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Transformation 2013 Design Challenge Planning Form Guide Design Challenge Title: Landfill Reclamation: A Cleanup Process Teacher(s): Gloria Schuldt School: Taylor High School Subject: Chemistry Abstract: The project will direct the class to act as consulting engineers to help a recycling company decide how to handle lead contamination on their property. A presentation from the recycling company along with a memo outlining the conditions on the site will start the project off. The student will collect background research, develop experiments, collect and analyze data and finally decided on a best course of action for the company. Their final products will be a formal report and a presentation to the recycling company.

MEETING THE NEEDS OF STEM EDUCATION THROUGH DESIGN CHALLENGES

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Step 1: Begin with the End in Mind Does this design challenge meet the criteria for STEM student needs (21st century skills, TEKS, TAKS)?

Summarize the theme or “big ideas� for this design challenge. The project will ask the class to act as consulting engineers to help a recycling company decide how to handle lead contamination on their property. A presentation from the recycling company along with a memo outlining the conditions on the site will start the project off. The student will collect background research, develop experiments, collect and analyze data and finally decided on a best course of action for the company. Their final products will be a formal report and a presentation to the recycling company.

Identify the TEKS/SEs that students will learn in the design challenge (two or three). Targeted 10B Demonstrate and document the effects of a corrosion process and evaluate the importance 12A Demonstrate and explain effects of temperature and the nature of solid solutes on the solubility of solids. 12B Develop general rules for solubility through investigations with aqueous solutions. 12C Evaluate the significance of water as a solvent in living organisms and in the environment. Untargeted 5A Identify changes in matter, determine the nature of the change, and examine the forms of energy involved. 1B make wise choices in the use and conservation of resources and the disposal or recycling of materials.

Identify key skills students will develop in this design challenge. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Understand how titrations work, and the processes surrounding the standardization of NaOH. Interpret the various types of titration graphs. Create a design flow diagram Organize, analyze, evaluate, make inferences, and predict trends from data

Identify the 21st century skills that students will practice in this design challenge (one or two). www.21stcenturyskills.org 1. 2. 3. 4.

Demonstrating originality and inventiveness in work Understanding the interconnections among systems Framing, analyzing and synthesizing information in order to solve problems and answer questions Using technology as a tool to research, organize, evaluate and communicate information, and the possession of a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues surrounding the access and use of information

Identify STEM outcomes to be included in this design challenge. Students experience the engineering design process. Students use technology to perform titrations. Students work with engineering partners in the community.

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Step 2: Craft the Design Challenge  Have you posed an authentic problem or significant question that engages students and requires STEM knowledge to solve or answer? Taylor Smile Landfill.doc

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Step 3: Map the Design Challenge Look at the major product for the design challenge and analyze the tasks necessary to produce a high-quality product. What do students need to know and be able to do to complete the tasks successfully? How and when will they learn the necessary knowledge and skills? 

Do the products and tasks give all students the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned?

Identify all of the tasks and products required to accomplish the design challenge. Determine if your students have the skills they need to accomplish each task. Make decisions about whether or not students are ready for each task. Then decide how you will spend your instructional time preparing students for each phase of the task.

Knowledge and Skills Needed Elaborate on the knowledge and skills (TEKS student expectations) required to accomplish each step of the task.

Already Learned

Taught before the project

Taught during the project

X

1. Interpret Acid Base titration curves 2.

How to use CBR/CBL pH probes

X

3.

How to write a flow chart

X X

4. Dimensional Analysis 5. Make inferences and predict trends from data

X X

6. Use technology to create Acid Base Titration Curves

X

7. Acid Base titration and pH 8. 9.

What PBL tools will you use? (check appropriate box) Know/need to know lists (add tool here) Daily goal sheets (add tool here) Journals (add tool here) Briefs (add tool here) Task lists (add tool here) Problem logs (add tool here) Project flow charts (add tool here)

