AIA Housing Awards 2013

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AIA HOUSING AWARDS AND AIA/HUD SECRETARY AWARDS TWO-THOUSAND THIRTEEN


AIA Housing Awards & AIA/HUD Secretary Awards 2013 Copyright Š 2013 by American Institute of Architects Housing Knowledge Community All rights reserved. No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any form without written permission of the copywright owners. First published in 2013 by: American Institute of Architects Housing Knowledge Community http://network.aia.org/hkc

Book design by TSK Architects, Los Angeles, CA. www.tska.com ISBN 978-1-304-1104-6


2013

AIA HOUSING AWARDS AIA/HUD SECRETARY AWARDS



Table of Contents FOREWARD

2 Letter from Stephen Schreiber, FAIA

3 Letter from Shaun Donovan

INTRODUCTION

4 American Institute of Architects Housing Knowledge Community

5 U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development Office of Policy Development & Research

6-7 AIA Housing Awards

8-9 AIA/HUD Secretary Awards

AWARD RECIPIENTS 10-37 AIA Housing Awards 32-45 AIA/HUD Secretary Awards

46 Housing Knowldge Community Committee Members


LETTER FROM STEPHEN SCHREIBER The Housing Knowledge Community of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) is proud to be a sponsor of the AIA Housing Awards program and the AIA/HUD Secretary Housing and Community Design Awards. The Housing Awards program, now in its 13th year, was established to recognize the best in housing design and promote the importance of good housing as a necessity of life, a sanctuary for the human spirit and a valuable national resource. The AIA/HUD Secretary’s Awards recognizes excellence in affordable housing architecture, neighborhood design, participatory design, and accessibility. The jury of architects, educators and writers recognized 6 projects for AIA Housing Awards and 3 projects for the AIA/HUD Secretary Awards from a very competitive pool of entries. This publication celebrates exemplary housing and community engaged design. Congratulations to the winners.

Stephen Schreiber, FAIA Chair, 2013 Housing Knowledge Community

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LETTER FROM SHAUN DONOVAN The HUD Secretary’s Housing and Community Design Award celebrates design practices in the affordable housing arena that produce more livable and sustainable housing for lowand moderate-income people living in the United States. Since 2000, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has been proud to work with the American Institute of Architects to honor developments that marry innovative design with affordability. This year, three affordable housing developments represent shining examples of this marriage – Via Verde-The Green Way in New York City; Community Learning in Leominster, Massachusetts; and New Accessible Passive Solar Housing, Stoneham, Massachusetts. Each provides, in their own way, national affordable housing models. As a trained architect, I recognize that these developments prove that you can push the boundaries of design while still creating something very special that folks can actually afford. These projects took innovative visions from the drawing board and made them a reality in communities. I am proud to recognize such creative thinking. Join me in congratulating the development teams of these outstanding projects.

Shaun Donovan Secretary U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

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AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS Founded in 1857, members of the American Institute of Architects consistently work to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through nearly 300 state and local chapters, the AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public well being. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards. The AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders, and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world.

AIA HOUSING KNOWLEDGE COMMUNITY The AIA Housing Knowledge Community tracks housing issues and develops relationships with industry stakeholders to encourage and promote safe, attractive, accessible, and affordable housing for all Americans.

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US DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOPMENT The U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development’s (HUD) mission is to create strong, sustainable, inclusive communities and quality affordable homes for all. HUD is working to strengthen the housing market to bolster the economy and protect consumers; meet the need for quality affordable rental homes: utilize housing as a platform for improving quality of life; build inclusive and sustainable communities free from discrimination; and transform the way HUD does business.

HUD OFFICE OF POLICY & RESEARCH The purpose of the Office of Policy Development and Research (PD&R) is to support the mission of the Department and the policy agenda of the Secretary. PD&R performs policy analysis, research, surveys, studies, and evaluations, both short- and long-term, to assist the Secretary and other HUD principal staff to make informed decisions on HUD policies, programs, and budget and legislative proposals. This work is undertaken by in-house staff and through contracts with outside organizations. PD&R plays a key role in the development of HUD’s Strategic Plan, and in helping the Department meet its responsibilities under the Government Performance and Results Act. Through an active program of publications and information clearinghouses, PD&R’s work products are distributed widely to the housing research community and to the interested public. The Office of University Partnerships within PD&R administers grant programs to colleges and universities engaged in community building activities. PD&R’s research and studies support the international exchange of information and data on housing and development topics. In addition to Headquarters staff, PD&R has field economists who provide intelligence on local economic and housing conditions and technical and analytical support to HUD clients and management in Headquarters and the field.

