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OUTLOOK 2011 WELCOME!

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DESTINATION CROATIA WHERE EVERYONE’S COME FROM IN 2011

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MEET THE DIRECTORS THE MEN IN CHARGE TELL ALL

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CROATIA CROATIA OTHER ACTIVITES FOR THE REST OF YOUR STAY

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SAY WHAT A ROUGH GUIDE TO SERBO-CROAT

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MALA THE DUBSTEP ORIGINAL SPEAKS HIS MIND

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A QUESTION OF BASS JOE MUGGS CONSIDERS

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WORLD SCENES BASS MUSIC AROUND THE GLOBE

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RODIGAN THE GENTLEMAN SELECTOR

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ARTLOOK OUTLOOK’S ADDED DIMENSION

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ILLUSTRATED SITE MAP

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FRICTION THE SHOGUN BOSS STOPS BY

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PULA: FORTIFIED THE INCREDIBLE HISTORY OF THIS PART OF THE WORLD

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ARENA GUIDE A LOOK AT EVERY ARENA AT OUTLOOK 2011

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BOAT PARTIES RAVES ON THE WAVES

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LABEL FEATURE

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DON’T BE SILLY YOU LOT ARE PRETTY FUNNY SOMETIMES

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DOS AND DON’TS

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TRANSPORT HOW TO GET AROUND AND GET HOME

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ESSENTIAL INFO IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR YOUR STAY

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WORDS: Jon Cook, Joe Muggs, Natalia Fricker, Noah Ball, Johnny Scratchley. DESIGN & LAYOUT: Andy Hayes courtesy of Trap Magazine. PICTURES: Ashes57, Dan Medhurst, Chris Hoyle, Campbell Keys, Laura Lewis, Poslati, Zoe Lower. THANKS: We were going to use this space to thank everyone who has helped us along the way but we have brains like sieves, so instead we did a doodle of a smiley face.

Big love and respect to everyone involved in making this event so special, you know who you are. x x


DOBRODOSLI!

WELCOME!

“It’s with great pleasure that we welcome friends old and new to this year’s Outlook Festival.”

B

ass music and soundsystem culture seem to have captured the hearts of hundreds of thousands of people across the globe over recent years, bringing a refreshing energy back to some amazing genres of music and giving legendary artists new generations of fans. Soundsystem culture and the bass music scene have always been about pushing real music... underground music... roots music... Here at Outlook, we’re doing our very best to be respectful to that ethos. The larger names on our bill are those of authentic legends from each genre of music, not the mainstream, more commercial artists that are currently making headlines now that bass music is gaining popularity. Alongside the bigger names on the line-up, we also represent what could be the most wide ranging and in-depth view of bass music anywhere - whether that be reggae, drum & bass, hiphop, garage, dub, techno, electronica and, of course, dubstep. Over 500 artists in four days... It’s going to be BIG. We’ve made some changes to the festival for 2011 - we’ve added four new arenas across the site that we think will blow you away. Outlook’s capacity has increased to approximately 10,000 this year so we’re still relatively small as far as festivals go, but this has meant we can really go to town on the production and line-up. We’re sure you’ll agree that this year’s is the best Outlook yet. Full descriptions of the new stages can be found later on in this programme. The most visible additions are the Harbour and Dockside Stages, which are set down on the shipping harbour where the boat parties departed from last year. The Harbour Stage is this year’s main arena, holding up to 7,000 people and has quite possibly the best soundsystem specification of any stage at any festival in the world. It’s serious.

The Dockside (2,500 capacity) is the second arena in this location and here you’ll be able to see some of the biggest names in bass music clash against each another on two of Europe’s best reggae soundsystems. We’ve added the Basketball Court arena for daytime vibes in the campsite, featuring one of Europe’s largest breakdancing competitions and music that represents soundsystem culture in more of a bloc party vibe. Up at the fort we have another new addition, The Moat, which has to be seen to be believed. Anyone who was at the festival last year will be aware of Mungo’s Arena. Since 2010 the terrace above Mungo’s has had further work done and this year our festival goers will be able to look down onto the bass-filled pit below. From up here you also get a clear view of the city of Pula across the bay; regarded as one of the best views in the region. In addition to the new arenas, we’ve also massively expanded our range of soundsystems and we can fairly safely say that you won’t find another festival in the world of our size with such high soundsystem specifications. For the tech nerds among you, you can read more about the systems we’re using in the pages of the Arena Guide section later in this guide. We’re overjoyed to be back in Pula at Fort Punta Christo. After last year’s festival, we knew we’d found our home - the place has a very special energy and we’re glad to be back for Outlook 2011. Outlook 2010 was immense, the crowd was a wonderful, smiling dancing crew that were there for the music and the vibes, and we hope that all our new friends this year follow suit. Love and happiness from the festival directors, NOAH, SIMON, JOE, JOHNNY, JACK & MARK.


RESPECT DUE To everyone who has helped bring this event together over the years, it’s been an amazing experience working with so many people passionate about the music that we represent at Outlook, and whether you’re a volunteer or the head of production, you should feel proud to have been part of the family.

LOVE CROATIA We’re certain that you’ll enjoy your stay here - Croatia is a beautiful country and its people are friendly and courteous. In order to keep things as enjoyable as possible for everyone, we ask that you remember to be respectful of the local people and of their beautiful country. Pick up your litter and dispose of it in the bins provided. Remember to say your Molim (Please) and Hvalas (Thank yous).

CHECK YOURSELF BEFORE YOU WRECK YOURSELF Before heading up to the Fort or Harbour Arena each day, make sure you check that you’ve got some decent footwear on. Flip-flops and flimsy sandals are not permitted in either the Fort or the Harbour. We would advise that you wear trainers when coming to the festival.


GLASGOW ELECTRIC ELIMINATORS

MANCHESTER HIT & RUN NOTTINGHAM DETONATE

DESTINATION CROATIA

LEEDS EXODUS SHEFFIELD TUESDAY CLUB LEICESTER KONTACT

BIRMINGHAM CUSTARD FACTORY

SWINDON DUBSTEK

CARDIFF WELSH CLUB

OXFORD FREE RANGE

BRISTOL MOTION

LONDON OUTLOOK

READING RESONANCE

EXETER THE DEEP END

MAIDSTONE DUBBED OUT

BOURNEMOUTH DUBNIUM

TAKING PLACE IN CROATIA AND ORGANISED FROM THE UK, OUTLOOK IS A TRULY INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL, BRINGING TOGETHER PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD TO CELEBRATE THEIR LOVE OF BASS-MUSIC CULTURE.

AMSTE CHEEKY

CAMBRIDGE STINK LIKE SOCK

SOUTHEND ON SEA DUBATEERS

BRIGHTON VAGABONDZ

BREST STAND HIGH PARIS SKANK IT UP

In 2011, an incredible 53 launch parties took place everywhere from Tel Aviv to Tokyo, promising to make this year’s Outlook the most international festival yet. Check out this map to see just exactly where everybody will be coming from this year!

GENEVA TOP RANK LYON TOTAL REZ

BARCELONA RAZMATATZ

GRANADA SUB DIVISION

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STOCKHOLM ALL OUT DUBSTEP

MALMO ALL OUT DUBSTEP COPENHAGEN OHOI

RDAM Y MONDAY

AMSTERDAM SWAGGER

AMSTERDAM SONIC WARFARE VS LOCKDOWN

ANTWERP UNTITLED

LEIPZIG THE DISTILLERY

BRUSSELS JE M’ EN FISH

KIEV KIEV BASS PRAGUE UNITED FORCES OF DUB

BRATISLAVA UPRISING TOKYO PARTY2STYLE

BUDAPEST BLADERUNNAZ

OSAKA SUNSUI

GRAZ DISKO404

CROATIA SEASPLASH

KING

BUCHAREST ARENA DNB

BOLOGNA DROP FELLAS

LIVERNO NUMA CREW

BOSNIA CONTRA CREW

SOFIA TRUE BADNESS TUSCANY MUV FESTIVAL

THESSALONIKA PONY LICKS NAPLES OLD RIVER PARK

ATHENS DBAR

MALTA STATIX TEL AVIV SUB MOB


NAME: Jack ‘Vagabondz’ Robinson

NAME: Joe ‘Vagabondz’ Barnett

MEET THE DIRECTORS Outlook isn’t just the work of one man. And it’s definitely not the work of a massive corporate machine, out to charge you £7 for a dirty burger and bombard you with advertising all weekend… In fact, Outlook is run by a team of five guys just like you and me, hailing from all across the UK and each bringing a totally different set of ideas, personalities and musical tastes to the table. Here, we give the men behind the madness the opportunity to have their say. Read on to discover how they got involved, why they bother and what they’re most looking forward to this year…

I do this because…

I do this because…

It keeps me out of trouble.

To give people what they want and because if we hadn't done it, a bunch of soulless promoters with dollar signs for eyes would have ended up doing it and ruining the scene even more....

2011’s most exciting new edition is… Pharoahe Monch.

My Top 5 must-see acts are.. Phaeleh, Jah Shaka, any of DMZ/Deep Medi Crew, Twinkle Brothers, Submotion Orchestra.

My best Outlook moment so far was…

2011’s most exciting new edition is… Has to be the Moat! Ever since we first laid eyes on the fort, we’ve wanted to excavate the Moat area and drop a heavy system in there... I can’t wait to see it come to life!

Falling off the main stage back in 2009.

My Top 5 must-see acts are..

