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Issue16 Spring / Summer 2013 www.epikouria.com â‚Ź6.50

Why it Matters

ISSN 1790-5141

How to Grow Healthy


editorial

Live Long and Prosper

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he whole brouhaha about the so-called Mediterranean Diet started back in the 1940s when a Minnesotan researcher noticed that the middle-aged, Midwestern men around him were dropping like flies from coronary heart disease. The researcher, Ancel Keys (of K-Ration fame), postulated that maybe something about their lifestyle was leading them to an early grave. It was. He then set about finding researchers in other countries so that a crosscultural comparison could be made between middle-aged men who consumed vastly different diets. All in all, 12,763 men between the ages of 40-59 years from 7 different countries were recruited. To make a long story short, the group of men in Crete were the big winners (by a wide margin and even though, I tear-up-to-tell-you, they smoked). Calling the diet the “Cretan Diet” was apparently a non-starter, so instead it is now known, utterly erroneously, as the Mediterranean Diet – a name destined to confuse consumers for generations to come.

But meat is cheap, you say, and didn’t those villagers have goats and sheep and cows? They ate cheese, didn’t they? Yes to goats and sheep, no to cows and, sure, lots of cheese. But back then, meat wasn’t cheap (and in the case of goats and sheep, it still isn’t). Goats and sheep are grazing animals; they cannot be feedlotted.This makes them more expensive to raise, and also means you need lots of land to raise them on so they have enough to eat. Today’s meat, and it’s mostly cow the western world eats now, is almost entirely feedlotted. This came about in the 1970s when the US government decided to directly subsidize commodity crops like corn. Corn became cheap. Corn became feed. And the cows came out of the grazing pastures and into factory farms where they could be crammed side to side and pumped with hormones to make them grow fast and antibiotics to keep them from getting sick from such proximity to other animals. That’s why meat is cheap (and a disaster for the environment, but that’s another story). So the question is, do we emulate the eating habits of villagers of 60s Crete, thereby vastly increasing our odds of living long and healthy lives as study after study after study, including the study written about in this issue, has proven? Or do we continue on down the path towards obesity until the majority of the world is supersized? Ellen Gooch Editor-in-Chief

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Photo: George Drakopoulos / Food styling: Tina Webb

What were those long-lived men consuming? A lot of vegetables, nuts, olive oil, fruit, fish and, because there is a God, plenty of wine. What they weren’t eating is much red meat. Before you congratulate them on their rectitude, I should mention that the study took place in the early 1960s. Greece was still feeling the aftereffects of WWII; meat was expensive and few could afford much of it. So what those villagers ate is what was readily available. And the thing about Crete is, there is a whole lot that is ΄ Just take a stroll up any of a number readily available.What some greens to saute? of nearby hills with a bag and some scissors and take as much of the wild stuff as you’d like. Fruit and olive trees abound. Fish is a short boat ride away. Really, all they needed to “import” was wheat flour, because heaven knows the Greeks can’t live without bread.


contents

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News Bites Introducing the latest products from Greece

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Why it matters Food retailers can make a difference

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Mediterranean Diet Shown to ward off heart attack and stroke

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Gourmet Greek Two British shops offer Greek delights

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20 Minute Dishes Speeding down the road toward health

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10 + 1: Honey

Cover Yggdrasil Photo George Drakopoulos Styling Tina Webb

Tell it to the bees

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Last Look Catching the wind, island style

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Advertiser Index page 6 Sourcing Guides page 44

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advertiser index AIQ INTERNATIONAL TRADE LTD

NUTRIA A.E.

Olive oil, Olives, Olive pastes www.aiq.gr

Olive oil www.nutria.gr

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back cover

ARTION GREEK FOODS

UNION OF VINICULTRURAL COOPERATIVES

Olive oil, Olives, honey www.artiongreekfoods.com

SAMOU

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BOUZINELOS NIKOS – GASTOUNIOTI SOFIA

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VICTOR GREEK DISTILLERY S.A.

Vinegar www.sofiatisfisis.gr

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ELAION one S.A.

Olive Oil, Honey www.elaion.com

Samos muscat wines www.samoswine.gr Ouzo, Brandy, Wine, Dessert Wine, Spirits, Liqueur www.ouzovictor.gr

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WINE ROADS OF NORTHERN GREECE

Inside front cover

FARMA PIERIAS L.T.D.

Dairy Products www.farmapierias.gr

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GEORGOUDIS S.A. - PARTHENON

Olives, Mediterranean specialties www.olives.gr

Association of wine producers of the vineyards of Northern Greece www.wineroads.grInside

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ZANAE MEDITERRANEAN DELICATESSEN

Mezes products, ready to serve meals www.zanae.gr

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HELIOS PASTA

Pasta products www.heliospasta.gr

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HEPO

recipe index

Ηellenic Foreign Trade Organization www.hepo.gr

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IONIKI SFOLIATA S.A.

Frozen dough and pastry products www.ionikigr.com

inside back cover

MINERVA S.A.

Olive oil, Olives, Olive paste, margarines, butter, seed oil, cheeses www.minerva.com.gr

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HIGH SPEED GOURMET

Baked Salmon with Butter Sauce

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Latholemono

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Black Beans with Feta

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Roasted Garden

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Makaronia with Healthy Creamy Sauce

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Founder Triaina Publishing – Kyriakos Korovilas Publisher Nikos Korovilas Editor-in-Chief Ellen Gooch Editor-at-Large Diane Pappas Em Smith-Hughs Assistant Editor Diane Pappas Photos George Drakopoulos Food Styling Tina Webb Publishing Advertising Manager Katerina Gitsi Information Technology Philippe Watel Accounting Niki Gavala Triaina Publishing Offices: 110, Syngrou Avenue 117 41 Athens (4th floor) Tel.: +30-210-9240748 Fax: +30-210-9242650 www.epikouria.com e-mail: info@epikouria.com

COPYRIGHT 2013 Triaina Publishing (ISSN 1790-5141), all rights reserved.

Epikouria is a trademark of Triaina Publishing. Reproduction in part or in full is strictly prohibited without written consent. Epikouria assumes no liability for either the content or presentation of advertisements.


News bites from Greece By Em Smith - Hughs

Lemon Lady Ladi Biosas’ premium extra virgin olive oil comes complete with an aesthetic design inspired by its vertical integrated production process. The newest oil, Agrumato, combines olive flavors with the citrus of oranges and lemons. The full-bodied essence leaves you with no reason to be sour. www.ladibiosas.com

Novel Ntolmadakia Forget everything you know about Ntolmadakia.The traditional Greek dish of vineleaf wraps with rice and fresh herbs has been reinvented. The full-flavored Sultana vineleaves, combined with fresh dill, spearmint, parsley and spring onion, now comes in a glass jar and is ready to eat. Experience the taste of grandma’s Ntolmadakia like never before. www.ntolmadakia.com 8

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news Viva La Feta As every Greek knows, the classic dynamic of spinach and feta is impossible to resist. Simple for use as a dip, sauce, or active ingredient in any meal, this spinach and feta pairing is sure to complete you. You had me at “feta”. www.simplygreek.gr

The Wine Monologues MONO is the new brand by TSANTALI that celebrates the indigenous ingredients that Greece has to offer. Let this selection be your introduction to the up & coming trend in winemaking – monovarietal wine. MONO MOSCHOFILERO contains the aroma of rose petal and lemon blossom, with a spicy finish. MONO ATHIRI is a white wine with hints of yellow fruit flavors. MONO MOSCHOMAVRO is a dry red with an accent of clove. There has never been a better time to experience the taste of the Aegean breeze. www.tsantali.com/tsantali.gr

Wholesome Luxuries A new dip by Mylelia puts a spin on traditional caviar. Made with smoked eggplant, roasted almonds, and fresh basil, this full-flavored caviar is an unexpected treat for every occasion. What’s not to love? www.mylelia.gr 10

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news

Newly Wedded Pom Never before has the phrase “to your health” been more exciting. The combination of sparkling moschato bianco and pomegranate juice is just as intriguing as one might suspect. An intensely fresh aroma and low alcohol content make Mr & Mrs Pom idyllic for an afternoon under the “pom” trees. NETRINO netrino@netrino.com.gr

Bottarga Delights Trikalinos Bottarga has developed a new box-set in two luxurious versions: one contains two sticks of bottarga, and the other has one stick of bottarga, a jar of bottarga powder, and a can of fleur de sel. For those who aren’t familiar with bottarga, it is cured fish roe, a perfect accompaniment to fleur de sel, also known as sea salt. Each of the Trikalinos Products is packaged with enjoyment tips and instructions. www.trikalinos.gr

