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CONTENTS

SEPTEMBER / STYLE

Model Raliat Akinlolu takes it all in at Monarch Stables.

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DEPARTMENTS

Social Hour p. 28 Kristin’s Column p. 32 Community Profile p. 34 Tribeza Talk p. 38 Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 40 Music Pick p. 41 Art Pick p. 42 Event Pick p. 44 Fall Lookbook p. 90 Style Profile p. 98 Travel Pick p. 100 Karen’s Pick p. 106 Dining Guide p. 108 FEATURES

Slow Burn p. 50 Drivers of Style p. 60 Choosing Courage p. 78 Youth Culture p. 84 ON THE COVER Our favorite fall looks captured by Minta Maria Smail and styled by Sari Warenoff.

ON THE MODEL Left: TIBI dress, $895, Kick Pleat. LUCCHESE boots, $749, Allens Boots.

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DEPARTMENTS

Social Hour p. 18 Kristin’s Column p. 24

Community Profile

C O M E V I S I T U S ! South Congress | Lamar Central | The Domain


EDITOR'S LETTER

A

NEW SEASON HAS ARRIVED…ALMOST. IN AUSTIN THIS NEW SEASON, KNOWN elsewhere as fall, is less an actual change in temperature and more a sheer willing of the mind. Fall is here because, damn it we say it is. A new school year has started, with all of its implied pencil sharpening; college football has begun, which around here means burnt orange (Hook ’em); and we are beginning to at least contemplate slipping back on those jeans that were last seen months ago. After a summer where, among other things, my family and I road tripped through the Pacific Northwest (my trusty polaroid never far from reach), I am sad to leave it all behind but now ready for a shift, a change. Nothing embodies this change more than what I still affectingly call back-to-school shopping. As a child this meant picking out the latest and greatest pair of plaid Keds, usually at the Anderson Lanebased Sandy’s Shoes, and as an adult it means tucking into September’s plentiful fashion magazines before hitting Austin’s brick-and-mortar pavement. Whether you are a capsule-wardrobe kind of gal or enjoy pieces with dramatic flair, this issue of Tribeza is worth tucking into. In “Slow Burn” you will find an edit of fall finery flawlessly captured by Minta Maria Smail. The shoot, which took place at Monarch Stables and was styled by Sari Warenoff, was one of those dream days. It all clicked, we had a blast, and somehow it seems to show. This time of year is fun — fall fashion is FUN — and while you may not have a trick roper (see page 50) to pair with your new wardrobe, we have just the week where you can show it all off (air conditioning included). Style Week No. 15 is here, and it’s time to celebrate together. Let’s fete Austin’s best in fashion, food, film, and design with a good ol’ fashioned party, the kind where you actually RSVP, show up early, and also manage to stay late. We are kicking off this year’s lineup with a bash at Kendra Scott’s glam headquarters and closing things out with the new Lookbook Live at Mattie’s, while also managing to squeeze in a Night at the Movies and crowd favorite Dinner x Design — all opportunities to get dressed up (or down) and discover Austin’s endlessly creative pockets. Those pockets are where you will find many of the Austinites featured in the following pages. This year’s “Drivers of Style” group encompasses individuals who are ever sharpening their talent, drive, and personal style. Virginia Cumberbatch works daily to repair past and current injustices in her position at the University of Texas while also effortlessly pulling of a double-breasted tuxedo dress. Sheila Youngblood, owner of Rancho Pillow, cares deeply about sharing culture and art with others at the Round Top compound she has put her heart and soul into. And while on the topic of heart and soul, don’t miss the opportunity to read all about the dynamic Jessica Honegger, whose new book Imperfect Courage was just released this past August. Anne Bruno talks with the business mogul and mom about the courage it took to found and sustain Noonday Collection, a fair-trade jewelry and accessories company. The business that began out of her desire to adopt has now grown to something much bigger — a way for women and men all over the globe to work with dignity and purpose. Truly, I am just scratching the surface. I could go on and on, but instead I’ll just say, happy (almost) fall. I hope it’s a great one. Margaret Williams margaret@tribeza.com

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DOMAIN NORTHSIDE 11624 Rock Rose Ave Women’s . Men’s . Accessories


TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

S E P T E M B E R 2 01 8

N O. 2 05

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR

Margaret Williams

ART DIRECTOR

September Broadhead

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Cowart

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Hannah Morrow

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Elizabeth Arnold

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Krissy Hearn Shaleena Keefer Errica Williams INTERNS

Abby Moore Avery Tanner PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

WRITERS

Jess Archer Neal Baker Nicole Beckley PHOTOGR APHERS

Isaac Anthony Minta Maria Smail Matt Conant Holly Cowart Molly Culver Jonathan Garza Dagny Piasecki Taylor Prinsen ILLUSTR ATOR

Chris Nickels

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2018 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S

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19 – 21 October Circuit of the Americas, Austin, Texas

20 October BRUNO MARS

Tickets: TheCircuit.com

21 October BRITNEY SPEARS


SOCIAL HOUR

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FOSTER ATX REVIVAL

Foster ATX held an exclusive, two-night soirée at Wolf House in celebration of its second anniversary. Putting their own spin on New Year’s Eve in July, guests dressed up for a night of dancing to live music, craft cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, and immersive experiences. A portion of the proceeds from the event were donated to Casa Marianella.

LALA’S ANNUAL CHRISTMAS IN JULY PARTY

While it’s Christmas year-round at North Austin neighborhood bar Lala’s, the local favorite threw a holiday bash six months early with its annual Christmas in July party. Patrons channeled their holiday spirit for the summer elf costume contest and indulged in delicious drink specials, including plenty of Boozy Eggnog.

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8TH ANNUAL PAY IT FORWARD WITH DANIEL CURTIS BENEFIT

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5 FOSTER ATX REVIVAL 1. Kyle & Mackenzie Smith 2. William Jackson & Tomar Williams 3. Stephanie Gutierrez, Shelby Goodwin & Sara Barge LALA’S ANNUAL CHRISTMAS IN JULY PARTY 4. Juan Salinas 5. Michael Pollei 6. Greg Mercurio & Rebecca Hagler 8TH ANNUAL PAY IT FORWARD WITH DANIEL CURTIS BENEFIT 7. Virginia Wolf & Mike Haynes 8. Jared & Kim Dunton

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y J O N AT H A N G A R Z A A N D J I M I N N E S

On August 2, the AT&T Hotel and Conference Center hosted the 8th Annual Pay It Forward With Daniel Curtis event, benefiting the Lone Star Paralysis Foundation and Easterseals of Central Texas. The night featured more than 20 of Austin’s most prestigious restaurants, silent and live auctions, and a live performance by The Nightowls.


SOCIAL HOUR

WHITE LINEN NIGHT

2ND Street District held its highly anticipated sixth annual White Linen Night on August 4. At the block party, which benefitted Austin Food & Wine Alliance and SafePlace, guests enjoyed food from Austin’s favorite restaurants, creative wine and beer pairings, and live music from local R&B and soul artist Tameca Jones.

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BANGER’S 6TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY

On August 4, Banger’s Sausage House & Beer Garden toasted to six years in business by holding a Texas-size barbecue and beer festival. Guests were treated to a legendary anniversary lineup of more than 100 special beers, a delectable menu of classic comfort food favorites, and incredible brass and country bands that kept the party going from noon until night.

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TRIBEZA AUGUST RELEASE PARTY

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WHITE LINEN NIGHT 1. Josh Woods, Angela Woods, Lauren Camper & Brian Camper 2. Amanda Tatom & Debbie Tolany 3. Chase Lewis & Shelby Sorrel 4. Tameca Jones BANGER’S 6TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY 5. Ben Siegel & Anthony De Loache 6. Katey Staman, Mckenzie Griffin & Jessica Villanueva 7. Hanna & Matt Everhart TRIBEZA AUGUST RELEASE PARTY 8. Alexis Bradley, Madeleine Inglish & Lauren Conley 9. Greg Rucker & Georgie Morrell 10. Cara Caulkins & Sara Reichardt 11. Mason Johns & Matt Jeffries

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y TAY LO R P R I N S E N A N D J O N AT H A N G A R Z A

Friends of the magazine gathered at downtown Austin’s Blu Dot on August 7 to commemorate the release of Tribeza’s August Makers Issue. While grooving to beats by DJ Amy Edwards, party-goers enjoyed exclusive popup shops by Austin makers Era Ceramics and Esperos, customized photographs by Oh Happy Day Booth, and sensational sips and bites courtesy of Manuel’s, Jim-Jim’s Water Ice, Chameleon Cold-Brew, Treaty Oak Distilling, Waterloo Sparkling Water, and Austin Eastciders.


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The right is reserved to make modifications and changes to the information contained herein. Renderings, photos and sketches are representational only, and may not be totally accurate. Dimensions, sizes, specifications, layouts, views and materials are approximate only and subject to change without notice.


KRISTIN'S COLUMN

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What’s Hot FOR FALL By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Chris Nickels

Someone needs to let the fashion industry know about fall in Texas. The rest of the world might be ready to shift into long sleeves, warm wool fabrics, jackets, and boots, but we are just hitting the apex of the summer inferno. We park in the mall parking lot and walk across the scalding-hot pavement. Our faces are glistening with sweat before we get to the front door of Nordstrom. AC blasts us as we enter, rendering us frozen. We see the mannequins dressed in the newest fall fashion and sigh wistfully as we look down at our shorts, tank tops, and flip-flops. This is the uniform of Austin, from March until early November. I love putting on summer dresses, jean shorts, sandals, and sleeveless tops at the first hint of spring. But by late August, early September, I am so over it. I give up. I stop drying my hair with a round brush because it’s too damn hot in my bathroom, so I have a frizzy, unkempt look. Or else I just pull it back into a messy version of a hybrid ponytail-bun. Sunscreen makes my face look perpetually shiny. Makeup feels goopy, so I

fly my freckle flag and go au naturel. Some days my deodorant works better than others. I rotate the same shorts and tank tops. Or I just stay in my workout clothes, because I may as well. That way, at least if I look (and smell) sporty, I have the excuse that I worked out at some point in the day. I choose white or black as my go-to colors, because they look less soggy. I avoid silk and linen at all costs. I am literally stuck, perhaps melted, in a fashion rut. I am not sure how men do it, the men who have to dress for work. If I had to put on slacks, a button-down, tie, sport coat, socks, and loafers, I would never leave my air-conditioned office. In my own corporate days, back when women had to wear stockings (!!), I would literally rip them off in my car and drive home barefoot. There was a pile of wadded-up stockings and at least two pairs of high heels on the floorboard of my Jeep’s passenger side at all times. I remember standing in the office restroom, crouched beneath the hand dryer to dry the sweaty back of my Ann Taylor linen blazer after afternoon meetings that

required getting in and out of a steaming-hot car. We used to have after-work happy hours on the deck at Hula Hut, guzzling swirls in the blazing 5 o’clock sun. I am not sure how I didn’t faint. Football games are supposed to be fall fashion forward. How can you dress cute when sweat is soaking through your clothes and making your hair look as though you just went swimming? Or how about when you stand up to cheer and you wonder if your wet shorts make you appear incontinent to the fans behind you? I marvel at the UT fans wearing jeans and cowboy boots, not sure how they don’t turn into a puddle standing in the sunny section. This fall I will be attending my son’s college football games at Rice University, in the one town that is typically hotter and more humid than Austin — Houston. I want to be the cute, proud football mom, but I might have to settle for just proud. It seems our only choices to keep our cool and still look cool are to travel to real fall climates, or have patience and wait for November.

“SOMEONE NEEDS TO LET THE FASHION INDUSTRY KNOW ABOUT FALL IN TEXAS.” tribeza.com

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

Love Your Look PERSONAL ST YLIST L AUREL KINNEY ON INVESTING IN OURSELVES THROUGH WHAT WE WE AR By Nicole Beckley Photographs by Molly Culver


S

ince 2011 Laurel Kinney has made it her mission to leverage personal style to elevate people’s feelings about themselves. With a degree in psychology from Reed College and a master’s in social work from Columbia University, Kinney worked as a crisis social worker in New York and a hospice social worker in Austin before shifting focus. Here she shares how psychology interacts with style and pulls back the curtain on what her days entail. HOW DID YOU GET INTO PERSONAL STYLING?

