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FEELING RIGHT AT H O ME

What it’s like to live, work, and play at the Domain

MY PA R K , M Y P O O L , MY C I T Y

Creating community conversation through choreography

N O. 190 | N E I G H B O R H O O D S

Neighbors who share more than a cup of sugar

BUILD IT AND THEY WILL COME

16 YEARS


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REALTYARE. MERGES ENGELOPENING & VÖLKERS WE ARESTONEHAVEN WHERE OUR CLIENTS NEW WITH LOCATIONS NEAR YOU.

Engel & Völkers is excited to announce our merger with Austin based StoneHaven Realty. StoneHaven Realty, along with owner/broker, Samantha Hale, has joined our growing Engel & Völkers family along with her team of successful, highly qualified agents. To maintain their leadership in the marketplace and to meet the growing need to provide global real estate services, StoneHaven’s decision to join Engel & Völkers was a logical move in order to continue to provide their clients the highest quality of service and coverage in our changing marketplace. Welcome to the E&V team! Domain Northside

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TA N L I N E S .

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onica has been a licensed REALTOR® since 2002, and she represents Buyers and Sellers in the beautiful city of Austin, Texas where she has lived for 23 years of her life. Monica specializes in luxury, waterfront, gated, and golf communities throughout the greater Austin area. She has been recognized for being in the top 1% of her industry and is continually nominated for Austin Business Journal’s top real estate professional award. Known for her professionalism, integrity, and loyalty, she provides you with personal assistance, the most up to date information concerning the market trends, the most advanced business strategies, and the ability to close the most complex of transactions.

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SARA SCAGLIONE | DESIGNER 1126 1/2 W 6TH STREET | 512.478.5666 SHA B B YSL I P S AU ST I N . C OM


CO N T E N T S | F E AT U R E S

JUNE FEELING RIGHT AT HOME Neighbors who share more than a cup of sugar

P. 48 OUR AUSTIN STORY The surprisingly historic places you walk past every day

P. 58 MY PARK, MY POOL, MY CITY Creating community conversation through choreography

P. 66 NEIGHBORHOOD PERSPECTIVES The grass isn’t always greener on the other side

P. 70 BUILD IT AND THEY WILL COME What it’s like to live, work, and play at the Domain

P. 76 QUINTESSENTIAL AUSTIN Cuernavaca, just outside the city limits

P. 82

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Bartholomew Pool in East Austin’s Windsor Park neighborhood. Photograph by Leah Muse.


Spring Sale Photography by Alexandra Valenti

20 — 60% CONTEMPORARY & DESIGNER IN STORE NOW

CÉLINE DRIES VAN NOTEN CHLOÉ LEMAIRE LOEWE ROSIE ASSOULIN MARNI SIES MARJAN THE ROW ISABEL MARANT MONIQUE PÉAN SAINT LAURENT CO BALENCIAGA PROTAGONIST NAK ARMSTRONG ZERO + MARIA CORNEJO PROENZA SCHOULER ULLA JOHNSON ACNE STUDIOS BROCK COLLECTION RAQUEL ALLEGRA KHAITE FERNANDO JORGE GOLDEN GOOSE TOME ALEXANDER WANG SIMON MILLER PLUS MANY MORE LAMAR • THE MENS SHOP • SOUTH CONGRESS BYGEORGEAUSTIN.COM


CO N T E N T S | DE PA RT M E N TS

Life + Style

Social Hour p. 20

F I N D M O R E AT

S T Y LE PICK p. 100

A PEEK TH ROUG H TH E B LI N DS p. 102

Community + Culture COLUMN: KRISTIN ARMSTRONG p. 29

TRIBEZA.COM

100

LOC AL LOVE p. 32 PROFILE p. 34 TRIBEZ A TALK p. 38

Food + Thought

FOLLOW @TR IBEZ A ON INSTAGR A M

K AREN ’S PICK p. 108

CONVERSATION p. 110 DINING GUIDE p. 112

From enjoying margaritas and cold beers at some of our favorite spots to spending evenings with close friends, we’ve been busy embracing the fact that it’s officially summertime. Follow along to see how we’re spending the warm sunny days!

38 Arts + Happenings

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDARS p. 42 MUSIC PICK p. 43 ART PICK p. 44 EVENT PICK p. 46

108 @ TRIBEZ A

42 14 JUNE 2017 |

A Look Behind !…! p. 116 tribeza.com


CHRIS LONG BROKER ASSOCIATE / 512.289.6300 CHRIS@ GO TTESM A N R ESIDEN T IAL.COM C H R ISLO N GA USTIN . C OM

G OT TESMANRE SIDENTIAL. C OM / GOTTESMAN RES I DEN T I A L R EA L ES T A T E

9517 VELETTA- PENDING


EDITOR'S LETTER

I

N SOME WAYS, NEIGHBORS ARE LIKE FAMILY—YOU CAN’T CHOOSE THEM AND YOU’RE GOING TO

see them regularly whether you like it or not. Yet, most of us love our family members in spite of their quirks and we cut them a lot of slack, but we don’t always take that approach when it comes to our neighbors—though perhaps we should. The house I grew up in fell out of escrow twice before my parents bought it, both times because the owners disclosed their problematic next-door neighbor who had been involved in a couple of lawsuits, one of which involved rock throwing. Nonetheless, my mom wanted to move into the house, which was in a great neighborhood, and she was determined to make it work. I learned a lot observing the way my mom handled our neighbor’s idiosyncrasies. Before we had even moved in, while my parents were remodeling, I remember they pulled into the driveway as our neighbor was emerging from our backyard with an armful of our bricks. My parents just waved to her. And that was the beginning of a never-boring decade in which she spent a fair amount of time in both our back and front yards, doing all kinds of unsolicited landscaping and painting work for us. Her actions were usually benign enough. She had a couple of loose boards in the wooden fence separating our properties, presumably for easy access. She trimmed our trees, went through our trash and recycled what she could use, and threw biscuits to our Labrador, Loki, who was always a fan. But sometimes her landscaping work grew a bit invasive. I remember peeking through the blinds with my younger brother, getting a kick out of spying on her as she hacked my mom’s cacti to pieces, and not just the cacti, but the large ceramic pots containing them, too. On another occasion, she took out our giant Bird of Paradise plant, claiming that it might attract rats. And at some point, she painted the bricks along our walkway a green color that matched her house and looked somewhat unsightly. My mom never confronted our neighbor about any of her deeds. And our neighbor was fond of my mom. She often cut flowers from her garden, and left them in glass jars on our porch. She routinely picked up the New York Times from our driveway and delivered it to our door, though sometimes after she had clipped out some of the liberal op-eds, which perhaps she didn’t want us to read. And she regularly warned us about suspicious cars and people (who were typically just my high school friends picking me up on a weekend night), and we would nod and smile and thank her for her concern. When I heard a few years ago that she had passed away, I felt a bit sad. I was living in Iceland at the time, and when I came back home to visit some months later, her unique green house had been painted a more pedestrian beige color and her unruly garden had been reined in. She was no longer in front of her house as she had so often been, watering her roses, her hair in rollers. I still think about her from time to time, and the great lesson it was to live next to her. After all, neighbors come in all shapes and sizes, and there is something to appreciate about everyone. It takes effort to make a real, welcoming neighborhood, and I think those who work toward creating that sense of community for everyone are—like my mom and our old neighbor—people worth celebrating. Enjoy our Neighborhoods Issue,

anna@tribeza.com

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BOOK A SUMMER STAY THAT HITS ALL THE RIGHT NOTES. Performance admission is complimentary and open only to resort guests ages 13+. Come out early and join us for a BBQ Cookout before the music begins. Contact a reservations specialist at 866-572-7369 for details and make sure to ask about our VIP Experience Package.

PRESENTED BY:


TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

16 YEARS

J U N E 2 017

N O. 1 9 0

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR

Anna Andersen

ART DIRECTOR

Alexander Wolf

SENIOR EDITOR

Brittani Sonnenberg

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

EDITORIAL

COORDINATOR

Hannah Zieschang

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Cowart

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Elizabeth Arnold

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Joanna Steblay INTERNS

Khortlyn Cole Defne Comlek Henry Davis Andi Lozano Caitlin Moore PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres ILLUSTR ATOR

Heather Sundquist

WRITERS

Derek Van Wagner Eli John Eric Webber Evan Ross Laura Beck MP Mueller Nicole Beckley PHOTOGR APHERS

Bells & Whistles Photography Breezy Ritter Danielle Chloe Holly Cowart Jessica Pages Knoxy Knox Leonid Furmansky Leah Muse Miguel Angel Robert Gomez Sarah Frankie Linder Warren Chang

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2017 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


SOCIAL HOUR PARAMOUNT ADVISORY COUNCIL PARTY The Paramount and Stateside Theatres’ Advisory Council Party took place on Tuesday, April 18. Hosted by Kathy and Patrick Terry at their home, the intimate celebration featured a performance by Moontower Comedy Festival veteran Colin Quinn. The evening was filled with incredible partners, sponsors, advocates and friends celebrating the historic theatres.

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ROOT BALL GALA

MACK, JACK AND MCCONAUGHEY

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The 5th annual Mack, Jack & McConaughey fundraising event featured concerts by Jack Ingram, Miranda Lambert, Little Big Town, Kris Kristofferson and a dozen other performers at ACL Live at The Moody Theater. There were also golf tournaments and a fashion show at the JW Marriott where designer Jason Wu spoke and showed his latest collection.

PARAMOUNT ADVISORY COUNCIL PARTY: 1. Jim Ritts, Debbie Mitchell & Jack Jordan 2. Patrick & Kathy Terry ROOT BALL GALA: 3. Ladye Anne Wofford & Thais Perkins 4. April & Amanda Rose 5. Janki DePalma, Rich DePalma & Erin Gurak MACK, JACK AND MCCONAUGHEY: 6. Mark & Bridget Shen 7. Camila Alves McConaughey & Matthew McConaughey 8. Ashley Wenson & Terri Parworth 9. Jennifer & Justin Simmons

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y B E L L S & W H I S T L E S P H OTO G R A P H Y, L E O N I D F U R M A N S K Y A N D L E A H M U S E

TreeFolks along with 175 guests celebrated a successful planting season at the 3rd annual Root Ball Gala held at Springdale Farm. Live jazz, a robust silent auction and farm-fresh fare created the idyllic setting as TreeFolks honored several community members for their longstanding commitment to the Central Texas environment.


BOSCH BASH FOR WOMEN & THEIR WORK This year’s Women & Their Work benefit was a colorful Elysian nod to the late-15th century painter Hieronymus Bosch and his seminal work, “The Garden of Earthly Delights.” Kimberly and Dan Renner welcomed festively dressed guests at The Renner Project and their residence, an urban loft above their studio, where face painters, a Renaissance quartet, a feast, and photo booth awaited.

WORLD OF WONDERS GALA

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The Harry Ransom Center celebrated its 60th anniversary with its World of Wonders gala on April 22. More than 350 guests enjoyed cocktails, dinner, and music while experiencing a showcase of treasures from the Ransom Center’s collections. Proceeds from the gala, more than $400,000, will make it possible for the Ransom Center to acquire new works and share its holdings with the Austin community.

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BOSCH BASH FOR WOMEN & THEIR WORK: 1. Austin Adams & Karen Kelly 2 . Tammie Rubin & Hollis Hammonds 3. Evan Voyles & Amy Mack WORLD OF WONDERS GALA: 4. Nell McKeown, Debra McKeown, Kelley McClure & Jefferey Williams 5. David Ochsner & Lucy Enniss 6. Elizabeth Avellan & Daniela Lozano 7. Tom Borders, Sally Quinn, Carmel Borders & Josh Borders 8. Brian Cassidy, Megan Barnard, Aaron Pratt & Jessica Kamphaus tribeza.com

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SOCIAL HOUR

UMLAUF GARDEN PARTY The 19th annual UMLAUF Garden Party welcomed more than 800 guests for “An Evening Under a Texas Sky” on Thursday, April 27. Twenty-five restaurants served delicious bites while Twin Liquors showcased some of the season’s best sips. The event raised over $300,000 for the cultivation of art, culture, and community through educational programming and exhibitions at the UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum.

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THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF AUSTIN’S 2017 AUSTIN ENTERTAINS On May 4 the Junior League of Austin debuted Austin Entertains, a culinary event featuring an all-female lineup of chefs and mixologists. Guests strolled around Brazos Hall enjoying tastings, signature cocktails, a rooftop dessert lounge and music from DJ Mel. Funds raised benefited the Junior League of Austin and signature programs FIT-Food In Tummies and Coats for Kids.

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UMLAUF GARDEN PARTY: 1. Dana Tomlin & Maggie Bettner 2. Margaret Galton, Sarah Saenz & Kristyn Ciani 3. Rebecca & Joshua Gindele 4. Anne Nicholson & Joey Bacon 5. Chelsea Blalock & Peter Jansen 6. Jordan Huneryager & Ryan Potter THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF AUSTIN’S 2017 AUSTIN ENTERTAINS: 7. Lee Crawford, Annabelle Turner & Janice Demartino 8. Karen Quinlan & Lisa Allen 9. Marisa Williams & Michelle Lewis 10. Sheridan Butler, Blair Hunter & Ali Bills

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SOCIAL HOUR

HAAM CORPORATE BATTLE OF THE BANDS The Health Alliance for Austin Musicians and Cirrus Logic hosted the 10th annual Corporate Battle of the Bands at ACL Live at The Moody Theater on May 5. Bands from Austin-area businesses showcased their unsung talents as they competed to impress a panel of celebrity judges and win the coveted title of Austin’s Best Corporate Band.

TEXAS WOMEN FOR THE ARTS

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Texas Women for the Arts held its 12th Annual Meeting in Austin May 8–10. The group granted vital funds to arts education programs across the state while enjoying the best of Austin’s arts, culture, and culinary scenes, including the Blanton Museum, UMLAUF Sculpture Garden, Laguna Gloria, Canopy, The Pershing, and more.

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HAAM CORPORATE BATTLE OF THE BANDS: 1. Christy Holladay & Lana Freeman 2. Anna Tallent, Alex Rohach, & Stephen Jeffrey 3. Andy Rumelt, David Hiskey, Peter Foskey & Lawrence Sarkar 4. Janson Woodlee & Kim Couch TEXAS WOMEN FOR THE ARTS: 5. Jennifer Ransom Rice & Ellen Mason 6. Caroline Huddleston Haley & Leslie Robnett 7. Linda LaMantia & Julie Linn 8. Jessica Karlsruher & Natasha Valocchi 9. Marti Peterson, Kelli Blanton & Linda Gladden

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y H O L LY CO WA R T/ B E N P O R T E R A N D B R E E Z Y R I T T E R

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ODD DUCK

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN


TWIST TOURS Photography | 3D Spaces+Floor Plans

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COMMUNITY + CULTURE CULTURAL DISPATCHES FROM AUSTIN’S CREATIVE COMMUNITY

Radio Coffee & Beer on Manchaca Rd. PHOTOGR APH COURTESY OF RADIO COFFEE & BEER

K R I S T I N ' S CO L U M N

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LO C A L LOV E

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PROFILE

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T R I B E Z A TA L tribeza.com K 38 | JUNE 2017

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Making Austin home for over 30 years.

moreland.com Austin :: 512.480.0848 Lake Travis :: 512.263.3282


K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Good Neighbor By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Heather Sundquist

I

THOUGHT IT WAS ADOR ABLE WHEN MY

kids took off walking through the neighborhood to sell items for a school fundraiser. My tall son Luke in his official school football attire flanked by his little sisters in their school uniforms—plaid skirts and collared shirts. Aww, how old fashioned and cute. It reminded me of the good old days when my girls wore Brownie uniforms with knee socks and pulled a red wagon full of thin mints around our old cul-de-sac. Luke didn’t bring his sisters because he wanted quality sibling time. Lord no. He is just smart. He knows that he is rather shy and his twin sisters are extroverted, experienced marketers. Sales tribeza.com

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K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

IT HAS BEEN SEVER AL YEARS, AND SHE HAS NEVER SMILED OR WAVED AT ME AGAIN. SHE NEVER SAID SHE WAS SORRY. SHE NEVER ASKED HOW MY KIDS WERE FARING IN JUVIE OR HOW THEIR PTSD RECOVERY WAS GOING.

are certain when you have a dynamic sales pitch followed by simultaneous blond twin head tilts and wide smiles. And it was hot, so he wanted to be done as quickly as possible. I went inside to cook dinner. It was almost dusk, and I was expecting them home any minute when my phone rang. “Uh, Mom?” It was Luke, and he sounded terrified. “Can you drive over to the next street? The cops are coming.” What the hell? “Yes, I’m on my way!” I grabbed my keys and forgot to turn off the oven. I drove around the corner and saw f lashing lights illuminating my three children who were being questioned by a police officer. I pulled up crooked behind the cop car and hopped out. My girls were sobbing and Luke was sheet white. Our neighbor had called the police because she felt threatened by trespassers in her yard. Trespassers? Threatened by children clad in a football button down shirt and khakis and private school uniforms? I was livid. The police officer—convinced the danger was under control—shrugged at me, smiled and left. I ushered my traumatized kids into the car. And then I spotted her, the seemingly nice lady who walked her dog past my house every day and smiled and waved at me. The one who said she

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liked my stories in Tribeza and remembered when my kids were little and she watched the Tour de France on TV. I looked at her, and she looked at me. Our eyes met and she realized she knew me, and my kids, and had just called the police to have them arrested. She mumbled something incoherent and f led into her house and slammed the door. It has been several years, and she has never smiled or waved at me again. She never said she was sorry. She never asked how my kids were faring in juvie or how their PTSD recovery was going. I have to ask, what happened to the good old days? Remember when neighbors helped each other build barns or harvest crops? Okay, me neither, but I do remember block parties and neighborhood cookouts. I remember buying countless boxes of Girl Scout cookies, Cub Scout popcorn, and candy bars to benefit the marching band. I love a good lemonade stand with a hand-painted sign and sticky, sloshing cups of pucker-tart lemonade made from powder. I’ve let entrepreneurial little girls walk my dogs around the block for ten bucks. I pay patriotic Boy Scouts to post a flag by my mailbox on Memorial Day, Veterans Day and the 4th of July. I bought poinsettias and pumpkins to support a church youth group going on a mission retreat. I’ve driven lost dogs home to the address on their tag. I’m not Mother Teresa. I’m just a neighbor and that’s what neighbors do. We try to be nice and friendly. We look out for each other. We pick up our dog’s poop even if no one is looking. We put the newspaper on the front porch when we get the chance. We water each other’s plants and feed each other’s dogs when we go on vacation. And we try to give all our children some tiny example of what it was like to grow up in a place where you could ride your bike until dinnertime, borrow an egg or a cup of sugar, repent and repair after breaking a window with a baseball, and feel safe just knowing you were known.


