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Style The

Issue


CONTENTS

SEPTEMBER DEPARTMENTS

Tribeza Talk p.14 Social Hour p. 18 Kristin’s Column p. 22 Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 34 Karen’s Pick p. 74 Dining Guide p. 76 FEATURES

Go Bold or Go Home p. 40 The Magic and The Muse p. 51 Austin Eye View p. 60

THIS PAGE Brown Sweater Dries Van Noten ($545) from ByGeorge Flannel Loewe Check Shirt ($990) from ByGeorge Officine Generale James Cotton Corduroy Sand Trousers ($235) from ByGeorge Nicole Romano Bracelet ($170) from Estilo

COVER AND GO BOLD OR GO HOME BY PHIL KLINE

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“I

LIKE MY MONEY RIGHT WHERE I CAN SEE IT — HANGING IN MY

closet.” Carrie Bradshaw, Sex and the City That quote couldn’t be closer to home for me. When I found out that my first issue as Executive Editor at TRIBEZA was going to be centered around style, I was like a giddy little girl playing dress-up in her mom’s high heels, doing a happy dance. After all, style is something that we all have — we just need to find it. This year’s fall style issue is all about bright and bold fashion that will leave you eager to ditch the casual wear and emerge from the dark, into the spotlight. Our “Go Bold or Go Home” fashion feature highlights looks that demand attention and make no excuses for being fierce. You’ll also want to check out our designer feature — “The Magic and The Muse” — showcasing four local fashion designers and their exclusive masterpieces that inspire the future. Both of these features, along with the cover, were photographed by the amazing Phil Kline, who somehow managed to take my vision for each

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piece, elevate it to the next level and exceed all expectations. Behind the scenes, our talented team of art directors, writers, producers, stylists and models came together to tell each story. There were a lot of cooks in the kitchen, but with this group of perfectionists, I wouldn’t have had it any other way. This issue also introduces a new series — “Austin Eye View “— featuring the perspectives of various Austinites. For September, we chose to highlight four food and drink professionals, style them from head-to-toe in looks from local retailers, and get their take on their industry and what makes it fashionable. I look forward to digging in every month and bringing you the very best of Austin — the city that sparkles in the spotlight!

Carrie Crowe Executive Editor

P H OTO B Y P H I L K L I N E AT W E S T C H E L S E A CO N T E M P O R A RY

EDITOR’S LETTER


PUBLISHERS’S LETTER

YEARS

AUSTIN CUR ATED S E P T E M B E R 2 02 1

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Carrie Crowe

ART DIRECTION

October Custom Publishing

DIGITAL DIRECTOR

Aaron Parsley

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Holly Cowart

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

David Clough

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen O. Spezia

I

PUBLISHER

Mark Fisher

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Krissy Hearn

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Julia Grisemer Paul Krushin

ACCOUNTING MANAGER

Dylan Sack

PRINCIPALS

George Elliman – CEO Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

WRITERS

AM DELIGHTED TO WELCOME CARRIE TO TRIBEZA AS OUR NEW

Executive Editor. Carrie brings a wealth of experience to the company with a number of years as the Editor of Rare Magazine, and most recently as the Dir of Marketing and Communications at Austin FIT Magazine. As we move forward with TRIBEZA, it is important that the entire team bring the same level of passion, enthusiasm, commitment and professionalism to the table. We are extremely fortunate that Carrie agreed to join us and take the company’s vision to the next level. I am honored to take on the role as Publisher, and take the reins from George. These are big boots to fill, but I am excited to continue the legacy of making TRIBEZA the best, most relevant, cutting-edge publication in Austin that focuses on local businesses, while maintaining a high standard of creativity. To make this a reality and ensure its enduring success, we have assembled an incredible team at TRIBEZA, and adding Carrie to the mix will only enhance our ability to be more successful moving forward. Mark Fisher Publisher

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Holly Cowart Darcie Duttweiler Veronica Meewes Laurel Miller Tolly Moseley Bryan Parker Camille Styles Meher Qazilbash EDITORIAL INTERN

Meher Qazilbash COPY EDITOR

Ashley Brown

PHOTOGR APHERS

Holly Cowart Chase Daniel Phil Kline Brittany Dawn Short Drew Anthony Smith CONTRIBUTING ARTIST

Shaylin Wallace

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2021 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


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T R I B E Z A TA L K

FUN THINGS FOR GETTING INTO A COZY STATE OF MIND Camille Styles is editor-in-chief of CamilleStyles.com, an Austin-based lifestyle site that reaches millions of readers around the globe. A daily guide to creating your most beautiful life, the site covers food, gatherings, design, wellness and beauty. For TRIBEZA’s style issue, we tapped the tastemaker to share the local items she’s loving for the cozier days and nights ahead. For Camille, it’s all about carving out time for those daily rituals that spark joy. IG Handle: @camillestyles Website: camillestyles.com

Helm Boots I think that every guy needs a solid moto boot that can be dressed up or down — one that immediately sends the message, “I’m cool, but I’m not trying too hard.” Thank goodness for local boot maker Helm that has kept Austin guys looking effortlessly cool since 2009, and this simple pair of slim-cut Pablos is my pick for the season. The Pablo ($295) helmboots.com

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ByGeorge BEAUTY For a beauty product lover like me, this launch is downright dangerous. Makeup artist Erin Lee Smith has curated a selection of natural brands and cult favorite beauty products that feel as elevated and luxe as the fashion that’s made ByGeorge a destination. Sure, that leather Celine bag may not be in my fall shopping budget this year, but you can bet I’ll be treating myself to a red lipstick from La Bouche Rouge with its luxurious refillable leather case. 70s America Lipstick Refill ($35) bygeorgeaustin.com

H E L M B O OT S P H OTO CO U R T E S Y O F O F H E L M . B YG E O R G E B E A U T Y P H OTO B Y M I C H E L L E N A S H . M AT R I A R C H C A N D L E S P H OTO B Y K E L S E Y H A R P E R . M U G P H OTO B Y S E Q U OYA H J O H N S O N . T H E T E N S P OT P H OTO CO U R T E S Y O F T E T E N S P OT. L A LO T E Q U I L A P H OTO B Y G I S E L L E A U S T I N .

Camille Styles’ local faves for cozier nights


T R I B E Z A TA L K

The Ten Spot Nail Polish in Irish Coffee The pandemic paused my biweekly manicures, and I’ll admit, my nails have suffered. That is, until I started diving back into at-home nail care, and you know what? It’s actually pretty fun. This shade from The Ten Spot is the perfect nude for fall — not too pink, and so neutral that you barely notice chips. And when you do decide to return to the professionals, this new spot in Rosedale Village is stringent on safety and a gorgeous environment to get your self-care on. Irish Coffee ($11) thetenspotbeauty.com

Matriarch Candles from Frond Plant Shop I was thrilled to discover that one of my favorite local shops stocks these divine candles. Each one is hand-poured in L.A. and looks as gorgeous on your coffee table as it smells. Just be forewarned before stepping into Frond to scoop one up; you’re probably going to walk out with two new plant babies, a ceramic planter and a hanging raffia basket, in addition to your candle. Or maybe that was just me. Indigo Candle ($48) frondaustin.com

Mug from The Coy Collection Call me basic, but I feel a flutter of excitement the moment I see the words “pumpkin spice” start appearing around town. Thankfully, I’ll be drinking mine out of a one-of-a-kind mug that’s anything but basic from local ceramicist The Coy Collection. Each one is made to order and is a literal art piece — think of it as an “investment piece” that will truly brighten every morning. Pink Moo Mug ($85) thecoycollection.com

LALO Tequila Anyone who claims that margaritas are just for summer clearly hasn’t tasted LALO because they’d know that this perfect tequila is meant for all-year-round sipping. During chillier months, I’ll be mixing up a spicy blood orange marg that makes the most of fresh winter citrus. Hot hostess tip: Always keep a bottle of LALO on hand for last minute holiday cocktails — you can thank me later. LALO Tequila ($52.99) shoplalospirits.com

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| SEPTEMBER 2021

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Nontoxic Skincare from Botnia at eleMINT A change in seasons is a perfect time to clean up your bathroom drawer, and may I suggest starting with nontoxic skincare from Botnia, available at eleMINT’s beautiful studio in east Austin? The entire collection is a treat for the senses, but I especially love the nourishing Weekly Digest Mast packed with colloidal oatmeal proteins for moisture, and pumpkin and pomegranate enzymes for gentle exfoliation and brightening. It’s just what’s needed for my parched post-summer skin. Botnia Weekly Digest Mask ($38) elemintskin.com

Burlap & Twine A curated “flower bar” on the happiest ever shop on wheels? Genius. For me, the quickest way to make my home feel like a sanctuary is to add fresh flowers, and new mobile concept Burlap & Twine makes it easier than ever. For fall, I’ll be hitting up their bright blue 1971 VW truck to treat myself — or a lucky friend — to their seasonal blooms sourced from local farms. instagram.com/burlapandtwineatx

Body Jade Roller by Esker Yes, I know you already gua sha, jade roll and lymphatic massage your face on the reg, but what about the rest of your body? It clearly needs some love, too, and Austin-based beauty company Esker has turned their attention to our skin below the neck. This extra-large jade roller is covered in ridges that boost stimulation, break apart tension-causing fascia and decrease puffiness. Self-care Sunday, sorted. Allover Roller ($65) eskerbeauty.com

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Lingerie from Elle’s Boutique I’ll admit that pre-pandemic, my shopping choices were mostly based on how they made me look. But now, they’re every bit as much about how they make me feel. Enter Elle’s, a shop that’s dedicated to inspiring women to feel their most sensual. As we enter layering season, this year I’m giving a little more thought to that first layer. Even if I’m the only one who sees it, it’s amazing how the right lingerie can make one feel extra confident, underneath it all. ellesboutique.co

B U R L A P & T W I N E P H OTO B Y I A N H A I S L E Y. B O DY J A D E R O L L E R P H OTO B Y G A B R I E L A E P E L B O I M . B OT N I A P H OTO CO U R T E S T Y O F B OT N I A . E L L E ’ S B O U T I Q U E P H OTO B Y M I C H E L L E N A S H . W O U N D E D PA I N T I N G P H OTO B Y K E LT I S M I T H . S I L K C H A R M E U S E R O B E P H OTO B Y J E S S I C A PAG E S .

T R I B E Z A TA L K


T R I B E Z A TA L K

Wool Jacket from Estilo It’s become almost tradition that for my husband’s birthday each fall, I buy him a cool jacket for the season ahead. There’s something about a well-cut jacket that makes any outfit look pulled together, and this one is made of boiled wool but feels as soft as fleece. Pair with slim cut pants and a well-fitted white tee for a fall look that’s as ready for a night out as it is a cozy evening around the fire. Boiled Wool Jacket, NN07 ($550) estiloboutique.com

“Wounded” Painting by Artist Kelti Smith It’s hard to choose a favorite piece from local artist Kelti Smith. All of her paintings are surprising, expressive and absolutely original. I especially love the simplicity and saturated color in this piece, cleverly titled “Wounded.” Not sure about you, but it makes me excited for all the pomegranate seeds I’ll be devouring this fall. “ Wounded” Painting (16 x 16) Acrylic Paint On Paper instagram.com/p/CKFKaVtlPyV

Silk Charmeuse Robe from Miranda Bennett Each of these 100% silk robes is bundled dyed in house in Austin using concentrated natural dye extract. The result is one-of-a-kind prints that makes these robes feel like an art piece to slip into post-shower. Or pair over a tank and denim for an effortlessly chic daytime look. Thanks to Miranda Bennett’s Zero Waste model, this is a purchase I can truly feel good about. Bundle Dyed Robe, Silk Charmeuse in Jalisco V.3 ($420) shopmirandabennett.com

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Social

HOUR On June 15, TRIBEZA’s Neighborhood Guide Launch party took place at the West Chelsea Contemporary, hosted by SWBC Mortgage/The Breed Team and Heritage Title Company. Visitors were treated to incredible artwork, delicious bites from 34th Street Catering, summer attire from ByGeorge and beats by DJ Ramesh while sipping local drinks from Epic Western, BOXT and Rambler Sparkling Water.

WEST CHELSEA CONTEMPORARY X CEY ADAMS

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West Chelsea Contemporary collaborated with Cey Adams, iconic artist and founding Creative Director of Def Jam Recordings, in celebration of his masterful creations and Juneteenth. To honor the national holiday, the museum organized a release party for a limited-edition catalog of Adams’ new mixed media works along with an exclusive in-person artist talk.

EL ALMA 10TH ANNIVERSARY El Alma, the revered Mexican restaurant, hosted an extravagant fiesta for its 10-year anniversary on June 24. Guests enjoyed dishes from both their past and present menus, along with a ceviche bar and queso fountain. Patrons also enjoyed a pop-up satellite bar on the restaurant’s rooftop, danced to a fun DJ set, and participated in a gift card raffle.

NEIGHBORHOOD GUIDE RELEASE PARTY 1. Callie Fowler & Sarah Railey 2. Diane Humphreys, Susie Davis, Cameron Breed & Carl Alberty 3. Daniel Nguyen, Matthew Trujillo & Jake Rosenberg 4. Rubyanne Rutledge & Catherine Simpkins 5. Weston Lipscomb & Alan Gonzalez 6. Jessica Jurado & Adam Jurado WEST CHELSEA CONTEMPORARY X CEY ADAMS 7. Cey Adams 8. Lindsay Hamm 9. Gary Lichtenstein EL ALMA 10TH ANNIVERSARY 10. Shannon Bogges & Amy Layton 11. Tom Munos & Meredith Champman 12. Anna Amaro, Chef Alma, Steven Merlo & Rhiana Cielonko 13. Jeff Fouler & Natalie Kakovitch 14. Kaila Parker & Alban Foulsen 15. Laurel Engle, Michael Reynolds, Katie Whetter & Charlie Troy

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N E I G H B O R H O O D G U I D E R E L E A S E PA R T Y P H OTO S B Y E R I N R E A S . W E S T C H E L S E A CO N T E M P O R A R Y X C E Y A DA M S P H OTO S B Y J O N AT H A N G A R Z A . E L A L M A 10T H A N N I V E R S A R Y P H OTO S B Y E R I C A W I L K I N S P H OTO G R A P H Y.