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AIA HOUSING AWARDS The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has selected the six recipients of the 2013 Housing Awards. The AIA’s Housing Awards Program, now in its 13th year, was established to recognize the best in housing design and promote the importance of good housing as a necessity of life, a sanctuary for the human spirit and a valuable national resource. The jury for the 2013 Housing Awards includes: Kathleen Dorgan, AIA, Chair, Dorgan Architecture & Planning; John Isch, AIA, RWA Architects, Inc.; R. Thomas Jones, AIA, California Polytechnic State University; Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA and Charles L. Travis, AIA, The Housing Studio, P.A. The jury recognized projects in four award categories: One/Two Family Custom Housing, One/Two Family Production Housing (none selected this year), Multifamily Housing and Special Housing. One/Two Family Custom Housing The One and Two Family Custom Residences award recognizes outstanding designs for custom and remodeled homes for specific client(s). Multifamily Living The Multifamily Housing award recognizes outstanding apartment and condominium design. Both high- and low-density projects for public and private clients were considered. In addition to architectural design features, the jury assessed the integration of the building(s) into their context, including open and recreational space, transportation options and features that contribute to livable communities. Specialized Housing The Special Housing award recognizes outstanding design of housing that meets the unique needs of other specialized housing types such as single room occupancy residences (SROs), independent living for the disabled, residential rehabilitation programs, domestic violence shelters, and other special housing. 6 | AIA Housing Award 2013

(above) One/Two Family Custom Housing House in the Mountains GLUCK+ Photography: Steve Mundinger (right) Multifamily Living Via Verde Dattner Architects & Grimshaw Architects Photography: David Dunberg / Esto


(left) Specialized Housing West Campus Housing - Phase 1 Mahlum Architects Photography: Ben Benschneider (below) One/Two Family Custom Housing Lake View Residence Alterstudio Architecture, LLP Photography: Whit Preston

(above) One/Two Family Custom Housing Eagle Ridge Gary Gladwish Architecture Photography: Will Austin (left) One/Two Family Custom Housing Halls Ridge Knoll Guest House Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Photography: Nic Lehoux

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AIA/HUD SECRETARY’S AWARD The American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) Housing and Custom Residential Knowledge Community, in conjunction with the Office of the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD), recognized three recipients of the 2013 AIA/HUD Secretary Awards. The categories of the program include (1) Excellence in Affordable Housing Design (2) Creating Community Connection Award (no recipient selected this year) (3) Community-Informed Design Award and (4) Housing Accessibility - Alan J. Rothman Award. These awards demonstrate that design matters, and the recipient projects offer examples of important developments in the housing industry. The jury for the 2013 AIA/HUD Secretary Awards includes: Kathleen Dorgan, AIA, Chair, Dorgan Architecture & Planning; Luis Borray, Assoc. AIA, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development; Elizabeth A. Cocke, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development; John Isch, AIA, RWA Architects, Inc.; R. Thomas Jones, AIA, California Polytechnic State University; Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA; and Charles L. Travis, AIA, The Housing Studio, P.A. “These developments prove that you can push the boundaries of design while still creating something very special that folks can actually afford,” said HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan. “These projects took innovative visions from the drawing board and made them a part of how we live today.” HUD sponsors four annual awards in conjunction with the American Institute of Architects (AIA). Collectively known as the AIA/HUD Secretary’s Housing Community Design Awards program, it is one of several award programs that the Office of Policy Development and Research launched with national organizations whose missions relate to HUD. Excellence in Affordable Housing This award recognizes architecture that demonstrates overall excellence in terms of design in response to both the needs and constraints of affordable housing. Community-Informed Design The Community-Informed Design recognizes design that supports physical communities as they rebuild social structures and relationships that may have been weakened by outmigration, disinvestment, and the isolation of inner-city areas. Housing Accessibility - Alan J. Rothman Award The purpose of this award is to recognize exemplary projects that demonstrate excellence in improving housing accessibility for people with disabilities.