L O C A L L OV E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

LOCAL LOVE A GOOD NEIGHBORHOOD HANGOUT IS A SPOT WHERE YOU CAN MEET UP WITH FRIENDS AND SPEND AN HOUR OR T WO. HERE ARE A FEW CASUAL, COZ Y, AND UNIQUE PL ACES THAT MAKE FOR GRE AT HANGOUTS. By Nicole Beckley

MELLOW JOHNNY’S / JUAN PELOTA CAFÉ Downtown: 400 Nueces St. Nestled near the warehouse district, this is a minimecca for cycling enthusiasts to hang out, check their gear, and drink some top-notch coffee.

FIGURE 8 COFFEE PURVEYORS East Austin: 1111 Chicon St. A go-to hotspot for regular coffee shop workers and writers, the sunlit tables and smell of Four Barrel coffee can’t help but make for an inviting atmosphere. Park yourself at the bar, or catch up with a friend at an outdoor patio table.

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QUACK’S 43RD STREET BAKERY

RADIO COFFEE & BEER

Hyde Park: 411 E. 43rd St. Boasting alluring cases of sweet treats, including colorfully decorated cookies, frosted cupcakes, muffins and pies, Quack’s is the quintessential place to pop in for a scone and a coffee, or sit outside with a friend for a weekend snack.

South Austin: 4204 Manchaca Rd. With cold brew on tap, a patio begging to be sat on, and live music and trivia nights it’s no wonder Radio is often packed. Escape the heat at an indoor table with another kind of brew on tap – beers from Blue Owl, Hops & Grain, Austin Beerworks and a dozen or so others.

EGO’S South Congress: 510 S. Congress Ave. Inside this funky cavernous space beneath a parking garage, lies your chance to turn a room full of strangers into a room full of friends through the power of karaoke.

DONN’S DEPOT Clarksville: 1600 W. 5th St. From the older couples cutting a rug on the dance floor to piano tunes, to the ladies’ bathroom housed in an old train caboose, this bar is flush with laid-back charm.

MALVERN BOOKS North University: 613 W. 29th St. An intimate shop with offbeat titles, chapbooks, and a good poetry selection, Malvern also hosts regular author events and literary journal issue release parties.

THINKERY Mueller: 1830 Simond Ave. More than a standard children’s museum, the Thinkery offers interactive exhibitions both kids and adults can enjoy. And, their adults-only Thinkery 21 events are popular nights to have a drink and do some learning.

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P R O F I L E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Your Friendly Neighborhood Collector EDWARD V. LOPE Z TELLS US ABOUT HIS YARD FULL OF MEMORIES By Anna Andersen Photographs by Sarah Frankie Linder

A

S I PULL UP TO THE CORNER OF

East Second and Attayac Street, I’m relieved to spot a man washing his car two houses down on Second. I’m hoping to speak to the person who lives in the corner house, the one with the elaborate display of toys in the front yard, but I’m a little nervous because the meticulously placed Power Wheels look long out of use, and I have no idea who to expect at the door. “Hey, do you know your neighbor on the corner over here?” I ask the guy washing his car. “Oh yeah, that’s Eddie,” the man responds. “He likes to sit outside, on Attayac. We call him Bear.” I turn the corner and find a few people sitting in chairs on the sidewalk. I tell them I’m looking for Eddie. Sure enough, one of them shouts, “Bear!” through the screen door. And a minute later, a jovial, 60-year-old man emerges from inside, more than happy to talk to me about his toys. So why do they call you Bear? Well, it’s not because I weighed 460 at one time; it’s because I snore real good. Oh yeah? Big time. Did you ever see that guy from “Harry Potter,” the one that breaks down the door?

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Lopez has lived in this house for the last 58 years.


Hagrid? Yeah. He’s a big man. That’s me 35 years ago. I had a beautiful beard… Those are my Tonka toys right there. I used to play with those. You’ve been collecting this stuff since you were a kid? Yeah, I used to play with some of the toys in the yard. Can you imagine that? When I was a kid I used to love toys.

When I was 12, my uncle used to give me a dollar and I would go to Fourth Street where the trains were at and they’d bring the comic books without the covers. We don’t care about covers, we just want to read them. Many years ago, we had a fire. It was an accident, and all my comic books, my Hot Wheels, everything I was collecting for so many years, went. All except one magazine, Ghost Rider, first edition. And I told everybody these are going to become movies…

Not only that but I would say this neighborhood is going to become very expensive. “Shut up, man. No, it’s not,” people would say. “It’s going to become Westlake,” I’d say. And that was 30 years ago. I said that to a lot of people and it’s coming true. I’d say with another five years this corner is going to be a million bucks. Did you ever see “The Andy Griffith Show”? I stopped drinking, but I was like Otis Campbell. Nobody could make me mad. I was jolly. When I lost all my comics, I didn’t feel bad. tribeza.com

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Lopez says he inherited a lot of these toys from his friends over the years.

You started collecting comic books, and then? Hot Wheels. Some of these Power Wheels were my niece’s. They grew out of them. My brother said, “Hey, I got me a truck. I don’t know what to do with it.” And I said, “Is it a toy?” And he said, “Yeah.” And I said, “Bring it over.” Look at that John Deere. His son grew out of it. He said, “Can I bring it to the house?” And I said, “Yeah, just put it in the front yard.” The one on the table is from 1957. That’s my year. We used to pedal around. Which one is the oldest? It’s in the back. If I put it here, somebody will steal it. If it’s more than 40 years old, they’re going to take it. I got all my Harleys in the back. That’s a Harley right there. Very legendary in Texas. But that baby is heavy. You’d need a truck to take it.

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People want to bring me more and more, and I say, “No, dammit, my parking lot is already full.” Do people ever complain about your yard? Just the City. They come and say we had complaints about your yard. And I say, “Yeah right, I’d like to know who they are,” and they say, “We can’t say.” Well, I already know who they are: Nobody, that’s who. But I say, “Go ahead, tell me what I need to do and I’ll do it.” A nice woman from the City goes, “To tell you the truth, there’s no law against toys in your yard, but this is a lot.” Duh. And then she goes, “You know what, is this art?” I say, “Of course, what do you think?” They’re not dirty or nothing. The rain takes care of it. So does the sun. Eventually it gets brittle. Plastic doesn’t last forever. Eventually, they’re going to get old, and I’m not going to replace

them. Then I’m done. So that’s my deal. I have more inside that I can’t bring outside because they’ve got memories. What kinds of memories? Playing with them. Getting hurt with them. I didn’t care. Them Tonka toys are the best. You can’t break them. They’ll break you. Those are the big boys. But you have so many of them. Surely they weren’t all yours as a kid? No, no, no. I only had like seven. People just came over and said, “Hey, I have another one.” And I said, “Well bring it over.” And they said, “Well where you going to put it at?” And I said, “Put it on the ledge, next to my other ones.” One of my friends has 245 of them. Man! Beautiful. I told him, “Don’t let that go…” Some guys saw my collection and said, “Hey


man, can I put my bikes in there?” And I said, “Yeah, come on and put it there.” So they did. And a friend of mine brought me this other one. All these people had their fun with them. What about all the trophies? The trophies, those I found. I don’t know why they’re throwing them away. They’re nice. Somebody must have earned them. And you have some toy lawn mowers over there. Yeah, I love those because I love to cut the yard, you know. I used to do it with the push lawn mower. It’s old school, man. Then all of a sudden they came out with funny faces on them. I love it. What else do you collect? I see Winnie the Pooh. I had some Barbie dolls from 1966, but I didn’t know what I had. You let them go? Yeah, I gave them away.

I could have collected wrestlers, too. But you see, if you’re going to have a hobby, you need to stick to that only. You cannot afford to have another hobby. My hobby is Hot Wheels because they’re small and you can collect a whole bunch of them. Your yard feels like such a time capsule. Actually, it is. If you really look real good, you can find a pig in there. See the pig? Hmm... On the plant. Oh yeah, there it is. Tell me about the pig. That’s old. It used to be my mom’s. It’s a real one. That tree right there, I grew it. Me and my dad did, when I was five years old. That tree is 55 years old. And if you look on top of the tree, that’s my wheelbarrow. That’s an oldy right there. Did you place everything so nicely in the yard like this? No, a friend of mine came over and did it. I told

him where to put everything. You know, if you’re going to stack something in a truck, you have to know how to do it. And if you’re going to have a collection, you want people to see it. If you’re going to have a whole bunch of dollies, a really nice collection, why keep them in boxes in the closet? Just take them out and hang them up. I like to admire my toys. It’s all memories. It keeps me young. Youth is everything. When I feel sad, I come over here and look at this. You gotta have something like that. You’ll find me here when I wake up. I work the graveyard shift. I’m a paperboy for the Statesman, for 18 years now. That’s a lot, but I love it. The night is never boring.

I LIKE TO ADMIRE MY TOYS. IT’S ALL MEMORIES. IT KEEPS ME YOUNG. YOUTH IS EVERYTHING. WHEN I FEEL SAD, I COME OVER HERE AND LOOK AT THIS. YOU GOTTA HAVE SOMETHING LIKE THAT.

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T R I B E Z A TA L K | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

TRIBEZ A

TALK AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO AUSTIN’S HIDDEN GEMS By Nicole Beckley

MAPPING THE FUTURE Whether you’re a longtime Austin resident or a new transplant, you’ve probably thought about how the city is growing and changing. Wish you could weigh in on hot topics like affordability, mobility and permitting? Now’s the time to publicly comment, provide feedback, and learn more about the city’s CodeNEXT plan, which will help determine what can be built where. Learn more at CodeTALK June 7 at City Hall. AUSTINTEXAS.GOV/DEPARTMENT/CODENEXT

Vive la France If there’s a local politician to get excited about this summer it may be Le Politique (“the politician”), a classic French eatery opening inside the Northshore apartment and office building. Nestled between the second street district and the Green Water redevelopment, the restaurant will serve lunch, brunch and dinner, and feature a patisserie and coffee shop, under the direction of Chef Derek Salkin and pastry Chef Alyssa Hurlstone. Consider the tarte flambée an initiative worth supporting. LEPOLITIQUEAUSTIN.COM

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Best Foot FORWARD “I think walking is just the best way to be connected, to people, to be connected to place,” says Katie Deolloz, founder of ATX Walks. Since August 2016 Deolloz has made community walking in Austin a priority, leading organized walks in different neighborhoods. As a current fellow at the national Walking College and a member of the City’s pedestrian advisory council, Deolloz is passionate about bipedalism as a mode of transportation and for its health benefits. “Walking is the most accessible form of physical activity for the largest number of people across the ages,” Deolloz says, “Whether you’re eight or 80, most likely you’re able to go for a walk.” Her organized walks highlight neighborhood features and bring out a wide variety of community members. “When you’re walking with people, especially in a place like Austin, you’re able to notice things together, some of the funky art work that’s around, the murals, you’re able to discuss it in real time and share that experience,” Deolloz says. MEETUP.COM/ATXWALKS


GOING BANANAS “We always look for locations that are walkable and bikeable from the surrounding neighborhood,” says Anthony Sobotik, co-founder of Lick Honest Ice Creams. Their new shop in the Mueller development opened in April, and families are already flocking for signature flavors like Texas Sheet Cake and Too Hot Chocolate. Since opening Lick’s first location on South Lamar in 2011 (now in Lamar Union), owners Sobotik and Chad Palmatier have emphasized natural local ingredients. Growing up in Hallettsville, Texas, Sobotik calls on his rural roots to work with Texas farmers who supply all the vegetables, herbs, and fruits, including, for the first time, bananas. This summer they’ll offer a limited edition Banana Nut Fudge, with SRSLY chocolate fudge sauce and Texas toasted peanuts. “It was a good way for us to use three super-local ingredients in one flavor,” Sobotik says. ILIKELICK.COM

Mi Kasita es su Casita From dumpster dweller to CEO, Jeff Wilson’s fascination with small spaces has taken him on an interesting journey. Perhaps better known as Professor Dumpster, Wilson spent a year living in a 33-square foot dumpster while he was a professor at HustonTillotson University. “The dumpster was like a test of the ultimate limits of home and living smaller,” Wilson says, “I spent a lot more time out in the neighborhood and community, it kind of became my living room.” The project also planted the seed for what would become Kasita, his new business which produces and retails small (352 sq. foot.) homes for $139,000. Check out the model at 1304 E. 4th St. on Thursdays from 10 a.m. to noon. KASITA.COM

LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR When it comes to going above and beyond in service of a fellow Austinite, Lydia Clay goes boldly. A project manager at Momark Development, Clay was inspired to donate a kidney to a fellow Leadership Austin Essential class member’s child. This year’s recipient of Leadership Austin’s Ascendant Award, Clay will be recognized along with outstanding community members Ron Kessler and Ballet Austin’s Executive Director Cookie Ruiz, during Leadership Austin’s Best Party Ever on June 2 at Brazos Hall. LEADERSHIPAUSTIN.ORG tribeza.com

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COMPOSITION NO. 6, OIL ON CANVAS, 36”X60”

BLACK & WHITE NO. 2, OIL ON CANVAS, 40”X70”

TUSCANY / UMBRIA NO. 3, OIL ON CANVAS, 36”X48”

ERWIN MEYER NEW WORK JUNE 9-18, 2017 PRIVATE VIEW* OPENING ON VIEW CLOSING

JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE

9 10 11-17 18

7:00-9:00 7:00-9:00 4:00-8:00 7:00-9:00

PM PM PM PM

10203 OLD MANCHACA RD., AUSTIN, TX 78748 WWW.ERWINMEYERSTUDIO.COM *RSVP: RACAE@ERWINMEYERSTUDIO.COM 512 560 1841

© 2017 ERWIN MEYER STUDIO, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


ARTS + HAPPENINGS WHERE TO GO AND WHAT TO DO

Repo Man— New work by Philip Durst at Davis Gallery. PHOTOGR APH COURTESY OF DAVIS GALLERY

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MUSIC PICK

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ARTS PICK

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C A L E N DA R S | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Entertainment MUSIC PHOEBE HUNT & THE GATHERERS June 2 Paramount Theatre FLORIDA GEORGIA LINE June 2 Circuit of the Americas LETI GARZA Y LA BANDA June 2 & 16 Iron Cactus T.I. June 4 Empire Control Room PUNCH BROTHERS June 7 ACL Live at The Moody Theater MUSE WITH 30 SECONDS TO MARS June 10 Austin360 Amphitheater THE JOY FORMIDABLE June 13 Parish Austin REDD VOLKAERT June 14 Rollins Studio Theatre SOLSTICE FESTIVAL June 15–17 Pan Am Park CHICAGO & THE DOOBIE BROTHERS June 17 Austin360 Amphitheater THE REVOLUTION June 17 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

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GIRLPOOL June 17 Barracuda SOUND & CINEMA June 21 & 28 The Long Center FUTURE June 23 Austin360 Amphitheater DEFTONES & RISE AGAINST June 28 Austin360 Amphitheater THE WINE DOWN WITH SUPERFÓNICOS June 28 3TEN ACL Live

JURY AWARDWINNING SHORTS June 27 Violet Crown Cinema AUSTIN WEBFEST June 29–July 2 LA LA LAND IN CONCERT June 30 The Long Center

MOVIES IN THE PARK: SISTER ACT June 1 Rosewood Park FEMME FILM FRIDAYS: OBVIOUS CHILD June 2 Bullock Texas State History Museum SUMMER FREE FAMILY FILM SERIES June 3 & 10 Bullock Texas State History Museum TEXAS TELEVISION FESTIVAL June 8–11 Various Locations ASTER AFTER DARK: A CONVERSATION WITH JEFF NICHOLS June 9 Lake Austin Spa Resort

DAVID KOECHNER June 8–10 Cap City Comedy Club GENTRIF*CKED June 9 & 10 Spider House Ballroom SUGAR SAMMY June 14–17 Cap City Comedy Club

THEATER SOMETHING ROTTEN! June 1–4 Bass Concert Hall

FILM

COMEDY

GLACIER June 1–4 The Long Center FIESTA 2017 June 3 Paramount Theatre AFTER THE CURTAIN

AUNTY DONNA June 17 Stateside at the Paramount KURTIS CONNER June 21 The Hideout Theatre GINA BRILLON June 21–24 Cap City Comedy Club JR BROW June 28–July 1 Cap City Comedy Club

June 10 The Long Center MY FAVORITE THINGS

June 22–24 Rollins Studio Theatre GUYS AND DOLLS Through June 25 Austin Playhouse IN THE HEIGHTS Through July 2 ZACH Theatre

CHILDREN WOODLAND FAERIE TRAIL May 27–July 30 Zilker Botanical Garden SUMMER FILM CAMP June 5–July 28 St. David’s Episcopal Church UKULELE SUMMER CAMP June 5–June 9 4201 Wilshire Parkway


AUSTIN SYMPHONY CHILDREN’S DAY ART PARK June 7–28 Symphony Square KIDS OBSTACLE CHALLENGE 2017 June 10 Dripping Springs Ranch Park

OTHER BUBBLEPALOOZA! June 3 The Long Center ATLAS RIDE 2017 June 3 Running Brushy Middle School LIBATIONS TRAIL June 3–24 Omni Austin Hotel Downtown CIRCUS 1903: THE GOLDEN AGE OF THE CIRCUS June 6–8 The Long Center REPUBLIC OF TEXAS BIKER RALLY June 8–11 Travis County Exposition Center & Sixth Street BATTLESTAR GALACTICA REUNION June 10 Paramount Theatre CENTRAL TEXAS JUNETEENTH 2K, PARADE & CELEBRATION June 17 MLK Blvd. & Rosewood Park

AFRICAN AMERICAN BOOK FESTIVAL June 24 George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center KEEP AUSTIN WEIRD FEST & 5K June 24 Downtown Austin BEER CAMP ON TOUR June 24 Carson Creek Ranch TRAILER FOOD TUESDAYS June 27 The Long Center RHYTHM ON STAGE June 22 The Long Center

MUSIC PICK

SUN RADIO 100.1 FM PRESENTS BRUCE ROBISON & KELLY WILLIS AND RAY BENSON & DALE WATSON By Derek Van Wagner

ACL Live at The Moody Theater JUNE 16

Have you ever had the best of both worlds? Perhaps you won the lottery after you donated to charity, or you found 20 bucks while on a jet ski. If you have never felt that sensation, don’t fret because June 16 is your chance. Head to The Moody Theater to experience some of the best country music Austin has to offer with the sweet tones of Bruce Robison & Kelly Willis followed by the salty antics of Ray Benson & Dale Watson. With Willis’s heavenly voice and Robison's melodic songwriting, the duo has made a name for themselves as one of Austin's most harmonious couples. Now on the other side of the spectrum, Watson and Benson have separately made names for themselves as two maverick band leaders, with Benson in front of Asleep at the Wheel and Watson leading His Lonestars. From the Grand Ole Opry to Ginny's Little Longhorn Saloon, they’ve just about played every watering hole in the country, and now they are the keepers of the flame for rowdy, raucous, Texas honky tonk music. So put some yin in your yang, some sin in your grin, maybe a little rum in your ice cream, and come downtown on Friday night to see both sides of the coin that Austin calls country music. tribeza.com

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A R T S P I C K | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Arts DIANA GREENBERG: SOLO SHOW June 3–July 1 Wally Workman Gallery OF TEXAS RIVERS AND TEXAS ART June 5 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center ERWIN MEYER: NEW WORK June 9–18 Erwin Meyer Studio EN BOLA June 10–August 12 de stijl | PODIUM FOR ART RESA WOHLRABE Through June 11 Art on 5th

ART PICK

REPO MAN By Eli John

Davis Gallery THROUGH JULY 8

Given that the world’s population has recently surpassed seven billion, you’d be forgiven for assuming that Philip Durst, the Austin-based collage artist who pops up when you google “Philip Durst Austin” is different from Philip Durst, the Austin-based lawyer whose work focuses on civil rights and employment law. A quick glance at the oeuvre of the former, however, reveals a different story: among the quotidian detritus that Durst repurposes into lively, colorful collages—materials like Starbucks cups, plastic cutlery, and Dum Dums wrappers—you’ll find scraps of paper excised from old law textbooks. Case closed! Philip Durst’s new work is on view in a solo exhibition at Davis Gallery called “Repo Man.” Despite the menacing intimations of the show’s name, the exhibition hopes to convey a sense of fun and optimism. Working with the mundane byproducts of everyday life, Durst creates geometric, colorful, and satisfyingly precise collages, quilt-like in appearance. “Such a tremendous amount of artistic talent, choice, and color goes into such ephemeral packaging,” he says, “That I like to preserve their beauty and vibrance.” Even as he transforms disposable materials into art, he doesn’t completely obfuscate their workaday origins, resulting in works that are not simply pleasant to look at, but they also muse upon, and challenge, our assumptions about the disposability of such objects.