Tasteful Shades Santo wines is introducing a new line, Santorini, to their existing family of wines. Santorini is designed to promote the history and tradition of PDO wine-making in Greece. Even its packaging is aimed to mimic the Mediterranean sea, soil, and plants with blue, grey, and green color schemes. Let Santorini be your invitation to the Grecian experience. www.santowines.com

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Sausage Nation Apelistra has scoured Greece for the greatest family recipies. Their new line of sausages comes from separate parts of the Grecian islands – from Crete to Corfu. Who knew that there could be so much variety in sausage alone? From three-meat to cheese, there is something for everyone. www.apelistra.gr

Mastered Mastelo Odysea’s Mastelo cheese is a semi-soft white cheese made with milk produced by cows that graze on the Greek island of Chios. The distinct salty taste is best when it has been fried or grilled and is ideally served on salad, pizza, or vegetables. As an interesting alternative to mozzarella, Mastelo can add just the right amount of Greek to any of your favorite dishes. www.odysea.com

http://www.sofiatisfisis.gr

Pure organic grape products from the famous vineyards of “NEMEA” Certified according to: REG E.U 837/2007, USDA ORGANIC, ISO 9001: 2000, ISO 22000: 2005

PRODUCTS:

 Red dry wine V.Q.P.R.D Nemea  Red wine vinegar var. “agiorgitiko”  White wine vinegar var. “roditis” &

“moschofilero”  Pure grape syrup  Sweet vinegar  Red wine vinegar with basil & garlic extract  White wine vinegar with thyme extract  White vinegar with mandarin & spices  Balsamic vinegar 3 years aged

KOUTSI KORINTH, 20500 ΝΕΜΕΑ, GREECE ΤEL.: ++30 2746023436, FAX: ++30 2746024038 info@sofiatisfisis.gr


news

Biome Wonder Limnos Organic Wines has developed a dry white, entitled BioLimnos. Its distinct flavor can be attributed to its origins in organic vineyards grown in the volcanic soil of Limnos. Don’t let the black bottle keep you from seeing the luminescence of BioLimnos for yourself. www.limnosorganicwines.gr

Heavenly Honey You haven’t had honey until you’ve tasted Melion, collected from the fir forests of Arcadia. This PDO product has a silky caramel flavor, and is high in nutritional value. Just about everything the Greeks touch turns to gold, even honey! www.elaion.com

Virgin and a Half AiQ has expanded their series of fine olive products with their new supreme quality olive oil, AiQ “0,5”. Cultivated from the finest handpicked organic olives, the unaltered extra virgin olive oil only contains 0.3% acidity. AiQ “0,5” leaves nothing to be desired in the whole spectrum of fine olive oil. www.aiq.gr 14

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news

Oak-y Dokey Kardasi’s aged Tsipouro is a fine Brandy matured in French and American oak barrels.The new aging process allows for a more fragrant and richerflavoured tsipouro. Its vanilla, caramel, and fruity aromas are sure to entice your senses. KARDASI DISTILLERY www.tsipourokardasi.gr Mini Magic Ioniki Filosophy has done it again with their newest filo creation, mini triangle snacks. With several new flavor options, minis provide you with a few of the basic Greek necessities – plenty of filo and feta. Discover a new philosophy of life for the whole family with filo snacks. www.ionikifilosophy.com

Viola! Cheese! Violife is a dairy-free cheese alternative, which is completely vegan-friendly. Its 100% palm oil recipe is soya and gluten free, and melts just like real cheese. Violife is available in ten different flavors, including tomato & basil, mushroom, and herb. This leaves nothing to be desired for cheese lovers everywhere. www.violife.gr 16

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cover story

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Why it

A Call to Arms for Food Retailers

Matters Photo: George Drakopoulos

1 Food Styling: Tina Webb

Photo: George Drakopoulos Food Styling: Tina Webb

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f the 6,290 ready to eat meals rated by the organization, FoodFacts.com, 4,216, or 67%, were given a grade of “F”. The story is much the same for snack food, with 5,896 products receiving an “F” grade out of a pool of 10,620, as well as for breakfast food, with 1,190 out of 2,957 designated as health failures. What earned these products their dismal grades was the presence of various substances thought to adversely affect health. These include (but are not limited to): hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils; artificial colorings; natural and artificial flavors; monosodium glutamate (MSG) and High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS).

Toxic Fat and other delights Hydrogenated oil, also known as trans-fat, is a toxic manmade fat which, when consumed, increases the chances of coronary heart disease by raising the level of LDL cholesterol and lowering the level of so-called “good” HDL cholesterol. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires food makers to indicate if a serving of a product contains more than .5 grams. If the product contains less than .5 grams, it can be labeled “trans-fat free.” However, those “servings” can add up fast. As potato chip maker, Lays, so eloquently put it:“I bet you can’t eat just one.” The health qualities of artificial colorings are discussed in detail in a publication by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, entitled “Food Dyes, A Rainbow of Risk”, which enumerates many of their less savory qualities, such as possibly inducing various forms of tumors and inciting hyperactivity in children. “Natural flavors” is a benign-sounding umbrella term which denotes just about

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By Ellen Gooch

anything found in nature which can be used to flavor food. Natural flavors include the juice of ground beetles and castoreum, a glandular secretion of beavers. For all intents and purposes, there is no difference between natural and artificial flavors. In either case, there is no way to know exactly what these “flavors” are made of. As far as MSG is concerned, the FDA does require that food makers indicate on packaging if actual MSG, has been added to a product. They don’t, however, require that naturally occurring Processed Free Glutamic Acids be labeled as MSG. If you see such things as “yeast extract”,“textured protein”, or “dry milk powder”, be aware, it is MSG. The FDA considers MSG to be Generally Regarded As Safe (GRAS), but it is nonetheless an extremely controversial ingredient the detractors of which blame for both mild (nausea, enflamed skin) and serious (autism, alzheimers) side effects.

Eat and never feel full And then there is High Fructose Corn Syrup. The official line on this substance is that it just as safe as any other sugar. In fact, the FDA web site states: “We are not aware of any evidence…that there is a difference in safety between foods containing HFCS 42 or HFCS 55 and foods containing similar amounts of other nutritive sweeteners with approximately equal glucose and fructose content, such as sucrose, honey, or other traditional sweeteners.” However, several studies that the FDA is apparently unaware of dispute this assertion. A 2004 study by researchers at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge and University of Nor th Carolina, Chapel Hill, found that “unlike glucose, fructose does not stimulate insulin

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secretion or enhance leptin production.” In other words, you can eat tons of HFCS without ever feeling full. A 2010 study conducted at Princeton concluded that,“excessive consumption of high-fructose corn syrup found in many beverages may be an important factor in the obesity epidemic”. The most recent study, released in January 2013 in the Journal of the American Medical Association by Yale Medical School researchers, stated that “A common counterargument [in regards to HFCS] is that it is the excess calories that are important, not the food. Simply put: just eat less. The reality, however, is that hunger and fullness are major determinants of how much humans eat, just as thirst determines how much humans drink.These sensations cannot simply be willed away or ignored.” To be fair, the FDA is now looking into fructose. Their National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) is currently “examining the effect of fructose on fat cells, because in the development and progression of obesity and type II diabetes, fat tissue may play an important role. Energy imbalance, excess nutrient consumption including excess consumption of refined carbohydrates and sugar-sweetened beverages, can trigger increases in the number and size of fat cells. This increase can result in insulin resistance and other metabolic syndromes. Uptake of fructose changes glucose metabolism within fat cells, which can lead to the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and type II diabetes.”

