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DECEMBER 2015 AUG UST 2015

THE

People I S S U E


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AUS T I N

Gifts for Your Guy 1.

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OWNE R L ARRY MCG UIRE SHARES HIS FAVORITE GIFTS FROM THE MENS S HOP

LAMAR

SOUTH CONGRESS

THE MENS SHOP

BYGEORGEAUSTIN.COM

1. Filson Briefcase 2. Kapital Wool Scarf 3. Ben Medansky Pipe 4. 1979 Gold & Onyx Rolex Presidential 5. Levi’s LVC Shearling Denim Jacket 6. World of Speed by Johannes Huwe 7. Common Projects Achilles Mid 8. Marvis Licorice Toothpaste 9. D.S. & Durga Coriander Fragrance 10. Dries Van Noten Pajamas 11. Bang & Olufsen Beolit Speaker 12. Inis Meián Sweater 13. John Lobb Suede Loafer 14. Anderson’s Woven Belts 15. A.P.C. Quilted Vest


LEONARD SEATING SYSTEM RODOLFO DORDONI DESIGN

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2803 Wooldridge

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2522 Pearce

4317 Dunning


DECEMBER

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T R IBE Z A

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O N T H E C OV E R : C A S E Y C H A P M A N R O S S ; P H O T O B Y B I L L S A L L A N S ; S T Y L I N G B Y A S H L E Y H O R S L E Y; H A I R B Y G A B R I E L L E VA N D E R M E E R ; M A K E U P B Y B E T H A N Y R E N F R O O F L I P S E R V I C E .

features

D E PA RTM E NT S

City on the Rise 46

COMMUNIT Y

10 to Watch 52 People of the Year 70 Co-Working 9 to 5 88

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DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

STYLE

Social Hour

20

Column: Kristin Armstrong

Style Pick

28

Exposed

Street Style

32

TRIBEZA Talk

42

ARTS

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

36

Music Pick

37

Event Pick

38

Art Pick

40

98 112

DINING

Dining Pick

100

Dining Guide

104

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ILLUSTRATION BY JOY GALLAGHER; MEREDITH WALKER PHOTO BY CHAD WADSWORTH; WALKER LUKENS PHOTO BY BILL SALLANS; ST. ELMO MARKET PHOTO BY KENNY BRAUN; WEWORK PHOTO BY ANDREW CHAN; ARTWORK BY KEVIN GREENBLAT.

Contents


Editor's Letter

W

hen offered the job as editor of TRIBEZA, the first thing I did was splurge on a very expensive meal at Perla’s complete with multiple bottles of rosé and a “Perla’s Grande Platter.” The second thing I did was create a list in my phone called “People of the Year.”

For months, I filled that list with the names of people doing compelling work across the cultural spectrum. If someone told an interesting anecdote in a meeting, I wrote it on the list. Met someone at a party? Name went on the list. If TRIBEZA publisher George Elliman left an Michael Fojtasek and Austin American-Statesman article about a new local business on my Grae Nonas rocking their desk (which usually includes his notes in the margin), I wrote it on the shades poolside at the list. I turned to the TRIBEZA editorial team, friends, artists, industry South Congress Hotel. insiders, sources, reporters and musicians for their suggestions on who they think is shaping Austin arts and culture. Editing the list proved an incredibly daunting task. After all, to tell the story of Austin is to tell the story of her people, and it is a job we take very seriously — and what makes this issue so very special. The first names I wrote down were chefs Grae Nonas and Michael Fojtasek of Olamaie. Over the past year, I have taken friends, family and out-of-towners to dine in the sweet little house on San Antonio Street. In my opinion, what Nonas and Fojtasek are doing in their kitchen is the perfect microcosm for where Austin’s culinary culture is heading. For this shoot, we took them out of the kitchen and to the swanky South Congress Hotel to be photographed by the talented Chad Wadsworth. To read the full story, head to page 70. In addition to Nonas and Fojtasek, you will find dozens of Austin’s most compelling figures including our cover star, Casey Chapman Ross. An up and coming photographer, this image of Chapman Ross captured so perfectly the important moment we are having as a city. The eyes of the world are very much upon Austin, and photographer Bill Sallans captured that sentiment beautifully.

What an honor it is to share their work with you.

K AT I E F R I E L @katiefriel

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DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

PHOTOG R A PH BY CH A D WA DS WORTH

Learning about these people, hearing their stories, reading their words, and sitting with them during portrait sessions, I have fallen a little bit in love with each of our People of the Year — and I know our readers will, too.


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A U S T I N A R T S + C U LT U R E

EDITOR

Katie Friel

ART DIRECTOR

Ashley Horsley

PUBLISHER

George Elliman DIRECTOR OF SALES

Ashley Beall

ASSISTANT EDITOR

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

COLUMNIST

SALES & OPERATIONS MANAGER

Sofia Sokolove

Kristin Armstrong

WRITERS

Nicole Beckley Sallie Lewis Audrey McGlinchy James Ruiz Karen Spezia Sam Sumpter PHOTOGRAPHERS

Chad Adams Miguel Angel Kenny Braun Daniel Cavazos Andrew Chan Chelsea Laine Francis John Pesina Matt Rainwaters Bill Sallans The Voorhes Chad Wadsworth ILLUSTRATOR

Joy Gallagher

Lexi Ross

Derek Van Wagner INTERNS

James Ruiz Tiffani Linh Le PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres MAILING ADDRESS 706a west 34th street austin, texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 www.tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2015 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited.

Subscribe to TRIBEZA!

VISIT TRIBEZA .COM FOR DETAIL S


Come Visit Us. Shop our showroom tucked away just one mile east of South Congress at 2090 Woodward Street. Or visit us online to see what’s new, find inspiration and browse our digital catalog. Exclusively in Austin. FOURHANDSHOME.COM


AUS T I N

’Tis the Season 3.

2. 4.

1

1. Chloé Faye Bag 2. Elder Statesman Cashmere Blanket 3. Mykita Sunglasses 4. Illesteva Sunglasses 5. Compartes Chocolates 6. Vacation Days Artwork 7. Wildsam Field Guides 8. Comme Des Garçons Leather Pouch 9. Marfa Journal 10. Golden Goose Sneakers 11. Adam Silverman Vase 12. Erin Considine Choker 13. Kenzo Colorblock Sweater 14. Skultuna Brass Dinner Bells 15. Susanne Kaufmann Beauty

5. 11.

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CRE AT I V E D I R ECTOR K R I ST E N CO L E S H A R ES H ER TO P G IF TS FO R T H E L A DY O N YO U R L IST LAMAR

SOUTH CONGRESS

THE MENS SHOP

BYGEORGEAUSTIN.COM


social hour

AUSTIN

Social Hour

2

1

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ARTBASH

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Art Alliance Austin hosted their inaugural fall fundraiser, ARTBASH, at The Belmont with an art exhibition featuring an eclectic mix of local and nationally recognized artists as well as installations from KERTA. SXSW DJs kept the music playing while Tito’s Handmade Vodka kept the drinks coming.

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The Bevel House Cocktail Party

Scott + Cooner, Dick Clark + Associates and builder John Luce hosted a cocktail party to mark the completion of their latest residential project, The Bevel House — a lavish home nestled in West Lake Hills.

ARTBASH: 1. Christy Bieker & Clare Simonas 2. Renee Amos & Lisa Miller 3. Heather Wagner Reed, Al Beavers & Steve Maddox 4. Zach Tavel, Jade Martines & Daniel Seong 5. Lauren Brown & Valerie Cason The Bevel House: 6. Carol Rylander & Tom Bentley 7. Natalie Bardagjy & Paul Bardagjy 8. Michael Linehan & Catherine Linehan 9. Kristopher White & Johanna Reed 10. Dick Clark & Kumara Wilcoxon

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DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY J EN N Y S AT H N G A M & M I G U EL A N G EL (U LOV EI)


Nestled in the Texas Hill Country just 20 minutes outside of Austin is the Deep Eddy Vodka Tasting Room. Open to the public Friday and Saturday from 11am - 5pm and Sunday from 12pm - 5pm, the space is also available for private parties 7 days a week. With a covered patio and gorgeous interior, the Tasting Room is the perfect venue for events, birthday parties and weddings!

DE E P E DDY VODK A DISTI L L E RY 2250 E HWY 290, DRIPPING SPRINGS, TX 78620

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social hour

AUSTIN

1

3

2

6

5

Ladies and Gentlemen…The Beatles! Costume Contest

The LBJ Presidential Library celebrated their current exhibit, Ladies and Gentlemen…The Beatles!, with a Halloween costume contest judged by TRIBEZA editor Katie Friel, KGSR’s Andy Langer and Austin Way editor Kathy Blackwell. Guests arrived in creative get-ups, snapped photos in an Abbey Road photo booth by Annie Ray, and danced to tunes from Deejay Honeycomb.

4

7

Michael Hsu Anniversary Party

The Michael Hsu Office of Architecture celebrated 10 years of designing innovative and award-winning homes, offices and businesses in Austin. Some of the firm’s newly-opened projects include the South Congress Hotel and Shawn Cirkiel’s Bullfight.

Costume Contest: 1. Cheryl & Mike Dillon 2. Candice Hessel, Brian Motas & Catherine Kuchar 3. Todd Wiseman & Carsi Mitzner 4. Jennifer Eshelman, Christie & Steve Lewis Michael Hsu: 5. Shannon Mouser, Laurie Aroch & Maya Aroch 6. Beau Frail, Kelsie Bridges & Wes Haynie 7. Mark Busboom, Shaunn Fox & Justin Farmer

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DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY C H A D A DA M S


social hour

AUSTIN

1

3

2

6 B Scene: Bossa Nova

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4

8

The Blanton celebrated the opening of their newest exhibition, Moderno: Design for Living in Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela, 1940-1978, with Latin jazz music from DJ Michael Crockett and Paula Maya, dance lessons from Go Dance and a performance by Austin Samba School. Guests nibbled on Latin American street food from Boteco and mmmpanadas while sipping on festive caipirinhas.

9

5

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Abbey Rose Opening Party

Sisters Ali and Matti Bills, along with their mother Becky Bills, celebrated the grand opening of Abbey Rose, a new women’s apparel and accessory boutique now open in Westlake. Desserts and hors d'oeuvres were provided by Mum Foods.

B Scene: 1. Edna Black & Vicky Mescher 2. Sai Kondrakunta, Heidi Shay & Sanjana Reddy 3. Ryan Smith & Jay Johnson 4. Jason & Michelle Rexilius 5. Marry Melecki & Nelia Robbi Abbey Rose: 6. Kim Collins & Madison Collins 7. Ali Bills, Becky Bills & Matti Bills 8. Grace Russell & Kat Russell 9. Amanda Roberson & Benjamin Pollock 10. Sofia Torres & Jamie Poe

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DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY J O H N P E S I N A & M I G U EL A N G EL (U LOV EI)


6 J A N U A RY

23, 2016

PRE SE N TI N G SP ON SOR

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V I S I T T R I B E Z A E V E N T S . C O M / I N T E R I O R S -T O U R F O R T I C K E T S A N D M O R E I N F O R M A T I O N


community

COLUMN

Mirror Image BY K R I S TI N A R M S TRO NG I LLU S TR ATIO N BY JOY G A LL AG H ER

I CAN ADMIT IT. I now desperately need my glasses. This was cemented by the moment

at ACL Music Festival this year in which I realized: I cannot read the schedule. If you need to whip out your reading glasses to see the band lineup, there is a serious chance you are too old for ACL. Luckily, I was way cooler than that. I took a quick pic of it with my phone and did the “pinchy finger old lady zoom.” It’s not only words I see better with glasses. It’s people, too. I recently unearthed a buried memory of being at a restaurant in Monaco when our son, Luke, was a toddler. It was a Texas-themed restaurant called Stars and Bars, and I hope it’s still open because I had some serious fun there back in the day. Anyway, we were there because it had something extremely rare in Europe: a staffed kids’ playroom. We could have cocktails in peace while Luke was well supervised, getting his face painted and playing games. Parent heaven. Feeling a bit nervous, we excused ourselves midway through dinner and went to take a quick peek through a window into the playroom. Something surreal happened as we watched our son through the looking glass. We stood and viewed him like a silent movie. He was oblivious to our observing him, having fun, not looking or pining for us at all. Perhaps it was the first time I experienced him awake and unaware of me as I watched him. The realization hit me square in the stomach that one day my little baby was going to have a life beyond me and without me. It sounds silly to describe this to you now; I almost backspaced over that sentence for the sheer vulnerability of it. But in that moment even my rather unsentimental husband had eyes full of tears. Fast-forward 15 years later to Luke’s 16th birthday this past October. I dropped a very important ball by missing the mommy memo explaining that you have to sign up for driving tests online at least two weeks in advance. I felt so bad for him that I woke up early on his birthday and drove around to various TxDMV offices to beg for redemption. I got turned away everywhere, scoffed at and dismissed for my maternal oversight. One nice lady took pity on me and referred us to the Pflugerville location. I woke up my birthday boy and we headed north. At least I had all the required paperwork. Luke did his eye exam, finger-

printing and smiled for his photo against the blue background. Then the man behind the desk asked what time our driving test appointment was. I had to come clean, “Not until the end of the month. I totally blew it. Can you please help?” I swallowed hard, sweating, squeezing my crossed fingers so tightly that my knuckles hurt. He typed silently on his computer for endless moments. “Can you come back at 4 pm today? We had a cancellation.” “Hot damn! I mean yes, sir. Thank you, sir.” I wanted to hug him. We were back in Pflugerville well before “pfour” and ready to go. We got in line again and they instructed Luke to drive around back and find lane one and wait for his turn. Wait, he drives around the back alone? God, I was not ready for this. I handed him my car keys and he walked away, through the glass door into the parking lot, leaving his mother and his childhood behind. I sat on a hard plastic chair and waited, heart racing, mindlessly fiddling with my phone and checking the time that would not pass. Finally a text message buzzed: I passed. I watched those glass doors, a ridiculous grin plastered to my face. A man, dressed like my son, walked back in and straight into my arms. I was not sure how 7 lbs., 9 oz. could suddenly turn into 6’2” and 235 lbs. with a driver’s license, but it had happened. We drove straight to his dad’s house to pick up his car (a used Chevy pickup truck for our Texas kid). I waited outside the driveway for Luke to pull out behind me. I knew he knew the way home, but I wanted to make a procession out of his inaugural drive. I wanted to watch this. I was fine until the stoplight at West Lynn. No, his car didn’t hit me – but everything else did. All of it. All at once. I looked in my rearview mirror and saw my baby boy, now a beautiful grown man, driving a truck. I could not breathe, suffocated by 16 years of love crammed into one moment. I saw him again through the looking glass, just like I had in Monaco so many years before. He was looking down, messing with the air or the radio, and when he looked up he caught my eye and smiled at me – a smile of relief, love, gratitude and sweet freedom. It was my undoing, though I waited until late at night to have my cry. Sometimes the proper lens offers us the perspective to really see our lives, and the beloved people in it.

I L LU S T R AT I O N BY J OY G A L L AG H ER For a limite d- e dit i on p r int , c onta c t jo ygall agh e r@g m ail .c om .

tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

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EXPOSED

The Voorhes Inside their South Austin studio, the former home of a gospel church, there’s a good chance you might catch husband-and-wifeteam Adam Voorhes and Robin Finlay experimenting with camping matches in order to make a fireball or simulating a wrecking ball crashing through a wall. The pair is the creative force — he the photographer, she the prop designer — behind the highly compelling graphic images appearing in Wired, Variety, Details and O magazines (and this month, TRIBEZA), among others. After meeting eight years ago at a magazine, the duo recognized there was more to their relationship than just the work. Here they share with TRIBEZA what type of projects excite them, how they progressed from being just co-workers, and what they do to relax. N. BECKLEY

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DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


community ON FINDING THE PERFECT SPACE Robin Finlay: It was a full-on church when we came to look at it. It had pews and royal blue carpet everywhere and gold angel statues and a walk-in baptismal. Adam Voorhes: Just think about photo studios in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Portland — they’re all in old buildings that were warehouses. I don’t think there’s one left in Austin. [A building with] 6,000 square feet and a 20-foot ceiling? Church. ON WORK THAT EXCITES THEM AV: If you think it can’t actually be done, and nobody else will do it, that’s the stuff we want to do. It’s difficult, we have to figure out a way to pull it off and make it safe enough to execute. I like that the most. RF: If you want to do something that's slightly illegal or crazy or could break your equipment, call us.

THE HIGHLIGHTS OF 2015 RF: We’ve had more national covers this year than we’ve ever had. We had three Atlantic covers, and two Fortune covers, two for Money magazine, and every time it happens it just seems surreal. Afar, the travel magazine, there’s an art director there who saw our stuff and approached us and said "I really love what you do, but I want you to do it in white," which took out the element of color that we were relying on. It was really conceptual and they really pushed us.

Umi Sushi is the couple’s go-to delivery option for a night in with their dogs, Lefty and Lucy.

