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TREDINNICK. A place where everyone has a voice. Where hard work pays off. Where everyone is equal and everyone has a chance. It seems like these days getting your work out into the world and for people to take you seriously is mission fucking impossible. Unless you’re blessed to be born into wealth or know a friend of a friend who has links into industry, every other creative out there is just left unwelcome and unheard. As if our art is just nothing. No one is original anymore, I never see anyone taking risks and trying new things because they don’t want to tarnish their reputation. Society is now just riddled with dick riders sucking every cock in sight in the hope it will allow them to take the lift to success, rather than joining the few of us who are willing to take the stairs and create a legacy of our own. Throughout my time trying to create my path into the graphics industry, I have constantly had my vision shat on by lecturers, friends, other designers, internet trolls just because they don’t agree with my way of thinking, the way I dress, the way I speak. Whatever the reason may be, fuck it. I’m going to continue doing things my way. Since I stopped trying to please everyone and not gave a fuck about the negativity I have actually gained more support with my idea and managed to pursue Tredinnick on my own.

on what art you want to produce, you create the world around you. By joining the Tredinnick movement, you will be apart of a huge creative community. Collaborating with anyone who may need your required skills. Whether you’re an illustrator, photographer, industrial engineer, model, musician... Whatever your skill set you’re apart of this movement. By creating an online portfolio and show casing your latest projects allowing the public to see exactly what you get up to. We can work with the public and provide them with the specific service they require. With no limitations combining the skill sets of the Tredinnick community you can freelance yourself out for any project. Any projects completed will be featured in the magazine also, allowing people to receive a hands on experience and gain an insight into our world also. The harder you work, the more projects you get involved in, the more publications you will be featured in allowing you to get your work out into the world also. By helping other people you are also helping yourself, and this is exactly what I want Tredinnick to stand for.

It’s sad because nowadays we have to brand ourselves so hard just to get our name out there. The industry is made out to be like a massive battleground, with everyone fighting it out to try and get a job with an agency to make the next man more money off your work. But why? Tredinnick is still an agency you could say. But instead you decide how much you charge, you decide

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We’re stuck in a system where employers want you to be straight out of uni but to have 30 years experience in the industry. If you don’t live in London then you will never make it as a designer. People don’t want to know you until you’re ‘somebody’. But the second you get a bit of attention for your work they come crawling into your life and act like they’ve been fucking with you since day one. Where the only option for most of us is to use social media to try and get our work out there, with the risk that people then steal your work to use for their own and won’t pay homage. People are quick enough to support the celebrity endorsed shit before their own friends. This shit needs to stop. Cut out all the stereotypes, all the critics and just appreciate the art for what it is. Instead of focusing on what each creative doesn’t have or can’t do. Why not look at the skill set and vision they can bring to the table. It doesn’t matter about your background, where you’re from or any other poor excuse to not employ somebody. We all have to start off somewhere.

At the end of the day we have to work together in order for us all to grow so let’s stop the shit and support one another. Everyone wants the glitz and glam but doesn’t want to put the work in the actually get there. You got to put in work to get something out in life. And if you don’t start by supporting your friends or by even grinding to get your own work out there then how the fuck are we supposed to eat? “The road to success is not easy to navigate, but with hard work, drive and passion, it’s possible to achieve the American dream.” - Tommy Hilfiger


Everyone seems to have a pretty solid idea about how they want to live their life. From houses, vehicles, clothes, holidays etc most people know what they want in life before they actually have a plan of how they will get it. It’s all very well wanting all these materialistic things but none of you want to work for it. You sit on your ass and blame the government, people on benefits, previous generations for fucking up and we are clearing the mess or your friends holding you back. Bullshit, quit making excuses and go out to do something about it. You want that big house and nice car, then say yes to that over time your boss offered you and no to your friends on that night out. I constantly hear people telling me I’m boring because I rarely go out. How I need to have more fun and that I am always working that I never get a break. Yet when I go out I constantly find myself bored, sat spinning my twat off in the beer garden holding a Corona in my left hand whilst smoking on a Marlboro Gold surrounded by people chatting complete shit and wishing to be anywhere but in this current situation. It’s funny because all my life I grew up wishing I could be someone else, being into art wasn’t seen as cool. But I have come to realise that instead of trying to fit in with everyone else. I stuck to myself and created the life I wanted around me instead. I 08

started to look deeper into things happening around me, started to appreciate just life in general and thankful for just having a roof over my head and food on my plate. With that over time everything that used to bother me became irrelevant. I then interpreted the way I look at life into my work, when your life becomes your work you can never be bored. Never not be inspired, thinking about the next thing. Yes it is frustrating, but it’s also brilliant. Doing what you love everyday and turning that into a career is a dream. But fuck that, do what you love and make it your lifestyle. In a world filled with negativity, it’s very easy to lose focus and not believe in yourself due to people constantly talking shit. Working your ass off just for a piece of paper to determine your future. You all get so caught up in shit that doesn’t matter that you start to lose touch of who you actually are in order to impress people who don’t care about you. If you believe every time someone says you can’t do something then nothing would ever be achieved. Fuck what they say man, believe in yourself and make sure once you succeed you let those mother fuckers know wassup and that you did it without their help. It’s okay to lose people, just don’t lose yourself.


RED PAINT THE TOWN

THE THIRST IS REAL.

Can someone please tell me what is actually going on, as I find myself consumed in a society riddled with shufflers, roid ragers and 40 year old men trapped in their youth, still hitting up clubs in the hope of getting lucky with anything that has a pulse. But let’s not forget the sponsors Team Breezy, all you funky mother fuckers out their who turn up with your headbands and hottest dance moves letting all these gal know they ain’t loyal. If it wasn’t for you man out in the club poppin like you’re in a Chris Brown video then how would we know that Thirsty Thursday is here?

Filling night clubs like cattle, with their fresh trims and lashes on fleek. A god given gift given to those selected few specimen who are blessing the town of this fine Thursday evening. But fuck it, the night is still young and as man just got paid from my 40 hour week at Esso I’m gonna be champagne poppin’ all night and act like a complete prick as I run the show tonight boys. I am a baller and I am going to spunk my cash on all these girls here who don’t even give a fuck about me. They’re just here for the free drinks and attention but do not fear Tom, as for I am the chosen one to fulfill this duty to the public. The night ends with you leaving the club with a load of girls and you’re feeling good, mission accomplished you’ve managed to clear your bank account. You’re the big shot leaving with the ladies. You open the exit door to let the five ladies out and you follow after, knowing manners are crucial. You kindly walk your company to their taxis and send their drunken asses home to fuck their boyfriends waiting up for them. Congratulations. You’re now living off ready meals for the rest of the month but you your head with pride as you know payday is in 28 days where you can do the exact same thing again.

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If you’re from the shire then there is no doubt you have heard of BeatsWorkin at some point or another. If you haven’t, then I am sorry but what the fuck are you doing with your life? Put this article down now and go there. Go on. Go.

When did Beats start up and originate from?

Anyways, where to begin...

How has the whole experience been since the store was just an idea?