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X


Step 4: Plan the Design Challenge 5E Lesson TASK 1: Enter the Design Challenge Title and TEKS/TAKS objectives for your 5E lesson. TASK 2: Describe the activities that occur throughout the 5E learning cycle. Provide explicit instructions in the 5E lesson plan, such that a first year teacher can easily understand what is expected and execute the design challenge lesson. Provide discussion facilitation questions if applicable. Use the planning forms provided on the following pages to complete each section of the 5E lesson. Refer to Step 3: Map the Design Challenge to help you identify relevant activities to include in the 5E learning cycle that focus on what students need to know and be able to do to complete the design challenge. Be sure to provide an estimate of time required to complete this phase of your lesson. TASK 3: Identify and define the products and artifacts for each phase of the design challenge 5E learning cycle. Artifacts are evidence of the student’s thinking. Products could include culminating products or products that provide checkpoints for progress through the learning cycle. The table below shows some examples of artifacts and products. Many additional possibilities exist. Use the planning forms provided on the following pages to complete the 5E lesson. ARTIFACTS PRODUCTS Notes Research papers* Journal entries Reports* E-mail records Multimedia shows* Chat records Presentations within the school* Records of conversations, decisions, revisions Exhibitions outside the school* Interviews using a structured set of questions Proposals Short, reflective paragraphs Outlines Library search record Plans Telephone logs Blueprints Purchase receipts Drafts Samples Edited drafts Minutes of meetings Revised drafts Discarded ideas Models Prototypes Product critiques Group process reports Videos Final versions of papers Field guides Biographies Websites Flow charts Design Briefs *indicates culminating projects

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Design Challenge Title: Landfill Reclamation: A Cleanup Process TEKS/TAKS objectives: Targeted 10B , 12ABC Untargeted 1B, 5A

Engage Activity (Time: 30 min )

Bring an assortment of common materials for students to identify: 1. What is the chemical makeup? 2. Is it recyclable? 3. What effect does it have on the environment? Landfill Quiz: http://science.howstuffworks.com/landfill-quiz.htm Show EPA video on landfills. Brainstorm ideas on what are the problems that exist in a landfill. Introduce design challenge (Taylor Smile Landfill.doc).

Define the products and artifacts for the Engage Activity. Artifacts (KWL charts, journal entries, etc) are evidence of the student’s thinking.

Artifacts: KWL Products: Graphic organizer illustrating the byproducts of materials found in a landfill.

Products (flow charts, data tables, models, etc) include checkpoints for progress through a design challenge. Materials/Equipment: assortment of everyday material for the students to discuss. Lead based paint, assortment of metals, diapers, trash, electronics, food, etc Resources: Watch this Medialink video to see how a Kimberly-Clark plant in South Carolina is using landfill gas as a renewable energy source. Trash decomposes and releases methane. That gas is captured and helps to power neighboring factories.: http://www.howstuffworks.com/landfill.htm#

Landfill information: http://zerowasteamerica.org/Landfills.htm Electronics, Lead and Landfill article: http://www.cehca.org/storage/cehca/documents/ehp_9.04_full_color_version.pdf Soil Test information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soil_test Lead soil test kit: http://www.carolina.com/product/lead+soil+test+kit.do?keyword=Soils&sortby=bestMatches

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Lead in groundwater: http://www.myhamilton.ca/myhamilton/CityandGovernment/HealthandSocialServices/PublicHe alth/SafeWater/QA-Lead.htm Explore Activity 1 (45-60 minutes) Students get involved with phenomena and materials, students work in teams to explore through inquiry.

What is in our landfill? Students will be taken to the landfill to determine what is distributed throughout by the community. Each student group will take a three square foot area and catalog what has been disposed. The team will then categorize all material as to the following criteria: 1. composition 2. recyclability 3. toxicity The students will then collaborate as a larger group to determine what items they may have in common. Then based upon the size of the landfill, they can determine the amount of trash that exists in their community. Alternative: Have the students document the trash thrown out by their family in a week. Then have them get into get into groups and determine the above. The students can calculate the amount of trash by multiplying their trash by the population of their community.

Define the products and artifacts for the Explore Activity. Artifacts (KWL charts, journal entries, etc) are evidence of the student’s thinking.

Journal with all the trash listed. Flow chart with the trash categorized. The checkpoint will be an oral discussion of what the students found, and the group flow chart.