I discovered personal styling and it seemed like a cool marriage of my skills: talking to people about hard stuff — because actually a lot of issues come up in people’s closets and around their identity and investing in themselves. Thinking about what’s important to put out there as far as who they are and what kind of goals they have. I thought it was a really cool thing to be able to take some of the skills that I had learned as a social worker and translate it into this kind of physical manifestation through clothes. IS IT CORRECT THAT PEOPLE TEND TO SEEK YOU OUT WHEN THEY’RE GOING THROUGH SOME KIND OF LIFE SHIFT?

Yeah, for sure. When you feel like you’ve changed inside but then you’re putting on clothes and you don’t recognize who you are anymore on the outside. You’re trying to figure out, who should I portray now? A lot of us don’t constantly evaluate those things, and we just suddenly find ourselves hating all of our clothes for some reason. Trying to put your finger on what it is is really challenging for people without an objective person guiding them through that.

Kinney, at Billy Reid. Her approach to personal style isn’t necessarily about fashion, “I’m more into people and how they can more fully embody the person they want to be,” Kinney says. tribeza.com

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

for her wedding dress together. So we become friends usually. Those clients call me when they know, like, “I need to feel as confident as possible for the next five months and I don’t want to have to worry about my clothes.” That’s when we reevaluate. Like, “Where are you at, what are you hoping to achieve this year, and how can we use your style to support that and make you feel like you’re really there and you’re doing it?” It’s like a whole-life approach. I always say, it’s 80 percent psychology and only 20 percent about the clothes, really. So I definitely feel like I look at it differently than just from a straight fashion perspective. I IMAGINE YOU SPEND A LOT OF TIME IN PEOPLE’S HOMES AND IN THEIR CLOSETS. WHAT IS THAT LIKE FOR YOU?

It’s funny, because doing hospice social work, you’re going into people’s homes all the time, and it’s under much different circumstances. I think most of my clients, I’m a stranger to them when I’m first meeting with them, so I think they’re way more nervous than I am. I just try to be real and myself and disarm them from feeling judged or awkward or anything. I literally come in, and, like, five minutes later they’re taking their clothes off [laughs]. Like, “Hey, take your pants off, let’s get to work.” IT SEEMS LIKE YOUR DAYS WOULD VARY A LOT. WHAT’S A TYPICAL DAY LIKE?

At 7 a.m. I usually wake up and I go to yoga. I do ashtanga, so it takes an hour and a half. It’s a flow that you do independently, so it’s not a led class, but everybody does it together. I usually get coffee on my way home, and then I take the dogs on a walk, get ready, answer emails. I’m usually seeing clients by 11.

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Usually I have at least one to three clients every day during the week, and when I’m not doing that, there’s three different things I’m doing with my clients. It’s either closet sorting, shopping, or outfit creation and styling. So I’m either driving around to people’s houses or I’m going to the Domain or Barton Creek or boutiques around town and pulling and then meeting the clients and trying stuff on with them. So I’m all over the place. Throughout the week I have strategy calls with clients, so I’ll have random half-hour chunks of talking on the phone with potential clients. It’s really different every day … I usually wrap things up around 5 or 6, and then I go home and walk the dogs, make dinner, chill out. WHAT IS THE PROCESS LIKE WITH FOLKS WHOM YOU’VE BEEN WORKING WITH OVER A FEW YEARS? DO THEY HAVE BIG CHANGES?

Yeah, it’s fun. I’ve had a client since I started, like seven years. She was wearing literally all bright neon, like J.Crew everything, and I’ve seen her style change so much. She now has a capsule wardrobe of mostly neutrals. She’s moved up in her career many times over, and we just shopped

HAS THERE BEEN A MOMENT THAT STANDS OUT FOR YOU, WHERE YOU REALIZED THIS WAS REALLY WHAT YOU WANTED TO DO?

Really, it never gets old to help someone see themselves a little differently. You can see the change literally happening in the dressing room sometimes — where someone puts something on that makes them look the way they feel inside. I’m getting chills thinking about it. It’s so cool, because their whole spirit can change in that dressing room — to see someone just stand differently and appreciate the reflection in the mirror. I had a 90-year-old client in Nordstrom once who said, [in a flirtatious voice] “I like what I see.” And I was like, “That’s awesome.” It’s so great to give people permission to love what they look like and not feel like it’s something that they shouldn’t be allowed to do, no matter what their size is or shape is; it’s possible to feel amazing in your clothes, no matter what. It’s cool when someone finally sees that. Sometimes it’s for the first time. It doesn’t always happen quickly, but it is really cool when you start to get those little sparks. This interview has been edited and condensed.


I M AG E S O N T H I S PAG E CO U R T E S Y O F L A U R E L K I N N E Y A N D M I C H A E L H E R N A N D E Z

A DAY IN THE LIFE: A typical day for Kinney

might involve shopping at the Domain or Barton Creek and pulling potential outfits for clients. Kinney also frequents Banana Republic, Anthropologie and Madewell, where Kinney says, “Their jeans usually fit everyone really well.” She also seeks out boutiques and Nordstrom, “because usually you can find a lot of different things there at different price ranges.” For more, follow @laurel_kinney on Instagram.

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TRIBEZ A

TALK

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN By Nicole Beckley

ROOM TO RELAX What’s better than a little pampering? How about the full spa experience. Milk + Honey, the Austin-based brand started by Alissa Bayer in 2006, is transforming its Arboretum Market location into its largest full-service spa. The expanded outpost will offer a full range of treatments, including massages, waxing, nails, and facials, as well as products like the brand’s new all-natural deodorant, with scents of coconut and lemongrass, and lavender and tea tree. MILKANDHONEYSPA.COM

World’s Faire “I grew up in an entrepreneurial family. I always knew that I wanted to start a business,” Sydney Sherman says. A few years ago, while traveling in India, Sherman was struck by seeing people living in extreme poverty. “I just thought, ‘OK, I have to do something to help.’” Sherman turned her attention to ethical purchasing, wanting

Krewe’s All Here In late June Krewe Eyewear opened up shop on South Congress Avenue inside a tiny house. Modeled after New Orleans’ home styles, the house’s shotgun shape and wraparound glass windows invite folks in to try on glasses popularized by the likes of Gigi Hadid and Beyoncé. The brand’s first Texas Tiny House debuted during SXSW 2017, and the current residency is expected to continue until January. KREWE.COM

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to create a platform that would bring fair-trade brands together in one space and provide more information for shoppers. In D e c emb er 2017, S her m a n launched Fa ire, a n online marketplace of 50 international sellers focused on ethical and fair-trade goods, including handbags, jewelry, and men’s and women’s fashion. FAIRE.SHOP.


SEEING CLEARLY If you’re caught in a game day dilemma about which bag to bring to the stadium, Kelly Wynne has a few solutions. With new rules calling for clear or very small bags in many venues, Wynne offers up the clear Mingle Mingle Mini, an eight-by-six crossbody in multiple styles and outlined in various colors (yes, including burntorange python). There’s also the option for the BYOBackpack, a clear backpack that gives a little more space, with a removable top to turn it into a handbag. Keep an eye out for the brand’s new diaper bags and luggage coming this fall. KELLYWYNNE.COM

THE BIG Leagues For Musa Ato, owner of the Second Street menswear shop League of Rebels, his personal, polished style emerged from a youth spent wearing school uniforms. “That’s still the way I dress still today,” Ato says. “Any day you catch me will be the same thing: a dress shirt tucked in, wool slacks, and a necktie.” The necktie, he concedes can be optional, but the functionality and integrity of fabrics is not, a belief at the core of the garments he produces. Since 2016 League of Rebels has offered high-quality men’s fashion at its downtown outpost, which doubled in size earlier this year. There Ato espouses the beauty of merino wool suits and offers limited-edition shirts and select pieces. Up next? “Silk pajamas,” Ato says. “That’s what I’m most excited a b o u t .” LE AG U EOFREBEL S.COM

Noble Attire

“We knew we wanted to do a womenswear line and wanted it to be fun and something that was inspiring to other women,” Staley Moore says. Having grown up together in Fort Worth, Moore, along with Mackenzie Shoppa, and their respective sisters, Mary Elizabeth Crawford and Madi Davis, created Noble 31, a women’s fashion brand built on the idea of creating timeless pieces. The brand, whose name stems from Proverbs 31, spent two and a half years in development, with the four women launching the first collection in May 2017. “Since we started this idea, there have been three cross-country moves, three babies, and two weddings,” Shoppa says. The seed of the idea for the brand began with Shoppa while she was studying costume design at UT Austin, and she serves as lead designer, taking inspiration from the theater and nature. “I have more of an open mind to mix textures and colors and there-are-no-rules kind of thing,” Shoppa says. The result is silk tops and white denim skirts, surprise pleats, and relaxed pants. “Our stuff is ready-to-wear, and we spend a lot of time sourcing the best fabrics and making sure that each garment is perfect,” Moore says. SHOPNOBLE31.COM

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C ALENDARS

Entertainment FIRST AID KIT

MUSIC

September 18 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

LEON BRIDGES

September 1 & 2 ACL Live at The Moody Theater BEN HARPER & CHARLIE MUSSELWHITE

September 2 Stubb’s BBQ

ALICE IN CHAINS

September 6 ACL Live at The Moody Theater MOBLEY

September 6 Shady Grove MARGO PRICE W/ HAYES CARLL

September 7 ACL Live at The Moody Theater WATERLOO MUSIC FESTIVAL

September 7 – 9 Carson Creek Ranch

MICHAEL NESMITH & THE FIRST NATIONAL BAND

September 8 Paramount Theatre

GRIZZLY BEAR

September 18 Frank Erwin Center

September 24 Emo’s Austin

K.D. LANG

KALI UCHIS

September 18 Paramount Theatre

September 27 Stubb’s BBQ

BRUCE ROBISON & KELLY WILLIS

RIVER REVIVAL MUSIC FESTIVAL

September 19 Long Center

September 27 – 30 KL Ranch Camp

GRAHAM NASH

INTERPOL

September 19 Paramount Theatre

September 28 Bass Concert Hall

ZHU

STANLEY CLARKE

September 19 Stubb’s BBQ

September 28 One World Theatre

ANGEL OLSEN W/ HAND HABITS

STRFKR

September 20 Paramount Theatre

DIERKS BENTLEY

September 20 Austin360 Amphitheater

SOCIAL DISTORTION

September 13 Stubb’s BBQ LUCIUS

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THE DECEMBERISTS

September 29 Bass Concert Hall

W.C. CLARK BLUES REVUE

September 29 Antone’s Nightclub LORD HURON

FUTURE ISLANDS

FALL OUT BOY

ROBERT PLANT & THE SENSATIONAL SPACE SHIFTERS

September 23 Frank Erwin Center

September 29 – October 1 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

TROYE SIVAN

NORTHSIDE AMPLIFIED

September 23 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

September 14 Paramount Theatre

September 28 Stubb’s BBQ

September 29 & 30 Stubb’s BBQ

September 22 Stubb’s BBQ

September 12 Stubb’s BBQ

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THRICE

September 21 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

September 11 Stubb’s BBQ

September 24 Stubb’s BBQ

GAME OF THRONES LIVE CONCERT EXPERIENCE

4TH & GOAL GALA FT. NASHVILLE

RISE AGAINST

SLASH FT. MYLES KENNEDY & THE CONSPIRATORS

September 29 & 30 Domain NORTHSIDE

FILM CAPITAL CITY BLACK FILM FESTIVAL

Through September 2 Various Locations

MOVIES IN THE PARK: BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

September 6 Adams Hemphill Park

ALL GENDERS, LIFESTYLES AND IDENTITIES FILM FESTIVAL

September 6 – 9 Various Locations

MOVIES IN THE PARK: HOOK

September 20 Govalle Park

FANTASTIC FEST

September 20 – 27 Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas TEXAS FOCUS: WHAT WAS OURS