What I love about Outlook is…

David Rodigan, Gentleman’s Dub Club, MJ Cole, Dawn Penn, Ben Hunter & Marksman (last set Sunday in The Moat).

The fact that five very different people with completely different taste in music who, prior to Outlook, probably wouldn't even have looked twice at each other in the pub have somehow pulled together to produce Outlook!

I got involved in Outlook thanks to… A series of poor life choices… that might just have actually paid off.

On Monday morning, you’ll find me… Back at the main gate trying to get everyone home.

Don’t... ...leave any drink riders unguarded for even a second; all artists are thieves.

My best Outlook moment so far was… Watching the crowd from the main stage during Roots Manuva’s set last year.

What I love about Outlook is… Definitely the people. We couldn't ask for a better crowd - best vibes of any event I've ever seen - no trouble and smiles all round.

I got involved in Outlook thanks to… Being in the right place at the right time, and a lot of standing in cold doorways flyering to a bunch of drunken c*nts.

On Monday morning, you’ll find me… In The Moat from 5 to 6am. With my favourite people in the world.

Don’t... ...expect a comment in response to all of your facebook posts during and after the festival – we’re going to need a small break!”


NAME: Johnny ‘Jila’ Scratchley

NAME: noahfuckinguseatall

NAME: Simon ‘Exodus’ Scott

I do this because…

I do this because…

I do this because…

Of the feeling of seeing the crowd’s reaction when that tune drops down.

I like music. And people.

I get high on stress.

2011’s most exciting new edition is…

2011’s most exciting new edition is…

Barrington Levy.

The new stages beside the seaside.

2011’s most exciting new edition is… The Harbour - we have put in so much work to make this the new centerpiece for the event.

My Top 5 must-see acts are.. Pharoehe Monch, Horace Andy, Submotion Orchestra, Joe Coseness, David Rodigan.

My best Outlook moment so far was…

My Top 5 must-see acts are..

My Top 5 must-see acts are..

Barrington Levy, Katy B, Magnetic Man, Skrillex, Travis, Bob Marley.

Kyle Hall, Firehouse Sound, Iration Steppas, Digital Mystikz, dBridge.

My best Outlook moment so far was…

My best Outlook moment so far was…

Falling asleep at the end in a portacabin.

Watching one of my festival partners wander off to his accommodation, leaving his MacBook discarded on the floor outside the venue.

What I love about Outlook is…

In 2010, seeing Congo Natty and crew playing the last set on the main stage. Nancie and Phoebe singing ‘Notorious’ by Turbulance to end it blew my mind and my tear ducts.

I got involved in Outlook thanks to…

What I love about Outlook is…

The artists. They made me do it and I'm weak willed.

The coming together of so many different people from all around the world with one common love - bass music.

I got involved in Outlook thanks to… Noah. He asked and I said yes.

On Monday morning, you’ll find me… You won't.

The New Era caps and home-counties students. Yes bruv.

On Monday morning, you’ll find me… In the local record shop digging for the hottest Balkan turbo folk and AustroGerman Oom-Pah ballads.

Don’t... ...ever ask me to fill in a questionnaire three weeks before a festival?!

What I love about Outlook is… Giving the punters an all-in-one festival and holiday.

I got involved in Outlook thanks to… The fact I couldn’t say no. Beats getting a proper job.

On Monday morning, you’ll find me… Waiting for Wednesday to come along so I can get a decent night’s sleep.

Don’t... ...piss off the locals!

Don’t... ...disrespect our beautiful location.

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C R O AT I A C R O AT I A !

1.

FOR THOSE OF YOU STAYING AROUND IN THIS BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY AFTER THE GATES TO THE FORT HAVE BEEN LOCKED FOR ANOTHER YEAR, HERE’S OUR PICK OF PLACES TO VISIT AND THINGS TO SEE. FROM ANCIENT MONUMENTS TO IDYLLIC BEACHES AND AN ISLAND FULL OF EXOTIC ANIMALS, THERE’S A LOT MORE TO CROATIA THAN JUST THE WORLD’S GREATEST BASS-MUSIC FESTIVAL…

1. PULA AMPHITHEATRE Pula is one of Istria’s most beautiful and authentic cities, speckled with Roman ruins, centered around the magnificent Arena. Like the Colosseum in Rome? Well, this amphitheatre was built at the same time, during the reign of Emperor Vespasian in the 1st Century AD. With stone tiers all the way around, an estimated 20,000 blood-thirsty spectators once watched the gladiators fight to the death in the central flat arena below. The hub for cultural activities in times gone by, from gladiator tournaments to medieval markets in the Middle Ages, this phenomenal architectural feat is still at the core of Pula’s vibrancy. Host to a wide range of events, including the Pula Film Festival, the Arena also holds many music concerts, with a capacity of around 5,000 spectators. Artists such as Manu Chao, Buena Vista Social Club, Sting, Jamiroquai and Crazy Couzins have all graced the Arena with their presence. Getting to Pula is easy, take a look at the ‘Transport’ section later on in this programme for details on buses and taxis into town.

2. BRUJINI ISLANDS This stunning archipelago consists of two main pine-covered islands and 13 smaller islets, situated just northwest of Pula, off the Istrian Coast. If you fancy getting closer to nature, then this is your thing. Don’t be surprised if you bump into the odd free-roaming giraffe or bear - you won’t be hallucinating! This is Brujini, where extravagant Yugoslav leader Tito introduced crazy subtropical species to create a safari park to house exotic animals gifted to him by world leaders. Many world famous heads of state and celebrities visited Tito’s paradise, the first being Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie in 1954, who contributed an Ethiopian elephant! Though the islands have been inhabited for thousands of years, Tito gave them fame, spending six months there every year from 1947 until he died in 1980. Part National Park since 1983, the islands are covered by meadows, parks, forests and rare plants, such as wild cucumber and marine poppy. Horseback riding, golf, tennis, sailing, windsurfing, diving and bike/boat rental are all on offer. Excursion boats leave regularly from the Pula waterfront. Or, if you fancy going independently, take public bus 21 from Pula to Fazana (15KN, 8km) and sign up with the national park office for a tour www.brijuni.hr; tours 125-210KN.

4.


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3. ISLAND OF PAG Like the sepia setting on your camera? Well, you won’t need it to photograph Pag! Home to Outlook 2009, the island has its own mysterious, ancient atmosphere - like a setting out of a 1950s Italian film - with dramatic barren, rocky landscapes, spotted with patches of shrubs and a dozen small villages. Despite the almost lunar landscape, the islanders still farm the land and produce Sutica, a decent domestic white wine, and Paski Sir; delicious Pag cheese, salty and sharp, soaked in olive oil and aged in stone. Despite its anachronistic feel, Novalja is a carefree, vibrant resort near the clubbing mecca of Zree Beach! So go check it out! Just catch a bus from Pula to Rijeka, (around 80KN, 2hrs), then hop on a boat from Rijeka to Pag’s northern port Novalja (40KN, 2.5hrs).

4. SPLIT 5.

3.

2.

Croatia’s second-largest city, Split’s atmosphere perfectly balances historic tradition with modern buzz, epitomised by the wealth of thriving bars, restaurants and shops nestled inside the charming old walls of Roman emperor Doicletian’s retirement palace. One of the world’s most wow-worthy Roman monuments (built AD 295-305), this gave Split its fame and is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The turquoise Adriatic lulls behind the dramatic coastal mountains, and the vibrant and beautiful city is also a great diving board to the hip islands nearby. Taste the culinary delicacies and stunning beaches of Vis (car ferry from Split, 54KN, 2.5hrs), laze on the sexy beach of Zlatni Rat, party all night and absorb the glamour at Hvar Town’s seafront bars, or visit the impeccable ancient architecture of tiny Togir, central Dalmatia’s World Heritage Site. Buses from Pula to Split run three times a day (387-392KN, 10hrs), or bus it to Rijeka and get a ferry to Split. Once there, visit Jadrolinija in the large ferry terminal opposite the bus station for most coastal ferry and catamaran boats to the islands.

5. DUBROVNIK If you have time to roam even further south, then Dubrovnik is definitely worth the trip. The ‘jewel of the Adriatic’ according to Lord Byron and ‘paradise on Earth’ for George Bernard Shaw, this stunning city does not disappoint. Take a relaxing stroll around the old town and marvel at its magnificent walls and beautiful baroque architecture that transports you back in time. Dubrovnik is also a fantastic place from which to explore the gorgeous coastline of southern Croatia and the lush neighboring islands: Lokrum, Korcula (with its fantastic white wine and citadel), Mljet National Park, mountainous Peljesac Peninsula and Trsteno Gardens. To reach this incredible city, catch a bus to Rijeka, and then change to a bus to Dubrovnik (13hrs). FOR MORE DETAILED TOURIST INFO - PLEASE VISIT OUR HELPFUL STAFF AT ANY OF THE INFORMATION POINTS ON SITE.


SAY WHAT? BECAUSE THEY DON’T SAY GET ME, BARE AND FAM IN CROATIA.

“On/Ona/Ono je sjeban/a/o!” - “He/she/it is fucked up!” “Hvala, prijatelj!” - “Cheers mate!” “Volim te” - “I love you” “Hočeš ti plesati?” (ho-chesh tee pleh-sah-tee) - “Do you wanna dance?”

“Mirovaj, prijatelj!” “Chill mate!”

