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autumn 2013

Making the Switch Marine Care Ricketts Point Celebrates 10 Years

Summer by the Sea a Roaring Success Community Nursery Open Day


From the Mayor Welcome to the Autumn edition of the Banksia Bulletin. I hope that you and your family enjoyed the summer season and that you were able to get out in beautiful Bayside and make the most of warm weather activities in the area. I know that many of you were able to take part in the events available through the ‘Summer by the Sea’ program presented by the Department of Sustainability and Environment and supported by Bayside City Council. The events touched on a range of sustainability topics including climate change, marine protection, and native vegetation, and had a focus around inviting young people to connect with nature. It was truly fantastic to see so many families take advantage of the opportunities to learn about what makes Bayside one of the most liveable cities in Victoria. The popularity of these events illustrates the communities’ interest in, and commitment to, our environment. That’s why, as part of our environmental commitments under the Community Plan, Council will ensure that the protection of our natural assets and sustainability of our City will continue to be a key component of the new Council Plan which is set to be reviewed this year.

In addition to the terrific turn out for ‘Summer by the Sea’ events, I would like to recognise the enthusiasm and ongoing commitment of our volunteer Friends groups. Bayside Friends are absolutely integral to keeping our reserves and foreshore healthy and thriving. I would greatly encourage Bayside residents interested in nature and sustainability to make contact with their local group to learn more about our unique environment and participate in conservation works. To find local Friends groups that operate in your area, please see the last page of this publication. Finally, I would like to encourage you to consider receiving the Banksia Bulletin online by email in the future. As part of Council’s ongoing commitment to sustainability, we are continually looking for opportunities to reduce our carbon footprint and prevent wastage. The online version of the publication will be sent to your email address as a PDF. If you would like to receive the winter edition of the Bulletin by email please write to the Banksia team at banksia@bayside.vic.gov.au

Cr Stephen Hartney Mayor Bayside City Council

Front cover image Purple Sea Urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma at Ricketts Point. Photograph by Triér Murphy Back cover image 3186 Beach Patrol clean up Brighton Beach for Clean Up Australia Day. Photograph by Triér Murphy

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banksia bulletin — autumn 2013


In this ISSUE Special features

4 5 7 11

Other articles Emergency Markers Project

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Public Meeting Notice

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Ricketts Point  Management Plan

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Friends of Highett Grassy Woodland

Making the Switch to Energy Efficient Lighting

Excursions to Brighton  and Cheltenham 1891

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Ride on the Wild Side

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The ‘Drooping She-oaks’

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Shirley Joy

Alan Sherlock

Marine Care Ricketts Point Celebrates 10 Years

Pauline Reynolds

Cliff Top Walks

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Junior Ranger

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Meaningful Dialogues

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Coastal Management Plan 

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My name is Jules

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Working Bee Calendar

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Elizabeth Walsh

Ray Lewis

Joanne Burke

Barbara Jakob

Community Nursery Open Day

Julie Shepherd 

Summer by the Sea a Roaring Success Phillip Wierzbowski

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Bayside is switching to energy efficient lighting Did you know that street lights contribute to around half of Council’s carbon emissions? Climate change projections show that the City of Bayside is significantly exposed to climate extremes and natural hazards such as increased temperatures, less rainfall, more drought, more storms, rising sea level and coastal impacts. Climate change also threatens open space and trees through events such as flooding and the impact of extreme heat on vegetation. Responding to climate change involves reducing greenhouse gas emissions, identifying actions for adapting to change and realising possible opportunities that might arise from a changing climate or government policies.

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To help reduce greenhouse emissions Council has started work on a three year project to reduce Bayside’s energy consumption by replacing street lights with more energy efficient lights and removing some lights that are no longer required. It is expected that changing the street lights will reduce carbon emissions by the equivalent of 9,000 less cars per year and will reduce Council’s street lighting costs by $10 million over the next 20 years.