September 28 Bullock Texas State History Museum

THEATER THE GRAPES OF WRATH

Through September 2 The City Theatre MONROE

September 7 – 30 Austin Playhouse THE BIG FAT INDIAN WEDDING

September 6 – 9 Mueller Lake Park

TOMMY THE ROCK MUSICAL

September 7 – 30 The City Theatre ONCE

September 19 – October 28 ZACH Theatre BALLET AUSTIN PRESENTS THE FIREBIRD

September 21 – 23 Long Center TAYLOR MAC

September 27 & 28 Bass Concert Hall

COMEDY OUT OF BOUNDS COMEDY FESTIVAL

Through September 3 Various Locations JEFF DYE

September 12 – 15 Cap City Comedy Club HANNIBAL BURESS

September 14 ACL Live at The Moody Theater TEXAS FUNNIEST REPORTER SHOW

September 16 Cap City Comedy Club TIM ALLEN

September 21 Bass Concert Hall PAUL REISER

September 29 Paramount Theatre


CHILDREN DISCOVERED

September 5 Domain NORTHSIDE TORTOISE AND HARE

September 8 – January 27 ZACH Theatre LITTLE TEXANS

September 13 Bullock Texas State History Museum KIDZ BOP LIVE 2018

September 21 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park

OTHER FREE DAY OF YOGA

September 3 Various Locations

ZILKER RELAYS

September 7 Zilker Park

GREAT SKATE

September 8 Domain NORTHSIDE P H OTO G R A P H B Y TAY LO R B OY L S TO N

SOUL OF AUSTIN CULTURE FEST

September 8 Huston-Tillotson University GARDEN BROS CIRCUS

September 8 & 9 Travis County Expo Center BIRTHDAY BASH

September 9 Long Center

DREAM COME TRUE FOUNDATION GALA

September 18 Brodie Homestead

GRAPE PUNCH SESSIONS

September 18 – 25 William Chris Vineyards

WHISKIES OF THE WORLD

September 20 Fair Market

CREATIVES MEET BUSINESS EXPERIENCE

September 20 – 22 Various Locations

TRANS-PECOS FESTIVAL

Marfa, Texas September 20 – 23 El Cosmico MARFA SOL

September 21 & 22 Al Campo AUSTIN MUSEUM DAY

September 23 Museums Across Austin

TEXAS TRIBUNE FESTIVAL

September 27 – 29 Downtown Austin

AMERICAN INDIAN HERITAGE DAY 2018

September 28 Bullock Texas State History Museum AUSTIN OKTOBERFEST

September 29 Scholz Garten

NORTHSIDE AMPLIFIED

September 29 & 30 Domain NORTHSIDE Lawn

MUSIC PICK

Angel Olsen By Neal Baker

PAR AMOUNT THEATRE, SEPTEMBER 20

When Angel Olsen played the Austin City Limits Music Festival back in 2017, she brought with her a posse uniformed in suits, bolo ties, and electric guitars. Upon her entrance, it was clear that the band was outfitted to contrast Olsen’s own maxi-dress-and-big-sunglasses style. Performing her blistering indie folk, the band played it cool while Olsen opened up to the crowd. This most recent iteration of her personality is one of many that the St. Louis native has taken on over the years as a performer. Her songwriting similarly models this varied spectrum, from the dry earthiness of her album “Half Way Home” and the gritty tremolo of “Burn Your Fire for No Witness” to the big-sky Western backdrop of her recent “My Woman.” But the defining characteristic of Olsen’s music throughout has been neither the band nor the studio production. Her songs are all platforms for her sensible guitar playing and distinctly communicative voice. Both of these have plenty of room to shine on her current solo tour, which arrives at the Paramount Theatre on September 20. She’s touring not to back an album but simply to sing her songs. With a set list merging the recent and the retrospective, you’re just as likely to hear a new, unreleased song as something from years ago, all dressed up like you’ve never seen before.

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ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts Through September 8 Davis Gallery MEG AUBREY: SURFACE

Through September 9 Women & Their Work PAUL STANKIEWICZ

Through September 9 ART on 5th JILL LEAR + KATIE MARATTA

Through September 29 Gallery Shoal Creek TERRA GOOLSBY: BLACK RAINBOW

Through September 29 Dimension Gallery

ART PICK

ART AT FLOWER HILL

September 1 – 15 The Neill-Cochran House Museum

Red Dot Art Spree By Neal Baker WOMEN & THEIR WORK, SEPTEMBER 13

Since 1978, Women & Their Work has promoted the creations of countless female artists. Now, in 2018, it celebrates 40 years of meaningful contributions to the way that Austinites access, share, and understand contemporary art. In addition to the diverse history of artists presented in the gallery, Women & Their work promotes art education through a program that reaches out to schools and provides tours, performances, and workshops. For all its contributions, the gallery gained support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Warhol Initiative, designed to help bolster the work of arts organizations across the country. Women & Their Work is many things, not the least of which is a marketplace. Presentation and promotion make artists visible, but purchasing makes them a living. On Thursday, September 13, the gallery will be presenting the works of more than 100 Texas artists at Red Dot Art Spree. With taxfree price tags under $750 and a silent auction, the event offers a chance to support these artists and the gallery while in turn bringing more art into your own life. The event runs from 7 to 10 p.m. and includes catering from El Locavore and Tito’s Handmade Vodka. Tickets to the event can be found online (womenandtheirwork.org), with VIP tickets allowing for early entry.

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BLAIR GALLACHER: SOUND & VISION

September 1 – November 10 Dougherty Arts Center THOMAS COOK: NOCTURNE

September 1 – November 10 Dougherty Arts Center

CAROL DAWSON SOLO SHOW

September 8 – 29 Wally Workman Gallery WORLD OF HUNT SLONEM

September 8 – 30 Russell Collection Fine Art Gallery HARRY UNDERWOOD ART SHOW

September 8 – October 15 Yard Dog Art Gallery FRAMING EUGÈNE ATGET: PHOTOGRAPHY & PRINT CULTURE IN NINETEENTHCENTURY PARIS

September 8 – December 2 Blanton Museum of Art RED DOT ART SPREE

September 13 Women & Their Work EDWARD LANE MCCARTNEY

September 15 – October 13 CAMIBAart Gallery DE/CONSTRUCTION

September 15 – October 20 Davis Gallery

THE RESIDENCY: SESSION VII

EDWARD LANE MCCARTNEY

UMLAUF PRIZE 2018: SHANIE TOMASSINI

HUMA BHABHA: OTHER FORMS OF LIFE

September 6 Native Hostels

September 6 – November 5 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum ANN WOOD: QUICK AND QUIET

September 7 – October 8 Big Medium Gallery

September 15 – October 13 CAMIBAart Gallery

September 15 – January 13 The Contemporary Austin Jones Center

A R T W O R K T I T L E D “ T H R O U G H T H E LO O K I N G G L A S S ” B Y E V E LY N CO N T R E R A S

REFLECTOR


Raise Your Vibration Enjoy Local Art The Eli Halpin Gallery Gift Shop & Art Studio 1023 Springdale Rd 10A Austin Texas

e l i h a l p i n . c o m

WWG Carol Dawson Wally W ork m an Gall e ry

1 2 0 2 West Si x t h St reet A u st i n , Tex a s 78703 wa l l y wo r k manga l l er y.co m 5 1 2.472.7428 Image: Roseate Spoonbill (detail), watercolor on paper, 46 x 32 inches


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN –JONES CENTER

EVENT PICK

Texas Tribune Festival By Neal Baker DOWNTOWN AUSTIN, SEPTEMBER 27-29

The responsibilities of being a U.S. citizen sure can be exhausting. It’s often difficult to follow along with the flurry of politics or to feel at all involved in what goes on on Capitol Hill. Fortunately, with the arrival of this month’s Texas Tribune Festival, Austinites are being handed a playbill. From September 27 to 29 the event will occupy numerous downtown venues, creating space for conversation on some of the biggest questions our state and country face right now. The festival’s all-star guest list goes on and on: Nancy Pelosi, John Kerry, Jeff Flake, Christine Todd Whitman, and Beto O’Rourke, to name a few. But the event is also full of breakfasts and luncheons, live recordings of podcasts, and panels talking about everything from energy issues to public health. These can be accessed with a conference pass covering all three days of the festival, with special rates for students and educators. The spirit of the Texas Tribune has always been one of meaningful civic engagement, and this festival is the best possible example. With midterm elections coming not long after, it’s an opportunity to take part in the fullest way possible and be engaged with those who occupy and pass through our Statehouse.

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700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: Tu-F 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Azie Morton Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu-F 10-4, Sat-Su 12-4 umlaufsculpture.org

P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F T H E T E X A S T R I B U N E F E S T I VA L

MUSEUMS


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com ART ON 5TH 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org

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CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd., Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 camibaart.com CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 721 Congress Ave. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: S 12–5 dimensiongallery.org DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery FLATBED PRESS 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M–F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

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FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org GALLERY SHOAL CREEK 2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 galleryshoalcreek.com GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sa & Su 11-4 linkpinart.com LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sa & Su 12-5 massgallery.org

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11- 6 modernrocksgallery.com

THE TWYLA GALLERY 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu–Sa 12-6 mondotees.com

VISUAL ARTS CENTER 209 W. 9th St. (800) 928 9997 Hours: M-F 10-6 twyla.com/austingallery

OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 1600 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 russell–collection.com SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: Tu-F 10-5 space12.org STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn St. (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12-6 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990-8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992-2044 catezane.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990-2707 fbgartgallery.com

FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997-4949 fredericksburgartguild.org INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997-9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992-3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997-0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997-6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307-3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456-9667 urbanherbal.com


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Lake Travis Earrings in sterling silver, part of the Swimmin Holes collection www.huntdesignjewelry.com 512.527.4239 custom designs welcome


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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y DA N I E L L E C H LO E & J O N AT H A N G A R Z A

Tribeza Style Week returns to celebrate Austin’s best in fashion, design, food and film. For this year, our fifteenth, we’ve included a mix of crowd favorites and the newly reimagined Lookbook Live. To purchase tickets, visit tribeza.com/style-week-2018


KICK-OFF PARTY

DINNER X DESIGN

Tribeza Style Week No.15 kicks off at Kendra Scott’s headquarters, on North Lamar. This stunning location will be the perfect spot to sip cocktails curated by Playa Real Tequila and Treaty Oak Distilling, preview the Lexus Drivers of Style Portrait Gallery and get an exclusive first look at Kendra Scott’s new Charms Collection. Bites will be provided from local favorite Guild, and Kendra Scott and Westlake Dermatology will offer specialty treatments at the Kendra Scott Nail Bar. You won’t leave empty-handed, thanks to Kendra Scott, Milk + Honey, and more!

The Pershing, a members-only tucked away club, is the ideal spot for Dinner x Design, an eagerly anticipated evening celebrating Austin’s best in food and design. This year we are thrilled to partner with Shannon Eddings, Joe Holm (Clayton & Little), Rachel Horn, and Matthew Tsang who’ll work alongside top chefs from Il Brutto, Tiny Boxwoods, The Pershing and more. We are all as excited as you are to see the worlds they create through their table designs and menus. Cocktails courtesy of Playa Real Tequila and Treaty Oak Distilling will complement the whole evening and we’ll stay hydrated thanks to Richard’s Rainwater. You won’t leave empty-handed, thanks to Outdoor Voices, Milk + Honey, Estilo and more!

NIGHT AT THE MOVIES

LOOKBOOK LIVE

In The Gospel According to André, a documentary directed by Kate Novack, we get a glimpse into the world of longtime Vogue editor André Leon Talley, a fashion icon famous for his quips and caftans. Following a panel with Austin’s style aficionados, this newly released film will be screened at the glam and perfectly appointed AFS Cinema. Treaty Oak Distilling and Playa Real Tequila will provide cocktails, and Rebecca Meeker of Lucky Lime will be whipping up bites. You won’t leave empty-handed, thanks to Milk + Honey, The Mrs and more!