Products (flow charts, data tables, models, etc) include checkpoints for progress through a design challenge. Materials/Equipment: paper/pencil

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Resources: Students will be taken to the local landfill to get a visual image of what/how much trash is generated in the community.

Explain (Time:20-25 minutes) Students discuss observations, ideas, questions and hypotheses with peers, facilitators, groups. Learners apply labels to their experiences – thus developing common language, clarification/explanation of key concepts

Question and Answer Activity: What is an environmental blueprint? What objects do you see that are, or can be, made of recycled materials… - in your classroom? - in the cafeteria? - at home? - in the park? - in the store? What is a landfill? What do you think are some examples of hazardous waste? Why should you worry about materials in your landfill? What is the outcome of hazardous waste in a landfill? How does it affect the environment? These questions will lead to a discussion of hazardous waste and what are the chemical and physical properties of hazardous waste.

The students will generate an organizer with a list of chemical and physical properties. Define the products and artifacts Artifacts: for the Explain activity. Notes Artifacts (KWL charts, journal Graphic Organizer entries, etc) are evidence of the student’s thinking. Products (flow charts, data tables, models, etc) include checkpoints for progress through the design challenge.

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Materials/Equipment: paper/pencil

Resources: none needed

Explore Activity 2 (Time: 60 – 90 minutes) Students get involved with phenomena and materials, students work in teams to explore through inquiry.

Students are to research what is a landfill and what waste is dumped into one yearly. The students will use the computer to look for the following information at a minimum.

Collect data (information) about the soil and the land in your area. Is there a possibility that hazardous materials are leaching into the soil? Write a short one page report of what information you found. Be prepared to share this information with the class.

Look for the following reports: Waste Type Report - A waste type report identifies the type of waste that is available in the surrounding area, and the kind of waste that will be allowed in a particular landfill. The type of waste you are allowed to place into the landfill will determine the design of the landfill. Waste Volume Report - This report estimates the amount of waste that is generated in an area. The area will be where you would get the waste for your landfill, such as a particular neighborhood or part of a city. Landfill Volume - This report estimates the amount of waste and cover (cover is usually soil that is spread over the top of the garbage every day) that will be placed into the landfill. Recycling and Incineration (burn waste to ashes) - Recycling and incineration are two methods that cut down the amount of waste that is put into a landfill. A landfill operator will need to know if recycling or incineration is required for certain kinds of waste. If you incinerate waste, the ash that remains may be placed into a landfill as waste. What is the ash composition?

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Define the products and artifacts for the Explore Activity. Artifacts (KWL charts, journal entries, etc) are evidence of the student’s thinking.

Artifacts: Notes Library Search Record Products: Website documentation One page report of information found.

Products (flow charts, data tables, models, etc) include checkpoints for progress through a design challenge. Materials/Equipment: Computer/ projector Classroom set of computers with internet access

Resources: Presentation of what are acceptable resources. Library list of good internet resources.

Explain (Time:45 minutes) Students discuss observations, ideas, questions and hypotheses with peers, facilitators, groups. Learners apply labels to their experiences – thus developing common language, clarification/explanation of key concepts

Viewing Times The film Bury, Burn or Return: Winning the War Against Waste is 27 minutes long. Introduction Bury, Burn or Return: Winning the War Against Waste introduces two “main concepts.” 1. The economy and political systems drive a society’s ability to limit man’s impact on the environment. 2. Government support, investment, and technology are necessary to win the war against waste. In addition, the film introduces the practical concepts of environmental pollution and problems that result from the uncontrolled disposal of waste as well as how modern waste management has minimized environmental threats through use of integrated waste management, including:  Landfills;  Waste-to-energy; and  Reuse and recycling. Discussion Points The following questions may be used to stimulate student discussion of the film. 1. Archaeologists have found that all societies and