From a kid the first store I remember shopping in religiously was Beats. Whether it be from the fat DC days to the Dunks, Vans or Janoskis they always managed to hook me up with something dope. I think what drew me to the store most was the atmosphere, you knew when you walked in you weren’t in there just to shop. Shit, the majority of the time I go in nowadays just show my face and see how everyone is. From a wide range of products and brands, Beats has a constant collection of the freshest street-wear clothing out at the moment. Everytime you visit there is always new stock available, so make sure if you swing buy to have a few £££ in your pocket because very rarely do you find yourself walking out of there empty handed. Since opening the store 12 years ago, the little bearded hobbit fellow who goes by the name of Glenn (The owner) has branched out from the street-wear scene for a minute and opened a coffee shop called ‘Coffee ‘N’ Skate’. By deciding to keep the brick walls and having a concrete counter to match the floor he has managed to create this raw experience you will not get from your mainstream coffee franchise. He has also kept it simple with the decour - by having a wooden counter along one side of the shop with a load of quirky adjustable stools, with tables and chairs outside if you want to be at one with nature whilst drinking your organic coffee out of your recycled cup. Yes, thats right mu’fuckas my mans not only on his next level coffee shit but he’s also a guardian of the galaxy. Besides saving the world, serving the public with the finest beverages known to man, running a clothing shop and looking like the next star of Ice Road Truckers I managed to sit down with him for five and ask him a couple questions about his journey from starting up BeatsWorkin, running pop-up yard sales the last couple years to now his latest venture with the coffee shop. Here’s what he had to say.

The 23rd April 2002/03. Can’t quite remember... Haha. The local skate shop closed down. The owner Will, great guy, had just ran out of steam and shut the doors. Just seemed like a good move at the time.

Fun. Hard. Emotional. Man a lot happens in 14 years. Not only do you have that store, you also have had various pop-up shops over time which have been a great success and now Coffee ‘N’ Skate... Did you ever imagine this much growth? It definitely wasn’t some sort of masterplan that’s for sure. These kind of things just grow. If you work at them for long enough and have passion in what you’re doing you can do anything man. Throughout all of this from stores, skate teams and local events, what do you think is your biggest achievement? Shit. Man that’s a tough one haha. Every achievement is your next biggest achievement. I don’t have a particular one this whole journey has been mad! Many people prefer online shopping these days, yet you still have many customers come into the store each day even if it’s just to say hello. What do you feel Beats offers that keeps drawing people back? Beats is an experience. You come in, have a chat. Check some garms. Buy some kicks. Go grab a coffee. Hang out. It’s a social thing as well as a retail. Online does it’s thing and if that’s how you shop that’s cool. But in a world where so much of our time is spent staring at a computer or mobile phone, it’s nice to have that real world experience. The new Coffee ‘N’ Skate store is only going to enhance that side of Beats. It’s been crazy man

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the mix of crew who pass through the cafe. We have even been getting the grey pound! haha. It’s sick, some old people just jammin’ in the cafe talking about skateboard graphics and winking at the staff. Love it. Also getting the college crew in the mornings, I heard one blamed us for being late haha. Overall, I think the cafe is exactly what Barnstaple needed. There are so many coffee shops dotted around town, but they’re all the same. All the same interior, same pretentious dickheads sat with their mochas reading the same paper and same miserable bastards behind the till to busy staring at the clock waiting for their shift to finish rather than worrying about getting your order right or actually providing good customer service. Coffee ‘N’ Skate, all is welcome. First of all, that judgmental bullshit is gone. It doesn’t matter if you’re hungover as shit and after a pick me up, or just want to meet your friends for a catch up. With the help from the BeatsWorkin mascot Mr Hewlett and Pricey, Barnstaples junior heart-throb you’ll find yourself weak at the knees with the phenomenal service these two jokers provide. Whilst taking photographs for the article, I got into conversation with Richard and Jane, an elderly couple in the cafe at the time to see what their thoughts were on the new development. Richard was sat down at the counter whilst Jane was waiting at the till for their drinks. ‘Very impressive, my grandchildren are into skateboarding. I think they would love this place.’ Waiting upon his 2nd cup of coffee as the previous one ended up on the floor, I was listening to him decide whether this incident happened because the cup was to hot or because he thinks his wife has arthritis and can no longer carry a drink without aid.

coffee beans. I have never smelt anything so fresh.’ ‘Chocolate cake would be a nice extra, if I was here I would gladly make it for you...’ ‘needs scones’ Richard interrupted one last time. That was it for me, these two had me creasing so I had to leave. Turns out these two were from Canada, so hearing there opinion of the cafe I took an interest to as the whole experience was new for them. Before leaving, there was a young girl sat outside waiting for her bus called Millie. I wanted to see what her thoughts were on the cafe also, so I asked if she could write what she thought on the place whilst I ordered my own beverage before hitting the road. Her note read.. ‘A really nice place, I walk past and see it’s always packed with people laughing. I have never actually been here before but as it was quiet I thought I would give it a try aha. I will definitely bring my friends here though, seems like a fun place to chill out. The staff are really friendly as well:)’ All jokes aside, Glen has done a fantastic job with the cafe and from asking different generations their thoughts it seems it’s a thumbs up for him. I even witnessed him get the grey pound with photographic evidence on in the bottom right photo. Big up everyone who got involved with this article as well and let me know their thoughts on the place. It’s nice to see such positive feedback about something for once.

‘Ohh, I love his hair. You never really see people with hairstyles like...’ I look up to see Jane making her grand entrance into this conversation by commenting on Pricey’s dreadlocks but her opinion got quickly cut by Richard finishing her sentence with ‘Which needs cutting.’ I couldn’t help but laugh, all I could picture was those two in some old school whip plodding around the UK. Jane looking at all the brochures, wanting to go here and there with Richard in the drivers seat following orders. If you have ever seen ‘Keeping up with appearances’ then I am pretty certain you can paint an image in your head of what I was witnessing. Suddenly, Jane was at it again. ‘Let me tell you something young man. Back in my day we would walk down the street and whenever you passed a bakery all you could smell was the fresh loaf being taken out the oven. The smell was incredible and would follow you down the street. But since time has moved on you don’t get that anymore.’ Before I could even process what she was talking about Richard cuts her off again ‘Love you’re getting on a bit, you can barely see. Can’t hear, struggle walking you really think bread is gonna stop smelling or do you think it could be the last of your senses packing up also?’ I felt so awkward for a moment until they both started laughing. But I thought Jane would’ve learnt her lesson but apparently not, as she had a lot more to say. ‘As I was saying, the reason why I came here was because when I walked past I could smell 14

If you haven’t already then make sure you come through and meet the fam as it’s an experience you won’t forget. This is definitely one of the hottest spots in the area and well worth a visit.


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WHAT INSPIRES YOU? If like myself you are studying a creative subject, then I’m sure you can agree with me at some point you have been asked ‘Who is your favourite artist? Have you been to any exhibitions recently? What inspires you the most?’. Firstly, fuck off. Throughout school, college and uni I constantly heard the same old bullshit about how you need to do artist research for you to pursue your idea. Yes, don’t get me wrong, studying artists and researching into previous art movements is beneficial into the development of your work. But don’t sit there and tell me that if I don’t have a little black fucking book of my favourite designers in my pocket that I won’t make it as a designer. Personally, I could not give a shit about what other artists are doing nor do I care to include them in my research to try and establish some bullshit link between their work and mine. Instead, I get inspired by everyday life that is happening around me. To be perfectly honest, I don’t even know how people get inspired by galleries anyways. Everytime I go to an exhibition it seems to be the same old shit, large rooms with two paintings on the wall. Bunch of weird ass people stood staring, arms crossed with one hand scratching their chin in silence. Instead, why don’t you use that £20 entry fee to throw some petrol in your tank and go for a drive and find inspiration from the shit that’s going on around you. Take in your surroundings and use that to inspire yourself. You man don’t even go exhibitions to appreciate the art, just to grab a snap of the ticket to put on social media to make your fan girls think you’re deep and a decent guy. Fuck yourselves. Aw babe, I fucking love art I feel it really speaks to my soul you know. It touches my heart, I literally feel like this painting is speaking to me. I write poetry you know, have a listen. Roses are red, violets are blue, I chat complete shit, in the hope I can hit that ass too. Yeah safe, that’s deep bro. Keep at it. But what you fuckers don’t realise is that you’re killing it for the people who do go to appreciate it. I couldn’t give a fuck if your Instagram got 55 likes for the photo of the ticket, get your iPhone out my face you annoying piece of lump of. The last time I went to a gallery with my a group of friends as they ‘heard’ it was really good. They were hyped for the queue and taking pictures of the build up, but once they were actually in the mood suddenly changed and they couldn’t wait to get out. Don’t fucking go to an exhibition if you don’t care for what is in it. Don’t get me wrong I do appreciate the exhibits and the people enthusiastic to go, just go if it actually interests you and not for the hype. It’s a waste of your time and money. Focus on what you’re doing and don’t piss the world off with unnecessary bullshit that we don’t need.