Our final event, celebrating Austin’s best in fashion, has been reimagined as Lookbook Live. With Mattie’s as our backdrop, this evening —highlighting looks by Esby, Good Company, Olivia Shoppe, Neiman Marcus, Raven + Lily, and The Garden Room — will be a can’t-miss. Black Fret will be serving up live music, Haute House Lash & Beauty Bar will be on hand for all your lash needs, and Liza Beth Jewelry will be popping up with her singular designs. Treaty Oak Distilling and Playa Real Tequila will once again be serving cocktails with Richard’s Rainwater providing the hydration. Many thanks to Urban Betty for providing the night’s glam for our models. You won’t leave empty-handed, thanks to Milk + Honey, Kelly Wynne and more!

HOSTED BY KENDR A SCOTT THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 6-8 P.M. Tickets complimentary but sure to go fast… don’t forget to RSVP!

THE PERSHING SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 7-10 P.M. TICKETS $160

AFS CINEMA TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 6-9 P.M. TICKETS $25

MATTIE’S THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 6-9 P.M. TICKETS $55

P H OTO G R A P H B Y T I M OT H Y PA U L S M I T H

SPONSORS

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Slow Burn EASE INTO AUTUMN WITH BOLD COLORS AND STRIKING STYLES PHOTOGRAPHS BY Minta Maria Smail

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STYLING BY Sari Warenoff


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Previous Page: THEORY dress, $395, Theory (Domain NORTHSIDE). MARLA AARON necklace chain and lock, $578 and $840, Kick Pleat. CHLOÉ bag, $1490, ByGeorge. Opposite Page: GALLIANO VINTAGE dress, $2890, Big Bertha’s Paradise Vintage. RACHEL COMEY belt, $195, Kick Pleat. LUCCHESE boots (pictured on front cover), $749, Allens Boots. Left: TIBI dress, $895, Kick Pleat.

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Left: CO dress, $1395, ByGeorge. VINTAGE SQUASH BLOSSOM, $2500, Good Company. DUE EAST blanket, $125. tribeza.com

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CHRISTIAN WIJNANTS pants, $644, Kick Pleat. CHRISTIAN WIJNANTS sweater, $495, Kick Pleat. Scarf, stylist’s own. VADA JEWELRY VINTAGE necklace, $1650, ByGeorge. CHLOÉ booties, $880, Neiman Marcus.

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Left: KHAITE jacket, $392, ByGeorge. CLARK HELDMAN necklace, $985, Kick Pleat. Hair and Makeup: AVERY ALLEN. Model: RALIAT AKINLOLU (Kim Dawson Agency). Shot on location at MONARCH STABLES. Trick Roping Talent: WILL FITZPATRICK. Special thanks to Monarch Stables for their hospitality. To find out more please visit monarchstablesaustin.com

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DRIVERS OF

HANNAH MORROW PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAGNY PIASECKI BY

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IN COLLABORATION WITH LEXUS, WE HIGHLIGHT THE AUSTINITES DRIVING OUR CITY’S CONVERSATION ON IN COLLABORATION WE HIGHLIGHT THE STYLEWITH AND LEXUS, SUBSTANCE. AUSTINITES DRIVING OUR CITY’S CONVERSATION ABOUT STYLE AND What do you want toSUBSTANCE communicate through your style? That’s what we asked the eminent group who comprise this year’s Drivers of Style. They agreed: Style is an extension of the self. It’s a palette that can be learned or predisposed or completely made up along the way, and there’s no wrong way to arrive at it. The following folks boast not only a good nose for style, but appetites that have driven and continue to drive Austin forward with inclusive conversations and creative ventures. Here’s a taste of our city’s finest.

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Sheila Youngblood OWNER, RANCHO PILLOW

If you’ve ever ventured to Round Top, you may have followed a yellow-brick road to the otherworldly Rancho Pillow. The 20-acre compound, where guests can stay in casitas or luxe tents (including a teepee), is saturated in style, with each structure meticulously clobbered in color and eccentricities. It’s a place where anything goes and everything belongs, a ’60s Palm Springs estate meets a curandera’s modern homestead. To have visited Rancho is to know its owner and designer, the incandescent Sheila Youngblood. “It’s only an expression of my heart,” she says of her style. “No hidden messages.” Raised in Houston, Youngblood names her maternal grandmother, Nellie, as an early influence and cultivator of artistic expression, calling her “authentic to the bone” and a great lover of life. “She invited me into a deeper place creatively at a very young age, and that has never left me,” she says. It was Nellie who used to make many of Youngblood’s clothes, building a closet of culottes and jumpsuits. Simple silhouettes have abided her, as she most often pairs caftans with a miscellany of layers and bare feet. Most of Youngblood’s accessories are vintage or custom, and all have interesting backstories — black pearls from French

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Polynesia, shark teeth from Japan crocheted with deer skin, a bone bird carved from antlers by an artist in Oklahoma (she’s run over it twice, she says, and glued the wings back on). She’s partial to aesthetics of Latin America, praising native artisans and the spirit of homegrown creation as her own creative musings. “By wearing these special pieces they create or those inspired by them, I celebrate their history and passion, culture and courage, pride and beauty,” she says. “Latin American art adorns all my spaces, and my body — it warms my heart and bathes us all in color.” These inspirations are apparent at her central Austin home as well as at Rancho Pillow, where folk art adorns most walls and textiles veil the floor. When she purchased Rancho in 2006 after a visit to the nearby annual antiques fair, the then-only structure on the property was a restored 1896 farmhouse, now known as the Red House. She has since added several structures, including a residential recording studio and a performance space called Pozo Hondo in 2010. “But more than anything, it’s a place to just be. To be alone or with people you love. To celebrate, laugh, be inspired, heal, rest, and grow.”


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Moyo Oyelola ARTIST AND FREELANCE DESIGNER In 2016, artist Moyo Oyelola mentioned in an interview that he wanted to visit 30 countries by the age of 30. A brilliant photographer, Oyelola has documented his travels via Instagram (@moyo3k), with images traversing destinations from Marrakech to Namibia to L.A. With his 30th birthday looming, I was curious to see if he had met his ambitious goal. He laughed and shook his head. Not quite yet, he said, but you never know. “It could be the miracle at the end of the game,” says Oyelola. “In a way, it’s a little superficial, but it’s very intentional in the sense of — hey, get out there. There are places I really want to see and learn from so I can come back and bring it all here.” The first time Oyelola left a country, it was his home country of Nigeria. He was seven years old when his family’s name was drawn through the lottery system to receive a visa; they sold everything and ended up in Austin, where his uncle was living. Though he was able to get accustomed to Texas culture, the idea of home was nurtured as his passion for storytelling developed. “Regardless of whatever I do

today, that place [Nigeria] has been factored into who I am,” he says. “There are layers to me. There’s all kinds of parts and pieces to everyone’s story.” His pants, he says as pinches his well-tailored trousers made of African adire textile, are local to Abeokuta, where he was born. “Style has to be very unique and individualized, especially as opposed to fashion. I think great style fits the person, whether it’s a Japanese kimono or African attire. It fits them because they’re speaking their truth.” Ancestry, in historical and contemporary terms, is a theme that carries through Oyelola’s art. Though he works as a freelance creative on commercial projects, his personal art is often multidisciplinary, spanning from videography to 3-D constructions. But passion projects dot his horizon; he mentions, in particular, an upcoming one focusing on soccer as a unifying force in communities. “Spiritually, my thing going into this year is to strip it all down. I want to let my art evolve. And that’s true for style, too.”

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Abby and Scott Martin FOUNDER, THE LITTLE YOGA HOUSE AND DESIGNER, JOEL MOZERSKY DESIGN

To be comfortable — liberated from a tight waistband or a shoe with no give or an unbreathable button-up — is a high priority for Abby and Scott Martin. Both spend a fair amount of time in motion: Abby is the founder and co-owner of family yoga studio The Little Yoga House, and Scott is an avid climber (the two met at Austin Bouldering Project in 2016). It’s a quality that the couple, who wed in April, also carry into their style. “Abby has a great sense for making relatively comfortable things look chic,” says Scott. The musician, who delivers vocals and guitar for his band, Boyfrndz, jump-started his career in interior design after a chance meeting with Joel Mozersky. He’s now been with Mozersky’s firm for a little over a year. “I think my design style is a tad more adventurous,” he says. “I like a little more personality and risk in that world.” Abby, who, by the nature of instructing yoga, spends most days wrapped in a stretchy textile, says she tries to find ways to sneak a simple styling into her every day. “I put [style] into

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the design of the studios,” she says, in reference to Little Yoga House’s Anderson Lane location and its new preschool, set to open on Woodrow Avenue this fall. She co-designed both spaces with her business partner, An Dang, and dreams of starting her own line of children’s yoga apparel down the road. She says her personal style is set in neutrals, guided by comfort and versatility. “Being able to say, you know, I accept that is not my style, that doesn’t look good on my body,” she says. “I know what does look good. I can work with this.” Shortly after their wedding, held at Green Pastures, Abby and Scott moved into a home in Brentwood, which they’ve redesigned together. Style is in the seams for this couple, running through their careers and acting as a passion that stitches them together. And with Scott’s design career in bloom and Abby’s business under expansion, the two are getting anything but comfortable as they strive for success in Austin.


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Alexandra Valenti ARTIST AND PHOTOGRAPHER

In her rather cavernous East Austin studio, Alexandra Valenti looks particularly petite curled up on a sofa. Finally, she says, after many tiny box studios, she has room to breathe. “Now I’m able to make big shit, and it’s the most fun. Being able to put stuff on the floor and create on eight-foot canvases … I always wanted to make big pieces,” says Valenti, who stands on the lower end of five-foot-something, “but I never knew how I could physically do it.” In the two years since she moved into this studio, Valenti’s career as a photographer, artist, and art director has grown into new spaces. Last year, she became ByGeorge’s art director, leading the brand’s editorial efforts and photographing its portrait series. She’s taken on commercial projects from big names like Nordstrom and Volcom. She’s also achieved her first solo show, titled “Present Primitive,” at Austin’s Preacher Gallery. “I worked on it for eight months and made about 72 pieces, but we could only fit 59 in the gallery,” says Valenti, who also has 148

prints featured at the new Line hotel downtown. The show, fully comprised of her organic free-form paintings, nearly sold out within three hours. So, yes, Valenti is busy. Her daily uniform — men’s jeans tailored just right to her small frame paired with feminine, often vintage blouses — allows her to bop around studios with a camera or paintbrush in hand. “That balance between masculine and feminine — I like women who wear men’s clothing,” says Valenti, who also collects vintage Gucci loafers and wide-brim hats. “I think of women artists back in the ’50s and ’60s, like Joni Mitchell or Helen Frankenthaler. It’s comfort, it’s function.” That time period is the inspiration for a line of scarves she’s releasing this fall. Based on her paintings, the line will be made in Italy but designed entirely locally. “I had Preacher design all the packaging. It’s my take on a Balenciaga box,” says Valenti. “I’ve always wanted to do [a scarf line], because I wear them a lot and I love them as art pieces. Do it, but do it well. Do it right.”