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY M AT T R A I N WAT ER S

PROFILE

CURRENT SOURCES OF INSPIRATION

AV: For me, Instagram is huge because there are people I’ve been inspired by since I was in school whose work I can see. [They’re posting] stuff that they’re doing for clients, but also personal things — a little slice of life — and that’s really fun. ON DEEPENING THEIR RELATIONSHIP AV: It started as a professional relationship then it became a friendship. Robin would go out of her way to make projects for the magazine that I would be interested in and then we would collaborate. One day, it was the weirdest thing, it was actually like a switch flipped in my brain and all of a sudden my brain was like, “You are really into this girl.” RF: I remember the phone call. I was driving on Ben White, and my mom was in the car. It’s Adam, and I’m like, “Oh, he wants to talk about work,” and I pick up the phone and he’s like, “I think we should have drinks and I think I like you,” and I’m like, “Mom, I think I have a problem.” I didn’t want to lose my best still-life photographer.

HOW THEY UNWIND RF: Our biggest relaxation — we order delivery sushi and we sit in bed with our bulldogs and watch sci-fi. AV: Our home is kind of our sanctuary.

Instagram and artists like Charles Masters serve as sources of inspiration.

Finlay says it took “three different fails” to create a large, realistic-looking wrecking ball for the Atlantic cover.

tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

33


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DECEMBER CALENDARS arts & entertainment

Entertainment Calendar Music A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS December 5, showtimes vary Stateside at the Paramount SCOTT BRADLEE’S POSTMODERN JUKEBOX December 5, 6:30pm ACL Live at Moody Theater OF MONSTERS AND MEN December 8, 8pm ACL Live at the Moody Theater TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA December 9, 7pm Frank Erwin Center

TOADIES December 26, 8pm Emo’s WILLIE NELSON & FAMILY NEW YEAR December 29, 6pm ACL Live at Moody Theater

Film THE POLAR EXPRESS December 2, 7pm Paramount Theatre

BLUE WATER HIGHWAY December 10, 8pm Stubb’s Inside

WARREN MILLER’S CHASING SHADOWS December 3, 8pm Paramount Theatre

JESSE MARCHANT December 12, 9pm The Mohawk

TOM AT THE FARM December 4, 8pm Marchesa Hall & Theatre

STEVE LIPPIA’S CENTENNIAL SINATRA December 12, 8pm Paramount Theatre

MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS December 8, 7pm Paramount Theatre

THE WIND + THE WAVE December 12, 9pm Stubb’s Inside MILK CARTON KIDS December 13, 8pm The Paramount Theatre LOVE. AT THE STATESIDE. December 18, 8pm Stateside at the Paramount

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JOSH GROBAN December 19, 8pm Bass Concert Hall

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

NEW YORK, NEW YORK December 10, 7:30pm Marchesa Hall & Theatre HOME ALONE December 14, 7pm Paramount Theatre DIE HARD December 15, 7pm Paramount Theatre

STAR WARS MARATHON December 17-January 1, hours vary Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET December 17, 7pm Paramount Theatre

Theatre THE WILD PARTY November 20-December 5 Oscar G. Brockett Theatre THE SANTALAND DIARIES November 25-December 27, hours vary ZACH Theatre NOW NOW OH NOW December 3-19, hours vary The Off Center THE BOOK OF MORMON December 8-13, showtimes vary Bass Concert Hall THE MOTH December 9, 8pm The Paramount Theatre A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE November 18-December 6, showtimes vary The Long Center BLUE MAN GROUP December 26-27, showtimes vary The Long Center

Comedy RYAN STOUT December 4-5 The Velveeta Room TRUTH, LIES, AND FANTASY December 9, 7-9pm Spider House Cafe & Ballroom BRUCE BRUCE December 10-12 Cap City Comedy Club CHRIS CUBAS December 11-12, hours vary The Velveeta Room THE KNOWN WIZARDS December 13, 5:30-9pm ZACH Theatre ERIN FOLEY W/ DUNCAN CARSON December 16-20, 12 am Cap City Comedy Club

Children NUTCRACKER December 5-23, showtimes vary The Long Center for the Performing Arts GIRLSTART DESTEMBER FEST December 6, 12-3pm Bob Bullock Museum GINGERBREAD HOUSE WORKSHOP December 6-24, hours vary The Thinkery

PETER AND THE WOLF December 11-13, showtimes vary Stateside at the Paramount DISNEY LIVE! THREE CLASSIC FAIRY TALES December 19, 1pm Frank Erwin Center

Other BLUE GENIE ART BAZAAR November 27-December 24 Marchesa Hall & Theatre THE SECOND ANNUAL BLACK BALL GALA December 4, 6pm Paramount Theatre WILD IDEAS SHOPPING EVENT December 4-6 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center ART FROM THE STREETS SHOW & SALE December 5, 11am-5pm Austin Convention Center TRAIL OF LIGHTS December 8-22, 7-10pm Zilker Park HITS RUNNING FESTIVALS December 20, hours vary Circuit of the Americas AUSTIN’S NEW YEAR December 31, 4-10pm Auditorium Shores


MUSIC PICK

Willie Nelson & Family New Year

I AUSTIN CONVENTION CENTER DEC. 5 & 6, 11AM-5PM Presenting original works from Austin’s homeless at the 23rd Annual Art From the Streets Show & Sale. Details at ArtFromTheStreets.Org. This project is supported in part by the Cultural Arts Division of the City of Austin Economic Development Department.

Artwork above by June Yan.

f you can’t spend the holiday season with your own kin, the next best thing is to celebrate with Willie Nelson & Family, and this month, our bearded, pigtailed hometown hero will be closing out 2015 with three consecutive performances at ACL Live at the Moody Theater—fittingly located on his namesake boulevard. With a career spanning decades, the 82-year-old crooner has produced dozens of albums, and amassed countless awards and accolades—ranging from numberone records to a New York Times bestselling book—and is a bona fide music legend. And while Nelson certainly doesn’t require supporting star power, for this event, Grammy-winning country singer Kacey Musgraves is also set to take the stage. (The two have collaborated before: Musgraves performed at Nelson’s Fourth of July Picnic this summer, and he’s featured in her song “Are You Sure,” the video for which was shot at east side hipster honky tonk The White Horse.) Along with Musgraves, the lineup includes Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real—who specialize in a sound they’ve dubbed “cowboy hippie surf rock”— and each evening will be hosted by KGSR’s Andy Langer, the man behind one of Austin’s most recognizable voices. Whether you’re a fan or a Nelson newbie, this is what we’d dub a guaranteed good time, and we suggest you catch the music icon this month before he goes, um, ”On the Road Again.” Willie Nelson & Family New Year will be taking place at ACL Live on the evenings of December 29, 30 and 31. Tickets are available at acl-live.com.

S. SUMPTER tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

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arts & entertainment

CALENDARS

Arts Calendar UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM

Jésus Moroles: A Tribute Exhibition November 20-March 13 WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY

Angie Renfro: Solo Show December 5-23

THE BLANTON MUSEUM

A Christmas Carol at ZACH Theatre

W

hen it comes to holiday stories, there isn’t a more timeless tale than A Christmas Carol, which is taking over the stage of the ZACH Theatre this month. For the (very) few who may be unfamiliar with the Charles Dickens classic, the plot revolves around Ebenezer Scrooge, a frugal, crotchety old man whose attitude towards the so-called “season of giving” is best summated in two words: “Bah, humbug.” But after revelatory visits from three poltergeists—the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Christmas Present and Christmas Yet to Come—Scrooge does some soul-searching and eventually realizes the error of his ways. (Spoiler alert: In a somewhat predictable turn of events, we get a happy ending when the grinch turns giver.) The ZACH performance takes a musical twist. It takes the stage with “a traditional Victorian setting and gorgeous period costumes, but with a musical score that spans genres and eras, from rousing gospel to rock-n-soul favorites, and from nostalgic harmony classics to contemporary hits.” Basically, there’s no better way to spark your own holiday spirit. Whether you’re a fan of the season, the songs or the idea of second chances, on the festive front, this is one show that’s destined to deliver. A Christmas Carol is running through December 27. Find more tickets and information at zachtheatre.org. S. SUMPTER

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DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

GALLERY

Flatbed Homecoming Exhibition Through December 14 PHOTO METHODE GALLERY

Kevin Greenblat: Child of the Mississippi Through December 22

The Crusader Bible: A Gothic Masterpiece December 12 – April 3

YARD DOG

HARRY RANSOM CENTER

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON

Shakespeare in Print and Performance December 21 – May 29

Bob Schneider “Heroes” Through January 3

The Uncrowd Through January 3

BOB BULLOCK TEXAS STATE

ONGOING FLATBED PRESS AND GALLERY

HISTORY MUSEUM

Tom Lea: Chronicler of the 20th Century America Through January 3

Memento: Monotypes and Monoprints Through December 1

LBJ PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY

GALLERY SHOAL CREEK

BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

Speaking Silence/Contemporary Sculpture Through December 3 ART ON 5TH

Landscapes of the Imagination: An Exhibition with Suzy Scarborough Through December 5

Ladies and Gentlemen, The Beatles! Through January 10

Moderno: Design for Living in Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela, 1940–1978 Through January 17 THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN — JONES CENTER

Strange Pilgrims Through January 21

BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

Donald Moffett Through February 28

I M AG E COU RTE SY OF Z ACH TH E ATRE

EVENT PICK

FLATBED PRESS AND


The exhibition is organized by Americas Society, Inc., and made possible by the generous support of the National Endowment for the Arts; the New York State Council on the Arts; the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs; PRISA/Santillana USA; SRE/AMEXCID – CONACULTA – INBA and the Mexican Cultural Institute of New York; Jaime and Raquel Gilinski; Mex-Am Cultural Foundation; and Grupo DIARQ.

Support for the exhibition at the Blanton is provided in part by Isabella Hutchinson and Diego Gradowczyk. Media Sponsor: Univision The exhibition is organized by Americas Society, Inc., and made possible by the generous support of the Alfredo Boulton, Pampatar, ca. for 1953, of York the living of Alfredo Boulton’s beach house, National Endowment the Photograph Arts; the New Stateroom Council on the Arts; the New York City Department Margarita Cultural Island, Venezuela, designed by Miguel Collection:– Fundación Alberto Vollmer, Affairs; PRISA/Santillana USA;Arroyo, SRE/AMEXCID CONACULTA – INBA and Caracas the Mexican Cultur Institute of New York; Jaime and Raquel Gilinski; Mex-Am Cultural Foundation; and Grupo DIARQ.


arts & entertainment

ART SPACES

THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA

3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–Su 10-4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org

ART PICK

Holiday Open House at Flatbed

W

hile there’s no denying the universal appeal of a gift card, bypass the mall this year and step up your giving game with a piece of original artwork instead. On December 12, Photo Méthode Gallery is hosting a Holiday Open House at the Flatbed Building, a creative hot spot that also houses Flatbed Press and Gallery, CamibaArt, Gallery Shoal Creek and other studios, many of which will be participating in the event as well. The open house not only serves as an opportunity to find something for everyone on your list—prints, books and other small works will be available for sale— but also allows for one-on-ones with the artists themselves. Essentially, gallery director Tina Weitz describes it best, as a chance to “come, de-stress and enjoy some beautiful art this busy holiday season.” The open house is also the final day for photography fans to view Photo Méthode’s current featured exhibit: Kevin Greenblat’s “Child of the Mississippi,” a powerful, street-style documentation of the people and rich culture of New Orleans and southern Louisiana. “I hope people walk away feeling introspective…feeling good about the human spirit,” Greenblat said of the photo series, which depicts life in the grittier areas of the region. “I think it’s really alive and well.” The Holiday Open House will take place at the Flatbed Building at 2832 E. Martin Luther King Blvd. on December 12 from 12-5 pm. Find more info on both the event and Kevin Greenblat’s exhibit at photomethode.com. S. SUMPTER

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THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER

700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: T-Sa 11-7, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org

BULLOCK MUSEUM

1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–6, Su 12–6 thestoryoftexas.com ELISABET NEY MUSEUM

304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM

802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM

1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER

300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org

MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM

419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM

409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THE THINKERY

1830 Simond Ave (512) 469 6200 Hours: T-Fri 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM

605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: T-F 10-4, Sa–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org

ART WORK BY KE VIN G REEN B L AT

Museums


Galleries ART AT THE DEN

317 W. 3rd St. (512) 222 3364 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-6, Su 12-5 artattheden.com ART ON 5TH

3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTPOST:

THE CENTER FOR CREATIVE EXPRESSION

4704 E. Cesar Chavez St. artpostaustin.com

ARTWORKS GALLERY

1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com

AUSTIN GALLERIES

5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appt. only austingalleries.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE

2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351 5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS

7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM

5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org

BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT CANOPY

916 Springdale Rd, Bldg 2 #101 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org CAPITAL FINE ART

1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com

CO-LAB PROJECTS: N SPACE

(512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com FIRST ACCESS GALLERY

2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery FLATBED PRESS

2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M-F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

905 Congress Ave. at Nelsen Partners (512) 300 8217 Hours: W 5:30-8 co-labprojects.org

GALLERY 702

CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON

702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu-Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com

613 Allen St. (512) 300 8217 By event and appt only co-labprojects.org

4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com

DAVIS GALLERY

GALLERY SHOAL CREEK

837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com

2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 11–5, Sa 10–3 galleryshoalcreek.com

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER

GRAYDUCK GALLERY

1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center EAST SIDE GLASS STUDIO

3401 E. 4th St. (512) 815 2569 Hours: Tu-Sa By appointment only eastsideglassstudio.com FAREWELL BOOKS

913 E. Cesar Chavez St.

2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12-5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY

1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA

227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007

Hours: M-F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY

360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W-Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY

1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY

507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sa-Su 12-5 massgallery.org MONDO GALLERY

4115 Guadalupe St. (512) 296 2439 Hours: Tu-Sa 12- 6 mondotees.com

PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX

702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 pumpproject.org ROI JAMES

3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART

1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com SPACE 12

3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 T-F 10-5 space12.org

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY

Fredericksburg

1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

AGAVE GALLERY

208 E. San Antonio St. (830) 990 1727 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 agavegallery.com

STUDIO 10

1011 West Lynn Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 (512) 236 1333 studiotenarts.com

ARTISANS AT ROCKY HILL

234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 11-3 artisansatrockyhill.com

TINY PARK GALLERY

1101 Navasota St. #2 (512) 809 3242 Hours: Sa 12-5 and by appt.

FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY

314 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 12-5 fbartgallery.com

TESTSITE

502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

INSIGHT GALLERY

214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-5:30 insightgallery.com

VISUAL ARTS CENTER

2300 Trinity St. (512) 232 2348 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 utvac.org

LARRY JACKSON ANTIQUES & ART GALLERY

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY

209 S. Llano (830) 997 0073 Hours: M-F 9:30-5, Sa 10-5 larryjacksonantiques.com

1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com

WOMEN & THEIR WORK

1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–5 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG

1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

THE GALLERY AT VAUDEVILLE

230 E. Main St. (830) 992 3234 Hours: M 8-6, W-F 8-6, Sa 8-9, Su 8-5 vaudeville-living.com WHISTLE PIK

425 E. Main St. (830) 990 8151 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 whistlepik.com

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TRIBEZ A TALK

N IG HT MOV E S

A N I N S I D E R ' S G U I D E TO A U S T I N ' S H I D D E N G E M S . BY N ICO L E B ECKL E Y

NO SM ALL VICTORY

HOME ON THE R A NG E

“I knew that I wanted to be a theater maker,” Kaci Beeler says. In 2005, the summer after graduating from Round Rock’s Westwood High School, Beeler became a regular at the Hideout Theatre, per-

With a résumé that includes time at Half Step, Weather Up and Midnight Cowboy, as well as running the bar and spirits program for Jeffrey’s, Josh Loving knows a thing or two about craft cocktails. For his new venture, Small Victory, he wanted to bring the focus back to the basics, starting with in-

forming improvised scenes and characters. “In that summer, I

house cut ice. “I’m not doing a whole lot of overly creative

started to realize improv has so many possibilities for what it can

or mixology things, just trying to keep it like a classic cocktail

grow into. It’s kind of uncharted territory,” Beeler says. “As some-

bar,” Loving says.

body who is also a painter, it’s pretty hard to make new discoveries

In the former Mike’s Pub space, tucked against a parking

in the art world, but improvisational theater felt really open and

garage on East 7th Street, the approximately 800 square foot

exciting.” Ten years and thousands of performances later (including shows in Ireland, England, and Australia with her group Parallelogramophonograph), Beeler is directing her eighth show at the Hideout, Boy, Howdy!, an improvised TV western, inspired by the likes of Bonanza. “It skirts this really nice line,” Beeler says, “I like

Dick Clark Architecture-designed bar lives up to its small moniker, accommodating less than 50 people. “We’re going to keep it clean and simple and high-quality,” Loving says. Cheers to that. For more information, visit smallvictory.bar

doing a show that is able to be family-friendly without feeling like a kids show.” For more information, visit hideouttheatre.com

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H IDEOUT TH E ATRE PHOTO COU RTE SY OF K ACI B EEL ER


G I F T ED & TA L E N T E D

Selecting the perfect holiday gift can be hard, but luckily Natalie Davis, co-founder of the artisan-focused Feliz pop-up shop, and owner of Canoe, has some expert recommendations: Dr. J All-Purpose Aromatic Spritz for Space, Face and Body by Dr. J Apothecary — “It’s always really nice getting to support local makers doing something in bath and body.” Large Ikat Scarf by Esby — “Both beautiful and handy – you can use it as a scarf, a wrap, or a throw for laying in the grass at Zilker. The grey and white Ikat pattern goes with everything and suits different tastes.” Jams from Emz Jamz — “From maker Emily Burgess. They’re really delicious, and a good hostess gift because who doesn’t like really nice jams?” Get Smart Gift Set by Canoe — “It’s perfect for impressing a boss or mentor. Both practical and luxurious, which means it will actu-

AUSTIN'S HOMEGROWN HOLIDAY TRADITIONS

ally get used – no small feat.”