“Jebiga” (yeh-bee-gah)

“Fuck it!” “Ko ti je cha cha?” “Who’s your Daddy?”

i!” “Ne brin orr y!” “Don’t w

čima” aka skola b -mah) la š o -c r lah hee “P -kah skoh a b h a (prosh-l ny passed n a r G e “ Th cakes” with the r chance) sed you (you mis

DRINKS BEER – PIVO (RED/WHITE) WINE (CRNO/BIJELO) VIN O WATER - VODA COFFEE - KAVA JUICE - SOK

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THE BASICS ESSENTIAL VOCAB TO GET YOU BY… “Hello” - “Bok” “Goodbye” - “Ciao” “Yes/No” - “Da/Ne” “Please” - “Molim” “Thank you” - “Hvala” “Sorry” - “Zao mi je” “How are you?” - “Kako ste/i”

“My name is... - “Zovem se... “What's your name?” - “Kako se zovete/zoves?” “Do you speak (English)?” - “Govorite/ Govoris li (engleski)?” “I’d like to buy...” - “Zelim kupiti...” “How much is it?” - “Koliko stoji?” “I want to go to...” - “Zelim da idem u...”


PHOTO:

Ashes57

THROW AWAY WHAT YOU THINK YOU LIKE AND DISLIKE AND EXPAND YOUR MIND.

MALA IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT AND INFLUENTIAL FIGURES IN THE HISTORY OF DUBSTEP. ALONGSIDE COKI, LOEFAH AND SGT POKES, HE PIONEERED THE DMZ CLUB-NIGHTS AT A TIME WHEN NOBODY OUTSIDE OF SOUTH LONDON OR BRISTOL HAD EVEN HEARD THE GENRE’S NAME, AND LATER HE ESTABLISHED THE GROUND-BREAKING AND HUGELY RESPECTED DEEP MEDI MUSIK RECORD LABEL. AS YOU’D EXPECT, MALA WAS PRESENT AT THE VERY FIRST OUTLOOK BACK IN 2008 AND HE AND HIS DMZ AND DEEP MEDI FAMILY ARE BACK AGAIN FOR 2011. After last year’s full-pressure session in Mungo’s Arena, this year dmz will be gracing The Dockside on Friday night, and DEEP MEDi will be heading out on the waves on Saturday evening for their very own Boat Party. Read on for the reflections of a man who really has been here from the start... YES MALA. WHAT ARE YOU MOST LOOKING FORWARD TO AT THIS YEAR’S FESTIVAL? “Running another dmz session. And seeing Barrington Levy live... That should be something to remember!” YOU AND THE REST OF DMZ HAVE BEEN PLAYING AT OUTLOOK SINCE THE BEGINNING. WHAT DOES THE FESTIVAL MEAN TO YOU? “It’s been an interesting one to watch grow over the years. I remember the first 1,000-person Outlook, to the magnitude it is now. I feel dmz has played an important part in helping this festival grow; we’ve always run a dmz session in the main area, which has helped bring through the finest creators of bass-weight. Outlook has a sense of home to it, because the ingredients so far have been right. You’ll find top musicians in a crosssection of styles that all relate.”

“Like with all things in life, we are inspired by someone or by something, and by what we experience. So, for me personally, it’s a continuation, the natural cycle of life. It’s a pleasure to see so many people doing this sound in their own way. I think it’s fair to say that a dubstep-orientated festival like Outlook can exist because of what a handful of people were doing back in the early 2000s, so we have to give thanks for this. The sound has given to many people worldwide.” YOU’RE SEEN AS ONE OF THE MOST CREDIBLE FIGURES IN UNDERGROUND MUSIC. ANY LESS THAN CREDIBLE SKELETONS IN THE CUPBOARD? “All about the riddims you jam in primary school… I’m the eldest of my brothers and cousins, so I had to do all the exploring and discovering myself...” IF YOU WEREN’T A PROFESSIONAL MUSICIAN, WHAT WOULD YOU BE? “An unknown musician still making music.” AS SOMEONE THAT WAS THERE AT THE BIRTH OF THE GENRE, WHAT CAME BEFORE DUBSTEP FOR YOU? “The Hardcore and jungle from early 90s are my biggest influence. Hearing that sound gave me the fire to want to create music myself. Everything after that has been a massive influence on shaping not just my sound, but who I am.”

WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE THING ABOUT OUTLOOK? “Good soundsystems, good music and the people enjoying those things.”

DOES DUBSTEP STILL FEEL EXCITING TO YOU? DO OTHER GENRES GRAB YOUR INTEREST MORE THESE DAYS? “I’ve never just listened to or liked one thing. There’s so much good music to be discovered. For me, it’s not even about like or dislike… It’s about feeling. You know when you feel something straight away. That’s what music I’m into. So throw away what you think you like and dislike and expand your mind.”

AND YOUR BEST MEMORY FROM OUTLOOK SO FAR? “Too many of those to pick one! I do love the DEEP MEDi Boat Parties though! We always set off just before the sun begins to set. Being on the sea at that time brings about an energy you can’t feel anywhere else.”

AND FINALLY, IF YOU WERE DESERTED ON A CROATIAN ISLAND, WITH ONLY ONE SONG ON YOUR IPOD – WHAT WOULD IT BE? “Picking just one would be a nightmare, so I’d happily settle for the sound of the sea.”

YOU AND THE REST OF DMZ ARE CONSIDERED TO BE AMONG THE FOREFATHERS OF DUBSTEP – HOW DOES IT FEEL TO KNOW YOU WERE SO PIVOTAL IN GIVING THE WORLD THE SOUND?

CHECK MALA AT THE DMZ CLUB-NIGHT TAKING PLACE AT THE DOCKSIDE ON FRIDAY NIGHT, AND THE DEEP MEDI BOAT PARTY, LEAVING SATURDAY AT 6PM.


A QUESTION OF BASS... WORDS: Joe Muggs

IT’S ONLY IN ITS FOURTH YEAR OF EXISTENCE, AND THE SECOND IN ITS MIND-BLOWING FORT PUNTA CHRISTO LOCATION, BUT OUTLOOK HAS BECOME A VITAL POINT IN THE CALENDAR FOR THOSE INVOLVED WITH DUBSTEP, GRIME AND OTHER UK UNDERGROUND SCENES. IT'S NOT ONLY A JOLLY IN THE SUN, BUT THE ONE TIME IN THE YEAR WHEN EVERYONE INVOLVED TAKES A BREAK FROM INTERNATIONAL TOURING AND COMES TOGETHER IN THE SAME PLACE, A TIME TO COMPARE NOTES AND TAKE STOCK OF THE SCENES’ PROGRESS. OUTLOOK’S ORGANISERS MAKE EVEN BIGGER CLAIMS FOR THE FESTIVAL, THOUGH: THEY SEE IT AS DRAWING TOGETHER DECADES’ WORTH OF “BASS MUSIC AND SOUNDSYSTEM CULTURE”.

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These phrases ‘bass music’ and ‘soundsystem culture’ have been kicking about increasingly in recent years, and their usage sheds interesting light on the diverse entangled sounds that make up the best of current electronic/club music. In particular, they provide an alternative to the dominating industry categories of ‘dance’ and ‘urban’ with their not-really-even-concealed racial subtexts. In the climate of fear, suspicion and outright bigotry haunting the country in the wake of the recent riots, it’s abundantly clear that this is not merely some micro-genre hair-splitting over where to shelve CDs, but that these categorisations shape our understanding of living British culture and subculture. Speaking just after the UK riots, but before David Starkey's unfortunate outburst about “whites becoming black”, Noah Ball of Outlook proudly told me that Outlook uses ‘bass music’ as a catch-all term for ‘music of black cultural origin’ – placing the festival in a long tradition of white, mainly working-class, British youth finding inspiration in black music, from mods to soulboys to ravers. It’s the same wellspring that has fed most of our greatest pop musicians from The Kinks to Culture Club, Madness to Katy B, and which has fuelled our globally admired club culture for decades. It’s been standard practice to characterise grime and dubstep – the British innovations of the past decade that form the core sounds of Outlook – as emerging essentially from a lineage extending from the rave explosion of the early 1990s via drum & bass and UK garage. It’s a narrative that more or less equates UK music with London music. But the histories of the five-man Outlook team in DJing and promoting various clubs around the north of England, particularly in Leeds, back up Noah’s assertion of a much broader context. Jonathan Scratchley, Jack Robinson and Joe Barnet are the younger part of the team. Their Vagabondz night in Leeds (and more recently London and Brighton) has indeed focused on the post-rave sounds of jungle, grime and dubstep, but has always mixed it with strong elements of both classic dub/reggae and US hip-hop: Johnny characterises their sound as being “good music across genres as long as it has attitude.” These are all sounds with intimation – or even explicit expression – of aggression, and which have as such suffered negative stereotyping and even persecution as supposedly promoting violence, when in fact more often than not they provide cathartic escape from it. Ball’s own New Bohemia, also in Leeds, focuses on ‘soulful dance music’, mixing funk, soul and the jazzy sound of broken beat with British hip-hop and some of the more rave-derived styles. Simon Scott, meanwhile, is fundamentally rooted (no pun intended) in reggae; his long running Subdub night has been a major outpost for righteous roots and dub in the north, and more recently his other night Exodus has been probably the single most important staging post for the spread of dubstep outside its foundational territories of London and Bristol. And it’s this multiplicity – representative of how non-purist clubs across Britain have always defined themselves – that makes Outlook so valuable and timely right now. As dubstep is spreading globally, it keeps risking becoming a monoculture, defined by one or two particular sonic tics, so by broadening its remit to ‘bass music’, the festival makes a very clear statement about its context and mongrel nature. DJs such as Benji B (a protégé of Gilles Peterson) and Alexander Nut both represent a currently vibrant scene that takes in jazz-funk, hip-hop and many more styles outside the limited rule-set of the post-rave lineage.