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NINA KATCHADOURIAN: CURIOUSER Through June 11 Blanton Museum of Art LAKEY: CHAOS TO ORDER Through June 11 CAMIBAart LAURA LIT June 17–July 27 Women & Their Work MARLENE LLANES: PLACES & PERCEPTIONS Through June 22 Mexican American Cultural Center JILL LEAR: SPONTANEITY WITHIN STRUCTURE Through June 24 Gallery Shoal Creek

CARVER MUSEUM: HIGHER LEARNING Through June 24 George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center SEBASTIÁN: THE GEOMETRY OF SPACE AND TIME Through June 25 Mexic-Arte Museum PHILIP DURST: REPO MAN Through July 8 Davis Gallery PRIDE & JOY: THE TEXAS BLUES OF STEVIE RAY VAUGHAN Through July 23 Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum MENTORING A MUSE: CHARLES UMLAUF & FARRAH FAWCETT Through August 20 Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum


Diana Gre eber g

What secrets can a 1900s ballet costume reveal? View this story—and many more—at the Harry Ransom Center. THROUGH JULY 16 21st and Guadalupe Streets www.hrc.utexas.edu FREE ADMISSION

Learn to code in Austin. We’ll teach you web development and help you find a job.

theironyard.com/austin or call us: 615.953.0089

WWG

Wa lly Wor km a n Ga l l ery

1 2 0 2 West Si x t h St reet A u st i n , Tex as 78703 wa l l y wo r k manga l l er y.co m 5 1 2 .472.7428 Image: Midnight in Harlem (detail), mixed media on canvas, 36 x 36 inches


E V E N T P I C K | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Art SPACES MUSEUMS THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER 700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org

EVENT PICK

SOUND & CINEMA By Defne Comlek

The Long Center JUNE 21, JUNE 28, JULY 19, AND JULY 26, 6 P.M.

Who doesn’t love an old, classic Hollywood film? Pair it with a live band performance, and a perfect view of the downtown Austin skyline and you have yourself an unbeatable set up. Lucky for us, Alamo Drafthouse and Do512 have once again teamed up to bring us Sound and Cinema, a four-show series scheduled to add a little communal pizzazz to those summer nights. On four Wednesday evenings this summer, the Long Center’s expansive grass lawn will play host to the free, family-friendly evenings, which kick off with a live band performance followed by a fan favorite film shown on a giant inflatable screen. With past performances by local favorites The Midnight Stroll and The Echocentrics followed by screenings of films like “Tommy Boy” and “Footloose,” we’re expecting this year’s lineup to be an audio and visual treat for attendees of all ages. So bring a blanket, take a seat on the lawn, and unwind with boozy sips and food truck picks. Not in the mood for cocktails? Top off your evening with a frozen dessert instead. Doors will open at 6 p.m. Stay tuned for movie lineups.

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BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6, F–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave Hours: T-Fri 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: T-Fri 10-4, Sa-Su 12-4 umlaufsculpture.org


A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T | M U S E U M S & G A L L E R I E S

GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 900 RR 620 S. Unit B110 (512) 243 7429 Hours: T–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com ART AT THE DEN 317 W. 3rd St. (512) 222 3364 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-6, Su 12-5 artattheden.com ART ON 5TH 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By Appt. Only austingalleries.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com

BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd. Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 camibaart.com CAPITAL FINE ART 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M–Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 613 Allen St. (512) 300 8217 By event and appt only co-labprojects.org

FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery

LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org

ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com

FLATBED PRESS 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M–F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sa-Su, 11-4 linkpinart.com

FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com

RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART 1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

GALLERY 702 702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu–Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com

DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON 4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com

DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 dimensiongallery.org

GALLERY SHOAL CREEK 2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 galleryshoalcreek.com

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12-5 grayduckgallery.com

EAST SIDE GLASS STUDIO 3401 E. 4th St. (512) 815 2569 Hours: Tu-Sa By appt. only eastsideglassstudio.com FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com

JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sa-Su 12-5 massgallery.org MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd. #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu - Sa, 11- 6 modernrocksgallery.com MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu - Sa, 12- 6 mondotees.com OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: T–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 pumpproject.org

SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 T-F 10-5 space12.org STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com VISUAL ARTS CENTER 2300 Trinity St. (512) 232 2348 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 utvac.org WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–5 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG AGAVE GALLERY 208 E. San Antonio St. (830) 990 1727 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 agavegallery.com ARTISANS AT ROCKY HILL 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 11-3 artisansatrockyhill.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 314 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 12-5 fbartgallery.com INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-5:30 insightgallery.com LARRY JACKSON ANTIQUES & ART GALLERY 209 S. Llano (830) 997 0073 Hours: M-F 9:30-5, Sa 10-5 larryjacksonantiques.com THE GALLERY AT VAUDEVILLE 230 E. Main St. (830) 992 3234 Hours: M 8-6, W-F 8-6, Sa 8-9, Su 8-5 vaudeville-living.com WHISTLE PIK 425 E. Main St. (830) 990 8151 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 whistlepik.com

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FEELING RIGHT AT HOME

Neighbors who share more than a cup of sugar BY MP MUELLER PHOTOGRAPHS BY ROBERT GOMEZ

Most of us can check the boxes for being on the giving and receiving end of neighborly gestures: borrowing a cup of sugar, friendly chitchat over the fence, toting someone else’s emptied trash cans from the curb. Then there are those who take it up a notch. Not satisfied with a friendly wave from some safe, invisible perimeter around their house, there are people who possess an almost primal desire to create community wherever they rest their heads. Like queens at a quilting bee, these people stitch together a warm blanket of friendships and a sense of place where there were previously just random swatches of fabric and a spool of thread. If Foursquare were still a thing, they would amass enough points for mega Mayor badges within hours. And if having a great neighborhood were a competitive sport, HOAs would be secretly bribing them to relocate with free car washes, leaf raking, and pet sitting. You get the point. For our Neighborhoods issue, we say howdy, and thank you, to some Austinites who demonstrate the exceptional qualities of a great neighbor. You make us feel right at home. 48 JUNE 2017 |

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DOGS THESE DAYS C AN FETCH MORE THAN STICKS OR BONES.

EMRIN DHATT & BUSTER Collaring friendships through dogs in

Central East Austin

Friends, for example. When Emrin Dhatt moved to Austin from San Francisco two years ago to take a job with Dropbox, she didn’t know a soul save her boyfriend. “It was really hard to meet people,” Dhatt said. Soon a!er she moved into an apartment at the Eleven complex in the Central East Austin neighborhood, she got a dog, Buster, who she would take to the neighborhood dog park around 6 p.m. each day for some poochercise. O!en, they would show up but, with scattered schedules, alas, there would be no other dogs to romp with. Eventually she met two other neighborhood dog owners who were experiencing the same thing—always waiting for other dogs and owners to show up. So they started a group chat of three to coordinate rendezvous for their Rovers. The group grew and today there are 30 or so dog owners living in the Eleven and AMLI East Side apartments who see each other nearly every day at the dog park. People in their group are a mixed breed. A few are from Austin—the group refers to them as unicorns—but most are transplants. Californian, Australian, and British accents mix it up with Texan at their daily post-work ritual. “Before this group, none of us really knew our neighbors. A lot of us who came from different places didn’t know a lot of people, and some of us were rather isolated.” These dog lovers take a page from their pets and tend to sniff each other out. “If someone new moves to the building with a dog, we’ll approach them and let them know about the group meet-up.” Beyond sharing recommendations on dog walkers and vets, they’ve become friends who have supported one another through tough days at work, break ups, and even health emergencies. “When my boyfriend was recently hospitalized,” Dhatt recounted, “they watched my dog so I could be with him and offered to make me meals. They were there to console me when things weren’t looking good, and a doctor in the group helped explain some of the procedures, medicine, and seriousness of the situation, which was immensely helpful.” Puppy Friends is the name of their group text, as it started when the original three had months-old dogs in tow. A year later, this now larger, disparate group of buddies share advice on everything from car shopping negotiations to job hunting. They dog sit for each other and lend a sympathetic, supportive ear when needed. They march in parades together and do nights out as a group. If Brisket, Poncho, Panda, Apollo, Poppy, and Odie can broker unlikely friendships, we may see an update to C.M. Coolidge’s Dogs Playing Poker painting series. Dogs in dresses and suits, clasping briefcases and popping melatonin, as they cavort through time zones, brokering world peace.

People in their group are a mixed breed. A few are from Austin—the group refers to them as unicorns—but most are transplants. Californian, Australian, and British accents mix it up with Texan at their daily post-work ritual. tribeza.com

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PERCHED ABOVE THE LOST CREEK COUNTRY CLUB GOLF COURSE IS

The Foothills of Barton Creek, a gated community with a nest of higher-end homes. Nancy Shields moved there eight years ago when she married her husband Brad. Beautiful homes, sumptuous views . . . life was good for this fast-talking woman from Lafayette, Louisiana, right? “The first two years I didn’t want to stay there,” Shields shared over coffee. “I would wave to my neighbors and they would go into their garages and put their garage doors down.” That didn’t sit right for Shields, whose first job out of college was a three-year stint as a missionary in Mombasa, Kenya. She was of the mindset that the world was her community and her training would help her serve as a beacon to those in need. Five years ago, a man came up to her at a party. His wife had just been diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease and he thought if she could belong to a neighborhood group, it would help her. Could Nancy do something? It was at that point Shields decided to put a figurative light out in her yard and call on her neighbors. She had been keeping a spreadsheet of neighbors’ emails, cra!ed a letter inviting them to get together, closed her eyes and hit send. And gather they have. They always have Christmas and Halloween get-togethers and a Walk ‘N Wine evening slated for the fall. (You guessed it . . . everyone brings a bottle of vino and neighbors visit house to house.) This April they had a Spring Fling event with a bouncy house, concert with musicians from the neighborhood, hamburgers on the grill, and an Easter egg hunt. And, twice a month, the ladies of the Foothills get together to laugh over wine and share what’s going on in their lives. That felt, but not seen, beacon in her front yard pulls in people in their time of need. Shields will get texts throughout the day from neighbors with requests for help which she fields and dispatches—flat tires, dogs on the loose, meals for someone who broke their leg. “Last year, when a woman across the street lost her husband in the middle of the night, I was her first call,” Shields said. The neighborhood rallied, putting on a reception a!er his funeral in his home. “It was his dying wish and we didn’t even know it,” Shields said. “He wanted people to go back to his house following his service. We had people there who didn’t even know him, but showed up with food. We’ve turned into this neighborhood of caring people.” “It’s never easy to do community,” Shields reflected. “It will cost you something. But at the end of my life, what do I really want to say? That I cared and invested in people or closed my door and listened to music all day? Community, too, is messy,” she confessed. “We don’t always know how to do it right, but if we are just out there trying and we have good intentions and we’re open to the experience, good things will come of it. This neighborhood has turned out to be the most amazing place.”

“It’s never easy to do community,” Shields reflected. “It will cost you something. But at the end of my life, what do I really want to say? That I cared and invested in people or closed my door and listened to music all day?” 52 JUNE 2017 |

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NANCY SHIELDS Serving as a beacon in

the Foothills of Barton Creek


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MANY OF US ARE SENSITIVE TO REJECTION. REACH OUT AND ASK A

MORGAN & STEPHEN STEPHANIAN Getting past no to neighborhood

in Mesa Park

new acquaintance to dinner, get a polite no, and we may try again. Any polite no a!er that, and we’ll shrug our shoulders and call it a loss. But Mesa Park residents Morgan and Stephen Stephanian, both native Austinites, graciously accepted the rejections. And kept asking. Stephen, a realtor and fi!h generation Austinite, has relatives close by, but Morgan’s extended family all lives in West Texas. Might as well be Montana. Her desire for a close neighborhood, something she didn’t have growing up, was a big impetus for the outreach. “I wanted to know my neighbors, have people around me who I could walk to and say hi and have that sense of neighborhood,” Morgan said. So they kept asking people in their Northwest Austin neighborhood, near the Domain, over to dinner. For the first couple of years, invitations were floated to eight different families about forty times collectively. The Stephanians were batting 50%. But they were persistent and, as the adage goes, it paid off. Today, 12 neighbors and five children, including the Stephanians’ two toddlers, gather weekly for dinner, typically held in the couple’s home. The key, according to Morgan, is to be very, very consistent and establish the meal on the same night each week. People now build their business schedules around their Monday Night Dinners, or MNDs, as they are referred to in their text conversations. And these neighbors have forged a new family. “We’ve had marriages and babies and we’ve grieved together—we’ve been through job losses and losing family,” Morgan said. They’ve visited each other in the hospital and brought meals to new parents a!er children in the group were born. And several times, when people have gone abroad, the group has celebrated their return with themed meals from their destinations such as Cuba, Italy, Spain and New Zealand. The neighborly love spills over beyond those who see each other on Monday nights. The Stephanians are party throwers for all seasons, hosting their neighborhood’s National Night Out event in October, an annual backyard beer and appetizer holiday party in December, and a 4th of July party that typically draws 75 in red, white, and blue. “I feel like we live in a small town,” Morgan said. “We borrow stuff from each other all the time—lawn mowers and blow-up mattresses for company coming to town. I have neighbors texting me ‘I need a cup of flour, I need three eggs’ . . . I get that all the time. Living in a close community isn’t everyone’s forte, but when it works out and comes together, it’s really cool.”

For the first couple of years, invitations were floated to eight different families about forty times collectively. The Stephanians were batting 50%. tribeza.com

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I MET ERIK A BROWN ON A SOMBER OCCASION. FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS HAD

come together to plan the memorial service of a beloved 18-year-old son, Ezra Polter, who was tragically killed in a car wreck in 2015. The group had five days to organize and plan a memorial service held on the grounds of Laguna Gloria. More than 1,000 guests were expected. Spreadsheets and sign-up forms were flying around online. At the center of it all, making calm from grief and chaos, was Erika Brown. There was a strong whiff of reverence in others’ voices when they spoke of Brown. Awe was present along with a trait rarely shown by the most uber alpha women—submissive obeyance. A palpable, but unspoken, sigh of relief . . . Brown was in charge and this would happen. It would be seamless. It would be beautiful. And it was. Brown was born and reared in Lubbock—her dad was an art professor at Texas Tech. Luckily for us, she came to Austin to attend UT, and stayed. She and her husband Bick own the two Hyde Park Bar & Grill restaurants. Their three kids have wended their way through central Austin schools, from Bryker Woods Elementary to O. Henry Middle School and now Austin High. If you are a school administrator, you want someone like Brown walking through your doors. She sees projects for safety and greater improvement others miss. Brown then figures out how to get them done, finds grant money, cajoling reserve budgets and jingling donations out of booster clubs and parents, and oversees the construction and installation. The first project she tackled on a long list of school improvements was the teachers’ lounge at Bryker Woods. “I went in there and it was a dismal yellow with le!over mismatched office furniture and I thought ‘How are the teachers to enjoy their jobs spending time here? They spend more time here than at home.’” She gutted their work space, lounge and kitchen area, adding Four Hands furniture, great appliances and custom cabinets. “My idea has always been to support the people who do a lot for me, teachers, in particular,” Brown shared. “Let’s make things more efficient for them and make it so they enjoy and can focus on their jobs.” Beyond that project are dozens of others: installation of limestone retaining walls that doubled as outdoor amphitheater seating trackside at Bryker Woods and O. Henry Middle School; sidewalks, bike racks, and water fountains with bottle refill stations. As her kids matriculated through to Stephen F. Austin High School, she tackled locker room improvements, got picnic tables and a wellness center added. Notably she tackled spiffing up the school’s main gathering place: its gym. 25 years had lapsed since its walls were touched by a brush and color. Brown worked with administrators, parents and boosters, aggregating funding to repaint it. Her latest project is enhancing the soul of the Rosedale neighborhood, Ramsey Park. She’s been involved for four and half years, first in the planning stages and now in the execution stages, as the general contractor on various projects. Fundraiser pavers etched with donor names will be overlaid on a walkway the winds through the park, much-needed shading now covers the basketball court, permanent umbrellas cool down the toddlers in their play area, forty-foot trees are being planted, and the park’s first ever permanent art installation by neighborhood artist Robbin Polter will soon be affixed to the park’s pavilion. Brown, throughout our conversation, stressed that she didn’t get these things done in a vacuum. And, she gave kudos to her husband who stepped up parenting duties to support her full-time volunteerism. Brown also credited her mom for setting a great example of giving back to the community. The most rewarding project she’s worked on? “That would be Ramsey Park,” she said. “To walk by—and I walk or drive by almost every single day—and to see the entire park being used just warms my heart. That I had a hand in people’s enjoyment there really makes me happy.”

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ERIKA BROWN Keeping things blooming in Rosedale


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OUR AUSTIN STORY We explore the surprisingly historic places you might be walking past everyday BY ANNE BRUNO


P H OTO G R A P H S CO U R T E S Y O F A U S T I N H I S TO R Y C E N T E R A N D M E X I C-A R T E M U S E U M

Mexican and Mexican American workers in Walker’s Austex Chili Factory, 1924. Opposite, Bird’s eye view of the City of Austin, 1873.

