of the worldfamous Mormon Tabernacle Choir and touring the magnificent Temple Square Garden, which sprawls across 35 acres. Among tour companies that offer research visits to Salt Lake City are Ancestor Seekers (ancestorseekers.com) and AnnMar Genealogy Trips (genealogytrips.com). The ancestraltravel. net website offers an in-

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ternational inventory of genealogy research tour providers. Another must-see website is cyndislist.com, a free categorized and cross-referenced list of more than 335,000 links to helpful resources. Categories include localities, ethnic groups, religions and more. This can help people planning a trip to locate archives, court houses, cemeteries and other places where they can seek family history information before they leave home. Those seeking the ultimate in a personalized tour may find what they’re looking for at www.ancestralfootsteps. com. A researcher accompanies clients throughout their journey to places where their ancestors lived, attended school, worked and worshipped. Its luxury offerings might even include travel by private jet and a chauf-

S

feur-driven car. Roots researchers who prefer to combine the pleasures of a cruise with their family exploration also can find inviting alternatives. For example, Legacy Family Tree cruises combine daily genealogy classes taught by experts in the field with itineraries that range from the Caribbean and Panama Canal to Alaska and Australia. When not getting valuable information and assistance relating to their family history hunt, passengers can enjoy the usual cruise ship amenities and activities, plus some surprises like an ice skating rink, miniature golf and classes in wine tasting, jewelry making and other pursuits. For more information, log onto legacyfamilytree. com. People who sign up with Cruise Everything for a genealogy voyage get to help plan the subjects that experts in the field will discuss. Passengers receive a questionnaire several months in advance that allows the speakers to cover the topics of greatest interest. Their presentations in-

clude information about using the Internet for research, photography and sources of helpful records. Participants also may arrange a private appointment with a presenter to get personal assistance. The January 16-23, 2016 cruise will visit several Caribbean destinations, with shore excursions available for those who wish to explore them. For more information log onto cecruisegroups.com. Enjoying a Caribbean cruise may seem to have little in common with searching for one’s ancestral links. It’s but one of a variety of opportunities for those seeking to combine a love of travel with the chance to add branches to the family tree. Victor Block is an award-winning travel journalist who lives in Washington, D.C., and spends summers in Rangeley, Maine. He is a guidebook author who has traveled to more than 70 countries. His articles appear in newspapers around the country, and on travel websites. n

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MOOSE PRINTS October 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

Page 11

CLUES ACROSS 1. Angling worm 5. Tissue that conducts food in plants 11. 1937 Steinbeck novella 14. Feed storehouse 15. Raised pattern cotton cloth 18. Prophetic signs 19. Cowboy competitions 21. Ophthalmic products company, ______ Worldwide 23. Prefix meaning inside 24. Arousing or provoking laughter 28. Plant spike 29. Atomic #94 30. Himalayan goat 32. Patti Hearst’s captors 33. Rock TV channel 35. Pen point 36. Tiny bite 39. Organized work group 41. Atomic #58 42. Food fish of the genus Alosa 44. Fleshy slice of meat 46. Shallowest Great

Lake 47. Tapered tucks 51. Winter muskmelon 54. Isaac’s mother 56. Picasso’s birth place 58. Lowest hereditary title 60. Streisand/Reford film 62. Verb states 63. Soluble ribonucleic acid CLUES DOWN 1. Sink in 2. Hairdo 3. Muslim leaders 4. Ringworm 5. Oppresses or maltreats 6. Cut fodder 7. Natural logarithm 8. Not divisible by two 9. Independent Islamic ruler 10. Written proposal or reminder 12. Tilt or slant 13. Nests of pheasants 16. Portable shelters 17. Swiss singing 20. Body of an organism

22. Opposite of “yes� 25. 41st state 26. 007’s Fleming 27. They speak Muskhogean 29. Payment (abbr.) 31. “Spud Papers� author’s initials 34. Large vessel for holding liquids 36. Nanosecond (abbr.) 37. Worn to Mecca 38. 1/100 rupee 40. Of I 43. Distributed cards 45. Public promotion of a product 48. Hard to find 49. Thinks or supposes 50. More lucid 52. Thai monetary unit 53. Phil __, CIA Diary author 55. Dialect variant of “heron� 57. One of the tender bristles in some grasses 58. Pass 59. Hot or iced brewed beverage 61. Equally