NEIGHBORHOOD GUIDE RELEASE PARTY


SOCIAL HOUR

CRYSTAL BALL GALA The Helping Hand Home Crystal Ball gala was held July 10 at Palmer Auditorium. Chaired by Leslie Davenport and Suzanne Nash, nearly 1,500 guests attended to benefit the Helping Hand Home for Children. Prior to the gala was a stylish luncheon where Adelante and Garden Room presented their looks in a fashion show, followed by several adoptive families who modeled. Debutantes were presented at the luncheon and the evening gala.

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WOMEN & THEIR WORK HOMECOMING

PERSHING PICNIC Pershing Picnic took place on July 18 in benefit of the Austin charitable organization Black Fret. The public reveled in the gorgeous music of three local bands and two local DJs for an unforgettable day. The lineup included music acts Primo the Alien, Barbara Nesbitt, Miggy and TJE, and David Ramirez. Complementing the incredible shows were pop-ups filled with cold drinks and vintage, artisan and other local goods vendors. CRYSTAL BALL GALA 1. Leslie Davenport & Suzanne Nash 2. Mei Mei Graber, Grace Eckols & Annabel Merritt 3. Brooke & Blake Pozzi Smith 4. Janie Cagle, Ava Accardi & Morgan McHaney 5. John, Sophie & Jenny Stokes 6. Natalie & Fielding Sulester 7. Amy Biegel & Ellen Burt 8. Derek & Stephanie Land WOMEN & THEIR WORK HOMECOMING 9. Kendra Villa & Alyson Fall 10. Kyle & Avery Nelson 11. Emily Apollo & Jodi Lazar 12. Carol Wagoner, Sheryl Draker & Frances Thompson PERSHING PICNIC 13. Mallory Bellinger & Sara Dinkin 14. Esther Gomez & Dani Donnell 15. Tessa Bloomer & Braden Finberg 16. Anne Marie Beard, Jennifer Carver & Maddie Logan

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H E L P I N G H A N D H O M E G A L A P H OTO S B Y J E T T E R P H OTO G R A P H Y. H O M E CO M I N G W &T W P H OTO S B Y J O N AT H A N G A R Z A . P E R S H I N G P I C N I C P H OTO S B Y E R I N R E A S .

The Austin-based nonprofit visual and performing arts organization, Women & Their Work, celebrated moving into a new permanent location. The glorious homecoming event marked even further progress in honoring and uplifting art created by Texas women artists. Featured in the creative celebration were innovative works of contemporary art, a live dance performance by Jennifer Sherburn, music by DJ La Moon, delectable refreshments from El Locavore and a chic photo booth setup.


KRISTIN'S COLUMN

Nothing To Prove By Kristin Armstrong Artwork by Shaylin Wallace

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T ISN’T EASY TO GET a family of college-age kids all in one place at the same time. Between jobs, internships, sports, friends and significant others, a family vacation has to be strategized in advance and then immediately booked, so it’s officially blocked. This summer, my parents, my kids, my son’s girlfriend and I were all together at our house in Santa Barbara, California, and I honestly could not remember the last time we were all there at the same time. This precious time was made even more significant with milestone birthdays just around the bend — my 50th in August and my father’s 80th in October. One of the most thoughtful people on the planet gifted me with an early birthday present — a photographer to take some family photos on the beach. I was so excited imagining these images captured of my favorite people and freezing this moment in family history. Last year, we couldn’t even hug my parents. Life has thrown a few curveballs, but we made it all the way here. It was a true family photo, complete with stress about outfits and infighting between siblings. My parents, wise survivalists, packed wine and cheese for sustenance. Our photographer, Laura, was amazing. She took everything in stride and even coaxed smiles out of the dissention in the ranks. Nothing fazed her. She was an expert with light, both capturing it and exuding it. She is a couple years older than I am, with gorgeous skin, bright blue eyes and soft gray hair. She carries herself with the easy confidence and warmth of a stunning, talented grown-ass woman. A woman who fully inhabits herself has nothing to prove. By sunset, I had made a new friend. Several days after returning home, our large file of photos hit my inbox. Some made me laugh, some made me cry, and all of them made me happy. She captured elements of personality and dynamics of connection that would take years to explain in words.

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There was one file called “Kristin” with photographs she took of just me. Normally, that would feel awkward to me, but with her, it just felt like we were hanging out at the beach. Plus, I want to write another book this year and will need an updated author photo. In some, I was wearing a white jumpsuit with a long, sleeveless white sweater as a wrap. In others, I wore black. I brought a few of my favorite hats. In most of the shots, I am either walking along the edge of the waves or sitting on a rock by the cliffs. I had an epiphany as I was looking through these photos. It’s personal, but I’m going to share it with you because this issue is about style, and style is literally nothing without freedom and confidence. Here goes. Today, when I look back at photos of my younger self, I think, “Oh, I look so happy, or fit. Or, look how great my skin looked.” Yet I know that at the time the photo was taken, I would have been on a flaw-finding mission, noticing I had a pimple, needed to get my hair highlighted, needed to lose (or gain — AKA misery skinny) five pounds or something equally critical and pointless. When I looked at these photos Laura took of me, I actually saw myself. This sounds simple, but it absolutely isn’t. Maybe it was seeing myself through her lens, and finally clearing my own. I wasn’t looking for wrinkles or noticing if my hair was frizzy in the beach air. I wasn’t scrutinizing the angle of my arm or wondering if my smile was too big (it legit probably is most of the time). I wasn’t wishing I were younger, or thinner, or prettier or different somehow. I wasn’t giving a single shit about comparing myself to anyone. I looked at the woman in the photo looking back at me, and thought she was simply beautiful. This is not 80-year-old me, looking back at 50-year-old me, thinking I was cute or had nice skin. This was me, now, today, appreciating myself right where I am, not in retrospect. If I could bottle this awareness and give it away, or write or speak these words and teach what I discovered, oh, honey, I would. It would save us all so much struggle, so much striving, so much division, so much wasted energy, so much precious time. By the time this is published, I will be 50 years old. And the gift of seeing myself as I am, as enough, may be one of the finer gifts of my passage into Part Two.


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Howler Brothers Combines Cool Style With a Fun-Loving Philosophy THE AUSTIN-BASED BR AND REFLECTS THE CIT Y’S L AID-BACK ENERGY, APPRECIATION OF NATURE AND LOVE OF ADVENTURE By Meher Qazilbash Photos by Chase Daniel

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OWLER BROTHERS IS A MANIFESTATION OF the Austin spirit. Founded by Chase Heard and Andy Stepanian, two members of the band Wrinkle Neck Mules, the brand’s clothing displays the intersection of design, music, sports and entrepreneurship. With Heard’s background in architecture and graphic design, designing apparel was not too far a reach. Mix that with his time spent as a musician and his childhood love of ’90s surf culture, and Howler Brothers became the perfect Austin brand. Howler Brothers just recently celebrated its ten-year anniversary, and it continues to flourish. They started with just a simple desire to offer a younger, fresher aesthetic to the outdoor world, but ended up becoming a go-to spot for men of all ages. “It’s a huge variety of people from super young, hip high school kids all the way up to aspirational older guys who are young at heart,” says Heard. Celebrities like Matthew McConaughey and Will Ferrell have sported the looks. There are a lot of qualities that explain the huge appeal to Austinites, most obviously that it’s authentic, unassuming and unconventional.

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“We focus on surf culture in a landlocked city. We keep doing stranger and stranger special, limited edition releases. I don’t know that we would have that same success in a town other than Austin, where people really embrace all the oddities and alternative ways of thinking.” Straying from the norm is key to the brand, along with not taking itself too seriously. In the world of outdoor apparel, great feats against nature are typically the emphasis. But rather than conquering the elements, Howler Brothers offers a philosophy that associates the outdoors with appreciation, lightheartedness and a sense of humor. “We’re really about doing stuff with your buddies. It’s more about the mission and the voyage than the destination. All the fun stuff that happens along the way, and all the relationships and good times you share, are really what our brand is about, more than some incredible accomplishment or pursuit in nature.” As for the adventures to come for Howler Brothers, there are many. Soon to emerge in the future are expansions of the line, and a new store in Clarksville. “We’re trying to grow a bunch, but we’re really trying to avoid losing any of the authenticity and the genuine nature that we’ve cultivated.” While womenswear may not be something Howler Brothers is ready to take on just yet, Heard assures us that it’s definitely on the horizon.   As for advice for those interested in turning passion projects into thriving businesses, Heard says, “You have to follow your gut, and know that the timing is never going to be perfect. If it’s something that you believe in, you need to make a concerted effort and take the plunge and just go all in, in order to see if it works or not. You can only do it partway or halfway for so long.” howlerbros.com    


eleMINT: Curated Clean A MODERN FACIAL STUDIO THAT PROMOTES CLE AN BE AUT Y, COMMUNIT Y AND PL ANTS By Tolly Moseley Photos by Brittany Dawn Short

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HE ZOOM SCREEN FLICKERS TO LIFE, AND SMILING BACK at me is Shauntavia Ward. We’re here to discuss eleMINT, her modern facial studio on East 6th Street, but before we dive in, I’m a little distracted. That’s because I’ve got a confession: I don’t particularly like facials. Shauntavia laughs good-naturedly when I admit this. “I always break out afterwards,” I explain. “I hate getting extractions, and, and …” She gazes at me calmly, much like a doctor or nurse with good bedside manner. Perhaps that’s because Shauntavia was a nurse, working in medicine for 10 years and ER for five. Something tells me she knows how to make me feel better about extractions.  “We get that a lot from brand new clients,” she reassures me. The conventional spa model often follows a plug-and-play approach, where acne clients get a certain type of treatment, dry skin clients get another — and to be sure, those broad treatment options can work, some of the time.

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But eleMINT is something entirely different. “We are not a corrective studio,” she tells me. “We’re a restorative studio, and we believe in plants, as well as the science behind them.” This intrigues me because “plant-based” is the buzz phrase of the moment. However, Shauntavia’s penchant for research makes her studio and treatments distinct. You’re never getting an algorithmic treatment at eleMINT, with “plant-based” tossed in as a marketing term. Instead, you’re getting individual ingredients, mixed right there in front you, after a full evaluation from your aesthetician. “The products we carry are apothecary style, and we mix them according to your needs that day,” Shauntavia explains. When I go in myself to get a facial (more on that in a moment), I see the process in action: eleMINT buys from Botnia, a woman-owned microfarm in California, that cultivates skin-soothing classics — lavender, rose, chamomile — as well as lesser-known, highly researched flora, like yarrow and meadowsweet. “Skin recognizes plants and their calming, healing effects,” says Shauntavia. “With clean beauty, you’ll get the detox of an effective facial, but in small increments. Not enough to disrupt your day-to-day activity, but enough to disrupt any stagnancy.”

TH E PRO DUCTS WE CARRY ARE APOTH ECARY STYLE, AN D WE M IX TH EM ACCO RD I NG TO YOU R N EEDS THAT DAY. I’m starting to feel more confident about all of this. I book a facial at eleMINT (they offer two: Simplicity, a 30-minute treatment, and Radiant, a 60-minute treatment) and cross my fingers. Yes, I’ve been a facial skeptic, but Shauntavia’s background in Western medicine was interesting to me. Back when she was a nurse, she started a beauty blog, and she began training in med spa procedures to expand her beauty repertoire. It was precisely this experience that inspired her to step away and study a different type of care — one that wasn’t transactional, but community based, one that empowered patients to cultivate beauty at the studio and at home, rather than solely depending on an expensive practitioner. The result is eleMINT, a light-filled space tucked next door to Practice Yoga, where treatment rooms are open, there’s no gratuity (they encourage you to donate to your favorite charity instead), and you’re instantly greeted like an old friend. “You must be Tolly!” calls Josh Zuniga, my aesthetician for the day. Chatty

and sweet, Josh sits me down and asks me about my skin concerns. I’m at the charming age when acne and wrinkles both like to show up on my face, but then again, eleMINT isn’t about trying to get you to a beauty ideal. The whole vibe here is “love the skin you’re in,” and now I can say from experience: my love is real. “We’re going to put some cooling elements on your face,” Josh explains, educating me on each and every ingredient. I’ve opted for the Simplicity treatment, but next time I’m coming for Radiant; it involves a hydro jelly mask, where serum specially mixed for your skin is applied to the face, then the mask is placed on top of it, pressing hydration and all those healing botanicals directly into your pores.   “We’re also going to use some high frequency to kill any bacteria hanging out beneath the surface,” Josh says, wielding a handheld wand in front of me. I expect to come out of that round a bit red ... but when it’s all said and done, I leave eleMINT with zero inflammation. Am I glowing? Yes. Am I spotty, like after other facial treatments I’ve had? Absolutely not. Instead, my skin looks smooth and healthy — like I’ve just worked out. Or like I’ve used a good Instagram filter. “Tolly, your skin looks really good,” says a friend of mine the next day. She’s a beauty school alum, and I perk up at the compliment. “I just had a facial!” I explain, gushing about Josh, Shauntavia and the cozy-cool interior at eleMINT.  “Do they have openings?” she asks, pulling out her phone.  Because community and accessibility are two big pillars of eleMINT, I imagine my friend will have no problem getting an appointment. But word is getting out, and bookings are filling. That’s because this Austin facial studio offers something truly unique: a relationship-based approach to beauty care, where the instant glow-up is undeniable. And the long-term effects? Skin education, deep healing and a complexion powered by plants. It’s no wonder folks are flocking to their door.  elemintskin.com   tribeza.com

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Every Rose Has Its Thorn WOMEN’S BOUTIQUE WOOD & ROSE OFFERS BOTH SOF TNESS AND EDGE By Darcie Duttweiler Photos by Brittany Dawn Short

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ALKING INTO WOOD & ROSE ON NORTH LAMAR BOULEVARD, with its stark white walls and glistening floors, feels like entering a modern art gallery — except you can actually touch almost everything in this gorgeous women’s boutique. Owned by Wendy Vaughn, the shop is a feast for the senses with luxurious textiles like Italian cashmere (oh so soft!) and silk, the eye candy of colorful prints and patterns, as well as the sultry and earthy ZenBunni Holy Smoke incense permeating the air.