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Below, earliest known photograph of Republic Square Park, 1869. Right, Ted Eubanks, historian and interpretive planner, stands on what’s left of Austin’ first African American church, “Old Wesley on the Hill.” Only the steps of the 1867 church founded by former slaves remain, unmarked, in a vacant lot near 8th and Neches Streets.

P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F A U S T I N H I S TO R Y C E N T E R A N D M E X I C-A R T E M U S E U M

ITH A MERE THREE CABINS SITUATED ON THE

Colorado River at the mouth of Shoal Creek in an area possessing few advantages and all the disadvantages one could imagine, Austin’s hardscrabble beginnings hardly forecast its future. In fact, according to interpretive planner and longtime Austinite Ted Eubanks, in the early 19th century, no city was less probable for greatness than Austin. Were he here today, Mirabeau B. Lamar, one of Texas’ more colorful characters, would likely argue otherwise. On a scouting trip in the fall of 1838 in a ravine we now call Congress Avenue, Lamar, vice president of the Republic of Texas, shot one of the biggest buffalo bulls he and his traveling companions had ever seen. Such great fortune captured his lively imagination and that very day, Lamar decided that “this would be the seat of a great empire!” “Several months later when Edwin Waller shows up in May of 1839 to lay out a city plan, what he finds is a handful of ne’er-do-wells, opportunistic land schemers, survivors of Indian raids, despots, and some seriously independent thinkers living among rocks and cedar trees,” Eubanks explains. “By their nature, the people then living at Waterloo, as the small settlement was known, really weren’t suited to live anywhere but on the edge of something.” Independent thinking and an affinity for pushing boundaries are among contemporary Austin’s most attractive qualities, drawing people and businesses in numbers Waller couldn’t conceive. But qualities strong enough to propel a place from a tiny dot on an unpopulated map to an admired and highly desirable city don’t materialize overnight. The Downtown Austin Alliance (DAA), in partnership with the Austin Parks and Recreation Department and some of Austin’s longtime preservation organizations, thinks it’s time Austinites learned more about how we came to be who we are. That, in turn, says the DAA’s Melissa Barry, can help us think about where we’re going. As is always the case, learning happens naturally through stories. And if any place has a few good tales to tell, it’s Austin, Texas. The initial task of the Our Austin Stories project, Barry explains, is to gather the public’s passed down stories as well as first-person accounts about Austin’s original public spaces—the three remaining designated squares from Waller’s original 14-block by 14-block city plan. Once stories have been

collected and research into every possible source reveals themes about the significance of the squares, then things like signage, online guides and cultural event planning will be designed and put in place later this year to bring the stories to life. Ultimately, people will get to experience Austin’s rich and colorful history instead of simply walking past it. We sat down with Barry, Eubanks and Charles Peveto, co-chair of Friends of Wooldridge Square, to hear a sampling of stories from two of the most frequented squares today, Wooldridge and Republic, and to learn how Austin’s past turned into Austin present. Eubanks, who has led similar efforts in other cities, describes Austin as a truly unique American story. “Absolutely fascinating, but mostly unknown, events happened in places many of us pass on a daily basis. It’s not hard to connect the dots and see the line from Austin’s past to its present, but in many of Austin’s historically important places you have no way of knowing the history you might be standing right in front of,” Eubanks says. Regarding those connections, Eubanks adds, “We hear a lot about keeping Austin weird and how different Austin is from the rest of Texas, but I’m here to tell you it’s pretty much been that way from the start.”


P H OTO G R A P H B Y L E O N I D F U R M A M S K Y

“We hear a lot about keeping Austin weird and how different Austin is from the rest of Texas, but I’m here to tell you it’s pretty much been that way from the start.”

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y T E D L E E E U B A N K S

And use it they did; if someone had something of importance to say or an issue needed to be debated, WOOLDRIDGE SQUARE is where it happened. From the bandstand, political and civil rights history was made.

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R I G H T PAG E , LO W E R L E F T, 19 6 8 M U S I C P O S T E R B Y J I M F R A N K L I N ; U P P E R A N D LO W E R R I G H T, P H OTO G R A P H S CO U R T E S Y O F A U S T I N H I S TO RY C E N T E R

Evidence supporting that statement spans the political and cultural spectrum. A map illustrating the 1861 referendum on secession shows Travis County as one of the few in Texas whose residents voted to remain in the Union. And on September 29, 1968, a now-ubiquitous Austin cultural reference shows up for the first time when local artist Jim Franklin introduces the armadillo in a poster advertising a free concert held at downtown’s Wooldridge Square. That idiosyncratic mascot would find a permanent place in Austin’s music and hippie culture. (Think Eddie Wilson’s famed Armadillo World Headquarters founded in 1970, and the t-shirts and coffee mugs available at BookPeople, Austin’s homegrown and very independent bookstore.) Peveto says as soon as Mayor A. P. Wooldridge cleaned up what had simply been an empty space several blocks southwest of the Capitol, dedicated the space as a park, and constructed the Classical Revival bandstand there in 1910, Wooldridge Square become the cornerstone of a progressive downtown community. “Even back then, and partly due to Mayor Wooldridge’s keen interest in education and the civic development of the young city, Austin was considered more liberal than other places in the state,” Peveto says. “The fact that Wooldridge Square’s sloping ground creates a natural amphitheater made it possible for large crowds to gather and hear someone speak from the bandstand. Mayor Wooldridge made it known that all were welcome to use the square—that was unusual in Texas at that time.” And use it they did; if someone had something of importance to say or an issue needed to be debated, Wooldridge Square is where it happened. From the bandstand, political and civil rights history was made. In 1928, Minnie Fisher Cunningham, a leader in the Texas Woman Suffrage Association (which o!en held rallies at the square) announced her campaign and became the first woman from Texas to run for the U.S. Senate. Cunningham’s announcement foreshadowed a similar one made 20 years later by the U.S. Representative from Texas’ 10th District, Lyndon Baines Johnson. That campaign would prove successful, taking the candidate from the square’s

bandstand all the way to the White House where he would sign into law two of the most important pieces of civil rights legislation. But, as Eubanks relates, it was years before Cunningham and LBJ that another speaker—one for whom freedom and equality were poignantly urgent—drew crowds of a size and racial mix not seen before. It was September of 1911 and Booker T. Washington was touring the country speaking on civil rights. As Washington was denied the opportunity to speak at the State Capitol building by legislation passed specifically to bar his presence, Mayor Wooldridge invited the slave-born political figure to share his ideas from the bandstand. In a city with less than 25,000 residents, 5,000 showed up to Wooldridge Square to hear the powerful orator.

Since 1910, Wooldridge Square’s bandstand has played host to some of Austin’s most important cultural and political events.

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Left, former slave, Rev. Jacob Fontaine, one of Austin’s earliest and most prolific civic leaders. Below, Walker’s Austex Chili Factory located across Republic Squre in Austin’s “Mexico.”

Several blocks south of Wooldridge Square is Republic Square, so named for one of the most important events to take place under its live oaks, now called the Auction Oaks. Here, only four months a!er creating his city plan, Judge Waller held the first auction of lots in order to fund the construction of government buildings for the Republic’s new capital. Today’s shoppers who frequent the square’s Saturday farmers market are likely unaware of their own participation in one of the city’s most important and longest-running stories. In the town’s earliest days, present-day Republic Square and the blocks immediately surrounding it become the epicenter of the city’s Mexican and Mexican American community. Food was a key element for these residents, sustaining their culture and everyday way of life. In time, food in particular would prove to be enormously influential in the everyday life of the future Austin as well. According to a recent exhibit at the Austin History Center curated by the Mexic-Arte Museum, in 1875 close to 300 Mexican immigrants and Mexican Americans lived west of downtown Congress Avenue to the banks of Shoal Creek. Most settled in the area around the square and in time the cluster of neighborhoods became known simply as “Mexico.” While the square would be dubbed “Mexican Park” by newspapers and Anglos, most of those living in the area called it “Guadalupe Park” for Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, built across the road in 1907. The canopy of live oaks which had served as Waller’s auction site played host to the traditional goings on of a typical Mexican village zócalo: street vendors sold candy, tamales, and pan dulces, and families strolled through the square on their way home from Sunday mass. Daily life in Austin’s “Mexico” was hard, even for the time, with inadequate housing and a lack of city services. However, a level of commerce prospered there. The area was home to one of Austin’s largest businesses in the first half of the 20th century. Possessing the world’s only automated tamale-making machine, Walker’s Austex Chili Factory was located just off Republic Square. At a time when many businesses would not hire Mexicans or Mexican Americans, the chili factory employed 15 percent of Austin’s entire Mexican population. Austin’s “Mexico” neighborhood encompassing the Republic’s historic oaks endured for more than 50 years before the City Plan of 1928 codified segregation and people of color (mostly African Americans, Mexicans and Mexican Americans) were forced to move east of East Avenue, today’s IH-35. In reflecting on the importance of the Our Austin Stories project, historian Eubanks refers to a quote from George Santayana which he says may be overused but is right and even prescient for Austin today: Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. A thoroughly explored understanding of our diverse history, from multiple perspectives, is the only way we can move wisely and united into the future. The Our Austin Stories project is slated to continue through the fall, although talk of expanding its scope has grown as community interest increases.

P H OTO G R A P H S CO U R T E S Y O F A U S T I N H I S TO R Y C E N T E R A N D M E X I C-A R T E M U S E U M

While the bandstand has always commanded attention, Washington’s appearance there was not the only significant connection between Austin’s early African American community and the historic square. Immediately south, Block 101, designated for churches in Waller’s plan, was where, following emancipation from 57 years of slavery, Reverend Jacob Fontaine founded the First (Colored) Baptist Church of Austin. Fontaine had moved to Austin with his master who was Lamar’s personal secretary; he is thought to have been in Lamar’s party on that fateful scouting trip to Waterloo. A prolific civic leader, Jacob Fontaine became active in politics during Reconstruction. Even though his own descendants and all other African Americans would not be allowed by law to attend the University of Texas until 1956 (58 years a!er his death), Fontaine played a key role in getting out the black vote to support the university being located in Austin. In the course of his long life, Fontaine went on to found five more churches, worked as a janitor, operated a grocery and laundry service, owned a book and medicine store, and in 1876 established one of the first black weekly newspapers in the South. The Gold Dollar served the freed-slave community in critical ways: it promoted literacy, kept the newly-freed citizens current on events and, for ten cents, placed ads that helped family members separated by slavery locate relatives after emancipation.


P H OTO G R A P H B Y T E D L E E E U B A N K S

Austin’s “Mexico” neighborhood encompassing the REPUBLIC’S HISTORIC OAKS endured for more than 50 years before the City Plan of 1928 codified segregation and people of color (mostly African Americans, Mexicans and Mexican Americans) were forced to move east of East Avenue, today’s IH-35.

One of Austin’s oldest bridges (built over Shoal Creek in 1887), now adjacent to Hut’s Hamburgers on West 6th Street.

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y

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MY PARK, MY POOL, MY CITY Creating community conversation through choreography BY NICOLE BECKLEY PHOTOGRAPHS BY LEAH MUSE

P H OTO G R A P H B Y

TO DESCRIBE WHAT SUMMER SOUNDS LIKE IS TO DESCRIBE LIFE AT

the pool—the plop and splash of a cannonball hitting the water, the giggles of young swimmers, the shouts of “walk!” issued by whistle-wearing lifeguards. These are the sorts of sounds and images that have been serving as inspiration for Forkli! Danceworks, as they prepare for their next production, “My Park, My Pool, My City,” opening in July. A multi-year collaboration between Forkli! and the City of Austin’s Parks and Recreation and Aquatics programs, the project received a National Endowment for the Arts Our Town grant in 2016, an award reserved for projects taking on a city issue. “It’s not really about a single artistic show, it’s about how to use an artistic process to tackle a city problem,” explains Allison Orr, Forkli!’s artistic director. Using art to reveal the way a city works is o!en intrinsic to the pieces Orr produces. From working with Austin Energy electrical technicians for tribeza.com

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Top: Forklift’s Artistic Director, Allison Orr. Left: “We want to get people talking about pools and caring about pools,” says Associate Choreographer Krissie Marty.

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“PowerUP” (2013) to embedding with sanitation workers for “The Trash Project” (2009, 2011), which became the subject of the 2012 documentary “Trash Dance,” Orr and her team zero in on humanizing how communities function. Before they create the elements of a dance performance, they do a lot of listening and looking—gathering the stories of the people involved and cataloguing their movements to ultimately translate into choreography. For “My Park, My Pool, My City,” the scope is even broader. Over the next three years, dances will be developed at three different pools, beginning at Bartholomew Pool in East Austin’s Windsor Park neighborhood. “With this piece it’s not just the story of a lifeguard it’s also the story of the maintenance guy and the story of the pool user; it’s the whole community of people who are related to this place,” Orr says. Originally built in the 1960s, Bartholomew Pool completed a multi-million-dollar renovation in 2014. The first historically integrated pool in Austin, it’s open year-round, but swells with summer swimmers.


With its recent renovation, Bartholomew may now be a star of the aquatics program, but the city’s 51 public aquatic facilities rely on regular maintenance, repair work and staffing and many face deep infrastructure needs. Jodi Jay, Austin Parks and Recreation’s aquatics division manager, explains that the city is at a critical point in its facilities development, both maintaining what currently exists and planning for the future. “We do have areas as a community that are underserved that do not have pools,” Jay says, “And so what does a sustainable system within a city that has grown tremendously over the years, what does that look like?” Collaborating on “My Park, My Pool, My City,” the hope is to raise these issues in a real and human way. “It’s not a simple solution. It’s going to take years and it’s going to take people from across the city caring about it to fix it, the city alone won’t be able to do it,” Orr says, “What we hope is that our project both ends up helping the neighbors that participate to have a deeper understanding of the problem and are more hopeful or willing or organized to advocate for themselves, but also to get people who don’t live in the neighborhood caring as well about the aquatic system.” Part of the community engagement piece begins poolside. Now in its fi!h semester, the Swim ATX program connects high school students with the opportunity to lifeguard — o!en their first job—thanks to a partnership between AISD and the YMCA. “The whole reason we began this program is we realized that our pool of employees did not really reflect the city as a whole,” explains Adrian Ortega, one of Swim ATX’s founding members. Looking to bring in members of the community who hadn’t previously been reached, Ortega coaches students as they learn the required skills, noting the personal growth that comes through the program. By the end Ortega says, “They really appreciate what it means to be a lifeguard. We’ve also started tracking their grades and their fitness, everything just gets better.” The program helps fill the need for more lifeguards while engaging neighborhood teens. A number of them will likely be a part of the cast of “My Park, My Pool, My City,” allowing their neighbors to see some of the work they do in a new way. “I think the arts are an effective instrument, sometimes they’re the only instrument of really translating the importance of what is going on in our community and sometimes more broadly in our nation,” explains Frank Cooksey, a former Austin mayor and family friend of Orr’s.

An arts project can help bring the concept of combating infrastructure crises down to human scale, presenting it as the idea of taking care of our fellow neighbors. “The arts are able to characterize [something] in a way that grabs people’s emotions. The pool project in particular involves a kind of attempt to describe human relationships that come out of a community of people who are engaged in service and recreational enjoyment together,” Cooksey says. “Dance, motion, and art are able to get at the way that a community is formed around a local neighborhood swimming pool.” “MY PARK, MY POOL, MY CITY” RUNS JULY 21 & 22, AND 28 & 29 AT BARTHOLOMEW POOL, 1800 E. 51 ST. A PREVIEW SHOW WILL BE HELD JUNE 8 AT 5:30PM AT AUSTIN MOTEL, 1220 S. CONGRESS AVE. TICKETS AVAILABLE AT FORKLIFTDANCEWORKS.ORG

“With this piece it’s not just the story of a lifeguard it’s also the story of the maintenance guy and the story of the pool user; it’s the whole community of people who are related to this place,” Orr says. tribeza.com

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NEIGHBORHOOD PERSPECTIVES THE GRASS ISN’T ALWAYS GREENER ON THE OTHER SIDE

For our annual Neighborhoods issue, we reached out to a bunch of people to learn what, in their words, is best about the neighborhood they call home. When asked if they could see themselves living in another neighborhood, some could (trees and proximity to downtown were big draws!), but most seemed more than content to be just where they are, enjoying their favorite neighborhood hangouts and hidden gems—which they have graciously shared with the rest of us. COMPILED BY ANNA ANDERSEN(LOCATION PHOTOGRAPHS BY DANIELLE CHLOE

best BYOB mini golf paradise. What’s something most people don’t know about your neighborhood? There

are four Torchy's Tacos locations within five minutes of my house. Bouldin Creek must have the highest taco demand in the known universe. We are surrounded by tacos!

MIKEY TRAFTON

Part-time watermelon farmer living in Bouldin Creek

Are you on a sugar-borrowing basis with your neighbors? No way—I'm afraid

of social contact. I'm the guy in the neighborhood who turns all the lights off on Halloween and pretends I'm not home.

What do you like best about your neighborhood?

If you could live in any other neighborhood, which one would it be and why?

It's a quiet hamlet in the shadow of downtown Austin. Favorite neighborhood hangouts? The High Road (formerly Elks Lodge, with the best pool in the city). Hidden gems? Peter Pan Mini Golf, the city's

Probably Travis Heights or Zilker—our neighboring neighborhoods to the east and west. They have almost as many taco joints as Bouldin Creek.

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Lake Park at Mueller

ANNA FAGAN

Category analyst living in East Riverside

What do you like best about your neighborhood? It is close to the trail

around Lady Bird Lake and I have an affordable one-bedroom apartment. Favorite neighborhood hangouts? The Lady Bird Lake boardwalk,

Buzzmill, Mour, The Jackalope. Hidden gems? The new Jackalope bar has surprisingly great food and a good atmosphere. Buzzmill has free standup comedy every Wednesday. What’s something most people don’t know about your neighborhood? That the new Jackalope exists. Are you on a sugar-borrowing basis with your neighbors? Not

in my apartment complex, but I have met a lot of people walking at the trail that live in nearby complexes! If you could live in any other neighborhood, which one would it be and why? Clarksville. It’s close to

downtown, but still has the neighborhood community feel. It’s very safe, has a lot of trees, and is within walking distance to the trail.

The Jackalope

The High Road tribeza.com

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Hidden gems? Ford Street on Halloween sums

up the Zilker spirit well. The street is closed to cars and every neighbor goes all-out — think front yard mazes, DIY haunted garages, and freak flags flying in every direction. What’s something most people don’t know about your neighborhood? When the first

MICHAEL PORTMAN

Co-founder of Birds Barbershop living in Zilker

What do you like best about your neighborhood? The best part about Zilker

is the proximity to the park, Barton Springs and especially the hike and bike trail. Zilker keeps my family healthy. Favorite neighborhood hangouts? I like going to Zilker Elementary on the weekends to toss around a baseball with one son while the other one skateboards the outdoor hallways with his first-grade thrasher crew. The Bluebonnet Food Mart down the road is our neighborhood bodega, making it so that I can go days without leaving the Zilker Bubble.