Subsidizing the path to obesity

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hoever we are to believe, one thing is certain. In the US, the growing national rate of consumption of HFCS mirrors the growing numbers of the obese. According to the Center for Disease Control, today 35.7% of the US adult population is obese, up from 23% in 2005 and 12% in 1990. Today 17% of children between the ages of 2 and 19 years old are obese as well. Obesity is related to 10’s of diseases, including type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, and certain cancers. The CDC estimates the costs of obesity on the US health care system to exceed $147 billion a year. Another estimate from researchers at Lehigh University puts the cost at $190 billion and growing. How did we get here? During the Nixon administration, the farm loan program was replaced by direct subsidies in order to keep consumer prices down. As a result, more

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As potato chip maker, Lays, so eloquently put it: “I bet you can’t eat just one.” epikouria


Hunger and fullness are major determinants of how much humans eat, just as thirst determines how much humans drink. These sensations cannot simply be willed away or ignored. and more corn was grown, outstripping demand and forcing corn prices downward. Seeing an opportunity for a sweetener less expensive than cane sugar, Big Food started using HFCS. By 2009, HFCS accounted for almost half of added sugars in the US. To recap: American tax payers subsidize the farming of corn. This corn is used for HFCS and other things, notably the utterly inefficient fuel, ethanol.Then Americans consume the HFCS. A bit more than a third of them become obese. The cost of treating those with conditions associated with obesity is high and growing, regardless of whether private or public insurance, e.g. Medicare and Medicaid, is covering it. Someone has to pay for this. And by someone, I mean the American tax payer. Kafka is rolling in his grave. It almost makes you nostalgic for Solyndra. Well, you say (and Big Food would be pleased to hear you say it), no one is forcing people to eat until they’re obese. Aren’t they? They lace food with a substance that prevents eaters from feeling full. Their food formulations are designed to be as addictive as possible, as meticulously documented by Michael Moss in his must-read New York Times article, “The Extraordinary Science of Junk Food”. As he puts it, “Why are the diabetes and

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obesity and hypertension numbers still spiraling out of control? It’s not just a matter of poor willpower on the part of the consumer and a give-the-people-what-theywant attitude on the part of the food manufacturers. What I found, over four years of research and reporting, was a conscious effort – taking place in labs and marketing meetings and grocery-store aisles – to get people hooked on foods that are convenient and inexpensive.”

Lean Cuisine Not So Lean Let’s go back to those Food Facts ratings. It would come as a surprise to no one that Hot Pockets Meatballs & Mozzarella Sandwiches or Swanson Hungr y-Man SportsGrill - Pulled Pork with BBQ Sauce in Flatbread & Cheese Fries would garner a grade of “F”. But what about Birds Eye Voila! Garlic Chicken, Pasta & Vegetables, or Marie Callender’s Grilled Southwestern Style Chicken? Or even worse, Healthy Choice Lemon Pepper Fish, Weight Watchers Smart Ones Sirloin Beef & Asian Style Vegetables in Teriyaki Sauce or Stouffer’s Lean Cuisine Roasted Turkey Breast? Here is the ingredient list for that roasted turkey:

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Ingredients (73): Water, Turkey Tenderloins Cooked (Turkey Tenderloins, Water, Seasoning [Yeast Extract, Maltodextrin, Salt, Flavor(s) Turkey, Turkey Stock, Soybean(s) Oil Partially Hydrogenated, Flavor(s), Gum Arabic], Corn Starch Modified, Salt, Canola Oil, Carrageenan, Sodium Phosphate, Flavoring Natural, Paprika), Carrot(s), Corn, Bean(s) Green, Onion(s), Croutons [Wheat Flour Enriched (Wheat Flour, Niacin, Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Folic Acid (Vitamin aB)], Corn Meal, Corn Syrup High Fructose, Yeast, Contains 22% or less Soybean(s) Oil, Salt, Calcium Propionate Preservative, Yeast Nutrients (Calcium Sulphate (Sulfate), Monocalcium Phosphate, Ammonium Sulfate) , Dough Conditioner(s) (, Ascorbic Acid), Annatto) color(s), Celer y, Canola Oil, Corn Starch Modified, Milk Skim, Flavor(s) Turkey (, Flavor(s), Turkey Stock Dried, Maltodextrin, Sesame Oil), with Annatto color(s), Flour Bleached Enriched (, Caramel color(s), Onion(s) Dehydrated, Turmeric Extractives, Folic Acid (Vitamin aB)), Niacin, Cottonseed Oil Partially Hydrogenated, Soybean(s) Oil Partially Hydrogenated, Potassium Chloride, Iron Reduced, Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Soybean(s) Oil, Spice(s), Sugar, Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Wheat Flour, Wheat Starch and, Yeast Extract.

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rom this label, we know that this product contains: MSG, flavors (unspecified), HFCS, and trans-fats. Imagine you were someone trying to lose or watch your weight. There you are in the frozen section of your supermarket, trying to make an intelligent choice. So you take home a Lean Cuisine. Only it isn’t really helping you get lean. In fact, few Lean Cuisines are good for you. 154 out of 178 have an “F” rating. Their

highest rating is a B-, which was awarded to a single product. For Weight Watchers, 161 out of 211 received an “F”. For Healthy Choice, 144 out of 195 flunked. If you think this is appalling, spend a few minutes on the Food Facts web site to see how many “F” rated products Big Food targets to children. Chef Boyardee ABCs & 123s Pasta, Hormel Kid’s Kitchen Spaghetti Rings & Franks, and Kellogg’s Spider-Man Cereal are just the tip of the iceberg. As every decent pusher knows – it’s best to get them while they’re young.

Are there any solutions? What’s to be done? Michael Mudd, a repenting former executive vice president of global corporate affairs for Kraft Foods, made a few suggestions in a recent NewYork Times opinion piece. This first was to levy taxes on foods and drinks that are the most harmful to our health. Another was to enforce strict guidelines on how food is marketed to children. Finally, he suggested better communication with consumers, including expanded labeling. The so-called soda tax idea has been floated before, but so far groups such as Americans Against Food Taxes, an organization backed by Welch’s, PepsiCo, the American Beverage Association, the Corn Refiners Association, McDonald’s and Burger King, have managed to sink them. Big Food has also lobbied hard and successfully to avoid even voluntary guidelines prepared by the FDA, the FTC, the Department of Agriculture, and the CDC for marketing food to kids. But maybe better communication is an option. Or maybe the US should consider terminating agricultural subsidies, thereby removing the prevalence of cheap corn. That could only happen if Iowa didn’t have a pivotal role in picking potential presidential candidates. Imagine how many people could possibly be healthier if, instead of being the first major political event in a presidential election year, the Iowa Caucuses took place in February or March. Not only Americans could derive health benefits: US exports of HFCS increase dramatically every year. In 1992 the US exported 100,000 short tons of HFCS. In 2012, the US exported 1,711,000 short tons.

Kafka is rolling in his grave. It Retailers to the rescue Pollen, of “Eat food, not too much, mostly vegetaalmost makes Michael bles” fame, predicted a “coming tide of litigation” against Food. That was back in 2003. But perhaps this tide you nostalgic for Big will finally roll in. If so, the question is, will only Big Food Solyndra. be hit with litigation or will retailers be implicated as well? 22

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SAMOS VIN DOUX AD 89x247.qxp

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After all, that Lean Cuisine wasn’t purchased directly from Nestle (parent company of Stouffer’s), it was purchased from a retailer. The bywords of any customer relationship are trust and accountability. No doubt, food retailing is a difficult business. Few retailers would be successful if they stopped selling less healthy products. On the other hand, providing more healthy options to customers couldn’t hurt, would likely be a mitigating factor if litigation reared its ugly head and, finally, might even be good for business. According to a 2012 report from Mintel, as gleaned from retailers, distributors and importers, product claims that most interest consumers are: all natural, organic, sustainable, local, eco-friendly and fair trade. In other words, consumers are looking for food they can trust. In addition, Mintel reports that one of the “emerging cuisines” is Mediterranean. t this point it has been proven conclusively that the Mediterranean Diet is extremely healthy. See the article on it in this issue. In addition to the bakery aisle and the soda aisle and the frozen food aisle, why not devote a section for healthy Mediterranean foods? I understand that, as an editor for a Greek food magazine, this suggestion may sound self-serving. But the truth is, many foods that have never been proximate to the Aegean fit the profile of the Mediterranean Diet. For starters, this section could be located as close to possible to the produce section, because (preferably locally grown and extremely fresh) fruits and vegetables are the linchpins of the diet. Other key elements include extra virgin olive oil, olives, cured (and fresh) fish, and nuts. Greece exports all of these products; so do many other countries. In addition, perhaps it would be possible to provide a Mediterranean Diet recipe a day. Maybe a basket could be filled with ingredients needed to make the dish, serving 4. The recipes could be simple to make in less than 20 minutes and require little clean up. We have provided a few such recipes as examples. Ex Kraft employee, Mudd, closed his aforementioned opinion piece with this: “I left the industry when I finally had to acknowledge that reform would never come from within. I could no longer accept a business model that put profits over public health and no one else should have to, either.” Amen to that. Following is a pictorial guide to a well-stocked Mediterranean aisle, one that includes both perishable and shelf-stable items.

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Mediterranean Diet Shown to Ward Off Heart Attack and Stroke By Gina Kolata Photo: George Drakopoulos 1 Food Styling: Tina Webb 24

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About 30 % of heart attacks, strokes and deaths from heart disease can be prevented in people at high risk if they switch to a Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil, nuts, beans, fish, fruits and vegetables, and even drink wine with meals, a large and rigorous new study has found.