Make the switch at home As part of Council’s street light changeover, we’re also helping Bayside residents to save energy and money by making the switch at home. Subscribe to Brighter eNews today at www.bayside.vic.gov.au/ brighter to learn more about Council’s events and programs and tips on how you can save energy and live more sustainably at home. The first 500 new subscribers to the Brighter eNews will win a free Green Light Brighter Pack which includes information and practical tools to help you make the switch. Learn more about our street light replacement program by visiting our website www.bayside.vic.gov. au/streetlights

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Common Sea Star Patriella Calcar Photo by Ray Lewis

Pink-tipped anemone Epiactis Australiensis Photo by David Reinhard

Marine Care Ricketts Point enters 2013 with great enthusiasm Celebrating 10 years, Marine Care Ricketts Point has truly entered into a new era. These days it is not uncommon for us to have a members meeting with over 50 attendees, and recently we had a snorkelling event where 38 people attended. Because of our increased participation numbers and resulting wider skill base, we have begun to take a greater interest in so called ‘Citizen Science’ activities. This ‘crowd sourced-science’, along with the underwater camera boom, has dramatically increased our understanding of local species.

This year we have published four marine reference books, and are well progressed with a professional water quality testing regime. Additionally, we have begun a beach litter assessment programme with Parks Victoria, and are a major contributor to the annual Great Fish Count. Marine Care Ricketts Point is also assisting RMIT University with three other research projects concerning sea urchins, sea stars and local fossils.

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We have been fortunate in attracting a great deal of local media attention over the past year, which has led to greater public awareness of the sanctuary values, achieving one of our five key objectives. We anticipate 2013 being an even bigger and better year for our collective. Ray Lewis Marine Care Ricketts Point

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Public Meeting Notice The Friends of Highett Grassy Woodland will host an information and support evening for the retention of the woodland and open space which is part of the CSIRO site in Highett. An example of what Council’s new signs might look like

Emergency Markers Project Planning is underway for Council to install new signage along Bayside’s foreshore to help identify the location of a person calling 000 in the event of an emergency. Emergency Markers is an initiative of Emergency Services Telecommunications Authority (ESTA), to help aid the call and dispatch process during a Triple Zero (000) call when located in public areas such as parks, cycling tracks and foreshore areas.

This site is to be sold for residential development and it is vital that we not only conserve the rare remnant woodland as a special part of our heritage but to make sure that there is open space for the people of Highett. We will show a short film illustrating how a Grassy Woodland can look when it is cared for and there will be speakers who will briefly outline the history of the area and where we are in our efforts to save it. Please come along to this important meeting and learn what you can do to help. What: When: Where:

Public meeting in support of open space Thursday 9 May 7:30 – 9:30pm Highett Community House, 2 Livingston St Highett

Please contact Pauline Reynolds from the Friends of Highett Grassy Woodland on 95986368 for more information

Signage will be installed on existing infrastructure where possible, and will follow an alpha numerical system along Bayside’s foreshore. The new signs are supported by GPS co-ordinates and directional instructions enabling ESTA operators to provide information to police, fire brigade, ambulance and Victorian State Emergency Service advising of obstructions such as locked gates, road closures and the quickest access points. This saves time and may help save lives. Further information about this very important initiative will be provided during the implementation stage of the project. CSIRO site should be retained for woodland and open space says Pauline Reynolds

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Bayside Community Nursery Open Day The Bayside Community Nursery will hold an Open Day on Saturday 11 May from 9am until 2pm in celebration of Arbor Week. Residents are invited to come along and choose from a wide range of indigenous plants for sale, all of which have been propagated from local heathland and coastal species. These plants are ideally suited to Bayside gardens, require less watering once established and do not rely on fertilisers as they are naturally suited to Bayside’s sandy soils. Plants range from ground covers, grasses and lilies, medium size bushes and shrubs to large trees. Many of these species have attractive flowers that have the added bonus of attracting native birds and insects to household gardens.