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Greg Mathews CO-OWNER, HILLSIDE FARMACY

From where he sits, Texas native Greg Mathews is at least 150 miles from the coast and probably another 50 from anything that resembles a rideable wave. But when he arrives at SHDW Studios on a July morning, he looks as though he just rolled in from a morning surf session. This look will be authentic in a few days’ time, as he leaves the following day for the Maldives. “That’s all I can think about. My wife said that when I come back I need to have it out of my system,” he laughs. It’s with his wife, Australian expat Jade Place-Mathews, that he owns East Side favorite Hillside Farmacy on East 11th Street and El Diablo Taco Truck in Brooklyn. In 2008, the same year they opened the taco truck, the Mathews bought a home in Austin in hopes of opening a bar on the East Side with partner Mickie Spencer, owner of Eastside Showroom (now Ah Sing Den). The team was approached about the insides of Jones Drugstore in Elgin, which had remained untouched since the ’70s. “They had just shut the doors. All the cabinetry, merchandise, postcards from the ’50s and ’60s,

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newspapers from the ’70s. It was insane,” he says. When they entered conversations regarding the 11th Street property, then Gene’s Po-Boys, owner Yvette Turner informed the Mathews about the building’s history — her father, Doc Young, was the first African-American pharmacist in Austin and operated Hillside Drugstore for decades. With chef Sonya Coté on board, the venture changed from bar to restaurant, with a focus on locally sourced food. “It was very organic,” he says, no pun intended. “It all sort of showed itself to us.” This carefree attitude allows a gentle jest — please, he begs, don’t write that he really says surfer dude-isms — but being laid-back suits him, and our city, very well. He didn’t bring a change of clothes for this shoot; what you see is what you get. “When you’re younger, you’re more image-conscious, which is totally fine, but I never liked it,” he says. “I think doing what you believe in and whatever speaks to you will always be right. Own it. Keep your word. Have as much fun as you can. Do good stuff,” he says with a well-worn smile. “Oh, and be on time.”


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Kelly Krause CONFERENCE PROGRAMMING MANAGER, SXSW After following Kelly Krause on Instagram (@kelljokrause) for a long while, there was a split-second concern that I was about to walk into a “don’t meet your heroes” situation. Krause is a conference programming manager at SXSW (in layman’s terms, this is called a dream job), where she created the SXstyle track, which has welcomed the likes of designer Marc Jacobs, OG #Girlboss Sophia Amoruso, and model Karlie Kloss. In 2014, the same year that her style and tech track became official, Krause wrote a viral article called “How to Change Your Life” for CamilleStyles. com recounting her 135-pound weight loss journey and newfound commitment to physical and mental health. This past April, Lululemon surprised her with an ambassadorship after pitching “In the Practice of,” a bimonthly series she hosts with community leaders. Would she spill the proverbial beans and tell me how she does it all? “Pitch it. Ask for it. If it’s a no, try to negotiate something else. You’ll never get it until you ask for it,” she says warmly. “Once I hear someone’s passion about something, about why we should do something

or create change, it’s a no-brainer.” This is the beauty of Kelly Krause. She weaves her life with silk, threading her vulnerabilities to her strengths and entwining others to her own success. “I’m at my most confident when I’m wearing something that I love. I feel the best when I’m taking care of myself. It goes hand in hand,” says Krause, who likes cycling classes at RIDE and jogs around Lady Bird Lake. “Style for me is based on telling some kind of story, and I end up telling that story a little bit better when I’m taking care of myself — physically, mentally — in all aspects of life.” The definition of wellness is flexible (though not always related to a yoga practice), and Krause hopes her Lululemon series will reach an audience who keep it at the forefront in different ways. Flexible, too, is the definition of style, and it’s surely no synonym for one size or another. “We’re all in the practice of doing something, and in order to be good at what we do in business and be creative, we have to take care of ourselves. That’s the conversation I’m interested in having.”

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Matt Davis

FOUNDER, PLAYA REAL PREMIUM TEQUILA You will not catch Matt Davis slouching around Austin for a number of reasons. His resume includes work for online shopping site Gilt Groupe. He’s a regular at ByGeorge. Not to mention, his wife is Kendra Scott. In fewer words, style comes with the territory. “For her, it’s integrated into her everyday work. But, yes, I definitely can’t go out in a ratty T-shirt and flip-flops — not that there’s anything wrong with that,” laughs Matt Davis, founder of Playa Real Premium Tequila, which launched in January of last year. Much like Scott, who began her journey to becoming a jewelry mogul in her spare bedroom, Playa Real began as a passion project. While living in California, Davis and pals would take weekend trips to Mexico to enjoy the surf and smalltown tequila. “The locals would put the tequila in big glass vats and add whatever fruit they want, and just let it naturally infuse,” says Davis. “I told my friend, we have got to bottle this up.” A few years later, after Davis had met and married Scott in 2014, Playa Real emerged as a full-blown booze business. “I was ready for my next adventure. [Scott] said that there’s never a right time

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to launch a brand,” says Davis, who had previously worked for Heineken for ten years, “but there are right places and Austin is the right place.” Now on shelves is Playa Real’s triple-distilled Silver tequila, a 100 percent pure agave tour de force that’s also the base for the brand’s pineapple- and mandarin-infused varieties. “All the money goes into the liquid itself. It’s a simple bottle. People want to feel the value of what they’re getting.” The quality-over-quantity mindset is also evident in Davis’ closet, where craftsmanship and clean lines take precedence. “I’m a huge Brunello Cucinelli fan. Some of it is outrageously expensive and I can’t justify the cost, but I know the quality is so good that when you purchase it, you don’t have to purchase another of the same for years,” says Davis. “Style is a way to get through different aspects of my life and my psyche. You want to be put together and look nice — look like you have your books and your business in order — but there are also times you want to get a little adventurous. By putting my own stamp on it, I hope it brings that out.”


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Virginia Cumberbatch DIRECTOR, THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT CENTER

With more than a hundred people moving daily to Austin metro, natives can feel few and far between. But to have been raised here, leave with no intention of returning, and then pursue a career path of social justice that leads you back to your hometown, that’s the singular exceptionality of Virginia Cumberbatch. “To me, moving back felt like what was best,” says Cumberbatch, who graduated from the University of Texas’ LBJ School of Public Affairs with her master’s in 2016. Shortly after, she was offered her current role as director of UT’s Community Engagement Center under the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement. “I feel so blessed to be living here in this time period of Austin, which is growing like crazy and not just, like, the amount of people but the change — changes that are prosperous for some but marginalizing others. To be here and be in a certain position where I have resources at my disposal to address some of those inequalities is really special.” One of four children, Cumberbatch says her parents fostered creativity in style, empowering personal choices while incorporating more-nuanced

conversations about how their style may translate in a predominantly white city (for example, she says, natural hairstyles or dreadlocks for her brothers). “My style is part of my expression; my work is defined in some very heavy topics. So the way that I celebrate on a daily basis, when I have to have a conversation about how we’re marginalizing people of color, but then I get to wear this really bright-yellow jacket,” she says, smiling, “and it’s going to make me feel okay about having it.” Cumberbatch also advocates for equality off the clock in more ways than one. She patronizes shops locally owned by women of color, like Olive and Altatudes. She co-edited “As We Saw It: The Story of Integration at the University of Texas,” a collective recount from UT’s first black students, which was published at the beginning of this year. And this fall, Cumberbatch is collaborating with civil rights attorney Meagan Harding on a platform called Rosa Rebellion. Their first project is called “Rebel + Rest.” “We’re really excited to be developing a space to empower women of color committed to creative social justice.”

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Choosing Courage A NEW BOOK FROM NOONDAY COLLECTION’S JESSICA HONEGGER MAKES AN INSPIRING CASE FOR GOING SCARED BY

ANNE BRUNO PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATT CONANT

You might think the founder and CEO of a multimillion-dollar company who comes up with impromptu colloquialisms like “Champagne on fire!” to describe her own energy (live on Facebook, no less) is devoid of fear and self-doubt. Wrong. In her new book “Imperfect Courage: Live a Life of Purpose by Leaving Comfort and Going Scared,”Jessica Honegger tells the story of how the side hustle she came up with to finance the international adoption of her youngest child started at the counter of an Austin pawnshop and morphed into Noonday Collection, the world’s most successful fair-trade fashion brand. In a free-form conversation that touched on everything from poverty and genocide, to her change of heart about shopping, to the everyday life of a busy working mom, Honegger candidly shares what she learned by “going scared.”

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All of Noonday’s jewelry and accessories are crafted individually, by hand. JH: Well, I love stories. That comes from my dad, and I’ve always been a storyteller by nature. Within the first year of getting started, I knew that what I was witnessing had to be shared. I wanted to be a good steward for the stories of the women I was meeting, from our first partner, Jalia in Uganda, to everyone since. Their stories are so powerful, and I’m passionate about the idea that we’re all more alike than we are different, regardless of the specific circumstances of our lives. As Maya Angelou said, “I come as one, but I stand as 10,000.” So there are really that many names in invisible ink on the cover. AB: What’s it like to move between the worlds of raising a family and building a business in a prosperous city like Austin and working with people around the world, mostly single moms, who are struggling just to feed their kids? JH: That’s definitely another paradox, and it can be a challenge. I’ve been in the Gap shopping for back-to-school clothes when my phone’s rung with news that one of our artisan partners needs serious medical attention she can’t afford, or there’s political unrest in one of the communities we work in and decisions have to be made. That’s when you realize the contrasts and how fortunate we are.

I think everyone can relate to feeling overwhelmed by the idea of poverty or the reality of human trafficking, and honestly, it can feel paralyzing. But you can make a decision to act, to help in some way. There’s a positive role every one of us can play in these big issues, and some kind of action we can take. AB: Do people respond to engaging with such overwhelming issues via fashion?

ANNE BRUNO: Let’s start with the paradoxes. You describe yourself as someone who hated shopping your entire life. Yet here you are, eight years into running a fashion business that’s placed over $19 million in orders with 4,500 artisans in 14 countries. Noonday has now sold nearly 500,000 pieces of handmade jewelry and accessories online and at home trunk shows. How did that happen?

JH: Fashion’s so approachable. It’s like putting zucchini in your brownies — women are drawn to the stories behind everything we make, and we get to use that as a platform to talk about some of these difficult subjects. In the book, I talk about getting out of our own worlds and taking off the bubble wrap we typically live in. No one wants to think about things like genocide and sexual abuse in Rwanda, me included. It’s really hard. But the stories create a human connection and make it easier to go there.

JESSICA HONEGGER: That’s true about me hating shopping when I was younger! But what’s behind what we’re doing at Noonday goes way beyond shopping and is about opportunity, for those wanting dignified work and those wanting to use the power of their purse to fuel the change they want to see in the world.

AB: One of the stories you tell deals with more of an everyday issue that any woman can relate to and that’s the struggle with body image. You frame that in the context of the importance of sisterhood. Tell me about the connection between the two.

AB: When did you first contemplate writing a book about your experiences starting Noonday Collection?

JH: From the time I was little, I always compared myself to others, thinking about who’s fatter, who’s skinnier, better, worse, things like that. It’s so easy to

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Honneger and her team at Noonday Collection’s Austin headquarters.

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Women make up the majority of Noonday’s artisans in 14 countries across the globe.

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y E S T H E R H AV E N S

When one rises,we all rise together.


get caught up in a cycle of judgment and competition. You have to stop and ask, “Am I going to see her as a competitor and measure myself against her and find myself coming up short, or putting her down because I come up better? Or am I just going to see her as a sister and choose to believe in her way and what she has to give?” I think we’ve come so far, but in many spheres, especially business, there’s been limited leadership opportunities for women. So a sense of competition, like you have to elbow instead of reaching out a hand, still exists. That’s something I forget sometimes, because at Noonday, I’m surrounded by a sisterhood. It never takes away from your own success to ask someone else, “Hey, how I can help you?” People who do that are the kind of people I want to be around. AB: Does that concept of sisterhood reflect what you’ve observed in your partners in other countries? JH: Yes, and it’s really a cultural difference. America was built on the idea of individual success, but in other cultures, there’s more of a tribal mentality, where if one person succeeds, the whole tribe succeeds. When I lived in Guatemala and taught school, I remember that cheating was a foreign concept to the kids — they just wanted everyone to do well! I saw such a communal spirit there.