I’m not writing this article just to piss and moan about shit though, I’m actually trying to make you think and look at things differently. You don’t need to go to events and shit just because you heard it was the place to be, go out and discover your own shit. Once you find something that triggers your imagination you don’t need to worry about going to all these fake ass conventions to jump on the next mans dick to try and get some attention. Find something that makes you think. It doesn’t even have to even inspire you it could be something you hate, but it’s made you think about how you can make it better. Everything you need is right infront of you, you just need to open you eyes. Even when people tell you that your work isn’t good enough, fuck them. As long as you think your work is dope then you keep doing you, create something for yourself and don’t let anyone tell you shit. If you have to rely on events and other shit to get you motivated, then you’re fucked because if it suddenly stopped what would you do? Stop worrying about people pleasing, what others may think about you, whether your work is good enough or even about fucking up. As long as you think your work is cool and you’re proud that’s what matters. You may even look back in a day/ month/ year and think differently about what you did but then that’s because you’ve evolved and become better. Sometimes you gotta fuck up for you to realise why and you can learn from it. Life is just a game and you got to play by the rules or else you’re just gonna be stuck in the same loop hole forever. A lot of people think I am arrogant or a prick because I always speak my mind and don’t really give a shit about peoples opinions. But then again I constantly find myself being told I can’t do something and people talking shit once I do it on my own and prove them wrong? So who would you say is the prick? If you’re going to talk shit about my vision and say I can’t do something I won’t stop until I have done it as to me success is the greatest revenge. Knowing you have achieved something on your own, doing it your way, with everyone tell you to quit or your work is shit. But you did it, despite all that. Isn’t that something to be proud of? Fuck those guys, that’s why I stick to myself and not listen to shit. Throughout this project I have had people telling me you can’t do it yet here you are reading this article right? You see people featured in this magazine? Exactly. I’m not saying my opinion is right, I’m just saying it’s something to think about.

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The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched they must be felt with the heart. Helen Keller


YOU ARE CONSUMED.


TOM CROOK GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Here are a few questions I have come up with to help us gain an insight into what goes on behind the art. With new designers posting their work daily we see the finished product, but ever sit and wonder how they came up with the concept to begin with? Here are a series of articles from a range of artists, allowing you to see the method behind the madness. @TOMCROOK_ First off, tell me a bit about yourself and what you do? My name is Tom Crook. I’m 21 years old and I am a graphic design student currently studying at SCAT. Alongside my studies, I somehow stumbled into freelance illustration. It started off as a bit of fun, as a pass time when I wasn’t working I would throw on some music and just draw whatever I was listening to at the time. I had no where to put my work as it was never relevant to any of my briefs so I just started posting it on social media. Over time I started to get requests from people and it took off from there really. Who’s your favourite artist/ creative atm and how do you get inspired for your own work? I don’t actually have a favourite artist haha. In Senior school I studied Hundertwasser for a while as I was fascinated with the colour pallet he worked with and the freedom he had with his brush. To be perfectly honest I have never really cared for other artists or what they are doing. The more time I spend worrying about what other people are doing the less time I time I have focusing on what I am doing. But when I am scrolling through my Instagram I am constantly fascinated with Mago Dovjenko’s work. His work is next level, from painting murals around New York to some insane digital art this guy is super talented. Check his work trust. I get inspired for my own work by different things really. A lot of people search so hard for inspiration, yet when it comes to producing work their creativity is limited. Most artists nowadays seem to have an

imagination barrier. I just go about my business, and just take in what’s happening around me. I love people watching, I don’t know why but I find humans fascinating. I get most creative at night though, going for a drive with a bit of music really sparks my imagination. I just love the freedom, you can do what you want with no one around to ruin shit. Sitting at crooks peak (if you know then you know) at like 2am with your mates talking about how fucked up the world is and listening to the ocean. Man it’s fucking beautiful. What projects have you been working on recently/ got lined up in the works? I have done a few graphic design jobs here and there for people when cash is short but other than that I’ve been pretty blessed with a consistent request for illustrations. I have had a few people ask for prints of my previous work so I am currently in the works of creating a website for myself showcasing my work and allowing people to purchase prints. This is how all of this actually began, I’m still in shock I have managed to pull it off haha. Tredinnick was originally going to be my graphic/ illustration identity, so I could start to brand my work. But I always talked about and drew up plans of how I could hopefully make it grow into a network, connecting other creative people together. Imagine that, one day my identity not only represents myself but a team of people. And they represent me. I know so many people who are so fucking talented but are to shy to put their work out as to what others may think but fuck that. Thats why I decided to pursue this for my project and take it upon myself

to give these talented little fuckers a voice haha. For the future I don’t plan on anything else to major, obviously I will stick to producing more illustrations but I want to pursue this further by making more issues of this magazine as although it has been stressful trying to get it done. To watch what I used to talk about with my mates actually grow into a product is remarkable to me. Since creating an identity for yourself via your work, has it effected your personal life in any way and what people may think about you? Shit aha, kinda I guess? I use art to actually help my personal life I guess. I have difficulty dealing with my anger so to sit down with my ear phones in and fuck around on illustrator is almost like meditation for me. But then I started to create a name for myself via my style of work and getting recognised for being that dude who does the ‘cool GTA drawings’ rather than for my short temper was refreshing. It’s funny because I spent so long trying to find solutions to help with my anger and people used to judge me for it, now I use it to make a name for myself and doing something positive so people who still talk shit don’t phase me anymore haha. So I guess it’s safe to say my work and personal life now balance each other. What was mad though was I went to London with my friend Tom earlier in the year for the Ejder pop-up event in Shoreditch, at the after party someone came up to me and was like ‘you’re Tom Crook aren’t you?’. Usually when I hear that I’m just like fuckkkkkk, 25


here we go haha but this girl actually followed my Instagram and was a fan of my work. That was mad, like a couple years back when Tumblr was more of a thing Tom and Oz who were like my brothers, used to be ‘Tumblr famous’ and everywhere we went people would know who they were. I think that’s what made me realise the actual power of the internet and what you could do with it. I wasn’t really apart of that trend, I didn’t really understand peoples mentality of it. People suddenly changed around you and seeked this self proclaimed ‘fame’. It’s quite sad that people actually rate their self worth off the amount of following they have. It was funny though, as although they had the following and people interested in what they did with their lives, I was the one who could drive and was working at the time to fund it. So if they ever fucked me off when we were out I would just play the ‘how’re you getting home?’ card and that was that haha. But yeah, they would just take photos of the different shit we got up to and with there following my name started to get out there. I used that opportunity start posting my work online, they would reblog it and that was that. Instead of a few hundred people seeing my work suddenly it was thousands. Like these guys had 80k people following them! But I was young at the time and didn’t really know how I could use that to my advantage. Just having people comment on my work saying it was dope was enough for me. But yeah, going up to this event and for once I got noticed for MY shit, not for being friends with someone ‘internet famous’ was so sick. Sounds lame but that moment literally made me realise I could do this as a career. As for what people think of me, could not give a fuck. The people who talk the most shit about me I have never actually had a conversation with them haha. People think because I tend to voice my opinion and say things how it is that I’m a prick. I’m actually quite a quiet person, I’m more of a thinker. I take in everything that is happening around me as everyday shit inspires me man. But if I think something isn’t right I will speak up and voice my opinion. I tend to try and create a piece of work after these situations