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The findings, published on The New England Journal of Medicine’s Web site on Monday, February 25th, 2013, were based on the first major clinical trial to measure the diet’s effect on heart risks. The magnitude of the diet’s benefits startled experts. The study ended early, after almost five years, because the results were so clear it was considered unethical to continue. The diet helped those following it, even though they did not lose weight and most of them were already taking statins, or blood pressure or diabetes drugs to lower their heart disease risk. “Really impressive,” said Rachel Johnson, a professor of nutrition at the University of Vermont and a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association. “And the really important thing – the coolest thing – is that they used very meaningful endpoints.They did not look at risk factors like cholesterol or hypertension or weight.They looked at heart attacks and strokes and death. At the end of the day, that is what really matters.” Until now, evidence that the Mediterranean diet reduced the risk of heart disease was weak, based mostly on studies showing that people from Mediterranean countries seemed to have lower rates of heart disease – a pattern that could have been attributed to factors other than diet.

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And some experts had been skeptical that the effect of diet could be detected, if it existed at all, because so many people are already taking powerful drugs to reduce heart disease risk, while other experts hesitated to recommend the diet to people who already had weight problems, since oils and nuts have a lot of calories. Heart disease experts said the study was a triumph because it showed that a diet was powerful in reducing heart disease risk, and it did so using the most rigorous methods. Scientists randomly assigned 7,447 people in Spain who were overweight, were smokers, or had diabetes or other risk factors for heart disease to follow the Mediterranean diet or a low-fat one. Low-fat diets have not been shown in any rigorous way to be helpful, and they are also very hard for patients to maintain – a reality borne out in the new study, said Dr. Steven E. Nissen, chairman of the department of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. “Now along comes this group and does a gigantic study in Spain that says you can eat a nicely balanced diet with fruits and vegetables and olive oil and lower heart disease by 30 percent,” he said.“And you can actually enjoy life.” The study, by Dr. Ramon Estruch, a professor of medicine at the University of Barcelona, and his colleagues, was long in the planning. The investigators traveled the 26

world, seeking advice on how best to answer the question of whether a diet alone could make a big difference in heart disease risk. They visited the Harvard School of Public Health several times to consult Dr. Frank M. Sacks, a professor of cardiovascular disease prevention there. In the end, they decided to randomly assign subjects at high risk of heart disease to three groups. One would be given a low-fat diet and counseled on how to follow it. The other two groups would be counseled to follow a Mediterranean diet. At first the Mediterranean dieters got more intense support. They met regularly with dietitians while members of the low-fat group just got an initial visit to train them in how to adhere to the diet, followed by a leaflet each year on the diet.Then the researchers decided to add more intensive counseling for them, too, but they still had difficulty staying with the diet. One group assigned to a Mediterranean diet was given extra-virgin olive oil each week and was instructed to use at least 4 four tablespoons a day. The other group got a combination of walnuts, almonds and hazelnuts and was instructed to eat about an ounce of the mix each day.An ounce of walnuts, for example, is about a quarter cup – a generous handful.The mainstays of the diet consisted of at least three servings a day of fruits and at least two servings of vegetables. Participants were to eat fish at least three times a week and legumes, which include beans, peas and lentils, at least three times a week.They were to eat white meat instead of red, and, for those accustomed to drinking, to have at least seven glasses of wine a week with meals. They were encouraged to avoid commercially made cookies, cakes and pastries and to limit their consumption of dairy products and processed meats. epikouria


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To assess compliance with the Mediterranean diet, researchers measured levels of a marker in urine of olive oil consumption – hydroxytyrosol – and a blood marker of nut consumption – alpha-linolenic acid. The participants stayed with the Mediterranean diet, the investigators reported. But those assigned to a low-fat diet did not lower their fat intake very much. So the study wound up comparing the usual modern diet, with its regular consumption of red meat, sodas and commercial baked goods, with a diet that shunned all that. Dr. Estr uch said he thought the ef fect of the Mediterranean diet was due to the entire package, not just the olive oil or nuts. He did not expect, though, to see such a big effect so soon.“This is actually really surprising to us,” he said. The researchers were careful to say in their paper that while the diet clearly reduced heart disease for those at high risk for it, more research was needed to establish its benefits for people at low risk. But Dr. Estruch said he expected it would also help people at both high and low risk, and suggested that the best way to use it for protection would be to start in childhood. Not everyone is convinced, though. Dr. Caldwell Blakeman Esselstyn Jr., the author of the best seller “Prevent and

Reverse Heart Disease: The Revolutionary, Scientifically Proven, Nutrition-Based Cure,” who promotes a vegan diet and does not allow olive oil, dismissed the study. His views and those of another promoter of a verylow-fat diet, Dr. Dean Ornish, president of the nonprofit Preventive Medicine Research Institute, have influenced many to try to become vegan. Former President Bill Clinton, interviewed on CNN, said Dr. Esselstyn’s and Dr. Ornish’s writings helped convince him that he could reverse his heart disease in that way. Dr. Esselstyn said those in the Mediterranean diet study still had heart attacks and strokes. So, he said, all the study showed was that “the Mediterranean diet and the horrible control diet were able to create disease in people who otherwise did not have it.” Others hailed the study. “This group is to be congratulated for carrying out a study that is nearly impossible to do well,” said Dr. Robert H. Eckel, a professor of medicine at the University of Colorado and a past president of the American Heart Association. As for the researchers, they have changed their own diets and are following a Mediterranean one, Dr. Estruch said. “We have all learned,” he said.

This article was first published in the New York Times on Monday, February 25, 2013

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Ambassadors of Greece By Margarita Michelakou

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Two stores selling Greek goodies try to teach Londoners all about healthy food.

The Life Goddess Deli By the ages of 31 and 35, respectively, brothers Nikos and Yiorgos Nyfoudis from Sallonica had already established a flourishing business exporting EPSA soft drinks and juices to London. Looking to expand their business, last January they decided, along with their good friend Elias Koulakiotis, a long-time London resident, to supply Londoners with goodies from Greek soil and also serve lunch to those hungry for homemade traditional Mediterranean food. For six months they travelled all across Greece looking for small producers and cooperatives who make exceptional delicacies, producers like Koukakis farm at Kato Apostoli in Kilkis, which has been breeding cows and sheep in 600 acres worth of clean air for more than four decades. The Life Goddess Divine Deli has now opened its doors close to the British Museum, in a neighborhood busy with students from the numerous schools of the area. It took a while for them to find appropriate space since they had no credit history in England and the landlords were hesitant to accept them. IDEA, Interior Design Art, created the plans for the space, imbuing a Greek atmosphere in the heart of a mutlicultural market. Sallonica's multi-awarded design group, Beetroot (Red Dot agency of the year 2011, known for their Monsters exhibition), designed the company's identity. The Life Goddess now sells olive oil from Laconia, cheese from Amari in Crete, marmalades from Macedonia, cold cuts from Mesologgi and much more in their own beautiful packaging, the logo of which features a whimsical rendering of a goat. Goats mean a lot to the Greeks.They are associated in Greek mythology with Zeus, the head of the Olympian gods. The story goes like this:

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Zeus’ father, Cronus, then the head guy, was told by a prophecy that one day he would be overthrown by one of his children. To avoid this outcome, he simply ate the kids. Zeus’ mother, Rhea, who objected to this policy, hid Zeus in a cave on Mount Aigaion on Crete in the care of Amalthea, who suckled him on the milk of her goat. That’s why Amalthea is often represented by a goat and why the Nyfoudis brothers chose this symbol for their shop. Along with their private labeled olive oil, honey, herbs, olives, nuts and yoghurt, the three friends also sell eponymous products like orzo by Allotines Gefseis, Arvanitis feta cheese and many celebrated Greek wines. Outside the deli you can also enjoy a small menu of Greek plates (2 homemade traditional plates, 3 salads, and 1soup) that changes every day and which disappears by noon (many by take-away). The Life Goddess opened in a happy conjunction with Notting Hill's Greek restaurant, Mazi, owned by Christina Mouratoglou, also from Thesaloniki, which gets excellent reviews and is the place to be right now. Only two months after its opening, the Life Goddess got in the app "London’s Best Coffee" and very soon she will have a sister shop in Brussels. www.thelifegoddess.com

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London is a city that had no familiarity with nuts and didn’t have a similar store until now.