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“Shopping here is a very tactile experience,” Vaughn laughs. Dressed in a long white skirt, pink checkered Vans sneakers and topped with neon green glasses, Vaughn is a walking calling card for her store. In fact, with her ruby red rose sleeve tattoo trailing down her arm, the shop is literally an extension of Vaughn and her fashion sense. “The rose is just the most beautiful, feminine flower,” she explains regarding the store’s name. “And Wood is my middle name, after my great-grandma, Charity Wood. I just loved how the name is feminine with an edge — just like me!” It’s easy to see how the shop is a reflection of Vaughn when browsing racks of dresses, denim, handbags and accessories from international designers like byTiMo, Hannoh Wessel and Munthe. Girly, floral dresses are nestled next to funky, boxy tie-dyed button-downs, amongst plenty of gold accents and lush, blush pink velvets. The interiors were crafted by Kim Lewis, who also designed EyeJoy and Kesos Tacos, and the shop feels extremely welcoming.


I CREATED A LOW- PRESSU RE ENVI RO N M ENT FO R PEO PLE TO CO M E I N AN D FEEL I N S PI RED. “I want my customers to feel comfortable. I created a low-pressure environment for people to come in and feel inspired,” she adds. Perhaps that’s because Vaughn’s a Texas gal who made a pit stop in Cali to hone her fashion sense but never lost her Southern hospitality. In 2002, Vaughn opened a West Hollywood boutique called Bird and later moved to Austin in 2015 to be closer to family. She recreated the boutique off South Lamar and then opened Wood & Rose in 2018 before shuttering Bird to focus solely on the second shop, which she felt spoke more personally to her. “I wanted to showcase my own style, and I had grown so much since opening Bird,” Vaughn says.

When asked what she senses clients will gravitate toward in the coming months, Vaughn shrugs and explains that she doesn’t follow trends too closely. She peruses international fashion magazines to find designers that inspire her, but she never wants to carry items that will fall out of style in six months or a year. Post-pandemic lifestyles have dictated that while people are ready to dress up again, they still want fabrics that feel luxurious on the body, which is also a big motivator against “fast fashion.” “Clothing is an investment,” Vaughn explains. “All of my pieces are built to last, and it’s important that we invest in a nice quality of clothes instead of dumping things that are no longer trendy.” Vaughn even still wears items she sold in her very first year at Bird in L.A. At the end of the day, she wants her customers to purchase clothes they love. Of course, there will be silhouettes and designs that will flatter a certain body type, but most importantly, it’s all about feeling confident and gorgeous, and she’s here to help. “Women set too many rules for ourselves on what we can and can’t do, and we all should wear what makes us feel beautiful and not listen to the parameters the fashion world has told us.” shopwoodandrose.com   tribeza.com

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Sorek Barbershop and Menswear Offers Fresh Cut Styles A SOPHISTICATED NEW SHOP IN E AST AUSTIN PROVIDES TAILORED AT TIRE AND PERSONALIZED GROOMING By Bryan C. Parker Photos by Drew Anthony Smith

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T THE CORNER OF 6TH AND CHICON IN EAST Austin, Sorek Barbershop and Menswear offers headto-toe grooming and fashion services to a discerning clientele. Opened in August of last year, the shop occupies a space beneath the sleek angles of the new ARRIVE Hotel, designed by Baldridge Architects. On a warm Tuesday morning in July, shop founder Jason Gourd sits in a stylish teal armchair, and his business partner Jared leans over the check-in counter as the brothers explain their vision for Sorek. “I wanted a space that had classic elements but didn’t feel like you were going back in time,” explains Jason. Keenly interested in men’s grooming, the resurgence of barbershops in the last decade excited Jason, but he felt at some point they crossed into kitsch — “whisky barrels and suspenders,” as he puts it. By contrast, Sorek offers traditional barber services amid chic décor, befitting a modern customer. The aesthetic of dark black shelving and light natural wood trim embody the conceptual balance of classic and contemporary. Sorek’s services mirror this mission. The carefully curated shop will employ four veteran barbers to provide basic haircuts for clients on a tight schedule as well as more attentive treatments like their Wake up Call or Organic Facial. Both services use Anthony brand skincare products and are intended to refresh and revitalize the skin. Beard trims and hot lather neck shaves are also among the shop’s menu of services. While Jason manages the barbering, Jared has spearheaded a line of menswear that includes jacketing and suiting, making Sorek a one-stop-shop for anyone looking to update their style with a refined, new look.

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Close your eyes and imagine the warm Mediterranean breeze of Napoli, Italy. Scrubby splashes of green vegetation dot the gently rolling hills in a climate akin to that of South and Central Texas. That European locale serves as a prime source of inspiration for Sorek’s line of menswear. Lightweight, breathable fabrics are used for timeless designs that are casual enough for a night out and formal enough for the boardroom. Unstructured and unlined blazers provide cool comfort for all seasons. Beyond its Italian influence, the line draws inspiration from Americana styles, as with a series of denim shirts planned for release in the fall. Not only does Sorek’s clothing line cater to the environment of its home city, but the shop also specializes in creating made-to-measure versions of their pieces.

guys are a medium because the small is too small and the large is too large, not because it looks best,” he adds. Jared sees clothes that fit exceptionally well as a means of instilling confidence in and empowering his customers. Jason agrees that “what one shirt can do for a guy’s self-esteem is huge.” Though Sorek opened at a difficult time amid the pandemic, Jason says his business concept was planned to roll out over a matter of years rather than months and expects Sorek to see sustained longevity here in Austin. He feels at home here, where the Houston native first obtained his barber’s license and played in bands before getting serious about entrepreneurship. “What better place to be able to start a brand than a community like this, that has not only young professionals, but creatives?” he muses. According to Jason, the shop’s “forced soft opening” ultimately worked well for a new store, allowing them to plan thoroughly and take steps forward with intention. Moreover, after so much time at home recently, patrons see the value in a pampered salon experience more than ever before. Jason has fixed more than a few Covid haircuts, but he’s also seen a general renewed appreciation for personal care. After months working at home in sweats and a t-shirt, it feels invigorating to up the sartorial game for a night out or a return to the office. “Look good, feel good” is a familiar mindset among the fashion-minded. With Sorek available for everything from a fresh haircut to a stylish new wardrobe, the shop provides an accessible place to refine your external presentation and your internal mindset. sorek.com  

TH ERE’S A LOT TO B E SAI D ABOUT SO M ETH I NG THAT’S MAD E FO R YOU. “We do all of the measurements and pinning in store, and then we have a tailor that executes that for us,” explains Jason. The brand’s tagline — “Designed in Texas, made for you” — fits perfectly. Customers can buy pieces ready to wear off the rack, or they can have a new one cut from scratch to their exact specifications. “There’s a lot to be said about something that’s made for you,” says Jared, who got his start in the fashion industry at 21. “Most tribeza.com

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ARTS PICK

Wonderspaces 1205 SHELDON COVE By Meher Qazilbash

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Clockwise from top left: Transition by Joost Jordens & Mike Von Rotz. SUN by Philip Schütte. Sweet Spot by Shawn Causey and Mark Daniell. Into the Breath by Stefano Ogliari Badessi.

I N TO T H E B R E AT H P H OTO B Y A I R I K AT S U TA . A M I N D S A N G P H OTO B Y D E R E K J I . S W E E T S P OT P H OTO B Y D E VO N H U TC H I N S . S U N P H OTO B Y S O C I E T Y H I L L F I L M S .

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HE CALIFORNIA-BASED INTERa c tive and immersive museum opened in Austin, where it now remains permanently, in 2020. Wonderspaces offers a highly sensory experience with spectacular exhibits that are not just pleasing to the eye but also involve sounds, movement and touch. Combining innovative technology with human interaction, the experimental nature of this museum creates a unique experience that invites visitors to not be passive consumers of art but autonomous creators themselves. Wonderspaces is filled with awe-inspiring installations like Into the Breath, a Chinese dragon made of glimmering golden tea bags where visitors are invited inside to bask in the meditative atmosphere. Other fan favorites are Submergence, which displays over 8,000 hanging lights that create a dazzling space to walk through, and Body Paint, the colorful installation that uses participants’ movements to create vibrant compositions, making them essential components of the artwork. Recently added is the SUN installation that offers an empowering experience to visitors in which they can control the rise and setting of the sun by moving a ball. Even more installations that inspire playfulness and curiosity are available to the public, and each one upholds the Wonderspaces mission to create a shared understanding through shared experiences. The artwork encourages guests to connect with the art, the artist’s vision and with each other. austin.wonderspaces.com  


C ALENDARS B E S U R E T O C H E C K W E B S I T E S F O R U P D AT E D I N F O R M AT I O N A N D S A F E T Y P R O T O C O L S

Entertainment THE DROP-IN Through September 9 Long Center Terrace

ANBERLIN September 9 Emo’s Austin DWIGHT YOAKAM September 10 Nutty Brown Amphitheatre

ELI YOUNG BAND September 3 Whitewater Amphitheater ROSE FEST September 4 Haute Spot COHEED & CAMBRIA + THE USED September 4 Germania Insurance Amphitheater  KEEP AUSTIN WEIRD: JAMESTOWN REVIVAL September 5 Fair Market RAY WYLIE HUBBARD September 5 Haute Spot JOSH ABBOTT BAND September 5 Whitewater Amphitheater KEVIN GATES September 8 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater CITY AND COLOUR  September 8 Paramount Theatre REBELUTION September 9 Moody Amphitheater at Waterloo Park PRIMUS September 9 ACL Live UMPHREY’S MCGEE September 9 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater

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DAYGLOW September 10 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater JUKEBOX THE GHOST September 10 Mohawk BLENDED FESTIVAL September 10 & 11 Long Center LADY A September 11 Whitewater Amphitheater WHITE DENIM September 11 Mohawk GLASS ANIMALS September 12 Moody Amphitheater at Waterloo Park PITBULL W/ IGGY AZALEA September 12 Germania Insurance Amphitheater

THE PETERSON BROTHERS September 13 Continental Club

TOMAR & THE FCS September 17 & 18 C-Boy’s Heart & Soul

JMSN September 24 Scoot Inn

HERBIE HANCOCK September 13 Paramount Theatre

ASO: ¡ESPÍRITU LATINO! September 17 & 18 Long Center

LOCAL H September 26 Empire Control Room

HAAM DAY 2021 September 14 HAAM + Virtual

MOLLY BURCH September 18 Mohawk

BIG THIEF September 15 ACL Live at the Moody Theater COUNTING CROWS September 15 Moody Amphitheater at Waterloo Park

TINASHE September 18 Emo’s Austin

ERIC CLAPTON September 15 Frank Erwin Center

LUCY DACUS September 19 Scoot Inn

KINGS OF LEON W/ COLD WAR KIDS September 15 Germania Insurance Amphitheater

EARTH, WIND & FIRE September 19 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

KHAI DREAMS September 15 Antone’s Nightclub KHRUANGBIN September 15 – 18 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater SISTER HAZEL September 17 Haute Spot SYLVAN ESSO September 17 Moody Amphitheater at Waterloo Park LIL BABY September 17 Germania Insurance Amphitheater

KORN & STAIND September 18 Germania Insurance Amphitheater

MUSIC OF THE BEATLES FOR KIDS September 19 Mohawk 

THRICE September 26 Emo’s Austin RODRIGO Y GABRIELA September 26 ACL Live at the Moody Theater BOZ SCAGGS September 27 Paramount Theatre MAROON 5 September 27 Germania Insurance Amphitheater TECH N9NE September 27 Emo’s Austin 311 September 28 Moody Amphitheater at Waterloo Park

JAKE MILLER September 19 The Parish

KISS September 29 Germania Insurance Amphitheater

MICHAEL BUBLÉ September 20 Frank Erwin Center

HELMET September 30 Haute Spot

GARY NUMAN September 23 Emo’s Austin

CHROMEO October 1 Empire Control Room

THE MONKEES September 23 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater

CHRISTONE “KINGFISH” INGRAM October 2 Paramount Theatre

DINOSAUR JR. September 23 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

DAYG LO W P H OTO B Y N I C K W O N G .

MUSIC


FILM

INTO THE WOODS September 29 – November 7 ZACH Theatre

AGLIFF PRISM 34 FILM FESTIVAL Through September 6 Various Locations + Virtual

COMEDY

MOONSTRUCK DRIVEIN MOVIES Through September 13 Circuit of the Americas SUMMER MOVIES ON THE LAWN Through September 19 The Arboretum FANTASTIC FEST 2021 September 23 – 30 Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar AUSTIN ACTION FEST & MARKET September 25 & 26 Austin School of Film

THEATER

T R A N S - P E CO S F E S T I VA L P H OTO B Y C H A D WA D S W O R T H .