Interested people are welcome to attend and are advised to contact Erika Anderson at the nursery on 9583 8408 prior to attending. The nursery is also open for plant sales during these times.

The Bayside Community Nursery also runs volunteers sessions on Thursday and Saturday mornings from 10am until 12 noon. The volunteer program provides an opportunity for enthusiastic members of the community to work alongside Council staff to propagate, from local indigenous bushland plants, trees and shrubs to revegetate the bushland environment.

For further information regarding the Bayside Community Nursery, contact Erika Anderson on 9583 8408.

Two other events are celebrated with Open Days at the nursery throughout the year: National Tree Day – Saturday 13 July 9am – 2pm National Threatened Species Day – Saturday 7 September 9am – 2pm Plants are available for sale at each of these Open Days.

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Ricketts Point and Ricketts Point Landside Management Plan The draft Ricketts Point and Ricketts Point Landside Management Plan (2013) is a strategic management plan for the public land above the high watermark at Ricketts Point (within the coastal reserve) and the public land located on the landward side of Beach Road known as Ricketts Point Landside. Bayside City Council is Committee of Management for both of these sites. 8

The Ricketts Point Marine Sanctuary is adjacent to these sites. It forms part of a system of thirteen Marine National Parks and ten other Marine Sanctuaries, established in Victorian waters in 2002. The Sanctuary is a significant feature on the eastern shoreline of Port Phillip and a valued asset for Bayside. The draft Ricketts Point and Ricketts Point Landside Management Plan (2013) provides a long term vision that includes the protection of the coastal environment and the sustainable provision of coastal recreational amenity as its primary objectives. Key stakeholders have provided input that has been considered in the development of the draft plan. These include local Friends Groups, the Beaumaris Conservation Society, foreshore clubs and local businesses

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within the site, the Department of Sustainability and Environment, and Parks Victoria. The vision for Ricketts Point is that it will be considered an exemplar of effective and sustainable management within the wider catchment of Port Phillip and Westernport, with access for all abilities. Here, the community can enjoy and learn about the environment through a variety of active recreation, eco-tourism and educational opportunities, while ensuring environmental sustainability of the landscape. The proposed draft Management Plan will assist Council to enable the protection and enhancement of the natural values of Ricketts Point.


It will bring together existing and proposed initiatives into one overarching management plan, which: • establishes the importance of the relationship between Ricketts Point and Ricketts Point Marine Sanctuary, and how Ricketts Point will be managed to support the values of the Marine Sanctuary • identifies existing conditions and values along the foreshore and recommends measures to protect and enhance these values • provides strategic direction for the next ten years • provides a clear decision making tool for Ricketts Point • provides ongoing management strategies. Key management challenges for Ricketts Point and Ricketts Point Landside have been identified and include the following: • managing the interface between Ricketts Point, Ricketts Point Marine Sanctuary and the urban environment

• mitigating and managing erosion and climate change impacts • protecting indigenous cultural sites and values • minimising impacts on indigenous flora and fauna • providing appropriate infrastructure • visitor management • effective operational management and enforcement • building effective and positive relationships. The draft plan identifies seven principles around which the site will be managed to address the above challenges. Each principle contains a descriptive overview, objectives, strategies and actions to achieve these principles, and specific actions for implementation. In priority order, these principles are as follows: Principle One: Protect Environmental Values and Coastal Character Principle Two: Manage the Impacts of Climate Change

Principle Three: Protect and Celebrate Cultural Heritage Values Principle Four: Manage the Built Environment Principle Five: Facilitate Appropriate Access, Movement and Connectivity Principle Six: Encourage Education and Community Involvement Principle Seven: Support Environmentally Sustainable Economic Development A copy of the draft Ricketts Point and Ricketts Point Landside Management Plan (2013), including a site map is available for comment on Council’s website at: www.bayside.vic.gov.au/ricketts_ point_management_plan.htm Comments will be received until Tuesday 30 April. If you have any further queries, please contact Council’s Open Space Planning and Policy Officer, Amy Hough on 9599 4339.