CARPO London Carpo London opened its doors in the beginning of 2013 with the goal of teaching Londoners all about the nutritional value of nuts.The Kontopoulos family has spent 23 years in wholesaling, processing and packaging of nuts from Greece and abroad with quality certificate ISO 22000 and has had the experience of working with nationwide branch networks, hotels, restaurants and merchants, plus daily service to 300 points in Attica. Carpo Hellas exports to Germany, France and Italy and, since 2009, in collaboration with Kraft Foods Hellas, is the exclusive supplier of Kraft products in hotels, restaurants, coffee shops and small shops in Greece. After witnessing the closure of many partner businesses this past winter due to the harsh economic decline they decided to take the next step, and for the first time they will offer their wares directly to the public.They started with Carpo Athens in the heart of the city in Kolonaki, and were an immediate success with their rare nuts, fresh chocolates in bars, impressive dried fruits, honey from Greek producers, Greek coffee and beverages.The owners themselves served the customers and a barista is always there to make a small espresso for the customer waiting for his almonds to be freshly roasted in front of him. After a year and great success, the London shop opened 32

in a very hot spot, 16 Piccadilly Street. It has the same simple and tasteful atmosphere with sacks of goods waiting to be consumed and the same especially friendly service. Carpo is looking for small producers from all over the world that are in the nut business and that offer the seasons’ best that those lands have available. Now Carpo’s small luxurious black packaging appear more and more often in the London streets, bags that contain Greek Pumpkin seeds, Greek Sunflower seeds, dried Greek Sultanas, Figs from Evea (Taxiarchis), wild Shitake mushrooms from Pindos, Thyme honey from Kalymnos and also non-Greek products like dried Thailand mango and Brazil nuts. London is a city that had no familiarity with nuts and didn’t have a similar store until now. But now Londoners visit Carpo ignorant and leave knowing all about the nutritional value of nuts (the shop is mostly viewed as a health food store).They also find quality products like chocolate beverages by Pavlideis or snacks made of Greek wasabi.

www.carpolondon.co.uk epikouria


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recipes

The secret to cooking quick is to have a well-stocked pantry with plenty of shelfstable and slow perishing items on hand, such as pasta, canned beans and olive oil as well as yogur t, butter and vegetables. Shopping daily is not an option for most people. Planning matters. Know what you are going to make and take out every item you need to make it before you start to cook: all the ingredients, all the utensils and the pots and pans. If you are going to bake something, preheat the oven the second you walk in the door. Finally, two main things set apart a professional chef from a homecook: knife skills and a staff. It takes practice to use a knife properly. You also have to have a very good knife. Nothing slows you down more than a small, dull knife. We recommend 8 inch chef knives from Global or Henkel. Chefs with a staff don’t have to worry about all those pesky plates and pots that need washing. Some “fast” recipes take more time to clean up than it takes to both cook and eat them. The recipes herein do not.

© Robynmac | Dreamstime.com

High Speed Gourmet 34

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Baked Salmon with Butter Sauce

© Robynmac | Dreamstime.com

Butter, in moderation, is not bad for you. Serves 4 Total time: 20 minutes Prep time: 5 minutes Cook time: 15 minutes

Ingredients Four 4 ounce salmon filets (or one long 16 ounce filet) ½ a lemon ½ stick butter 2 green onions / scallions, chopped Salt and pepper

Latholemono The name says it all (if you speak Greek): oil and lemon. This sauce is used to flavor everything from salads and steamed vegetables to fish and other seafood.

Ingredients Lemon Extra virgin olive oil Salt and pepper

Preparation Preheat the oven 400 degrees F (200 degrees C), top and bottom heat.Line a baking pan with aluminum foil. Wash the salmon filets and pat them dry. Sprinkle them liberally with salt and pepper and place them skin side down on the prepared tray. When the oven is ready, cook the salmon until tender (the meat should easily flake), about 15 minutes (check at 10 minutes, overcooked salmon isn’t so tasty). While the salmon is cooking, in a small saucepan combine the butter, the juice of half a lemon and the chopped green onion. Melt butter over low heat. Spoon butter sauce over cooked salmon and serve. This goes nicely over basmati rice. If you are feeling flush, sprinkle salmon roe over the fish as well. epikouria

Preparation Whisk together 1 part lemon juice to 2 parts olive oil until well blended. Adjust to your desired acidity. Add salt and pepper to taste. In Greece, if you were to order a brassino or green salad in a taverna, you would most likely be given a salad that consists of chopped lettuce, chopped dill and chopped green onion. Slices of cucumber may be involved. It will be dressed with the above sauce. It’s a simple salad and goes with just about everything. Adding avocado is also nice.

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recipes

Black Beans with Feta Serves 4 Total time: 17 minutes Prep time: 7 minutes Cook time: 10 minutes

Ingredients 1 can black beans (we like Goya) 2 green onions, chopped 1 lime Handful of cilantro, chopped 1 medium tomato, chopped Salt and pepper 4 ounces of Feta

Preparation In a medium sauce pan combine the beans and their liquid, the onions, the juice of the lime (citric juices neutralize the windy effects of beans), the cilantro and the tomato. Heat through over medium heat. Season to taste. Divide into four bowls, crumble Feta over the beans and serve.

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Roasted Garden

Serves 4 Total time: 35 minutes Prep time: 10 minutes Cook time: 25 minutes

Ingredients

into 6 slices 1 leek, cut into thick rounds Extra virgin olive oil Salt and pepper 4 ounces Graviera cheese, grated Balsamic vinegar to taste

1 head radicchio, quartered 1 small head of broccoli, stems trimmed, cut into pieces 1 large carrot, thickly sliced 1 large yellow pepper, cut

Preparation Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Cover a roasting pan with aluminum foil. Wash the vegetables, pat them dry and slice/cut them. Place the vegetables in a bowl, sprinkle with olive oil, salt and pepper and toss to combine. Arrange the vegetables in the pan. In truth you can use any vegetables you have on hand, though the size of the pieces relative to the density of the vegetable should be similar so they finish cooking at the same time. Radicchio is surprisingly delicious roasted. Roast vegetables for 20 minutes (they should be slightly browned). Remove pan from oven and sprinkle vegetables with the grated cheese. Return pan to the oven for five minutes, at which point the cheese should be melted and bubbling. Place vegetables on a platter, drizzle with sweet balsamic vinegar and serve. epikouria


Makaronia with Healthy Creamy Sauce Serves 4 Total time: 20 minutes Prep time: 5 minutes Cook time: 3 to get the water to boil, 12 to cook the pasta

Ingredients 12 ounces penne pasta 1.5 cups grated cheese such as Graviera or Gruyere 1 bunch baby arugula, washed 10 cherry tomatoes, halved 1 small container Greek yogurt (we recommend FAGE Total regular, not low or reduced fat) Salt and pepper

Preparation Fill a large pot with water, cover the pot with a lid and bring to a boil (covering the pot helps the water to heat faster, but be careful, as soon as it starts to boil, remove the lid or you risk the lid blowing off). Add a palmful of salt to the water. This changes the frequency of the “waves� to the frequency ideal for cooking pasta. Add the pasta and stir. In whatever large bowl you will be using to serve the pasta, combine remaining ingredients. Note that cheese can be purchased pre-grated and argula can be purchased pre-washed. Stir the pasta from time to time so it doesn’t stick on the bottom of the pan necessitating time-consuming cleanup.When the pasta is Al Dente (firm but not hard and certainly not mushy, usually takes 10-12 minutes), take a large spoon or ladle and add about cup of the pasta cooking liquid to the serving bowl with the other ingredients. Drain the pasta, making sure you get it all, again, for cleanup reasons. Stir the sauce in the serving bowl. Add the pasta, mix to combine and serve. epikouria

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10+1 Honey 1. According to ancient Greek wisdom, if a bee lands on a baby’s mouth, the child will grow up to be a great poet. 2. Exper t beekeepers with a professional guild, the Minoans of Crete used a terracotta beehive nearly identical to the type still used today on the island. 3. The Minoans loved their honey; one of the most renowned Minoan artifacts ever found is a cast gold pendant depicting 2 bees flanking a drop of honey. 4. Bee-keeping was so widespread an industry in Ancient Greece that the great legislator, Solon (639-599 BC), degreed that anyone wanting to start a new hive must place

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it at least 300 feet (approximately) from any existing hive. 5. In Greek Mythology there is a triad of prophesizing nymphs called the Thriai. The poet Homer wrote of them: “From their home they fly now here, now there, feeding on honey-comb and bringing all things to pass. And when they are inspired through eating yellow honey, they are willing to speak the truth; but if they be deprived of the gods’ sweet food, then they speak falsely.” 6. The Greater Honeyguide is a bird which feeds on the contents of hives. Humans have been following the birds since prehistory to get their hands on honey. 7. The best honeys can be identified by taste, aroma and consistency. A good honey will glide off a spoon in a steady stream without breaking into droplets. 8. In Indian Ayurvedic medicine, honey helps balance the body (but should never be heated). 9. Honey soothes throats, may ameliorate allegories, and is a highly effective antimicrobial agent. 10. Beekeepers call the time when major nectar sources are in bloom and the weather is advantageous for bees to fly a honey flow. 11. “Telling the bees” is an Appalachian custom whereby important events like births, marriages and deaths must be reported to the bees.