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, you may prefer to be in control of your fate, but you may have to relinquish some control to someone else for the time being. It can be an eyeopening situation. TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, you have high hopes of solidifying a relationship this week and things will go according to plan so long as you stay focused. Enjoy the fruits of your labors. GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, some interesting things unfold at the office this week. Your hard work and ability to keep a cool head will prevail, and others will notice. CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 You’re ready for fun and games even before the weekend arrives, Cancer. You may start daydreaming about all the plans to make. Just don’t let it distract you. LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, a particular situation will take up much of your time this week, even into the weekend. You may have to postpone some of your plans for a later date. VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Focus your attention on maintaining a healthy perspective on information that comes your way, Virgo. A new perspective might be just what you need to sort this situation out. LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, good things are ahead in the weeks to come. Both your personal and professional lives are about to take a turn for the better, and you deserve these positive developments.

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, insecurities can hinder your plans this week. Think positively and you can accomplish whatever comes your way. Lean on a friend or two if need be. SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, enjoy the company of others this week. Spend time with your friends and family and don’t be afraid to try new things. Fun times are ahead. CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, the more you can focus on the tasks at hand, the faster you will accomplish each of your goals. Procrastination has no place in your week right now. AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 You thrive on mental puzzles and complex concepts, Aquarius. So you’re ready to tackle whatever gets thrown your way this week. Challenges are your strong suit. PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 Carve out some time for going over your finances, Pisces. You may have some opportunites coming your way, and you want your finances in order.

Tree Talk • Tips from an Arborist • By Robert Fogg

Trees and Fresh Air

Every day, huge amounts of carbon, in the form of CO2, are released into the atmosphere. The cars we drive, heating and cooling our homes, even naturally rotting vegetation releases carbon into the atmosphere. There is some concern that too much CO2 in the

atmosphere is warming our planet, creating a greenhouse effect. The good news is that we have trees on our side. Trees absorb CO2 and release oxygen. They also cool the earth and help filter out contaminants. Trees have a lot to do with the clean air we breathe ev-

ery day. So, next time you take a breath of nice clean fresh air, thank a tree. The author is general manager of Q-Team Tree Service in Naples and is also a licensed Arborist. He can be reached at RobertFogg@Q-Team.com or 207-693-3831.

OCTOBER 25 Katy Perry, Singer (31) OCTOBER 26 Keith Urban, Singer (48) OCTOBER 27 Simon LeBon, Singer (56) OCTOBER 28 Julia Roberts, Actress (48)

  

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MOOSE PRINTS Page 12 www.centralmainetoday.com

October 2015

November at the Raymond Village Library At a Glance Tuesday, November 3: Election Day - Remember to Vote. Wednesday, November 4: LEGO Club for ages 6 and up, 3:30 to 4:30pm Wednesday, November 4: Lisa Luken presents “6 Steps to Simple”, 6:30pm Saturday, November 14: Gift Basket Making at the library 10:00am to 3:00pm Sunday, November 15: Gift Basket Sale begins 10:00am at the library Monday, November 16: Trustee Meeting at 6:00pm Thursday, November 19: Lawyer at the Library from 6:00pm to 7:00pm Thursday, November 19: Recycle old books to Christmas Ornaments, 6:30pm Thursday, November 19: Book Group, 7:00pm at the library Sunday, November 29: Annual Tree Lighting at the library at 5:00pm Election Day We encourage all residents of Raymond to ex-

ercise their right and privilege to vote. As you leave the polls, be sure to check out the library trifold to see what your Raymond Village Library can offer and help yourself to a free book. LEGO Club Students, ages 6 and up, are invited to join us at the monthly LEGO Club, beginning Wednesday, November 4, and continuing the first Wednesday of each month from 3:30pm to 4:30pm. We will supply the space and the LEGOS. Kids just need to come with their ideas and imaginations. 6 Steps to Simple Do you just wish you could “get organized”? Join Lisa Luken who is a Professional Organizer and Simple Living Mentor and learn how to use 6 simple steps that will help you to get focused, take action, and find freedom from your stuff, allowing you to live life and do what you love. She will also share