I tell a story in the book about a group we work with in Ethiopia where one of the moms passed away and the other women just told the child, “Well, you’ve got four aunties now, and we’ll all raise you together.” In the places where there’s a lot of abuse and a woman gets kicked out of her home, the way the women rally together and take care of one another is absolutely inspiring to me. In my own family, I grew up around lots of aunts, so that idea of collaboration and collectivity feels natural. AB: Noonday Collection, as a Certified B Corporation, is built around the no-

tion of using business for the greater good. In the book, you talk about entrepreneurship as a way to provide dignified and sustainable jobs for others. How does that work? JH: It’s all about linked prosperity among the stakeholders — the artisans, who create our handmade pieces; our ambassadors and hostesses, who sell the products through trunk shows; our customers, whose purchases fuel more opportunities for the artisans; and our employees here in Austin. When one rises, we all rise together.

When I was in college, my perception of business was very different than it is today. Then I heard speakers like the founders of Ben & Jerry’s as well as John

Mackey, who coined the term “conscious capitalism,” and it really opened my eyes to another way that brings empowerment to others. I attended a retreat once with the author Richard Foster, a Quaker theologian. He told me that his prayer for me was to never scorn the rich and never glorify the poor, but walk with both in peace and build a bridge between them. That bridge-building has turned out to be central to my entire life. AB: Lots of CEOs have written books about their experiences, but few are as much of a direct call to action as yours. Why this approach? JH: For one thing, as a maker, I’m biased toward action. And I’ve seen the opportunity we’ve all been given to create opportunity for others. The women and their families, these incredible communities of artisans all over the world — what I’ve witnessed changed me. Believe me, the fear and anxiety never go away for any of us, but that’s okay. By going scared and expanding my empathy to literally take in the whole world, I came to see what I was capable of doing and the impact I could make.

That’s what I want readers to know. My goal for the book is to lead people to action. It’s really an invitation to just go scared but keep going toward whatever it is that makes your heart beat a little faster. That’s how you’ll find a life of purpose. Don’t compare yourself and diminish what you have to bring. The world really does need every single one of us and our imperfect courage to shine a light into the darkness. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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Youth Culture HANNAH MORROW BY

PHOTOGRAPHS

ISAAC ANTHONY BY

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WITH BIG COLLABORATIONS AND BIGGER ASPIRATIONS, AUSTIN NATIVE NICHOLAS OSELLA IS AN ARTIST WITH A BRIGHT FUTURE

W

hen Vogue dropped its September issue last month, a noteworthy detail behind the Beyoncé cover was quick to surface: The photographer wasn’t Annie Leibovitz or Peter Lindbergh. It was 23-year-old Tyler Mitchell. In a creative landscape deemed traditional, the odds would not have been in Mitchell’s favor. There’s a hierarchy to climb, a network that often takes years to build. Only then, possibly decades into a career, do some creatives catch that kind of opportunity. But to overlook an artist due to age would be a mistake. The same holds true for Austin-born artist Nicholas Osella. At 23 years old, Osella already has high-profile collaborations in his portfolio. Curtis Kariuki, personal photographer to 20-year-old rapper Lil Yachty, found Osella via Twitter last year, and the two teamed up to chronicle Yachty’s first official tour, a project eventually titled “Lil Yachty Scrapbook.” Later in 2017, Osella was approached by A$AP Mob’s art collective, AWGE, to create art for their album “Too Cozy.” Osella’s piece by the same name was featured on A$AP Rocky’s Instagram, exposed to 6.6 million of Rocky’s followers. “My overall mission is leveling the playing field of music and art,” says Osella, who moved to New York City in June. “There was once a time they existed in harmony, primarily during the reign of Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring during the ’80s. I believe that to be in hiding, and it’s a goal of mine to help bring that back.”

ON HIS PROCESS: Osella uses broad paint strokes, typography, chain stitching, and found images to create his collages. “It’s a horrific display of creativity because of the way my brain works; it just makes sense to surround myself with what I’m doing,” says Osella. “Much of the collaging ends up on the floor. I like to find the images no one has ever seen, so it’s new for everyone. A new way to view the pictures, and a new subject matter. A$AP Rocky eating an apple. Or Andy Warhol eating a hamburger. That’s my kind of photo.”

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ON HIS HOMETOWN: “There is something so apparent and mystical about Austin. It’s where everything began for me, and I’m sure where everything will end,” says Osella, who grew up in the city and studied graphic design at UT. “When I left Austin to come to New York, I told myself that in order to completely appreciate that city as a home, I needed to leave and experience a different life. But I am so proud to be from Austin. And I feel bad for everyone who can’t say that.”

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ON HIS BUSINESS: “StudioWOS was made a long time ago, and since then, it has meant something different every time I try to put a label on it,” says Osella. “Right now, I’m involving myself with paints and collages, but next week it could be something completely different. My work lives in a constant narrative, like a story being told. New chapters, pages turning. Just as everyone, I have something to share with the world. I’ll leave what I am and what I do up for interpretation.”

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ON THE WEST CAMPUS COLLECTION: “The clothes were inspired 110 percent by my friends, family, and community of Austin. They’re my people, and an extension of me,” says Osella, who graduated from UT in 2017. “My sister, Sophie, always tells me about how clothes should start conversations, and that’s exactly what art should do. Cause some reaction and make someone think, ‘How did they make that?’”

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LEFT COLUMN: Osella remixes photos of A$AP Rocky and Frank Ocean, both shot by Kariuk. BELOW: Branding for clothing company CHNGE, for which Osella served as art director.

ON CARRYING THE TORCH OF HIS INSPIRATIONS: “Keith Haring and Andy Warhol will always be the people who taught my mind how to walk, who gave me my courage,” says Osella. “Keith Haring wrote in his journal the day Andy Warhol died that now that he was gone, no one would be there to take the torch and continue the work they were doing. At some point, someone will be there to pick up the pencil and continue drawing the line. I can only honor him in my own way. I think I’ve made good progress so far.”

I M AG E S CO U R T E S Y O F S T U D I O W O S

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F A PRODUCT OF MASTERY

INTRODUCING

THE ALL-NEW 2019 LEXUS ES ONE PARALLELED EXPERIENCE, TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS

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LEXUS OF AUSTIN 9910 Stonelake Blvd | Austin, TX 78759 512-343-3400 | LexusofAustin.com tribeza.com

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N A M I E N RCUS A M NEIMAN

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THEDEN R A G ROOM

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A I V I L O PPE O H S S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

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OLIVIA SHOPPE OLIVIA SHOPPE OL SH

FALL IN AUSTIN IS AN EXTENSION OF SUMMER. THANKFULLY, MANY CHILDREN’S CLOTHING BRANDS HAVE LIGHTER WEIGHT AND SHORT SLEEVE CLOTHING OPTIONS AS WE AWAIT COOLER WEATHER. THIS SEASON LOOK FOR FUN METALLICS, LOTS OF RUFFLES, AND PINK TO BE SOME OF THE HOTTEST TRENDS IN KIDS FASHION.


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A E LIVIA HOPPE

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STYLE PROFILE

Heirlooms for a Daughter REFLECTIONS ON A CONVERSATION WITH GWEN RILEY By Jess Archer Photographs by Holly Cowart

S

INCE STAG FIRST OPENED ITS DOORS ON SOUTH CONGRESS

Avenue in 2009, female shoppers, milling around the men’s goods, have been asking the same question: What about women’s clothes? And chances are, they’ve posed that question to the cool, casually hip Gwen Riley, director of buying and operations for Stag — and now the founder and owner of Daughters. Says Gwen, “For several years I worked the retail floor at Stag, and women would come up to me in the store and ask, ‘What brands are you wearing? Where are your jeans from?’ It was always in my mind to start a women’s clothing store. I just needed to learn from [Stag owners] Steve Shuck and Don Weir before I could take on that challenge.” And that’s exactly what Gwen did. She hustled to learn as much as possible about Stag’s business operations. Eventually Steve and Don made her an assistant buyer. She was a quick study and eager for more of a challenge. It became natural that she join the owners on their biannual purchasing trips to New York City and Las Vegas. “Plenty of the brands we carry at Stag have women’s lines, too, so often on our purchasing trips I would try them on,” Gwen says. “In my mind I was gathering information for the clothes I wanted to carry in a women’s store. Eventually, I felt ready to approach Don and Steve about starting a women’s line at Stag.” With all her accumulated knowledge and practical experience, Gwen could finally hone in on exactly what she wanted her women’s store to be. Daughters has now been in operation, both online and within 130 feet of the South Congress Stag store, since March 2018. For Gwen, the business of Daughters is driven by the analytical side of her personality, as well as a

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Gwen Riley pictured in the Daughters space, which is tucked within Stag’s South Congress location. When sourcing for Daughters she is drawn to pieces that both tell a story and have utility.


P R O D U C T I M AG E S CO U R T E S Y O F DA U G H T E R S

sentimental side, which very much embraces the values that were handed down to her as a daughter. Every inch of Daughters — from the brands the store carries to the layout and the online ethos — has been carefully curated by Gwen. She doesn’t leave much to chance and would prefer to analyze the data of what sells and why. “For both Stag and Daughters, I’m the how and why. I read the numbers and capitalize on our accomplishments.” When asked if Daughters will show up in the other four Stag locations around the country, Gwen isn’t promising anything. “Retail is really volatile. Our success with Daughters so far has been quite manageable. I’m steering the ship, and I don’t want to push too hard too soon.” But as analytical and diagnostic as she may be, Gwen is also quietly sentimental about the heart of the name she gave her store. Being a daughter is a role she very much embraces. Gwen’s the youngest of three, with an older brother and sister. She was born and raised in Brookline, MA by devoted parents who were married 47 years (her father passed away this past April). Her father, Peter, worked at Harvard University restoring antiquated buildings, and together her parents were antiques collectors. “I was bred with the mentality that old is better, that maintaining a beautiful antique is a good endeavor,” Gwen says. It’s not surprising then that as the buyer for Stag and Daughters, Gwen has an eye for vintage wares. “Growing up, Mom would always take us thrift shopping. It became our way of being in our own minds, instead of being driven by mall fads.” You’ll find lovely vintage clothes and jewelry at Daughters — carefully selected not by industry fashion trends but simply by what Gwen loves. Items like a 1960s handmade suede fringe jacket, or a flower

enamel vase pendant necklace. They’re heirloom pieces, the kind of thing you might pass down to, say, your daughter. In addition to a fondness for vintage, practicality and comfort rank high on Gwen’s criteria of what to wear. Again, it’s Gwen’s mother, Abbey Jane, who taught her that clothes should also have utility. “My mom was a nurse in the Navy during the Vietnam war,” Gwen says. “Her uniform was a skirt and jacket. But when she was stationed in the field, she got to wear fatigues. She loved the fatigues — said it was fantastic to wear something so comfortable and practical for her job. A tight-fitting skirt got in her way. She taught me that clothes should have a purpose beyond looking pretty.” To that end, Gwen is all about the comfort and utility of a great pair of jeans: “Everything for me starts with a good pair of jeans and great tank top.” Both of which Daughters carries in strong supply, stocking a variety of Levi’s fits, both new and vintage, as well as the Imogene + Willie brand. “If I can help a woman get into the dressing room with a great pair of jeans that fit well and feel reflective of her personality, I’m happy.” So far, the feedback on Daughters has been quite positive and reflects Gwen’s ultimate aim for the store, which pays homage to the values her parents instilled in her. “When women walk into Daughters, I want them to feel that the items we carry are both familiar and new, a sense of nostalgia meets a curiosity of finding something new — all available in one place.” This holiday season you can find a pop-up version of Daughters at the Stag Domain NORTHSIDE location. You might even see Gwen there, tending to the setup and the customers, absently touching the heirloom gold chain she always wears around her neck, a gift of devotion from her late father to her mother. tribeza.com

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T R AV E L P I C K

Pacific Northwest ONE FAMILY’S ROAD TRIP By Margaret Williams

T

HE SCHEMING, MY SCHEMING,

started around this time last year. Could I plan and pull off a two-week family road trip that would wind our troop of four through the Pacific Northwest — an area I had never actually been to but had a very clear picture of in my mind? I floated the idea to my husband, and I knew he was intrigued when I wasn’t met with the usual concerns that govern our daily lives. I wanted this trip to be something different. Real time away. Time away from how we normally live, time away from the heat, and, yes, time away from the tiny computers that have taken up almost permanent residence in our hands. I wanted to explore, camp, and celebrate a summer where our kids, still only a few years removed from the baby days, would find it all completely magical. Confession: I love trip planning. I would have been a great travel agent. Give me a few disparate coordinates and I am tickled to connect the detailed dots. Armed with friendly endorsements (I mean, what is the point of a dinner party if not to file away your tablemates’ recent trip) and travel stories from the Sunday paper, I relish plotting

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OPPOSITE PAGE: The author’s

trusty Polaroid camera was never far from her side as she and her family worked their way through the beaches, mountains and cities of the Pacific Northwest.

it all out in advance. The trick being, by the time said trip actually arrives, everyone involved, myself included, has the illusion of spontaneity. All of this — my Pacific Northwest wanderlust and travel agent dreams — came to an auspicious head one stormy weekend last fall. With all four of us trapped inside for a full 48 hours, movies were cued up, forts were built, and the planning began. But where to start? The home of a best childhood friend seemed perfect. We could arrive at this softest of landing pads, let the kids entertain one another, and catch up with old pals. The fact that this happy home also happened to be in the Bay Area, Alameda, to be exact, certainly didn’t hurt. We would get to explore San Francisco, all the while getting organized for the camping and traveling that lay ahead. After that initial f lurry of planning many months before and a more recent scramble to make sure our flight, packing and rental car basics were covered, arrive we did. By July 16, we had already spent two days riding ferries, eating every dumpling and Tartine morning bun we could get our hands on, and dashing through the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Once we had decided to kick things off in the Bay Area, I knew Redwood National and State Parks

After a few days spent camping in Redwood National Park, Portland’s Wald House, originally designed in the ‘70s by architect James G. Tropfenbaum was a welcome change.