While every city observes the holidays in different ways, there are some

Workshop with Foxwares Ceramics — “[Owner Lindsey Wohlge-

been a staple, with visitors wishing for good luck and spinning beneath

muth] does all sorts of beautiful serving ware and planters and glasses,

the Zilker Tree.

and lots of lovely things that would make a great gift for anyone. She’s teaching a series of workshops in her home studio. First, she does dinner and then you make a project, which is really fun.” For more information, visit felizaustin.com/artists

traditions that are uniquely Austin. Since 1965, the Trail of Lights has According to the Austin History Center’s Rusty

Heckaman, early on, as part of Yule Fest, the Zilker Tree was advertised as “the tallest man-made electric tree.” The trail also includes the iconic Yule Log, which in its original conception was to be lit on the first night of the Trail of Light’s opening and burn continuously, with an ember to be saved and used the next year. According to Heckaman, in the late 1800s, Austinites celebrated New Year’s Day with open houses thrown by elegantly dressed hostesses. Neighbors would pay each other visits, with the gentlemen leaving decorative calling cards. The open house ritual was carried on at the Governor’s Mansion until the 1970s. (Of course today open houses have given way to bowl game watch parties.) Perhaps the coldest Austin tradition happens on New Year’s Day. For more than 35 years Austinites have used January 1 to wipe the slate clean by taking the “polar plunge” into Barton Springs. For more information, visit library.austintexas.gov/ahc

YU L E LOG PHOTO COU RTE SY OF AUS TIN H IS TORY CENTER

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AUSTIN SHADEWORKS Get ready for the Holidays with a new look! 8868 Research Blvd #101 512-472-1768 austinshadeworks.com


www.eswealth.com | 512.250.2277 Jenny Fleming, CPA

Sara Seely, CFA


IN AUSTIN, it can feel like another day, another new development. This year, St. Elmo Market, Community First! and Seaholm caught our eye for their function, design and emphasis on thoughtful development that will forever change how Austinites live. When all three developments are fully realized, they will be game changers for not only the neighborhoods in which they live, but for the city as a whole. Here, we meet the people behind the projects and learn just what we can expect once the final brick is laid.

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Brandon Bolin, left, and Matt Spiller, right, in the bus factory that will become St. Elmo Market. tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

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ST. ELMO South Austin Imagine the sights, smells and sounds of the world’s great marketplaces, like Mercado de San Miguel in Madrid or Pike Place in Seattle. Now imagine that energy, flavor and cultural blending right here in South Austin. Brandon Bolin of GroundFloor Development and Matt Spiller are the two developers behind St. Elmo, a 12-acre, mixed-use project that is the future home to a premier public market in the Capital City. Spiller, who spent years working in the hospitality industry, and Bolin, whose expertise is in development, knew that the one-time bus manufacturing warehouse on South Congress Avenue and St. Elmo Road would be the perfect venue for a robust, worldly marketplace. Adding such a venue to the city is fitting given the tremendous culinary growth seen in recent years. “Austin has one of the most progressive culinary scenes that’s going on in this part of the world,” says Spiller. Capturing the city’s distinct flavor and honoring its increasingly international influence is one of the many aims of the market, as is creating a space where entrepreneurs in food and beverage can launch focused ideas and build on big dreams. Much research went into the planning process. Spiller and Bolin traveled the United States and Europe, moving from market to market to learn from the different social experiences offered at each venue. Certain elements were taken from myriad places, such as the openness of Reading Terminal Market in Philadelphia, which is going to be emulated at the market in St. Elmo. To bring more depth to the experience, this central food and beverage hub will be flanked by a host of other projects, including condominiums, creative office spaces, entertainment outlets and even a hotel. No matter if you’re a resident, a vendor, or someone simply passing through, the community here will be grounded by the market, an age-old social gathering place driven by food and drink that is finding new life at St. Elmo.

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COMMUNITY FIRST! VILLAGE East Austin For Austin nonprofit Mobile Loaves & Fishes (MLF), providing shelter for the homeless extends far beyond four walls–real solutions come from building communities. “You have to have that community and place to belong,” says Donna Emery, development director at MLF. The organization has received much praise since its inception, (in November CEO and co-founder Alan Graham was named “Austinite of the Year” by the Austin Chamber of Commerce), thanks to its innovative responses to tackling the needs of Austin’s homeless. Over the years, the organization has provided places to heal, means of nourishment, and opportunities for the disabled and chronically homeless to find purpose. With the program’s latest project, Community First! Village, a 27– acre master planned project in East Austin, this effort will be continued in profound ways. Here, residents are empowered to take on different opportunities that will earn them an income, such as selling concessions and operating the projector at the Alamo Drafthouse community theater. The Community First! Village will also have a sanctuary and hospitality center, recovery gatherings, Bible studies and music groups. There will be a medical building and a building supplies center to service the operation yard. There will be workshops and art studios and tiers of housing options, including RVs and micro homes to name a few. “We have the best custom builders in Austin, Texas over there building,” says Emery, adding that 5,000 volunteers over the past two years have helped with the project, including everyone from cabinet makers to electricians, Eagle Scout groups and charitable organizations. “It’s really been accept“Austinite of the Year” Alan graham at the Community First! Village.

ed by the community in a huge way,” she says adding, “We’re seeing hearts transformed.” tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

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From left to right: Daniel Roth, David Stauch, Allen Cowden, John Rosato and Kent Collins

THE SEAHOLM Downtown Though our skyline may be gleaming with new glass buildings, one of the city’s most anticipated developments was actually inspired by a historical facility. The Seaholm Power Plant is an unusual space for Austin because of its industrial edge, a distinguishing factor that John Rosato of Southwest Strategies Group recognizes. “We went to great pains to maintain the character and bones of the power plant,” he says. The 12-year project has been a joint effort of a team compromised of local companies. In addition to John Rosato, this includes Danny Roth from Southwest Strategies; CIM Group; Jeff Trigger; Allen Cowden of State Street Properties’ and Kent Collins of Centro Development, LLC. Preserving the integrity of the power plant meant keeping many artifacts in tact, such as pipes, for example. Vestiges of these elements are also mirrored throughout the entire Seaholm development, which includes a low-rise building home to Trader Joe’s among other retailers, and a 31-story condominium tower that will be move-in ready in March 2016. “We borrowed all of the steel and concrete elements in the other two buildings so they were complementary and not competing with the power plant,” says Rosato. All three of the buildings surround a public plaza, which will be home to programs and events such as morning yoga with Ballet Austin. The LEED Silver power plant has been meticulously repurposed with sustainability in mind, one effort of which includes capturing rainwater to irrigate the property’s landscaping. Coupling style and sustainability, green spaces and industrial flair, the Seaholm is creating a community that all at once pays homage to its heritage while embodying the future of Austin.

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THESE 10 LOCALS ARE RISING STARS — AND DESTINED TO ONLY GET BRIGHTER

INTRO BY THE VOORHES PORTRAITS BY BILL SALLANS STYLING BY ASHLEY HORSLEY H A I R B Y G A B R I E L L E VA N D E R M E E R MAKE UP BY BETHANY RENFRO OF LIP SERVICE

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C

CASEY CHAPMAN ROSS

Casey Chapman Ross originally landed on our radar as someone we wanted to work with, but digging a little deeper we learned just how impressive this year has been for the mother of two. Though she has a degree in Studio Art from the University of Texas at Austin, Chapman Ross is building a reputation for capturing intimate moments in politics. Over the past year, this former realtor has been on the campaign trail with presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton, and has photographed everyone from the Castro brothers and Barack Obama to Kinky Friedman and Dan Rather.

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Catch us up on your past year:

What’s one piece of advice you wish someone

The past year my work has taken on a focus in

had given you 5 years ago?

progressive movements and politics in Texas.

You can raise a family and focus on your dreams

Working on campaign trails with elected leaders

too. Don’t settle: do what makes you most excited.

and nonprofit groups has led to a lot of really in-

The rest will figure itself out, and everyone will be

teresting photographic opportunities and inspir-

better for it.

ing people.

Who inspires or drives you?

Why Austin?

Above all, setting an example for my kids of

I love the entrepreneurial spirit in this city. It’s not

strong work ethic, passion, creativity and caring

nearly as intimidating to go out on your own and

for others.

try something new when there’s a large commu-

How do you get it all done?

nity of creatives around you doing the same.

A lot of help from my husband, my parents, my

Is there anything that frustrates you about Austin?

in-laws and extended family.

Not really. I think the growth of such an awesome

How do you relax?

city is natural, so I just try and take the bad —

By playing with my kids, Netflix binges, house

like traffic — with the good, and find a place and

projects and hosting pot-luck dinners.

a schedule that allows for it to be less of an issue.

What helps you get through creative blocks?

What has been your biggest challenge or obsta-

Continuing to shoot, pushing through the harder

cle this past year?

days and delivering my best work. When I sud-

My biggest obstacle has been, and still is, focusing

denly come across an image that I emotionally

on my passion projects and not necessarily trying

connect with and of course, when a client is emo-

to take on everything. Time management is al-

tionally touched, it suddenly empowers me to do

ways a work in progress.

more and continue finding ways to improve.

Who are your style and creative icons?

Tell us what to expect from you in 2016:

Annie Leibovitz, Mary Ellen Matthews,

Definitely more involvement in the 2016 Demo-

Pete Souza.

cratic presidential race, How or what that looks like? I’ll let you know when I do!

“YOU CAN RAISE A FAMILY AND FOCUS ON YOUR DREAMS TOO. DON’T SETTLE: DO WHAT MAKES YOU MOST EXCITED.” tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

55


#BOSSBABESATX

B Back in the spring of 2015, the three women behind #bossbabesATX, Jane Claire Hervey, Ashlee Jordan and Leslie Lozano, had an idea: What if there was a place for young creative women to come together to meet, network and create a collaborative community? In May they LESLIE’S TOP BY EQUIPMENT; AVAILABLE AT FOUND

scheduled the first meetup at Friends & Neighbors, expecting a few dozen of their friends to show up. Instead, the event was packed with hundreds of attendees, and the idea quickly spread across the city. Over the past eight months, the mission of #bossbabes has grown even bigger, and the women have added retreats in addition to their popular gatherings. Expect even more from these babes in 2016 including a statewide tour, and meetups in cities like New York City and Los Angeles. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: JANE CLAIRE HERVEY, LESLIE LOZANO & ASHLEE JORDAN

56

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


Jane Claire Hervey [Founder and Head of Oper-

don’t just have one job or one passion.

ations at #bossbabesATX]

What has been your biggest challenge or obstacle

Catch us up on your past year:

this past year?

I graduated from the University of Texas at Austin

Myself. I am a perfectionist and I hold myself to

with a Bachelor’s of Arts in Journalism in Decem-

impossible standards but I’m finally letting myself

ber, after launching Gear From Last Night with

breathe and allowing myself to create freely.

my business partner, Josh Huck. I became the full-time Content Production Manager at Texts

Ashlee Jordan [Vendors Coordinator and Babe

From Last Night. In May, I founded #bossbabe-

Gang Editor at #bossbabesATX]

sATX and brought my best friends onto my team.

Catch us up on your past year:

It’s been a whirlwind ever since.

My toddler turned two, my handmade cloth-

Who is your style icon? Creative icon?

ing company, Crafts and Arts, turned three, and

I don’t really have a style icon. I’d hate to credit my

my best friend birthed the brainchild that is now

unhealthy sneaker addiction to anyone in particular.

#bossbabesATX. It’s been a pretty good year so far.

My creative icon is definitely Gloria Steinem. She’s

Why Austin?

a feminist powerhouse, and she created Ms. Maga-

My heart is in Austin, romantically and creatively. I

zine — a publication with a mission statement and a

say this a lot to people when the topic of uprooting

business model that was ahead of its time.

and settling in Austin arises, but this city is so wel-

What’s one piece of advice you wish someone

coming. I’m constantly surrounded and impressed

had given you 5 years ago?

by creative, fascinating human beings from here

I wish someone had told me that nothing is absolute.

and I think that speaks loudly of the city.

If I mess up one day, that doesn’t mean I will mess up

What has been your biggest challenge or obstacle

always. If I kill it one day, that doesn’t mean I’m always

this past year?

going to be successful. We exist on sliding scales.

Trying to find a happy medium in being a 24-yearold entrepreneur, a creative, and a mom has been

Leslie Lozano [Art and Workshop Coordinator

really tough. I’ve also learned to stop apologizing

for #bossbabesATX]

for being myself this year — which was a tough feat.

Catch us up on your past year:

What are you proudest of professionally?

I celebrated living in Austin for a year, started a

The birth of #bossbabesATX has been momentous

new position with a local printing company, be-

for me. Being able to work side by side with two

gan taking monthly improv classes at the Hideout

people that I admire, respect and love so much

Theatre, and launched #bossbabesATX.

is a dream. On a personal level, I’ve created a name

Why Austin?

for myself in the Austin pop-up community. I’ve also

The people. #bossbabesATX has shown me there

successfully set up at pop-up markets once a month,

are genuine, kind, talented, hardworking people

every month this year (which is a crazy amount of

in this city. The majority of the people in Austin

handmade man power for a single person). tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

57


Raised in the state for which she is named, Vir-

along with them. I packed all my things into trash

ginia Madison Fisk ended up in Austin after a

bags, threw those and my dog into my car and

stint in Los Angeles. Tired of LA, the artist/

house with three of my best girlfriends, got a job

production designer decided on a whim to

a week after being here, and never looked back.

pack her bags and move to Austin. Though she

Best decision of my life. The people here are kind

knew no one in town, Fisk quickly became one to watch in Austin’s art world. In 2014, she won the top prize during the Tequila Herradura’s “Barrel Art Collection,” netting a $10,000 prize and a exhibit at the Mexic-Arte Muse-

and warm and it reminds me of where I grew up in Virginia. Austin is definitely home now and I couldn’t be happier. What has been your biggest challenge or obstacle this past year? This year was filled with a lot of self-discovery for me. Learning how to not let personal life devour

“THIS YEAR WAS FILLED

um. In addition to crafting beautiful abstract

and destroy my work, but instead inspire and

paintings, Fisk is also a jewelry designer and

inform it. Turning heartache or self doubt from

WITH A LOT OF SELF-

sculptor.

an all-consuming feeling into a controllable, cre-

DISCOVERY FOR ME.

Catch us up on your past year:

LEARNING HOW TO NOT LET PERSONAL LIFE

I have spent most of this year working insatiably in my studio. Along with continuing my series of meditation paintings, I ventured into the realm of jewelry making, something I had always been interested in, and loved finding that it helped ease the creative blocks and stagnation that can arise

DEVOUR AND DESTROY MY WORK, BUT INSTEAD INSPIRE AND INFORM IT.”

when working too much in one medium. I was part of the Art + Tequila group show at Mexic-Arte (a reprise of the Tequila Herradura Barrel Art show from October 2014) and now have a piece in Mexic-Arte’s permanent collection. Why Austin? Five years ago I was working on a film in Bartlesville, Oklahoma and I was dreading going back to Los Angeles when it ended. My friends on the film were moving to Austin and I blindly agreed to go

58

made the drive from LA to Austin. I moved into a

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

ative fuel can be difficult but it’s necessary to my art making practice — and the understanding of myself. Who is your style icon? Definitely my mother (a native Texan). She knows what she likes and rocks it. Classic, clean and casual, nothing too frilly. Denim is key. You can dress it up with heels or throw on your boots and tromp through the fields to feed the horses. Who is your creative icon? My father. He has become a creative mentor to me (and my boss a handful of times). That dude never stops working. He becomes obsessed with the process and puts his whole being into his work. I admire his drive and endless thirst for knowledge. How do you get it all done? Still working on that. But I love what I do so it isn’t a chore. Working fulfills me. I feel very lucky.


How do you relax? Nothing beats watching Netflix while in the tub, but a good book, dog snuggles and a glass (or three) of wine doesn’t hurt either. What are you proudest of professionally? Winning the Herradura Barrel Art show was a very proud moment. It was some outside validation of my work that comes so rarely when you are alone in your studio.

JEWELRY BY VM FISK

Tell us what to expect from you in 2016: More shows, more art! I’ve got some new exciting work brewing in my brain that is a bit of a change from the large abstract geometric pieces I have been focused on, and a little more autobiographical. I’m also planning on getting my jewelry into a few shops around town, keep your ears and eyes open.


“TOO OFTEN, AUSTINITES KNOW WHAT WE STAND AGAINST, BUT WE CAN’T FIGURE OUT WHAT WE STAND FOR.”

60

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


GREGORIO CASAR

T

Is there anything that frustrates you about Austin? I love how much we love our city, we love our people, and we hold on to an egalitarian spirit that’s rare in Texas. The challenge? Too often, Austinites know what we stand against, but we can’t figure out what we stand for. What inspires you? So many young people throughout our country’s history have been a part of making our so-

There are wunderkinds and then there is Aus-

ciety a better place. From students sitting in at

tin City Council Member Gregorio “Greg”

lunch counters in Nashville to young workers

SUIT BY JOHN VARVATOS, SHIRT BY NEIMAN MARCUS, TIE BY DRIES VAN NOTEN, ALL AVAILABLE AT NEIMAN MARCUS. SHOES BY COMMON PROJECTS, AVAILABLE AT BY GEORGE.