how to use this process to get organized and simplify for the holidays. This free program takes place on Wednesday, November 4 at 6:30pm. Please call 6554283 or email sally.holt@ raymondvillagelibrary.org to reserve your seat. This program is possible thanks to Innovative Distribution Services. Wish List for Gift Basket Fundraiser Our gift baskets are sought after during the Holidays, and your donations of a few items will help make this holiday fundraiser a success. Suggestions: Clean small to medium-sized baskets; Clean basket stuffing/ decorative colored straw/ shred; Cellophane basket bags – medium to large; Antique or new – tea cups, coffee mugs and soup mugs; Packets of individually packed cookies, chips, popcorn or other snacks; Individually wrapped hard candies, candy canes, and chocolates; Mini packs of tea, coffee, cider mix, Hot chocolate or soup; Small holiday wooden, or plastic tree decorations; Holiday stems of silk flowers;

FIND THE PHONY AD!!! You could win a Gift Certi�icate to an area merchant from one of our papers!

Small gift items or knickknacks or toys – for man, woman or child; Small gift books – for man, woman or child. Any of these donated items may be brought to the library from October 19 until November 12 during regular library hours. Volunteers will be needed to help put the baskets together on Saturday, November 14 from 10:00am to 3:00pm. Please come and donate whatever amount of time you are able. A sign-up sheet will be available at the library. There will be a short “howto session” given, then the fun begins! Refreshments will be served. Call 6554283 for more information. Basket Sale Our popular gift baskets will be going on sale Sunday, November 15 in time for Thanksgiving. Each basket is unique and perfect for holiday gifting, especially when you are looking for a present for a hostess, teacher, or special friend. They will be available at the library during regular library hours through December until they are all gone.

Make and Take Craft After school on Wednesday, November 18 and on the third Wednesday of each month thereafter, there will be a Make and Take Craft fun time at the library for children. This will be an easy to-do craft for children to create and take home with them. This would be best for ages 5 through 8. Lawyer at the Library On Thursday, November 19 from 6 to 7pm, Miklos Pongratz, attorney at law, will be at the library to meet with people on a drop-in basis to answer legal question and provide pro-bono advice. We are pleased to have Attorney Pongratz at the Raymond Village Library each month and hope our patrons will avail themselves of his help. Old Books to Christmas Ornaments Gather round for another upcycling challenge with old books, as we come together to make Christmas ornaments, Thursday, November 19 at 6:30pm. The pretty cream and white theme using old book pages will become your favorite addition to the

riotous colors that come with Christmas decorating. There is a $5.00 materials fee. Call 655-4283 to reserve your spot. Book Group In November the book group will meet on Thursday, November 19, at 7:00pm. In order to discover what the next generation is reading, each person will pick their own selection from the Young Adult or Junior Fiction section. For more information, call 655-4283. New participants are always welcome. Annual Tree Lighting Each year the Raymond Village Library, in collaboration with the Raymond Lions Club sponsors the tree lighting on the library lawn. Everyone is invited, bring friends and relatives, join in the carol singing, enjoy the refreshments and the youngsters are invited to a special story time at 4:30 at the library. There will also be a special guest for the little ones. This is a wonderful old-fashion community tradition beginning the Holiday Season. See you at the library on Sunday, November 29 at 5:00pm! n

We have September Contest Winners! FIND THE PHONY AD!

Congratulations!

It is easy to �ind - just read through the ads in this issue of Moose Prints and �ind the phony ad. Either �ill out the entry form below (one entry per month please) and mail to: Find The Phony Ad Contest, P.O. Box 214 Turner, ME 04282 or email to: phonyad@turnerpublishing.net. (one entry per household please) You must include all the information requested below to be eligible to win. Note: Turner Publishing will not lend or sell your email address to a third party.