THEATRE GUILD ON THE AIR September 5 – October 3 Neill-Cochran House Museum THE WOOSTER GROUP: THE B-SIDE September 9 – 12 McCullough Theatre BOOMTOWN September 16 – 25 Dougherty Arts Center TEXAS BURLESQUE FESTIVAL September 17 & 18 Long Center BALLET AUSTIN: JOY / 3 HAPPY DANCES September 24 – 26 Long Center

DREW MICHAEL September 2 – 4 Creek and the Cave

FORTUNE FEIMSTER September 26 Paramount Theatre JARED FREID October 1 & 2 Vulcan Gas Company

OTHER

ANTHONY RODIA September 3 & 4 Vulcan Gas Company

SHOAL CREEK SOCIAL September 1 – 15 Shoal Creek Trail

HEATHER LAND September 9 Stateside at the Paramount

LONESTAR ROUND UP September 3 & 4 Travis County Expo Center

RONNY CHIENG September 9 Paramount Theatre

BEN HUR SHRINE CIRCUS September 3 – 5 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park

CHRISTINA P. September 9 – 11 Creek and the Cave STEVE-O September 10 Paramount Theatre GEORGE LOPEZ September 10 ACL Live at the Moody Theater SAM JAY September 10 & 11 Stateside at the Paramount ILIZA SHLESINGER September 17 Bass Concert Hall ANDREW SCHULZ September 19 & 20 Paramount Theatre MOONTOWER COMEDY FESTIVAL September 22 – 25 Paramount Theatre + Various Locations

RISE LIVE WOMEN’S WEEKEND September 4 – 6 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

TEXAS PLAYBOYS DOUBLE HEADER September 11 The Long Time

TRANS-PECOS FESTIVAL September 22 – 26 El Cosmico

RENEGADE CRAFT FAIR September 11 & 12 Fair Market

TEXAS ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR September 25 & 26 Hill Country Arts Foundation

CASA SUPERHERO RUN September 12 Virtual

MOTOGP RED BULL GRAND PRIX OF THE AMERICAS October 1 – 3 Circuit of the Americas

KEEP AUSTIN WEIRD: 5.12K RUN TO BRUNCH September 5 Various Locations

AUSTIN CHRONICLE HOT SAUCE FESTIVAL September 12 Far Out Lounge & Stage

BIKE NIGHT September 7, 14 & 21 Circuit of the Americas

FREE DAY OF DANCE September 12 Ballet Austin

ZILKER RELAYS September 10 Zilker Park

ARTE AGAVE TX September 17 Springdale Station PECAN STREET FESTIVAL September 18 & 19 6th Street

RED POPPY FESTIVAL October 1 – 3 Georgetown Historic Town Square

AUSTIN MUSEUM DAY September 19 Various Locations

OKTOBERFEST October 1 – 3 Downtown Fredericksburg

THE TEXAS TRIBUNE FESTIVAL September 20 – 25 Downtown Austin + Virtual

LONE STAR GOURD FESTIVAL October 1 – 3 Gillespie County Fairgrounds tribeza.com

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C ALENDARS B E S U R E T O C H E C K W E B S I T E S F O R U P D AT E D I N F O R M AT I O N A N D S A F E T Y P R O T O C O L S

Arts

SUZANNE BOCANEGRA: VALLEY   Through September 19 Blanton Museum of Art STEPHEN BERNARD JONES: ZERO TO SIXTY  Through September 16 Lydia Street Gallery INAUGURAL EXHIBITION Through September 21 Women & Their Work Gallery FLORA & FAUNA Through September 25 Davis Gallery  THANK YOU, PANDEMIC: A CONSOLATION Through September 25 Link & Pin Gallery ELIZABETH CHILES: TIME BEING Through October 3 grayDUCK Gallery OWNER’S CHOICE September 1 – November 20 Tiemann Art Gallery RACHEL KALISKY September 2 – October 2 Camiba Gallery BRIAN PHILLIPS September 3 – 25 Yard Dog Art Gallery HELMUT BARNETT: VARIATIONS September 4 – 26 Wally Workman Gallery

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JONATHAN JACKSON: WEST TEXAS EXPRESSIONS September 4 – October 9 Julia C. Butridge Gallery MARTY LEWIS: THE OTHER SIDE OF YESTERDAY September 4 – October 30 Julia C. Butridge Gallery VERONICA CECI: KEEPING HOUSE September 4 – October 30 Julia C. Butridge Gallery WITHOUT LIMITS: HELEN FRANKENTHALER, ABSTRACTION, AND THE LANGUAGE OF PRINT September 4 – February 20 Blanton Museum of Art THE BLACK INDEX September 16 – December 12 Christian-Green Gallery CHRISTOPHER BLAY: POWER, TRAPS, & TARGETS September 10 – October 9 Big Medium AMANDA WITUCKI: SOLO SHOW September 10 – October 10 Art for the People Gallery CRIT GROUP REUNION September 11 – January 16 The Contemporary Austin Jones Center DANIEL JOHNSTON: I LIVE MY BROKEN DREAMS  September 11 – March 20 The Contemporary Austin Jones Center

DAY OF THE DEAD COMMUNITY ALTARS   September 17 – November 21 Mexic-Arte Museum MX 21: RESISTANCE, REAFFIRMATION & RESILIENCE  September 17 – February 27 Mexic-Arte Museum  BENNÉ ROCKETT September 24 – November 4 Lydia Street Gallery TRÁ SLAUGHTER September 25 Ao5 Gallery BYRON BRAUCHLI: RIVER OF LIFE ROAMING THE RIO GRANDE  September 28 – October 9 Flatbed Center for Contemporary Printmaking COURTNEY EGAN: SUPERFLORA September 29 – January 23 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden RED DOT September 30 – October 12 Women & Their Work ROUND ROCK CHALK WALK ARTS FESTIVAL October 1 & 2 Dell Diamond

MUSEUMS BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 5482 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN –JONES CENTER 700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12–11, Th–Sa 12–9, Su 12–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12–4, Th–Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 974 1625 Hours: W–Su 12–5 austintexas.gov/department/ elisabet-ney-museum FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 463 7948 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–W 10–6, Th 10–9, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 W. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 974 1398 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. (512) 469 6200 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa–Su 10–6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Azie Morton Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu–F 10–4, Sa–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org

I M AG E CO U R T E S Y T H E DA N I E L J O H N S TO N T R U S T.

BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL: THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF KWAME BRATHWAITE Through September 19 Blanton Museum of Art


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C ALENDARS B E S U R E T O C H E C K W E B S I T E S F O R U P D AT E D I N F O R M AT I O N A N D S A F E T Y P R O T O C O L S

Art SPACES GALLERIES ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: M–F 10–6, Su 10-2 adamsgalleriesaustin.com AO5 GALLERY 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 ao5gallery.com ART FOR THE PEOPLE 1711 S. 1st St. (512) 761 4708 Hours: Tu–Th 11–6, F-Su 11–7 artforthepeoplegallery.com ARTUS CO. 10000 Research Blvd., Ste. 118 (512) 761 6484 Hours: M–Su 12–6 artusco.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–F 10–5, Sa 10–4 artworksaustin.com ATELIER 1205 1205 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 434 9046 Hours: Tu-F 11-4 atelier1205.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351 5934 Hours: Tu–Su 11–6 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ARTSPACE 7739 Northcross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 763 0646 Hours: F-Sa 11–5 austinartspace.com

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AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com

CONTRACOMMON 12912 Hill Country Blvd. #F-140 Hours: M–F By appointment only Sa–Su 12-6 contracommon.org

BALE CREEK ALLEN GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd. #103 (512) 633 0545 By appointment only balecreekallengallery.com

DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com

BIG MEDIUM GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., Bldg. 2 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 bigmedium.org CAMIBA GALLERY 6448 Hwy 290 East, Ste. A102 (512) 937 5921 Hours: F-Sa 12–6 camibaart.com CENTRAL LIBRARY GALLERY 710 W. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 974 7400 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F-Sa 10-6, Su 12-6 library.austintexas.gov/ central/gallery CHRISTIAN-GREEN GALLERY 201 E. 21st St. (512) 471 0254 Hours: T & Th, 1-3 galleriesatut.org CLOUD TREE STUDIOS & GALLERY 3411 E. 5th St. (512) 797 8852 By appointment only cloudtreestudiosandgallery.com CO-LAB PROJECTS 5419 Glissman Rd. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org

DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale Rd., Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: Th-Sa 10–6 dimensiongallery.org DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10–10, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FLATBED CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY PRINTMAKING 3701 Drossett Dr. (512) 477 9328 Hours: W–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 flatbedpress.com FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com ICOSA COLLECTIVE 916 Springdale Rd. #102 (512) 920 2062 Hours: F–Sa 12–6 icosacollective.com

IVESTER CONTEMPORARY 916 Springdale Rd. Bldg 2, ste. 107 (737) 209 0379 Hours: Tu–F 10-6, Sa 10-4 ivestercontemporary.com

MARTHA’S CONTEMPORARY 4115 Guadalupe St. (512) 695 1437 Hours: W-Su 12-7 facebook.com/ marthascontemporary

JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10–10, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 austintexas.gov/jcbgallery

MASS GALLERY 705 Gunter St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5–8, Sa–Su 12–5 massgallery.org

LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8–5, Sa 8–3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th St., Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Th–Sa 1–5 linkpinart.com LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11–6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 lotusasianart.com LYDIA STREET GALLERY 1200 E. 11th St. #109 (512) 524 1051 Hours: Sa–Su 12–5, By appointment M–F lydiastreetgallery.com

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6 modernrocksgallery.com MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. (512) 296 2447 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 mondoshop.com NEBULA GALLERY 217 W. 2nd St. (512) 239 9317 Hours: Tu–W 1–6, Th–F 1–7, Sa 12–7, Sun 12–6 thenebulagallery.com NORTHERN-SOUTHERN 1902 E. 12th St. Hours: Sa 3–6:30 northern-southern.com OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 974 1300 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PREACHER GALLERY 119 W. 8th St. (512) 489 0200 By appointment only preacher.co/gallery


C ALENDARS

PRIZER GALLERY 2023 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 575 3559 Hours: Sa 12–5 prizerartsandletters.org

WONDERSPACES AUSTIN 1205 Sheldon Cove, Ste. 2-A Hours: W–Th 3–10, F 4–11, Sa 10–11, Su 10–8 austin.wonderspaces.com

SOCO MODERN ART GALLERY 2900 S. Congress Ave. #100 (512) 409 9943 Hours: M By appointment only Tu–Su 11-7 socomodern.com

YARD DOG 916 Springdale Rd. #103 (512) 912 1613 Hours: F–Sa 1–5, yarddog.com

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 507 0828 Hours: Tu-Sa 11–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com TIEMANN ART GALLERY 1706 N. Mays St., Round Rock (512) 551 9774 Hours: M–Sa 10-5 tagroundrock.com VISUAL ARTS CENTER 2300 Trinity St. (512) 471 3713 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 utvac.org WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5, Su 12–4 wallyworkman.com WEST CHELSEA CONTEMPORARY 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: M–Su 12–6, By appointment 10–12 wcc.art WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1311 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–6 womenandtheirwork.org

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (512) 300 0898 catezane.com

“Ballanda” Oil on canvas, 41" x 49", by Texas artist Monica Puryear

FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997 4949 fredericksburgartguild.us INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 992 3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997 0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. (830) 307 3071 URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456 9667 urbanherbal.com

Specializing in the Best Texas Artists 30 minutes north of downtown Austin Easy parking in front of gallery

Hours: Mon-Sat 10am - 5pm Contact: (512)-551-9774 tagroundrock.com 1706 N Mays St, Round Rock, TX 78664 Original Fine Art • Custom Frame Shop Live Concerts • Receptions • Workshops • Lectures • Date Nights


Emerge from the dark and into the spotlight with fashion that’s looked over, not overlooked

Go Bold or go home BY CARRIE CROWE PHOTOGRAPHER: PHIL KLINE ART DIRECTOR: TORQUIL DEWAR PRODUCER: CORY RIVADEMAR MODELS: LINDSEY COCHRAN XAVIER ALVARADO FEMALE STYLIST: GABBY AVALOS MALE STYLIST: TREION MURRY HAIR AND MAKEUP: JENNIFER CURTTRIGHT AT WEST CHELSEA CONTEMPORARY WCC.ART

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left: Crocodile Pattern Hat ($138) from Scotch & Soda Embroider Graphic Sweater ($138) from Scotch & Soda Sun Faded Navy Fit 2 Aero Stretch ($225) from Nordstrom  Elder Statesman Cardigan ($1795) from ByGeorge  Loewe Gold Platform Lace Up ($690) from ByGeorge  Grey Oxidized Sterling Silver Corded Bracelet ($68) from Kendra Scott Beck Chain Bracelet in Oxidized Sterling Silver ($198) from Kendra Scott Kenneth Corded Bracelet Ox Silver Neutral ($88) from Kendra Scott Cade Oxidized Sterling Silver Corded Bracelet Multi Mix ($78) from Kendra Scott this page: ACLER Marigold Pleated Spaghetti Strap Dress ($185) from MOSS Alexandre Birman Evelyn Bootie Snow ($895) from Valentines Abalone Link Necklace ($370) from Valentines tribeza.com

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left: Twill Blazer ($248) from Scotch & Soda Lowry Trousers ($148) from Scotch & Soda Vince Clementine Camisole ($195) from Julian Gold Solar Hoops ($225) from Valentines

right: Blueberry Cheesecake Gender Thieves Vest ($80) from Hawkins Bucklew Robert Barakett White V-neck ($60) from Nordstrom Issey Biyake Blue Button Down ($445) from ByGeorge  Ray Bans ($150) from Ray-Ban 

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left: Amanda Uprichard Samba Dress ($251) from Estilo Amanda Uprichard Caprianna Dress ($282) from Estilo Pink Clutch ($268) from Valentines Barney’s New York Cobalt Suede Peep Toe Sandal ($95) from MOSS Darner Los Angeles Socks ($40) from Garment Nicole Romano Hoops ($165) from Estilo

right: Scarlett – Multi Hat ($450) from Milli Starr Nicole Romano Hoops ($165) from Estilo tribeza.com

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left: Giada Forte Silver Velvet Slip Midi Dress ($365) from MOSS Isabel Marant Studded Wrap Belt ($250) from MOSS Rosetta Getty Burgundy Satin Lapel Jacket ($225) from MOSS Demi Open Frame Earrings ($68) from Kate Spade

right: Mott Super Slim Fit Recycled Polyester Trousers ($148) from Scotch & Soda Single Breast Classic Blazer ($258) from Scotch & Soda Grandad Long-Sleeved T-shirt ($88) from Scotch & Soda Jen Hansen Necklace ($198) from Estilo 

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left: Graphic Detail Cotton Blend Hoodie ($128) from Scotch & Soda Rodd & Gun Roberton Island Double Breasted Wool Blend Coat ($298.80) from Nordstrom James Cotton Corduroy Sand Trousers ($235) from Officine Generale Nicole Romano Bracelet ($170) from Estilo 

right: Amur Jumpsuit ($495) from Estilo Ryder Linear Earrings ($68) from Kate Spade tribeza.com

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By Darcie Duttweiler

theMAGIC and the

Photos by Phil Kline

MUSE

FOUR AUSTIN DESIGNERS CREATE AN EXCLUSIVE NEW MASTERPIECE TO INSPIRE THE FUTURE

RICK SOTO

CUSTOM SUIT MAKER

LIKA STEEL

COUTURE WOMEN’S WEAR

LINDA ASAF

WOMEN’S EVENING WEAR

BRITTANY ALLEN CONTEMPORARY WOMEN’S READY-TOWEAR, ATHLEISURE AND SWIMSUITS

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RICK SOTO / CUSTOM SUIT MAKER Inspiration

“I WANTED SOMETHING TO EXEMPLIFY MY BRAND AND THE RELATIONSHIP I HAVE WITH MY CLIENTS. I AM A HUGE FAN OF MIXING AND MATCHING DIFFERENT FABRICS, AND WHEN I GET THE GREENLIGHT FOR CREATIVE FREEDOM, I LOVE CREATING LOOKS AND SURPRISING CLIENTS WITH OUTFITS THEY PROBABLY WOULD HAVE NEVER PICKED IF JUST LOOKING AT A PAIR OF SWATCHES.”