Birds Barbershop opened on South Lamar in Zilker eleven years ago, I spent a lot of time getting to know the nooks and crannies of the place I'd eventually call home. What clinched it was the corner of Folts and Treadwell, where neighbors have set up a Frisbee golf course across several front yards. Only in Zilker.

ANNIE STUBBS

Mom living in Great Hills

What do you like best about your neighborhood? The diversity! On any

Are you on a sugar-borrowing basis with your neighbors? Definitely. If I forget to can-

given day, I can hear three or more languages being spoken at the grocery store. It makes me feel like Austin is truly becoming an urban center.

cel the newspaper before a trip or a package gets le! out when we're gone, someone will stop by and keep the house looking occupied. When there isn't an outdoor tie-dye party going on, I like that Zilker folk tend to keep to themselves, but always look out for their own.

Favorite neighborhood hangouts?

Northwest Family YMCA, Garbo's Lobster. Hidden gems? There is a red sauce Italian restaurant called Reale's that I love. It is family owned and operated, a bit kitschy, and I always feel happy when we go there.

If you could live in any other neighborhood, which one would it be and why?

What’s something most people don’t know about your neighborhood?

Barton Hills, because it's next to Zilker.

When we walk out our back gate, we walk straight into the Bull Creek Greenbelt and a mile-long trail with water crossings that ends at our neighborhood park. Are you on a sugar-borrowing basis with your neighbors? Yes! The kids play

together in our front yards and the adults all stop to chat while walking their dogs. If you could live in any other neighborhood, which one would it be and why? Probably Pemberton Heights

because the houses and trees are dreamy and we do miss being "in town."

Bluebonnet Food Mart

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JESSE PARKER STOWELL

Publicist living in Travis Heights

What do you like best about your neighborhood? Travis Heights is a truly residential

neighborhood where you can say hi to your neighbors as you climb the hill from Riverside towards the creek. With South Congress just a few blocks away, a late-night snack at June's feels like a neighborhood block party. Favorite neighborhood hangouts? I’m a huge fan of Larry McGuire’s (McGuire Moorman Hospitality) and Liz Lambert’s (Bunkhouse) properties as they create elevated spaces

that still feel like Austin. I go to June’s All Day o!en for a delicious salad lunch or late night glass of wine picked out by June Rodil. If I have celebrity clients in town I recommend they stay at Hotel Saint Cecilia, mostly as another reason to have drinks poolside. For breakfast meetings I’ll go to Café No Se for coffee and their perfect kouign amann pastry. If I want no frills beer in a relaxed environment I’ll go to the Whip In. Hidden gems? I don’t think people visiting Austin get to see the beautiful homes on Newning and Academy Drive with their green yards and Blunn Creek nearby, just minutes from the hustle and bustle of South Congress and across the lake from downtown.

What’s something most people don’t know about your neighborhood? I feel New India

Cuisine on South Congress isn't appreciated nearly enough. A Goan twist on Indian food, this fish-heavy restaurant serves a lunch special that gives you a little taste of everything. Are you on a sugar-borrowing basis with your neighbors? The original Austin

neighbors are friendly and many of the transplants know each other from similar social circles in their previous hometowns of San Francisco, New York and Los Angeles. If you could live in any other neighborhood, which one would it be and why? I love

East Austin, the houses going in are modern but the neighbors are probably too cool for me.

LAUREN ROBERTSON

Whip In

Speech pathologist, mom, potter, and musician living in Highland

What do you like best about your neighborhood? It’s close to Metro Rail, fairly walkable, Favorite neighborhood hangouts?

What’s something most people don’t know about your neighborhood?

Are you on a sugar-borrowing basis with your neighbors? Absolutely. If you could live in any other neighborhood, which one would it be and why?

Black Star Coop, Michi Ramen, AFS Cinema, Galaxy Highland Theater, Stiles Switch BBQ, Barrett's Coffee, Kula Sushi.

The story goes that the streets are named a!er girls who lived in an orphanage where Highland ACC now stands.

Maybe Hyde Park? I used to live there in the ‘90s and I loved being able to walk or bike to everything (didn't own a car back then).

and community oriented.

Hidden gems? We have a great new

park in the works in St. Johns.

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CAMERON LOCKLEY

GERTIE WILSON

Restaurateur living in Mueller

Founder/CEO living in Western Trails

What do you like best about your neighborhood?

What do you like best about your neighborhood? Our incredible community.

I personally enjoy the farmer’s market on Sunday mornings underneath the old airport hangar. I also love that I get to avoid any and all highways on my short commute to work in north-central Austin. Favorite neighborhood hangouts? Mueller Lake Park. My dog Rafa and I take a walk around the lake every morning before checking the mail. The squirrels keep us entertained along the way! Hidden gems? Everything in Mueller is new (well, at least new-ish) since the entire neighborhood has been built on the site of the old Austin airport. Just across 51st Street (the northern border of Mueller) is a locally owned Tex-Mex dive called Paco’s Tacos. Good tacos and always friendly service. What’s something most people don’t know about your neighborhood? It’s not

finished! There are still dozens and dozens of acres of land being developed for homes and possibly even a new elementary school. Are you on a sugar-borrowing basis with your neighbors? I borrow eggs and power tools

from my friend Ashley and her family who live around the corner … we went to junior high together in Dallas! I also co-hosted a meet and greet for then mayoral candidate Steve Adler with my neighbor Josh around the other corner. If you could live in any other neighborhood, which one would it be and why? Clarksville.

I love the old trees, proximity to downtown, and some of my favorite restaurants are there ... so probably best for my pocketbook that I don’t!

We have an architect, a World War II veteran and jet pilot, tech gurus, a real estate agent, an engineer, an APD officer, retired teachers, professors and so many more. We all help and watch out for each other! Favorite neighborhood hangouts?

The private greenbelt on the creek in our backyards where we regularly get together. Central Market for a!er-dinner gelato Paco’s Tacos

runs, weekend breakfast tacos and live music. The farmer’s market at the Toney Burger Center, a quick three-minute bike ride away. South Austin Gym, a place where you feel Rocky Balboa may have worked out. Radio Bar for local cra! beer, hot coffee and yummy food truck grub. Hidden gems? I love stopping by the Summer Moon Trailer down the road on Manchaca and William Cannon. I also like Joslin Park where you can play tennis, throw a Frisbee or run around the track. What’s something most people don’t know about your neighborhood? Williamson

Creek runs through our neighborhood, making our backyards a small "greenbelt" which you would never know just by driving by! We all leave an open area in the back with no fencing so that all the neighbors can enjoy the open space. Our 90-year-old retired vet neighbor looks forward to hopping on his mower and cutting the grass for everyone weekly! Are you on a sugar-borrowing basis with your neighbors? Absolutely! In addition to

being able to ask our neighbors for anything, we meet up nightly in back by the creek to let our pups play and visit with each other. If you could live in any other neighborhood, which one would it be and why? I

would not trade our neighbors, creek and community for anything! We are SO LUCKY!

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SARO MOHAMMED

Education researcher, wife, and mom living in Winding Prairie/Trailside Estates

Summer Moon Trailer

What do you like best about your neighborhood? It's so peaceful, quiet, and

green. It's close enough to downtown that we don't feel like we're far away from the action, but it’s far enough away that we leave the hustle and bustle behind. Hidden gems? The whole neighbor-

hood! Villa St. Clair and Decker Lake (Lake Walter E. Long) are definitely highlights. Decker is great for fishing, triathlons, and even the Austin Iron Man qualifier! Favorite hangouts? The Travis County Expo Center—home to the rodeo and fair during spring break — is a favorite. (Where else would you get front-row seats to Johnny Depp playing as Willie Nelson's guest bass guitarist for $35?!) What’s something most people don’t know about your neighborhood? That it

exists and, honestly, I think we love it that way! Are you on a sugar-borrowing basis with your neighbors? With some of them, yes.

Although we don't have formal get togethers, I've certainly hosted and been hosted by my neighbors, and everybody knows everybody here. If you could live in any other neighborhood, which one would it be and why? Nope.

This is the perfect place for us!

LAUREN ROSS

Attorney, mom, and wife living in Hyde Park

What do you like best about your neighborhood? I like the fact that I can walk to

restaurants, bars, coffee shops (Quack’s!) and I can get downtown in less than 10 minutes (barring traffic). I also like my friendly neighbors. Favorite neighborhood hangouts?

Drink.Well, Quack’s, Vino Vino, Hyde Park Bar & Grill, Shipe Park. Hidden gems? I don't know if it’s hidden, but the Flag Store at 45th and Duval has EVERYTHING you could ever want and never knew you needed. What’s something most people don’t know about your neighborhood? Our post

office workers still walk door to door to deliver mail all year long!

Flag Store

Are you on a sugar-borrowing basis with your neighbors? Absolutely, especially since

one of my neighbors is a professional baker. If you could live in any other neighborhood, which one would it be and why? Rosedale —

it's close by and has a great park (Ramsey). tribeza.com

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Build It and They Will Come

WHAT IT’S LIKE TO LIVE, WORK, AND PLAY AT THE DOMAIN

BY BRITTANI SONNENBERG(PHOTOGRAPHS BY WARREN CHANG

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Walkability and a dogfriendly environment made the Domain NORTHSIDE irresistible for Heather Mathers and her family.

“AS LONG AS I’M IN AUSTIN, I’M LIVING HERE,” SAYS FREDRICK MARTIN,

leaning back into his patio chair and surveying the sidewalk in front of the Archer Hotel with satisfaction. It’s 5 p.m. on a Thursday evening, and the Domain is unwinding: the first happy hour revelers are out, along with late-day shoppers and athletic types basking in the smug glow of a good workout. I’m sitting down for a glass of wine with Martin and his neighbor Heather Mathers, both residents at The Standard, one of the Domain’s nine apartment buildings, to hear what it’s like to live at the mall. They both laugh away the question: it’s the typical reaction they get around town. “I moved here because of the walkability, and because it’s kid-and dog-friendly, not because of Nordstrom,” says Mathers, a preschool director who is finishing her PhD in early childhood education at UT. She, her husband, and teenage son moved here from East Austin last year. “I was initially drawn to the apartment complex, and when I saw it on Google Maps, I thought, ‘That can’t be right, that’s just a mall’,” says Martin, who moved here from Houston four years ago, and initially lived at the Residences, another Domain apartment complex. “But when I got up here, I thought: ‘This is it.’” Martin, who grew up in Miami, and lived in New York before coming to Texas, says he was drawn to the “live, work, and play” concept. And while he’s far from a shopaholic, “you can’t beat the convenience. You can buy everything here, from a pair of socks to a car.” How do they feel about the Domain’s dramatic development in the past year? “It’s great,” says Mathers. “We get invited to all these awesome openings.” She turns to Martin. “Remember the Restoration Hardware opening?”

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“Oh my God,” he says. “That was awesome. Black tie.” Mathers loves that her teenager can meet friends at nearby hangouts and still be close by. “It’s safe and easy,” she says. “It turns out we didn’t need a yard. We were ready for a break from the responsibilities of homeownership, and love the community feel, from events thrown by the Standard, to meeting other residents on our floor, to hanging out with fellow dog owners.” Martin, who also owns a dog, agrees. “This place is crazy about dogs. You know the dogs’ names before you know the owners.” Aside from canine affinities, Martin and Mather say that a common denominator of Domain residents is their sociability. “You don’t run into too many introverts,” says Martin. “I mean, at the end of the day, we live in a mall. You’re going to be surrounded by other people.” Mathers adds that most residents seem like they’re transplants from other places around the country and the globe. “There’s a good mix of ages,” she says. I mention that the setup seems to simultaneously trade on a nostalgia for small-town living (with Rock Rose functioning as a Main Street of sorts) and futuristic urban planning, with mixed-use complexes that have been embraced elsewhere in Austin, like Mueller. Martin (who decided not to live in Mueller, since his workplace is there, and he prefers a live-play arrangement to a live-work-play one) agrees. “I’ve got relationships with the servers in all my favorite places. You start to know everyone, you bring the dog. I haven’t gone downtown since Uber le! Austin.” “Remember when the Symphony played?” asks Mathers, referring to a recent concert held by the Symphony on the Northside Lawn. “We just sat out on our balconies and drank wine, took in the music.” “It’s definitely not Austin weird,” says Martin. “But the developers have made a big effort to bring some of the city’s boutiques here, too, like STAG and Weathered Coalition. I think it’s a model that can work in any city.” When challenged to come up with a drawback, the only thing Martin and Mathers can offer seems to be, like any Austinite, traffic-related. But their complaints have to do with pedestrians, not gridlock on I-35. “You’ve got shoppers that think it’s fine to just walk into traffic,” Martin says. “They don’t live here,” Mathers adds. “It’s people who are just coming to the mall for the day.” And while SXSW creates havoc for the rest of the city, it’s Christmas shopping that breeds chaos at the Domain. Not to mention getting in and out of the garage on a Friday or Saturday night, thanks to the wild popularity of Rock Rose. But Martin says it’s a small price to pay. “I very rarely pull my car back out of the garage until Monday morning,” he says. “Everything’s here. It doesn’t make any sense to go anywhere else.”


“Why would I go anywhere else?” asks Fredrick Martin, a four-year Domain NORTHSIDE resident. tribeza.com

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“I shop everyday!” admits Domain NORTHSIDE resident Rachal Robichau.

Rachal Robichau, a Woodlands native, and a hair stylist, was a longtime North Austin resident, who stumbled onto The Standard when she and James Raeh, her pitbull, got lost one day in the maze of Domain construction sites. James perked up at the sight of a water bowl and treats, and Robichau decided to take a tour of the apartment complex. (Note to leasing agents: never underestimate the power of a water bowl.) The two fell in love with the premises, and moved in shortly a!er. Like Mathers and Martin, Robichau adores the “community vibe,” and says that the retail workers, maintenance crew, bartenders, security, doormen, feel like “family.” “I was never neighborly when I was in a house,” she says, “but here I’m greeted daily by people that I now consider friends. They run up to James as if they haven’t seen her in weeks!” For Robichau, proximity to a sprawling mall can also be a liability: “I shop everyday!” she admits. “Whole Foods, Sephora, Victoria's Secret, Nordstrom will stay afloat due to me!” Another double-edged sword of Domain life is the intense socializing: “we're such a tight group . . . you can't go downstairs without running into the same crew, which can go both ways depending on your escapades!”

CHRISS INSISTS THAT THE DOMAIN IS “THE MOST ETHNICALLY AND CULTURALLY DIVERSE” NEIGHBORHOOD IN AUSTIN. “YOU HEAR SO MUCH ABOUT KEEPING AUSTIN WEIRD,” HE SAYS. “BUT WHERE’S THE INTERNATIONAL CROWD? WHERE ARE THE 150 NEW RESIDENTS, ARRIVING EVERY DAY? THEY’RE UP AT THE DOMAIN.” 80 JUNE 2017 |

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John Chriss, the co-manager of Engels and Völker at Domain Northside, also has an unofficial title: the “self-appointed mayor of the Domain.” You can spot him around the neighborhood in an open-road cowboy hat, he says, although that style is getting so ubiquitous that he might have to switch up his signature look. Chriss lives at the IMT, and his office is on the ground floor, with a seconds-long elevator commute. “I wake up, grab a coffee at Apanas, go to work, hit Culinary Dropout for lunch, stop by Jack & Ginger’s for dinner, go home, then get up and do it all over again.” Chriss calls the Domain “Austin’s new Uptown”: “It’s a piece of Dallas; a piece of Scottsdale,” he says. “It’s urban, flashy, and fast-paced,” a stark contrast to “Willie Nelson Austin.” And it’s not just the vibe that makes living at the Domain different; all the available apartments are for lease, not sale. “That puts everyone in the same boat,” says Chriss. “Everyone’s renting, working jobs in tech or retail, with a target demographic of 30-50.” Chriss insists that the Domain is “the most ethnically and culturally diverse” neighborhood in Austin. “You hear so much about keeping Austin weird,” he says. “But where’s the international crowd? Where are the 150 new residents, arriving every day? They’re up at the Domain.” Part of the appeal, he says, lies in the Domain’s tabula rasa qualities. “It’s any developer’s dream,” he says. “In America, corporations are people. Here, Mr. Simon and Mr. Peter are in charge: they control pricing, they’ve got anchor tenants.” Unlike comparable planned communities like Mueller, Chriss says, or The Grove, the developers were not obligated to include affordable housing units.


So while the Domain may be Austin’s largest “culmination of different cultures,” as Chriss puts it, with start-ups and restaurants residents hailing from all over the globe, it comes with a price-tag that lower-income Austinites can ill afford. But Chriss argues that rent, starting at around $1000 a month, is much more reasonable than what you’ll find in other sectors of the city. Chriss grew up in Corpus Christi, which he describes as a “sleepy little surf town,” where he spent his adolescence “looking out the window, yearning to move.” He’s lived in Los Angeles, Seville, Spain, and Sydney, Australia, but he’s happy to be in Austin, which he says, “respects individuality and cares about the arts” unlike Los Angeles, a city he describes as a “giant greasy machine that eats people up and spits them out.” Chriss claims that the Domain is “uniquely Austin,” in this manner, too,

that the developers are “hellbent on keeping and promoting local talent,” and “matching the mentality of Austin.” There’s no question that these “Domainites,” as Robichau put it, heart their new hood. Hard. And if their enthusiasm occasionally sounds slightly defensive or echoes the shrill tones of a pep rally, it’s not surprising. Both conspicuous consumerism and a walkable, “live-work-play” urbanism are new looks for Austin, and whether the Domain’s cosmopolitan identity will develop into an interesting, complex culture or stay closer to the eponymous cocktail remains to be seen. Just as John Chriss is considering a new look, and ditching the cowboy hat, his new neighborhood is experimenting with what its own aesthetic will turn out to be, and chances are, it won’t look too much like the rest of Texas—or Austin.

John Chriss enjoys a swift elevator commute from his apartment to his office at the Domain’s IMT.

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Quintessential Austin, Just Outside the City Limits TRAILERS, MANSIONS, AND A DO-YOUROWN-THING ATTITUDE MAKE CUERNAVACA THE HAPPY ODDBALL OF BEE CAVE ROAD BY ERIC WEBBER( PHOTOGRAPHS BY ERIC WEBBER

RESIDENTS CALL IT ECCENTRIC AND FREE-SPIRITED. THERE’S BEAUTIFUL

lake frontage, a touch of celebrity cachet, and an old Austin vibe, despite the growing number of new multimillion dollar homes. If that sounds to you like a quintessential Austin neighborhood, you’re right. Almost. Cuernavaca may be one of the most Austin-y of neighborhoods, except it isn’t even in Austin. And many Austinites haven’t even heard of it. “Cuerny,” to many who live there, sits ten miles west of downtown. Technically it’s not a neighborhood at all, but two dozen developments bordered on the south by Bee Cave Road (FM 2244) and on the north by Lake Austin. It gets its name from Cuernavaca Drive, but its unique character comes from old Austin. Drive west on 2244 past Loop 360 and you’ll pass several sprawling developments, notable for cul-de-sacs, greenbelts and large Mediterranean-style homes with tidy lawns. Head north on Cuernavaca Drive and you’ll find some of that too. But you’ll also find a distinctly different mindset than you’ll find anywhere else in the area.