Biscuit Star Tosia Magificaat Ricketts Point Photograph by David Reinhard

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Excursions to Brighton and Cheltenham 1891

It is now 120 years since these articles were published in “The Victorian Naturalist” Vol. VIII, No.6, October, 1891. “Excursion to Brighton Beach” and “Excursion to Cheltenham” are a strong reminder of the volume of magnificent native bushland and wildlife we have lost since the articles were written. The challenge to locate historic articles relevant to early European settlement in the State of Victoria is demanding, but very rewarding. For example, “Bush Wanderings of a Naturalist” by Horace William Wheelwright, first published in 1861 tells us on page 107, of Wainwright’s

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old mate Rendall, who “shot on the heather at Picnic Point, about twelve miles south of Melbourne. He bagged 1,500 quail on one ground in the season; but he had miles to shoot over”. This account is very telling of the differences of our area then and now. My favourite book research website is www.abebooks.com May your searches be successful. Shirley Joy

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Dr Vicki Karalis tours Brighton Beach as part of her Geology Rocks presentation

Tacy shows off her beach art at the Junior Ranges session

Liam shows off one of the geocaches. Geocaching proved popular with all ages and abilities.

Sarah and Lachlan enjoy the paddle boarding session in the Summer by the Sea program

Summer by the Sea 2013 program This year representatives of the Bayside Environment Friends Network participated in the Summer by the Sea festival which provides 300 free events held in 80 Victorian locations to celebrate our coastline. Bayside Environment Friends Network was instrumental in increasing community awareness, understanding, and active stewardship of the rich and diverse natural and cultural values of Victoria’s marine and coastal environments. The network showcased the unique marine and coastal environments within Bayside and the many challenges facing these fragile environments affected by human behaviours. Summer by the Sea activities were designed for groups of teens and young adults to connect with long-standing volunteer groups and organisations that protect marine

and coastal environments. This was achieved through the introduction of two new activities for the program –Guided Bicycle Ride and Geocaching. Geocaching was a highlight of the program. This innovative approach to environmental education was made both fun and rewarding for the 135 participants who happily located 23 hidden containers or caches and answered related environmental questions within the set time limit. As Coastcare facilitator for Port Phillip and Westernport, I would like to thank BEFN, in particular Barbara Jakob for her leadership, and Kirsten Friend from Bayside City Council for her support in contributing towards the success of the program within the City of Bayside. Phillip Wierzbowski Coastcare Facilitator Department of Sustainability and Environment wrap up

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Ian Parson explains the “Water for Wildlife” project and how it helps Bayside wildife stay cool.

Ride on the Wild Side

wrap up

During the Christmas holidays on a fine Tuesday morning, a group of cyclists set out on a journey from the Trey Bit Oval at Sandringham. They were a mixed group from all over Melbourne, and were bound for Quiet Corner. The group was led by long time cyclists, Alan Sherlock and Michael Norris. The event was part of Bayside’s annual ‘Summer by the Sea’ program. After a quick briefing, adults and children of all ages and cycling ability took to the Beach Road Bike Path and headed south. The ride took place in three stages. Stops had been planned along the way where riders could learn more about the history, wildlife, nature and

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conservation initiatives in this beautiful part of the world.

been installed to help during the long dry summer.

The first stop at the Southey Street grassed area was to hear from the BRASCA crew about some of the conservation work they had been involved in over many years.

We finally arrived at Quiet Corner and wheeled our bikes down to the beautiful area behind the sea wall where bird expert Kim Croker spoke to us about seabirds. We delighted in the flock of swans that were there to greet us!