The soundsystem created independent zones of protection and safety within Jamaica’s dangerous urban environments.


By also including artists from throughout the history of reggae – Mad Professor, The Twinkle Brothers, Janet Kay, Jah Shaka, Horace Andy and the uniquely British DJ David Rodigan – but presenting them not as heritage acts but as part of the ‘soundsystem culture’, there’s a clear sense in Outlook of the music’s history as alive within it. Scratchley describes this living history as something that encapsulates the earliest principles of African music - “communication through rhythm, and movement as creativity and expression” - as transmitted via American soul, funk and hip-hop and even more so by the developments of Jamaican soundsystem music through ska, rocksteady, reggae and dancehall with “makeshift generators, turntables and huge speakers”. There is an innate positivity and cultural cohesion in the latter strand that stands counter to the bigoted assertions of David Starkey and his supporters that “becoming black” or more specifically adopting Jamaican cultural forms feeds gangsterism and violence. Writers such as Steve Goodman aka Kode 9 (who is playing live with vocalist Spaceape at Outlook) have long documented how the soundsystem created independent zones of protection and safety within Jamaica’s dangerous urban environments. And Mala (also at Outlook 2011), who co-runs the dmz club in Brixton, has spoken on the sense of his club’s name as “de-militarised zone”, a musical safe area where conflicts can be left behind. Above all, Outlook is a four-day party in the sunshine. But it’s amazing what a political statement throwing a really good party can sometimes be. The mix of artists and attendees, crossing racial, class and generational boundaries, is a slap in the face for those who would wilfully misunderstand or misrepresent British street and club culture. And when Scratchley says that the aim is for “the audience to become involved in learning of the history of bass culture, to be taken on a journey from the birth of bass culture to the expansion of it, and understand what it means today,” this is a mission that means a lot more than simply getting them involved in the music.

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It’s amazing what a political statement throwing a really good party can sometimes be.


BASS MUSIC IS BOOMING, NOT JUST IN THE UK, BUT ACROSS THE WORLD. THIS YEAR, OUTLOOK WELCOMES ARTISTS AND BRANDS FROM ALL AROUND THE GLOBE AS IT SEEKS TO CELEBRATE EVERY ASPECT OF THE BASS CULTURE THAT LIES AT THE FESTIVAL’S VERY HEART. ALMOST EVERY MAJOR CITY IN THE DEVELOPED WORLD NOW HAS RECOGNISED PROMOTERS, ARTISTS AND RECORD LABELS PASSIONATELY PUSHING BASS MUSIC IN THEIR RESPECTIVE COUNTRIES. HERE, WE INVITE FIVE FRIENDS OF OUTLOOK FROM FIVE OF OUR FAVOURITE COUNTRIES TO GIVE AN EXPERT INSIGHT INTO THE BASS-HEAVY HAPPENINGS IN THEIR HOMELANDS.

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FRANCE LYON

SPAIN BARCELONA

POLAND KRAKOW

LOCAL EXPERT: JULIAN (TOTAAL REZ)

LOCAL EXPERT: SEVI (BUS FESTIVAL, SUNSPLASH)

LOCAL EXPERT: MACIEJ ANTCZAK

“To me, bass music’s popularity in France has increased since the end of the 1990s with the explosion of the French dub scene (High Tone, Kaly Live Dub, Improvisator Dub and more). These bands helped people to be more open, firstly to drum & bass and then later dubstep. Although these days neither of these genres enjoy the same level of popularity they might once have had, overall bass music is alive and active in France with lots of events every weekend all over the country.”

“It was difficult to bring styles such as dubstep to Spain. Back in 2005 there were small crews doing underground parties - Surco, Hybrid and Reboot in Barcelona, Impersonal Strikes in Madrid, and La Gallina crew in Zaragoza. They were hard times with few followers and little money to bring in international artists. Everything changed in 2009 with the birth of the Disboot label, Fundub festival, and the B-low and The Bus parties. You can now see international artists every week and the scene has become stronger.”

“Bass music is developing intensively in Poland and visible progress has been made since 2009, with more and more scenes and venues appearing all the time. Widely understood, bass music is represented in Poland by names such as Radikal Guru, Substep Infrabass, Tom Encore, Erionite, ROS, R33lc4sh, Kwazar and Playaman (as well as entire Respecta Kru) and many more producers and DJs, ranging from reggae/dub to D&B, dubstep and garage. The culture is quickly developing in our country and is becoming increasingly recognised across Europe.”

LEADING LABELS... 7even Jarring Effects Disturbing Science

LEADING LABELS... Disboot Discontinu records Pendrive

LEADING LABELS... New Moon Recordings CCTV Recordings Subtopia Records

NAMES TO CHECK... Flore Von D Dirtyphonics

NAMES TO CHECK... Cardopusher Loop Stepwalker Cauto

NAMES TO CHECK... Radikal Guru CLS & Wax Substep Infrabass

BEST RAVES... Dub Station (Paris) Splash (Paris) EZ! (Lyon)

BEST RAVES... B-Low (Barcelona) Holly Dubz (Madrid) The Bus (Barcelona)

BEST RAVES... Krzysztofory (Cracow) 1500m2 (Warsaw) 8Bit (Poznań)


JAPAN TOKYO LOCAL EXPERT: TRIDENT (PART2STYLE) “Dub reggae has been popular in Japan for many years with established scenes and major dances popping off every week all around the country. However, over the last few years, reggae fans and electronic music heads have come together in Japan, increasingly united by the music they love, and together they are becoming bass-music fans. The scene and the number of people taking part in it are both increasing in size rapidly.”

LEADING LABELS... Part2Style Rudiments El Ricallan NAMES TO CHECK... Goth-Trad Rub-A-Dub Market Party2style Sound BEST RAVES... Back To Chill Strictly Dancing Mood Drum & Bass Sessions

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AMERICA NEW YORK LOCAL EXPERT: REGENT “New York has had a thriving electronic music scene ever since it all began back in the 1980s. With the advent of underground bass music, the city has continued to maintain its involvement, building a solid pool of artist, labels and club-nights. New York residents such as Lion Dub, Cassien, Dave Q and Joe Nice have all been instrumental in building up scenes in Brooklyn for dub, dubstep, jungle and juke.”

LEADING LABELS... DFA Tr-Angle Trouble & Bass NAMES TO CHECK... Background Sound Braille Brenmar BEST RAVES... Trouble & Bass Twissup Mr Sunday

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RODIGAN THE

GENTLEMAN

SELECTOR

WORDS: Jon Cook PHOTOS: Laura Lewis

D ATURE AS FE

IN

F

or all their myriad influences and disparate strains of origin, the styles of electronic music collectively known today as ‘bass music’ are forever indebted to one genre – reggae. Whether hidden deep in their genealogy or blindingly obvious, it’s no exaggeration to say that without reggae, and its dub and dancehall offspring, there would be no drum & bass, no dubstep, no garage... Our lives would have been poorer without the Jamaican musicians who got there first, who realised the importance of bass and placed it at the centre of their musical world. And within that mind-blowingly rich and resilient genre, one man is respected as having no superior when it comes to knowledge, passion, and most importantly, selection. That man is David Rodigan, a legendary sage and DJ to reggae fans, and to onlookers a fascinating figure who over a forty-year career has ridden a wave of genuine passion and sheer enthusiasm that’s enabled a middle-class, university educated Englishman firstly to infiltrate and become hugely respected in the world of Jamaican music and then, more recently, experience new-found fame in a realm usually occupied by DJs more than half his age, the world of dubstep and modern raves. Beginning his career as a DJ way back in the 1970s, when the profession attracted little of the glamour and attention it does today, Rodigan has never neglected the music he first discovered in late-1960s Britain as a teenager. With over four decades of collecting records to draw from and some of the most envied dubplates on earth, Rodigan holds a reputation as not only a peerless selector, but as an inspirational figure to all those who dedicate their lives to music.

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There was a deafening hush as they realised this guy Rodigan from London who they’d heard on the radio was actually a white guy.

“Originally a ‘dubplate’ was an exclusive mix of a track that only you had. You’d go to King Tubby and say ‘I want a dubplate mix of Michael Prophet, ‘Gunman’,’ and Tubby would do you a mix that only you could play; because he’d do it there and then, cut it straight on to the acetate. He’d have the four-track; mix, cut out the bass, put the sub tone button in, chase the vocal; he’d give you the vocal mix, then he’d give you a pure dub mix. That was a dubplate. Then in the late-80s, soundsystems like Body Guard and Stone Love in Jamiaica started getting the artists to come to the studio and voice the same song with their own name being mentioned in the dubplate by the artist. And that was the beginning of a different style of dubplate, the customised, personalised dubplate – that’s the way the name was changed.”