Casar. At just 25, Casar is the youngest per-

demanding fair pay at North Austin’s Economy Furniture store, young folks have always been

son ever elected to the Austin City Council,

a part of pushing the envelope. I feel like I get

and in less than a year, he has become one

to be a part of that same movement every day

of the most successful members on the city’s first 10-1 council. Despite weathering a re-

in my job. How do you get it all done? My incredible staff. Folks thought we’d be the

call election and subsequent lawsuit from his

underdogs since my team is made up of en-

embittered District 4 opponent, Casar was

tirely 20-and-30-somethings. But the amount

named the Austin Chronicle’s “Best Elected City Official” in 2015.

of work we get done as an office is really unmatched, I think, because of their commitment to making Austin a better place to live. They’re my family here. Just like any good family, they

Catch us up on your past year:

not only take care of me, but push me to do

Austin’s local government in 2015 has felt like the

what’s right.

Wild West. It’s the first year that Austin has been

Who is your style icon?

governed by a Council elected in 10 single-mem-

Mos Def.

ber districts. The result was that 10 of the 11 elect-

Who is your creative icon?

ed officials, including myself, are brand new. Old

James Baldwin.

ways of doing business have been thrown out, and

Tell us what to expect from you in 2016:

we’re working hard to fill the void with bold action

Relentless work from my office to get us off

to deal with our biggest issues: income inequality

the list of most economically segregated cities

and the erosion of workers’ rights, skyrocketing

in the country. We have a lot of work to do on

housing prices and traffic woes without much

making sure our neighborhoods are affordable

mass transit available.

and integrated. tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

61


“PEOPLE LOVE TO

Here at TRIBEZA, we have long turned to the

only natural that most of my cooking inspiration

Austin-based blog “Love & Lemons” to find

comes from not only amazing restaurants here in

not only a recipe for our next meal, but cre-

town, but also the produce that grows here. I also healthy food blog. People love to say that Austin

raphy and thoughtful design. Run by Jeanine

is all about meat and barbecue, but there’s really

Donofrio and her husband, Jack, “Love &

so much more than that. Texas has amazing vegetables, folks. given you 5 years ago?

quently come, you guessed it, with a dash of

About five years ago, I left a really successful

ons” will jump off of the screen and onto the

graphic design business that I had built to start a food blog with no ads. Everyone I knew thought guess the advice I would give myself would be to

house Penguin.

trust my instincts.

What year is this? Just kidding. A little over a year ago, my husband Jack and I started working on a cookbook. This past year has been a whirlwind of cooking, styling, shooting, dishwashing, and writing this 320-page monster of a book. We worked through Christmas, Valentine’s Day, Labor Day, you name it. Other than a celebratory vacation to Italy when we were done, this year was a whirlwind to say the least. Why Austin? The food of course! I love to travel and I’m always inspired by those experiences — but there’s so much amazing food right outside my doorstep. It’s

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

BUT THERE’S REALLY SO MUCH MORE THAN THAT. TEXAS

I was crazy, but it all ended up working out. So I

page with a cookbook from publishing power-

Catch us up on your past year:

AND BARBECUE,

What’s one piece of advice you wish someone had

and offers readers healthful recipes that fre-

love and lemon. In March 2016, “Love & Lem-

IS ALL ABOUT MEAT

probably post more taco recipes than any other

ative inspiration from the beautiful photog-

Lemons” is a superstar in the culinary world,

62

SAY THAT AUSTIN

HAS AMAZING

Who/what/where inspires or drives you? Our “Love & Lemons” blog readers really keep me going. I’ll often have a bad day — either a recipe or photo session doesn’t work out or I get overly wrapped up in social media. Later, I’ll get an email saying how my recipes have helped someone eat more healthy vegetable-based meals, and I remember why I’m really doing this. Blogging can sometimes feel like it’s all about the likes and numbers, but it’s really about food and community. How do you get it all done? I’m still not sure. How do you relax? Happy hour. #yeswayrose What makes you laugh? My dogs make me laugh. They give me the most

VEGETABLES, FOLKS.”


ridiculous looks and I’m the crazy person that Instagrams too many pictures of my pets. I always say that a “dog blog” will be my next thing. What are you proudest of professionally? That I do what I love every day and figured out how to make it my job. What helps you get through creative blocks?

TOP BY JOIE, AVAILABLE AT FOUND

I want to say that traveling helps because I love to explore food in new places, but actually just getting back to work and pushing through the tough times helps me the most. It’s not a very romantic answer, but I find it helpful to just keep putting one foot in front of the other. Tell us what to expect from you in 2016: The Love and Lemons Cookbook: An Apple-to-Zucchini Celebration of Impromptu Cooking comes out March 29th. After that, we’ll see!


JACKET BY JOHN VARVATOS, AVAILABLE AT NEIMAN MARCUS

MATT COOK


Why do you love working in this city?

What makes you laugh?

Although the city has seen tremendous growth,

Politicians.

there remains a tight-knit writing and film com-

What are you proudest of professionally?

munity filled with talented and inspiring people.

That I’ve found success doing something I

What has been your biggest challenge or ob-

love.

stacle this past year?

What helps you get through creative blocks?

Recognizing and paying attention to those

Knowing all my writing involves rewriting, I just

things I can control and those I can’t.

push through. If you write through the block

Who is your creative icon?

you get the basic idea out there, then can go

Hemingway.

back later and polish it.

What’s one piece of advice you wish someone

Tell us what to expect from you in 2016:

had given you 5 years ago?

Triple 9 is slated for release in February. By Way

This ties into the biggest challenge of the past

Of Helena has no date set, but should be out

year, which is to focus on the things in life I can

in 2016. This industry is filled with many un-

control and not worry about those I can’t.

knowns, but hopefully some of my other proj-

What inspires or drives you?

ects will move further towards/into production,

My military experiences, my wife and my son.

including Matterhorn (based on the Vietnam

and “The Call of Battle,” then you will soon.

How do you get it all done?

War novel by Karl Marlantes), which is being

Next year, the Austin-based screenwriter and

Early mornings, late nights, outlines and fear

adapted as a series for HBO, and a film about

of failure.

the Apostle Paul which will star Hugh Jackman

How do you relax?

and is being produced by Matt Damon and Ben

Scotch.

Affleck’s Pearl Street.

I If you don’t already know Matt Cook from his brilliant Texas Monthly pieces, “Soldier”

producer has two high profile films set for release: Triple 9 and By Way of Helena. The crime drama Triple 9, which is slated for a February release, features an all-star ensemble cast including Kate Winslet, Casey Affleck and Woody Harrelson. Cook’s other film, By Way of Helena, stars Liam Hemsworth (and, incidentally, Woody Harrelson), and tells the story of a Texas Ranger sent to investigate a series of unexplained deaths in a small Texas town. As if Cook’s year wasn’t busy enough, he and his wife, Lauren Wolf, will welcome their second child this spring.

“ALTHOUGH THE CITY HAS SEEN TREMENDOUS GROWTH, THERE REMAINS A TIGHT-KNIT WRITING AND FILM COMMUNITY FILLED WITH TALENTED AND INSPIRING PEOPLE. ” tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

65


Catch us up on your past year:

is inspirational to me. I love to learn from people

2014 was the year of survival with our newborn

who are taking risks, but keeping it simple and

daughter, so 2015 has been the year of get it to-

focused at the same time. Ideas often flow for me

gether. I spent the year experimenting with dif-

from learning about an innovation in a different

ferent products and services, honing Coterie

industry and how it can apply to mine.

Market’s focus and working towards the best ver-

What’s one piece of advice you wish someone

sion of the business model. We grew our offerings,

had given you 5 years ago?

Craigslist for part time help — an ad that just

expanded corporate gifts, and launched The Coterie

When starting a business, try hard to find one to

happened to be placed by Dan Graham on be-

Sampler in September, which we’re hoping to grow.

two fantastic partners before you take the leap on

Why Austin?

your own.

Ten years ago, Chelsea Staires Sun had just graduated and moved to Austin to begin her post-collegiate life. She replied to an ad on

half of his just-launched startup, BuildASign.

The standout thing I love about working in Austin

Over the next seven years, Staires Sun worked

How do you relax?

is the people in my community. Makers and other

Taking a beat for myself. A mug of great coffee

her way up at the uber-successful start-up,

types of entrepreneurs are so friendly and ready

(that’s still warm) in the morning does wonders

to talk shop, trade tips and give of themselves. I

for my day.

love to collaborate and am grateful for this open

What are you proudest of professionally?

and in 2012, left BuildASign to launch Coterie Market, an online marketplace that curates,

culture. I started Coterie Market knowing that, if

The amount of revenue that Coterie is helping to

collects and delivers locally-made products

I did it right, I could see myself doing it for the

keep flowing through the local economy, my rela-

to your door. In September, Coterie Market

rest of my life, and a big part of what makes that

tionship with my employees, and good volunteer

possible are the people I work with.

work.

What has been your biggest challenge or obsta-

What helps you get through creative blocks?

cle this past year?

If I can, I sleep on it.

well as special collaboration projects from local

Professionally, it continues to be marketing and

Tell us what to expect from you in 2016:

culinary superstars like Counter 3 Five VII pastry

customer acquisition. Personally, it’s been finding

The two phrases I love to hear most at Coterie are

balance.

“Oh wow, this is made in Austin?” and “Every-

Who is your style or creative icon?

body loved their gifts so much!” so I’ll be working

Anything that is a fresh take on timeless appeal

hard to hear them as often as possible.

launched a subscription box service that features the best products from Austin makers, as

chef Sarah Prieto and Ben Edgerton and Andrew Wiseheart of Contigo and Gardner.

66

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


“I LOVE TO LEARN FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE TAKING RISKS, BUT KEEPING IT SIMPLE AND FOCUSED AT THE SAME TIME.”


Okay, okay, living in Austin, you’ve probably already heard Walker Lukens’ music. The Side Arms lead singer has been named a KUTX “One to Watch,” and his single “Every Night” was called “a delectable concoction” by SPIN. (Whether a song can be “delectable” is unclear, but what we do know is “Every Night” is a really good tune.) With an album produced by Spoon’s Jim Eno slated for release in 2016, we’re betting that next year everyone both in Austin and out will have heard the delightful Walker Lukens. Catch us up on your past year: I put out a song called “Every Night” back in January and have mainly been riding the wave of that ever since. My backing band, The Side Arms, and I played a lot of shows and put a lot of miles on SaVANtha Fox [our van], shook a lot of hands, ate a lot of tacos, slept in a lot of uncomfortable places, used a lot of drink tickets, listened to a lot of Marc Maron and that Usher song, “I Don’t Mind.” Most importantly, we’ve also been working on an album with Jim Eno [drummer of Spoon] at his studio, Public Hi-Fi. It’s been a good year. Why Austin? I met the drummer from one of my favorite bands in a bar. As fate would have it, he’d been listening to my last record because he’d heard the single on KUTX. Fast forward a few years and we just finished making a full-length record together. What’s not to love about being a musician in this town? Is there anything that frustrates you about living / working in Austin?

68

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com

This could be the greatest city in the world if more

band pushes me to be better: Zac Catanzaro, Rog-

Austinites knew how to make unprotected left

er Mason, Kyle Vonderau, Mckenzie Griffin.

turns and voted in local elections.

How do you relax?

Who is your creative icon?

I’m really good at having fun, but not so good at re-

I like artists that go big even if they strike out a

laxing. I’m hoping to learn how to do that before I die.

few times: Serge Gainsbourg, Roberto Bolaño,

What are you proudest of professionally?

David Bowie, Nina Simone, Picasso, Prince.

I am really proud of the last record I made, Devot-

What’s one piece of advice you wish someone

ed, and the record that I just finished with Jim.

had given you 5 years ago?

It was a big moment to play with The Side Arms

In a Marc Maron interview with Mike Myers, My-

at Blues on the Green and to be part of a sold out

ers says, “Cast yourself.” Start doing the thing that

show at The Troubadour in LA.

you want to be doing now. Don’t wait around for

What helps you get through creative blocks?

opportunities to come to you.

There’s a Henry Miller quote I really like; “When

What drives you?

you can’t create, you can work.” People make too

Writing songs is sheer compulsion for me at this

much of the difference between creative work and

point. I think like a lot of artists, I would love to be

other kinds of work. Elbow grease, grit, coffee,

a small part of the history that I’ve been obsessed

deep breaths, exercise. If all else fails, read a book,

with my whole life. I want lots of people to know

see a movie, phone a friend.

my songs.

Tell us what to expect from you in 2016:

How do you get it all done?

I am going to put out a lot of music and play a lot

As Nasty Nas hath told us, “I never sleep ‘cause

of shows. I’m going to annoy you about that on

sleep is the cousin of death.” Also, everyone in my

the Internet.


“THIS COULD BE THE GREATEST CITY IN THE WORLD IF MORE AUSTINITES KNEW HOW TO MAKE UNPROTECTED LEFT TURNS AND

JACKET BY LANVIN, PANTS BY OFFICINE GENERALE, TIE BY DRIES VAN NOTEN, ALL AVAILABLE AT BY GEORGE

VOTED IN LOCAL ELECTIONS.”

tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

69


Olamaie chefs Grae Nonas and Michael Fojtasek. The new restaurant was nominated for its first James Beard Award this year.

70

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


D EC E M B E R 2 0 1 5

Photography by Chad Wadsworth

Hair by Jessica Casarez of Lip Service Makeup by Dolce Ivy Kim

MEET THE LOCALS WHOSE WORK IS CHANGING THE COURSE OF AUSTIN’S CULTURE.

TRIBEZA’S

people of the year tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

71


WE ALL KNOW AUSTIN’S CULINARY SCENE IS HOT, BUT WHERE IS IT HEADED? WHEREVER MICHAEL FOJTASEK AND GRAE NONAS WANNA TAKE IT.

Grae Nonas (left) and Michael Fojtasek (right)

72

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


Michael Fojtasek & Grae Nonas

B Y K AT I E F R I E L

taken those ideas off of the page and put it into practice. Olamaie isn’t just about delicious dishes, it’s about creating a place where food is made with the ingredients available, and honors the treatment of animals and farmers alike. Rather than rely on mega suppliers to deliver ingredients with unknowable origins, Fojtasek and Nonas let local producers and farmers’ markets be their guides. Both chefs go to market twice a week, Wednesday and Saturday, and are among the earliest shoppers —if not the first. “We’re the first one downtown,” says Fojtasek. “I take pride in that. Farmers love it because they know [we’re] gonna buy stuff.” Once inside the gates, the chefs go from stall to stall, gathering ingredients and inspiration for the night’s menu. “Everyone says that they use the best ingredients, everyone says that they do it the best way,” explains Nonas. “And the thing is is that we do do that. We do practice what we preach.” Part of the practice has been to not only develop a relationship with the farmers around Central Texas, but to understand the complexities of things like weather patterns’ affect on crop cycles. “In Austin, if you want to do that way of procuring [ingredients], you have to approach your entire culinary world based around what’s out there today,” explains Fojtasek. “You can’t plan so much ahead, you don’t know that it’s going to happen.” The result is a menu that changes daily, if not hourly. “What affects Mother Earth, that affects the ground and that affects our produce and that affects our plate. And whatever affects our plate, we have to change. We don’t have that option like, ‘Oh, we’ll just substitute today with some California crab.’ No, no, no. It doesn’t work

In retrospect, the deck was never stacked in Olamaie’s favor. The restau-

like that. It’s either that dish goes away, or we have to replace it with another

rant is in a lonely stretch of downtown between campus and the Capitol,

ingredient,” says Fojtasek.

in an 85-year-old house that previously was the site of two failed restau-

This is not to say that Olamaie is the first restaurant in Austin to ap-

rants and a head shop. The two chefs running the joint are from Dallas

proach food in this way. The chefs are quick to name Jesse Griffiths of Dai

and New England, met in California, and came to Austin to start a South-

Due; Todd Duplechan and Jessica Maher of Lenoir; and Bryce Gilmore of

ern-inspired restaurant. When Olamaie finally opened it was nearly a year

Odd Duck and Barley Swine among those who inspire them. Collectively,

behind schedule and had endured months of the proverbial restaurant kiss

these culinary creatives are doing the work that is landing Austin at the top of

of death: hype.

every best-of list. High-end dining in a stuffy space no longer represents the up-

By my, oh my, has Olamaie lived up to the acclaim. Since the San Antonio Street restaurant opened her doors in August 2014, chefs Michael Fojtasek and

per echelon of cuisine. Instead, chefs like Griffiths, Gilmore, Fojtasek and Nonas are crafting experiences that are approachable, creative and sustainable.