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ick Soto’s love of suits started when he was a boy watching classic gangster movies like “Casino” and “Goodfellas.” “Important people in those movies were always wearing suits, and they were always so confident,” Soto explains. The 36-year-old Victoria, Texas, native got his start in the fashion industry designing and selling neckties, bowties, and flower lapels at trade shows while also working as a pharmaceutical sales rep. The hobby turned into something more when, with the help of a master tailor, he deconstructed his favorite suits and learned how to replicate the process. Soto has been creating custom suits since 2016, mostly in a tricked-out mobile truck that he purchased with severance after a drug patent fell through. At the time, the mobile truck was a novel concept and garnered attention from GQ within six months of opening. While Soto has worked with the likes of Emmanuel Acho, Ian Rapoport, Justin Fields and Micah Parsons, he wants all of his clients to feel special in his suits. He especially enjoys helping nonbinary folks create a suit to perfectly fit their bodies. “They finally see themselves the way they want to look, and we’re doing our best to make everyone feel happy and confident.” In a post-pandemic world, Soto is looking forward to crafting fun garments for his clients’ special events, like weddings and public speaking engagements, but currently he’s on the hunt for the perfect sneakers for his baby girl due in October.

DESIGN AESTHETIC “It’s mostly classic silhouettes and designs, but with being custom, I have the opportunity to create other things that people want to see themselves in, like capes and crowns, and making our clients look like kings.” FAVORITE PRINTS “I love a classic design that surprises you when you walk up close to it and you see herringbone, polka dot, or pinstripe patterns. I really like the element of surprise.” DESIGN IDOL “Ralph Lauren started with neckties, and it evolved from there. We don’t necessarily have the same style, but I love his story.”

CURRENT INSPIRATION “I try to stay ahead of the game, and that inspires me to create something different and think outside of the box.” DREAM CLIENT “In my shop, I have photos of people I’ve worked with, and I have an empty frame that says, ‘Reserved for Matthew McConaughey,’ so I’m trying to will it into existence. I think he’d be fun to work with!” HOW TO SHOP Book a custom appointment online at sotoandco.com and visit the mobile truck in Mueller or his east side showroom.


Rick Soto sotoandco.com Model: Antonio Guevara Hair/Makeup: Kelli Wilson Ponce tribeza.com

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Lika Steel likasteel.shop Model: Alexis Popovich Hair/Makeup: Aoife McCarthy

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uch like how she met her husband in Tel Aviv when neither one of them spoke each other’s language, Lika Steel likes to express herself visually. “I’m a visionary,” she says. “I like to say my message through design. You can speak without using words.” Originally from Moldova, the 45-year-old couture designer never saw fashion as a viable career, even though she was always creating. Her mother is a doctor and her aunt a judge, and Steel was working in marketing for more than 15 years when she spotted a beautiful building that inspired her. “It was the fashion design school, and I started classes a week later.” Upon graduating from the Tel Aviv School of Design in 2014 and moving to Texas when her husband was relocated back to the U.S., Steel started her first collection titled “Savage Rose,” which juxtaposed very sharp and gentle elements. Unlike many designers who push themselves to mass produce, Steel creates what she calls “slow fashion” and prefers to only show one collection a year. Currently she’s working on bridal pieces after being moved by beautiful white swans while on vacation at an Austrian lake. “I actually don’t even know who would buy it,” she laughs. “It’s white but very, very different.” Steel views fashion as an artistic expression and is currently working on a project called “Fashion and Art” by collaborating with other Austin artists, from dancers to painters, to create a collection of art with 30 to 40 dresses. She aims to show the pieces in an art gallery next year. “Fashion is so much more than styling. It’s a self-expression of the artist who creates it,” Steel says.

LIKA STEEL /

COUTURE WOMEN’S WEAR

Inspiration DESIGN AESTHETIC: “It’s definitely a contradiction. I like the meeting of putting things together that don’t belong together. Something really beautiful comes from that.” FAVORITE COLORS: “Dark colors. I like black! Also, dark green and dark purple.” DESIGN IDOLS: “Coco Chanel because she’s very classic, and Alexander McQueen because he’s completely crazy.”

CURRENT INSPIRATION: “My inspiration comes from my inner world, what I’m living, and everything around me. My language of design comes from the wisdom of strong women.” DREAM CLIENT: “Meryl Streep has a lot of elegance but also a lot of spice.”

“THIS IS PART OF MY NEW COLLECTION, ‘INLIGHT,’ WHICH SYMBOLIZES A BRIGHT FUTURE. WE ARE STILL FIGHTING THE PANDEMIC, BUT I WANT TO SEE THE LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL, AND THE COLLECTION REPRESENTS THE NEW EPOCH OF REBIRTH.”

HOW TO SHOP: Stay tuned for more at likasteel.shop or follow along on Instagram at @lika_steel for future pop-up shops.

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LINDA ASAF / WOMEN’S EVENING WEAR Inspiration “THIS DESIGN IS A REFLECTION OF HOW I’VE EVOLVED AS A DESIGNER OVER TIME. I GOT MY START DESIGNING READYTO-WEAR, BUT NOW I ALSO CREATE LUXURY FASHION USING ADVANCED DESIGN TECHNIQUES AND SOME OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL FABRICS IN THE WORLD. I ENJOY THE FACT THAT MY DESIGNS CAN BRING A SMILE TO THOSE WHO APPRECIATE CREATIVITY.”

ith more than 20 years in Austin and almost 12 years at her current showroom off of West Sixth Street, Linda Asaf has seen the capitol city’s fashion scene grow firsthand. “When I first moved here in 1999, I had so many friends who wouldn’t go to a party unless they were wearing their Teva sandals,” Asaf laughs. “Now, we’re much more fashion focused, but it’s still very easygoing and chill.” The women’s evening wear designer is most renowned for her handmade gowns with haute couture textiles and elaborate embellishments of crystals and pearls, decidedly the types of garments most didn’t wear during lockdown. Needless to say, Asaf is definitely looking forward to the possibility that we might repeat the Roaring ’20s in our post-pandemic lives. Last year, she worked with the local fashion industry to produce masks for healthcare workers when PPE was in short supply. “If I was going to wear a mask, I was going to design something cute to wear,” Asaf says. Take Heart Masks also donated thousands of masks to the city’s homeless. The longtime designer credits the nuns at Incarnate Word Academy in Corpus Christi for teaching her to sew, but it wasn’t until she quit her job at Citigroup to work at a women’s apparel company that Asaf was bit by the fashion bug, and she hasn’t looked back since. Asaf prides herself on making clients happy, even several years from now. She still wears one of her very first designs, a flirty sundress that receives plenty of compliments to this day. “I don’t ever want a client to pull something out of their closet 20 years from now and say, ‘What was she thinking?’”

DESIGN AESTHETIC: “I create luxury fashion that accentuates the female form. It’s classic with a design edge and lots of details. I love the adventure of doing luxury fashion.” FAVORITE TEXTILES: “There are so many beautiful laces from France, Italy, and Spain. I also adore embroidered tulle. I work with so many fabulous textile shops, and the technology is evolving the industry to make so many things possible. I’m like a kid in a candy store!”

DESIGN IDOL: “I’m currently inspired by Iris Van Herpen, this young Dutch woman based in Amsterdam who has created a whole new category of fashion. It’s 3-D and meticulous, and she’s done a lot of collaborations with architects.” CURRENT INSPIRATION: “I always let the textiles speak to me. There are just so many different types and possibilities.” DREAM CLIENT: “Kamala Harris. It’s important for young women of color to see how much you can achieve.” HOW TO SHOP: Visit her showroom at 1405 West Sixth St.

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Linda Asaf lindaasaf.com Model: Kaitlyn Covington Hair: Teresa Romero, Jose Luis Salon Makeup: Isabel Garcia, Jose Luis Salon Earrings: Sugar Gay Isber Rhinestone Belt: ADORN by Samouce tribeza.com

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Brittany Allen shopbrittanyallen.com Model: Julie Jason Hair/Makeup: Brittany Allen Assistant: Skylar Paxton Headband: Brittany Allen Earrings: Cassandra Collections

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he season 18 finale of “Project Runway” aired on March 12, 2020, a mere five days before Mayor Steve Adler instituted the city’s lockdown. Normally, once a season has finished, the contestants will go on press tours, be invited for speaking engagements, and hold pop-up shops for their designs. After finishing in sixth place, Austin designer Brittany Allen says she’s happy for the exposure she received from the show but was bummed she missed out on meeting her fans and clients face-to-face. Hailing from Fort Smith, Arkansas, Allen moved to Austin in 2015 for her husband’s new job; although, she admits she was going to have to leave Arkansas eventually because her fashion aesthetic wasn’t for everyone. “I think it’s one of those things, where, like be who you are, because if people like it, they’re going to find you,” Allen says. “I just ride out my own aesthetic, and it turns out a lot of women in Texas love it … as well as women from all over the world.” Although she missed out on the post-“Project Runway” press blitz, Allen has had a busy pandemic career, infusing her love of prints, including her famous butterflies, into an athleisure wear line and eventually into her first foray into swimsuits. While many designers craft clothes for specific seasons, Allen plans to produce clothes year-round, and after a much-needed break, she hopes to share new designs soon. “Now, more than ever, people need exciting things to wear. People want color and prints, and I’m here to give them fun, exciting happy clothes.”

DESIGN AESTHETIC: “I always say that it’s kind of borderline tacky, but more refreshed, more refined. It’s definitely very print heavy, and very colorful. I am trying to redefine what sophistication means.” FAVORITE COLOR: “Pink is the base color of my brand. It sometimes gets a weaker rep in the world of art and design because it’s associated with femininity. But women are the superior sex — I mean we can grow a human being, for God’s sake. So, it should be considered the strongest color out there!” DESIGN IDOL: “I worked with Betsy Johnson, and I loved her motivation in the industry. She fought tooth and nail for her business, and I love that about her.”

CURRENT INSPIRATION: “I am very inspired by emotions. If I’m sad, I’ll put it into the clothes. If I’m happy, I’ll put it into the clothes. I really want to be an artist and use fashion as an outlet of my expression, and I want that emotion to come out very strongly when people see the clothes.” DREAM CLIENT: “Kacey Musgraves! She’s very fearless, truthful and Southern — just like me. And she’s very feminine but also independent and powerful. Of course, she has that song ‘Butterflies.’ It would just be a match made in heaven.”

BRITTANY ALLEN / CONTEMPORARY WOMEN’S READY-TOWEAR, ATHLEISURE AND SWIMSUITS

Inspiration “THEY ARE VERY FEMININE BUT HAVE A STRONG, POWERFUL MEANING, WHICH IS WHAT I WANT MY CUSTOMERS TO FEEL WHEN THEY WEAR ONE OF MY GARMENTS — LIKE THEY ARE THE STRONGEST, MOST POWERFUL AND CONFIDENT FEMALE IN THE ROOM.”

HOW TO SHOP: Online at shopbrittanyallen.com.

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AUSTIN EYE VIEW

Le ague of Rebels R icco P urple Suit ($ 16 5 0) Le ague of Rebels A shmore W hite Dre s s Shir t ($ 18 0) Le ague of Rebels W hite B e spoke P ocke t Square ($ 6 5) Le ague of Rebels A rling ton W ide Neck tie ($ 6 8) Le ague of Rebels Circular C u f f links ($ 115)

C.K. CHIN

FOUNDER OF CHINTERTAINMENT, INC. AND OPER ATING PARTNER OF WU CHOW, SWIF T’S AT TIC, NATIVE HOSTEL AND HOPE OUTDOOR GALLERY chinter tainment.com

By Veronica Meewes / Photos by Brittany Dawn Short Styled by Carrie Crowe / Photo Shoot at League of Rebels / leagueofrebels.com

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How would you say the hospitality industry has changed in the past year? “The root I don’t think has changed. The best of us in the industry found ways to continue to feed people, to take care of people, to serve the community. When we were told that we would be shutting down and we had to figure out what to do with thousands of dollars of product that would be going bad, it made me so proud to see our community figure out how to use that to feed people who had just lost their jobs or who were ill. Sure, the obvious answer lies in the method as to how we provide our service, but the truth is, if you look around, the purest form of our industry is and always will be there.”

pend any amount of time in Austin, and you’re bound to meet C.K. Chin. This man-about-town, known for his warm smile and (pre-pandemic) teddy bear hugs, entered the service industry 23 years ago, starting off bartending and quickly moving up the ranks to managing bars and restaurants. He’s most known for his roles as an operations partner in Swift’s Attic and Wu Chow, but he has most recently been focusing on some exciting new projects, including a speakeasy sushi bar opening on the east side this fall, and the new HOPE Outdoor Gallery. The venue and event space, set to open at the start of 2022, will feature an art gallery, full bar and cafe, picnic area, commissary kitchen, food trailer program and marketplace with local vendors. After being a part of some major disaster relief efforts this year, C.K. couldn’t feel more prepared to bring this charity-focused arts oasis to our community.