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Cuernavaca has a history of laissez faire attitudes toward things like building codes, architectural styles, construction materials, and personal choice. You won’t see a tractor in a yard or a year-round Christmas display in the Rob Roy neighborhood. A street of mobile homes a stone’s throw from a $4 million waterfront mansion? That wouldn’t fly in Tarrytown. Not only can those things be found in Cuernavaca, but many residents embrace the asymmetry and wear it as a badge of honor. It figures; the neighborhood was brought up that way. Cuernavaca’s first permanent residents were ranchers. Their descendants recall hearing tales of Comanche raids—naked Comanches, so one story goes. A!er the damming of the lower Colorado River in the 1930s and ‘40s, a smattering of cottages sprang up along what had become the new Lake Austin. By the late 1950s there were enough homeowners to create the Lake Hills Community Association. Lake Hills is still one of the most prominent of the area’s subdivisions, and their “park” with a clubhouse, pool, boat ramp, and


“It’s like taking part of East Austin and dropping it into Westlake,” says Harris-Rubino.

beach is still a fixture in the neighborhood. People trickled into Cuernavaca into the 1970s, though the area was still remote and mobile homes were as common as houses. That’s when ceramic artist Claudia Reese arrived, looking for a house to rent. “A real estate agent told me, ‘Little lady, you don’t have to rent, you can buy!’” recalls Reese. The agent hauled her out on then two-lane Bee Cave Road and sold her a modest house on a nice piece of land for only $15,000. Reese later discovered the house, built as a weekend getaway, was insulated with old newspapers. “There were more drug labs than children out here then,” remembers Reese, whose home and Cera-Mix Studio now occupy a hilltop in the Tumbleweed Hills subdivision. More artists, musicians, assorted hippies, and lake fans followed, attracted by affordable housing, large lots, low taxes, privacy, and few building codes. “The only restriction was that I couldn’t raise pigs,” Reese says. “Other animals were okay; just no pigs.” The ‘80s brought serious land development to western Travis County and more traditional homebuyers mingled with Cuernavaca’s original iconoclasts. Through the population surge of the ‘90s and 2000s, as more upscale neighborhoods took shape around them, Cuernavaca held fast to many of its idiosyncrasies. Realtor Claude Smith has watched the neighborhood change—and not— over many years. “It’s always been a mixed bag,” he says, describing the residents. “It’s still one of the broadest cross-sections of buyers you’ll see in Austin.” Smith is referring mainly to economic diversity. Cuernavaca is more ethnically diverse than many adjacent areas, but only slightly so. He attributes the broad attraction to it being right on the water and the most affordable option in the Eanes school district. But the lifestyle is a draw too. “Cuernavaca is something of a last frontier out here,” he says.

Residents are loyal to the neighborhood and protective of their heritage, but that doesn’t mean that things aren’t changing. Newer subdivisions like Bella Lago boast manicured lawns and curbs, a departure from the typical Cuernavaca scruffiness. Many of the newer waterfront properties would be at home in any of Austin’s most expensive enclaves. Some residents see a tipping point. “The trailers will be gone in five years,” says Turk Pipkin, a writer and filmmaker who has lived at the end of Cuernavaca Road for 27 years. Pipkin worries that rising property values and taxes will inevitably make the neighborhood more homogeneous. “Old-school hippie artists and musicians are an important part of the neighborhood,” he says, “but they’re going to be priced out soon.” Not everyone is worried about Cuernavaca turning into just another waterfront neighborhood. Funkiness still abounds. There’s a robust arts cooperative, the annual Cuerny Jam music festival, a variety of clubs catering to sundry interests and directions to many homes still include “Turn off the paved road.” And there are plenty of new residents committed to perpetuating the Cuerny lifestyle. Jennifer Harris-Rubino, a design executive, moved to Cuernavaca from East Austin four years ago, drawn partly by the uniqueness. “It’s like taking part of East Austin and dropping it into Westlake,” says Harris-Rubino. She knows things won’t always stay the same, but she also expresses appreciation for Cuernavaca’s history of going against the grain. “We know things will change, but we’ll definitely lean into it.” tribeza.com

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A DV E R T I S I N G @ T R I B E Z A .CO M

S U B S C R I B E T O T R I B E Z A AT T R I B E Z A .C O M


AUSTIN

Neighborhood Guide F R O M N O R T H W E S T H I L L S TO B A R TO N H I L L S A N D E V E R Y W H E R E I N B E T W E E N , A U S T I N ’ S TO P R E A LTO R S S H A R E T H E I R FAV O R I T E P L A C E S TO E AT, D R I N K , S H O P A N D P L AY. P H OTO G R A P H S B Y T R AV I S H A L L M A R K

S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

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ANNA LEE IS A MEMBER OF THE ELITE 25 AUSTIN, # 1 AG E N T A M O N G M O R E L A N D’ S AU S T I N AG E N TS A N D R A N K E D TO P 3 I N T H E 2 01 6 A B J R E A LT O R R A N K I N G S .

Tarrytown

P H OT O TA K E N A T T H E CO N T E M P O R A RY AU S T I N L A G U N A G LO R I A .

Aloe Body and Skin (2414 Exposition Blvd.)—“A great spot for massages, facials, and acupuncture.” Food! Food! (2727 Exposition Blvd.)—“My favorite place for a quick lunch.” Tarrytown Pharmacy (2727 Exposition Blvd.)—“For cards, supplies, and gifts.” Maudie’s (2608 W. 7th St.)—“The old standby for Mexican food and margaritas.” Deep Eddy (401 Deep Eddy Ave.)—“For swimming and watching movies in the summer.” Tarrytown Park (2106 Tower Dr.)—“Neighborhood park where families are playing and hosting birthday parties.” Reed Park (2600 Pecos St.)—“Swimming in the summer, walking the trail through the park and ending up on Scenic Drive.” The Contemporary Austin, Laguna Gloria (3809 W. 35th St.)—“For walking the grounds and taking art classes.” Over The Rainbow (2727 Exposition Blvd.)—“For children’s toys/gifts. This place has been around since I was in elementary school.”

ANNA LEE BORN AND RAISED IN TARRYTOWN, Anna Lee is a fourth-generation Austinite, and

is no stranger to Austin residential real estate. Her parents still live in the neighborhood in her childhood home. She believes everyone who wants to sell or buy a home deserves to have a qualified and experienced agent who can provide them with the best services, knowledge, and care from the beginning of the transaction to the closing table. ANNA@MORELAND.COM | ANNAMORRISONLEE.COM | 512.968.6419

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KEVIN BURNS BORN FROM HIS ENTREPRENEURIAL VISION to develop an on-the-ground real

estate firm, Urbanspace has led the way for downtown development as the original urban core real estate service provider. Burns finds great joy in helping people transition from the suburbs to the city or from another town into Austin. He’s raised two daughters and works, sleeps, dines, plays, and entertains downtown, and the Seaholm District is by far his favorite. KEVIN@URBANSPACELIFESTYLE.COM | URBANSPACELIFESTYLE.COM | 512.848.8722

Seaholm District Whole Foods (525 N. Lamar Blvd.)—“I can eat a healthy meal at the fish counter and grab the day’s groceries on the way home.” Ranch 616 (616 Nueces St.)—“The food is delicious and the staff make me feel like I am home.” Trader Joe’s (211 Walter Seaholm Dr. #100)— “Green juice and chocolate peanut butter cups are staples in my diet.” Lady Bird Lake and the Ann and Roy Butler Hike-and-Bike Trail —“It is the emerald of our city.” ACL Live at the Moody Theater (310 W. Willie Nelson Blvd.)—“Can’t beat having a world class live music venue a few blocks from home.” True Food Kitchen (222 West Ave.)—“I have turned it into my personal healthy cafeteria. Where else can the kiddos play while mom and dad enjoy a glass of wine?”

U R B A N S PAC E R E A L E S TAT E + I N T E R I O R S WA S C R E AT E D O U T O F K E V I N ’ S PA S S I O N F O R D OW N TOW N A N D

Irene’s (506 West Ave.)—“One of my favorite morning/noon/night spots to have a cup of coffee or a happy hour cocktail.” Violet Crown Theater (434 W. 2nd St.)—“Hands down best movie theater in Austin.”

THE URBAN CORE OF AUSTIN. IT HAS LED

Coast (360 Nueces St.)—“Best ceviche in town.”

H I M TO B ECO M E T H E # 1 AG E N T I N R E S I D E N T I A L SA L E S (OV E R $ 2 0 0 MILLION IN 2016) AND

Numero 28 (452 W. 2nd St.)—“Best pizza and patio in town.”

A MEMBER OF AUSTIN’S E L I T E 2 5 R E A LT O R S .

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KUMARA IS THE NUMBER ONE PRODUCER FOR

Old Enfield/ Pemberton

K U P E R S OT H E B Y ’ S FOR TWO CONSECUTIVE Y E A R S, AC H I E V I N G OV E R $ 6 5 M I N SA L E S

Jeffrey’s Restaurant (1204 W. Lynn St.)—“My absolute favorite. An Austin staple with so much history, an intimate atmosphere and delicious food. You’ll find me in the bar on a rich blue velvet banquette with friends and clients weekly.”

IN 2016.

Josephine House (1601 Waterston Ave.)—“Jeffrey’s sister restaurant offers a more casual experience with great food and an incredible patio. I love bringing my boys for brunch, lunch or dinner. Another weekly staple for me when the weather is lovely.” Wildflower Organics (524 N. Lamar Blvd.)—“They have, hands down, the most beautiful bedding and bathroom accessories — it is where I buy my organic mattresses and other beautiful furnishings.” Pease Park (1100 Kingsbury St.)—“I love to bring my boys to Pease Park. It has so much to offer, including a water park in the summer and a wonderful playground.” Hope Outdoor Gallery (1101 Baylor St.)—“Also known as the Graffiti Park. An incredible place to check out local art. There is so much to see and it is always evolving.” Cafe Medici (1101 W. Lynn St.)—“This local Austin coffee shop has the absolute best coffee and tea. It has a fun and casual vibe in a renovated house in the heart of Clarksville and it’s always full of familiar faces.” Clark’s Oyster Bar (1200 W 6th St.)—“This is my calling when I’m craving oysters and seafood. It has wonderful outdoor seating, great food and atmosphere.” Fresh Plus Grocery (1221 W. Lynn St.)—“One of the oldest grocery stores in Austin, it has a great boutique feel and has everything you need, including a delicious deli.”

KUMARA WILCOXON

Wink Wine Bar (1014 N. Lamar Blvd.)—“This quiet, tucked away treasure has great wine and delicious food. It is small and intimate and has a comfy, relaxing ambiance.”

AS A TOP INFLUENCER in Austin real estate, Kumara Wilcoxon maintains a well-

Outdoor Voices (606 Blanco St.)—“They have the best sportswear for my daily exercise which includes jogging, spinning, yoga and barre.”

with its wide streets, towering live oaks, and the walkability to all that Clarksville has

known presence, commitment and passion for the intricacies of the Austin market and lifestyle. She loves the historic nature of the Old Enfield/Pemberton neighborhood, to offer. Her ultimate satisfaction comes from building lifelong relationships with her clients. KUMARAWILCOXON@GMAIL.COM | KUMARAWILCOXON.COM | 512.423.5035

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CINDY GOLDRICK WHEN CINDY GOLDRICK FIRST MOVED TO AUSTIN, Westlake struck her as the

most beautiful and unique residential area with its large lots and hilltops with stunning views. In the ‘90s she and her family put down roots there on a quiet cul-de-sac, which was close to downtown, her office, and also her children’s schools. The tranquility and

Westlake Lizzylu (3300 Bee Cave Rd.)—“A charming, eclectic gift shop owned and operated by Gene Attal and his family, with proceeds going to several charities.”

privacy she has enjoyed has made for a great retreat where they can end their busy days in the company of some of the same neighbors she’s had for over twenty years. CINDY@WILSONGOLDRICK.COM | WILSONGOLDRICK.COM | 512.423.7264

Trianon Coffee (3201 Bee Cave Rd.)—“Steve, an employee there, always says ‘Come for the coffee, stay for the show.’ Always the best way to start my day!” Las Palomas (3201 Bee Cave Rd.)—“Still run by the wonderful Dale family, it has been a favorite since the ‘80s with their great food and fun environment. We always run into neighbors there.” Marye’s Gourmet Pizza and Blue Dahlia Bistro (3663 Bee Cave Rd.)—“Two small, independently-owned restaurants with excellent menus.” RedBird Boutique (3663 Bee Cave Rd.)—“They have beautiful, unique pieces for women.” Abbey Rose Boutique (3300 Bee Cave Rd.)—“I love their beautifully curated selection of women’s clothing.” Hutson Clothing Co. (3663 Bee Cave Rd.)—“A great shop for men’s clothing and accessories with a fantastic selection of ties.”

WITH 35 YEARS (AND COUNTING) OF EXPERIENCE SELLING REAL E S TA T E I N A U S T I N ,

Allure Nail Salon (3300 Bee Cave Rd.)—“A relaxing place to get a quick mani-pedi.” Zilker Park & Barton Springs pool —“Some of Austin’s most-loved outdoor spots.”

C I N DY F E E L S F O R T U N AT E TO H AV E W I T N E S S E D THE GROWTH OF THIS PROGRESSIVE C I T Y F I R S T H A N D.

Barton Creek Greenbelt —“The beauty of being able to access the Barton Creek Greenbelt off of Spyglass Drive and hike the trails or swim in one of the many swimming spots along the creek is an experience my family will always cherish.”

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KNOWING THE HOME VA L U E S A S W E L L A S T H E L I F E S T Y L E S T H AT

Highland Park West

B A LC O N E S P A R K A N D

Mount Bonnell —“If you can catch a sunset from the top, you’ll never forget it.”

W H O WA N T TO K N OW

Perry Art Park —“Three large sculptures are on longterm loan from Laguna Gloria and help extend the love of art into our area of town.”

H I G H L A N D PA R K W E S T OFFER HAS SERVED REBECCA WELL WHEN WORKING WITH CLIENTS THE BENEFITS OF LIVING IN THIS AREA OF AUSTIN.

Russell’s Bakery and Coffee Shop (3339 Hancock Dr.)—“It’s always fun to go in and grab a mocha and visit with friends, clients and neighbors. And, the cinnamon rolls are to die for!” Personally Yours (5416 Parkcrest Dr.)—“A lovely shop that carries wonderful gift items for babies, house warmings, campers and members of the university Greek system.” Berry Austin (5523 Balcones Dr.)—“How can you not like multiple flavors of frozen yogurt and tons of toppings? This is a neighborhood favorite year round, but can be a party during the dog days of summer.” Parkcrest Cleaners (5507 Parkcrest Dr.)—“I wouldn’t dream of taking my fine linens and better clothing anywhere else.” Bright Leaf Nature Preserve —“Bringing 216 acres together through 34 separate real estate transactions, Georgia Lucas created an oasis for future generations.” Crenshaw Athletic Club (5000 Fairview Dr.)–“This club offers programs for children that combine academics and athletics.”

REBECCA SPRATLIN

Coutures by Laura (5416 Parkcrest Dr.)—“I was so grateful when Laura did a marvelous job of giving new life to an old coat I bought many years ago in Rome.”

REBECCA SPRATLIN BEGAN AS AN ARTIST, earned an MBA and worked in the

Chez Zee (5406 Balcones Dr.)—“Don’t even think about going there without ordering the Lemon Rosemary cake. It will make you weak in the knees.”

corporate world before becoming a luxury realtor and broker ten years ago. Since moving to the neighborhood, she’s enjoyed countless memories of backyard BBQs, neighborhood kids coming over to swim, hosting book groups and even a gastro club. She is a board member for the Highland Park West and Balcones Area Neighborhood Association and helps plan events like Movies in the Park and the July 4th parade. REBECCA@REBECCAREALTYLLC.COM | REBECCAREALTYLLC.COM | 512.694.2191

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MARGARET PARMA COMING FROM SOUTH FLORIDA, Margaret Parma loves being surrounded by

nature, watching deer run across her front yard and enjoying the community parks and hike and bike trails —all only 14 miles from downtown. She loves helping her clients build a new home or find an existing home that fits their lifestyle.

Northwest Hills Movie House Eatery (8300 N. FM 620)— “How do I explain enjoying your favorite big screen movies in a leather La-Z-Boy chair and having dinner and drinks served to your own table?”

REALTOR.MARGARETPARMA@GMAIL.COM | AUSTINLUXURYRESIDENTIAL.COM | 512.632.9519

The Domain (11410 Century Oaks Terrace)— “Outdoor mall offering a variety of upscale shops and department stores, plus dining options and a cinema.” County Line on the Lake (204 Ranch Rd. 2222)—“I love the homemade bread, the family-friendly vibe and the lake view.” Rudy’s Country Store BBQ (11570 Research Blvd.)— “The yummy brisket beef, jalapeño sausage and creamed corn are my go-tos.” Siena Ristorante Toscana (6203 N. Capital of Texas Hwy.)—“The most romantic restaurant in Austin for wine and upscale, seasonal Tuscan plates like wild boar bruschetta.” Oasis Restaurant (6550 Comanche Trail)—“This was the first Austin icon restaurant I visited as a tourist in the ‘80s. The margaritas and the views are amazing.” Steiner Ranch Steak House (5424 Steiner Ranch Blvd.)—“The steaks are mouth-watering and the view is absolutely breathtaking.” Fonda San Miguel (2330 W. N Loop Blvd.)—“I love their sophisticated take on traditional Mexican cuisine served in a colorful, hacienda-style space.” M A R G A R E T PA R M A I S A B RO K E R O F OV E R 3 7 YEARS, WITH 29 YEARS

Bull Creek Park (6701 Lakewood Dr.)—“A really fun spot to hang in the water on a hot summer day with nice trails for the dogs.”

IN TEXAS SELLING HOMES IN AUSTIN, L A K E W AY, W E S T L A K E AND NW HILLS

The Arboretum (10000 Research Blvd.)—“Accessible location with great shopping and restaurants, including my favorite, The Cheesecake Factory.”

COMMUNITIES.

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THE PUBLISHER OF TOW E R S. N E T A N D T H E OW N E R O F TOW E R S

Rainey Street

R E A LT Y, J U D E H A S ALSO SERVED ON T H E D OW N TOW N

Royal Blue Grocery (51 Rainey St.)—“I order my coffee there in the mornings, grab some fresh fruit or a slice of Eastside P ies pizza for lunch.”