Grae Nonas have received an almost unending slew of accolades including two

Though Fojtasek and Nonas spent 2015 topping lists and gracing mag-

James Beard nominations (one for Outstanding Restaurant and one for Rising

azine covers, both chefs say they haven’t had time to celebrate. (“When we found

Star Chef of the Year for Nonas); Food + Wine’s Best New Chefs 2015; and Tex-

out that we were [named] Best New Chefs by Food + Wine, we walked down to

as Monthly’s No. 2 Best Restaurant in Texas, just to name a few.

the cooler, high-fived and that was it,” says Nonas.”) Instead, they’ve focused on

Beyond the inspired dishes, impeccable wine list and on point cocktails

getting their team in place, learning how to be “married” as co-chefs, and getting

that have garnered awards, Fojtasek and Nona’s holistic approach to food rep-

Austin diners to trust the experience of eating at Olamaie. “[As for] 2016, it will

resents the best of Austin’s new culinary scene. Much has been written about

be a progression,” says Nonas, “continuing to focus on what we have ... and move

how the chefs’ originally bonded over a love of vintage cookbooks, but they’ve

that forward.” tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

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keith kreeger CERAMICIST

THIS SOUGHT-AFTER MAKER IS CHANGING THE WAY AUSTIN DINES

B Y S O F I A S O KO LO V E

self going into politics or law and instead began seeing a future as an artist. “It just happened,” Kreeger says of his career as a ceramicist and maker, who ran his own contemporary craft gallery on Cape Cod for 12 years before moving to Austin in 2009 with his wife, Evangelina, a native Texan, and their three kids. “It was a scary move,” he says. Kreeger was leaving the support system he had on Cape Cod, something that’s even more important when your work is “something you have to see and hold and touch.” But the Austin arts community embraced him almost immediately, and his work, which was at the time primarily retail, began to shift more and more towards the hospitality industry. “Again, I just sort of fell into it,” says Kreeger. “I wasn’t trying to work with hospitality, I just realized that all of my customers were going out to eat, and were thinking about where their objects came from along with where their food came from. Details and experience matter within the restaurant world. Just like real food matters, real objects matter.” These days, he’s busy unloading several kilns a week for at least a dozen restaurants in town, plus more nationally. Kreeger feels lucky to be in a

Here’s the funny thing about one of the hottest names in Austin’s restau-

city that is both receptive of his work, and so eager to collaborate. “The

rant scene right now: He’s not a chef, or even a bartender, he’s a ceramicist.

support of this city for me and my work…I’m grateful for it,” says Kreeger,

Keith Kreeger’s work is playing a major role in how we dine — both in Aus-

more than once throughout our breakfast.

tin and across the country.

though [Austin is] booming and growing and there are cranes all over the

one of them. It’s very cool,” the soft-spoken Kreeger says over avocado toast

place for the third time since I moved here, there’s this underlying support

at Café No Se. Almost subconsciously, he picks up the large dish in front of

that it has for good things.”

him to see whose work it is, and then chuckles as he sets it down: “My kids, now they pick up plates when we go out to eat. It’s fantastic.”

74

“Making things here has been really good for me,” he goes on. “Even

“There’s not many objects in restaurants that you touch, and I work with

Kreeger makes sure to give back to the supportive community he has found in Austin. In addition to his own work, he serves as President of the

If you’ve ever eaten in Austin’s best restaurants, then you know Kreeger’s

Board of Directors of Big Medium, and played a major role in putting on

work. It’s a vessel for exquisite sushi at Uchi and Uchiko, beautiful veggies

this year’s East Austin Studio Tour, which he feels strongly connected to

at Gardner, and the best biscuits ever at Olamaie. Kreeger produces custom

on a personal level. “I moved here in August [2009] and in November I

ceramics not only for Austin’s finest chefs like Paul Qui (he designed an en-

opened the doors for E.A.S.T… so you know right away I had people walk-

tire custom dinnerware collection for the opening of the famed chef ’s flag-

ing through my studio. [The tour] was really important to me.”

ship restaurant Qui), but for top chefs across America, like Tim Maslow of

Now, he’s working to make sure other emerging artists can continue

Boston’s Ribelle. There’s no question that his thoughtful, handmade work

to have that same experience — both at E.A.S.T and in Austin in general.

is an integral part of elevating diners’ experiences.

“I’ve seen it as an artist, and I know how important it is,” he says. “I don’t

From the very beginning of his career, Kreeger has been driven by his

think there’s an art experience in this city that activates the city as E.A.S.T

instincts. As an American studies major at Skidmore College, he took a ce-

does. [It’s] really important to the identity of the city to make sure we

ramics class one summer and found himself hooked. “I’ve always loved the

continue to have access to the creative culture.”

process,” he says. “I loved seeing the results and unloading the kiln and see-

As far as his own work, Kreeger plans to just keep following that killer

ing the ideas … there’s information in every piece that you make.” Spending

instinct of his. “I want to just keep working,” he says. “Intuition has gotten

more and more time in the ceramics studio, Kreeger stopped envisioning him-

me to this exciting place, and I’m going to keep rolling with it.”

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


“Even though [Austin is] booming and growing and there are cranes all over the place, there’s this underlying support that it has for good things.”

tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

75


“DON’T GET ADVICE — JUST GET OUT.”


meredith walker

the one. Lets go do something right now.’” During a late night conversation between Poehler and Walker over the horrors of middle school, they realized they had both had someone who was older and acted as a mentor. “Each of those interactions were the times that we felt okay,” Walker explains, “And so we thought, how can we be that for somebody?” The answer was Smart Girls, which started as Smart Girls at the Party, a web-based show and blog meant to celebrate the “everyday girl.” There’s nothing fancy, and — aside from Poehler’s appearances — nothing Hollywood, about the series, which was launched in 2008 and features a teenage girl or woman (often an Austinite) being interviewed by Poehler about

CO - C R E ATO R A N D E X E C U T I V E P R O D U C E R O F A M Y POEHLER’S SMART GIRLS

her interests. Each episode ends in a totally dorky, contagious dance party

THE FORMER HEAD OF SNL’S TALENT DEPARTMENT HAS DEDICATED HER LIFE TO HELPING TEENAGE GIRLS

you interested in in life? Talk about it. What’s it like?’” explains Walker.

B Y S O F I A S O KO LO V E

with the whole cast and crew. “We really just wanted [to ask]: ‘What are In the past seven years, the Smart Girls community has taken off, with Walker at its helm. In October 2014, Smart Girls was acquired by Legendary Entertainment (which also owns Chris Hardwick’s Nerdist Industries and Felicia Day’s Geek & Sundry) and the plan is to roll out even more shows. She Said, hosted by comedic duo and real-life fiancées Cameron Esposito and Rhea Butcher, premiered in November with the two hav-

Meredith Walker has the kind of gregarious personality that makes you feel

ing an honest (and often hilarious) body-positive dialogue about women’s

immediately at ease, which is probably why she’s so good at her job. Walk-

health. It went viral.

er is the co-creator and executive producer of Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls,

Walker, proud owner to two rescue dogs, may be most excited about

a multi-media platform dedicated to helping teenage girls cultivate their

the new show Heavy Petting, which profiles shelter dogs with celebrity

authentic selves. “Change the world by being yourself,” is the Smart Girls

voiceovers. (Also, keep an eye out for Austin Pets Alive! dogs in upcoming

motto, and something Walker fully embraces. A Houston native who lived

episodes.)

in New York City and Los Angeles before settling in Austin in 2006, she is

It may be called “Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls,” but “Amy and Meredith’s

unapologetically, brilliantly herself — and she’s doing her best to change the

Smart Girls” would make more sense; almost everything on the site is ex-

world, one middle schooler at a time.

ecuted, and has the spirit, of the infectiously energetic Walker. “I don’t ask

It was working with the respected journalist Linda Ellerbee at Nick News

our audience to do something that we haven’t done,” she says. “Whether

with Linda Ellerbee where Walker first realized her passion for helping

it’s an Instagram challenge … or jumping in the water on a freezing day,

people with their own narratives. As producer of the Peabody and Emmy

I’ve done every one of them, and if I haven’t already done it, I do it with

Award winning show, Walker worked to help people share their stories. “It

them.” On any given day, you might find Walker and her executive assis-

would be painful sometimes,” she remembers, “because I’d be in [places

tant, Lillian Garza, volunteering in the Austin community, then taking to

like] someone’s trailer home hearing their story, but it felt so good to have

the site and social media with information to help other smart girls do the

somebody listening to them. And that’s really where I learned the art of

same in their own towns.

letting someone tell their story to you and helping them feel comfortable doing that.”

“Don’t get advice — just get out,” she says. “If you want to build self-esteem don’t talk about it, don’t do a self-esteem workshop, don’t fill out a

After Nick News, Walker became the head of the talent department at

form, don’t read an article about it … those are all great endeavors but if

Saturday Night Live, where she met best friend Amy Poehler. She says:

you really want to have it, you gotta just get it.” Luckily for us, Walker is

“You know how it is when you just meet that person and you’re like ‘You’re

dedicated to helping us do that, no matter our age. tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

77


nicholas white C EO O F T H E DA I LY D OT

“It’s been said that journalism is a conversation, and I think it’s a specific kind of conversation. It’s supposed to be based on fact and not ideology or belief,” says White. “We think it’s our job to put more of that journalistic conversation out in the world.” That conversation now involves over 10 million readers a month and a publishing rate of 50 stories a day. White credits the effectiveness of his staff, 80 full-time employees working from offices in New York City, San Francisco and Austin’s Allandale neighborhood, with allowing him to play the role of the idea guy. His focus changes every few months, ranging from business development to editorial standards, which White insists should be bulletproof. “We do audits on editorial quality all the time. We pick a facet like good ledes, or something more value oriented, like we want there to be original

THE FRONT PAGE OF THE INTERNET IS BASED RIGHT HERE IN AUSTIN B Y DA N G E N T I L E

information in each article so that we’re not just aggregating the rest of the universe,” says White. The combination of tight reporting and insider access has allowed the Daily Dot to dive deep into topics that the mainstream media can’t quite wrap their heads around. When Sony’s servers were compromised last Christmas, the Dot was the first to cover it — and even scored an inter-

78

If you’re not familiar with the Daily Dot, here’s a Twitter-sized summary:

view with the hackers. This cross-section of Internet culture and societal

It’s an Austin-based online publisher as serious about hard-hitting cyberse-

impact is where the site is at its best, like in one of White’s favorite stories

curity journalism as it is about viral videos of hockey-playing circus bears.

in which writer Kevin Morris explored how the online government sim-

At the helm is 36-year-old CEO Nicholas White, who previously served

ulation game eRepublik is directly inspiring Russian opposition leaders.

as a VP of a group of regional newspapers based in Ohio. There, he pio-

The Dot’s fearlessness to dig into the nerdiest trenches results in stories

neered a web-forward approach to local print news to give smaller markets

that no one else could tell.

a digital voice. The Daily Dot applies the same mentality to the subject of

Given their intersection between the worlds of media and tech, you

the Internet, reporting on the web as if it were a city growing in influence

might expect the Daily Dot to be headquartered on the East or West coast,

and ready to take a place on the global stage.

but White sees Austin as a sweet spot in the middle. Technology business-

When the site launched in 2011, the Internet was over-saturated with

es are booming, media companies are growing, and it’s still an affordable

media, but underserved by the type of journalism that could help unlock its

place to start a company. By the numbers the Daily Dot is up 500 percent

potential. “We’ve barely scratched the surface of what the Internet is doing

in revenue this year and investors have taken notice with a recent round

to human society, and that’s the story we’re here to tell,” says White.

of $10 million in funding that will allow the company to scale their sales

The site began as a grassroots project with articles published direct-

team, editorial ranks, and lean into ideas like e-sports video coverage. But

ly to social media rather than through a traditional website. By marrying

even though they have the funding of a serious Silicon Valley or Silicon

the medium and the message, the Daily Dot staked its claim as insiders

Alley media property, White still feels like the personality of Austin is a

writing about outsider communities. That meant authoritatively covering

big influence.

Reddit, e-sports, and subcultures like adult My Little Pony fans (known as

“I think there’s something Internet-y about Austin’s culture of live and

“bronies”), without the type of condescending wink-and-nudge you’d see in

let live inclusion,” says White. “Obviously there’s the business side of it

traditional media. It makes the site feel more like a natural discourse than

here too, but the thing about Austin — and the Internet — is that there’s a

a spectator sport.

place for everyone. Even if you’re a brony.”

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


“It’s been said that journalism is a conversation, and I think it’s a specific kind of conversation. It’s supposed to be based on fact and not ideology or belief.” tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

79


“IN THE FUTURE,” SHE SAYS, “DIFFERENT COMPANIES [ARE] GOING TO KNOW A TON ABOUT YOU, AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL ALRIGHT WHAT IF YOU COULD GET ALL THAT DATA AND USE IT AS A WAY TO UNDERSTAND WHO YOU ARE?’”

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DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


laurie frick DATA A R T I S T

AN AUSTIN ARTIST IS MAKING NATIONAL WAVES BY TURNING SELF-TRACKING DATA INTO ART

resentations of those patterns. “It really is a sense of self,” says Frick of the process. “You see the colors and the patterns that feel familiar [and] you can start to read or recognize things.” Frick believes data can help us get to know ourselves in a deeply intimate way, and her goal is to present it in a way that’s consumable. “Art gets people to look a lot longer,” she explains. “It holds you, it sort of grabs an emotional part of you that a chart or a paragraph doesn’t.” It’s that idea that was behind “FRICKbits,” her app that launched after a successful Kickstarter campaign in November of last year. “It’s not trying to be anything complicated.” The app, which was built by Austin digital project studio thirteen23, takes location data from your phone and abstracts it. “You earn small bits and clusters for the places you go all the time,” Frick says of the app, which was modeled after a series of her watercolor pattern portraits and allows you to choose a color palette “It’s a simple way for people to experiment with ‘Oh my god, I get my data back

B Y S O F I A S O KO LO V E

in this kind of pattern.’” Frick has felt strongly since starting her self-surveillance work nearly five years ago that our behavioral patterns are our own, and we should

“Run towards your data,” is artist Laurie Frick’s mantra. Originally trained

reclaim them as such. “Life makes beautiful patterns, it belongs to you,” is

as an engineer, Frick now uses her background in tech to create large-scale

another mantra of Frick’s. “In the future,” she says, “different companies

mixed-media and visually stunning pieces, transforming personal data into

[are] going to know a ton about you, and I thought, ‘Well alright what if

abstract artwork. Her unique approach and ability to seamlessly navigate

you could get all that data and use it as a way to understand who you are?’”

the intersection between the visual arts and science is gaining her well-de-

Her concepts have been well received in the art world — in addition to her

served national attention in both the creative and technology industries.

recent solo exhibition this summer at the renowned Pavel Zoubok Gallery

Frick is pretty into self-surveillance. She has an EEG monitor to measure

in New York City’s Chelsea neighborhood, Frick has been widely exhibited

sleep patterns, a calorie counting app, a wireless scale and a time tracking

in California and Texas and covered by outlets like The Atlantic, NPR and

logging system on her computer that records where she spends her time

The Huffington Post.

online — just to name a few. “We’re at this moment in the world where ev-

It’s not just the art world that’s responding to Frick’s work. Recently,

erything’s becoming tracked and measured about us. And people are a little

she’s started connecting with companies like Samsung and Microsoft. On

freaked out, or they find it a little creepy or they’re worried,” Frick explains.

a recent project with the Samsung labs mobile phones team, Frick was

She, on the other hand, sees it as an opportunity to understand ourselves

surprised by the company’s interest in making data collection more of a

in a really intricate way: “It’s almost like technology boosted mindfulness.”

two-way street. “They were really interested in the idea of how all this

The way she creates her “data selfies” as she sometimes jokingly calls

data that’s gathered in the phone could be a reflection of who you are,” she

them is this: she takes the numbers and data from her various measure-

says. “Samsung was really interested in finding ways to give data back to

ment tools (data she sees as “unapproachable” on its own), and studies the

the user, but the problem they really find is ‘Well, what do we give them?

algorithms and patterns. She then uses different types of colorful, textured

A bunch of spreadsheets? It’s gonna be junk, it’s gonna be this completely

materials like wood, leather or recycled paper, to create abstract visual rep-

unintelligible mess.’ And I said: ‘Well, give it back to them as art.’” tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

81


dr. eric tang

A S S IS TA N T PRO FE SSO R AT TH E UN I VERS I TY O F TEX AS AT AUSTIN

A UT PROFESSOR DISCUSSES THE BENEFIT — AND BLOWBACK — OF EXAMINING AUSTIN’S AFRICAN-AMERICAN DIASPORA.

B Y K AT I E F R I E L

always invoked it as part of what gave me motivation.” After landing a visiting professorship at Harvard University, he took a tenure track position at the University of Illinois at Chicago before being offered a position at the University of Texas at Austin in 2009. Though he was teaching courses on urban unrest, black studies and social movements at UT’s College of Liberal Arts, Tang said it was what he experienced outside the classroom that ultimately inspired him to conduct his now influential research. “Austin is so different from New York, yet it’s still a major city. I was really intrigued,” he says. What intrigued the professor wasn’t just the he could spend his lunch break in Barton Springs, it was that for the first time ever, he wasn’t just researching racial segregation, he was living it. “Walking through neighborhoods, driving through neighborhoods, moving in and out of public spaces and seeing just so how homogeneously white, black, Mexican the public spaces are here, on the one hand, it shouldn’t take me totally by surprise as a person who studies cities, but it also didn’t square with Austin’s reputation with itself.” Intrigued, Tang looked for answers only to find there weren’t any. “I am being honest, this is not false modesty, I thought someone must have stud-

82

Growing up as an Asian-American kid in Jamaica, Queens, Dr. Eric Tang

ied this question.”Along with a team of graduate students, Tang began ana-

learned to keep his head down. “I grew up in the ‘80s. The ‘80s and early

lyzing the data and quickly clued into the key question: Why was the third

‘90s in New York was a crucible of racial tension,” says Tang. “I grew up during

fastest growing city in the U.S. losing its black population?