Over the many years of his career, Rodigan has developed from a mere selector into a unique one-man show, who stands out front on the stage and schools his crowd on the importance and relevance of each track he plays. It is the recordings of these speeches that have led to a whole new generation of bass obsessives discovering Rodigan, as a DJ, a performer and a figure of huge respect, and you’re now just as likely to hear the man deliver his impassioned, almost sermonic, monologues at Fabric as you are at a clash in Montego Bay. It’s clear, then, that beyond his perennial career as a reggae icon, there is a new Rodigan in town, increasingly lionised by a whole new audience eagerly lapping up his words, his presence and, most importantly, his music. “Yes. There is a new Rodigan in town,” he begins in a clear-cut and very English accent, miles from the thickened patois-inflected tones with which he addresses his audiences at shows, “and I’m very grateful to the dubstep fraternity for welcoming me in the way that they have. It takes me back to 1972 when dub music hit these shores from Jamaica. It was so exciting, it was a revelation musically. And I can see and hear that same excitement in this music, dubstep. When dubstep first kicked in, my two sons were seriously into it and made me aware of it. Obviously, I was fascinated by it. Then I found out I was being sampled; speeches I’d made years ago. Don’t ask me where those speeches were made because I can’t remember... Breakage’s ‘Together’, was a very important track, it became immensely popular and then there was the Newham Generals version. “I was absolutely blown away to be getting all this attention and it was a big surprise when Caspa said, ‘Look I want you to be on my album and do the intro,’ and then to be invited to Fabric to play at Dub Police with his selectors. For me it was fantastic because it enabled me to once again play these King Tubby, Lee Perry, Joe Gibbs, Errol Thompson mixes – those great engineers in Jamaica who made this dub music that I wasn’t really able to play anymore. For me to be invited into that world; it’s enabled me to join the dots up musically; there is a direct musical heritage and lineage that can be traced back to those origins in western Kingston. And some of those King Tubby dubs that I’m able to play in a dubstep session connect completely and utterly with that audience. I can see it on their faces as the bass drops in or out, I see them getting it exactly as I got it. So yes, some have referred to it as a ‘career renaissance’ – my career was certainly absolutely fine, because it was in a world where I’ve been working for over 30 years; reggae. But this new world into which I’ve been welcomed is fantastic.” As he talks, the passion that informs Rodigan’s every word is infectious, and it really is remarkable to hear a man who is, on paper at least, almost triple the age of many of you reading this talk with such verve for what is very much a young person’s sound and invention, dubstep. And although Rodigan is a man who’s played to some of the biggest and, in the early days, most suspicious crowds possible, the

gravity of being asked to play at Fabric and then provide a mix for the London club’s world-renowned FABRICLIVE series is not lost on him. “The first of my gigs to incorporate dubstep was at Fabric. I walked onto the stage and I could hear what The Others were playing from the DJ booth across the other side of the dancefloor. The smoke machine started going, it was quite cold, the place was packed and I thought to myself ‘What have I done?’ And I actually got nervous; I haven’t been that nervous in a long time. I looked into this very young audience and thought ‘What am I gonna play?’ And there was a moment of doubt. And then I thought ‘I’m gonna play what I decided to play days ago when I first thought about this gig. I’m gonna play these dubs that I think are relevant and I’m gonna tell one or two stories that relate to them and show a couple of album sleeves that connect this thing up.’ I just did it... And the response was amazing. The love I got back from that audience; the anticipation, the shining eyes, the smiling faces when the dubs dropped... “I’d bought out one of my first ever King Tubby dubplates that I hardly ever take out the house, I played that and I’d chosen one or two dubstep tracks that I liked, things that I’d heard that I’d enjoyed. So now what I do, when I’m playing in those sessions, is I sprinkle a little of the kind of dubstep that I’m enjoying in. Not too much though, because I don’t want to look like I’m hitching my horse to a bandwagon, because I’m not. I’ve been invited into a world where I’ve been very well received and I come in, humbled by the attention, because it is a very special time in my career that this should be happening for me. “I’ve been given the opportunity to play the music I love. We must never forget that as DJs, all we ever want to do is share our love of music with like-minded souls. And you know you’ve got the DJ sickness when you’re 14 years of age, and you’re playing in your bedroom and you look out the window to see if anyone in the street is taking any notice. If you’ve ever caught yourself doing that, and peeping out from behind the nets curtains to see if anyone’s stopping in the street, in the hope that what you’ve just played has excited someone, you have the DJ fever. And there isn’t really an antidote to it; once you have that fever of wanting to share, and wanting to endorse and pass on, it never leaves you. So that’s what’s happened again here; I’ve been invited into a world where I can share what I think is important. And when you get the response back from the audience, you can’t buy that high. It’s almost illegal; it’s so good and it’s so rare.” Sharing his vast knowledge and zeal for the music he loves is at the very heart of what Rodigan does. Whether to a clued-up reggae crowd at a clash, or to a mostly uninitiated rave full of bass-hungry students, Rodigan’s uncontrollable tendency to stop the music and introduce each track with a story about its history or impact is what’s made him a superstar across geographical and musical boundaries. But how did this happen in the first place? What drove Rodigan to stop simply playing records and take to the microphone?


“It’s interesting how that developed,” he muses from behind his spectacles, “because originally when I first started DJing there was no talking. Let’s put this in context, in the 1960s the DJ didn’t have the status he does now, he was regarded as the nerd in the corner who had the records. You had records and you played them on one turntable. In Jamaica, someone would jive talk while you took that record off and put another one on. “When I first started professionally playing reggae in clubs in London in 1978, it was not acceptable for the selector to talk – the MC talked, that was the tradition, as it still is now in dubstep and drum & bass. So for me, as a white man playing in black clubs in 1978, you had to have a mic man. What used to happen was, you’d play the vocal, then you’d flip it over and play the rhythm and the mic man would talk and rhyme to it. The selector didn’t speak; I used to work with an MC called Papa Face, he was my MC from the 70s to the 80s. Then it changed. The new style of dubplate [See ‘Dubplates’ Box] meant you no longer needed a mic man, the whole business of someone toasting the flipside began to fade away, and it was all about having customised dubs with your name in them. “So I found myself not requiring an MC in the traditional way, but just playing the dubplates. I started telling stories about a particular song and soon I found myself almost not able to contain myself in wanting to share something about that moment. It just started to happen, and then people would ask, ‘Why didn’t you talk so much about the music this time?’ Then I knew I’d stumbled onto something. I found out that Jamaican MCs were doing impressions of me on stage ‘If Rodigan was here, let me do it in a Rodigan style’, and I realised then it had become something that people expected of me.” For MCs to be imitating an English-born white man at reggae shows in Jamaica is an indication of just how respected Rodigan was, and remains, on the Caribbean island. His is a reputation built purely on respect for his all-conquering love of Jamaican music, and in his 30-plus years of visiting the island Rodigan has not only earned the respect of the crowds, but also that of those at the very top of the reggae industry. “The love I’ve been given in Jamaica, from the first show, has been incredible. I went there in 1979 and cut my first dubs at King Tubby’s and then in 1983 I did my first radio show over there. I’d gone to Jamaica to record shows to be broadcast on Capital Radio where I worked at the time. I asked Barry G, who was the number-one DJ, if he’d do a top ten for me. So he did and said, ‘I’ll reciprocate, come on my show.’ So I went along that Saturday, he turned to me when the news was on, and said, ‘By the way, rather than you just being my guest from England and playing the top records from there, let’s do a clash!’ I said ‘Thanks for the warning!’ [See ‘Clash’ Box] It started at 8pm that Saturday night, and it finished at 2am, and it was the talk of Jamaica. Inevitably, after that radio show, we started doing live shows. The first I did in Kingston was at the New Kingston Drive In. I walked on to stage and there was a deafening hush as they realised this guy Rodigan

from London who they’d heard on the radio was actually a white guy. And after the initial shock, I was given a whole lotta love, as I always have been since whenever I play in Jamaica.” Jamaica is, unsurprisingly, a place very close to Rodigan’s heart and, as a man almost without parallel when it comes to awareness of the music emanating from the isle, his views on the state of Jamaican music today are of real interest. Having previously gone on the record to express his dissatisfaction with so much of the music coming from there these days, his opinions on the latest styles and fashions coming out of JA make for interesting reading... “Jamaican music is forever changing. But it seems to me it’s become somewhat obsessed with a new style of music, which I don’t identify as being reggae or dancehall, I identify it as a hybrid of pop, R&B and dance. I think the internet has enabled Jamaicans to see what is going on elsewhere. That sounds terribly patronising, but you have to remember that Jamaica is an island, and before the digital revolution, it was its own world in a sense; the music being made was always very Jamaican, the way they dressed was, it was unique. “Now, they see and hear Usher, Jay Z, whoever, and think ‘I could do that’. So a lot of the music has this hip-hop kind of flavour to it as its backdrop; I find that inadequate. It doesn’t move me, it doesn’t excite me; it doesn’t generate any passion in me to want to go out and own this rhythm, capture this beat. A lot of it doesn’t have the weight and bottom end and depth of what I would call traditional dancehall and reggae. Now a lot of the music is hypey-hypey for dancing, but it doesn’t have any substantial message or emotion in it other than just fun and vibes. And a lot of the topics and subject matters, in my opinion, leave a lot to be desired. So, I’m bitterly disappointed by a lot of that, I can’t get my head round it musically. There are new artists coming through, but in comparison with how it used to be in the 70s, 80s and 90s it is not as substantial as it was. That would be my observation. But like everything, you never know what’s around the corner. “Which is why I find the new world into which I’ve been invited by the likes of Caspa so very exciting. Jamaicans aren’t making dub music anymore; it’s not part of their musical vernacular. So to be able to play this great dub music, which I haven’t able to play for years because the reggae world haven’t been particularly interested in it, is amazing. So for me, going right back to your first question, yes, it’s like the summer of 73 again; I’m 22 again. I’m not saying that to defend my age, but age really is just a number. When you have a passion and a genuine love of something, it never leaves you. Music is so important in our lives. And the thing about music is, when it hits, as Bob Marley said, you really do feel no pain.” Rodigan opens the Harbour Stage on Thursday night. Check www.rodigan.com for more info.