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(above) Community-Informed Design Award Community Learning Center Abacus Architects + Planners Photography: Chuck Choi (left) Housing Accessibility - Alan J. Rotheman Award New Accessible Passive Solar Housing Abacus Architects + Planners Photography: Bruce Martin

(above) Excellence in Affordable Housing Design Award Via Verde. Dattner Architects & Grimshaw Architects Photography: David Dunberg / Esto

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Jury List

AIA Staff

2013 AIA HOUSING AWARDS JURY

Director, Knowledge Communities Bruce Bland The American Institute of Architects

Kathleen Dorgan, AIA, Chair Dorgan Architecture & Planning Storrs, CT John Isch, AIA RWA Architects, Inc. Cincinnati, OH R. Thomas Jones, AIA California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, CA Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA Austin, TX Charles L. Travis, AIA The Housing Studio, P.A. Charlotte, NC 2013 AIA/HUD SECRETARY’S AWARDS JURY Luis Borray, Assoc. AIA U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development Washington, D.C. Elizabeth A. Cocke U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development Washington, D.C. Kathleen Dorgan, AIA, Chair Dorgan Architecture & Planning Storrs, CT John Isch, AIA RWA Architects, Inc. Cincinnati, OH R. Thomas Jones, AIA California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, CA Stephen Sharpe, Hon. AIA Austin, TX Charles L. Travis, AIA The Housing Studio, P.A. Charlotte, NC

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Director, AIA Awards Elizabeth Henry The American Institute of Architects Manager, Honors & Awards Elizabeth Stepahin The American Institute of Architects Manager, Media Relations Matt Tinder The American Institute of Architects

HUD Staff Director, Research Utilization Division Rachelle Levitt Office of Policy Development and Research U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Deputy Director, Research Utilization Division Eileen Faulkner Office of Policy Development and Research U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development


2013

AIA Housing Awards and AIA/HUD Secretary Awards Recipients


AIA Housing Awards | One/Two Family Custom Housing Eagle Ridge | Gary Gladwish Architecture Orcas Island, WA | Gary@2GArc.com (206)552-9114 www.2GArc.com

Photography: Will Austin

Housing Jury Comment “This is one of the strongest projects we’ve seen. It uses common materials simply and is responsible to place and the client.” “This is such a Zen house — it does so much with so little, and it responds to the client’s wishes.”

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The artist-client for this house, located on Washington’s Orcas Island, requested an open, simple, low-maintenance design that emphasized and complemented nature and the forested landscape of its site. The hillside site has magnificent views to the west and is populated with madrone trees, firs, beech, thistle, moss, and rocks. Each part of the house was designed to accommodate the inevitable bad hips, knees, and back worn out from a lifetime of moving rocks, dirt, and plants for the artist’s own work. The program consists of a combined kitchen-dining-living area, study, master suite, art studio, and storage area, with the flexibility to add bedrooms or an apartment. The project uses some of the client’s favorite materials: old wood recycled from a 100-year-old barn demolished in eastern Washington, rusty steel for the siding, and moss and rocks salvaged from the building site. Large doors slide away to open the house to the expansive views, creating a living room in the woods. The entry garden bisects the house, creating two zones and bringing the site into the house and the eye out to the view. The 800-squarefoot art studio and storage areas have been left raw to facilitate converting them to additional bedrooms at a later date. To meet the client’s requirement that the house be highly efficient, it is constructed of structural insulated panels (SIPS). This method allows for a faster construction time, less waste generation, tighter construction, and better insulation. All the windows and doors are designed to surpass energy code requirements, and all of the lighting is either LED or compact fluorescent to reduce energy consumption. The siting and design of the house maximize passive solar benefits to reduce the energy load.

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SITE PLAN

SECTION 14 | AIA Housing Award 2013


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AIA Housing Awards | One/Two Family Custom Housing Halls Ridge Knoll Guest House| Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Saint Lucia Preserve, CA | gmottola@bcj.com (415)989-2100 www.bcj.com

Photography: Nic Lehoux

Housing Jury Comment

“This is an incredible house.” “It sets the standards really high and makes one judge everything else with a lot of scrutiny.”

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The guesthouse, part of a master plan for a vacation retreat, is located in the Santa Lucia Preserve, formerly the site of a historic cattle ranch. The building is carefully detailed in stone, timber, and glass to respond to the site’s rolling topography, a forest of ancient live oaks and manzanita, and panoramic views of the San Clemente Mountains and Los Padres National Forest beyond. The master plan for this vacation retreat includes a workshop, the guesthouse, and a main residence, all anchored to the ridge-top setting with a series of massive stone walls and fireplacechimneys. The first building to be constructed is the guesthouse, which flanks the winding entry drive. A stone wall anchors the building to the sloping site and screens the house and pool. A simple timber-framed shed roof springs from the stone wall, supporting naturally weathered zinc roofing over cedar-clad volumes. The guesthouse is sited to take advantage of passive design elements of the temperate California climate. Expansive windows provide natural lighting throughout the house, and a broad overhanging roof provides shade from the intense summer sun. Sliding doors and operable hopper windows throughout the house use the prevailing winds for natural ventilation, while also providing expansive views of the mountain range. Wood flooring in the living space of the house is reclaimed from an old barn structure.