Further down the track, ‘Bayside elder’, Pauline Reynolds, spoke of the wonderful She-oak Tree, a very common native on the foreshore. At Black Rock, Ian Parson spoke to us regarding the foreshore wildlife and showed us the various ceramic wildlife watering stations that had

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A great morning was had by everyone, and we did it all again two weeks later. Alan Sherlock Sandringham Bicycle Users Group


Pauline Reynolds from Friends of George Street Reserve explains all about Allocasuarina Sp.

The ‘Drooping She-oaks’ Allocasuarina verticillata One of the stops along the Ride on the Wild Side and Enviro Kids Walk activities was an information session about the Drooping She-oak. Participants were fascinated to learn that the trees have separate male and female plants and were called “She-oaks” by the early settlers. “She-oaks” made good furniture and resembled oak when milled in a certain way, but were called “she” as it was still considered inferior to oak.

The trees were also called “baker’s wood” as bakers used them for firing their ovens as the wood burns at a very high temperature. Because of this, the trees were harvested almost to extinction along the foreshore of the inner suburbs of Melbourne. The children on the guided tour were asked to count the trees between Love Street car park and Quiet Corner. One budding young botanist observed 71 female and 26 male

trees. Hopefully he’ll come back and plant a few more on National Tree Day. The walks and rides were a great success and both kids and adults were really interested in all the aspects of their adventure and had a great time. Pauline Reynolds Coordinator Friends of George Street Reserve

The children loved learning about the She-oak and were inspired to count all the male and female trees during the guided tour

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Cliff Top Walks Weather can determine what wildlife is seen when taking a group along the cliff top walking path. Cool, windy and irregular weather prevented participants on our first walk from hearing and seeing many birds. The second walk was much warmer with little breeze and it was easier for the group to hear birds in the bushes. Sand wasp burrows and a fox burrow were also recognised along the path. Ava and her dad David learn about our foreshore while making an octopus sand sculpture

Junior Ranger: mud pies and other sandy adventures

Many plant types were identified including our local edible Tetragonia implexicoma commonly known as New Zealand or Bower Spinach, which we learned is available from our local Community Nursery. Views of cliffs, the Cerberus, long sandy beaches and our city in the background helped tell the story about our local history, habitat, and local flora and fauna. Children and adults asked questions and were happy to learn about the different introduced birds and their native counterparts. Elizabeth Walsh Friends of Native Wildlife

Feel the sand under your feet. What does it feel like? Have you thought about where it came from? Do you think all beach sand from around the world is the same? What is in the sand? On Tuesday 22 January we were blessed with perfect weather for our beach activity day for 6-10 year olds and their parents at Ricketts Point. There was a choice of activities to try including: • a close up look at sand grains • a scavenger hunt to produce art work on canvas • seashell identification • sand sculptures of marine creatures. New friends were made as our eyes were opened to the splendour of our beach. Joanne Burke

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Cliff Top Walks participants enjoy the view of Port Phillip Bay

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Bayside families enjoy the wide range of activities at this year’s Summer by the Sea festivities.

Meaningful dialogues Bayside’s Friends groups are celebrating many years of important work in the local environment. Friends groups are honoured and valued for their engagement and their volunteer time. Their extensive knowledge is most appreciated and their passion for indigenous plants and local wildlife makes them respected advocates. The challenge for the longevity of Bayside environmental volunteerism is achieving multigenerational knowledge transfer. If we want our environment vibrant with local flora and fauna for years to come, we must ensure that younger generations learn about, and connect with, nature and our special reserves. A critical element therefore is finding ways to connect and communicate with one another. Whether the preferred method is talking, listening, writing, texting, we ought to make all of these options a possibility. During the summer school holidays the Bayside Environment Friends Network offered numerous activities to invite and encourage these conversations and assist with knowledge transfer from Bayside seniors to our youth. This year, we participated in DSE’s ‘Summer by the Sea’ program and delivered seven events. A total of 260 children and adults joined us

Thanks to all of our Summer by the Sea activity organisers. Well done to everyone.

on walks and bike rides along the foreshore, studied sea shells and beach sand, and searched through Donald MacDonald reserve for hidden treasures.