[racially-charged incidents like] Howard Beach, Bensonhurst, Crown Heights

At first, it appeared that what was happening in Austin was similar

… I think if anything, I’ve been ever since then on a journey to understand that.”

to trends in cities like Washington, DC, San Francisco, Chicago and Los

It’s a journey that began as a community organizer. Though he experi-

Angeles — cities becoming more service-based in industry and attracting

enced racial tensions growing up in New York City, Tang says it wasn’t until

college grads with higher wages who were pushing out minority residents.

college that he first began to understand systemic inequality. “That compels

Says Tang, “Something didn’t sit right with me in that easy comparison.”

you to commit your life to addressing it in some way. You’ve got the social

Six months into his research, he realized the key difference between us and

capital to do so: the college education and you’re passionate about those is-

those other cities was Austin was growing at a rapid rate — the fastest in the

sues. At the time, I thought community organizing was the best way to do it.”

nation behind Charlotte, North Carolina and Fort Worth. Of the top ten fast-

After graduating from New York University, Tang spent a decade going door

est growing cities (those with more than a half million people and at least 10

to door in the Bronx, working with marginalized populations and trying to

percent growth in population between 2000-2010), Austin was the only one

better understand the effect of unjust policies and systems.

to lose part of its African-American population. Austin was the outlier.

A decade into his work as a community organizer, Tang found out he and

Tang’s resulting study, which was released in 2014, made national head-

his partner were expecting a child. “I had been taking grad classes at [NYU],

lines, and was covered in almost every major paper including the Washing-

but I wasn’t committed,” says Tang. “When I realized we were having a kid,

ton Post and the New York Times. It set off a firestorm of debate both locally

I just got it done.” He returned to school, finished his Ph.D. and took a job

and nationally, and forced Austinites to meditate on how a city with such a

teaching at the City University of New York.

liberal reputation can be so deeply rooted in segregation.

Heading into the second phase of his career as an academic, Tang knew

Following its release, the study, and by extension Tang, was the focal

that what would differentiate him from his peers was his decade spent work-

point of criticism from outlets like Nate Silver’s blog FiveThirtyEight, which

ing in the community. “I never shied away from my organizing past, I’ve

argued that by redrawing the boundaries of the city, the African-Amer-

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


ican population actually showed a net increase. “That was a remarkable thing to see,” says Tang. “[Of course] one could argue, ‘Well if you draw the map differently and you include Del Valle and Round Rock and Pflugerville, then we would actually see some small growth in African Americans.’ But Austin’s city limits are Austin’s city limits.” The other key criticism Tang heard was from people who wondered why it was even an issue at all. “A lot of people asked me, ‘How do you know people weren’t taking advantage of these bedroom communities? Why are you making this a story of woe and hardship?’ And I’m like, ‘Why don’t we ask them?’” And so, that’s what he’s doing. Over the next six months, Tang will release three additional studies based on his interviews with multi-generational African-American families who have left Austin over the past decade. In addition to those studies, Tang is also writing a book for University of Texas Press, which is slated to hit shelves in 2017. Despite the criticism, Tang is proud of his work, and the questions of identity and history that it has Austinites pondering. But more than that he’s seeing the research, the very thing he left community organizing for, making a change. “When you get to answer burning questions for a living, you are privileged, you are very lucky. I see that as motivation. And if you get to produce data that’s actually relevant to people who are feeling marginalized, forgotten about and misrepresented, that’s even more fulfilling. That’s good work if you can get it.”

“if you get to produce data that’s actually relevant to people who are feeling marginalized, forgotten about and misrepresented, that’s even more fulfilling. That’s good work if you can get it.” tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

83


“I GREW FROM A LONG LINE OF ENTREPRENEURS.I NEVER KNEW ANYONE WHO ‘WORKED FOR THE MAN.’’’

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DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


jessica honegger F O U N D E R A N D C E O O F N O O N DAY CO L L E C T I O N

MEET THE WOMAN BEHIND THE FASTEST GROWING COMPANY IN AUSTIN.

B Y K AT I E F R I E L

westerner also volunteering — and together they continued on to Guatemala. “[Joe] was always the one who was vacuuming and putting the chairs away [after meetings], he had such a sweet, servant nature about him,” Honegger says. Eventually, the couple returned to the U.S. and landed back in Austin. Unsure what to do next, the pair began flipping houses and Honegger began working towards a master’s degree in education at Texas State. Together the pair had two children, and began research into adopting a third from Rwanda. When the economy started to slide into a recession in 2008, houses that had previously stayed on the market for days now sat for months. Halfway through the adoption process, the family realized they needed help raising funds to bring their son home. Inspired by her trips to Africa, Honegger decided to host a trunk show at her home featuring jewelry made by Ugandan women. Eighty of her friends showed up, and Honegger walked away with enough money to bring her son home from Uganda — and an idea. “At the time, five years ago, there weren’t a ton of fashion-forward, fair trade brands that were also social selling models,” explains Honegger. Inspired by one of her favorite Bible verses, Isaiah 58:10, she trademarked

In retrospect, Jessica Honegger could have lived a very different life.

the name “Noonday Collection.” She began curating jewelry from women

Growing up in San Antonio, Honegger had a self-described “comfortable

in countries in East Africa, Southeast Asia, as well as Central and South

upbringing” in the tony Alamo Heights neighborhood. In the early 1990s,

America. (Noonday has since brought on a creative team that designs the

Honegger, then a “strong-willed and curious” eighth grader, embarked on

jewelry and then outsources the work to women in these countries.)

a church mission trip to the then-downtrodden Washington, DC neighbor-

The decision to go into business for herself was easy, says Honegger. “I

hood of Adams Morgan. It was an experience, says Honegger, that forever

grew from a long line of entrepreneurs. My dad owned his own business,

changed the course of her life. “I remember being in this home for women

my grandad was this crazy rancher, oil man guy. I never knew anyone who

recovering from drug addiction, and … looking outside the window and

‘worked for the man.’’’ In 2010, she brought on a co-CEO, Travis Wilson,

they said it was the largest open-air drug market in [the city],” says Honeg-

and together the pair has created Austin’s fastest growing business.

ger. “I think that juxtaposition of being in my country’s capital, two miles

Part of what has contributed to Noonday Collection’s success is its social

from the White House and yet seeing poverty and what it [was doing] to

selling model (think your grandmother’s Tupperware parties, but cooler),

the community [impacted me].”

which allow “Ambassadors” to work when they want. Says Honegger, “Be-

The mission trip had such an impact on Honegger that four years later when it came time to apply to college, she submitted multiple applica-

ing an entrepreneur and an ambitious woman, I feel like I just want to give women permission to be ambitious.”

tions at universities in DC. Though she was accepted into most, her father,

She also wants to give back. Since its inception, Noonday Collection has

a fourth generation Aggie, quickly nixed the idea; Honegger rebelled by

made supporting adoption part of its business model, and today 10 per-

instead attending the University of Texas at Austin. While at UT, Honegger

cent of all trunk show sales are given to adoptive families. For a company

majored in Latin American studies and continued her mission work, re-

whose revenue was $11.8 million in 2014, that means real change. “When

turning to volunteer in DC and abroad.

women come together, we rise and shine. When we talk about these heavy

Post college, while working for Food for the Hungry International in Bolivia, Honegger met the man who would become her husband — a Mid-

things, poverty or the orphan crisis, it can feel heavy and debilitating, [Noonday] stands for something, creating something.” tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

85


philipp meyer AUTHOR

A PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST SHARES WHY HE PREFERS AUSTIN OVER NEW YORK OR LA B Y S O F I A S O KO LO V E

writing grad schools, and, you guessed it, got rejected by all of them. Then Meyer had a “huge artistic turnaround — it actually was the beginning of my current trajectory” and when he applied to schools the second time around, he got into several, including the Michener Center at the University of Texas at Austin. UT is the place that not only launched his career, but converted him into a forever Austinite. (After living here on and off for the past 10 years, Meyer recently bought a home in Bouldin Creek.) During his final year as a Michener fellow, Random House imprint Spiegel & Grau bought Meyer’s third manuscript, American Rust. It was on all accounts a critically successful book, and it sold well. But it didn’t sell like Meyers’ second novel, The Son. Published in 2013, The Son was a Pulitizer Prize finalist and landed on almost every “Ten Best Books of 2013” list there is. NPR called it “one of the most solid, unsparing pieces of American historical fiction to come out this century,” and The Washington Post said “it makes a viable claim to be a great American novel.” Lately, Meyer has spent time in Los Angeles, running the writer’s room for AMC’s adaptation of The Son. “I got lucky because a lot of people

The author of The Son — the epic, Pulitzer Prize nominated novel about a Texas

wanted it,” he explains about selling the rights to The Son. “It was one

oil-and-ranching dynasty that has been called “the most ambitious Texas novel

of those things where it was take a seven-figure paycheck for the rights

in thirty years” — is actually not from Texas. At least not originally.

and walk away. That was pretty tempting.” But talking with his best

Philipp Meyer grew up in Baltimore, Maryland with parents who were

friend Brian McGreevy (a fellow novelist and Michener graduate who

“artsy bohemian types,” and although they weren’t always poor, they were

adapted his own graphic novel, Hemlock Grove, for Netflix) he thought

struggling lower middle class by the time he left the house. “I never want-

about the other option: having a hand in adapting the show himself. “It’s

ed to be poor after that,” he remembers vowing, and so even though he

less money by a lot,” he says, “But I thought, artistically, it’d be interesting

graduated from Cornell with a 600-page manuscript under his belt (“It was

to adapt it.” And so he did.

quite bad”) and an English degree, he headed into the world of investment banking as a derivatives trader at UBS on Wall Street.

86

Meyer is happy to be back in Austin, and is refreshingly honest about why here — not LA or New York City — is where he feels most at home.

Meyer kept writing on the side though, and halfway through his second

“It’s perfect,” he says of the Capital City. “There are enough creative people

manuscript (which he decided was “fine”), something changed for him: “I

here that you can have a conversation with a lot of random people, and a

kind of knew I was an artist,” he says, and realizing he actually didn’t care

lot of people are doing something artistic. Whether it’s music, visual art,

about money, he confidently quit his banking job. “I never actually thought

or writing. So people get what that is. But also no one [cares]. And as

about it,” says Meyer. “It was just a switch [thrown]. I was like, ‘Oh this is

much as I think I fantasize it’d be nice to have some level of public recog-

what I’m supposed to be doing.’”

nition…for the most part, you just want to be left alone.”

Unfortunately, the literary world didn’t agree, at least not at first. “That

Meyer isn’t shy about his success, and even jokes, “Where is my Nobel

second book I finished was rejected by every single literary agent in the

Prize by the way?” But what he lacks in humility, the author makes up for

country,” he says “It was a least a hundred, because I kept track.” Out of

in gratitude. When Meyer talks about his many achievements, he often

money and living in his parents’ basement, Meyer worked manual labor

stops himself, puts both hands together at his chest and says, “Thank you,

jobs for a bit while continuing to write. He applied to a slew of creative

universe.”

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


Founded in 2010, WeWork now has 30 locations across the globe.

88

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


9 TO 5 BY AUDREY MCGLINCHY | PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREW CHAN

LIVING IN A TOWN fueled by the creative and tech industries, Austinites are used to seeing CEOs working from coffee shops and likeminded creatives sharing east side industrial spaces. Over the past decade, co-working has gone mainstream, and collaborating offices spaces are popping up across the nation. Austin is home to more than a dozen of these spaces. We popped into three — Vuka, WeWork and Chelsea Laine Francis’ weekly Caffé Medici meet-up — to find out just why locals are ditching the traditional office for a new way to work. tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

89


Tim Angelillo’s business is taking off, he says, thanks to creative energy at WeWork.

TIM ANGELILLO SOURCED

The international co-working chain WeWork opened its Austin site at Sixth Street and Congress Avenue earlier this year. Tim Angelillo has worked out of the space since it opened and it’s where, two months ago, he launched his company, Sourced. The business delivers everything a party host needs – ingredients, tools, dishware — to make and serve craft cocktails. For Angelillo and his new business, the various startups that work out of WeWork have provided invaluable information; one member even advised him on how much equity he should be offering in each round of fundraising. The energy, he said, is hard to eclipse. “Not everyone in there is making a craft cocktail,” said Angelillo. “But everyone in there is literally making something.”

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DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


WEWORK

WeWork has rapidly grown since it first took up residence on Congress Avenue in downtown Austin. tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

91


VUKA

92

DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


Zoe Schlag runs her

ZOE SCHLAG UNLTD USA

four-person business from the South Austin co-working space.

Each day, roughly 75 people work beneath Vuka’s vaulted ceilings in South Austin. The space predominantly attracts companies trying to make a social impact, like UnLtd USA, founded by Zoe Schlag. The company mentors new, socially minded organizations by helping them access capital and resources during a one-year fellowship. Schlag is one of a four-person team that, in her words, has “unofficially claimed the standing table.” One of the companies UnLtd USA is currently mentoring, PenPal Schools, also works out of Vuka. This makes scheduling, Schlag said, easy. Another advantage? The space’s proximity to Mellizoz Tacos. “I get ‘The ‘04 with no beans on corn every time,” said Schlag.

Caption goes here, this is where the caption would go. Captions are great because they tell us what we are looking at. tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

93


#ATX COWORKING LADIES NIGHT CHELSEA LAINE FRANCIS FREELANCE PHOTOGRAPHER

Whereas WeWork and Vuka own space in Austin, Francis borrows hers. Every Tuesday night, the photographer hosts a co-working group at Caffé Medici on West Lynn Street. It’s almost exclusively women (the group’s hashtag is #atxcoworkingladies, though they say men are welcome), many of whom are bloggers, graphic designers and photographers. Francis first discovered the power of co-working while living in Virginia, “I was a community manager for a co-working space called TOOLRY,” explains Francis. “I had heard of co-working before, but I didn’t know how incredibly beneficial it was until after I started my job there.” After moving to Austin with her husband earlier this year, Francis quickly ingratiated herself in the local creative community. For her, hosting the co-working nights is an extension of that community. “ I love the fact that on any given week, I see someone from the group hire another member of the group to further their business.”

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DECEMBER 2015 tribeza.com


The makeshift office at CaffĂŠ Medici allows freelance creatives to come together and share ideas.

tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

95


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style

PICK

Owner Tarica Navarro created a clean aesthetic inside the shop as way to showcase the products.

This sweet shop features good that are not only beautiful, but functional.

Kettle & Brine FO O D EN T H U S I A S T S F LO C K TO AU S T I N ’ S L AT E S T G O U R M A N D S H O P

A

trip to Kettle & Brine in Austin’s West End neighborhood is a feast an extension of that passion and a way to create a dialogue. The store was for the senses. In the store's center, a bold brass counter piece started to bring together products that were not only visually beautiful, sshines amidst white walls, raw pecan wood and steel shelving. but designed with intention. “When a product is both visually inspiring Design choices such as these were strategic for Tarica Navarro, the propri- and a joy to use because of its intentional design, we place more value in etor of Kettle & Brine, whose clean, natural aesthetic is evident through- it,” says Navarro adding, “It's as simple as getting excited to use my wooden out the space. “It was important to create a neutral backdrop to allow the spatula or cutting board so I cook more meals at home, spend more time products to shine,” she says. with family around the table, nurturing relationships around a joint meal A quick perusal of the shop reveals Kettle & Brine to be more than your experience.” average kitchen supply store. Rather, it is a place that connects people with The shop’s identity, which is evident throughout the finishes and fingerfood and celebrates worldly craft. From family-made Spanish knives to prints left by worldly artisans, is perhaps best encapsulated by its name. Japanese serving pieces, Mauviel copper cookware, and locally cast por- “The kettle represents the utilitarian accessories, while the brine stands celain, Kettle & Brine’s curated product selection celebrates the best of for the extra little efforts that go a long way in making a great meal,” says handcrafted work. Navarro. “In the end, it represents the special things that 908 W 12th St. Growing up in Thailand, Navarro’s passion for food develmake the ordinary better, and everyday more enjoyable.” (512) 375 4239 S. LEWIS oped from an early age. Today, Navarro says Kettle & Brine is

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P H OTO G R A P H Y BY C H EL S E A L A I N E F R A N C I S


SEPTEMBER 27, 2015 – JANUARY 24, 2016

Strange Pilgrims Charles Atlas, Trisha Baga, Millie Chen, Phil Collins, Andy Coolquitt, Ayşe Erkmen, Roger Hiorns, Nancy Holt, Lakes Were Rivers, Angelbert Metoyer, Bruce Nauman, Yoko Ono, Paul Sharits, Sofía Táboas

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Betty and Edward Marcus Sculpture Park / Laguna Gloria 3809 West 35th Street Austin, Texas 78703

Strange Pilgrims is organized by The Contemporary Austin. Special venue support and artist-in-residence partnership has been provided through the Visual Arts Center in the Department of Art and Art History at The University of Texas at Austin. Strange Pilgrims Exhibition Support: The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, AXA Art Americas Corporation, Suzanne Deal Booth, Lannan Foundation, The Moody Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, Texas Monthly, Vision Fund Leaders and Contributors. This project is supported in part by the Cultural Arts Division of the City of Austin Economic Development Department, a grant from the Texas Commission on the Arts, and by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Art Works.