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cultures had “garbage pits”. How does this knowledge of history help us see the future? 2. How does the story of Payatus, meaning the Promised Land, in the Philippines, illustrate the dangers of unrestricted dumping of garbage? What were the consequences of the landslide? 3. Why was the Fresh Kills, a landfill in New York, closed? 4. Now that Fresh Kills has been closed to “regular garbage,” how does New York City manage its waste? What other cities are exporting garbage?Where does it go? 5. Broward County, Florida, like many other localities, employs a modern integrated waste management approach to deal with waste. What are the components of integrated waste management? 6. How are modern landfills constructed? Can they be closed and reused? 7. How has Hong Kong developed a modern waste management system? 8. How is energy produced from waste? 9. 1970 was a “watershed year” for the environment in the United States. Why? 10. How can one person make a difference in waste management? 11. What will it take to globally win the war against waste? 12. Why do the economy and political systems drive a society’s ability to manage waste properly? 13. How do government support, private investment, and technology provide the ingredients for successful waste management? Vocabulary: Archaeologist, Consumption, Integrated waste management, Landfill, Leachate, Methane gas, Recycle, Scavenger, Waste, Watershed, Waste-to-energy

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Define the products and artifacts for the Explain activity. Artifacts (KWL charts, journal entries, etc) are evidence of the student’s thinking.

Artifacts: Notes Products: Quiz over film Video Quiz 1.doc

Products (flow charts, data tables, models, etc) include checkpoints for progress through the design challenge. Materials/Equipment: Bury, Burn or Return: Winning the War Against Waste Television and DVD Player

Resources: none needed

Explore Activity 3 (Time:50 minutes) Students get involved with phenomena and materials, students work in teams to explore through inquiry.

Consumer Chemical Lab: This lab is designed to make students aware of the fact that chemistry is not limited to dark brown bottles of chemicals purchased from scientific supply houses. Everything in this physical world is chemical in nature. By using items familiar to the students (consumer chemicals), the hope is that you will realize that chemistry is all around them, and not just confined to the chemistry lab. Lab: Exp 2 Consumer Chemical Lab.doc

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Define the products and artifacts for the Explore Activity.

Artifacts: Notes Products:

Artifacts (KWL charts, journal entries, etc) are evidence of the student’s thinking.

Lab Report .

Products (flow charts, data tables, models, etc) include checkpoints for progress through a design challenge. Materials/Equipment: Refer to the lab to determine chemicals and supplies needed Exp 2 Consumer Chemical Lab.doc

Resources: Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, Textbook “Holt Modern Chemistry”

Explain (Time: 90-120 minutes) Students discuss observations, ideas, questions and hypotheses with peers, facilitators, groups. Learners apply labels to their experiences – thus developing common language, clarification/explanation of key concepts

Acid Base Titration and pH The attached powerpoint will lead to discussion and learning of the basic concepts of Acid base Titration and pH. Acids & Bases.ppt

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Define the products and artifacts for the Explain activity. Artifacts (KWL charts, journal entries, etc) are evidence of the student’s thinking.

Artifacts: Notes Products: Flow Charts

Products (flow charts, data tables, models, etc) include checkpoints for progress through the design challenge. Materials/Equipment: computer with powerpoint

Explore Activity 4 (Time:90 minutes) Students get involved with phenomena and materials, students work in teams to explore through inquiry.

Acid Base Titration Curves: This is the final lab leading up to the lab in the design challenge. The students will learn how to combine pH and titration. The students will use the TI-83 with graph link to perform the titration. Attached lab: Acid Base_Titration_Curves.doc

Define the products and artifacts for the Explore Activity.

Artifacts: Notes Products:

Artifacts (KWL charts, journal entries, etc) are evidence of the student’s thinking.

Lab Report .

Products (flow charts, data tables, models, etc) include checkpoints for progress through a design challenge. Materials/Equipment: Refer to lab to determine chemicals and supplies needed Acid Base_Titration_Curves.doc

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Resources: Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, Textbook “Holt Modern Chemistry”, TI-83, CBL techniques handout.

Elaborate (Time:120 minutes) Expand on concepts learned, make connections to other related concepts, apply understandings to the world. (ex. Extend & apply knowledge).

Using the knowledge from previous titrations, each lab group is to develop and perform a lab that will determine the amount of lead in a sample from the landfill. The students will research and complete the titration, modifying the titration technique to successfully titrate a solution of lead. The results will let the group determine if a problem exists and what must be done to the landfill.