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T R AV E L P I C K

would be our next, and really first, road trip stop. This is where we would revel in the majesty of those larger-than-you-can-ever-capture-in-aphotograph trees and try our hand at camping with children. Let me stop you here. Before having children, my husband, Matt, and I were occasional campers. Nothing crazy. Since having children, the idea had seemed laughable, but now, armed with REI’s finest air mattresses and an almost six- and four-year-old, we were ready to give it a shot. Because here is the thing about camping: The Type A advanced planners among us (me) get rewarded with the most-postcard-worthy spots. For us, to drive onto a coastal redwood forest dirt road, that meant that six months to the day earlier I had been reserving a coveted Gold Bluffs Beach camping spot. Oh man, was the online scrambling on that early January morning worth it. We pulled up in awe. The Pacific was to our front, foggy, tree-covered cliffs to our back, and we were nestled among the dunes somewhere in between.

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Now we just needed to set up our brand-new tent and act as if we knew what we were doing. Check. Matt wrestled with the poles and rainfly while I went beachcombing with the kids. An hour later we were triumphantly reunited, as the kids unloaded handfuls of rocks, shells, and crab limbs and Matt proudly fired up the Coleman stove. The following days more or less unfolded in the same comforting rhythm. Slow meals, beach walks, hikes to our campsite adjacent Fern Canyon, and round after round of Go Fish. All punctuated by nightly campfire s’mores and a foggy chill that was too good to be true. Miraculously our kids found the whole experience thrilling. Forty-eight hours later, properly in touch with nature and ready for a shower, we packed up, waved goodbye to our campsite neighbors, and continued our drive north. By now Oregon was in our sights, and we were heading for Portland. Yachats, a small beach community with a stunning coastline, turned out

to be the perfect go-between. Waves crashed, and turnoff after turnoff promised another tuckedaway beach path. We happily took a break from the drive, dusted up on our tide-pool-spotting skills, and were rewarded with sea lions, starfish, and some clean laundry. As we continued to Portland and said goodbye to the beach for a few days, we prepared ourselves to hop back into city life. After camping and being on the road, I couldn’t wait to check into our Portland digs — the urbane Wald House — and meet my sister, who was hooking up with us for the rest of the trip. After a flurry of unpacking and catching up, we settled in with a glass of wine on the porch of this high-design and forested HomeAway property. The kids tripped over each other to regale their Aunt Caroline with camping stories (“We ate a snack inside a tree!”), while Matt announced we were heading to Pok Pok NW for dinner. Thai for all! Our Thai dinner led into the following morning’s Blue Star Doughnuts and Chemex-pre-


I WANTED THIS TRIP TO BE SOMETHING DIFFERENT. REAL TIME AWAY.

Williams’ husband Matt, and her son Ford walking along Ruby Beach in Mt. Olympic National Park.


T R AV E L P I C K

pared coffee (I told you it was urbane), which bolstered us for what turned out to be a day filled with the Portland Japanese Garden, Powell’s Books, Ace Hotel photo booth shenanigans, and walks along the Willamette River. No, we didn’t make it to Tusk, and we couldn’t bear the long wait at Salt & Straw, but since we all completely fell in love with Portland it’s no doubt we’ll back to tackle the next round of must-dos. For this next leg we would head back to the sticks and reunite with my favorite type of people: national park people. And reunite we did. Before long we were setting up camp at Mount Rainier National Park’s Ohanapecosh Campground. This time we had traded sandy dunes and fern-covered walls for subalpine rapids and lush meadows, all pointing toward the massive Mount Rainier. As we consulted with our sock-footed and Birkenstock-wearing park ranger about the best hikes to tackle while in the park, I fell a little more in love with everything these protected lands represent: access to the wild, freedom from the mundane, and respect for the natural world. Ken Burns, are you out there? Hiking was mostly well-received by the younger set, but swimming in the campsite’s Ohanapecosh River was certainly the highlight for our kids. Between the hike, swim, endless rounds of Uno, and what had to be s’more number 50, we all tucked into our tents as the stars came out. The next morning my sister and I would trick my kids (fruit by the foot!) into one last hike as Matt packed up the car for our second-to-last stop: Olympic National Park. This time we would be sleeping within the confines of a cozy cabin at Kalaloch Lodge — or so we thought. Upon arrival, the thing that I had secretly feared since I first began planning all those months ago happened. The lodge’s manager, Joe, politely explained that our cabin had been given away just an hour earlier. This is the cabin I had booked first during that rainy weekend, had anchored the whole of the trip, and was the spot my husband was most excited about. Upon seeing my panic — we were more or less in the middle

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of nowhere on the Olympic Peninsula with two starving kids — he correctly guessed that we had gotten our dates mixed up. They thought we were 24 hours late and therefore a no-show while I assumed we were right on time. Matt found a cell phone signal and somehow managed to make me feel worse when he optimistically explained there were available rooms at a casino resort two hours away. This was not good news. Thankfully Joe had higher ambitions for our group of five. He cajoled an innkeeper in the nearest town, Forks, Washington (yes, that Forks), into breaking his no-children-on-the-topfloor policy. We basically yelled our credit card number over the phone, swore up and down our kids were quieter than others (sure), and raced over to hold the room we knew others would be all too happy to snatch up. In the midst of the chaos Joe had found us a cabin for the next two nights so our foggy, fern-filled, beachside Olympic dreams could be fulfilled. Bless him. All would be right. We would in fact still get to explore the Hoh Rainforest, picnic alongside grazing elk at the Hoh River (a blue I’ve never seen before), climb on the sea stacks at famed Ruby Beach, and once again search for starfish at low tide. As our dusty and overflowing SUV screeched to a halt in front of Seattle’s historic and elegantly updated Hotel Sorrento, I sheepishly explained we had been on the road for the past two weeks. Thankfully they welcomed our Chaco-wearing feet with open arms and even had cookies waiting in our room. The marble-clad and art-filled elegance rubbed off on us as we tried our best to spruce up for a walk around the city. The last two days were a happy blur — fish-related pranks at Pike Place Market, swimming in the sound at Golden Gardens Park, a proper brunch at Oddfellows Café + Bar, and a visit to the top of the Space Needle, which was built at a time of seemingly endless optimism. We closed out our days the good kind of exhausted and grateful for this time spent together as a family.


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K RA A RVE ENL' SP P T I CI C KK

Spezia was won over by El Chipirón’s inventive gin cocktails and reimagining of traditional Spanish flavors.

El Chipirón By Karen Spezia Photographs by Holly Cowart

I

’ VE NEVER BEEN A BIG FAN OF GIN AND TONICS. BUT I AM NOW.

El Chipirón made a believer out of me. This year-old Spanish tapas bar has transformed the humble cocktail into an art form. Served in enormous glass goblets, these otherworldly creations come in unexpected flavor combinations lavishly garnished with garlands of fresh herbs and spices — and sometimes even aromatic smoke. This ain’t your grandpa’s G&T. Who knew that gin and tonics were the national drink of Spain? Unbeknownst to me, they’ve begun outpacing sangria and rum and Coke (“ron cola”) as Spain’s favorite libation. Their resurgence started almost two decades ago and spread like wildfire throughout the country. Now El Chipirón is introducing this classic-cocktail reboot to Austin. As in Spain, El Chipirón uses the finest gin — like Hendrick’s, Genius, Alkkemist, and Dripping Springs — and high-quality tonic like Fever-Tree. We started with the Luna Llena, a refreshing mix of gin, tonic, assorted

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fresh citrus, and cardamom. Next came the confidently feminine La Tejana, with gin, elderflower tonic, cardamom, juniper, lemon, rosemary, and peppercorn, followed by its more macho partner, El Tejano, with gin, tonic, cinnamon, star anise, orange, rosemary, and peppercorn. Both were infused with smoke and arrived at the table trailing an aromatic plume. Emboldened by our previous drinks, we attempted La Peligrosa, a boldly spicy creation that included peppercorn, juniper, cilantro, lemon, cucumber, and a powerful punch of serrano pepper. Each drink was as intricate and gorgeous as the next — and just as tasty. El Chipirón runs a first-rate bar, and G&Ts aren’t the only standouts. The Spanish margarita was one of the best I’ve had in town. There’s also a nice selection of Spanish beers and wine, served in porrones. These winefilled vessels create a festive atmosphere, as each guest takes turns artfully pouring wine directly into his or her mouth from the spout. Of course, drinking goblets of gin and pitchers of wine requires food to


EL CHIPIRÓN 2717 SOUTH LAMAR BLVD (512) 518-3618 ELCHIPIRONAUSTIN.COM

soak up those delicious drinks. And El Chipirón’s got that covered as well. Chef and Spanish native Pablo Gomez who co-owns the restaurant with his wife, Diana, offers an extensive selection of tapas and pinchos, the traditional and ever-present Spanish snack, to graze on while sipping the exquisite cocktails. Gomez has replicated the legendary nightlife experience of his homeland, where carousing groups of friends share small bites and plates to accompany their “gin tonics,” as they’re called in Spain. Gomez strives to preserve traditional Spanish flavors while updating classic dishes with modern, creative twists. Clearly he’s having fun in the kitchen as he transforms modest nibbles into miniature works of art. The queso de cabra con nueces was almost too pretty to eat: discs of creamy goat cheese atop a homemade cracker and garnished with colorful translucent dots of beet gels and smoked veggies, seasoned pecans, honey, and salt. The quintessential Spanish tortilla omelet is almost unrecognizable. Typically served in a quiche-like slice, Gomez reimagines the dish as a parfait, with potatoes, onions, mushrooms, and ham stacked between layers of frothy egg foam in a tall cup. Although I enjoyed these whimsical re-creations, my favorite dishes were the more classically prepared. The delicious empanadillas start with flaky dough that is then stuffed with fillings like pulled pork, chorizo, peppers and mushrooms. Another favorite was the pan con tomate y jamón, toasted bread gilded with olive oil, garlic, crushed fresh tomato, and serrano ham. We devoured the gambas a la plancha con ajillo, Gulf shrimp seasoned with chile, garlic, and lime. And the divinely simple platter of hand-sliced jamón Ibérico melted in our mouths. But the real star at El Chipirón are the libations, meant to be enjoyed with friends and family over some tasty nibbles. Gin and tonics are having a moment, so don’t miss out. Like me, you might just find yourself surprised and delighted. tribeza.com

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24 DINER

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

THE BREWER’S TABLE

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

4715 E. 5 St. | (512) 520 8199

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious plates

3663 Bee Caves Rd. | (512) 306 1668

With an emphasis on quality and community, this

24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favorites. Order

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and

East Austin restaurant leaves a seat for everyone at the

up the classics, including roasted chicken, burgers, all-day

dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy hour to share

brewer’s table. Local ranchers and farmers source the

breakfast, and decadent milkshakes.

a bottle of your favorite wine and a charcuterie board.

ingredients, which are utilized in both the kitchen and the brewery to eliminate food waste. The seasonally

34TH STREET CAFE

changing menu is unique, but provides options for even

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400

the pickiest of eaters (ask for the kids menu).