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dining P I C K dining P I C K

P H OTO G R A P H Y CO U RT E S Y O F P R ELO G ' S


dining

Juniper

PICK

2400 East Cesar Chavez #304 juniperaustin.com

AU S T I N C U L I N A RY A N D D E S I G N S TA R S CO M B I N E AT T H I S N E W E A S T AU S T I N S PAC E

J

uniper's greatness comes as no surprise. I sensed its potential long before it opened, when chef Nicholas Yanes hosted a pop-up preview dinner last summer and dazzled me with Italian-inspired dishes prepared in a borrowed kitchen. Fast-forward six months and the reality is as good as the tease. Juniper is open and it’s a stunner. As Austin overflows with Instagram-worthy chefs, few hit the high notes like Yanes. To get the full experience at Juniper, dine at the stylish bar overlooking the open kitchen, a theatrical laboratory bustling with sous chefs, cooks, mixologists and sommeliers. Yanes is stationed up front, giving every dish a meticulous final inspection before it is whisked to diners. His technique-driven cuisine is like edible art. High in style but low in pretense, it’s accessible, approachable and wildly delicious. His varied background (stints at Uchi and travels to Italy) juxtaposes minimalist and comfort cuisine. Most plates are meant for sharing, so we ordered with abandon. Presentation is half the fun at Juniper: raw half-shell oysters were nestled on a bed of sea salt atop a wooden plank, then dotted with basil and tomato seeds and a white balsamic “sea foam” that mimicked the ocean surf. Next came a delicious riff on the classic Caesar: a salad of wilted winter greens perched on a bed of fluffy eggs piped out of a pastry bag, and seasoned with cracked black pepper and freshly grated Parmesan cheese. We were tempted by the head-turning Little Lettuces salad: an entire head of Bibb lettuce P H OTO G R A P H Y BY DA N I EL C AVA ZOS

stuffed with fresh herbs, drizzled with honeyshallot dressing, and sprinkled with crispy bits. And we drooled over the chicken liver, a creamy smear of pate scattered with candied grapefruit, cress and pistachios. But we opted instead for the Puffy Potatoes, glorified tater tots filled with Parmesan cheese and served with a whipped dijon dipping sauce. Even the obligatory bread course got special attention: soft homemade slices studded with poppy and coriander seeds and served with cultured butter dotted with adorable tiny herbs. My Italian husband insisted on the risotto. Grated beets transformed the creamy rice into a vibrant purple hue, swirled with duck confit, mushrooms and a dollop of mascarpone cheese. I chose a lighter dish of ruby trout, poached in white wine with fennel and orange. Lastly, we had steak, a dish we’d previously enjoyed at the preview dinner. Silky cubes of ribeye sauced with tomato emulsion and a piquant chunky chimichurri — it was as good as we’d remembered. With little room for dessert, we contemplated the amazing chocolate “dinner mint,” but chose the miniature cannoli filled with pistachio-citrus ricotta and served with dark chocolate sauce. Equally as good as Juniper’s food is its serious beverage program loaded with custom cocktails, craft beers and diverse wines. We’re lucky to be living in Austin during these halcyon days of creative new restaurants. But few tick all the boxes — food, drink, service, ambience — like Juniper does. It’s the total package. Go. There. Now. K. SPEZIA tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

101


dining

PICK

2.

1.

3. 1. Michael Yanes, formerly of Uchi, delivers on the new east side Italian spot. 2. Enjoy deconstructed, modern takes on Italian classics like this zucchini with a sofrito emulsion, lemon and parsley. 3. Service & Beverage Director Nic Vascocu oversees the restaurant's cocktail program. 4. Mark Cravotta of Cravotta Interiors blended opulence with laid back chic to create an elegant space. 5. Both the food and the decor combine

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5.

4.

7.

6. a mix of Northern Italian influences with Austin style. 6. Juniper offers a mix of shared plates and entrees, cocktails and an impressive wine list. 7. The risotto comes with grated beets, duck confit, mushrooms and dollop of mascarpone cheese.

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY DA N I EL C AVA ZOS

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RING IN THE HOLIDAYS AT THESE COZ Y AND FESTIVE AUSTIN RESTAUR ANTS .

TACO FLATS

24 DINER

APIS

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

23526 Hwy. 71 West | (512) 436 8918

5520 Burnet Rd. #101 | (512) 284 8352

As the name suggests, this dinner

Situated on six acres in the Texas

The resurrected Taco Flats located on Burnet

promises delicious plates 24/7. Head

Hill Country, the menu at Apis pays

Road has become known for slinging traditional

over any time of the day or night to

homage to the honeybee through the

Mexican tacos on handmade tortillas, a crafty

satisfy cravings. Menu highlights

innovative use of fresh produce and

agave-based cocktail program, and its extensive

include roasted chicken, burgers,

honey provided by the restaurant’s

beer list. Reclaimed woods, custom furniture,

breakfast served around the clock,

own apiary.

and light fixtures create a laid back interior with

and one of a kind milkshakes like

good energy. Long communal seating, a large U-

roasted banana and brown sugar.

APOTHECARY CAFÉ AND

shaped bar, and an open style kitchen will remind

An extensive gluten free menu is also

WINE BAR

you of trendy neighborhood bars in Mexico City.

available.

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 371 1600 Apothecary’s soothing ambiance and

34TH STREET CAFÉ

GUSTO 4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100 Upscale-casual Italian in the heart of the Rosedale neighborhood. Fresh pastas, hand-tossed

excellent wine selection make it a great

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400 Consistently

satisfying

spot for drinks and bites with friends.

American

fare that toes the casual/fancy line

ARRO

— great for weeknight dinners and

601 W. 6th St. | (512) 992 2776

weekend indulgences alike. Order the

From Easy Tiger and 24 Diner’s ELM

chicken piccata.

Restaurant Group, this West Sixth

pizzas, incredible desserts (don’t miss the

spot offers rich French favorites and

salted caramel budino), and locally sourced,

ALCOMAR

seasonally inspired chalkboard specials. Full

1816 S. 1st St. | (512) 401 3161

bar with craft cocktails, local beers on tap, and

This seafood spot is a top choice for

ASTI TRATTORIA

boutique wines from around the world.

lunch or dinner. The newest concept

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

from the folks behind El Chile and

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria of-

El Chilito, Alcomar serves up some of

fers delicious Italian cuisine, like saf-

the city’s most delicious Latin Ameri-

fron risotto with seafood.

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

an excellent wine list.

can-inspired dishes.

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 ANDIAMO ITALIANO

Miguel offers exquisite Interior Mexican

2521 Rutland Dr. | (512) 719 3377

Austin’s only independent and family-

cuisine in a rich environment to stimulate

This neighborhood restaurant locat-

owned steakhouse has served beef

all the senses. Stunning fine art, lush tropi-

ed in an unassuming North Austin

aged the same way for over 17 years.

strip mall offers delectable, home-

Make sure to order a fresh seafood ap-

made Italian fare.

petizer; you won't regret it.

cal plants, sparkling light from traditional tin chandeliers…at Fonda San Miguel, your celebration comes alive. 459-4121 or www.

104 DECEMBER 2015

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AUSTIN LAND AND CATTLE

Celebrating 40 years in Austin, Fonda San

fondasanmiguel.com for details.

1205 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 1813


BANGER’S SAUSAGE HOUSE AND

BUFALINA

on bar fare. Take your pick from the exqui-

and Jessica Sanders bring craft cocktails

BEER GARDEN

1519 E. Cesar Chavez | (512) 524 2523

site cocktail menu and grab a spot on the

and American pub fare to drink.well. with

79 Rainey St. | (512) 386 1656

Wood-fired pizza with an elegant, trendy

expansive outdoor patio.

a seasonally changing menu. Snacks to try

Banger’s brings the German biergarten tra-

vibe; Insider tip: Get the Fresca pie.

sages and more than 100 beers on tap.

include fried chickpeas and house-made COUNTER 3. FIVE. VII

dition stateside with an array of artisan sauBULLFIGHT

315 Congress Ave. Ste. 100 | (512) 291 3327

Twinkies.

4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029

Belly up to the counter at this 24-seat space

DUE FORNI

BAR CONGRESS

Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners to

for an intimate dining experience that’s

106 E. 6th St. Ste. 106 | (512) 391 9300

200 Congress Ave. | (512) 827 2760

Spain for classic tapas and an extensive

modern yet approachable.

Due Forni serves up Roman and Neapolitan

Tucked in between Second Bar + Kitchen

wine list.

style pizza from two specially designed brick COUNTER CAFÉ

and the upscale Congress restaurant, Bar

ovens.

Congress stirs up quality, classic cocktails

CAFÉ JOSIE

626 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 708 8800

and delicious fare.

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

1914 E. 6th St.

EAST SIDE KING

Innovative and flavorful plates with fresh

It’s nothing fancy, but this tiny shotgun-style

1816 E. 6th St. | (512) 422 5884

BARLEY SWINE

ingredients, served in a quaint and intimate

diner has some of the city’s best breakfast

Chefs Paul Qui, Moto Utsunomiya and Ek

2024 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 394 8150

atmosphere.

offerings. Both the pancakes and the ham-

Timrek offer out-of-this-world pan-Asian

burger are legendary.

food from across town trailers.

Chef Bryce Gilmore offers small plates with locally-sourced ingredients at communal

CANTINE

high top tables.

1100 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 628 0348

COUNTER CULTURE

EAST SIDE SHOW ROOM

From the owners of Asti and Fino, a chic

2337 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 524 1540

1100 E. 6th St. | (512) 467 4280

BENJI'S CANTINA

and rustic Italian restaurant offering pizzas,

An East Austin haven for vegans and veg-

When you step inside, it’s like stepping into

716 W. 6th St. | (512) 476 8226

cocktails and more.

etarians.

a completely different era. Enjoy delicious

CHINATOWN

CRAVE

spired music, and cuisine by Fermin Nunez.

3407 Greystone Dr. (512) 343 9307

340 E. 2nd St. | (512) 469 0000

On nice nights, head back to the small out-

BLACKBIRD AND HENRY

107 W 5th St | (512) 343 9307

A classic American grill with a chic atmo-

door patio.

3016 Guadalupe St. | (512) 394 5264

Some of the best traditional Chinese food in

sphere and a wide selection of diverse dining

Globally inspired dishes are the star at this

town. Fast service in the dining room and

choices. Grab an intimate corner table and

EASY TIGER

casual but adventurous neighborhood res-

delivery is available.

enjoy lunch, dinner or happy hour!

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

CLARK’S OYSTER BAR

DAI DUE

den downstairs. This downtown restaurant

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 297 2525

2406 Manor Rd. | (512) 524 0688

is the kind of place where you can relax while

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

Small and always buzzing, Clark’s extensive

Dai Due’s breakfast, lunch and dinner

sipping a local brew on the patio as the smell

A cozy, French bistro serving up breakfast,

caviar and oyster menu, sharp aesthetics,

menus change frequently, offering guests a

of croissants and freshly baked pretzels waft

lunch and dinner.

and excellent service make it a refreshing

fleeting but delectable taste of the season’s

over you from upstairs.

indulgence on West Sixth Street. Indoor and

best local offerings. There’s a reason Dai

outdoor seating is available.

Due was named one of Bon Appetit’s Best

EL ALMA

New Restaurant.

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

vintage cocktails, 1930s- and 1940s-in-

Rooftop dining on West Sixth. Benji’s offers a fresh, innovative approach to Tex-Mex.

A delicious bakeshop upstairs and beer gar-

taurant. Enjoy lunch, dinner or brunch.

BOTTICELLI’S 1321 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 916 1315 An inviting trattoria with warm Tuscan col-

CONGRESS

ors, featuring a small bar up front and cozy

200 Congress Ave. | (512) 827 2760

DARUMA RAMEN

booths in back.

One of downtown's premier fine dining

612-B E. 6th St. | (512) 369 3897

Chef-driven, authentic Mexican cuisine with unmatched outdoor patio dining.

spots. Chef David Bull has crafted a menu

From the owners of the popular Kome on

EL NARANJO

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

worthy of his multiple James Beard Award

Airport Boulevard, Daruma features rich

85 Rainey St. | (512) 474 2776

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189

nominations.

chicken broth-based ramen and a simple,

Husband and wife team Iliana de la Vega

veggie-friendly menu.

and Ernesto Torrealba serve up authentic

13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000 Argentinean specialties like meat sand-

CONTIGO

wiches on baguettes, empanadas and tasty

2027 Anchor Ln. | (512) 614 2260

DRINK.WELL.

pastries. Intimate patio seating.

Ranch-to-table cuisine and an elegant take

207 E. 53rd St. | (512) 614 6683

cuisine from Mexico’s interior. Dine al fresco on this charming Rainey Street patio.

Located in the North Loop district, Michael

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105


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

FOODHEADS

Features menu options that surpass the

HENRI’S CHEESE & WINE

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

616 W. 34th St. | (512) 420 8400

typical café, combining deli style favorites

2026 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 442 3373

A charming French-Vietnamese eatery with

Fresh and inspired sandwiches, soups and salads

with comfort food. Bonus points for serving

Equal parts charcuterie, cheese, and wine

a colorful menu of pho, banh mis and more.

in a charming, refashioned cottage and porch.

breakfast until 4pm on weekends.

shop, Henri’s offers a cozy space to explore

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

GARDNER

EPICERIE

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

1914 E. 6th St. Ste. C | (512) 354 1480

HILLSIDE FARMACY

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

Small, neighborhood restaurant in Hyde

The second restaurant from the duo be-

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

A café and grocery with both Louisiana

Park serving thoughtful, locally-sourced

hind Contigo, Gardner provides a seasonal,

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully

and French sensibilities by Thomas Keller-

food at reasonable prices. Come early for

vegetable-focused lesson in balancing flavor,

restored 1950s-style pharmacy with a per-

trained Chef Sarah McIntosh.

Dollar Oyster Tuesdays.

texture and wonder.

fect porch for people watching on the east

FABI + ROSI

FORK & VINE

GLORIA’S

509 Hearn St. | (512) 236 0642

3010 W. Anderson Ln. | (512) 489 7000

3309 Esperanza Crossing Ste. 100 (512) 833 6400

A husband and wife cook up delicious Europe-

New American goes global with Thai curry

300 W. 6th St. #100| (512) 236 1795

HOBOKEN PIE

an-style dishes like pork schnitzel and paella.

shrimp, short rib Wellington and tacos, plus

Perfect for a date night at the Domain, Glo-

718 Red River St. | (512) 477 4256

an expansive wine list.

ria’s serves upscale Mexican cuisine and fea-

Ideally located steps from popular mu-

tures a spacious patio.

sic venues like Mohawk, Red Eye Fly, and

Vibrant and comfortable surrounding patio.

new wines or take a bottle home.

side. Oysters, cheese plates, and nightly din-

FINN & PORTER

ner specials.

500 E. 4th St. | (512) 493 4900

FRANK

Chef Peter Maffei serves up fresh seafood

407 Colorado St. | (512) 494 6916

GOODALL'S KITCHEN AND BAR

and steaks in a sleek and modern space. En-

Bacon-infused bloodies, a dozen different

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

joy new and innovative cocktails in the Finn

artisan hot dog options, and one of the best

Modern spins on American classics and lo-

HOME SLICE PIZZA

& Porter Loft Bar.

beer lists in town.

cally-sourced veggie sides inside Hotel Ella.

1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437

FOGO DE CHAO

FREEDMEN’S

GOURDOUGH’S

to Home Slice Pizza. Open until 3am on

309 E. 3rd St. | (512) 472 0220

2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953

1503 S. 1st St.

weekends for your post bar-hopping con-

An authentic Brazilian steakhouse that

Housed in a historic Austin landmark,

Gourdough’s Public House is famous for

venience and stocked with classics like the

shares the gaucho way of preparing meats.

smoke imbues the flavors of everything at

serving enormous donuts with imagina-

Margherita as well as innovative pies like

Enjoy a fine dining experience unlike any

Freedmen’s from the barbecue, to the des-

tive twists. Order up the Mother Clucker, a

the White Clam and special toppings like

other.

serts, to even their cocktail offerings.

donut topped with a fried chicken strip and

fried eggplant and meatballs.

Stubb’s, hit up Hoboken Pie for a late night slice. Open every night until 2:30am.

For pizza cravings south of the river, head

honey butter. FONDA SAN MIGUEL

FUKUMOTO

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121

514 Medina St. | (512) 770 6880

HAYMAKER

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

Fonda San Miguel serves up traditional

Tucked between Fifth and Sixth streets,

2310 Manor Rd. | (512) 243 6702

A gastropub with French inclinations, a

Mexican cuisine in a sophisticated and col-

Fukumoto serves up fresh sushi made with

Comfort food meets sports bar meets beer

beautiful patio and unique cocktails. The

orful setting. For more than 40 years, Fonda

high quality seafood, local produce and an

pub in Cherrywood, an easygoing place to

wine list is excellent and the perfect pairing

has been serving some of Austin's best mole

inventive menu.

get a craft beer and elevated bar food. Get the

for the restaurant’s famed steak frites and

namesake: The Haymaker is an open-faced

moules frites.

from its charming North Loop locale.