The attached video will assist in the process. Titration Video.rm Define the products and artifacts Artifacts: for the Elaborate activity. Notes Artifacts (KWL charts, journal Product: entries, etc) are evidence of the Flow Charts student’s thinking. Lab Report Products (flow charts, data tables, models, etc) include checkpoints for progress through the design challenge. Materials/Equipment: Materials as needed for the lab. TI-83, CBL, Computer with graphlink, excel

Resources: Lab Report Format Lab Report Format.doc, “Venier Chemistry with Calculators”

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Evaluate (Time: 240) Ongoing diagnostic process to determine if the learner has attained understanding of concepts & knowledge (ex. Rubrics, teacher observation with checklist, student interviews, portfolios, project products, problem-based learning products, assessments) Leads to opportunities for enrichment through further inquiry and investigation.

After completion of the previous lab, the students will use all information gathered to answer the following questions: -Is the lead likely to get into the groundwater (does the landfill need to implement the pump and treat system)? -Should the landfill introduce EDTA into their pump and treat system? -Is there a better way to handle the lead problem? -Suggestions for further research. The students will create a powerpoint presentation analyzing their data, and the results of their research. The students will present this information to a panel of their peers and then to a panel from “Taylor Landfill” (experts in the field of waste and reclamation).

Define the products and artifacts Artifacts: Notes for the Evaluate Activity. Artifacts (KWL charts, journal entries, etc) are evidence of the student’s thinking.

Products: Power point presentation Verbal presentation Lab results in form of lab report

Products (flow charts, data tables, models, etc) include checkpoints for progress through a design challenge. Materials/Equipment: computer with powerpoint, projector and video screen

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Step 5: Plan the Assessment State the criteria for exemplary performance for each artifact/product of each section of the 5E lesson. 

Do the products and criteria align with the standards and outcomes for the design challenge?

Engage Artifact(s)/Product(s): KWL Graphic Organizer (Thinking Maps): Rubric Thinking Map Rubric.doc Explore Artifact(s)/Product(s): Journal Entries: Rubric Journal note taking rubric.doc Flow Chart (Thinking Maps):Rubric Thinking Map Rubric.doc Explain Artifact(s)/Product(s): Graphic Organizer (Thinking Maps): Rubric Thinking Map Rubric.doc

Explore Artifact(s)/Product(s): Journal Entries: Rubric Journal note taking rubric.doc One page report with website documentation: Rubric Scientific Database Rubric.doc Explain Artifact(s)/Product(s): Notes: Rubric Journal note taking rubric.doc Quiz: Student completes with a grade of 90 Explore Artifact(s)/Product(s): Lab Report: Rubric Science Lab Report Evaluation Rubric.doc

Explain Artifact(s)/Product(s): Notes: Rubric Journal note taking rubric.doc Flow Chart (Thinking Maps):Rubric Thinking Map Rubric.doc Elaborate Artifact(s)/Product(s): Notes: Rubric Journal note taking rubric.doc Flow Chart (Thinking Maps):Rubric Thinking Map Rubric.doc Lab Report: Rubric Science Lab Report Evaluation Rubric.doc Evaluate Artifact(s)/Product(s): Notes: Rubric Journal note taking rubric.doc Powerpoint presentation: Rubric Science PowerPoint Rubric.doc Science Presentation: Rubric Science Presentation Evaluation Rubric.doc

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Step 6: Create Rubrics Develop rubrics for each artifact/product of the 5E learning cycle, using the criteria for exemplary performance as a foundation for the rubric. 

Do the artifacts/ products and criteria align with the standards and outcomes for the design challenge?

Use rubrics to demonstrate your expectations for students or create a rubric with students to determine the elements of exemplary performance. Effective rubrics:     

are based on an analysis of student work. target the central features of performance provide useful feedback to students use descriptors that students are able to use to self-assess or self-correct provide indicators with examples to demonstrate levels of performance

Rubric Resources: http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php http://www.rcampus.com/indexrubric.cfm http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/assess.html#rubrics http://www.uwstout.edu/soe/profdev/rubrics.shtml Math Problem Solving Rubric

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Reading - Analyzing Information: Journal/Note-taking Rubric CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Identifies important information

Student utilizes both print and nonprint resources to gather the answers to his/her questions.