as well. Let people try and see things from my perspective but through my work. I never post that shit though as I can’t be dealing with people then trying to start a debate when all I am trying to do is express myself haha. Please move onto the next question, people aggravate me haha. How do you go about getting your work out into the world? Do you feel like the methods you use give you enough recognition? Haha, I think my previous question will answer this as well. But mainly social media and the college exhibitions. We always have an end of year show which is cool, everyone just gets together and opens the college to the public allowing them to see our work. Other than that I just use social media. It’s at our fingertips and available to anyone, whether they see it or not is down to how much I put out I guess. I try to be fairly consistent with it though and mix it up, otherwise people will get bored of you or think you don’t take this shit seriously. How did you manage the financial side of this? What help and professional advice if did you get? I had a part time job which helped a lot with materials and printing costs, but my granddad got me my Mac when I first started uni as I didn’t have a computer. I didn’t even know how to use a computer properly before uni haha, everything I did was by hand and paper. But yeah, I am forever grateful to him as he helped me out a lot. When I first taught myself how to use the Adobe suite I would go and visit him at work to show him what I had been up to. He would stop what he was doing and make everyone in the office gather round and look at my work. He even bought my first print off me, he wanted one to put on the wall and sent me off to get it done for him haha. He’s a G though, he will be sat there will his cords on, brown leather shoes with some funky pink socks or some shit on, glasses attached to a piece of string so he doesn’t lose them. This guy is on some next level jiggy shit yet has prints of gangsters dotted around his office. I never really had professional advice though, the only advice I have got

from people around here is to change my style of work as it’s not considered ‘art’. I just kinda go with it I guess, I don’t know anyone else doing what I do so it’s hard to reach out and get advice, I just do my thing and stay persistent with it. Whats your biggest frustration about being a young creative in this modern day? Haha, where to begin. Social media is great for showing people what we get up to and receiving feedback on your work. But along with the support you get, there’s a lot of people out there who try and crush your vision. How do you deal with the negativity? Fuck them man. People are always gonna talk shit and there will always be someone who doesn’t agree with you. You can either sit an cry about it, or use it as motivation to prove them wrong and make your voice be heard. I always hear people say ‘if only I knew then what I knew now, things would be so different”. If you had a message for the next generation of creatives who may be inspired by what you do, what advice would you give them? Just believe in yourself and don’t take no for an answer. If someone says you can’t do something, use that as motivation to drive you to work harder. But I think the best advice to give is actually no advice. When I was trying to get my foot in the door I had no one there to show me. I had to find it and walk through it myself. Although it is frustrating and can drive you mad, I wouldn’t have it any other way. As now looking back I can say I did everything myself and I did it all my way. Just try everything and fail as much as you can as that allows you to realise where you fucked up and how you can better yourself.


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JOE BURN MUSICIAN

Although I have known of Joe for a substantial amount of time, it’s only been recently that I have worked with him on a personal level. After attending a few of his gigs, I knew he had a interest for music but it wasn’t until I asked him to get involved with this project that I really gained an understanding of his passion. From making his own beats to writing his own lyrics, Joe has established a personal style and is rapidly gaining a name for himself in the UK Hip-Hop scene.

@JOEBURN_

@jdotburn

First off, tell me a bit about yourself and what you do? Umm ok well obviously I go by the name Joe Burn haha. My birth name is double barreled cus I carry both my mums last name and my dads. I’ve always used my dads last name ‘Brasington’ so I thought as my artist name I will use the Burn from my mums side. I’ve always made music and wrote lyrics from as long as I can remember, music’s always been a massive part of my life. So yeah, I write raps and make beats basically haha. Who’s your favourite artist/ creative atm and how do you get inspired for your own work? My favourite artist is a very hard one, I have a wide taste in music and listen to loads of different artists and respect/ favour them for different reasons. I don’t really go by favourite but by how I feel at the time, but if I have to name an artist that I am listening to alot e.g the CD you would eject out my car it would be Chronixx or Dirty Dike. I get inspired by all sorts really but mostly the people, the media or my friends. I like to try and expose the lies that I’ve been raised to see through, aim to give a feeling of oneness. On a whole the people I’ve grown up around have always been my inspiration to what I do today.

What projects have you been working on recently/ got lined up in the works? Ooooohh haha. Yeah man I got lots of projects on at the minute, but when they will be released is something I couldn’t answer haha. I don’t like to put a date on anything or plan as such cus then I could fuck it up haha. But umm yeah I’m working on a track for the OneLion Mixtape Vol.2 to be released on their new record label near the end of the month featuring a collective of Southwest hip-hop artists. I’ve just finished writing to a new banger produced by Daddyskitz. Watch for that one trust me haha. An album is also on the cards as I’ve just finished a couple tracks for it produced by Challis and one from Cruicky. I’ve been working on a track produced by Badhabitz, an EP with Pres and a mixtape with my padre Pharmatis featuring the Sewerside family. Since creating an identity for yourself via your work, has it effected your personal life in any way and what people may think about you? Na not really. People who actually know me, know I’ve always been the same. I’m only at the very start of my journey anyway I’m just enjoying myself. I know people may pass

judgment but they’re probably bored and are doing nothing with their little boring lives haha jokes. Naa, anyway if everyone was to give a fuck about what people think about you this world would be a very boring and uninteresting place, thats the beauty of individuality. How do you go about getting your work out into the world? Do you feel like the methods you use give you enough recognition? Internet’s made a massive impact on getting yourself out there. Thats one of the benefits, but me personally I prefer networking by doing gigs, getting on the festival circuit, word of mouth etc. But yeah I could push my social networking alot more, enough people get really well known off just being bravely selfless with their promotion constant spamming. But yeah I’m not the best when it comes to stuff like that, not really my thing. How did you manage the financial side of this? What help and professional advice if did you get? My EP release was helped by Defcon Records for digital, and SouledOutStudios for vinyl. I also put money in if I have to. But at the same time you don’t have to have money to make music. Well apart 41


from petrol in the tank to go see Shire Roots and Blazenstien or Wez or Tis. But then it’s just going to see your mates haha, it’s not money in the tank its what we enjoy doing. I work at a local skate shop, I also do gigs and that. Defcon have been very supportive and have guided and pushed me since I was young. Natty who runs it said to me when I was 12 I had to shake a deal with him to release my first EP on Defcon after I had jumped on a open mic amongst them haha. My dad as well has been mad supportive. Also Daddy Skitz is from the same area as me originally. He’s my godfather, he grew up with my dad. But still, Skitz didn’t pay full attention to my music until I put a couple tracks out using the college equipment. I kept poppin’ up on the same gigs as him thats when he was like yeah it’s time to make a track haha Stand Up and called Hunta up on the hook. Whats your biggest frustration about being a young creative in this modern day? Ahhh, try not to let shit frustrate me really haha, but people stealing ideas or copying is always one to watch for. Social media is great for showing people what we get up to and receiving feedback on your work. But along with the support you get, there’s a lot of people out there who try and crush your vision. How do you deal with the negativity? Use it, if you don’t have any one being negative towards you or at least disliking you in anyway, you are doing something wrong. I always hear people say ‘if only I knew then what I knew now, things would be so different.” If you had a message for the next generation of creatives who may be inspired by what you do, what advice would you give them? Just gotta enjoy it and keep it you.