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SITE PLAN

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AIA Housing Awards | One/Two Family Custom Housing House in the Mountains| GLUCK+ Rocky Mountains, Colorado | info@gluckplus.com (212)690-4950 www.gluckplus.com

Photography: Steve Mundinger

Housing Jury Comment “This is a spectacular yet modest intervention of the landscape. The form is analogous to the site tectonics, and it shifts with the shape of the land.” “This is a space that unfolds itself and embraces you on all sides.” 20 | AIA Housing Award 2013


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invisible from the road above. These green roofs not only provide a super-insulated envelope but also preserve and highlight the original view from the existing house. Continuous clerestory windows wrap around the interior, screening out the road and revealing a spectacular mountain panorama. This clerestory creates a completely daylit space, with lighting necessary only at night. A massively thick solar wall on the south side separates the less-scenic service side of the building from the main meadow and courtyard. This side of the house is used for parking cars and recreational equipment and for harvesting solar energy. Given the site and climate, as well as the heating needs of a pool, spa, and radiant floor, a solar thermal system was chosen over a photovoltaic array. Solar panels are incorporated in the building façade. Integrated sensors and smart programming capabilities further increase the solar harvest and minimize use of the boiler. The annual energy consumption of the house is 32 percent less than its average counterpart. A retaining wall, clad in Cor-ten steel and cement

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indoor space on the downslope side. It features a fire pit and a manually retractable movie screen. 21 | AIA Housing Award 2013


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AIA Housing Awards | One/Two Family Custom Housing Lake View Residence| Alterstudio Architecture, LLP Austin, Texas | info@alterstudio.net (512)499-8007 www.alterstudio.net

Photography: Whit Preston

Housing Jury Comment “This house seems so integrated to the landscape — it is really hand in glove.” “This is a sort of humane modernism in the tradition of Aalto.”

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alterstudio architecture LLP


The site at Lake View, looking west over the Bright Leaf Preserve and up the Colorado River, was a powerful element in the design of this house for a family of four. They wanted a house that was simultaneously modern and intimate, expansive yet cozy. Visitors meander under a grove of ancient live oaks on the way to the front entry, framed by limestone, vertical cyprus, and verdant planting. Inside, an uninterrupted ceiling plane provides a surface for reflected lighting and creates a sense of continuity with the outdoors. A delicate window wall, accentuated by monolithic corner glazing, also connects the interior to the outdoors. The 5,900-square-foot house emphasizes views and a dynamic spatial sequence. Views are revealed slowly: carefully framed vistas anticipate what is yet to come. A rich palette of materials on the interior, including mahogany cabinetry and longleaf pine floors, combines to create a warm environment. The house is designed to suit the needs of an active family. Generous gathering spaces interwine and give way to smaller spaces for a more intimate retreat. Oriented for optimal cross-ventilation and protection from the sun without eschewing the view westward, the Lake View house also features geothermal HVAC systems, a photovoltaic array, reflective TPO roofing, cellular foam insulation, tankless water heaters, and FSC-certified and reclaimed woods. The house also takes advantage of the tree canopy to provide additional shading, and carefully placed skylights bring diffused aylight to the interior and help reduce reliance on electric lighting.

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SITE PLAN

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AIA Housing Awards | Specialized Housing

West Campus Housing - Phase 1| Mahlum Architects Seattle, Washington | www.mahlum.com

Photography: Ben Benschneider

Housing Jury Comment “This is a well-thought-out and executed project. It’s a model for urban dense housing. The treatment of the ground floor, the glazing, the use of warm materials is all exemplary.” “This project is quite engaging: the space planning is excellent as is the choice of materials inside and out.” 28 | AIA Housing Award 2013