Student utilizes both print and nonprint resources to gather the answers to five of his/her questions.

Student utilizes both print and nonprint resources to gather the answers to three of his/her questions.

Student utilizes both print and nonprint resources to gather the answers to one of his/her questions.

Identifies details

Student fully answers the research questions by providing supporting details.

Student records several details for each main point, but does not fully support his or her answers.

Student records one or two details for each main point, but does not fully support his or her answers.

Student's answer is not related to the research question.

Relates Graphics to Text

Student accurately explains how each graphic sky map is related to the text, and accurately determines whether each graphic/diagram agrees with the information in the text.

Student accurately explains how each graphic sky map is related to the text.

Student accurately explains how some of the sky maps are related to the text.

Student has difficulty relating graphics and diagrams to the text.

Student uses several sentences to accurately describe what the text is about.

Student summarizes most of the text accurately, but has some slight misunderstanding.

Student has great difficulty summarizing the text.

Summarization Student uses only 13 sentences to describe clearly what the textis about.

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Science Lab Report Evaluation Rubric

assignment # __________

Student Names:

Self-evaluation Score:

This analytic rubric is used to verify specific tasks performed when producing a lab report. If the task has been completed, all points are awarded. No points are awarded if the task is not complete. If the scoring criteria says "when required" and that area is not required in your lab, the points for the criteria are automatically added.

Category Lab Introduction 15 points

Procedures 15 points

Observations 15 points

Conclusion 25 points

Presentation 25 points

Lab Safety 5 points

Scoring Criteria

Weight

The question to be answered during the lab is stated.

5

Research references used to prepare for the lab are listed. (there are always research references)

5

The hypothesis clearly shows it is based on research and not just a wild guess.

5

Procedures are written as part of your pre-lab preparation and clearly state what you plan to do. If adjustments are made during the lab, those changes are noted as they occur.

5

There are no "understood" procedures. Examples include; get out the equipment, and turn on the gas, burner, or water.

5

Specific formulas for chemicals used or equations for reactions that occur during the lab, when required, are shown on the procedures side of the lab sheet.

5

"Results" that occur during a procedure are clearly recorded. (some procedures might not have observations)

5

Measurements, when required, are recorded as observations, using proper units.

5

Calculations, when required, are clearly shown on the observation side of the lab sheet.

5

Summarize your reasoning for the lab design, listing any facts or assumptions on which the lab is based.

5

Summarize the essential data gathered during the lab.

5

Use the essential data from the lab to answer the lab question.

5

Identify the one area of the lab most likely responsible for measurable experimental error.

10

The report is neatly printed in ink, with no visible corrections.

10

The report is written in such a way that others could accurately duplicate your experiment and compare their data with yours.

5

There is a clear diagram of the essential apparatus used in your experiment drawn in the largest available white space on the front of the lab report sheet.

10

No group members were sited for safety violations during the lab period.

5

Score

Total Points

Student Evaluation

Teacher Evaluation

100

Students are expected to honestly evaluate their own work. If the difference between the student evaluation

Self-evaluation and the teacher evaluation is more than 10 points, 5 points will be deducted from the teacher's score when the grade is recorded.

Deadline

Lab reports are due at the beginning of the next class period the day after lab. Reports will be accepted at the beginning of class the second class day after lab a deduction of 10 points for each date late.

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Science PowerPoint Rubric This rubric was modified for my use from a rubric posted by Joan Vandervelde at the University of Wisconsin. All credit is given to her for the original idea. Category

Introduction

Content

Excellent

3 points

Good

Fair

1 point

0 points

The introduction The introduction is clear presents the overall and coherent and relates topic and draws the to the topic. audience into the presentation with compelling questions or by relating to the audience's interests or goals.

The introduction shows some structure but does not create a strong sense of what is to follow. May be overly detailed or incomplete and is somewhat appealing to the audience.

The introduction does not orient the audience to what will follow.

10 points

6 points

4 points

0 points

The content is written clearly and concisely with a logical progression of ideas and supporting information.