This cozy neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up soups, salads, pizzas, and pastas — but don’t miss the

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

chicken piccata. The low-key setting makes it great for

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189

weeknight dinners and weekend indulgences.

13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000 Chef and Argentine native Reina Morris wraps the

ANNIE’S CAFÉ & BAR

f lavors of her culture into authentic and crispy

319 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 1884

empanadas. Don’t forget the chimichurri sauce!

Locally minded American offerings in a charming setting;

Follow up your meal with Argentina’s famous dessert,

perfect spot for a decadent downtown brunch.

alfajores — shortbread cookies filled with dulce de leche and rolled in coconut f lakes.

ASTI TRATTORIA 408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

BUFALINA & BUFALINA DUE

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dish-

1519 E. Cesar Chavez St., 6555 Burnet Rd. | (512) 215 8662

es along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off

These intimate restaurants serve up mouthwatering

your meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

pizzas, consistently baked with crispy edges and soft centers. The famous Neapolitan technique is executed

BAR CHI SUSHI 206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557 A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

by their Stefano Ferrara wood-burning ovens which run at more than 900 degrees. Lactose intolerants beware,

sushi and bar hot spot stays open until 2 a.m. on the week-

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 fondasanmiguel.com

ends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and

MIXIOTE! This succulent, seasoned lamb is prepared

CAFÉ JOSIE

a variety of sushi rolls under $10.

in a papillote (or wrapper), and slow-cooked until it’s

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

falling off of the bone. It arrives at your table steaming,

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience”

with an aroma that will turn heads along the way!

menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a

BARLEY SWINE 6555 Burnet Road, Suite 400 | (512) 394 8150

there is no shortage of cheese on this menu!

prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la

James Beard Award-nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourages

carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as

sharing with small plates made from locally sourced ingredi-

smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

ents, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

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V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

CAFÉ NO SÉ

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

GERALDINE’S

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

605 Davis St. | (512) 476 4755

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Viet-

Located inside Rainey Street’s Hotel Van Zandt,

décor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best place

namese eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mi,

Geraldine’s creates a unique, fun experience by combining

for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on the classic

and sweet treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor

creative cocktails, shareable plates, and scenic views of Lady

avocado toast is a must-try.

patio bring comfort and vibrancy to this South Austin

Bird Lake. Enjoy live bands every night of the week as you

neighborhood favorite. Don’t forget to end your meal

enjoy executive chef Stephen Bonin’s dishes and cocktails

with the housemade macarons.

from bar manager Caitlyn Jackson.

EPICERIE

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides

sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah

modern spins on American classics. Dig into a fried-mor-

CRU FOOD & WINE BAR

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in

tadella egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry-thyme

238 W. 2nd St. | (512)472 9463

here for a bite on Sundays.

cocktail.

CLARK’S OYSTER BAR 1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 297 2525 This neighborhood gem, coursey of McGuire Moorman Hospitality, has become a Clarksville favorite. Settle in for a selection of East and West Coast oysters paired with their signature Clark’s cioppino and craft martinis.

11410 Century Oaks | (512) 339 9463 CRU’s wildly popular ahi tartare is the perfect complement

THE FAREGROUND

to any of over 300 selections, 80 premium wines by the

111 Congress Ave.

glass, or 15 wine f lights. A state-of-the-art wine-preservation

GRIZZELDA’S 105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908

The Fareground has a little something for everyone

This charming East Austin spot lies somewhere between

— with six Austin food vendors and a central bar in

traditional Tex-Mex and regional Mexican recipes, each fused

this unique downtown food hall. You can enjoy meals

with a range of f lavors and styles. The attention to detail in

ranging from wild boar tacos at Dai Due Taqueria to

each dish shines, from dark mole served over chicken brined

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

made-to-order ramen at Ni-Komé. Remember to grab a

for 48 hours down to the tortillas made in-house daily.

Easy Tiger lures in both drink and food enthusiasts

monster cookie from Henbit on your way out to cap off

with a delicious bakeshop upstairs and a casual beer garden

your culinary experience!

system with temperature control ensures optimal taste and appreciation.

EASY TIGER

downstairs. Sip on some local brew and grab a hot, fresh

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

pretzel. Complete your snack with beer cheese and an array

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

This upscale-casual Italian spot in the heart of the

of dipping sauces.

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

Rosedale neighborhood serves fresh pastas, hand-tossed

Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

pizzas, and incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted

EL ALMA

serving unique dishes. Chefs-owners Sarah Heard and

caramel budino) alongside locally sourced and seasonally

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

Nathan Lemley serve thoughtful, locally sourced food with

inspired chalkboard specials. Gusto also offers a full

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with un-

an international twist at reasonable prices. Go early on

bar with craft cocktails, local beer on tap, and boutique

matched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Austin

Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

wines from around the world.

dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect for enjoying delicious specialized drinks outside for the everyday 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. happy hour!

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HILLSIDE FARMACY

JEFFREY’S

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the

America,” this historic Clarksville favorite

East Side. Oysters, cheese plates, and nightly dinner

has maintained the execution, top-notch service,

specials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that makes it an Austin staple.

HOME SLICE PIZZA 1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

Slice Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your

Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local,

post-bar-hopping convenience and stocked with

and organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s,

classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies

Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New

like the White Clam, topped with chopped clams and

Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and

Pecorino Romano.

indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

LA BARBECUE

HOPFIELDS 3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467 A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beautiful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine, and cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390 Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Irene’s presents simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies from pastry chef Mary Catherine Curren.

Executive chefs and co-owners Tatsu Aikawa and Takuya

joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer,

“Tako” Matsumoto have perfected the art of ramen, what

which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, serves up

they call “the soul food of Japan.” The restaurant serves

classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

savory broths with a variety of toppings and your choice of flavor, ranging from buttery to spicy. The authentic dish is

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778 A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired prix fixe meal. Almost every ingredient served at Lenoir comes locally sourced from Central Texas, making the unique, seasonal specialties even more enjoyable. Sit in the wine producing regions in the world.

3235 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 366 5808

MANUEL'S

East Austin to a rustic Southern home nestled in the

8557 Research Blvd. #126 1234 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 893 5561

JACOBY’S RESTAURANT & MERCANTILE

Jacoby’s Restaurant & Mercantile transports you from

RAMEN TATSU-YA

Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue

garden for happy hour and enjoy bottles from the top wine-

Rooted in a ranch-to-table dining experience,

THE PEACHED TORTILLA 5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439 This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with friendly staff, fun food, and a playful atmosphere. Affordably priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696

LENOIR

ITALIC

OLAMAIE 1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796 Food+Wine magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy goat cheese-caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits.

310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555 10201 Jollyville Road | (512) 345 1042

vastly different from your college ramen.

RED ASH ITALIA 303 Colorado St. | (512) 379 2906 Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between high-quality food and enticing ambiance. Located in downtown’s sleek Colorado Tower, this Italian steakhouse is led by an all-star team, including executive chef John Carver. Sit back, relax, and enjoy an exceptional evening.

TINY BOXWOOD’S 1503 W 35 St. (512) 220 0698

A local Austin favorite with a reputation for high-quality

countryside. The menu features the best dishes Southern

This Houston-based brand now serves it’s simple and deli-

regional Mexican food, fresh-pressed cocktails, margaritas,

cooking has to offer, including beef from Adam

cious food in Austin’s Bryker Woods neighborhood. Favor-

and tequilas. Try the Chile Relleno del Mar with Texas Gulf

Jacoby’s own family brand based in Melvin.

ites include house-ground burgers and salmon provencal

shrimp, day boat scallops, and jumbo lump blue crab,

salad. Stop by for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, but don’t

or Manuel’s famous mole. Located downtown at the corner

leave without one of their signature chocolate chip cookies!

of 3rd and Congress Avenue and in the Arboretum on

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Jollyville Road. One of the best happy hour deals in town.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN 222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430 Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-conscious eating, striking the perfect balance. The restaurant, located in downtown’s chicest new entertainment district, offers a full range of vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options.

VINAIGRETTE

WINEBELLY

2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791

519 W. Oltorf S. | (512) 487 1569

This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has one of the

Named one of the top-20 wine bars in America by Wine

prettiest patios in town. Along with an inviting ambiance, the

Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an international wine list and

salads are fresh, creative, bold, and most importantly deli-

Spanish-Mediterranean small plates.The bistro maintains a

cious, with nearly two dozen options to choose from.

local feel with its comfortable, laid-back interiors.

UCHIKO

WALTON’S FANCY AND STAPLE

WU CHOW 500 W. 5th St., #168 | (512) 476 2469 From the curators of Swift’s Attic, Wu Chow is expanding Austin’s cuisine offerings with traditional Chinese dishes sourced from local purveyors and farmers. Don’t miss the weekend dim sum menu.

4200 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808 The sensational sister creation of Uchi and former home of Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley and Nicholas Yanes, Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki.

609 W. 6 St. (512) 542 3380 Owned by actress and Austin resident Sandra Bullock, Walton’s is a dreamy brick-walled bakery, deli, and floral shop. Take some pastries home after indulging in gourmet sandwiches and fresh salads for lunch, or stay for the rotating dinner menu. Most importantly, make it before 2 p.m. to order the legendary biscuit sandwich served only during breakfast!


A LOOK BEHIND

TRICKS OF THE TRADE By Avery Tanner Photographs by Minta Maria Smail

F

OR THE FITZPATRICKS, TRICK ROPING IS THE FAMILY BUSINESSS.

Kevin Fitzpatrick (not pictured) has been performing around the country for years, with son Will (pictured above) now cementing his spot as a well-renowned trick roper himself. The competitive art, which involves spinning a lasso, or lariat, is quite a sight to behold and one we were lucky enough to witness firsthand at our Fall Style photo shoot. We asked the duo from Bandera to share the history of their unique family trade. It all started with Kevin’s father, Bud Fitzpatrick, who once rode a bull into Madison Square Garden for the National Finals Rodeo. “My grandfather was quite a cowboy who lived to be 99 years old. That’s where our cowboy legacy began,” Will says. A friend of Kevin’s father taught Kevin how to trick rope, and eventually, Kevin taught Will. At just 20 years old, Will has now been roping for 16 years, a skill he says sets him apart: “I like that I can do it and not a lot of people can.”

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Earlier this year, Kevin needed shoulder surgery, which required three months’ rest, but he had already booked a number of upcoming jobs. Enter Will. After finishing his school year at Texas State University, Will came home to take over the gigs for the summer. The father-son duo has a natural chemistry. “It’s really comfortable working with my dad. We’ve always done it together, so we know exactly what the other is thinking during our shows,” says Will. Some of their most notable jobs include the Los Angeles County Fair, tailgates at Super Bowls, and plenty of rodeos. As for Will’s favorite client, that distinction belongs to Morgan Freeman. On the day of his high school graduation, Will flew to Mississippi to perform at Freeman’s birthday party. The Fitzpatricks both have talent and charm to spare and can share in their love for this unique career. As for the future, Will hopes to give life to the “dying art” that is trick roping, something he will surely do with style.


Profile for TRIBEZA Austin Curated

TRIBEZA September 2018  

The Style Issue No. 205

TRIBEZA September 2018  

The Style Issue No. 205

Profile for tribeza

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