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DAN LANDSBURGH PHOTOGRAPHER

I have known Dan for too long, from the days when he used to work in Beats and hook me up with anything I needed. But over the last year he has finally managed to pursue his photography career and has moved to London to start his journey. Unfortunately for him though he’s been super busy with his work and didn’t manage to send over a portrait of himself for the article so I managed to go on his Facebook and find this gem.

@DANLANDSBURGH

First off, tell me a bit about yourself and what you do? Well my names Dan, originally from Devon. Worked in a skate shop and drank way to much coffee, but I recently gave that all up about 6 months ago to moved to London and try my hand in photography industry. Who’s your favourite artist/ creative atm and how do you get inspired for your own work? Well I’ve always had a few favorites like Craig Stecyk, French Fred from when I first got in to photography. I busted my ankle up skating so rather than just sitting around the house having a major pity party for one I started looking for other things I could do while my friend skated. But more recently I’ve been shooting the music side of photography so I looking at people like Todd Owyoungs work for inspiration, but I don’t want to pigeon hole myself into one style. What projects have you been working on recently/ got lined up in the works? Recently I’ve been just focusing promote myself, getting in contact with companies showing them my work to get more jobs. So I’ve not really been working on any personal projects as much. But early next year I aim to plan a skate tip with a few friends. These are always fun

and it’s good for me as it gives me a chance to explore new places and shoot some social documentary style photos. Since creating an identity for yourself via your work, has it effected your personal life in any way and what people may think about you? I can’t say that creating an identity has really effected my personal life. I mean really I’m still working on building my identity within the industry of photography and it’s probably one of those things you’re never going to stop doing if you want to keep your self current. How do you go about getting your work out into the world? Do you feel like the methods you use give you enough recognition? Well the best tools are social media platforms like Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and I have a website which I’m currently working on. Social media has made it easier to get your work out there but at the same time all these platforms are flooded with peoples work as these days every ones a photographer which means some times your work can get lost which is a shame, take instagram for example you could take the most amazing photo but some will upload a picture of there dinner that will for some reason get more recognition.

How did you manage the financial side of this? What help and professional advice if did you get? Well like I said I’ve only been working on building my self up within the industry for about 6 months, so financially I’ve been freelancing in order to keep some sort of cash flow coming in. Currently I am working as an image retoucher before I was working in a photographic studio and working as a photographers assistant. I think in this industry personally you have to make your self flexible other wise its just not going to work. Whats your biggest frustration about being a young creative in this modern day? As with most creative industry’s I imagine just the sea of competition. It’s not necessarily a bad thing as when you get the job it’s fucking amazing but working as a freelancer it can be a little frustrating not knowing where your next pay packet is going to come from. Social media is great for showing people what we get up to and receiving feedback on your work. But along with the support you get, there’s a lot of people out there who try and crush your vision. How do you deal with the negativity? I kinda feel that Negative people are just people who wish they were doing what you’re doing. There is always 45


someone who thinks they are above all and end all of there creative industry so feel that they can slate any one else work. There’s not point in take any negativity to heart not everyone will like your work and some will love it. But you have to get your work out there, there is no point in creating something and then keeping it all to yourself. Use these platforms like Instgram and Facebook, Flickr whatever you want to use to get feed back it’s the best way to make progress. I always hear people say ‘if only I knew then what I knew now, things

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would be so different”. If you had a message for the next generation of creatives who may be inspired by what you do, what advice would you give them? Make as many mistakes with your work as possible, because it’s the best way to learn. Don’t worry about trying something new and fucking up because once you’ve figured out what went wrong you wont make that mistake again.


MODESTEP Nass is always a mad festival, so hectic with everything going on but that’s why I love it. This image is of Tony Friend from Modestep giving it the double whammy fuck off’s. I was stoked later to find out he had used this image for his social media. It’s always a nice rewarding feeling to have your images used by bands. However every now and again you don’t get credited for your work and sadly this time was the latter.


ANNA JACKSON MODEL

Anna is one of my oldest friends so I had to get her on board with this project. From the geeky little tomboy I once knew, she suddenly took off and I hadn’t heard from her in months until I saw her on a Topshop advert. Now she travels across the globe doing all sorts of cool things and I couldn’t be prouder. @AFRANCESJ First off, tell me a bit about yourself and what you do? Hi I’m Anna! I grew up a small rural town in Devon before being whizzed off into the world of international modelling at 15. I am now living in London where I am still modelling as well as studying for a BA in History of Art at UCL. Who’s your favourite artist/ creative atm and how do you get inspired for your own work? At the moment I am totally inspired by the life works of Alexander McQueen. He not only inspires my work but my everyday life and how I perceive things. He encouraged thinking outside of the box, and the recent exhibition on his work at the V&A was by far the best exhibition I have ever been to! What projects have you been working on recently/ got lined up in the works? I spent most of the summer working in the head office of Alexander McQueen as their fitting model. I saw the whole process from start to finish of their new collection and I felt to honoured to be part of it. Recently I just finished London fashion week - totally exhausting and crazy but worth it for the creative buzz of the catwalks. I have just started back at university, so modelling has been put on a hold for a while! Since creating an identity for yourself via your work, has it effected your personal life in any way and what people may think about you? When I first started modelling, I tried to keep it as a secret for as long as possible afraid of what people would think - I couldn’t hide it anymore

though when people in my class started spotting me in magazines! I try not to let it affect my personal life, although I still to this day don’t introduce myself as a model. Many people have preconceptions about what sort of life I might live and what sort of industry I work in, and are quick to judge; but it is mainly because they have no understanding of insight into a world that is alien to them. People will forever be afraid and judgmental of the unknown. How do you go about getting your work out into the world? Do you feel like the methods you use give you enough recognition? I don’t really have to worry about getting myself out there - that is the job of my agency! But social media helps to get my face about, and a lot of networking helps to make new contacts and potential people I could work with. How did you manage the financial side of this? What help and professional advice if did you get? Modelling is a very fickle world in terms of work. You could easily go for 2 months with barely any work, but then you sometimes only need one job to make up for this financially. It is a very unpredictable and unreliable job, but thankfully now I am at university I have student loans to rely on if I am not working enough ! Whats your biggest frustration about being a young creative in this modern day? It frustrates me when I hear people say that all the creative things have already been done, and there is nothing new to discover, to produce, to develop. I think this is very smallminded! It can also be frustrating that most of the creative industries

still rely on who you know, not necessarily what you know or how talented you are. This is definitely the case in modelling: the models who are currently doing really well are usually those with parents or relations already in the industry, not the girls who work hard running around to castings all day! Social media is great for showing people what we get up to and receiving feedback on your work. But along with the support you get, there’s a lot of people out there who try and crush your vision. How do you deal with the negativity? There can be a lot of negativity towards models on social media. A lot of this can be to do with the controversy over the ‘body image’ and size of the models. I try not to let this bother me too much, but I do agree that there is a problem. Social media, despite having positives like you’ve said, also creates a platform to easily be able to judge and comment on things/people you don’t know; but I think a lot of this is just girl on girl jealousy. I always hear people say ‘if only I knew then what I knew now, things would be so different”. If you had a message for the next generation of creatives who may be inspired by what you do, what advice would you give them? Never forget who you are! You are not just a coat hanger or mannequin, don’t forget you are still unique and have a personality. Have the confidence to like what you like, wear what you want to, and be whoever the fuck you want to be!