The content is written with a logical progression of ideas and supporting information.

The content is vague in conveying a point of view and does not create a strong sense of purpose.

The content lacks a clear point of view and logical sequence of information.

The project includes motivating questions and advanced organizers. The project gives the audience a clear sense of the project’s main idea.

2 points

Includes persuasive information from reliable sources.

Includes some persuasive information with few facts.

The sequencing is unclear and does not appear interesting or relevant to the audience.

Includes little persuasive information and only one or two facts about the topic.

Some of the information Information is incomplete, out of date may not seem to fit. and/or incorrect. Sources used appear unreliable. Sequencing of ideas is unclear.

Information is accurate, current and comes mainly from * primary sources. Text Elements

Poor or Not Observed

6 points

4 points

2 point

0 points

The fonts are easy-toread and point size varies appropriately for headings and text.

Sometimes the fonts are easy-to-read, but in a few places the use of fonts, italics, bold, long paragraphs, color or busy background detracts and does not enhance readability.

Overall readability is difficult with lengthy paragraphs, too many different fonts, dark or busy background, overuse of bold or lack of appropriate indentations of text.

The text is extremely difficult to read with long blocks of text and small point size of fonts, inappropriate contrasting colors, poor use of headings, subheadings, indentations, or bold formatting.

6 points

4 points

2 point

0 points

The layout is visually pleasing and contributes to the overall message with appropriate use of headings, subheadings and white space.

The layout uses horizontal and vertical white space appropriately.

The layout shows some structure, but appears cluttered and busy or distracting with large gaps of white space or uses a distracting background.

The layout is cluttered, confusing, and does not use spacing, headings and subheadings to enhance the readability.

Use of italics, bold, and indentations enhances readability. Text is appropriate in length for the target audience and to the point. The background and colors enhance the readability of text. Layout

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POINTS


Scholarly Credits

Graphics, Sound and/or Animation

8 points

4 points

Sources of information are properly cited so that the audience can determine the credibility and authority of the information presented.

Most sources of Sometimes copyright information use proper guidelines are followed citation, and sources are documented to make it possible to check on the accuracy of information.

No way to check validity of information.

8 points

4 points

2 points

0 points

The graphics, sound and/or animation assist in presenting an overall theme and enhance understanding of concept, ideas and relationships.

The graphics, sound/and or animation visually depict material and assist the audience in understanding the flow of information or content.

Many of the graphics, sounds, and/or animations seem unrelated to the topic/theme and do not enhance the overall concepts.

The graphics, sounds, and/or animations are unrelated to the content.

Images are created using proper size and resolution, and all images enhance the content.

Images are proper size, Images are too resolution Most images large/small in size. or enhance the content. images are poorly cropped or the There are from 5-7 color/resolution is appropriate visuals or fuzzy. sounds in the 3-5 visuals or sounds presentation.. are appropriate for the presentation

At least 8 visuals are embedded in the PowerPoint

Writing Mechanics

2 points

0 points

Graphics do not enhance understanding of the content, or are distracting decorations that create a busy feeling and detract from the content. Fewer than 3 visuals or sounds are used in the presentation

9 points

6 points

3 points

0 points

The text is written with no errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.

The text is clearly written with little or no editing required for grammar, punctuation, and spelling.

Spelling, punctuation, and grammar errors distract or impair readability.

Errors in spelling, capitalization, punctuation, usage and grammar repeatedly distract the reader and major editing and revision is required.

(3 or more errors)

(more than 5 errors) /50 TOTAL POINTS * Primary sources can include original letters and diaries, personal observations, interviews, first-hand accounts, newspaper articles, magazine articles, journal articles, Web pages, audio recordings, video productions and photography.

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Science Presentation Evaluation Rubric Student Name:

assignment # __________ Score:

This analytic rubric is used to verify specific tasks performed during a student presentation. If the task has been completed, all points are awarded. No points are awarded if the task is not complete. Category

Organization 15 points

Content 35 points

Presentation, Oral or Other 50 points

Score

Scoring Criteria

Points

The type of presentation is appropriate for the topic and audience.

5

Information is presented in a logical sequence.