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Advertorial

Greece promotes its gifts HEPO’s business plan

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This year’s Summer Fancy Food Show returns to its base, NY, and hosts, as one of the most important food and beverage events in United States, a great number of exhibitors from around the world. The Hellenic Foreign Trade Board (HEPO), is organizing the Greek pavilion, giving the opportunity to Greek exporting companies of the food and beverage sector to present their business to buyers, professionals, journalists and opinion leaders of the American market. This year’s Greek delegation consists of 35 producing and exporting companies aspiring to introduce the fair’s visitors some of Greece’s flagship products; olive oil, olives, cheese and, of course, feta cheese, Greek yogurt, traditional antipasti products, bakery products, canned fruit, natural sparkling water and wines.

WHO IS WHO HEPO is a non-profit Organization operating under the Greek Government’s supervision. It cooperates with a variety of international trade organizations around the

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world aiming at promoting an “outward and forward” approach with respect to the Hellenic foreign trade.The organization’s main focus is to design and coordinate activities so as to help Greek enterprises to expand their business into foreign markets, promote best-practices in line with Greek national export policies, develop and apply know-how in matters of export policy, evaluate potential partnerships and pursue collaboration opportunities with enterprises abroad. HEPO also encourages and assists SMEs in their expansion to international markets by increasing networking opportunities and materializing new initiatives.

HEPO’S 2013 BUSINESS PLAN HEPO’s 2013 events’ agenda includes international trade fairs, business missions, in-store promotion activities and information seminars for the Greek export community. The agricultural and food products’ share in Greek exports imposes the enhancement of Greek branding abroad, placing HEPO’s relevant activities at the foreground.With a total of 20 food and beverage international fairs and a significant number of business missions in various target markets, HEPO supports the promotional activities of the

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Advertorial

Greek food and beverage exporting companies.The “Taste like Greece” brand for the sector of food and beverage leads additionally to the successful promotion of the Greek relevant products since the fall of 2011. HEPO coordinates and implements promotional activities for food products such as wine, fresh and frozen fish via funded programmes and in cooperation with the various sectors. In order to further boost Greek extroversion of the food and beverage sector, HEPO has enriched its action plan with a variety of parallel promotional activities such as tastings, in store promotion, the presentation of Greek products in overseas media and to consumers, food and beverage sector branding, and others. Finally, HEPO’s action plan includes information events aiming at specific target markets. Particularly, HEPO is aiming to markets such as United States, Brazil, Canada through the International Trade Fairs for the food and beverage sector like Summer Fancy Food

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Show, Sial Canada, Sial Brazil and Aspen Colorado. In addition, via an EU funded program promoting Greek wine, HEPO is participating in a numerous of promotional activities in North America. During the first half of 2013 a number of “above and below the line” actions have been planned and will be implemented, such as: • Road-shows in U.S.A. and Canada • Wine tastings and seminars in U.S.A. and Canada • In-store promotion in SAQ Quebec stores • Publicity in printed and digital magazines • Visit of 22 Masters of Wine from U.S.A. and Canada in Greece • Visit of wine professionals (buyers, journalists, sommeliers) from USA and Canada in Greece In Europe, still being the main and most famous target of the Greek export community, there are some of the most famous International Trade Fairs. During the first semester of 2013, HEPO has participated in several European trade Fairs such as:

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Advertorial

Prowein Accredited as one of the leading wine events around the globe, Prowein has become the most popular fair among Greek wine and spirits producers. Exceeding every precedent, more than 60 companies from every winemaking region around Greece joined HEPO’s pavilion promoting the unique elements of Greek wine. Plma Private label products have increased their retail

Fruitlogistica The most important global event for fresh fruit and vegetables, held yearly in Berlin.The Greek exhibitors that participated in HEPO’s pavilion introduced a large range of products to more than 58.000 visitors; citrus fruit, stone fruit, kiwis, grapes, strawberries, apples, pears from various productive areas in Greece were showcased during the event. Prodexpo Moscow’s Expocentre hosted in February the Prodexpo International Fair, that is considered to be one of Eurasias’ most popular food and beverage exhibition. The emerging market of Russia is in the foresight of the Greek exporting companies. In this context, there is a gradual increase of the participating companies that join HEPO’s pavilion, seeking for effective promotional activities for their products. Ife London HEPO’s participation for this year was a great success, as the participating companies interacted with approximately 30.000 visitors and performed a number of B2B meetings during the fair.

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share remarkably over the past few years. Honoring this niche market, Amsterdam hosts the annual PLMA exhibition. As this event features a unique opportunity for the promotion of this sector, more than ten Greek companies took part in the Greek mission, organized by the Hellenic Foreign Trade Board.

Vinexpo Bordeaux The most renowned wine region in France becomes the heart of the global wine market every year in June! Vinexpo is an established wine fair of the Old World, where Greek wine and spirit producers are present. HEPO’s 2013 pavilion comprised of 10 awardwinning representatives of the industry, coming from Northern Greece, Peloponnese,Attica and Santorini.Third countries, such as UAE, China and Australia are also on the business plan of HEPO.Through major trade fairs, HEPO is promoting the Greek export food and beverage products.

Gulfood One of the world’s biggest annual food and hospitality shows was hosted for the 18th consequent year in Dubai, numbering more than 70.000 visitors and 4.200 exhibitors. HEPO’s pavilion comprised of 56 Greek companies of the food and hospitality sector that interacted with buyers from the U.A.E., Middle East and Northern Africa, through several B2B meetings.

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Sial China Sial China is considered to be most important fair of the food and beverage market of Asia. The official Greek representation organized by the Hellenic Foreign Trade Board consisted of 20 companies of the food and wine industry. Focusing mainly at wine, as part of the action plan of the funded EU program promoting Greek wine to the Chinese market, HEPO implemented parallel activities, such as wine tastings at the wine bar operating in separate section of the exhibition and presentations of the Greek wine industry, by the Greek sommelier Nikos Panidis.

Interwine and Top wine China Promotional tools, such as wine fairs, are part of the actions of the EU funded program for Greek wine promotion in the Chinese market; through these events producers approach the Chinese wine industry and showcase the excellence of Greek wines. Fine Food Australia Greece participates in Fine Food Australia, the largest gathering of international food, drink and equipment for the retail, foodservice and hospitality industries, officially represented by HEPO. During this year’s fair taking place in September a great number of parallel events, seminars, masterclasses etc., have already been announced. In addition to the above mentioned trade fairs HEPO organized in co-operation with the Office of Economic and Commercial Affairs in Lisbon, a fortnight of in-store promotion in two large supermarkets of the El Corte Ingles chain in Lisbon and Porto in late April.The products of 18 companies from the food and beverage sector were exhibited in a specially designed section located centrally in both stores. The promotional activity included tastings of the promoted brands on a daily basis, giving the opportunity to buyers to savor the high quality of the Greek

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products. In the same time, under the supervision of the internationally acclaimed Greek chef Doxis Bekris, the roof-top restaurant of El Corte Ingles in Lisbon, served for a two weeks period a menu based on Greek traditional products and recipes, honoring the Greek gastronomy. As part of the promotional programs funded by EU for the fresh and frozen fish products, HEPO and the relevant Greek associations implemented two press-conference events, one in Athens and one in Thessaloniki, during the first trimester of 2013, presenting the action plans and the main goals of the programs.These targeted programs aim in familiarizing the consumers with the high quality and nutritional value of the fresh and frozen fishery and also, inform foreign markets about the high standards of the Greek fish industry. In this context, HEPO par ticipated in the European Seafood Exhibition (ESE), held at the Brussels Expo Centre in late April, highlighting the excellence of Greek fishery products through a number of live cooking shows. Furthermore, the popular Greek chef Dina Nikolaou and a group of specialists (nutritionists and dietitians) performed live cooking shows in Athens and Thessaloniki, providing the public with useful information about the cooking methods, the nutritional value and the tasting excellence of the Greek sea products. The 2013 action plan of the Organization includes a number of trade fairs, business missions and events that will take place around Europe during the second half of the year, such as the international exhibition Anuga in Germany, the business mission to Belgium in June and the in-store promotions in a great number of stores of Galeria Kaufhof around Germany.