Name: Address: City: State: Zip: ( ) Email Address: Phone: Would you like to receive email noti�ication of local sales and specials___Y___N

Please tell us your age (circle one) 12-25 yrs. 26-35 yrs. 36-45 yrs. 46-55 yrs. 56 yrs. & up

The Phony Ad is: Tell us what you think of this publication:

Country Courier: Rachel Price Country Connection: Theresa Shostak Auburn Highlights: Tiffany H. Nickerson Franklin Focus: Charmayne Coffren Lake Region Reader: Michelle Veayo Kennebec Current: Kathy Damon Good News Gazette: No Correct Entries

Western Maine Foothills: David T. Theriault Lisbon Ledger: Arlean Levesque Two Cent Times: Donna Broughton Oxford Hills Observer: Robert Dubois Moose Prints: Peter Pisciotta Somerset Express: Laura Russell Lewiston Leader: Sandra Joly

All of the winners listed have won gift certicates to one of our advertisers. If you haven’t won - keep playing! We get hundreds of entries each month! It’s easy to enter - read through the ads in this issue and nd the phony ad, ll out the entry form found in this paper and mail it in. If you have the correct answer, your name will be entered into a monthly drawing!


MOOSE PRINTS October 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

NewsBites

Page 13

SeniorsPlus Elects New Board Members

From the desk of Connie Jones‌

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Aging & Disability Resource Center for Androscoggin, Franklin, and Oxford counties 8 Falcon Road Lewiston, ME 04240 Â&#x2021; www.seniorsplus.org Like us on Facebook!

Dennis B. Gray, Patricia Vampatella, R.J. Gagnon, and Annette Nadeau have joined the Board of Trustees of SeniorsPlus.

SeniorsPlus, the designated Western Maine agency on aging, has appointed four new board members: R.J. Gagnon, Dennis B. Gray, Annette Nadeau, and Patricia Vampatella. The announcement was made at the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual meeting in Lewiston on Monday, September 28. A resident of Lewiston, Gagnon is the Finance

Director for the Pine Tree Society. Gray recently retired as the Executive Director of the United Way of Oxford County and is a resident of Norway. The owner and CFO of Bedard, Nadeau returns to the board after a hiatus and is a resident of Sabattus. Also returning to the board is New Gloucester resident Vampatella, who holds a PhD

and has worked in nursing and higher-education administration. Established in 1972, SeniorsPlus is the Western Maine designated Agency on Aging covering Franklin, Oxford and Androscoggin counties. The overall program goal of SeniorsPlus, which is headquartered in Lewiston, is to assist older adults and

adults with disabilities in Franklin, Oxford and Androscoggin counties to remain safely at home for as long as possible. The mission of SeniorsPlus is to enrich the lives of seniors and adults with disabilities. SeniorsPlus believes in supporting the independence, dignity and quality of life of those we serve. n

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Happy Halloween

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MOOSE PRINTS Page 14 www.centralmainetoday.com

October 2015

Androscoggin Home Care & Hospice Opened a New Drop-off Site

Androscoggin Home Care & Hospice (AHCH) opened a new Drop-off site for staff in Manchester in July. This new location will enhance AHCH’s efficiency to provide high quality home care, home hospice care and supportive care

services to our patients throughout the greater Augusta area. “This site provides staff a time effective base close to their patients that is safe, efficient, and insures that our staff is able to spend the necessary time with their patient by eliminating

New office sign at our newly acquired space in Manchester.

travel time back and forth to our Agency’s central location in Lewiston,” shares Julie Shackley, President and CEO. Earlier this year, Androscoggin Home Care and Hospice’s Norway office moved into a new space in the The Golden Arch building and expanded their Bridgton office, based out of the Bridgton Hospital, to provide staff with a more efficient and effective work environment. “With the addition of the new location and recent office expansion, our Agency has positioned itself to ensure that we can continue to provide the best care possible for our patients and their families throughout our service area,” shares Brenda Czado, Director of Home Care services. With 432 staff and 280 volunteers, AHCH provides care and support to residents in 122 municipalities, plantations and unorganized territories encompassing Androscoggin, Oxford, Franklin, northern Cumberland, and western Kennebec County as well as bordering com-