5

Presentation appropriately cites at least two references.

5

Introduction is attention-getting and establishes the speaker's credibility.

5

Scientific terms are appropriate for the target audience.

10

Presentation containes scientifically accurate material.

10

There is an obvious conclusion summarizing the presentation.

10

Oral - Speaker maintains good eye contact with the audience. Other - Presentation is eye-catching.

10

Oral - Speaker uses a clear voice, easily heard at the back of the room. Other - Presentation is easily viewed from a distance.

10

Oral - Speaker uses proper posture at all times. Other - Presentation is artistically pleasing without being distracting.

5

Oral - Good language skills and pronunciation are used. Other - Good writing skills and punctuation are used.

5

Oral - At least one well prepared visual aid is used for support. Other - Presentation identifies the author and date prepared.

5

Presentation shows obvious preparation and a practiced delivery.

10

Length of the presentation is within the assigned time requirement.

5

Total Points

100

Student Evaluation

Teacher Evaluation

Students are expected to honestly evaluate their own work. If the difference between the student Self-evaluation evaluation and the teacher evaluation is more than 10 points, 5 points will be deducted from the teacher's score when the grade is recorded. Deadline

All assignments are expected to be completed by the assigned deadline.

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Scientific Database Rubric Title of Database __________________________________ Authors' names: ____________________________________________________________________ Beginning 1

Developing 2

Accomplished 3

Exemplary 4

Needs frequent assistance to access internet sites and locate meaningful information.

Accesses internet sites with minimal assistance, gathers some relevant information.

Accesses internet sites easily, only gathers some relevant information.

Easily accesses internet sites; consistently locates and records meaningful information.

Research

Does not answer any questions suggested in the guidelines. Only found 1-2 animals

Answers some questions. 3-4 animals used as examples. Examples too general.

Answers some questions and includes a few other interesting facts. 5 animals given as examples. but details sometimes too general.

Answers most questions and gives detailed information. 6 or more animals used for examples.

Database

Data table missing information and is inaccurate. Missing headings or title. No organization attempted.

Complete database, minor inaccuracies. Missing 1 heading or title. Some attempt to organize data.

Accurate database. No headings or title missing. Logical order. Good organization.

Database neatly completed and totally accurate. Organization well done.

Concluding paragraph

Presents an illogical explanation for findings and does not address any of the questions suggested in the template.

Presents an illogical explanation for findings and addresses few questions.

Presents a logical explanation for findings and addresses some of the questions.

Presents a logical explanation for findings and addresses most of the questions.

Grammar & Spelling Attractiveness

Crumpled paper, frequent grammar and/or spelling errors.

Word processed, only one font and size, more than two errors in spelling and grammar. Neat condition.

Word processed, good use of font, color, and size. Well organized. Only one or two errors.

Word processed, excellent organization and use of lettering. All grammar and spelling correct. Provided pictures of adaptations. Extra effort evident.

Timeliness

Report handed in more than one week late.

Up to one week late.

Up to two days late.

Report handed in on time.

Use of Internet

Total

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Score


Thinking Map Rubric Criteria

Excellent

non-linear structure that provides a very complete picture of your ideas relative relationships importance of ideas is indicated and both simple and complex relationships are very effectively mapped map shows exploratory complex thinking about the meaningful relationships between ideas, themes, and the framework information is communication presented clearly and allows for a high level of understanding structure

Good

Adequate

Marginal

non-linear structure that provides a complete picture of your ideas relative importance of ideas is indicated and relationships are very effectively mapped

non-linear structure that provides a picture of your ideas

non-linear structure that shows some relationships between ideas

relative importance of ideas is indicated relationships are mapped

importance is evident but not very distinctive; relations are somewhat clear but lacking

map shows effective thinking about the meaningful relationships between ideas, themes, and the framework information is presented clearly and allows for a good level of understanding

map shows definite thinking about relationships between ideas, themes, and the framework

map shows some thinking about relationships between ideas, themes, and the framework

information is presented clearly and allows for a basic level of

understanding information is presented and some

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http://www.transformation2013.org/docs/Design%20Challenges/Landfill/LandfillReclamation_ACleanupProc