This project — providing 1,650 beds of student housing in five buildings — has transformed a neglected campus edge district into a vibrant, mixed-use urban precinct for a growing public university in the Northwest. Careful attention to program distribution, transparency, pedestrian flow, safe street crossing, and accessible routes and entries supports the interconnectivity of the concept. As the first phase of a student housing expansion for the university, the 668,800-square-foot project comprises three residential halls and two apartment buildings. To ensure the project is woven into the fabric of the city, it includes a number of publicly accessible spaces, including a 116-seat restaurant, 7,000-square-foot grocery store, cafÊ, conference center, academic support center, health and wellness center, and two retail spaces. Two public open spaces have been provided for residents and neighbors: an on-grade park, anchoring the complex along NE Campus Parkway, and a quiet courtyard allowing pedestrians to cut through one residence hall at grade or eat their to-go lunch from the grocery store. In addition, every building provides an elevated, secure, private terrace for its residential community outfitted for barbecuing or studying outdoors in fair weather. The project has inspired a new walkable, transit-oriented neighborhood, as a pedestrian-friendly environment has been created by narrowing roadways, widening sidewalks, planting trees along the streets, and adding covered bus stops. Accessible routes to bus stops and public amenities have been created by providing a pathway through a residence hall plaza, tying all four sites together and ensuring safe and easy passage for those with mobility impairments.

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“What is truely extrordinary is the site plan in relationship to program, the searching for connectivity, and the creation of pedestrian experience in what looks to be really an automotive environment.� - Barry Bergdoll The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art, NYC

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FULL BUILD-OUT

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Zoning allows zero-lot line buildings. The 5+2 construction type sets the effective height limit.

The building mass is re-shaped to allow for daylight and views for the residential fl oors.

The building skin is cut and pulled away to reveal ground level public and semi-public spaces.

Outdoor space, private and public, is created on top of and adjacent to the building, connecting the campus into the city.

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AIA Housing Awards | Multifamily Living Via Verde| Dattner Architects & Grimshaw Architects Bronx, New York | (212)274-2660 www.dattner.com | (646)293-3600 www.grimshaw-architects.com

Photography: David Dunberg / Esto

Housing Jury Comment “The site plan is terrific, and the design is very spirited.” “The way the building is broken into manageable units instead of being one continuous flow reflects and mimics the vibrancy of the surrounding neighborhood buildings.” 32 | AIA Housing Award 2013


Excellence in Affordable Housing Design Award |

AIA/HUD Secretary’s Awards

AIA/HUD Jury Comment “This project is a real stand out — transformative on a grand scale.” “The diversity of living spaces and the generous public spaces just set it apart from other projects.”

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This mixed-use complex provides healthy, affordable urban living for low- and middleincome residents of the South Bronx. As the winning entry in the New Housing New York Legacy Project competition, Via Verde reflects a commitment to creating social housing that addresses poverty, health, and the environment. Built on a former brownfield site, the project comprises three building types: a 20-story tower, a 6- to 13-story midrise duplex apartment component, and 2- to 4-story town houses. The 222-unit complex includes 151 rental units for lowincome residents and 71 cooperatives for residents earning 80–100% of the area median income. The ground floor features retail, a community health center, and, in response to suggestions from the community, live-work units. Sun-shades projecting from the street-side elevation diffuse solar radiation. Large windows, typically on two exposures, allow cross-ventilation and provide abundant daylighting. Natural lighting and colorful finishes in stairwells promote use of the stairs, complementing New York City’s Active Design program to encourage physical activity. The building envelope, a prefabricated rain screen panel system, provides a well-insulated enclosure with a contemporary aesthetic. The garden begins as a courtyard on grade and steps up through a series of southfacing roof terraces. The terraces, many of which are accessible to residents, feature a small apple orchard and plots for growing vegetables while also providing storm water control, enhanced insulation, and mitigation of the urban heat island effect. Rainwater is collected and recycled for irrigation. Energy efficiency and sustainable living are integral to the design. Photovoltaic panels, mounted on south-facing facades of the stepped roofs and on roof trellises, provide sufficient power for lighting in common areas. The project is on track to receive LEEDŽ NC Gold certification. 35 | AIA Housing Award 2013


SECTION

SITE PLAN 36 | AIA Housing Award 2013


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AIA/HUD Secretary’s Awards | Community-Informed Design Award Community Learning Center| Abacus Architects + Planners Leominster, Massachusetts | www.abacusarchitects.com

Photography: Chuck Choi

AIA/HUD Jury Comment “This level of craftsmanship out of a volunteer construction project is fantastic.” “They took a high school student’s design and made it work. Simple materials were used but they make whimsical gestures.”