COMMISSION, THE B OA R D O F D I R EC TO R S O F T H E D OW N TOW N AUSTIN ALLIANCE, AND

Waller Creek Boathouse (74 Trinity St.)—“From renting kayaks to chilling out at Alta’s Cafe overlooking the lake, this is one of my favorite spots in all of downtown Austin.”

A N U M B E R O F OT H E R BOARDS.

Banger’s Sausage House & Beer Garden (79 Rainey St.)—“This hits the Rainey vibe just right. It’s a converted bungalow space with 100 beers on tap, great food, a huge patio and a casual environment. And it’s expanding!” Ann & Roy Butler Hike-and-Bike Trail—“When you want to get away from all the entertainment on Rainey, the trail is a great bike and pedestrian connector to Lady Bird Lake and the rest of downtown.” Hotel Van Zandt (605 Davis St.)—“This hotel has moved the district forward into the next era, boasting one of the best new restaurants in the city, Geraldine’s, named after the neighborhood’s late guinea fowl pet.” L’Estelle House (88 1/2 Rainey St.)—“Owners Holly and Craig Nasso have been Rainey believers since the ‘90s and bring authentic comfort and culture to the neighborhood. It’s my wife’s favorite place on Rainey Street.” G’raj Mahal (73 Rainey St.)—“The best Indian pakoras I’ve ever eaten. Full stop.” Icenhauer’s (83 Rainey St.)—“Michael Hsu Architecture worked on its renovation, setting the bar high for bungalow rehabs on Rainey.”

JUDE GALLIGAN

El Naranjo (85 Rainey St.)—“Local, high-end and one of the first restaurants here, it’s a great date place when you’re looking for something a little more sophisticated.”

FEW PEOPLE KNOW DOWNTOWN and all of its districts better than Jude

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center (600 River St.)—“The MACC, as it’s known, is quietly one of the best architected buildings in downtown.

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Galligan. With an office on Rainey Street, he lives, works, and plays in the heart of downtown Austin. JUDE@TOWERS.NET | TOWERS.NET | 512-236-8898


LESLIE GOSSETT LESLIE GOSSETT DEVELOPED A PASSION for real estate growing up in Austin, and

began her career as a realtor while studying at Texas Christian University. She finds her drive in delivering superior results and a five-star experience for her clients. Leslie lives and works downtown, where she loves the walkability and connectedness to everything around her. On any given weekend, you will find her walking to Ballet Austin for reformer classes, meeting friends, family or clients for dinner, or taking her daughter to the local famers’ market. Leslie loves this city and the lifestyle it offers. For that reason, she is always enthused to help her clients share in what brings her so much joy. LESLIE@LESLIEGOSSETT.COM | LESLIEGOSSETT.COM | 512.942.7267

West Downtown Whole Foods (525 N. Lamar Blvd.)—“Whether I’m meeting a friend at the seafood bar for dinner, doing some quick grocery shopping or picking up my favorite acai bowl in town, this place checks all the boxes.” True Food Kitchen (222 West Ave.)—“I don’t think I will ever get sick of their bowls; I love the ancient grains and teriyaki quinoa. Great place to bring your kiddos. My daughter McKinley loves running around the front lawn with friends.” ByGeorge (524 N. Lamar Blvd.)—“Always unique and keeps me wanting more. I especially love their handbag and shoe selection! Their men’s shop is fantastic.” Fixe (500 W. 5th St.)—“Their beautiful and dimly lit bar is my favorite place to grab a cocktail. I love their Fixe 75, their take on the French 75.” Wu Chow (500 W. 5th St.)—“Two words: Soup Dumplings.” Ballet Austin (501 W 3rd St.)—“The best place in town for P ilates reformer classes.” Ranch 616 (616 Nueces St.)—“You are guaranteed to see a familiar face at this low key favorite, which serves some great apps. The Adam Bourke with a topo chico — a secret menu item — is refreshing and delicious!”

BEFORE JOINING KUPER S OT H E B Y ’ S I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E A LT Y, L E S L I E R A N H E R O W N B RO K E R AG E, N 3 0 L I V I N G, SPECIALIZING IN CENTRAL A U S T I N R E A L E S TAT E A N D T H E SALE OF NEW CONSTRUCTION HOMES. SHE ALSO HAS EXPERIENCE WITH DESIGN AND A S E P A R AT E S TA G I N G B U S I N E S S ,

ACL Live at The Moody Theater (310 W. Willie Nelson Blvd.)—“Intimate and fun date night experience. Not a bad seat in the house!” Josephine House (1601 Waterston Ave.)—“My absolute favorite lunch spot. I love the private tables out back.” SFC Farmers Market (422 Guadalupe St.)— “Love scoping out and supporting our local vendors. I bring McKinley here and teach her the importance of knowing where our food comes from.”

L DESIGNS.

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ANNA IS THE CO-OWNER OF THE BOUTIQUE REAL

2nd Street

E S TA T E A N D O N E O F AU S T I N ’ S TO P LU X U RY R E A L E S TA T E B R O K E R S .

Trace (200 Lavaca St.)—“We love to gather for family brunch on Sundays. The scene is lively and the food is delicious!” ACL Live at The Moody Theater (310 W. Willie Nelson Blvd.)—“My brother Michael is a show and concert enthusiast, so you’ll find us here for world class entertainment at least once a month.” Ballet Austin (501 W 3rd St.)—“The reformer P ilates program is second to none. Vlada and the other great instructors will whip you into shape!” Hacienda (204 Colorado St.)—“A beautifully curated store. Owner Jessica Beattie’s take on the modern lifestyle is fun and fresh. One of my go-tos for gifts for friends and clients.” Violet Crown Cinema (434 W. 2nd St.)—“Has the feel of a private cinema and the movie selections are always great.” La Condesa (400 W. 2nd St.)—“A longtime favorite for modern Mexican food. A great meeting spot for a classic margarita and dinner before a show.” Lady Bird Lake and the Ann and Roy Butler Hike-and-Bike Trail —“My husband Will is as sporty as they come, so on a nice day we are out cycling, paddle boarding or on a walk with our daughter and dog Nash.” Bob’s Steak and Chop House (301 Lavaca St.)— “Another family favorite. They treat you like family and have some of the best steaks in town.”

ANNA HARDEMAN

Jo’s Coffeeshop (242 W. 2nd St.)—“The Cheers of the 2nd Street District. I love their turbo iced coffee and can always count on running into a friend or two.”

AS A NATIVE AUSTINITE and 14-year real estate veteran, Anna Hardeman began her

New Central Library (710 W. Cesar Chavez St.)— “My mom and daughter routinely explore downtown, UT and the Capitol together, and I know she’s excited to make the library their new hangout.”

for dining, shopping and entertainment. Anna values faith, family, and friendships

career in downtown Austin and has been involved in selling in nearly every highrise condominium building. As a condo owner herself, downtown has been her hub and works hard to bring each client the very best of professionalism, knowledge, enthusiasm, and expertise. ANNA@BREAUSTIN.COM | THEBOUTIQUEREALESTATE.COM | 512.797.5122

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RYAN RODENBECK

RYAN RODENBECK IS THE BROKER/OWNER of Spyglass Realty and has been selling

homes in Barton Hills since 2008. Barton Hills is special to him because of the unique characteristics of being a suburban neighborhood surrounded by an urban setting on one side and a natural setting on the other, all hard to find in one Austin neighborhood.

Barton Hills

RYAN@SPYGLASSREALTY.COM | SPYGLASSREALTY.COM | 512.965.1480

Vox Table: The unique menu and drinks are to die for. The Gus Fruh entrance of the Greenbelt: A great place to hang out and swim with the family or swing into the water from the rope swing. Sunday movies at The Alamo Drafthouse: Finished off with chocolate chip cookies from Amy’s Ice Cream or a milkshake bourbon punch with the family. The ABGB: This beer garden + brewery has amazing pizza and drafts. One-2-One Bar: Go any night of the week for great live music.

SALMA MANZUR HAS LIVED IN AUSTIN since the age of five and graduated from the

University of Texas. As a broker associate at Realty Austin, she believes Hyde Park is special

SALMA MANZUR

not only because it is her home, but also because it is possible to walk to grocery stores, the neighborhood pool, parks, restaurants and shops, and it’s pretty. The streets are lined with trees, there isn’t much traffic and it is conveniently located three miles north of downtown with easy accessibility to all major highways.

Hyde Park

SALMA@REALTYAUSTIN.COM | REALTYAUSTIN.COM | 512.426.5418 Hyde Park Grill: The Wom Kim’s Peach Pudding dessert: don’t ask, just try. Asti Trattoria: A reservation is smart but you can likely slip in, sit at the bar, and eat a gourmet meal without the hustle and bustle of other eateries downtown. Dolce Vita: They’re open for breakfast, lunch or dinner, serving Italian expresso drinks and coffees, and my favorite, delicious gelato! Shipe Park & Pool: Here you can sit on a swing and watch kids play on the playground, dog owners play fetch with their furry friends, and at the right time of year, the pool will be full of neighborhood locals playing in the water. Elisabet Ney Museum: A hidden gem, special place. Worth a visit.

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JEN BERBAS Top Secret: Polvo’s is my absolute favorite spot for Mexican in town. The lively vibe, eclectic decor and delicious frozen margaritas are what make it a South Austin institution. Don’t be scared away by long waits on the weekend — the ceviche, beef fajitas, and salsa ahumada are worth it! jenberbas@realtyaustin.com | realtyaustin.com | 512.762.1470

Top Secret: I love walking to Perla’s with my dog Smooch and sitting on the patio. It’s the best place to enjoy watching the world go by while sitting under a gigantic, centuries-old oak tree. On the weekends, I’ll pop into C-Boys or Continental Club for some live tunes. karen@vanheuvenproperties.com | vanheuvenproperties.com | 512.569.5878

MARK MOORE

DAVE VAN HEUVEN

Top Secret: Josephine House is a perfect neighborhood spot in Clarksville to sit and enjoy brunch, lunch or dinner. I often stop by while walking my dog for their not-to-be missed margaritas out on the patio.

Top Secret: I take full advantage of Zilker Park, whether it is throwing aerobie, kayaking or running the trail. I usually end up at Lou Neff Point and admire the natural beauty with the ever-changing downtown skyline in the distance.

mark@gottesmanresidential.com | markfmoore.com | 512.771.7177

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KAREN KELLY

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dave@vanheuvenproperties.com | vanheuvenproperties.com| 512.658.0096


TO P P I C K S of Austin Realtors (1) ALOE SKIN + BODY 2414 Exposition Blvd.

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(2) WHOLE FOODS 525 N. Lamar Blvd. (3) JEFFREY’S RESTAURANT 1204 W. Lynn St. (4) LIZZYLU 3300 Bee Cave Rd.

5

(5) MOUNT BONNELL 3800 Mt. Bonnell Rd. (6) THE DOMAIN 8300 N. FM 620 (7) ROYAL BLUE GROCERY 51 Rainey St. (8) TRUE FOOD KITCHEN 222 West Ave.

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(9) TRACE 200 Lavaca St. (10) VOX TABLE 1100 S. Lamar Blvd. (11) HYDE PARK GRILL 4206 Duval St.

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(12) POLVO’S 2004 S. 1st St. (13) PERLA’S 1400 S. Congress Ave. (14) JOSEPHINE HOUSE 1601 Waterston Ave. (15) ZILKER PARK 2100 Barton Springs Rd.

3 4 2

415

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LIFE + STYLE HOW WE LIVE RIGHT NOW

Austin interior designer Kit Odom Garven. PHOTOGRAPH BY JESSICA PAGES

ST YLE PICK

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A PEEK THROUGH THE BLINDS

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STYLE PICK | LIFE + STYLE

FIG Home

OBJECT LESSONS IN ST YLE FROM A TARRY TOWN POP-UP By Anne Bruno Photographs by Jessica Pages

FIG Home’s studio reflects the found, inherited and gathered style of its online counterpart.

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W

HAT’S IT TAKE TO CREATE A UNIQUELY PERSONAL HOME OR WARDROBE,

one that ref lects your own style and not simply the latest trends on Pinterest and Instagram? Most style mavens have their tested strategies and Austin interior designer Kit Odom Garven and her business partner Lisa Davidson are no exception. Visit the website or Tarrytown pop-up shop of the duo’s joint retail project, FIG Home, and their mantra is immediately evident: found, inherited, gathered. “The things people treasure the most—unique jewelry, a great travel bag or a gorgeous pair of lamps—always have a story behind them,” Garven says. “A history is really the way people connect with what’s around them; it’s what makes something special. Using a design philosophy centered around things you’ve found, inherited or just gathered along the way can make seemingly disparate pieces work well together.” “It’s also an attitude,” Davidson adds, “One that creates a storyline through your home, or your closet.” The longtime collaborators met working in showrooms for the Austin design trade. Garven studied art history and interior design at Savannah College of Art and Design. She inherited her penchant for style from her maternal grandfather, a globetrotting fashion illustrator in the 1940s and ‘50s. Once Garven and Davidson, a veteran of Neiman Marcus and Horchow, realized their personalities were as compatible as their aesthetic sensibilities, the pair embarked on their current adventure. Items at FIG Home run the gamut from newly made pillows covered in antique Fortuny fabric to imported shoes, tops, and textiles to vintage entertaining accoutrements. Although the inventory varies, every item reflects the singular notion of pulling together those just right pieces you happened upon in an out-of-the-way shop, or while perusing your great aunt’s attic on a rainy day. The aunt with fabulous taste, that is. tribeza.com

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A PEEK THROUGH THE BLINDS | LIFE + STYLE

Subtract, Subtract, Subtract A HOMAGE TO HISTORY AND INNOVATION By Brittani Sonnenberg Photographs by Casey Woods

P

ICTURE RAPUNZEL’S LEGENDARY TOWER, CHOKED IN THICK

vines. Now substitute that tower with a stately historic house in Tarrytown, and swap out the vines with rot, raccoons and a problematic addition done in the seventies. When faced with such a foe, many architects and shining knights would have politely bowed out, or died battling the raccoons. But the two partners of Jobe Corral Architects, Camille Jobe and Ada Corral, simply rolled up their sleeves. The quest? Not to liberate a lady with long hair, but to free a house from itself. The client (who asked to remain anonymous) initially approached Jobe and Corral about a small-scale renovation of her new home, the so-called “Headmaster’s House,” where Texas Military Academy headmasters had once resided. She wanted to revamp the kitchen and dining room, the up-

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stairs bedroom and the exterior of the addition. The architects had worked with her on a former house, and loved her taste and creativity. But as they got to work, it became clear that the building required less of a renovation and more of a reinvention. “The addition was dominated by gnarled spaces, and linked to the original building by what looked like a gerbil tunnel,” explained Jobe. “We had to figure out how to balance a tall addition with the historic house,” added Corral. It was a physical and aesthetical challenge, not to mention a legal headache, since the building was on three lots with complex property lines. “It required a lot of research to find out what we could and could not change, and which forms we were married to,” said Jobe. Call it the architect’s serenity prayer.


Above, left: The master bathtub sits three stories above the backyard, nestled in pecan trees. Above, middle: An oddly shaped link from the historic side of the house into the addition was transformed into a dressing area for the master suite. Bottom: New steel panels surround the addition. Below: view from the backyard across the new pool and deck.

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A PEEK THROUGH THE BLINDS | LIFE + STYLE Minor adjustments to the existing living room included cleaning and painting of the existing wood trim and a new lighting design.

Above: View of pool and deck from roof deck above the addition. Western red cedar, concrete pavers and pool. Right: This cozy, carved-out space is in the attic of the historic portion of the house.

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Thankfully, the client embraced the expanding renovation, and optimistically referred to elements that the team couldn’t alter as “homages” to the original. “She was an incredibly gracious and inventive person to work with,” said Corral. “She trusted the team, but she knew what she wanted, and could offer brilliant interior design ideas.” Take the unique kitchen tiling, which the client brought in to Jobe and Corral’s office one day. “She showed us these unusual brown tiles, which were hand glazed with round edges. They had a great geometric quality,” said Corral. “We suggested she change the color to gray to match the kitchen’s palette,” said Jobe. “And the effect is wonderful. They look like little moons, changing from waxing to waning.” Jobe and Corral, along with a favorite local contractor, Woodeye Con-

struction, began trimming away, with magical results. The gerbil tunnel became a light-filled dressing area. The awkward stairs were replaced with a stylish iron staircase, twisting down the side of the addition like a long braid. The clunky balconies disappeared, replaced with a Juliet balcony, off the master bedroom, which the client could use to dry her running gear. (These days Juliet is all about running hills, not waiting around for Romeo to show up.) Ultimately, Jobe explained, the renovation was an exercise in subtracting, allowing the building’s essence to speak more clearly. Today, in the clean modern lines, sparkling pool, and graceful historical details of the remodeled Headmaster’s House, the client reportedly lives happily ever after… until the next enticing remodel appears.