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Andrea Kyriacou FASHION PHOTOGRAPHER

I have only met Andrea a couple times, but you can instantly tell she’s very passionate about photography and also a very pleasant person to talk to. Make sure you check her Youtube channel for reviews on the latest clothing drops and her webpage/ Instagram for her latest shoots. With her following rapidly growing she is definitely one to look out for in the fashion scene. www.andreakyriacou.co.uk

First off, tell me a bit about yourself and what you do? My name is Andrea Kyriacou, I’m 19 and I’ve lived in London my whole life. I am currently studying Photography at college and hoping to go onto University studying Fashion Photography. Who’s your favourite artist/ creative atm and how do you get inspired for your own work? There are so many creatives and artists that inspire me at the moment, however I do have to say Gosha Rubchinsky inspired my work the most alongside David Sims. One of my favourite designers and fashion photographers is Gosha Rubchinsky. It’s intriguing how his clothing and images reflect the cross- cultural chaos that happed in his country Moscow following the collapse of communism. I love how he shows that event through his unique urban, skate wear designs. For example the vibrant, colourful fabrics with miss matching patchwork and box fitting garments. He does not care for the current trends in the fashion industry and sticks to his own raw and original ideas, which I admire. This outlook inspires me with my own work as it encourages me to be bold with my own ideas in photography and not follow the trends. His images are based around the Russian fashion and youth skate culture, I feel like I can relate to his images because on a certain level it is universal and I feel like I am living and surrounded by that scene. I recently attended his book signing which took place at the London Dover Street Market where I was lucky enough to meet him.

@WXSTEMAN

What projects have you been working on recently/ got lined up in the works? College wise, my most recent project has been called ‘Telling Tales’ where you tell a story through your images. I chose the ‘Fashion’ pathway and my theme is 1970’s punk culture alongside the movement Rock Against Racism. I explore the birth of punk and tell the story of the hard racial fight and fashion trend through my models compositions, facial expressions and garments used. As personal projects go, I enjoy meeting new, unique people so I’m always scouting people on my own and shoot them. I like finding people who intrigue me and I find interesting. I always have and will be a lover of street-wear but I prefer not to shoot it all the time as I’m surrounded by it everyday and it doesn’t feel like anything special. Since creating an identity for yourself via your work, has it effected your personal life in any way and what people may think about you? It has changed my personal life by creating my own identity through my work because it has allowed me to meet new people who were originally just clients but have actually ended up being very close friends now. When it comes to people’s opinions of me, it varies. Which is a shame because sometimes I have no idea who they are. But I guess the more ‘popular’ you get online, the more ‘haters’ come along with it, it happens to everyone. So you just have to get on with it. You have to take peoples criticism with a pinch of salt.

youtu.be/2AYCW3NMtdE

How do you go about getting your work out into the world? Do you feel like the methods you use give you enough recognition? I have a website where I post my images, a Facebook group too dedicated to my images which allows people to ‘like’ the page and give me feedback which is always nice! It also keeps me up to date with how many people are viewing my work! I also have an Instagram, although it does need updating! I also run a YouTube channel which is another hobby of mine where I speak about fashion and my latest pick ups and my photography so promote it through there. I feel my methods do give me enough recognition as it’s everywhere for people to see! Also post on The Basement, which is a street wear group with 30,000 members, that’s full of creative people like musicians, models, artists and photographers. This also gets me recognition however, I wish people would share my posts sometimes too but I guess you cannot have everything! I’m also thinking about starting up a blog. How did you manage the financial side of this? What help and professional advice if did you get? I used to work a lot which funded my website! Apart from that, everything else is free so there isn’t much funding needed! My film cameras were handed down to me from my uncle and dad, which is awesome. I am saving money up to buy a good DSLR though. I haven’t really had any advice, as I’m the only one in my family who is into the creative and artistic pathway haha. I’ve done everything by myself as my family 57


still don’t really think what I’m doing is a ‘real’ thing… so yeah… I’m alone pretty much. My teacher helps me though; he knows how passionate I am about this subject and how much I want to succeed. Whats your biggest frustration about being a young creative in this modern day? I don’t really have any frustration about being a young creative; I think it’s cool. The only thing that annoys me is it seems to be a trend and everyone wants to be one just to ‘stunt’ on people and follow the crowd. It really annoys me because true creative, like myself find it hard to stand out and show how we are actually genuine and not new to the scene. Too many kids buying an expensive camera and thinking they’re photographers, or finding a photo online, printing it on a t-shirt and calling themselves designers. You’re not either of those, so stop it. It takes time, dedication and skill, it annoys me how easy they think it is

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to succeed just because they have a high follower count doesn’t mean you’ve made it. Social media is great for showing people what we get up to and receiving feedback on your work. But along with the support you get, there’s a lot of people out there who try and crush your vision. How do you deal with the negativity? I don’t care about the negativity. Constructive criticism is fine, as I always want to better myself. But I’ve been bullied all my life since I can remember for being that ‘emo’ kid and not being skinny or cool enough. So I’ve had no choice but to be strong and ignore people. Nowadays I just laugh at people who try and bring my friends or me down. I know I put the work in, and I’m trying my best. Irrelevant people’s opinion means nothing and I just brush it off. I always hear people say ‘if only I knew then what I knew now, things would be so different”. If you had

a message for the next generation of creatives who may be inspired by what you do, what advice would you give them? My advice would be, do what YOU like. Shoot what YOU find interesting and unique. Don’t follow a trend or do what your friend is doing. It’s a hard industry and you have to stand out for being yourself. There is always something special and quirky about each person, show that side and show how individual and rare you are. Don’t be discouraged if someone doesn’t like your work because art is subjective. Someone will love your work and some may not, but that’s just how it is. It won’t be an easy ride, but enjoy it! There is no rush to ‘make it’ just have fun on the journey. Don’t work to the extent where you feel too pressured and unhappy.


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CHARLI COLLIER Alternative Model The first time I met Charli was this summer. We ended up going to Summer Solstice together at StoneHenge, staying up all night watching a sunrise with a herd of pagans I think was a life changing experience for the both of us. Currently pursuing modelling as a hobby, she has rapidly grown a large following on social media. She has been featured in many alternative magazines and is getting more offers by the day. @CHARLILOUISE

First off, tell me a bit about yourself and what you do? My name is Charli Louise Collier, I’m 25 and am a part-time published alternative model. I’ve been on and off modelling since I was 16/17 but have only ever pursued it as a hobby. I have worked with some fantastic photographers in the alternative industry and have been published in several magazines including Elite Online Magazine & Teen Spirit. Who’s your favourite artist/ creative atm and how do you get inspired for your own work? I have always been influenced by drag actually, which has received wide ridicule and been susceptible to small minded opinions throughout it’s existence. In particular the club kid era with icons such as Amanda Lepore. A few queens in particular I am particularly interested in are: Sharon Needles, Milk & Violet Chachki. Some of the concepts they demonstrate as drag artists are shocking and extremely controversial, which is exactly what I love and what I hope to steer my work towards. I’m inspired by people who are very unique/different, remain true to themselves and to their style regardless of their reception and yet who remain completely humble. What projects have you been working on recently/ got lined up in the works?