Alan Sherlock

By using everyday activities such as bike riding and walking, paired with specialised information stations and GPS technology, we gave environmental education a fresh look and bridged the generations.

Ian Parsons

Having 260 participants at these events was really impressive. What really counts however, was the interest they showed for our local environment and the willingness to listen and be open to new experiences. The comment we heard most was, ”we didn’t know this exists here!”. The knowledge of our fantastic local experts and the great lengths they went to find interesting and engaging ways to present information was inspiring.

John Douglas

The success of these events is a great example of generational knowledge transfer. What an experience!

Sue Raverty

Andy Ross Bob Whiteway Daniel Noonan Elizabeth Walsh James Carroll Janina Daeuwel Jo Hurse Joanne Burke Justin Gorwell Kim Croker Liam Bucknell Liam Carroll Michael Norris Pat Salkin Pauline Reynolds Phil Wierzbowski Renee Mazzoni Ruben Jakob Vicki Karalis

We will strive to continue this important work in 2013. Barbara Jakob Coordinator Bayside Environment Friends Network

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wrap up

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Coastal Management Plan On Tuesday 12 February, Bayside City Council hosted a coastal workshop at Sandringham Football Club to discuss the Bayside Coastal Management Plan draft Discussion Paper. The draft Discussion Paper summarises issues associated with the future management of the Bayside foreshore arising from the feedback received to date, including the Open Coast walks held with the community towards the end of 2012. The draft Discussion Paper contains some initial responses to issues and poses questions in relation to particular matters. With over 40 attendees, the workshop was a great success. On arrival, participants had the opportunity to note, on aerial photographs, areas of the coast that were important to them or areas that they believed could be improved. Participants then broke into five groups to discuss the five themes that the Coastal Management Plan will focus on: 1. Activities – balancing competing needs and interests, services and demands

3. Character – coastal character and amenity 4. Community – community needs, use and interests 5. Coordination – Management, coordination and resourcing. Feedback from the workshop is available for review at www.bayside.vic.gov.au/opencoast (It should be noted that the comments made within this document are those of community members attending the meeting and do not represent the opinions of Bayside Council or its staff. Some minor modifications have been made to verbatim comments where reference to individuals and or clubs may not have been appropriate.)

Feedback received from the workshop and the draft Discussion Paper will assist Council in further developing the draft Coastal Management Plan which is anticipated to be available for public comment in May 2013.

2. Environment – managing the coastal environmental process

Get the Banksia Bulletin via email! If you would like to receive the winter edition of the Bulletin by email please write to the Banksia team at banksia@bayside.vic.gov.au

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banksia bulletin — autumn 2013


A Praying Mantis, one of Julie’s many photography subjects

Julie weeding Donald MacDonald Reserve

My name is Jules Many of you reading this will have met me or seen me around Bayside on the job. I’ve spent most of my 35 years living in the Bayside area with lots of that time spent using various parks and gardens for recreation, but never really knowing about the interesting world that lay beneath my feet until I started working for Citywide. From a very young age I spent a lot of time exploring the bushland and coastal tea tree scrub of Waratah Bay and Wilson’s Promontory while spending many school holidays with my cousins at our family holiday house in Sandy Point. I spent a lot of time working with my grandfather in his garden and was inspired to work at my house creating and maintaining garden beds even though neither of my parents had any idea or interest in gardening at all. In high school I considered pursuing a career in horticulture or work in the garden and landscaping field after spending a week doing work experience with Bayside City Council some 19 years ago. Upon finishing high school, I thought a break from schooling was what I wanted and set upon finding any full time job so I could enjoy my freedom from classrooms. Before I realised it many years had passed and life had led me to starting a business in the cleaning industry. As much as I had a great sense of achievement from having built my own business I really missed day to day contact with other employees, being part of something bigger and seeing more than a couple of hours of daylight. When I started at Bayside Community Nursery in September 2011, I had to learn a lot to be able to do my job, and quickly. At first the nursery appeared quite large and overwhelming, not only did these unfamiliar plants have common names but also botanical names. As the months passed, not only did I become familiar and comfortable in my surroundings, I found myself fascinated with the beauty of these precious plants.