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sourcing info AVGOTARAHO TRIKALINOS CO www.trikalinos.gr ELGEA L.T.D www.elgea.com.gr

BEANS 3 ALFA www.3alfa.gr A.C. «PELEKANOS» www.prespabeans.gr AHELOOS S.A. www.aheloos.com.gr ARGIRAKIS BROS S.A. www.trofino.com.gr AROSIS S.A. www.arosis.gr BIOAGROS S.A. www.bioagros.gr ENIPEAS VALLEY www.enipeasvalley.com EV.GE. PISTIOLAS S.A. www.agrino.gr MATOUKOGLOU BROS CO www.mato.gr OSPREX S.A. osprex@hol.gr PRODUCTS LAND VOIO www.proiontavoiou.gr

FETA AMARI S.A. www.amarisa.gr ARVANITIS S.A. www.cheese.gr AVIGAL S.A. www.avigal.gr BASDRAS S.A. www.basdras.gr BIOFARM S.A. www.biofarm.gr BIOPGAL www.biopgal.gr 44

BIZIOS S.A. www.bizios.gr D. RODOS BROS S.A. www.lesvigal.gr DELFI S.A. www.delfisa.gr DIVANIS S.A. www.divanischeese.com DODONI S.A. www.dodonidairy.com E.THIMELIS S.A. www.thimelischeese.gr ELGEA LTD www.elgea.com.gr EPIROS S.A. www.optima.gr EVROFARMA S.A. www.evrofarma.gr EVROKLIDON LTD www.evroklidon.com FAGE S.A. www.fage.gr FILOTAS BELAS & SON S.A. www.belasfoods.com G.TROULIARIS & CO www.trouliaris.gr GALAKTKOMIKI TRIPOLIS S.A. www.galaktokomikitripolis.gr HELLENIC PROTEIN S.A. www.hellenicprotein.gr HOTOS S.A. www.hotos.gr HRYSAFIS S.A. www.xrisafi.gr IRAKLIS KAIDANTZIS & CO www.kaidatzis.gr KARALIS S.A. www.karalis.gr KL. KLEPKOS & CO www.klepkos.gr KOLIOS S.A. www.kolios.gr KOUKAKI’S FARM S.A. www.koukfarm.gr KOURELLAS S.A. www.kourellas.gr LEADER A.E. www.leaderfoods.gr LESVOS DAIRY S.A. www.lesvosdairy.com LIMNOS DAIRY – G & S MARKAKIS S.A. www.kalathakilimnou.gr LYKAS & CΟ www.lykas.gr MATIS BROS S.A. www.matis.gr METSOVO S.A. www.metsovosa.gr MEVGAL S.A. www.mevgal.gr

MILK IN OF XANTHIS RODOPIS S.A. www.rodopi-sa.gr MINERVA S.A. www.minerva.com.gr NEOGAL DAIRY www.neogal.gr NIKAS S.A. www.nikas.gr OLIMPIAKI PARADOSI LTD www.olpa.gr OLYMPOS S.A. www.olympos.gr PAPATHANASIOU S.A. www.papathanasiou-abee.gr PAPATHANASIOY S.A. www.papathanasiouabee.gr PARADOSI S.A. www.paradosi.gr PUREGREEK.COM LTD www.puregreek.com ROUSSAS S.A. www.roussas.gr S.H.M. HELLAS S.A. www.shm.gr STYMPHALIA S.A. www.stymfalia-sa.gr THESGAL LTD www.thesgal.gr TROULIARIS G.& CΟ www.trouliaris.gr TYRAS S.A. www.tyras.gr U.A.C. OF RETHYMNO www.easreth.gr VIOTROS S.A. www.viotros.gr VOULGARIS BROS S.A. www.voulgari.gr

CRETAN BREAD HUSKS ARTION GREEK FOODS www.artiongreekfoods.com CRETAN EXPORTERS ASSOCIATION www.Crete-exporters.com KALABOKIS www.kalabokis.gi KRITIS GI www.kritisgi.gr N.TSATSARONAKIS S.A. to_manna@otenet.gr SAMARIA www.samaria.com.gr TASTE OF CRETE www.tasteofcrete.com epikouria


TSATSAKIS UΝLIMITED CO www.tsatsakis.gr ΚΡΗΤΩΝ ARTOS S.A. www.kritonartos.gr

FIGS AGREXPO S.A. www.goumas.gr DRAGONAS BROS S.A. www.dragonas.gr EVIA STAR S.A. eviastar@otenet.gr SYKIKI UNION COOPERATIVE OF FIGS AND NUTS www.sykiki.gr THE AGRICULTURE ASSOCIATION OF KIMI DISTRICT www.figkimi.gr VEKAP MENELAS BALDJIS LTD www.figs.gr

FISH FORKYS S.A. www.forkys.com GALAXIDI MARINE FARM S.A. www.gmf-sa.gr ANDROMEDA GROUP www.andromeda-aquaculture.gr DIAS S.A. www.diassa.gr HELLENIC FISHFARMING S.A. www.helfish.gr INTERFISH AQUACULTURE S.A. www.interfish.gr KEFALONIA FISHERIES www.kefish.gr NIREUS AQUACULTURE www.nireus.com V. GEITONAS & CO, LTD www.eelgeitonas.com

FRUITS AGRICULTURAL COOPERATIVE epikouria

OF ZAGOR PELION www.zagorin.gr AGRO HARA www.kiwi-tsechelidis.gr AGROCOM S.A. www.agrocom.gr ALEXANDER www.alexander-canning.com ALTERRA S.A. www.alterra.gr BIOAGROS www.bioagros.gr FROZITA S.A. www.frozita.com.gr FRUCTA UNION LTD www.fructaunion.gr FRUIT CENTER www.fruitcenter.gr GEFRA www.gefra.gr KATSIAMAKAS S.A. www.katsiamakas.gr MITROSILIS S.A. www.mitrosilis.gr TRIKALA FARMS LTD www.trikalafarms.gr VENUS GROWERS www.venusgrowers.gr ZEUS KIWI S.A. www.zeuskiwi.gr SOULIS SA www.soulis.gr SYNERGATIKI S.A. www.synergatiki.gr

NUTS ANTONIOS DELIPOULIOS S.A www.dekanuts.gr ANTONIO FOODS www.antoniofoods.com BALLY NUTS www.ballynuts.gr BIONOT www.bionot.gr CARDICO www.cardico.gr EUROSNACK S.A. www.eurosnacksa.com HATZIGEORGIOUS.A. www.perle.gr HARMONY - COUNINIOTIS www.kouniniotis.gr MAKIN DRY NUTS www.makin.gr

MENEXOPOULOS BROTHERS NUT STORES www.menexopoulos.com NIKOS TZITZIS & CO www.thegreeknutcompany.gr NUTCO S.A. www.kalatheri.gr MORAITI BROTHERS S.A. www.moraitisbros.gr OVAKIMIAN S.A. www.ovakimian.gr SDOUKOS S.A. www.sdoukos.com VAMVALIS FOOD S.A. www.pellito.gr S.SPIRIDIS A.E.B.E.DRIED FRUITS & NUTS www.oskar.gr

OLIVES AGRICULTURE OF ROVIES www.roviesolives.gr AGROMET S.A. www.banistradition.com AGROKAN HELLAS S.A. www.agrocanfoods.com ALEA S.A. www.alea-sa.gr ARI S.A www.arifoods.gr ARTION GREEK FOODS www.artiongreekfoods.com BRETAS S.A. www.bretas.gr CRETA NATURA PRODUCTS www.cretanaturachania.com CRETAN TASTE CO. www.cretantaste.gr D.E. GEORGOUDIS CO S.A. www.olives.gr DANCO S.A. www.danco.gr DEAS S.A. www.deasolives.gr ELI S.A. www.eli.gr ELKO OLIVES www.elko-olives.gr EN ALMI www.enalmi.com G. BAKOURIS Ν. BAKOURIS CO www.bakouris.gr HELLENIC FINE OILS www.hfo.gr 45


sourcing info HERCULES EXPORT hrcexport@hotmail.com ILIDA S.A. www.ilida.gr I. M. STROFILIA LTD www.wermio.gr INDIANA HELLAS LTD www.indianahellas.gr INTERCOMM FOODS S.A. www.intercomm.gr J. C. KOUTROGIANNOS CORP www.elko-olives.gr KANAKIS www.kanakis.com.g KAPA OLIVE FARM www.kapaolivefarm.gr KEFALAS - SPARTA S.A. www.organicvillage.gr KONSTANTOPOULOS S.A. www.konstolymp.gr KOUKOUNARAS S.A. www.koukounaras.gr LADAS FOODS S.A. www.ladasfoods.com ODISIA S.A. www.odisia.gr OLIVELLAS S.A. www.olivellas.gr PURE GREEK www.puregreek.com ROUAL TSATSOULIS www.royal.gr SEACRETS OF GREECE www.seacrets.gr SIOURAS S.A. www.siouras.gr THIN GREEN NATURAL GOODS www.thinkgreen.gr