I have recently finished my shoot for Elite Online Magazine, one of the hottest alternative magazines around & am very proud to part of Team Elite. I am working on booking more shoots in to get more work done for them over the coming months. I also will be getting myself round to shooting my Suicide Girls set very soon! Since creating an identity for yourself via your work, has it effected your personal life in any way and what people may think about you? My personal life? Not so much. I have a very supportive partner who respects what I do is just work. The general public? Very much so. So, when people know you through your work BEFORE they have ever met you personally, you have to be prepared for them to have already formed opinions on you. Usually based around what type of work you do, especially if its slightly more risque modelling, like mine. Unfortunately, that’s the way the world works. People generally tend to assume I’ll behave a certain way or adopt a certain attitude. The amount of times I’ve received surprised comments like “Wow, I didn’t expect you to be nice” and “What, don’t you get naked all the time though? Come on!” From shocked men because I won’t send them nude photos (which is another thing, having to get used to people assuming that because you model naked, you’ll get naked for them). People knowing who you are and

knowing your name is something I’ll never get used to. People asking for photos is humbling and I still can’t believe this happens. The best feeling you’ll ever get is someone coming up to you and telling you they love your work and that it inspires them. How do you go about getting your work out into the world? Do you feel like the methods you use give you enough recognition? Social Media is so powerful these days that I actually don’t do any face to face networking or manual marketing at all. I think with modelling, and actually quite a few creative arts, it is important to realize that the final product you create will have been put together by many contributors e.g. A photographer, model, MUA, hairstylist etc. All of which will want to display and market their work, so you will most definitely find that it will have a much larger reach than you probably expect. Sharing & virality are so important. How did you manage the financial side of this? What help and professional advice if did you get? Initially, I found, before I could even consider getting paid work & setting my rates, I had to first get my name out there a bit and have some good quality images already. It’s tough initially, unless you have contacts in the industry. As I only model part-time I always break even on a shoot even if I work on a TF basis (time-for: you


work for free for the photos) which means that my travel is covered and accommodation if required. I do paid shoots if I’m in need of the money but don’t usually display them in my portfolio. The best advice I’ve received is from the photographers themselves. I’ve actually had a really good experience in the alt scene so far, with everyone being very friendly. It’s almost like everyone helps each other to succeed and do well, which is refreshing. Whats your biggest frustration about being a young creative in this modern day? My biggest frustration is actually the other aspect of social media; it really is great that you can get your work out there so easily, don’t get me wrong, but it makes it even harder to stand out from everyone else, especially when the industry I’m in is so diluted with work of varying quality. I also get frustrated sometimes, as with most things creative, it 95% of the time seems to be about ‘who you know’ and not the actual quality of your work, which is incredibly disheartening, especially when I know so many extremely talented individuals giving up because they’re simply not friends with the right people. Social media is great for showing people what we get up to and receiving feedback on your work. But along with the support you get, there’s a lot of people out there who try and crush your vision. How do you deal with the negativity? I think with any creative outlet where you display your work publicly, you are opening yourself freely to feedback and criticism. You are sending people a personal invitation to comment, praise, judge and slate your work. In that respect, I think that taking negative criticism to heart is a bit contradictory. Learning the difference

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between constructive criticism and disrespectful comment is imperative. It is entirely up to you what you chose to acknowledge and work with in regards to peoples assessments. I listen to all comments and appreciate honesty and constructive comments regarding my work but I can easily differentiate between someone being professional and someone trying to personally attack me. It’s actually very easy to tell the difference and that kind of negativity is not beneficial to me and does not manifest. I’m confident enough in what I do to not be knocked down by spite for the sake of spite. I always hear people say ‘if only I knew then what I knew now, things would be so different”. If you had a message for the next generation of creatives who may be inspired by what you do, what advice would you give them? In regards to modelling; just don’t give up. If you want to do it as career, it fucking sucks to begin with. You’ll get some shit images, work with some shit people, people will slate you and tell you that you should give up. Just keep pushing, keep at it. Do.Not.Give.Up. Keep booking shoots, build your portfolio, network. The start of this path is when you are most susceptible to negativity, ignore it. Everyone has to start somewhere, treat every day as a step in the right direction. Learn something from every shoot. Ignore the stereotypical ‘beauty standards’. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO LOOK A CERTAIN WAY TO MODEL. There is so much ‘you don’t look like a model’ naivety thrown at beginners, laugh at that, swat those people away and move on. Honestly, anyone can be a model. Size 6-16. Brown hair, blonde hair, purple hair, no hair. Short - tall. If you want it, just go and do it.


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Evie Redwood ARTIST

After being house mates last year, I gained an insight into Eve’s passion for art when she would take up the entire living room with endless sketches covering the floor haha. She is super talented and such a lovely person in general. If you don’t like your photo taken though stay well away as there is a high chance she may ask to take your portrait if you end up crossing paths.

@EVIEREDWOOD

First off, tell me a bit about yourself and what you do? I’m currently a degree-less artist... I make art as much as I can and travel as much as I can. Who’s your favourite artist/ creative atm and how do you get inspired for your own work? I get inspired by meeting people and conversing and their beliefs and politics. My favourite artist at the moment is Jean-Michel Basquiat I recently watched a mad documentary about him that inspired me a lot. What projects have you been working on recently/ got lined up in the works? I found some dirty heroin needles in a graveyard I’ve put one in resin and I’m just looking at homelessness and addiction and societies/ the governments way of dealing with it. How do you go about getting your work out into the world? Do you feel like the methods you use give you enough recognition?

At the moment I’m only really using Instagram to publicise what I’m doing and sown times Facebook, I’m not well known for my work but I guess there always time for that...

receiving feedback on your work. But along with the support you get, there’s a lot of people out there who try and crush your vision. How do you deal with the negativity?

How did you manage the financial side of this? What help and professional advice if did you get?

Well everyone’s different, their either jealous of what you’re doing or just stupid and either way, poor them. I’m doing what I want and I’m happy being in a creative bubble.

I haven’t had any financial advice with my situation. At the moment I’m working two part times jobs and everyday I’m waking up with this tempting thought that I should just quit both be completely skint but spend all my time producing art, it’s difficult. Whats your biggest frustration about being a young creative in this modern day? The above, and the fact not many people back you and it’s so hard to be recognised. I really don’t want to work a 9-5 job and struggle to pay a mortgage and fit in to societies idea of ‘life’

I always hear people say ‘if only I knew then what I knew now, things would be so different”. If you had a message for next generation of creatives who may be inspired by what you do, what advice would you give them? Do what you want do art at school and at college and do a degree and don’t listen to what people tell you to do. Forget maths, express yourself and be yourself. Just keep working hard at what you want.

Social media is great for showing people what we get up to and

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WILL CHILDS ILLUSTRATOR

Since studying at the same university, I watched Will push boundaries and explore different methods in how he created his outcomes. You get a sense of his passion the second you start talking to him. Such a kind and enthusiastic guy, I look forward to seeing where he takes his creativity next. @BILLIEINK First off, tell me a bit about yourself and what you do? My names Will Childs and I’m a creative. I live and work currently in North Devon and I’m predominantly an illustrator with a pen, pencil and the pen tool. My drawing style is somewhat a hallmark of graphic novels and my process has evolved to the computers creating a thoughtful cartoonish comicy outcome of intriguing and detailed designs. Ive forced creativity down the road of painting, making, poetry and photography when I’m not at the hands of paper or my Mac. I work as a restaurant supervisor at a hotel serving people hot plates of ridiculously priced food. The repetitious role pays the bills and the pencils. Who’s your favourite artist/ creative atm and how do you get inspired for your own work? At the moment I’m completely absorbed in Jean Michelle Basquiat. His rise to recognition through street art and painting his own path makes me really envious and reminds me not every brush stroke or vectored line has to be perfect. What projects have you been working on recently/ got lined up in the works? I’ve recently been working for a company called The Prop Factory in Exeter who’s work was recently published in the tabloid The Guardian. I designed Halloween themed Jack in the boxes for an event in Exeter. I’m also working on a new logo and brand for a new electrical company in North Devon. Since creating an identity for yourself via your work, has it

effected your personal life in any way and what people may think about you? Yeah for sure people treat you differently because your an ‘arty’ one. I get stereotyped but who doesn’t? It’s sometimes a really good thing because people don’t know what to make of you and gives you a good platform. At the other end people assume your messy and unorganised and as much as that’s probably true it would be nice to pretend for a second. How do you go about getting your work out into the world? Do you feel like the methods you use give you enough recognition? Yeah I think my visual identity is predominantly vector illustration so social media plays a big part in pushing my work and reaching an audience. Personally the best kind of recognition is word of mouth and i find the more you please a customer the more chance they spread the word. How did you manage the financial side of this? What help and professional advice if did you get? College and talking to professional artists and illustrators helped me to realise my time is money and I need a lot of it to make good work so I treat it as a normal job I would evaluate all costs and come up with a figure.