What are your favorite and least favorite food and drink trends right now? “I can’t say that I really enjoyed the pivot to takeout. I feel that a restaurant is more than just a dish or a recipe, but rather a whole experience. I do love the move toward a combined meal effort that helped families get cooking in their own homes — part restaurant prepared and part homemade.

Not sure if this was a trend as much as it was out of necessity, but I loved seeing the creativity in the DIY “restaurant in your home” hybrid concept. The to-go cocktails have also been a really cool development that I never thought I would see. The nerd in me does kind of like seeing QR codes everywhere though. I had a QR code on my business card 10 years ago and people looked at me like I was crazy.” How would you describe your personal style on a day-to-day basis? “Oh man, the primary style carry-over from quarantine has been the shift over to comfort. Part of me misses putting on a clean and pressed suit every evening for service. There was something about straightening my tie or putting on a cufflink

that felt like I was donning a cape and cowl, but nowadays, I’m definitely more function over form. I do own about 40 pairs of various colored Chucks though.” How would you describe Austin style to someone from out of town? “I think you can easily fall victim to pigeonholing Austin style into an existing aesthetic, but I think over the last two decades of me being here, I can safely say we are at a desert oasis level of variety when it comes to style here. With so many transplants moving into Austin every day, I think it might be easier to use someone’s style to describe where they were before they got here than vice versa.” Describe your perfect Austin day — what would you eat, drink, do and see? “Start off with some breakfast tacos (from Valentina’s, or maybe Veracruz or El Primo), then go take a walk around Town Lake with my lady and her son and Biscuit, our pup. Ideally, my perfect Austin day would be one of our absolutely gorgeous

spring days or a perfectly cool and crisp day in the fall. Lunch would be a bowl of ramen from Ramen Tatsu-ya. I would then make time for a nap. If the day is as perfect as I am imagining it to be, this would most definitely be on a hammock. Dinner would be a chimaera of a meal with some great friends — a square of Cadillac pizza from Via 313, a bone marrow taco from Comedor, some Bob Armstrong Dip from Matt’s, some XLB from Wu Chow, Wagyu nigiri from Uchiko and maybe some dueling biscuits from Fixe and Olamaie. Post-dinner entertainment would be a show at Auditorium Shores. I would conclude my day as it started, with tacos. Some barbacoa and al pastor from La Mexicana would put a fantastic exclamation mark on my day.”

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AUSTIN EYE VIEW

P ink C obalt Dre s s ($7 2) B G Sigma Choker ($ 3 8) Daughter s Stone R ing ($ 4 0) B G Gold “ K” R ing ($ 4 0) World F inds Bracele t ($ 18)

KRISTEN HEANEY FOUNDER OF YARD BAR yardbar.com

By Veronica Meewes / Photos by Brittany Dawn Short Styled by Carrie Crowe / Photo Shoot at Addie Rose Boutique / shopaddierose.com

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hen Kristen Heaney often found herself faced with the conundrum of walking her German short-haired pointer mix, Venkman, or meeting her friends for happy hour, she decided to take matters into her own hands and create a place where both people and dogs could gather socially. She left her career in architecture to open Yard Bar in 2015, when there was nothing else like it in this dog-loving city. After some successful popups during the pandemic, she’s brought in The Peached Tortilla’s burger concept Fat City as a permanent fixture, and she is currently scouting for South and East Austin locations for Yard Bar. What attracted you to the hospitality industry? “I’m naturally drawn to helping and hosting people. I love to facilitate joyful experiences, whether that’s with my own friends and family, or when meeting new people and collaborating with new teams. I like to make things fun. With Yard Bar, I wanted a place where people and dogs were both enjoying the social experience, meeting new people and new dogs and enjoying good food and drinks — a place where making new friends came easily and you could feel at ease. I’m at my very best when I am helping people feel at home, welcome and comfortable.”

How would you say the industry has changed in the past year? “The past year took the industry’s Lego model, smashed it to the ground, shattered it into a bazillion pieces and gave us all a unique opportunity to build it back better. It’s given owners a chance to reconsider the value they deliver to the consumer, to test new ideas, to build better teams and systems and to stand up for their values. It certainly confirmed what we already know about the industry — it’s resilient, it finds a way, it supports its colleagues and it never stops serving its community. It also shed light on the fragility of a system built on razor thin margins. I think we’re going to start seeing menu prices more reflective of all the real costs that go into creating a dining experience, and I hope we’ll see more owners working toward living wage models and health care options for their employees. I think that’s the dream for small business owners — create a business that takes care of its team as well as it takes care of its community. That’s my dream, anyway.”

How would you describe your personal style on a day-to-day basis? “Casual and comfortable. When you own a dog park and bar, you’ve got to be prepared to get dirty. I’m a t-shirt and jeans kind of gal. I like to find clean, modern pieces with unique cuts. I’m right at home in a pair of boyfriend jeans and a relaxed-fit crisp white button down.” Where do you like to shop locally for clothes? “It’s a real treat to stroll along South Congress these days. After a year of hibernation, it’s been pretty wild to wake up to a new iteration of Austin. I’m enjoying the mix of new shops and restaurants next to vintage Austin favorites.” Besides clothing, what else makes a fashion statement in Austin? “Dogs, of course! Dogs are the perfect Austin accessory. They’re the perfect conversation starters.” What are your favorite and least favorite current fashion trends? “I’m still leaning into the romper and jumpsuit

trends. A well-fitted romper makes looking good seem effortless. I’m definitely a bit tired of the 10” rise jean.”

I WANTED A PLACE WHERE PEOPLE AND DOGS WERE BOTH ENJOYING THE SOCIAL EXPERIENCE, MEETING NEW PEOPLE AND NEW DOGS AND ENJOYING GOOD FOOD AND DRINKS.

How would you describe Austin style to someone from out of town? “Anything goes. Right? Fishing shirts or sequins. Boots or Birks. Hippie or preppy. It’s the mash-up that makes Austin great.” Describe your perfect Austin day — what would you eat, drink, do and see? “Hike Turkey Creek with my dog, make breakfast at home, a swim at Barton Springs with friends, a Pool Burger with a Hi Sign Hi-C IPA, a nap and a taping at ACL Live, followed by a late night Côte de Porc and French 75 at Justine’s.”

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AUSTIN EYE VIEW

G abriela Ramy Brook Dre s s ($ 425) Ink & A lloy Gold Euc aly p tus E arrings ($ 5 4) Bracele t L aura Eli z abe th Bracele t ($2 9 5)

A r turo Tr ue C ulturat a Shir t ($ 19 8) DL 19 6 1 Jeans ($ 18 9) C us tom He ar th and Soul A lligator B elt ($ 3 4 5) Shinola Watch ($ 1,4 5 0)

GABRIELA BUCIO CO-OWNER AND CRE ATIVE DIRECTOR OF GABRIEL A’S GROUP

ARTURO BUCIO CO-OWNER AND HE AD TALENT BUYER OF GABRIEL A’S GROUP  gabrielasgroup.com

By Veronica Meewes / Photos by Brittany Dawn Short Styled by Carrie Crowe / Photo Shoot at Hearth & Soul / hearthandsoul.com

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What are your favorite food and drink trends right now? GABRIELA: “I really love seeing the explosion of birria tacos here in Austin. They’ve always been popular in Mexican culture, but thanks to social media in particular, this traditional dish is now trending everywhere across the city and beyond. My favorite drink trend is matcha drinks. They are perfect for when you don’t want to be over-caffeinated with strong coffee or energy drinks, but still want a boost to get through the day.” When you’re not working, what can you usually be found doing? GABRIELA: “I really enjoy producing music and DJing (DJ Gabby Got It). It’s been a great outlet for my creativity, as well as de-stress from long days at the office.”

rowing up between McAllen and Austin, food and drink always played a big part in the lives of Gabriela and Arturo Bucios, and in 2018, the brother and sister team opened their first venture together. Arturo utilized his extensive service industry experience to play the role of both chef and management, while Gabriela drew on her years of bartending to create the bar program and put her art school background to use by assuming the role of creative director. Fast forward just three short years, and Gabriela’s Group has built a literal food and beverage empire with another location of Gabriela’s in the south; the candy-colored Taquero Much downtown; Revival Coffee and Seareinas, a Sinaloa-inspired seafood restaurant featuring live music. Arturo also brings live music acts into town, from all over the U.S. and Mexico, to perform at their two clubs, Mala Vida and Mala Santa. The mark they’ve left on Austin entertainment, with their fun approach to both dining and music, is already indelible, and we can’t wait to see what more is to come from this dynamic duo.

How would you describe your personal style on a day-to-day basis? GABRIELA: “Sporty-casual, with a lot of black pieces. I like to look good, but more importantly, be comfortable. Because I help to personally de-

sign merch for all of my concepts, I tend to wear a lot of our merch during the day, mixed with designer sneakers. I also like to dress up the look with a cool designer bag — a good purse can elevate almost any look.”

I LIKE TO LOOK GOOD, BUT MORE IMPORTANTLY, BE COMFORTABLE.

Where do you like to shop locally for clothes? GABRIELA: “Out Hyped, Hype Appeal, plus the vintage markets held at Revival Coffee. I also like to try and wear my friends’ merch and designs as another way to show support.” What are your favorite and least favorite current fashion trends? GABRIELA: “Right now, my favorite fashion trend is the use of neon and bright colors that really pop, plus colored sweatpants that use funky fabrics and unusual patterns. Of course, I love the use of the millennial pink color that is so popular right now. My least favorite trend is definitely the foam, croc-like designer shoes that Yeezy brought to the mainstream masses.” What are your favorite and least favorite food and drink trends right now? ARTURO: “My favorite trend for food right now is the use of mariscos, as well as incorporating live music into the dining experience. I always wanted an environment that embraces both in one of my restaurants, which is why Seareinas was a

perfect fit to be the next major project from my team. Favorite drink trend is and will always be margaritas. My least favorite food trend is tacos that aren’t really tacos aka street tacos. My least favorite drink trend is alcoholic drinks with tons of artificial flavoring. They not only alter the taste but can lead to major hangovers.” How would you describe your personal style on a day-to-day basis? ARTURO: “My day-to-day style is business or business casual because I’m always in work mode. This means you can often find me in a basic button-down shirt with jeans or slacks, while holding a very heavy computer bag.”

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AUSTIN EYE VIEW

Av iatornation Men’s 5 Stripe Swe atpant s ($ 15 6) Av iatornation Men’s 4 Stripe Ve s t ($ 3 9 5) Av iatornation Loc als Only Tee ($ 8 3)

BEN SABIN FOUNDER OF FRIENDS & ALLIES BREWING friendsandallies.beer

By Veronica Meewes / Photos by Brittany Dawn Short Styled by Carrie Crowe / Photo Shoot at Aviator Nation / aviatornation.com

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hen Texas native Ben Sabin branched off from working at Thirsty Planet to start his own project, he wanted the name to be an homage to Texas, the friendship state — and in 2015 Friends & Allies Brewing was born. The brewery, located in the same east side industrial complex as Austin Eastciders and the Austin Bouldering Project, quickly became known for its Fresh Coast IPA, a fresh take on West Coast IPA, and Noisy Cricket, a low alcohol session IPA. These days, they’re pumping out 2,000 barrels of beer a year, and Ben still wears many hats. On any given day, you might find this multi-tasking owner self-distributing to any number of bars and convenience stores around town, or making appearances at pint nights and special dinners in various small towns outside the city. What attracted you to the hospitality industry? “My first hospitality job was in college working as a busboy at Vespaio. Vespaio really taught me what the hospitality industry was all about. Being at the lowest level in the front of house really gave me some perspective on how difficult and demanding it can be sometimes. It also taught me how fun it can be, and all the interesting people you get to meet.”

How would you say the industry has changed in the past year? “We obviously lost a lot of good businesses last year. Our industry lost a huge chunk of revenue that comes from “on premise” sales. I do see a lot of businesses coming together to help each other out, whether it’s through special dinner pairings or showcasing a local brewery for the week/month.”

How would you describe your personal style on a day-to-day basis? “My personal style is generally very relaxed because of the nature of my work. I’m usually wearing Under Armour running shoes (HOVR Sonic), a t-shirt with our logo on it and some Lululemon shorts. I tend to clash a lot with three different types of blue on, but hey, it’s my favorite color.”

What are your favorite and least favorite food and drink trends right now? “My least favorite drink trends are the hard seltzers that are all over the market. It’s difficult to sell beer when these drinks are incredibly low calorie and can taste like any fruit flavor. My favorite trend is lower alcohol beers and seems to be shifting from IPAs back to more traditional lagers.”

Where do you like to shop locally for clothes? “I have recently taken a liking to Poncho clothing company out of Austin. The shirts are typically for outdoor activities like fishing, but they work really well in the nine months of summer we get here in Central Texas. For very nice events or fancy dinners, I have several shirts from Tom James Company; these are custom fitted, button-down shirts, and most are typically blue because that’s my color of choice.”

When you’re not working, what can you usually be found doing? “Running! Every morning I either run down South Lamar or I drive down to the trail at Town Lake and go about four to six miles. I have been doing this since 2005, when I first moved to Aus-

Besides clothing, what else makes a fashion statement in Austin? “I think unique hats are definitely on the rise, and boots are definitely still very relevant in Austin.”

tin to attend St. Edwards University.” How would you describe Austin style to someone from out of town? “Completely covered in tattoos, a Ramones t-shirt and a denim jacket when it’s 102 degrees outside.”

MY FAVORITE TREND IS LOWER ALCOHOL BEERS AND SEEMS TO BE SHIFTING FROM IPAS BACK TO MORE TRADITIONAL LAGERS.

Describe your perfect Austin day — what would you eat, drink, do and see? “Run around Town Lake, get a smoothie at JuiceLand, a coffee at Cosmic and a beer at the Mean Eyed Cat.”