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We must never forget that, as DJs, all we ever want to do is share our love of music with like-minded souls.


ARTLOOK’ THIS YEAR’S OUTLOOK IS ALL ABOUT CELEBRATING THE EVOLUTION OF BASS MUSIC AND SOUNDSYSTEM CULTURE. AS WELL AS BOOKING ACTS TO BOTH BLOW YOUR MIND AND EDUCATE AT THE SAME TIME, THE OUTLOOK TEAM HAS SPENT A GREAT DEAL OF TIME DESIGNING THE SITE TO REFLECT THIS. ART, THEREFORE, IS BEING TAKEN MORE SERIOUSLY THAN EVER BEFORE AT THIS YEAR’S FESTIVAL, AND WE’RE CONFIDENT YOU’LL AGREE THAT IT ENHANCES THE NATURAL BEAUTY OF THE PENINSULA, WHILE ADDING A NEW LEVEL TO THE OUTLOOK EXPERIENCE. There are loads of artists expressing themselves at this year’s event, in a variety of different forms. Here’s a brief rundown of some of the collectives and individuals involved at Outlook 2011 and what to look out for from them...


LAVA COLLECTIVE LAVA Collective invite artists from all over the world to participate in visual art and music projects. Since forming in 2009, they’ve staged over 20 art shows and parties. Previous guest artists include Ashes57, Bruno 9li, Stik and The Krah. Previous guest DJs include Edan, Loefah, Instra:mental and Benny Ill.

REPLETE Replete indulges in the dark arts of graffiti, creeping around derelict environments doing illegal makeovers and re-modeling unloved and forgotten spaces to add a spot of colour to the lives of the twisted denizens who dwell in and around them. A member of the ramshackle, prolific assembly of creative misfits, TPN Crew, who propel their solvent salvos throughout Europe.

ATG ATG (Ahead’a The Game) are a group of friends that form a collective of graffiti writers, visual artists, musicians and DJs, rooted in London sub-culture. ATG have been working with Outlook since the beginning and this year are bringing the full team along to create large scale pieces all across the festival site. They’re also holding one of their ‘ATG Do One’ club-nights on Friday night in Noah’s Ballroom.

SIREN Siren is a UK-born Latino graffiti artist, with 20 years experience behind him and who holds loyalty to KTF, RAW (UK) and IBM (NYC). His nomadic nature has taken him all over the world to paint. From a surprisingly traditional artistic background, at this year’s Outlook Festival, Siren will bridge the gap between the visual and typographic.

SNUB SNUB23 is prolific and unstoppable, and ultimately synonymous with a future technology gone bad. As part of the Grafik Warfare Collective and as a solo artist, SNUB23 has exhibited and painted at events across the UK and Europe, growing a fierce reputation with every new piece. This year he’s creating a giant ‘boom-box’ in the Basketball Court, and will be painting live during the festival.

EUROCULTURED This year we are very pleased to welcome 'Eurocultured' to Outlook, they are curating An Illustrated History of Bass Music and Soundsystem Culture in the clearing, graphically portraying seminal moments that have lead to the music we love. Eurocultured is a series of street festivals and linked projects that celebrate the diversity of European Culture in all its forms. We like the idea of people from different cultures coming together in the streets and getting on with each other as artists to paint, sing, dance and perform around them. We want to introduce our audience to new things and to fire their imaginations.

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FRICTION IS ONE OF D&B’S BIGGEST STARS AND WIDELY REGARDED AS BEING AMONG THE MOST TECHNICALLY GIFTED DJS IN DANCE MUSIC. AFTER SMASHING HIS WAY ONTO THE DRUM & BASS SCENE PRIMARILY ON THE STRENGTH OF HIS DJ PERFORMANCES ALONE JUST OVER A DECADE AGO, THE BRIGHTON-BASED SELECTOR AND HIS SHOGUN AUDIO RECORD LABEL AND CLUB-NIGHT HAVE GROWN TO BECOME ONE OF THE MOST CREDIBLE AND POWERFUL INSTITUTIONS IN DRUM & BASS. His position at the forefront of the scene, playing out every weekend all around the globe, has enabled Friction (and therefore Shogun) the insight and opportunity to snap up many of the most interesting and respected producers currently creating music at 174bpm. With Alix Perez, Icicle, Rockwell and, most recently, The Prototypes all exclusively signed to the label, few could argue that Shogun is one of D&B’s most vital operations. Playing on the main stage in the Harbour Arena on Sunday night, and also holding a Shogun Audio takeover on Saturday night at the Dockside Arena before dragging the rest of the Shogun family out onto the waves for a final-day boat party, you’ll get plenty of chances to hear Friction play at Outlook this year. We caught up with the man himself for a quick chat... EZ FRICTION! SO... ARE YOU EXCITED ABOUT PLAYING AT THIS YEAR’S OUTLOOK? “Yeah, can’t wait – there’s a lot of us out there this year, so it’s gonna be good!” ALTHOUGH YOU WEREN’T HERE YOURSELF, ANYONE THAT CAME TO OUTLOOK 2010 WILL REMEMBER THE REST OF THE SHOGUN AUDIO FAMILY DESTROYING THE OUTSIDE ARENA AND THEIR BOAT PARTY... WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN TOLD TO EXPECT? “All that anyone has told me about Outlook is great things. Croatia is such a beautiful place - I played at Hideout festival a couple of months back and that was in the same part of the world, so I really can’t wait to check out Outlook and find out if what I’ve been hearing is true!” YOU PLAY A LOT OF FESTIVALS AROUND THE WORLD. WHAT’S BEEN YOUR MOST MEMORABLE EXPERIENCE? “Playing b2b with Zinc at Exit festival in 2008 was probably one of the highlights of my career so far. We went on at 2am and played until sunrise to a huge crowd. Big vibes!” AND WHAT ARE YOUR THREE ESSENTIAL ITEMS FOR WHEN YOU’RE ON THE ROAD (OR IN THE AIR!)? 1. Bose noise-cancelling headphones. 2. Laptop. 3. Vodka. OUTLOOK ISN’T JUST A FESTIVAL; IT’S A HOLIDAY FOR MANY PEOPLE TOO... ANY HOLIDAYS FROM HELL YOU’D LIKE TO SHARE? “We got stranded in LA on holiday last year for a week because of the volcanic ash from the eruption. It was really bad because I was missing my son so much, and I couldn’t make it to five shows, but, then, it was also great as we ended up having an extra week’s holiday in Los Cabos!” TALKING OF BEING STRANDED, IF YOU WERE SHIPWRECKED ON A CROATIAN ISLAND, WHAT THREE THINGS WOULD YOU NEED TO SURVIVE? 1. SKY Sports. 2. A personal chef with an unlimited supply of food. 3. My studio. ONCE WE ALL GET BACK HOME, AND WE’VE STOPPED FEELING DEPRESSED THAT WE’RE NOT IN CROATIA ANYMORE, WHAT SHOULD WE BE WATCHING OUT FOR FROM SHOGUN OVER THE NEXT FEW MONTHS? “There’s too much to mention! Release wise, we have The Prototypes new single ‘Taking Me Over’ followed by an amazing new Shogun compilation album, that will feature tracks from Alix Perez, Spectrasoul, dBridge, Break, Icicle, Rockwell and more. And on top of that we’re doing Shogun Audio shows all around the world! FRICTION PLAYS THE HARBOUR ARENA ON SUNDAY AND YOU’LL FIND THE ENTIRE SHOGUN AUDIO FAMILY TAKING OVER THE DOCKSIDE ARENA ON SATURDAY NIGHT.


FORTIFIED’ PULA

WORDS: Noah Ball

OUR TRAVELS AS A FESTIVAL OVER THE PAST FOUR YEARS HAVE TAKEN US FROM THE RAINY BRITISH ISLES TO THE WONDERFUL COUNTRY OF CROATIA. OUR FIRST VISIT WAS TO A CHARMING RUSTIC FISHING VILLAGE IN DALMATIA WHERE THE MUSIC DIDN’T QUITE SUIT THE SENSIBILITIES OF THE LOCALS (DUBSTEP WAS REFERRED TO AS “THE DEVILS MUSIC”). FROM THERE, WE MOVED ONTO A BEACH CLUB ON AN ISLAND FAMOUS FOR ITS CHEESE, BEFORE WE FINALLY HAD THE GOOD LUCK TO MEET AN AMAZING CREW OF CROATIANS WHO BROUGHT US TO THE HOME WE NOW FIND OURSELVES IN. The Outlook team would like to take this opportunity to thank the crew from Fort Punta Christo and Seasplash for being fundamental in the creation of the good vibes you’ll find yourselves settled in to. We’ve been incredibly lucky to have been given the privilege to hold a party within the walls of the fort and its surroundings; there aren’t many places like this on earth where this is possible. Where else would you be able to rattle the walls of a national heritage site? We arrived here thanks to a meeting of music lovers, some of them based in Pula and some from different regions of the UK. However, we wanted to find out a bit more information about the city of Pula, so we asked the locals to fill us in... The remains of an early human (hominid) were found in a cave in the area that date back to around a million years ago, but the rapid development of the city didn’t take place until after the Istrian peninsula was conquered by the Romans in 177BC. The city grew to a population of 30,000 (it’s around 60,000 today) and iconic structures such as the Arena and the Forum were built during this time. The Arena is the most complete amphitheatre in the world. Following the collapse of the Roman Empire, the city of Pula, like much of Croatia, became the possession of various conflicting empires and rulers such as the Byzantine Empire, the Slavs and the Republic of Venice. The city suffered greatly under the changing of rulers, often the result of large battles that caused great destruction to the city. By the middle of the 18th Century, after years filled with war, malaria, typhoid and the plague, Pula was close to extinction with only 300 inhabitants left. At the turn of the 19th Century, rule was taken by the Austrian Empire (later Austro-Hungarian Empire) and it was during this time that many of Pula’s Forts were built. By the middle of that century, Pula was the main naval base of the Austrian Empire and was also appointed its main ship building centre. During this time, the port was heavily fortified - first by a ring of tower forts (of which Fort Punta Christo was one) followed in the 1880s by an outer ring of detached artillery forts.