munities in Sagadahoc and Somerset counties. Last year, Androscoggin Home Care & Hospice cared for 10,020 people. Of the patients served, 6,184 received skilled home care, 140 received Supportive Care services, 1,310 received hospice care and 2,100 were served by our Community Care Team. AHCH’s expansion into the Augusta community along with their other locations in Bridgton, Lewiston, Norway, Wilton, Hospice House in Auburn and a drop-off site in Rumford allows the agency to be close to the patients and families they serve. Androscoggin Home Care & Hospice is a nonprofit Medicare-certified agency that provides patient centered care that is meaningful, organized, developed, effective/efficient and has lasting quality. They provide specialized skilled, supportive and hospice services to Maine residents and their families in the comfort of their home and community. In 2005 they opened Maine’s first in-patient hospice facility in Auburn – this

year, they are recognizing 10 years of caring and compassion at the Hospice House. In 2014, Androscoggin Home Care & Hospice cared for over 10,200 patients and their families, providing

more than 1.2 million in free care to those in need. For more information on Androscoggin Home Care & Hospice and all of their services, visit their website at www. AHCH.org.n

By January 31, 2016, you must enroll in a Qualified Health Insurance Plan or pay a tax penalty of 2.5% of your income.

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MOOSE PRINTS The feel good newspaper because it’s all good news.

Turner Publishing, helping business and communities grow and prosper with it’s directly mailed publications letting people know that there is a lot of good news in our communities. Directly mailing 243,000 homes - that’s a circulation of over 607,500 people.

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MOOSE PRINTS October 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

Page 15

Western Maine Health Announce Board Changes David Preble, Chair of the Western Maine Health Board, announced the election of two new trustees to an initial three year term, Lance Bean of Bryant Pond and Gene Benner of Norway. Lance Bean received his undergraduate degree in Public Accounting from Husson College. Mr. Bean is currently a Certified Public Ac-

countant and Partner at Hoisington & Bean, P.A Certified Public Accountants and has been employed with the accounting firm since 1994. Mr. Bean and his wife, Jennifer are residents of Bryant Pond. Gene Benner, a graduate of the University of Maine Orono, is currently President and Treasurer at Bessey Motor Sales in South Paris. Mr.

Benner is very active in the community and has served on many local boards holding a variety of positions, including previously serving on the Western Maine Health Board. Mr. Benner and his wife, Ellen, are residents of Norway. Western Maine Health is a member of MaineHealth. Visit Western Maine Health online at www.wmhcc.org.n

Lance Bean, left and Gene Benner, right, have been elected to the Western Maine Health Board of Trustees.

Stephens Memorial Hospital Welcomes Certified Diabetes Educator Lynn Bauer

Lynn Bauer, RN, CDE

Timothy A. Churchill, President and Chief Executive Officer of Western Maine Health is pleased to announce Lynn Bauer, RN, CDE, has accepted the Certified Diabetes Educator position at Stephens Memorial Hospital. Lynn graduated from Duke University School of Nursing with her Bachelors of Science in Nursing. She possesses 30 years of experience as a diabetes educator, coordinator and nurse specialist. Lynn has developed evidence-based programs showcasing the

benefits of intensive diabetes management and insulin pump therapy. She has also been responsible for the development and coordination of all inpatient and outpatient diabetes education in another organization. Most recently, Lynn has covered the Northeast territory as a clinical specialist. Lynn resides in Casco with her husband Jim. They have two grown daughters and two grandchildren. She looks

forward to returning to the hospital setting and being a part of a team where she will work diligently to support the needs of the Diabetes Program and community. Stephens Memorial Hospital is a Leapfrog 2014 Top Rural Hospital and is a member of MaineHealth. Visit Western Maine Health on the Internet at www. wmhcc.org or follow us at Facebook.com/StephensMemorialME. n

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MOOSE PRINTS Page 16 www.centralmainetoday.com

October 2015

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Moose Prints October 2015  
Moose Prints October 2015  
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