OLIVE OIL “NEW ERA” AGRICULTURAL COOPERATIVE OF GARGALIANI www.newera-gargaliani.com AGREXPO S.A. www.goumas.gr AGRICULTURAL COOPERATIVE OF THRAPSANO www.cretan-olive-oil.gr AGRO.VI.M. www.agrovim.gr AGROCRETA www.agrocreta.gr 46

AGROKAN HELLAS S.A www.agrocanfoods.com AGROTIKH S.A. www.agrotiki-sa.gr AIQ INTERNATIONAL TRADE CO LTD http://www.aiq.gr ALEA S.A. www.alea-sa.gr AMALTHEA LTD www.amalthea.gr ANDROULAKIS PAVLOS www.androulakisp.gr ARTION GREEK FOODS www.artiongreekfoods.com ASTRIKAS ESTATE – BIOLEA www.biolea.gr BOTZAKIS S.A. www.creta-oil.gr BRAHIMO S.A. www.brahimo.gr CANDIAS OIL www.candiasoil.com COOPERATIVE OLIVE OIL INDUSTRY “ANATOLI” www.abea.gr CRETAN DELI TASTE www.cretandelitaste.gr CRETAN MYTHOS www.cretanmythos.gr CRETAN TASTE CO www.cretantaste.gr CRITIDA S.A. www.critida.com DIAMOND MESSINIAN EXTRA OLIVE OIL www.diamonolive.gr ELAIS – UNILIVER S.A. www.elais.gr ELEA CRETA www.eleacreta.gr ELEOURGIKI CENTRAL COOPERATIVE UNION www.eleourgiki.com ELGEA LTD www.elgea.com.gr EVRIPIDIS S.A. www.evripidis.com FRIEDRICH BLAUEL www.blauel.gr G. BAKOURIS - Ν. BAKOURIS CO www.bakouris.gr GAEA www.gaea.gr GREEK LAND FOODS LTD www.esti.com.gr GREEK TASTE SUGGESTIONS – GTS www.gts.com.gr GREEKPOL www.greekpol.gr

HELLENIC FINE OIL S.A. www.hfo.gr KANAKIS HLIAS www.kanakis.com.gr KEFALAS - SPARTA S.A. www.organicvillage.gr KOLUMPARI S.A. www.kolympari-sa.gr KORE S.A. www.kore.gr LATZIMAS S.A. www.latzimasoil.gr LIOKARPI PROTOGERAKIS www.oliveoil-kreta.com LYXNARAS VERGINA S.A. www.verginaolives.com MEDBEST S.A. www.medbest.gr MESSOLONGI FIELDS LTD www.messolongifields.com MINERVA S.A. www.minerva.com.gr N.GERENTES S.A. www.gerentesbros.com NUTRIA S.A. www.nutria.gr OLIO GRECO S.A. www.oliogrec@otenet.gr OLIVE OIL SELECTIONS “MOLEON” www.oliveoilselections.com OLYMPIA – XENIA S.A. www.olympia-oliveoil.com PANTELOPOULOU BROS “PANPROD” www.panprod.com PELANOS AGIRON SKRIVANOS www.elaion.com PELION BRAND SAPOUNAS & CO pelion-brand@vol.forthnet.gr PEZA UNION www.pezaunion.gr PREMIUM QUALITY FOODS S.A. www.pqf-oliveoil.gr RAFTELI – PROTOULI MARIA & CO protoulh@otenet.gr SPEIRON www.speironoliveoil.com TERRA CRETA S.A. www.terracreta.gr UNION OF AGRICALTURAL COOPERATIVES OF MESSINIA mesunion@otenet.gr UNION OF AGRICALTURAL COOPERATIVES OF MONOFATSIU www.monofatsiunion.gr VASILAKIS ESTATE www.vassilakisestate.gr epikouria


VINOLIO CRETA (AGIA TRIADA) www.agiatriada-chania.gr

PIE ALFA MEDITERRANEAN PIE RECIPES www.alfa.org.gr BAKER MASTER S.A. www.bakermaster.gr DORIKON S.A www.dorikon.gr EVOIKI ZIMI S.A. www.evoiki-zimi.gr HELLENIC DOUGH MICHAIL ARAMPATZIS S.A. www.elzymi.gr HELLENIC QUALITY FOODS S.A. www.hqf.gr IONIKI SFOLIATA www.ionikigr.com/ KAZAKIS LTD www.ntolmadakia.com RODOULA S.A. www.rodoula.gr SITISIS www.sitisis.gr TO XRYSO www.toxryso.gr TSABASIS S.A. www.tsabassis.gr ΖΑΝΑΕ - NIKOGLOU BAKERY YEAST S.A. www.zanae.gr ZEST ARAPAKI S.A. www.zest-arapaki.gr

READY MEALS DOLANO FOOD www.dolanofood.gr EDESMA www.edesma.com FAKOU BROS S.A. www.parnassos-foods.com FRESH GOURMET (CATERING) www.freshgourmet.gr GALITEL S.A. www.galitel.gr epikouria

I.M. STROFILIA LTD www.wermio.gr KAZAKIS LTD www.ntolmadakia.com MAGEIRA BROS S.A. www.afoimageira.gr MAKEDONIKI www.makedoniki.gr N. ONASSIS S.A.HELLENIC CANNED FOOD INDUSTRY www.onassis-foods.gr NORTH AEGEAN SEA CANNERIES S.A. www.konva.gr PALIRRIA S.A. www.palirria.com PLIAS S.A. www.plias.gr SPITIKA TROFIMA (HOMEMADE FOODS)” S.A. www.spitikatrofima.gr STROFILIA – KENTRIS S.A. www.strofilia.com T&T FOODS S.A. www.ttfoods.gr VIOSAL www.viosal.gr ΖΑΝΑΕ - NIKOGLOU BAKERY YEAST S.A. www.zanae.gr

YOGURT AVIGAL S.A. www.avigal.gr BIOPAN – KOURELLAS www.kourellas.gr DODONI S.A. www.dodonidairy.com EVROFARMA www.evrofarma.gr EVROKLIDON LTD www.evroklidon.com FAGE S.A. www.fage.gr FARMA PIERRIAS LTD www.farmapierrias.gr FRIESLAND CAMPINAHELLAS S.A. www.nounou.gr INAHOS S.A. www.inahos.gr KOLIOS S.A. www.kolios.gr

KOUKAKI’S FARM S.A. www.koukfarm.gr KOURELLAS S.A. www.kourellas.gr KRI-KRI S.A. www.krikri.gr MEVGAL S.A. www.mevgal.gr MILK IN OF XANTHIS RODOPIS S.A. www.rodopi-sa.gr NEOGAL DAIRY www.neogal.gr OLYMPOS S.A. www.olympos.gr PAPATHANASIOU S.A. www.papathanasiou-abee.gr SAVOIDAKIS G. S.A. www.savoidakis.gr SERGAL S.A. www.sergal.gr STYMPHALIA S.A. www.stymfalia-sa.gr TYRAS S.A. www.tyras.gr


last look

Windmills

T

he first thing you see when you sail into the port of Alefkandra on the island of Mykonos is a line of seven white windmills marching up the hill above the old town. Built in medieval times, these mills – and scores of others throughout the islands of Greece – were chiefly used to mill wheat. Known as a tower type windmill, they were built high to allow for a large set of sails that were attached to a cap at the top of the mill. Unlike tower mills elsewhere, the caps on Greek windmills were fixed in place, directed towards the prevailing winds (and it can be very windy in the islands). The first known drawing of a wind-powered machine is attributed to Heron of Alexandria, a Greek mathematician and engineer. Called an anemourion, or wind vane, it was used to power a pipe organ. Other notable inventions of Heron include a coinoperated vending machine, the force pump and a selfpropelled programmable cart used in theater productions. He was also the first to observe the imaginary number, the bane of calculus students the world over. While working windmills are a rarity in Greece today, many have been conver ted to homes and some are available to rent to those seeking a historic holiday.

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epikouria



Epikouria spring summer 2013