THE ISLAND OF BRIJONI IS WHERE EMPEROR TITO KEPT A HERD OF ELEPHANTS GIVEN TO HIM BY HAILE SELASSIE.

There are 49 fortifications in the region of variable condition. Many of these forts are interconnected by a network of tunnels running underground and under the sea bed. Fort Punta Christo, Outlook’s new home, was built in four stages between 1836 and 1883 and during this period it was the biggest, most armoured fort in the Austro-Hungarian defence system. The Fort was built from locally quarried stone and the moat was hollowed out of the solid rock in the ground surrounding it. Situated 45 metres above the sea, the Fort offers a breathtaking view of the entrance to the Bay of Pula (best seen from the terrace above Mungo’s Arena) as well as the island of Brijoni where Emperor Tito kept a herd of elephants given to him by Haile Selassie. During the third stage of its construction, two lateral wings were built (Fort Arena 1 & Mungo’s Arena) giving it three courtyards through which to enter the underground areas of this magnificent structure. In addition, a rotating steel dome with two large canons was placed over what is now Noah’s Ballroom. The Fort has as many as 270 spaces and secret passageways that can be found over its area covering 10,000m2. On the 22 February 1945 during World War 2 the Fort was badly damaged by allied bombing and from 1945 through until 1980 it was left abandoned. Back in 2001 our friend Dado, who has now become the Fort’s guardian, started cleaning the site with a few friends. By this time, it had fallen into major disrepair and was becoming completely overgrown. In 2003, they established the charitable organisation ‘Association of Friends of Coastal Fort Punta Christo, Stinjan’. In 2003 and 2004 the first and second Seasplash Festivals were held in Punta Christo and from that time a solid relationship was forged between the Fort and the Seasplash Association. Seasplash has been running for eight years now, and had brought a number of great reggae and dub artists to the region long before Outlook was even a drunken idea in our minds. It was through some mutual artists and friends that we connected with the Seasplash crew and we haven’t looked back since. Since our first visit, the constant regeneration of the fort has been amazing and we can’t imagine just how much work it has taken Dado and his team over the years. We are eternally grateful to him and his crew for rescuing such a beautiful building and not only bringing it back to life, but bringing events like ours to it. Once again we’d like to say thanks to Dado, Maja and all of the Fort Punta Christo crew for all their work and to Vedran and Djuro from Seasplash crew for making any of this possible in the first place. So, when you’re overwhelmed by the good vibes and the wonderful setting, give a little dance for the Croatian team who brought this together for us.


001 HARBOUR A brand new edition for 2011, the Harbour Arena will play host to Outlook’s live and headline acts across all four nights of the festival. Situated down below the fort and adjacent to the sea, this is where you’ll find the likes of David Rodigan, Skream, Foreign Beggars and Submotion Orchestra doing their thing on the main stage. With a truly world-class soundsystem, stage and light show, the Harbour represents a major step-up in production values for Outlook, providing an ideal setting for 2011’s musical centrepiece. With idyllic views stretching out across the Bay of Pula, this arena gives you the opportunity to dance from sunrise until sunset to some of the most exciting and legendary names in bass music.


DON’T MISS... DAVID RODIGAN, JAMIE XX, BENJI B, IRATION STEPPAS, SUBMOTION ORCHESTRA, TWINKLE BROTHERS, CONGO NATTY, TENOR FLY, PHAROAHE MONCH, GENTLEMAN’S DUB CLUB, FOREIGN BEGGARS, BENGA, HATCHA, JOHNNY CLARKE, SKREAM, SHY FX, FRICTION.

SOUNDSYSTEM: MARTIN AUDIO LONGBOW The Harbour Arena’s sound is provided by RG Jones Sound Engineering and utilises the Martin Audio Longbow system, as used on Glastonbury’s Pyramid Stage and Reading and Leeds’ main stage. Promising the best sound quality available, the system is arranged to ensure everyone in the crowd gets their fair share of that all-important bass! SPEC: Martin Audio Longbow flown array. Synco-designed MA triple 18-inch sub-bass system. Broadside cardioid array sub arrangement.

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002 DOCKSIDE Another new arena for 2011, the Dockside opens during the day and rolls all the way through until dawn. Sat next to the Harbour Arena, the Dockside shares the same production value as its big brother but differs in its dedication towards the heavier side of this year’s line-up. By day, the Dockside will witness a spectacular selection of Soundclashes between some of the biggest names at the festival, utilising the massive reggae soundsystems provided by OBF and Blackboard Jungle. Then, after night time falls, expect to see some of bass music’s biggest club-nights and artists ripping this arena apart. With shipping containers for walls, the ocean as a backdrop and more soundsystem than the fort can handle, we’re sure that the Dockside won’t disappoint.


DAYTIME DON’T MISS... OBF SOUNDSYSTEM VS BLACKBOARD JUNGLE SOUNDSYTEM DAILY SOUNDCLASH Mungo’s Hifi vs Firehouse Sound / Hessle Audio vs Swamp 81 / Congo Natty & Chopstick Dubplate vs Kenny Ken & Liondub / OBF vs Blackboard Jungle SOUNDSYSTEM: BLACKBOARD JUNGLE French soundsystem Blackboard Jungle are renowned for having one of the heaviest sounds in Europe. The crew now run their own label and produce their own dubs with which to test their rig's massive 30kW of power. SOUNDSYSTEM: OBF SOUNDSYSTEM OBF also hail from France, producing their own riddims to play to crowds across Europe on their lovingly built soundsystem, tuned for maximum bass pressure.

NIGHTTIME DON’T MISS... VAGABONDZ, DMZ, SHOGUN AUDIO, SUB:STANCE FEATURING... Plastician, Newham Generals, N-Type, Distance, Loefah, Digital Mystikz, Goth-Trad, Alix Perez, Rockwell, Pearson Sound, Scuba, Shackleton, Martyn. SOUNDSYSTEM: MARTIN AUDIO W8LC LINE ARRAY By night, the Dockside’s sound is again taken care of by RG Jones, promising the same levels of sonic excellence as the Harbour Stage. The custom-built system uses an all-horn design for superior bass impact, paired with Renkus Heinz 18-inch subs to get the ground really shaking. SPEC: Martin Audio W8LC Line Array. All-horn design. Renkus Heinz STS RR 18-inch subs.


003 FORTARENA After climbing the path to the Fort and passing through the festival entrance, you’re immediately struck by the towering 20-foot walls that encase the Fort Arena. Used as the main arena for 2010’s festival, the relegation of this enormous 2,000-capacity space to third on this year’s roster is evidence of just how much Outlook has grown since its last instalment. With a huge stage, epic light show, a soundsystem that throws the bass right to the back of the arena, and a spacious raised area from which to watch the stage and crowd below, the Fort Arena is one of Outlook’s most unique and evocative spaces. With music running from late afternoon until 5am, the Fort Arena will deliver many of this year’s most exciting names and takeover parties from some of the UK’s leading club-nights and labels.


HYPERDUB NEW BOHEMIA CLUB AUTONOMIC DUB PACK

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004 MUNGO’SARENA The roofless Mungo’s Arena was one of the highlights of Outlook 2010. With its metre-thick walls and regular shape, this atmospheric space enables the legendary Mungo’s Hifi system to provide a quality of sound you’ve probably never heard on an outdoor rig. Outlook are proud to invite Mungo’s back for this year’s festival to take care of what is now ‘their’ arena, and so once again the Glasgow-based collective will be driving their chest-rattling system all the way from Scotland to Croatia. Tucked away at the back of the Fort, this area is where you’ll find dub, dancehall, reggae and bashment blasting out of Mungo’s colossal cabinets and shaking the faces of the 1,000 people packed inside.


DANCEHALL SCIENCE RUFFNEK DISCOTEK SUBDUB

DON’T MISS... MUNGO’S HIFI, THE BUG & DADDY FREDDY, HEATWAVE, RSD, BRACKLES, OBF, VIBRONICS, PRINCE FATTY, CHANNEL ONE, JAH SHAKA. SOUNDSYSTEM: MUNGO’S HIFI The Mungo’s Hifi rig delivers the sort of bass only a system built for playing reggae ever could. With a depth of low-end that literally makes your septum quiver, and clarity of sound that never falters no matter how hard the system is pushed, make sure you spend some time stood in front of these speakers at some point this weekend. SPEC: Home-made 18-inch Super Scooper subs. Adapted Void Stasys 3 mk2 mid-top boxes. All speakers horn loaded.