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This 2,000-square-foot facility, built on the edge of a public housing development, was only possible through the efforts and contributions of students, teachers, residents, alumni, builders, and suppliers, all coordinated and overseen by the architecture firm. The local housing authority received a grant to cover half the cost of the facility and made arrangements with the nearby vocational/technical high school to provide the labor and drafting. The architects helped participants develop the building program, ensured that the project met the exacting standards of the funder, and worked with the teenage crew to bring design sketches into reality. The building is clad in multicolored fibercement panels with articulated aluminum joints. South-facing windows at the front entry provide passive solar heating in the winter, and deep overhangs and deciduous trees provide summer shade. The interior is a single, subtly articulated space that one teacher can monitor. Particleboard partitions, composed of recycled content, mark individual study areas. Light floods in from all sides, and sliding doors with glazed perforations provide acoustical privacy for story telling or conferences. The building can accommodate a number of functions, including meetings for 50 or more.

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AIA/HUD Secretary’s Awards | Housing Accessibility - Alan J. Rothman Award New Accessible Passive Solar Housing| Abacus Architects + Planners Stoneham, Massachusetts | www.abacusarchitects.com

Photography: Bruce Martin

AIA/HUD Jury Comment “This is good planning and good architecture — it accomplishes much with little. It provides occupants with dignity and a sense of feeling they are in a special place.” “This is an extraordinary building. What a great step forward it would be if every housing accessibility group modeled their projects after this one.” 42 | AIA Housing Award 2013


This project, for a small public housing authority, responded to a need to provide affordable accessible housing that could be used as a model for future development. In addition, the project had to embody the spirit of universal design principles by meeting high standards for energy efficiency and passive solar heating. Every element of the buildings, as well as the site, was designed to meet ADA and state accessibility requirements. The sloping topography of the site was carefully graded to ensure all the inclines were below 5 percent and to avoid the ramps and double railings that often make accessible buildings seem cut off from the surrounding landscape. Other issues concerning quality of life, connections to the outdoors, and responses to climate were viewed as just as important as the regulatory requirements. Entries are sheltered by simple pitched roofs, which have been lifted, warped, and folded to welcome in the sun and provide shade in the summer. South-facing windows bring in the low winter sun, and deciduous trees and broad overhangs provide summer shade. Terraces serve as outdoor rooms that help create a sense of community. The deep floor plates of the side-byside apartments are lit from above by clerestories and interior windows that bring the sun into every room, hallway, and bathroom. Artificial lighting is never needed during the day, and blue sky and green trees are visible in every direction. High-density foam insulation, high-performance windows, and radiant heating in the concrete floors keep the apartments comfortable and minimize energy usage. Despite the small size of the two- and three-bedroom apartments, the open plan and high ceilings create a sense of spaciousness. Changes in fenestration and ceiling height delineate the separate eating and living areas. Kitchens look out to the street, and living rooms face the woods to the south. Bathrooms and hallways are clustered in the middle.

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HKC Advisory Committee Members Chair Stephen D. Schreiber, FAIA University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA Past Chair Kathleen Dorgan, AIA, LEED-AP Dorgan Architecture & Planning Storrs, CT Chair Elect Jamie S. Blosser, AIA Atkin Olshin Schade Architects Santa Fe, NM Secretary R. Denise Everson, Assoc. AIA, LEED-AP District of Columbia Housing Authority Washington, DC Treasurer Victor Mirontschuk, AIA EDI International, Inc. New York, NY

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Thomas Burns, Assoc. AIA Davis Square Architects Boston, MA Donald Gray Jr, Assoc. AIA Fitzgerald Collaborative Group Tallahassee, FL Simon Ha, AIA, LEED-AP TSK Architects Los Angeles, CA Michael Kelly, AIA, LEED-AP District of Columbia Housing & Community Development Washington, DC Casius Pealer, Assoc. AIA, JD, LEED-AP Oystertree Consulting New Orleans, LA Katherine R. Williams, AIA Studio Ammons Petersburg, VA


The AIA Housing Knowledge Community tracks housing issues and develops relationships with industry stakeholders to encourage and promote safe, attractive, accessible, and affordable housing for all Americans. The AIA’s Knowledge Communities offer members a personalized design- and practicebased experience that provides knowledge-sharing, networking, and leadership opportunities. Visit us at: http://network.aia.org/hkc/ or follow us below:

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ISBN 978-1-304-11004-6

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