From seed collecting trips around Bayside’s many beautiful reserves I found myself wanting to learn more and understand where and how these plants exist. My current position with the bushland crew commenced in early July 2012 and has exposed me to an amazing world of indigenous plants, a diverse range of fungi, insects, the odd frog or two, beautiful birds and lizards big and small. I must admit I’m learning to appreciate and admire these creatures, but still from a distance. I am a keen amateur photographer thanks to the invention of mobile phone cameras, and found that the plants made fascinating subjects. In being so up close and personal, it wasn’t long before I began to notice the little critters that would pop out at me that seemed to be just as curious about me as I was about them. With all these new fascinating photography subjects and the many weeds that I’ve needed to get to know, my book collection has grown from 1 to around 45 and counting. Obviously my growing book collection is playing a helpful role in my job, education, as is the guidance from the experienced and dedicated management and crew at Citywide. What helps drive my growing passion and interest, however, is talking to and working alongside our dedicated Friends of Bayside volunteers. Their experience and knowledge of the Bayside flora, fauna and history is amazing and truly inspiring. I look forward to many more years of helping to preserve the beautiful flora and fauna in Bayside’s heathlands and on the coast and hope to be able to educate residents and visitors and inspire more people to join a Friends group and be part of something very special. Julie Shepherd Bushland Crew #1 City Wide

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Working Bee Calendar FRIENDS/ENVIRO GROUPS

MELWAY REF

CONTACT DETAILS

Friends of Balcombe Park

86 C4

Coordinator: Joan Couzoff Phone: (03) 9589 1060

Friends of Bay Road

77 B11

Coordinator: Michael Norris Phone: (03) 9521 6879 Email: menorris@ozemail.com.au

Bayside Environmental Friends Network

Coordinator: Barbara Jakob Mobile: 0408 032 963 Email: baysidefriends@gmail.com

Bayside Bushwalking Club (Charman to Cromer Rds, Beaumaris)

Contact: Jo Hurse (Citywide) 9283 2052

Bayside Community Nursery

77 D12

Beaumaris Conservation Society

President: Chris Sutton PO Box 7016, Beaumaris 3193 Email: ggd@netspace.net.au

Black Rock and Sandringham Conservation Association

Coordinator: Bob Whiteway Phone: (03) 9502 0060 Email: bobwhiteway@optusnet.com.au

Friends of Brighton Dunes

76 C2

Co-ordinator: Jenny Talbot Phone: (03) 9592 2109 Co-ordinator: Elizabeth McQuire Phone: (03) 9592 6474

Friends of Cheltenham Park

86 G1

Coordinator: Valerie Tyers Phone: (03) 9588 0107 Email: valerietyers@hotmail.com

Cheltenham Primary School Sanctuary Friends of Donald MacDonald Reserve

Contact: Marg McIntosh Phone: (03) 8585 3200 Email: cheltenham.ps@edumail.vic.gov.au

86 B6

Enviro Kids

Coordinator: Kim Croker Phone: (03) 9589 2443 Email: kcroker@bigpond.net.au Enquiries to Barbara Jakob Phone: 0408 032 963

Friends of George Street Reserve

86 B1

Coordinator: Val Tarrant Phone: (03) 9598 0554 Email: vtarrant@ozemail.com.au. Coordinator: Pauline Reynolds Phone: (03) 9598 6368 Email: pauline.reynolds@bigpond.com

Friends of Gramatan Avenue Heathland

86 C6

Coordinator: Ken Rendell Phone: (03) 9589 4452

Friends of Long Hollow Heathland

86 D5

Coordinator: Ken Rendell Phone: (03) 9589 4452

Friends of Merindah Park & Urban Forest

77 B12

Coordinator: David Cockburn Phone: (03) 9598 6148 Email: davidcoc@optusnet.com.au