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I

Here’s the Rub SPA SWAY TAKES SELF-CARE TO THE NE X T LEVEL WITH INTEGR ATED TRE ATMENTS AND PERSONALIZED THER APIST MATCHING By Laurel Miller Portrait by Anton Komar Spa Photos by Brandon Hill

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F THE PAST 18 MONTHS HAVE taught us anything, it’s that self-care isn’t an indulgence. Sometimes, the way through starts with a great massage, which has quantifiable benefits to mental, as well as physical, wellness. For Rei Leigh Harmer, owner of The Domain’s Spa Sway, the path to healing started in 2014. The native Austinite had just returned to Texas after three years in Las Vegas working in the hospitality industry. Harmer was seeking a lifestyle change when she was in a serious car accident. Suddenly, her life was a hamster wheel of doctor appointments and physical therapy, so she could learn to walk again. “That was the turning point in my journey,” says Harmer. “I was spending so much time getting necessary myofascial and deep tissue massage to facilitate healing and relieve pain, and increasingly found myself drawn to those who work as healers. It’s really special when you find your person, and they help you in your recovery.” Harmer knew she needed to find a way to afford ongoing treatments after her insurance no longer covered therapeutic aspects of her recovery. “I saw a white space in the market for luxury spa treatments at affordable prices. I also created an indepth hiring process that highlights a therapist’s skill sets and modalities to help pair clients with ‘their person,’ depending upon their individual goals,” she says. Spa Sway opened in 2014, and three years later Harmer opened sister spot Organic Bronze, a clean-product-focused, luxury spray tanning studio. She plans to open more Spa Sways in the Austin area soon.

With an emphasis on dermatologist-developed, clean product lines like SkinCeuticals and Elta MD (look for a soon-to-be-released organic branded line) and a concise menu of body and facial treatments combining Eastern and Western modalities with high-tech equipment, it’s no surprise Spa Sway is a haven for soul soothing, skin smoothing and pain relief. “A lot of times, people come in not knowing what they need,” says Harmer. “That’s why many of our treatments are customizable with add-on enhancements or, like our Signature Spa Sway Massage, combine different techniques to maximize the benefits for the client.” Wildly popular menu items include the CBD Therapeutic Massage, which promotes relaxation and has the potential to relieve inflammation; Lymphatic Massage, which uses gliding, stretching movements to reduce bloating and facilitate the elimination of waste products from the body; and Cupping, which assists with breaking down adhesions — those vicious little muscle knots caused by stress, injury or illness. Some face treatments use medical-grade devices and cutting-edge technology. The HydraFacial MD, for instance, employs a vacuum-like VortexFusion wand to exfoliate the skin for painless extractions, while the Mini Face Lift utilizes microcurrent combined with lymphatic drainage to firm, tone and define features. Harmer says her team calls the latter “the natural face lift treatment, because the results are so dramatic.” While a spa treatment is only as good as the therapist, products and equipment, the benefits also lie in learning to nurture yourself. “Just like fashion, it’s not about what you wear, but how you feel wearing it,” says Harmer. spasway.com


Behold BOXT AN ELEVATION OF THE NAPA EXPERIENCE DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR Words and Photos by Holly Cowart

A

T THE END OF THE DAY, FEW THINGS BEAT KICKING BACK with a glass or two (or three) of your favorite wine. Sipping wine is usually centered around great food, conversation and company, but it can also be confusing and intimidating. Behold BOXT — a series of fine wines that are changing the game one home at a time. Created by Sarah Puil, the consumer-centric brand launched in March of 2020 and contains six core profiles including three reds and three whites. The surprise? They come in an eco-friendly box that ships right to your front door. For some, that may conjure up images of college days or cast doubts on quality.

TH ERE’S N O CO M PARISO N . IT IS A LUXU RY WI N E EXPERI EN CE THAT WE’ RE CREATI NG. “Once they see the box and taste the wine, they don’t put us in that lane,” says Puil. “There’s no comparison. It is a luxury wine experience that we’re creating.” Although it was a big leap to leave the corporate world behind and enter the mostly male-dominated field, Puil’s years in the global business development space left her ready for a more personal endeavor. “​​I’ve always been somebody who believes that experiences are the way to get to know people, to create loyalty, to kind of create permission to interact. And so really, I knew that I was ready to do something on my own,” she explains. Puil met with countless wine experts and conducted extensive research to ensure a direct-to-consumer approach would work

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for the alcohol-based product. This is where the brand really transforms the usual premium wine experience. Rather than focusing on specific varietals, BOXT emphasizes the descriptors that are evoked while tasting the wine. For example, Profile One is “bright, crisp and dry” while Profile Six is “sweet, juicy and velvety.” The unique process is leaving a new generation of wine drinkers surprised at what they prefer when preconceptions are left at the door. The wines are sourced from around the world before being blended at the brand’s winery in Napa. This helps guarantee that, regardless of external environmental factors affecting the grapes any given year, the taste remains consistent among batches. Plus, they’re made without any additives. Early on, while navigating between new variables and unforeseeable shifts, one component that naturally arose during production was sustainability. BOXT is completely compostable, and one unit has 50% lower carbon emissions compared to a single bottle. Puil also plants a tree for each box that’s produced in collaboration with the nonprofit One Tree Planted, further offsetting the brand’s environmental footprint. BOXT can be purchased à la carte or through a regular subscription service. “We have a 100% happiness guarantee. So if you bought a box of our wine and said ‘I hate this,’ we’re going to refund you right away. We start with the solution,” says Puil. Nearly a year in, the company’s rapid growth is matched by the exciting plans in store for the future. Not only is the team 85% female, but they’ve gone from just five full-time employees to 22. Fans can expect some fun releases, too. After the successful introduction of a crisp and delicious rosé (Profile Nine), which launched during National Rosé Day in June, BOXT will debut a special wine this fall in celebration of the brand’s first shipping anniversary.  The truth is, not everyone is setting out to be a connoisseur. So whether you’re newer to the vino world or a long-time lover in search of a high-end house wine that never disappoints, revolutionize your next glass with BOXT. drinkboxt.com    


Austin's Premier Lingerie & Swim Boutique Specializing in Bra Fittings for Every Woman of All Sizes


Home Is Where the Hair Is NEW E AST AUSTIN BOUTIQUE SALON OFFERS HAIR CARE, ARTFUL COLORING AND FASHIONABLE CUTS WITH AMBIANCE TO BOOT By Laurel Miller Interior Photo by Tyler Cochran Headshot by Kara Maria and Joeli Middlebrooks of Kara Marie Collective

“H

AIR IS A FIBER, JUST LIKE COTTON,” SAYS TONI Jennings, co-owner of Austin’s unabashedly cool new Hair House salon. “If you wash a cotton shirt every day for six weeks, it’s going to be dull and falling apart. The same logic applies to your hair. Take care of it and respect it, or it will turn on you.” Jennings has earned a fan base for her undone precision cuts and “punky, vibrant” colorist skills. “My thing is taking high-maintenance colors and turning them into more realistic versions with regard to upkeep,” she says. Her fiancé and business partner, Tyler Cochran, specializes in fashion-forward, rock-and-roll-influenced cuts and artful balayage … what Jennings describes as “super organic with a great-looking grow-out.” Jennings trained at the Paul Mitchell School in Dallas, Cochran at Minneapolis’s Aveda Institute, and both have over a decade of experience doing hair in Austin. Jennings has done editorial work for TRIBEZA and Austin Fashion Week, while Cochran’s resume includes New York and Paris Fashion Weeks and accolades in Allure magazine. Hair House opened on October 25, 2020, after a grueling quarantine period that delayed its opening. “We signed the lease in late February, and things shut down two weeks later,” says Jennings. “We still had to pay rent, minus any funding from PPP loans or the city. It was brutal, but we decided to grin and bear it.” Despite the initial obstacles, Hair House has had clients clamoring for a fresh look or a return to self-care since last fall. “COVID-19 initially scared our entire industry, because hair stylists and colorists are literally in people’s

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faces for a living,” says Jennings. “But I don’t know a single stylist not booked out for at least eight weeks ahead.” The salon has just four chairs, and the ambiance and ethos reflect Jennings’ and Cochran’s commitment to the arts, sustainability and small local businesses. Texas-made clean beauty products and candles are displayed on reclaimed wood shelves made by Austin’s Aaron Victor Carpentry; the walls are adorned with works from local artists and photographers. Everything from the water delivery and complimentary beverages to the window cleaning service and graphic designers are from Austin. “Tyler is also a musician, and I’m an artist, and as creatives and small business owners, we understand how hard it is to compete with big companies, especially these days,” says Jennings. “It was really important to us to boost our community, and we’re lucky to have a diverse clientele who love to support small businesses.” Despite the challenges the pandemic has thrown their way, Hair House is a hit, and Jennings wouldn’t have it any other way. “It’s always a risk opening your own business. This past year has simultaneously shaved years off my life, as well as saved it.” hairhouseatx.com  


KAREN'S PICK

Honey Moon Spirit Lounge THIS E AST AUSTIN TACO GEM WILL LIF T YOUR SPIRITS By Karen O. Spezia Photos by Holly Cowart

S

OMETIMES THE MOST SURPRISING THINGS ARE RIGHT under your nose. Or in my case, right next door. Honey Moon Spirit Lounge, which opened in April, is just down the block from our TRIBEZA offices. But, it never crossed my radar until my work colleagues urged me to check it out. And once I did, I wondered how I’d overlooked our stylish neighbor for so long. Perhaps because looks can be deceiving. From afar, Honey Moon appears to be just another cozy midtown restaurant. Located in a renovated Craftsman bungalow, it seems all rough-hewn wood and rustic charm. But get a little closer, and preconceptions fade. The outdoor space is dazzling with a covered front deck illuminated by crystal chandeliers and flickering votive candles, their light bouncing off suspended vintage mirrors. Sleek marble tables are paired with woven French bistro chairs, instantly transporting you from Austin to a Parisian café. The side yard is ensconced in manicured landscaping and carpeted in lush green ‘grass,’ lined with intimate cocktail tables shaded by striped beach umbrellas, reminiscent of nautical French marinière shirts and evoking the French Riviera. The cozy backyard is more casual, with a pea gravel floor, funky neon art, rattan wicker chairs, fringed scarlet umbrellas and a private dining area surrounded by walls of twinkle lights. And then you step inside. Keep your cameras handy, folks, ’cause it’s an Instagram dream. The place is a kaleidoscope of design. The theme is whimsical French vintage: there’s a pressed-tin ceiling; brocade wallpaper; jewel-toned lighting in hot pink, amber and neon green; antique lamps and chandeliers; red velvet banquettes; fading framed portraits and objet d’art. But the pièce de résistance is the gorgeous custom-made, 20th century inspired bar that entices you to pull up a stool and sip on a cocktail. As its name — and centerpiece bar — implies, Honey Moon Spirit Lounge gives booze the spotlight. Its outstanding bar program is a nod to classic libations, emphasizing fresh juices and bespoke ingredients. Popular

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choices include the Old School Old Fashioned made with Old Forester bourbon, coffee-orange bitters, demerara sugar and a hint of smoke. There’s also the Spicy Margarita with Cimarron tequila, dry curaçao, lime, agave and herbed salt. A refreshing rift on a Moscow Mule, the Cheeks of a Bride cocktail mixes Rittenhouse rye whiskey, Tubi 60 citrus liqueur, pomegranate, lemon and ginger beer in a frosty highball glass. There’s also a terrific wine list with options from around the globe, including a ruby red sparkling French rosé and perfectly balanced Italian Barbera d’Alba. The beer list includes mostly local beers on tap plus a variety of cans and bottles from Minnesota, Wisconsin, France, Austria and the Texas Hill Country. Executive Chef Manuel Rocha (previously of Hopfields, Academia and Bonhomie) offers an eclectic selection of elevated comfort food and modern American shared plates. For starters, there are nibbles like chicken liver mousse with toasted sourdough, fresh raw oysters and elegant pimento cheese made with brie and gruyere. The crab rice is another favorite shared plate, featuring Charleston Gold rice, Pontchartrain blue crab, fried egg and Chinese XO sauce. Fried in decadent duck fat, the chicken thigh is terrific. It’s crunchy on the outside and tender on the inside and can be ordered “regular” or “Seoul hot” with a sweet and spicy kick. Be sure to order a side of heavenly homemade biscuits to accompany it, which come the yummy but unnecessary beetroot butter and sorghum syrup. There’s a messy Texas Wagyu Smashburger dripping with raclette cheese and chive dijonnaise, served on a sweet brioche bun. The thin and crispy pomme frites are a great complement. For a more sophisticated entrée, there’s rabbit confit served with maitake mushrooms, carrots and sunchoke puree in a lemon herb consommé, drizzled with Espelette pepper oil. For dessert, the popular Valrhona Chocolate Bar was sold out the night I was there, so I opted for the Bourbon Peach Tarte Tatin, crowned with streusel topping, toasted macadamia nuts and a scoop of creamy homemade cardamom ice cream. Honey Moon owners Adrienne Wiggins and Reed Calhoun were inspired to open their restaurant after their wedding and honeymoon were postponed last year due to COVID. Perhaps I’m the last to know, but what a delightful surprise to discover something so special, so close by. honeymoonspiritlounge.com tribeza.com

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24 DINER

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

COMEDOR

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

3663 Bee Cave Rd. | (512) 306 1668

501 Colorado St. | (512) 499 0977

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious plates

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and

Hiding in plain sight on one of downtown’s busiest street

24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favorites. Order up

dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy hour to share

corners, Comedor is a restaurant full of surprises. Lauded

the classics, including roasted chicken, burgers, all-day

a bottle of your favorite wine and a charcuterie board.

chef Philip Speer delivers a menu that is equally clever and

breakfast and decadent milkshakes.

34TH STREET CAFE

BUFALINA & BUFALINA DUE 6555 Burnet Rd. | (512) 215 8662

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400

This intimate restaurant serves up mouth-watering pizzas,

This neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up soups,

consistently baked with crispy edges and soft centers. The

salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the chicken

famous Neapolitan technique is executed by the Stefano

piccata. The low-key setting makes it great for weeknight

Ferrara wood-burning ovens, which runs at more than 900

dinners and weekend indulgences.

degrees. Lactose-intolerants beware, there is no shortage

ARLO GREY

of cheese on this menu!