106 DECEMBER 2015

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HOPFIELDS

GALAXY CAFÉ

roast beef sandwich, topped with flavorful

4616 Triangle Ave. | (512) 323 9494

slaw, tomatoes, a fried egg, decadent gruyere

1000 W. Lynn St. | (512) 478 3434

sauce, and — wait for it — French fries.


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HOUSE PIZZERIA

ting on one of the best patios in the city at

ever-changing menu of seasonal ingredients

American comfort food reigns at Liberty

5111 Airport Blvd. | (512) 600 4999

Juliet. Enjoy a curated wine list and twists

with an emphasis on simple, yet soulful,

Kitchen, with fresh takes on classic plates

A choice pizza place for a spontaneous night

on classic Italian dishes.

dishes. Paired with their extensive wine list,

like deviled eggs, seafood and burgers.

it’s the perfect setting to celebrate any spe-

out. Fresh and simple. Try the roasted olives and the kale salad too!

JUNIPER

cial occasion.

2400 E. Cesar Chavez St. Ste. 304 | (512) 436 3291

LITTLE BARREL & BROWN 1716 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 582 1229

ISLA

Uchi alum Nicolas Yanes cooks up Northern

LAMBERTS DOWNTOWN BARBECUE

From the owners of Botticelli's, this little

208 W. 4th St. | (512) 322 9921

Italian fare on the east side.

401 W. 2nd St. | (512) 494 1500

resto serves New American/comfort food.

Not your standard barbecue fare, meats at

With an impressive 24 seats, this restaurant

KOMÉ

Lambert’s have an Austin twist, like the rib-

boasts the biggest bar on South Congress.

4917 Airport Blvd. | (512) 712 5700

eye glazed with brown sugar and mustard.

ITALIC

Japanese comfort food made with fresh

Tucked away in the historic Schneider Broth-

LONESOME DOVE WESTERN BISTRO

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

ingredients and served in inventive ways.

ers Building in the Second Street District.

419 Colorado St. | (512) 271 2474

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Easy

Daily lunch specials include three types of

Tiger presents simple, rustic Italian plates.

ramen.

Caribbean-focused fare shines at Isla with tropical tiki sips and bites.

The Austin outpost of Tim Love’s Fort LA TRAVIATA

Worth institution boldly fuses earthy game

314 Congress Ave. | (512) 479 8131

like wild boar and creative dishes like hama-

KORIENTE

Authentic Italian in a cozy downtown set-

chi tostadas.

621 E. 7th St. | (512) 275 0852

ting; known for their wickedly rich and deli-

JACK ALLEN’S KITCHEN

Healthy, tasty Korean options like bulgogi

cious Spaghetti alla Carbonara.

7720 Hwy. 71 W. | (512) 852 8558

and curry dishes all served up by the friendly

Savor country favorites from Chef Jack

staff.

Don’t miss the sweet delicacies from Pastry Chef Mary Katherine Curren.

LUCKY ROBOT 1303 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 8081

LAVACA TEPPAN

A futuristic dining experience on South

1712 Lavaca St. | (512) 520 8630

Congress, inspired by the vibrant culture

LA BARBECUE

Serving your favorite Japanese dishes along

and cuisine of Tokyo.

JEFFREY’S

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696

with fun Sake twists to classic cocktails, like

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

Though it may not be as famous as that other

the MoSakeJito and the Sake Colada.

This historic Clarksville favorite has main-

Austin barbecue joint, La Barbecue is argu-

tained the execution, top-notch service and

ably just as delicious. This trailer, which is

LAUNDERETTE

2218 College Ave. | (512) 297 2423

luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that

owned by the legendary Mueller family,

2115 Holly St. | (512) 382 1599

Two locations, same straight-up Southern

makes Jeffrey’s an old Austin staple.

whips up classic barbecue with free beer and

Culinary magicians Rene Ortiz and Laura

goodness, from moon pies to fried green

live music.

Sawicki surprise diners at this east side gem

tomatoes to corn muffins to the crème de la

with menu items like crispy pork ribs and a

crème: fried chicken.

Gilmore on the covered patio.

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

LUCY’S FRIED CHICKEN 5408 Burnet Rd. | (512) 514 0664 &

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

LA CONDESA

Rustic, continental fare with an empha-

400 W. 2nd St. | (512) 499 0300

sis on fresh, local and organic ingredients.

Delectable cocktails, tasty tacos and ap-

LENOIR

4700 W. Guadalupe St. | (512) 419 9700

Serving lunch, happy hour, and dinner, the

petizers and delicious main courses, all

1807 S.1st St. | (512) 215 9778

Casual Italian fare and a well-stocked gour-

shady porch is the perfect spot for a late-

inspired by the hip and bohemian Condesa

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-

met grocery, alongside a deli, bakery, and

afternoon paloma.

neighborhood in Mexico City.

inspired prix-fixe meal in an intimate dining

espresso bar. Grab a gelato and unwind on

room and table that seats just 34 diners.

the patio overlooking the Triangle.

birthday cake ice cream sandwich. MANDOLA’S ITALIAN MARKET

JULIET RISTORANTE

LA V

1500 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 479 1800

1501 E. 7th St. | (512) 391 1888

LIBERTY KITCHEN

MANUEL’S

A Texas breeze feels Italian when you’re sit-

This elegant French restaurant boasts an

507 Pressler, Suite 700 | (512) 840 1330

310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555 &

108 DECEMBER 2015

tribeza.com


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

10201 Jollyville Rd. | (512) 345 1042 Definitely not your standard Tex-Mex, Manuel’s hits all the right notes for its upscale Mexican cuisine, cleanly presented in a chic setting. METTLE 507 Calles St. | (512) 507 0396 Created by Rainey Street proprietor Bridget Dunlap, Mettle offers a diverse, oftenexperimental menu exciting for omnivores and vegetarians alike. MONGERS MARKET + KITCHEN 2401 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 680 5045 Chef Shane Stark brings a casual Texas Gulf Coast sensibility to East Austin by slinging fresh seafood in the kitchen and at the counter. MOONSHINE PATIO BAR + GRILL 303 Red River St. | (512) 236 9599 Both a popular dinner and brunch spot, Moonshine’s decadent Southern comfort food is a downtown favorite. NORTH 11506 Century Oaks Ter. | (512) 339 4440 Enjoy modern Italian cuisine in a sleek interior at this Domain standout. NO VA KITCHEN & BAR 87 Rainey St. | (512) 382 5651 Subtle design elements make this space cohesive and modern. Enjoy creative twists on classic, comforting dishes from a pork belly/sirloin burger to seasonally topped flatbread pizza. ODD DUCK 1201 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 433 6521 Famed food trailer turned brick-and-mor-

tar, Odd Duck was the first venture from

PERLA’S SEAFOOD & OYSTER BAR

Great spot for lunch with coworkers or an

acclaimed chef Bryce Gilmore. Expect sea-

1400 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 291 7300

elegant night out with friends and family.

sonal fare and drinks with a Texas influence

A South Congress staple, expect the fresh-

at this South Lamar oasis.

est fish and oysters flown in daily from both

RUSSIAN HOUSE

coasts, carefully prepared with simple yet

307 E. 5th St. | (512) 428 5442

elegant flavors. Go early on a nice day to eat

Step into Russian House and you’ll forget

1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796

oysters and people watch on their fantastic

that you’re even in Austin. Come here for a

A menu that would leave any Southerner

front porch.

slow, relaxing evening to experience deli-

OLAMAIE

drooling, with a dash of contemporary cu-

cious Russian cuisine, and don’t miss out on

linary concepts. The dessert menu offers

PERRY’S STEAKHOUSE & GRILLE

your classic apple pie, or alternatively a more

114 W. 7th St. | (512) 474 6300

trendy goat’s cheese caramel ice cream.

Located downtown in the historic Norwood

SALTY SOW

Also, do yourself a favor and order the bis-

Tower, Perry’s is within easy walking dis-

1917 Manor Rd. | (512) 391 2337

cuits (they’re worth every delectable bite).

tance of the Texas State Capitol and other

Salty Sow serves up creative signature drinks,

downtown landmarks. This location fea-

including a Blueberry-Lemon Thyme Smash.

tures unique décor, patio seating and Perry’s

The food menu, heavy with sophisticated gas-

award-winning menu.

tropub fare, is perfect for late-night noshing.

ated this southern Italian-style restaurant

QUATTRO GATTI RISTORANTE

SANTA RITA TEX-MEX CANTINA

with a menu that highlights local, sea-

908 Congress Ave. | (512) 476 3131

1206 W. 38th St. | (512) 419 7482 &

sonal ingredients and includes a handful of

Downtown Italian restaurant dishing up

5900 W. Slaughter Ln. Ste. 500 | (512) 288 5100

Northern Italian favorites, too.

delicious antipasti and huge portions of Ital-

Fresh ingredients, traditional recipes, and

ian fare; great date night spot.

outstanding margaritas combined with

OLIVE & JUNE 3411 Glenview Ave. | (512) 467 9898

their many infused vodkas!

Celebrated Austin Chef Shawn Cirkiel cre-

OLIVIA

bright décor, attentive service and solid

2043 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 804 2700

QUI

A South Austin staple emphasizing fresh

1600 E. 6th St. | (512) 436 9626

and local produce. This famed brunch spot

Chef Paul Qui’s headquarters is one of the

SAWYER & CO.

also offers an exciting and diverse menu,

hottest new spots in town for an unparal-

4827 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 531 9033

from foie gras to French toast.

leled dining experience set under an airy,

Bringing more Cajun and soul food options to

beautiful backdrop.

the east side. The mid-century modern design

PARKSIDE

menu offerings.

adds quirk to some seriously good food.

301 E. 6th St. | (512) 474 9898

RAMEN TATSU-YA

This downtown spot is crowded, but the

8557 Research Blvd. Ste. 126 | (512) 339 0855

SEARSUCKER

happy hour — with half-price oysters and

1234 S. Lamar Blvd.

415 Colorado St. | (512) 394 8000

tasty cocktails — is a local favorite.

Japanese comfort food at its finest in Aus-

Stylish Southern fare from San Diego ce-

tin’s first brick-and-mortar, ramen-centric

lebrity chef Brian Malarkey. Go for the

eatery.

decadent small plates: duck fat fries with

PÉCHÉ 208 W 4th. St. | (512) 494 4011

tomato jam and prosciutto "dust," farm bird

Enjoy Prohibition-style cocktails at Austin’s

ROARING FORK

lollipops with bleu cheese, and the “cowboy

first absinthe bar alongside standout dishes of

701 Congress Ave. | (512) 583 0000

caviar.”

smoked duck salad and citrus-dusted salmon.

tribeza.com DECEMBER 2015

109


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

SECOND BAR + KITCHEN

Bold, authentic flavors with ingredients im-

TRACE

bountiful garden and local markets. This

200 Congress Ave. | (512) 827 2750

ported straight from Mexico; cozy outdoor

200 Lavaca St. | (512) 542 3660

Italian-inspired restaurant is a longtime

Another venture from Chef David Bull, Sec-

seating.

At The W Austin, TRACE focuses on re-

Austin favorite.

ond offers a swanky bistro experience in the heart of the 2nd Street District.

sponsibly- and locally-sourced ingredients THE BACKSPACE

from Texan farmers and artisans. Great out-

507 San Jacinto St. | (512) 474 9899

door seating and excellent service.

SIENA RISTORANTE TOSCANA

Classic antipasto and exquisite pizzas hot

6203 Capital of Tx. Hwy. | (512) 349 7667

out of the wood-fired brick oven straight

TRIO

Set in a Tuscan-style villa, Siena captures

from Naples.

98 San Jacinto Blvd. | (512) 685 8300 Wide selection of wines to accompany a

the essence of its namesake region. THE CARILLON RESTAURANT

top-notch steak with amazing views of Lady

SOUTH CONGRESS CAFÉ

1900 University Ave. | (512) 404 3655

Bird Lake.

1600 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 447 3905

Located inside the AT&T Conference Center

A south Austin hotspot, we recommend

on the University of Texas campus, this res-

TRULUCK’S

South Congress Café’s legendary brunch.

taurant serves up sophisticated, American

400 Colorado St. | (512) 482 9000

The carrot cake French toast and migas are

fare that is always artfully presented. Per-

Enjoy nightly entertainment over steak or

to die for.

fect place for a date night.

fresh seafood. Truluck’s serves the freshest crab, direct from their own fisheries, which

SWAY

THE CLAY PIT

1417 S. 1st St. | (512) 326 1999

1601 Guadalupe St. | (512) 322 5131

The culinary masterminds behind La

Zip in for a buffet-style lunch or settle in

UCHI

Condesa cook up Thai cuisine with a mod-

for a long dinner of contemporary Indian

801 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4808

ern twist. An intimate outdoor area, com-

cuisine.

Chef Tyson Cole has created an inventive menu that puts Uchi foremost among sushi

plete with a Thai spirit house, makes for an unforgettable experience.

they incorporate into nearly every dish.

THE GROVE WINE BAR + KITCHEN

spots in Austin.

6317 Bee Cave Rd. | (512) 327 8822 & SWIFT’S ATTIC

800 W. 6th St. | (512) 236 1440

UCHIKO

315 Congress Ave. | (512) 482 8842

Lively, popular Westlake wine bar and Ital-

4200 N. Lamar Blvd. Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808

Overlooking Congress Avenue, Swift’s Attic

ian restaurant. The wine list boasts more

The sensational sister creation of Uchi, and

draws from global inspirations and serves

than 250 wines by the bottle.

former home of Top Chef Paul Qui.

THE OASIS

UNIT-D PIZZERIA

6550 Comanche Trail | (512) 266 2442

2406 Manor Rd. | (512) 524 1922

TACOS AND TEQUILA

Popular spot situated on Lake Travis with

Pizza options abound in Austin, but Unit-D

507 Pressler St. | (512) 436 8226

breathtaking views.

uses an Italian-made pizza oven to fire up

up inventive cocktails in a historic downtown building.

Chef Alma Alcocer is serving up a taste of the Southwest in this modern, industrial space.

pies that are simple, yet thoughtful. THE TOWNSEND 718 Congress Ave. | (512) 887 8778

VESPAIO

TAKOBA

Nibble on charcuterie and cheese or sip one

1610 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 441 6100

1411 E. 7th St. | (512) 628 4466

of their handsome cocktail creations curat-

Daily rotating menus offer the best of the

ed by Justin Elliott.

season and the freshest from Vespaio’s

110 DECEMBER 2015

tribeza.com

VIA 313 PIZZERIA 6705 Highway 290 | (512) 584 8084 Detroit-style pizza that comes in squares, topped with classic ingredients and served in a no-frills environment. Expect the same at their trailers at the Violet Crown Social Club and Craft Pride. VINO VINO 4119 Guadalupe St. | (512) 465 9282 Two words: mussels and fries. This classic, dimly-lit wine joint offers exceptional shared plates and has the some of the friendliest service around. VOX TABLE 1100 S. Lamar Blvd. # 2140 | (512) 375 4869 Across the street from the Alamo Drafthouse at South Lamar, Vox’s “new American fare” is a perfect pick for date night. Be sure to try out their brunch offerings. WINEBELLY 519 W. Oltorf St. | (512) 487 1569 Tapas on Oltorf in a cozy setting. The bistro’s small plates are spins on old favorites and the wine cocktails are a welcome surprise. WINFLO OSTERIA 1315 W 6th St. | (512) 582 1027 Classic Italian fare made simply and with locally-sourced ingredients. WINK 1014 N. Lamar Blvd. Ste. E | (512) 482 8868 Rooted in the traditions of the slow food movement. Stop in for their incredible happy hour.


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style

STREET FA SHION

HALEY LEBEUF Jewelry by Haley Lebeuf

ALEXIS KRAUSS

and boots by Shellys.

Jacket by A.B.S, shirt from UO, skirt from Forever 21, platforms by Dolce Vita and a Brazilian vintage necklace.

SUE FLUGER Sweater from H&M Glasgow, pants from H&M and shoes Abound from Nordstrom Rack.

JASON ARCHER Helm boots, Levi's jeans, shirt by Banana Republic and jacket by Billabong.

W H AT AU S T I N I S W E A R I N G T O. . .

Artists of EAST From downtown cool to Bohemian-inspired looks, the artists of the East Austin Studio Tour are always stylish. P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y D A N I E L C AVA Z O S

KIAH DENSON Shirt from Target, pants by Paige, sandals by Sรถfft, jewelry from Madewell and glasses by David Benjamin.

JORDAN GENTRY Shirt by Generation Love,

JOSH ROW

skirt by Mark and Este from Le Garage Sale and boots by Madewell.

112 DECEMBER 2015

tribeza.com

LINDSEY CREEL Shirt by M.E. Shirley,

Hat by Scala with Canoe band,

pants by Madewell,

shirt by Britton and jacket, pants

boots by Cork-ease, the

altamont, shoes from Billy Reid.

original.


Shown: The not-old-fashioned Ufo table and Sign lounge chairs.

YOU’LL STILL BE

GRANDMA’S

FAVORITE,

DESPITE SAYING NO TO

HER CHINA.

115 West 8th Street Austin 512.480.0436 scottcooner.com


w w w. a l l e n s b o o t s . c o m

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For months, I filled that list with the names of people doing compelling work across the cultural spectrum. If someone told an interesting a...

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