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FOOD + THOUGHT A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON OUR LOCAL DINING SCENE

A dessert as sophisticated as its surroundings at Mattie’s at Green Pastures. PHOTOGRAPH BY KNOXY KNOX

K AREN’S PICK

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DINING GUIDE

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K AREN'S PICK | FOOD + THOUGHT

Mattie’s at Green Pastures A VENER ABLE AUSTIN ICON REEMERGES WITH A FRESH NEW ST YLE

By Karen O. Spezia Photographs by Knoxy Knox

A

SK ANY AUSTINITE OF A CERTAIN AGE WHERE THEY

celebrated weddings, graduations, or Mother’s Days, and chances are they’ll say, “Green Pastures.” For over 70 years, this fine dining institution was the place to celebrate special occasions. A hidden oasis among the funky bungalows of South Austin, the palatial Victorian estate occupied 23 wooded acres featuring manicured grounds and roaming peacocks. It was a destination that delighted generations. But in recent years, newer, trendier restaurants opened and Austin’s dining scene became a national sensation. And somehow, Green Pastures got lost in the shuffle. But, two years after it was sold off and shuttered for renovations in 2015, it’s now back with a fresh new style that still celebrates its historic roots. Rechristened Mattie’s at Green Pastures, honoring one of its original owners, this glorious urban paradise is now owned by Austin-based La Corsha Hospitality Group, the fine team who runs Second Bar + Kitchen and Boiler Nine + Grill. Currently, Mattie’s only serves dinner and weekend brunch, offering different experiences to showcase its dual personalities. At night, Mattie’s is sultry and mysterious, illuminated by flickering candles scattered among the dining nooks and clandestine bars. By day, the shaded wrap-around porch remains the coveted spot to dine al fresco. From the landscaping to the bathrooms, the place is prettier than ever. Let’s be clear: you go to Mattie’s for the unmatched ambiance and atmosphere. And that alone is worth a visit. But the food and the drinks successfully compete for your attention. To start, you must have a cocktail. They’re

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top-notch and expertly made with the perfect glassware, ingredients, and garnish. The Milk Punch is legendary, but the Mint Julep and Old Fashioned give it a run for its money. When you’re ready for vino, Wine Director Paula Rester has crafted an imaginative and impressive list. Grazing from the menu of upscale American classics is my favorite way to dine at Mattie’s. Order several of the outstanding appetizers to share, like the silky chicken liver pâté slathered on a baguette, flaky buttermilk biscuits smeared with guava butter, and Irish cheddar pimento cheese spread on grilled ciabatta. For entrees, don’t miss the outstanding fried chicken, prepared differently depending on the meal. At dinner, it’s the star of the plate, co-starring sides of potatoes and spinach. At brunch, crispy tenders share the spotlight on the Fried Chicken Eggs Benedict, served atop a homemade English muffin, poached eggs, and ladled with rich hollandaise. Standout sides include the lip-smacking crispy cauliflower, coated in spicy tamarind BBQ sauce and punched up with Thai bird chiles and scallions, and the tasty coins of garden fresh squash sautéed in savory curry and dusted with toasted coconut. Mattie’s is just the beginning of Green Pastures’ rebirth. Eventually, new event spaces, an outdoor pavilion, and a boutique hotel will be added to the revamped property. But the priority of this beloved icon was to bring fine dining back. Mattie’s transports you to another era, while keeping you firmly in the present. Welcome back, old friend. MATTIE’S AT GREEN PASTURES 811 W. LIVE OAK ST. (512) 444-1888 | MATTIESAUSTIN.COM

Upscale American classics and expertly crafted cocktails breathe new life into Austin’s most iconic of restaurant settings. And, yes, the peacocks still roam. tribeza.com

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D I N N E R C O N V E R S AT I O N | F O O D + T H O U G H T

Friday on the Lawn AN ALL ANDALE RESIDENT SHARES HER NEIGHBORHOOD’S SPECIAL TR ADITION, ONE THAT’S AS MUCH FUN FOR THE KIDS AS IT IS FOR THE ADULTS By Laura Beck Photographs by Danielle Chloe

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I

’VE ALWAYS LIKED ALL ANDALE, WHICH IS WHY WE DECIDED TO

raise our two girls, now ages 12 and 8, in this neighborhood. But my love affair with Allandale really began when my oldest daughter started kindergarten at Gullett Elementary. As the school song goes, “Gullett is a school like no other place.” It is a truly special community with kids, parents, and teachers forming bonds that last long after the kids have graduated. In fact, I’m betting these relationships last a lifetime. Right away, we started hosting gatherings. As an only child raised by a divorced mother who always opened our home to every friend so that the “orphans,” as she called them, always had a place to go for the holidays, or just for a Saturday night dinner and laughs, I too made a habit of opening our home to anyone and everyone. And fortunately, I have a very supportive husband (who I think secretly also loves a full house), so it is okay that we have, for instance, 90 kids running around our house for three hours every Halloween, along with 90 adults trying their best to ignore their children and the obscene amounts of candy being inhaled.


At the Beck’s Allandale house, Friday on the Lawn might mean celebrating the survival of another week or another year of school, or simply neighbors of all ages coming together for a little fun.

But hosting big events like that a few times a year wasn’t enough. One beautiful Friday after school, when my neighbor and I were sitting outside on her front lawn, and another friend stopped to pick up her daughter, the three of us decided the kids’ playdate should continue so the moms could enjoy some wine. And so was born Friday on the Lawn. There’s no rhyme or reason to when these happen, although nice weather definitely encourages the gathering, as does the feeling amongst the adults that “it’s high time we all got together for a drink.” People bring a chair and something to share, such as a bottle of wine or, as the kids hope, something with sugar. And again, anyone and everyone is welcome. Then, what I love best about the Gullett community springs into action: the first batch of parents come with their kiddos after picking them up from school; the rest of the family joins when after-school activities are done or the work week is over; neighbors out walking stop for a cocktail; new friends who received the invite bike over; teachers finish for the week and stop by, sometimes with their own kids, sometimes without them. Even after five days with our children, and dealing with the parents, the teachers at this school still want to spend time with us! And it all happens right on our front lawn, so all of Allandale witnesses the gathering, and they know they are welcome to join. We’ve kept Friday on the Lawn gatherings going since the first one in 2011, so the kids have grown up enjoying these old-school afternoons, running around outside, climbing trees, taking off their shoes to be barefoot in the grass, and sneaking extra cans of Sprite behind the potting shed in the backyard. Meanwhile, the adults sit back, raise a glass to surviving a week, or a month, or an entire school year. We put on some bug spray, eat the Tacodeli queso and chips before the kids vaporize it, and laugh with friends until the fireflies come out. Around dusk, we often realize we haven’t yet fed our children properly and we order some pizzas. From late afternoon to early evening, people come and go as they please. And when it’s time to take off, I love that many of our friends can walk home or hop back on their bicycles. So spoiled are we, living in the amazing neighborhood community of Allandale, enjoying something as simple, but as rare, as a gathering like Friday on the Lawn. The oldest of our kids are finishing up Lamar Middle School now, getting ready to begin high school. But, they still come over, still sit in the grass on a Friday afternoon and still hope someone brought something with sugar.

W E PU T ON SOME BUG SPR AY, E AT T HE TACODELI QU ESO A N D CHIPS BEFOR E T HE K IDS VA POR IZE IT, A N D L AUGH W IT H FR IEN DS U N T IL T HE FIR EFLIES COME OU T.

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BANGER’S SAUSAGE HOUSE & BEER GARDEN 79 Rainey St. | (512) 386 1656 Banger’s brings the German biergarten tradition to Rainey Street with an array of artisan sausages and more than 100 beers on tap. To get the full Banger’s experience, go for their weekend brunch and indulge in the Banger’s Benny, the beer garden’s take on eggs Benedict.

BARLEY SWINE 6555 Burnet Road ,Suite 400 | (512) 394 8150 James Beard Award-nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourages sharing with small plates made from locally-sourced ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN 4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

34TH STREET CATERING

Upscale-casual Italian in the heart of the Rosedale

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 323 2000 | 34thstreetcafe.com

neighborhood. Fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas,

One of the best and most creative full service

incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted caramel

catering companies in Austin. Acclaimed Chef

budino) and locally-sourced, seasonally inspired

Paul Petersen brings his culinary experience

chalkboard specials. Full bar with craft cocktails,

and high standards to catering company and

local beers on tap and boutique wines from around

to your event! Call them to save the date

the world.

and they'll start planning any occasion. We’re coming to the party.

BAR CHI SUSHI 206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557

24 DINER 600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 | fondasanmiguel.com

plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favor-

Veggie lovers will surely smile when tasting the calabacitas rellenas—baked zucchini filled with corn and white cheese, served with a Jitomate sauce. It’s just one of many vegetarian offerings, including salads, quesos, enchiladas, organic heirloom beans, and tamales made with swiss chard right out of our garden. And let’s not forget the Watermelon Margaritas…

ites. Order up the classics, including roasted chicken, burgers, all-day breakfast and decadent milkshakes.

ASTI TRATTORIA 408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218 The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dishes along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off your meal with the honey and goat cheese panna cotta.

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A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this sushi and bar hotspot stays open until 2 a.m. on the weekends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and a variety of sushi rolls under $10.

BRIBERY BAKERY 2013 Wells Branch Pkwy. #109 | (512) 531 9832 1900 Simond Ave. #300 | (512) 297 2720 Pastry Chef Jodi Elliott puts a fun spin on classic confections. The Mueller location is a Candy Land-esque space where diners can sip on cocktails, beer, wine and coffee.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

CENTRAL STANDARD

CHEZ NOUS

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 0823

510 Neches St. | (512) 473 2413

Between their full dinner menu, impressive raw bar and craft

Now an iconic Austin staple, Chez Nous creates authentic

cocktail offerings, Central Standard at the South Congress

French cuisine just a few yards away from bustling 6th

Hotel is the perfect place to spend a night on the town.

Street. Genuine, simple and delectable, it is hard not to leave

CHINATOWN

this bistro feeling completely satisfied.

3407 Greystone Dr. (512) 343 9307

CLARK’S OYSTER BAR

107 W. 5th St. | (512) 343 9307

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 297 2525

Some of the best traditional Chinese food in town. Fast

Small and always buzzing, Clark’s extensive caviar and oyster

service in the dining room and delivery is available.

menu, sharp aesthetics and excellent service make it a re-

This restaurant boasts an extensive and diverse dim sum

freshing indulgence on West Sixth Street. Chef Larry McGuire

menu for customers to munch on!

brings East Coast-inspired vibes to this seafood restaurant.

CONTIGO 2027 Anchor Ln. | (512) 614 2260

LAS PALOMAS

Chef Andrew Wiseheart serves ranch-to-table cuisine and an elegant take on bar fare at this east side gem. Take your

3201 Bee Caves Rd. #122 | (512) 327 9889 | laspalomasrestaurant.com

pick from the exquisite and bold cocktail menu and grab a

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique

spot on the expansive outdoor patio.

restaurant and bar offers authentic interior

COUNTER 3. FIVE. VII

Mexican cuisine in a sophisticated yet relaxed

315 Congress Ave, Ste. 100 | (512) 291 3327

setting. Enjoy family recipes made with fresh

Belly up to the counter at this 25-seat space for an intimate

ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas!

BULLFIGHT 4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029 Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners to the south of Spain

dining experience that’s modern yet approachable.

MANUEL'S

310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555 10201 Jollyville Road | (512) 345 1042

This unique eatery gives three, five and seven-course tasting menus in an immersive setting.

COUNTER CULTURE 2337 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 524 1540

for classic tapas, including croquettes and jamon serrano.

A local Austin favorite with a reputation for

An East Austin haven for vegans and vegetarians, Counter

The white-brick patio invites you to sip on some sangria and

high-quality regional Mexican food, fresh pressed

Culture provides internationally inspired vegan options with

enjoy the bites.

cocktails, margaritas and tequilas. Try the Chile

organic and local food. Daily specials are shared through

CANTINE

Relleno del Mar with Texas Gulf Shrimp, day boat

their constantly updated Twitter feed.

1100 S. Lamar Blvd. Suite 2115 | (512) 628 0348

scallops, and Jumbo Blue lump crab, or Manuel’s

DRINK.WELL.

Owned by restaurant veterans Lisa and Emmett Fox,

famous mole. Located downtown at the corner

207 E. 53rd St. | (512) 614 6683

Cantine produces new twists on Italian and Mediterranean

of 3rd and Congress Avenue and in the Arboretum

Located in the North Loop district, Michael and Jessica

classics. Along with the slew of culinary temptations,

on Jollyville Road. One of the best happy hour

Sanders bring craft cocktails and American pub fare to

the restaurant also has an impressive selection of imported

deals in town.

drink.well. with a seasonally changing menu. Snacks to try

liquor and a skilled bar staff.

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EAST SIDE KING

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

HOME SLICE PIZZA

1816 E. 6th St. | (512) 407 8166

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 101

1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437

2310 S. Lamar, Suite 101 | (512) 383 8382

Small, neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice

Winner of the James Beard Award and Top Chef, Paul Qui

serving unique dishes. Chef Ned Elliott serves thoughtful,

Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post bar-hop-

offers out-of-this-world pan-Asian food from across town

locally-sourced food with an international twist at reason-

ping convenience and stocked with classics like the

trailers with fellow chefs Moto Utsunomiya and Ek Timrek.

able prices. Go early on Tuesdays for dollar oysters.

Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam,

Try their legendary fried Brussels Sprouts!

FREEDMEN’S

topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano.

EASY TIGER

2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953

HOPFIELDS

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

Housed in a historic Austin landmark, smoke imbues the

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

From the ELM Restaurant Group, Easy Tiger lures in both

f lavors of everything at Freedmen’s — from the barbecue, to

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beautiful

drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop up-

the desserts and even their cocktail offerings. Pitmaster

patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine and cocktail

stairs and a casual beer garden downstairs. Sip on some local

and chef Evan LeRoy plates some of the city’s best barbecue

options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for the restau-

brew and grab a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with

on a charming outdoor patio.

rant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

beer cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

GERALDINE’S

ITALIC

EL ALMA

605 Davis St. | (512) 476 4755

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

Located inside Rainey Street’s Hotel Van Zandt, Geraldine’s

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Easy Tiger presents

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with un-

creates a unique, fun experience by combining creative

simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies

matched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Austin

cocktails, shareable plates and scenic views of Lady Bird

from Pastry Chef Mary Katherine Curren.

dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect for enjoy-

Lake. Enjoy live bands every night of the week as you enjoy

ing delicious specialized drinks outside for their everyday

Executive Chef Stephen Bonin’s dishes and cocktails from

JEFFREY’S

3 p.m. – 5 p.m. happy hour!

bar manager Jen Keyser.

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

the execution, top-notch service and luxurious but welcoming

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Vietnamese

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides mod-

atmosphere that makes Jeffrey’s an old Austin staple.

eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mis and sweet

ern spins on American classics. Dig into a fried mortadella

treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio bring com-

egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry thyme cocktail.

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

fort and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite.

HILLSIDE FARMACY

Rustic, continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local and

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s,

EPICERIE

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the east side.

New Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on their patio

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner specials are

and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

sensibilities by Thomas Keller-trained Chef Sarah

whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

LA BARBECUE

Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in here for a bite on Sundays!

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584 Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696 Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, whips up classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

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V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

L’ESTELLE HOUSE

REBEL PIZZA BAR

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN

88 1/2 Rainey St. | (512) 571 4588

7858 Shoal Creek Blvd. | (512) 457 5757

222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430

This cute walk-up kitchen and patio fuses traditional French

Along with its unique street art interiors, Rebel Pizza Bar

Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True

and Southern cuisine. Think late night Parisian-style burgers

delivers updated takes on bar classics including hot wings and

Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-con-

with frites or rosemary biscuits and gravy for Sunday brunch.

waff le fries. But the pizza is the real star of this cozy restau-

scious eating, striking the perfect balance. The restaurant,

L’OCA D’ORO

rant, like the Get Up Stand Up pie that packs a powerhouse of

located in downtown’s chicest new entertainment district, offers

flavors that will leave you jostling for the last slice.

a full range of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options.

Located in the Mueller development, Chef Fiore Tedesco

SALTY SOW

UCHIKO

delivers contemporary Italian cuisine with a strong nod to

1917 Manor Rd. | (512) 391 2337

4200 N. Lamar Blvd. Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808

the classics. Alongside delicious plates, guests will enjoy

Salty Sow serves up creative signature drinks, including

The sensational sister creation of Uchi, and former home

impressive cocktails, wine and a great craft beer selection.

a Blueberry-Lemon Thyme Smash. The food menu,

of Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley

MONGERS MARKET + KITCHEN

heavy with sophisticated gastropub fare, is perfect for late-

and Nicholas Yanes. Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone

night noshing.

should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki!

Chef Shane Stark brings a casual Texas Gulf Coast sensibility

SNOOZE

VINAIGRETTE

to East Austin by slinging fresh seafood in the kitchen and

3800 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 428 8444

2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791

at the counter.

This Denver original serves up brunch classics with a

This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has one

NAU’S ENFIELD DRUG

creative twist seven days a week, with two locations on either

of the prettiest patios in town. Along with an inviting

end of Lamar. With friendly service in an updated

ambiance, the salads are fresh, creative, bold and most impor-

diner atmosphere, Snooze is sure to start your day off right.

tantly delicious, with nearly two dozen options to choose from.

fountain within an antiquated drug store gives guests an

SWIFT’S ATTIC

WINEBELLY

unmatched experience founded on tradition. The food is

315 Congress Ave. | (512) 482 8842

6705 Hwy 290 # 503 | (512) 584 808

simple and classic, rivaled only by the scrumptious shakes

Overlooking Congress Avenue, Swift’s Attic draws from

3016 Guadalupe St. Suite 100 | (512) 358 6193

and hand mixed old-fashioned sodas.

global inspirations and serves up inventive cocktails in a

Named as one of the top 20 wine bars in America by Wine

OLAMAIE

historic downtown building.

Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an international wine list

1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796

TAKOBA

and Spanish-Mediterranean small plates. The bistro main-

Food+Wine Magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek

1411 E. 7th St. | (512) 628 4466

creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with

Takoba delivers bold, authentic f lavors with ingredients

WU CHOW

delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts.

imported straight from Mexico. Head over to East 7th Street

500 W. 5th St. #168 | (512) 476 2469

The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy

for tortas, tacos, margaritas and micheladas.

From the curators of Swift’s Attic, Wu Chow is expanding

goat cheese caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and

THE PEACHED TORTILLA

Austin’s cuisine offerings with traditional Chinese dishes

1900 Simond Ave. | (737) 212 1876

2401 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 215 8972

1115 West Lynn St. | (512) 476 1221 An Austin institution since 1951, this all-American soda

order the biscuits (they’re worth every delectable bite).

5520 Burnet Rd. #100 | (512) 330 4439

PIEOUS

This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with

12005 U.S. 290 West | (512) 394 7041

friendly staff, fun food and a playful atmosphere. Affordably

Unequivocally some of the best pizza Austin has to offer,

priced, you’ll find culinary inf luences from around the

Pieous brings together the unlikely, yet perfect combination

world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.

tains a local feel with it’s comfortable, laid back interiors.

sourced from local purveyors and farmers. Don’t miss their weekend dim sum menu.

of Neapolitan pizza and pastrami, with all dishes made from scratch. Decked out in prosciutto and arugula, the Rocket pizza is a crowd favorite and a must-try. tribeza.com

| JUNE 2017

115


A L O O K B E H I N D 7…7

Neighborhoods by the Numbers Compiled by Evan Ross

$370,600 MEDIAN HOME PRICE FOR A SINGLE-FAMILY HOME IN AUSTIN AS OF APRIL 2017

233,014 ESTIMATED

NUMBER OF CATS LIVING IN AUSTIN

$75

53

130 SCHOOLS IN THE

NEIGHBORHOODS

AUSTIN INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

IN AUSTIN

DISTRICT (AISD)

949,587

23

WHAT THE CITY OF

CITY OF AUSTIN’S

AUSTIN WILL PAY YOU TO

POPULATION

AUSTIN PUBLIC

KEEP CHICKENS

AS OF APRIL 1, 2017

LIBRARY SYSTEM

33.8

million

ESTIMATED NUMBER

OF TREES IN AUSTIN’S URBAN FOREST

116 JUNE 2017 |

tribeza.com

51

LIBRARIES IN THE

213,292 ESTIMATED

AQUATIC FACILITIES

NUMBER OF DOGS

IN AUSTIN

LIVING IN AUSTIN


D E S I G N PO R T R A I T.

Michel, seat system designed by Antonio Citterio. www.bebitalia.com B&B Italia Austin: 1009 West 6th Street, Suite 120 Austin, TX 78703 T. 512 617 7460 - bebaustin@internum.com


T R I B E Z A .C O M NEIGHBORHOODS | JUNE 2017

TRIBEZA June 2017  

The Neighborhoods Issue No. 190

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