Marine Care Ricketts Point Inc

86 C9

Phone: (03) 9589 4452

Friends of Native Wildlife

Coordinator: Michael Norris Phone: (03) 9521 6879 Email: Bayfonw@hotmail.com

NED (New Environment Directions) at Elsternwick Park

Coordinator: Neil Blake, Port Phillip EcoCentre Phone: (03) 9534 0413 Email: neilblake.ecocentre@iinet.net.au

Friends of Ricketts Point Landside

86 C9

St. Leonards College Conservation Group

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Contact: Erika Anderson 319 Reserve Road, Cheltenham 3192 Phone: (03) 9583 8408 Open Thurs and Sat 10am – 12pm

Coordinator: Sue Raverty Phone: (03) 9589 2103 Email: sraverty@westnet.com.au Contact: Luisa Ingram Phone: (03) 9909 9300 Email: Luisa.Ingram@stleonards.vic.edu.au

Friends of Table Rock

86 E10

Coordinator: Ken Rendell Phone: (03) 9589 4452

Friends of Watkins Bay

86 D9

Coordinator: Moira Longden Phone: (03) 9589 2725

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April to June 2013 TIME

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

10am – noon

28

26

30

10am – noon

13

11

8

4.30 – 6.00pm

29

27

24

Contact Jo Hurse (Citywide) 9283 2052

Bayside City Council encourages people from our local community groups to submit articles of interest, share experiences and news about any upcoming events. All articles are reviewed prior to publication and Council reserves the right to omit or edit submissions.

10am – noon

10am – noon

2, 16

7, 21

4, 18

8am – 10am

2, 9, 16, 23, 30

7, 14, 21, 28

4, 11, 18, 25

10am – noon

7

5

2

11

16

9am – noon Contact School 9583 1614 10am – noon

7

5

2

9.30am – 11.30am

28

26

23

10am – noon

21

19

16

1pm – 3pm

7

5

2

1pm – 3pm

28

26

30

10am – noon

9.30am 12.30pm – 2pm

Editorial Policy The purpose of publishing the Banksia Bulletin is to circulate information, report on events, and to profile relevant environmental issues important to our community. The Bulletin is also published to support the network of people involved in enjoying and protecting our local environment.

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Special event: Waterways Wildlife Park

1pm – 3pm

16

21

18

12.30pm – 2.30pm

30

28

25

10am – noon

24

29

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banksia bulletin — autumn 2013

Acknowledgements Thank you to all the people who have contributed to this issue of Banksia Bulletin. Disclaimer The views expressed in the Banksia Bulletin are not necessarily those of Bayside City Council nor its representatives. Editor Simon Hill, Manager Environmental Sustainability & Open Space. Content Coordinator Triér Murphy Sustainability Promotions Officer. Copy deadlines 2013 Copy deadlines are set for the first Friday of the month of release: Winter 2013 31 May for release end June Spring 2013 30 August for end of September Banksia Bulletin is published quarterly by Bayside City Council to service people interested in enjoying and protecting the local environment. If you would like to be added to the Banksia Bulletin mailing list, please contact Bayside City Council on 9599 4444 or email: banksia@bayside.vic.gov.au Please indicate whether you would prefer to receive your Banksia Bulletin by post or via email. Corporate Centre PO Box 27 Royal Avenue SANDRINGHAM VIC 3191 Telephone: 9599 4444 www.bayside.vic.gov.au banksia@bayside.vic.gov.au Hours of business 8.30am – 5pm Monday – Friday (except public holidays)

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Do you want to know more about Bayside and the Banksia Bulletin? Please refer to our website

www.bayside.vic.gov.au

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banksia bulletin — summer 2012/2013


Banksia Bulletin autumn 2013