Social media is great for showing people what we get up to + receiving feedback on your work. But along with the support you get, there’s a lot of people out there who try and crush your vision. How do you deal with the negativity? I guess hear them out. Hear what there saying and why. Make light of the situation and take it on board, because if you live a life where nobody likes you, your surely not living it right. Not everybody is going to like that single piece of work for whatever reason; subject matter, opinion, colours, style, the platform it’s advertised. We are all individuals with individual tastes. I always hear people say ‘if only I knew then what I knew now, things would be so different”. If you had a message for the next generation of creatives who may be inspired by what you do, what advice would you give them? I always find that by the end of a project I look back and realise how much I learnt and how stupid I was before I started. It’s important to be persistent and persevere. Your going to grow whatever you do so spend that time using all your time creating. The broader you are the better and channel skills you’ve already acquired to that new pathway your heading down on that particular piece of work.

Whats your biggest frustration about being a young creative in this modern day? There’s no path mapped out for you. No ladder to climb straight up. It’s a hard up and down side to side ricochet of opportunities and dead ends but in a way that’s the exciting part, it’s down to your persistence. 75


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AARON CHAPMAN ARTIST I have been familiar with Aaron and his work for some time, but it wasn’t until this brief had I reached out to see if he wanted to get involved. Through ARC, Aaron has gained a large amount of following for his artwork via social media and created a strong identity for himself. Constantly drawing on anything he can get his hands on, he is starting to leave his mark and I look forward to more pieces of work he has in lined up. @AARONCHAPMANART

First off, tell me a bit about yourself and what you do? My name is Aaron Chapman, I just turned 19 and I’m a (self proclaimed) Artist / Student. In terms of “what I do”; theres not much to say. I draw, paint, build on whatever I can get my hands on and then put a photo on social media if I feel like it. Who’s your favourite artist/ creative atm and how do you get inspired for your own work? If you asked me that question everyday for the next year you’d get a different reply every time. I don’t have a favourite Artist, I never have. I like what I like and that’s about it. My one constant inspiration is my family, particularly my late grandparents. They encouraged me to pursue my creative passion for as long as I can remember. Having said that I find inspiration in day to day objects and events . I often find inspiration in the palm of my hand when scrolling through social media, Not so much for subject matter but more so for work ethic and continuing to progress my ideas. I’m fortunate to have some very talented and creative people around me and they continue to influence me without realising it. What projects have you been working on recently/ got lined up in the works? I tend to work on 10 things at a time, I don’t know why but it always works out that way. I’ve been working on a few things for while now but being a bit of perfectionist i wont release something until I’m finished and happy with it. Some things are fairly

easy to work out as I’ve already shared some things on social media but the rest I’m keeping under wraps until they’re ready. Being in eduction kind of slows things down a little bit but I’ll make it work. I’m doing some cool things there that help me with my personal work too so I can’t complain. Since creating an identity for yourself via your work, has it effected your personal life in any way and what people may think about you? The one thing you should never doubt is the power of the internet. I didn’t know 90% of the people I now know before i started up my social media so yes it has affected my personal in that respect. I wouldn’t say I have an identity in terms of my work, I’m still working and perfecting my style and techniques but at the same time my variation between the two is what I enjoy the most but obviously in terms of having a profile its a way of recognition. I have no doubt that my social media causes people to make a preconception about me, everyone does it. It’s human nature to try and figure people out. How do you go about getting your work out into the world? Do you feel like the methods you use give you enough recognition? My only current outlet is social media (Or college if I’m exhibiting work). though I think social media is a great outlet I’m not looking for recognition because I don’t believe that I’ve done anything substantial enough to deserve recognition. I think it has the potential for when i do though. At this point social media is just a platform

for me to share my work, thats it. I think “recognition” is when things go wrong, I’ve seen plenty of people get recognition for things they didn’t do and I’ve seen plenty of people do things purely to get recognition. Thats not what it should be about. How did you manage the financial side of this? What help and professional advice if did you get? I’ve had no outgoings for sharing my work and as of now I don’t sell any of my work. The best thing about social media is how accessible it is, It’s free. (Not including the hundreds you’ve spent on your internet and smartphone.) Whats your biggest frustration about being a young creative in this modern day? MONEY. Everything has a price and everyone has to make a living, i seriously hate the concept of currency but thats how it is. It means that i cant just acquire everything i need to make my ideas a reality and that becomes so draining when you know what you want to do but cant. The key is to not let that beat you, just keep at it. It’ll all work out eventually . ALSO i hate that everyone is looking for “experience”. People need to realise that just because we’re young that doesn’t mean we aren’t capable. If we aren’t given an opportunity in the first place how are we meant to progress? Everyone has to start somewhere, take a risk. It’ll be worth it. Social media is great for showing people what we get up to and receiving feedback on your work. 79


But along with the support you get, there’s a lot of people out there who try and crush your vision. How do you deal with the negativity? It happens, I’ve just come to terms with it. If someone is willing to spend their precious time trying to put me or my work down then so be it but I’m going to continue regardless. Art is driven by opinion, its a very personal thing. If you don’t like it, leave it. If you like it, appreciate it. Its that simple. I think it says a lot about your character if you treat someone based on their talent or ability. I’m quite fortunate that any response I get is positive or constructive criticism which as far as I’m concerned is positive feedback, that may be due to the fact that everyone has grown up a bit or that i have a different audience now but whatever it is I’m glad it happened however when i did used to receive negative comments i would just delete it and move on. There was always more positive than negative so i just ignored it. I never set out to please everyone with my work, that’s why its MY work. I always hear people say ‘if only I knew then what I knew now, things would be so different”. If you had a message for the next generation of creatives who may be inspired by what you do, what advice would you give them? Do what you want to do, Know your worth and don’t do it for the money. Really I’m just a kid that likes to makes stuff and do things. I do it because i enjoy it. Love what you do and do what you love.

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I was in a service station WHSmith’s and flicked open the latest copy of ID magazine and I was greeted by a large photo of a familiar face and full page of text. It was an interview with Virgil Abloh and I couldn’t help but read the article. I got halfway through and I had to go so I bought the magazine just to carry on reading. In the interview he spoke about his concepts, inspirations, work ethic and the steps he took to get where he is today. I got home and read the article again at which point I wondered into one of the spare bedrooms where I keep my canvas’ and found a portrait of Virgil that I started over a half ago and hadn’t touch for over a year. My style and techniques

have changed since I started the piece but his words inspired me to rejuvenate the work. It was square canvas with white stripes on a black canvas and a partial portrait of his head. I took the painting into my room and an hour later it was complete. Before it was just acrylic on canvas, now it’s a multi media piece consisting oils, acrylic, spray paint and paper including a cut out from the magazine that was the inspiration behind finishing the piece. I did what the typical kid with Internet access does, posted a photo on Instagram tagged him the photo. I’d rather give it to him but it currently hangs in what I call ‘The Bedroom Gallery’. At least he likes it. 87


I just want to take a moment to thank each and every one of you who has been involved in this project. I would also like to give a massive fuck you to each of you who doubted me and told me this shit wasn’t possible. I have had great fun producing this editorial and meeting different people, hopefully I will be able to continue this and produce more in the future.

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