111 E Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 478 2991

CAFÉ NO SÉ

Arlo Grey is the debut restaurant from “Top Chef ” 10 winner

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

and “Fast Foodies’’ star Kristen Kish. Found inside the LINE

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic décor

Hotel, the picturesque lakeside spot has received praise for its

and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best place for

intentional design and elegant, French-and-Italian-inflected

weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on the classic

take on Texas ingredients.

avocado toast is a must-try.

ASTI TRATTORIA

CICLO

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

Ciclo is a modern Texas kitchen featuring locally inspired

dishes along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish

flavors and ingredients with a Latin influence, all brought

off your meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

to life through a unique collaboration between Chef de

6555 Burnet Rd., Ste. 400 | (512) 394 8150 James Beard Award–nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encour-

culinary traditions.

EASY TIGER 3508 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 964 8229 6406 N I-35 Frontage Rd., Ste. 1100 | (512) 494 4151 1501 E. 7th St. | (512) 839 8523 Easy Tiger lures in both drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop upstairs and a casual beer garden downstairs. Sip on some local brew and grab a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with beer, cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

98 San Jacinto Blvd. | (512) 685 8300

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian

BARLEY SWINE

unexpected, with contemporary cuisine riffs on Mexican

Cuisine James Flowers and world-re- nowned restaurateur, Richard Sandoval. Ciclo’s name reflects its focus on menu offerings that change seasonally from ceviches, crudos and grilled and smoked meats to inventive cocktails.

ages sharing with small plates made from locally sourced

ELDORADO CAFE

3300 W. Anderson Lane | (512) 420 2222 eldoradocafeatx.com

ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley

CLARK’S OYSTER BAR

croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 297 2525

fried chicken.

resonating the beat of the early 90’s, sending out

Small and always buzzing, Clark’s extensive caviar and

hot plates of the most decadently delicious and

oyster menu, sharp aesthetics and excellent service make

sometimes healthy eating you will find in Austin.

it a refreshing indulgence on West Sixth Street. Chef Larry

Mexican style comfort food with a deep honor

McGuire brings East Coast-inspired vibes to this seafood

towards the historical eateries that have made

restaurant.

Austin great. Come see us.

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Eldorado Cafe exemplifies old school Austin,


ÉPICERIE

HANK’S

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

5811 Berkman Dr. | (512) 609 8077

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French sen-

Delicious food and drinks, an easygoing waitstaff and a

sibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah McIntosh.

kid-friendly patio all work together to make Hank’s a favorite

Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in here for a bite on

neighborhood joint. With happy hour every day from 3-6:30,

Sundays.

the hardest task will be choosing between their frosé and frozen paloma.

FONDA SAN MIGUEL 2330 W. N Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 At Fonda San Miguel, authentic interior Mexican food is lovingly served inside a colorful hacienda-style restaurant. The art-adorned walls and indoor, plant-filled courtyard provide a pleasant escape in North Austin. Visit the Sunday brunch for a new menu with the most delicious interior Mexican brunch cuisine.

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC 306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010 Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area serving unique dishes. Chefs-owners Sarah Heard and Nathan Lemley serve thoughtful, locally sourced food with an international twist at reasonable prices. Go early on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

HILLSIDE FARMACY 1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168 Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored 1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the East Side. Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner specials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

HOPFIELDS 3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467 A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beautiful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine and cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

JEFFREY’S

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN + WINE BAR 4800 Burnet Road | (512) 458 1100 gustoitaliankitchen.com

Nestled in the Rosedale neighborhood of northcentral Austin, Gusto captures the warm, comforting, every-day flavors of Italian cuisine. Dishes range from house-made antipasti to hand-formed pizzas, salads, panini, fresh pasta, entrees featuring Texas farm raised meats, and scratch desserts. Craft cocktails, beer on tap, and boutique wines.

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584 Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants

JUNE’S ALL DAY

in America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained

1722 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 416 1722

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides mod-

the execution, top-notch service, and luxurious but

This wine-focused restaurant is complemented by serious

ern spins on American classics. Dig into a fried-mortadella

welcoming atmosphere that makes it an Austin staple.

cocktails and a menu of approachable bistro favorites.

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry-thyme cocktail.

Inspired by Paris cafes, Spanish tapas bodegas and urban

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

wine bars, June’s encourages sipping, noshing and lingering.

GRIZZELDA’S

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908

Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local

JUNIPER

This charming East Austin spot lies somewhere between

and organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s,

2400 E Cesar Chavez St #304 | (512) 220 9421

traditional Tex-Mex and regional Mexican recipes, each fused

Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New

Uchi Alumni Chef Nicholas Yanes fuses central Texas influ-

with a range of flavors and styles. The attention to detail in

Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and

ences and local farm produce with Italian fare. Start with

each dish shines and the tortillas are made in-house daily.

indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

puffy potatoes and the Chef ’s Brand New Cadillac Negroni.

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JUSTINE’S BRASSERIE

LIN ASIAN BAR + DIM SUM

PARKSIDE

4710 E. 5th St. | (512) 385 2900

1203 W. 6th St. | (512) 474 5107

301 E. 6th St. | (512) 474 9898

Justine’s is a quaint French brasserie deep in East Austin.

Located in a vintage West Sixth Street bungalow, Chef Ling

Patrons flock to this downtown hideaway for its wide

Don’t let the short drive deter you — the experience of eating

and her team create sophisticated Chinese dishes that draw

selection of oysters and other modern-American specialties.

traditional French plates among exquisite works of art and

enthusiastic crowds day and night. Make sure to stop by

The 6th Street locale is filled with industrial details and

decorative string lights makes for one idyllic evening with a

during weekend brunch to taste the full mouthwatering dim

plenty of natural light, so it’s no wonder that reservations are

significant other.

sum menu.

often necessary to get a table in the inviting space.

KEMURI TATSU-YA

LICHA’S CANTINA

QI AUSTIN

2713 E. 2nd St. | (512) 803 2224

1306 E. 6th St. | (512) 480 5960

835 W 6th St. #114 | (512) 474 2777

Kemuri Tatsu-Ya is a Japanese-Texan mash-up that injects

Located in the heart of East 6th, Licha’s is a quick trip to

Created by visionary chef Ling Qi Wu, also the owner of the

seriously good food with a sense of humor. The East Austin

the interior of Mexico. With masa made fresh in house and

esteemed Lin Asian Bar, Qi Austin dazzles with its top-notch

joint features Asian-inspired smoked meats and seafood, along

a large range of tequilas and mezcal, Licha’s Cantina is a

Chinese cuisine and vibrant artwork. Located in Shoal Creek

with yakitori, ramen, and izakaya classics meant for sharing.

celebration of authentic Mexican cuisine. The music, food

Walk, Qi Austin is a restaurant that pleases the eye as well as

Drinks are also an integral part of the meal, so come thirsty.

and ambiance will get you ready for a night out on the town.

the stomach.

LA BARBECUE

LORO

THE PEACHED TORTILLA

22401 E Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696

2115 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4858

5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439

Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbe-

Created by James Beard Award winners Tyson Cole and

This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with

cue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trail-

Aaron Franklin, this Asian smokehouse is a welcome addition

friendly staff, fun food and a playful atmosphere. Affordably

er, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, serves up

to South Lamar. The expansive indoor-outdoor space,

priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world

classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

designed by Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, is welcoming

with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.

and open, and unsurprisingly the food does not disappoint.

LAS PALOMAS

Don’t miss out on the sweet corn fritters, smoked beef brisket,

PICNIK

3201 Bee Cave Rd., #122 | (512) 327 9889

thai green curry or those potent boozy slushies.

4801 Burnet Rd. | (737) 226 0644

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique restaurant and bar offers authentic interior Mexican cuisine in a sophisticated yet relaxed setting. Enjoy family recipes made with fresh ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas.

LENOIR 1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778 A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired prix fixe meal. Almost every ingredient served at Lenoir comes locally sourced from Central Texas, making the unique, seasonal specialties even more enjoyable. Sit in the wine garden for happy hour and enjoy bottles from the top wine-producing regions in the world.

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1700 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 293-6118

MATTIE’S

A perfect place to find wholesome food for any type of dietary

811 W. Live Oak St. | (512) 444 1888

restriction in a bright and airy setting. This place truly lives

Mattie’s is a glorious urban paradise offering upscale

out the “good and good for you” concept with paleo-friendly

American classics. While the cocktails are top-notch and the

options and thoughtfully sourced ingredients.

cuisine is nothing short of outstanding, Mattie’s ambiance and atmosphere are unmatched.

POOL BURGER 2315 Lake Austin Blvd. | (512) 334 9747

ODD DUCK

Tiki meets Texas in this neighborhood burger bar. Located

1201 S Lamar Blvd | (512) 433 6521

behind Deep Eddy Cabaret, crunchy crinkle-cut fries and

Famed food trailer turned brick-and-mortar, Odd Duck is

juicy burgers are served from the window of a 1968 Airstream

the first venture from acclaimed chef Bryce Gilmore. Expect

Land Yacht.

seasonal fare and drinks with a strong Texas influence sourced locally whenever possible.


RED ASH ITALIA

TINY BOXWOODS

303 Colorado St. #200 | (512) 379 2906

1503 W. 35th St. | (512) 220 0698

Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between high-

This Houston-based brand now serves its simple and

quality food and enticing ambiance. This Italian steakhouse is

delicious food in Austin’s Bryker Woods neighborhood.

led by an all-star team, including executive chef John Carver.

Favorites include house-ground burgers, salmon Provencal

Sit back, relax and enjoy an exceptional evening.

salad and their chocolate chip cookies.

ROSEWOOD GULF COAST CHOP HOUSE

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN

1209 Rosewood Ave. | (512) 838 6205

222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430

Housed in a historic East Side cottage, this spot is quickly

11410 Century Oaks Terrace, Suite 100 | (512) 992-0685

becoming a staple. Chef Jesse DeLeon pays outstanding

Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True

homage to his South Texas roots with seasonal offerings from

Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-

Gulf Coast fishermen and Hill Country farmers and ranchers.

conscious eating. The restaurant, located in downtown’s Seaholm district, offers a full range of vegetarian, vegan and

SUERTE

gluten-free options.

1800 E. 6th St. | (512) 953 0092 Helmed by executive chef Fermín Núñez, Suerte was inspired by extensive travels through Central Mexico. Artisanal masa

UCHIKO

WATERLOO ICE HOUSE Escarpment Boulevard: 9600 Escarpment Blvd | (512) 301 1007 Burnet Road: 8600 Burnet Rd | (512) 458 6544 360 & 2222: 6203 N Capital of Texas Hwy | (512) 418 9700 Southpark Meadows: 9600 S IH 35 Frontage Rd | (512) 292 7900

4200 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808

waterlooicehouse.com

is the highlight, made from local heirloom corn and used in

The sensational sister creation of Uchi and former home of

Waterloo Ice House is an Austin original restaurant,

distinctive dishes rarely found on Austin menus. Order the

Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley and

serving up scratch-made breakfast, lunch, and

delectable Suadero Tacos, perfect for sharing with friends.

Nicholas Yanes, Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone

dinner options as well as Insta-worthy drinks for

should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki.

friends, families, and couples alike since 1976.

TEXAS FRENCH BREAD 2900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 499 0544 For decades, TFB has been a go-to destination for highquality European-style breads, pastries and seasonally inspired bistro meals. Whether grabbing a coffee and pastry on the fly, having casual business lunches with colleagues or enjoying the charming patio for an alfresco dinner, this neighborhood spot is an Austin favorite.

THAI FRESH

Come see how we keep Austin’s good vibes alive at VERBENA

one of our four locations nearest you.

612 W. 6th St. | (512) 991 3019 Located in downtown’s chic new Canopy hotel and designed

WINEBELLY

by Lake Flato Architects, Verbena offers vegetable-forward

519 W. Oltorf S. | (512) 487 1569

dishes that highlight regionally sourced meat, fish and

Named one of the top-20 wine bars in America by Wine En-

poultry. Chef Nic Yanes (Juniper, Uncle Nicky’s) is at the

thusiast, Winebelly boasts an international wine list and Span-

helm.

ish-Mediterranean small plates.The bistro maintains a local feel with its comfortable, laid-back interiors.

909 W. Mary St. | (512) 494 6436

VIXEN’S WEDDING

A restaurant, cooking school and market all in one place.

1813 E. 6th St. Suite A | (737) 242 7555

WU CHOW

When you’re done dining on traditional Thai favorites, stop

Vixen’s Wedding is a charming space creating something truly

500 W. 5th St., #168 | (512) 476 2469

by the adjoining coffee bar for freshly brewed joe, homemade

unique. Helmed by culinary super-couple Todd Duplechan

From the curators of Swift’s Attic, Wu Chow is expanding Aus-

ice cream and an array of baked goods.

and Jessica Maher, the restaurant specializes in Goan cuisine,

tin’s cuisine offerings with traditional Chinese dishes sourced

a cultural mash-up of bright and complex flavors.

from local purveyors and farmers. Don’t miss the weekend dim sum menu.

tribeza.com

| SEPTEMBER 2021

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W H AT ’ S N E W O N

TRIBEZA.COM CHILL OUT

POOL DAY

We spoke to the founders of nonprofit organization Tankproof, who came to Austin this summer bringing swimming lessons, fun and confidence to local kids. tribeza.com/tankproof

Follow us @Tribeza on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. WHERE DREAMS COME TRUE

Looking for fun? Take a trip to Dreamland, the 64-acre outdoor playground, and experience concerts, recreation, food and drinks. tribeza.com/dreamland-holds-art-music

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JULY/AUGUST 2021 | tribeza.com

Stories from this issue are available at tribeza.com, in addition to fresh content daily. Keep up by subscribing to our Tribeza Talk newsletter. tribeza.com/sign-up-newsletter

D R E A M L A N D P H OTO B Y H O L LY CO WA R T. CO C K TA I L S P H OTO B Y CO U R T N E Y G O F O R T H .

Keep cool in the Texas heat by visiting ​​these five frozen cocktail spots around Austin. tribeza.com/frozencocktails


Profile for TRIBEZA Austin Curated

Tribeza September 2021  

Tribeza September 2021  

Profile for tribeza

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