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005 THEMOAT The moment the Outlook team first laid eyes on Fort Punta Christo, they hatched a plan to take over the moat one day and transform it into the long, stretching venue it has now become for 2011. After plenty of work clearing the dense undergrowth, this uniquely shaped area is set to be one of Outlook’s most impressive arenas, providing yet another brand new space for 2011. A few people actually managed to fall into the Moat last year, so to all those that couldn’t wait until we actually opened this as an arena - there will be stairs this year! Make sure you plunge down into the 100-metre-long strip of the Moat and soak up the bass reverberating from the five-metre high walls that tower over DJ and crowd alike.


AUDIO WARFARE MOMENTUM SWAMP 81

DON’T MISS... BENNY PAGE, NICKY BLACKMARKET, TC1, SURVIVAL, S.P.Y, LOXY & INK, PINCH, ZED BIAS, ONEMAN, KENNY KEN, LIONDUB. SOUNDSYSTEM: NOISE CONTROL AUDIO Noise Control Audio systems have played a pivotal role in soundsystem culture, powering raves and reggae shows across Europe since 1990. NCA systems never compromise on design and aim to deliver the purest quality of sound possible, a fact proven at 2010’s Red Bull Culture Clash at the Roundhouse in London, which saw Channel One win convincingly using an NCA system. SPEC: Noise Control Audio system. Bespoke design. Ultra-pure sound.


006 OUTSIDEARENA Situated just outside the walls of the Fort, the tree fringed open-air space of the Outside Arena is the closest Outlook gets to a ‘normal’ festival stage. Surrounded by nature and with grass underfoot, this arena offers a completely different atmosphere to anywhere else at the festival, giving you the opportunity to roll around in bales of hay while listening to some of bass music’s most cutting-edge stars. Those who came last year will remember the road-block D&B session on the Friday night, where the Outside Arena easily pushed its 1,000 capacity to the limit and established itself as one of the best places to rave at Outlook.


DON’T MISS... JEREMIAH JAE, TEEBS, KIDKANEVIL, BROKE ‘N’ ENGLISH, TROPICS, KORELESS, SPACE DIMENSION CONTROLLER, KYLE HALL, FLOATING POINTS, ROSKA, MARCUS NASTY, MOSCA, BOK BOK VS L-VIS 1990, GIRL UNIT, MJ COLE, NIGHT OWL. SOUNDSYSTEM: NEURON The team behind Neuron live and breathe bass music culture and have provided soundsystems across the UK’s north-west since 2001. Look out for the big red rig, which in the last year was voted third best float system at Notting Hill, and sent off SubDub at Leeds West Indian Centre in style on New Year’s Eve. SPEC: Void Acoustic Stasys Primes. RMS power: 36,000w. Predicted continuous SPL at 1 metre: 151dB.

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007 THE COURTYARD Make your way along the darkened passageway that leads from the Fort’s inner entrance and you’ll find yourself in the 350-capacity Courtyard. Surrounded by walls and with stars twinkling in the sky above, this open yet intimate space delivers a perfectly chilled, constantly bubbling atmosphere to the very heart of the festival. Expect plenty of reggae, dub and experimental beats, and some of the most uplifting vibes you’ll find at Outlook.

DON’T MISS... SEASPLASH CREW, ARP 101, SEIJI, ALEXANDER NUT, FALTY DL. SOUNDSYSTEM: PURE DEAD MAD Pure Dead Mad are taking care of the sound in three arenas at this year’s Outlook, driving three stacks all the way from England to give you massive amounts of bass pressure from their A.S.S. rig.


008 THEDUNGEON This long dark tunnel curves round on itself to provide the perfect place for Outlook’s more upbeat rave sets. The arched shape of The Dungeon evenly funnels the bass from the two central stacks, to create an epic sound that reaches every inch of the room. With a capacity of just 300, it’s one of the site’s smaller arenas, and when you step inside you can’t help but feel you’re not actually at Outlook at all, but in a nightclub buried deep underground.

DON’T MISS... TRANSIT MAFIA, REDS, GUSTO, CAPTAIN KRUCH & REEPS ONE, GOLI & ASHBURNER, HOPPA, BEN HUNTER, MARKSMAN, SOUTH BOUND HANGERS, DJ MADD. SOUNDSYSTEM: PURE DEAD MAD As in The Courtyard, Pure Dead Mad provide the rig for The Dungeon, drawing on 21 years’ of experience in soundsystems to turn the entire space into one big bass box.


009 NOAH’S BALLROOM One of Outlook’s most evocative arenas, Noah’s Ballroom has to be seen to be believed. A circular pit with a soundsystem dropped in, this was many people’s favourite space at last year’s festival. We can’t tell whether it reminds us more of something out of Gladiator or Silence of The Lambs... “It puts the lotion on its skin, or else it gets the hose again...”

DON’T MISS... BUNZERO, CARDOPUSHER, RUCKSPIN, RACKNRUIN, RATTUS RATTUS, JAY 5IVE, PHAELEH, PHONETICS, RISKOTEQUE. SOUNDSYSTEM: PURE DEAD MAD Noah’s Ballroom is the third arena at this year’s Outlook taken care of by the team at Pure Dead Mad. Just wait until you hear what they do with their system with no UK Environmental Health around...


010 THE BEACH When you’ve been partying all night and the heat of the day begins to build, there’s no better place to be than The Beach. Located on the edge of the festival campsite, just a few hundred metres down the coast from the Fort, The Beach serves up strictly sun-soaked sounds from DJs and live acts every day, noon until sunset.

DON’T MISS... STEVE BEDLAM, KELVIN BROWN, EVERGREEN & LANDLORD, SAMMY DREAD, CHIMPO, TROJAN SOUNDSYSTEM, REGGAE ROAST, NICE UP SOUNDSYSTEM.

The perfect place to swim, sunbathe and shake off that hangover, The Beach will help you recover from the night before... and then get you raring for the one ahead.

011 THE BASKETBALL COURT After the massive success of last year’s daytime sessions on The Beach, the Outlook team knew they had to add something extra for 2011. This year sees the launch of The Basketball Court, where you’ll find daytime raving, great food, a cocktail bar and beautifully designed seating with extra shade.

DON’T MISS... ML-WIZ, MOSAIX, CAPITAL R, BREAKDANCE BATTLES, REGENT, DUB SMUGGLERS, HERBAL SESSIONS.

When the sun sets, this arena will become a cinema showing influential films inspired by reggae and soundsystem culture. When your raving feet are tired, make your way here. 54


BOAT PARTIES

As anyone who has ever been before will tell you, the Boat Parties are an essential part of the Outlook experience. This year, there are more parties than ever before, throughout the day and evening, giving you the chance to feel the breeze in your hair and the sun on your face as you bob through the waves to a bass-heavy soundtrack provided by many of the best acts performing at Outlook. Taking place across all four days of the festival, and with everyone from RinseFM to Renegade Hardware, Circus Records to Deep Medi, no matter what your preferred form of bass, there’s definitely a Boat Party for you. Please note that to board the Boat Parties you must have pre-bought your tickets before the festival began, and make sure you arrive on time as the boat will leave without you.


SCHEDULE: THURSDAY 1 SEPTEMBER BOAT 1 BOAT 2 BOAT 3 BOAT 4

HIT&RUN HOT WUK TUESDAY CLUB VS NEW BOHEMIA MUNGO’S BOAT

FRIDAY 2 SEPTEMBER BOAT 5 BOAT 6 BOAT 7 BOAT 8 BOAT 9 BOAT 10

HESSLE AUDIO VS HEMLOCK TRUE TIGER VS VAGABONDZ CONGO D&B HOT FLUSH RENEGADE HARDWARE DETONATE

SATURDAY 3 SEPTEMBER BOAT 11 BOAT 12 BOAT 13 BOAT 14 BOAT 15 BOAT 16

RANKIN RECORDS UKF VS CIRCUS SKREAM & PLASTICIAN’S “BOOZE CRUISE” DEEP MEDI SUBDUB DISPATCH

SUNDAY 4 SEPTEMBER BOAT 17 BOAT 18 BOAT 19 BOAT 20 BOAT 21 BOAT 22

CHANNEL ONE VS REGGAE ROAST TECTONIC SIN CITY SHOGUN AUDIO FOREIGN BEGGARS & FRIENDS SWAMP81


L A B E L F E A T U R E

MAFFI

DISPATCH

A SUBSIDIARY OF JAHTARI RECORDS, MAFFI MAKES DIGITAL DANCEHALL RIDDIMS, 80S STYLE. THE LABEL IS DOMINATED BY INDEPENDENT ARTISTS, AND MAINTAINS AN ETHOS OF KEEPING THINGS “SIMPLE, ROUGH AND CHEAP”. MAFFI’S JUNIOR TELLS US MORE...

DISPATCH RECORDINGS SPECIALISES IN PROVIDING CREDIBLE, FORWARD-THINKING MUSIC FROM SOME OF D&B’S MOST RESPECTED ARTISTS. LOVINGLY RUN WITH A MANDATE OF QUALITY FIRST, THE LABEL DEMONSTRATES EVERYTHING THAT’S GOOD ABOUT THE GENRE. LABEL BOSS ANT TC1 FILLS US IN...

WHO’S INVOLVED? “Maffi is a subsidiary of Jahtari, run by the Jahtari posse, Jan and Christoph, outta Leipzig, in collaboration with Moog and myself from Copenhagen. We make the riddims in Copenhagen, Jan and Christoph run the label, and Jan usually does the mixing of the tunes.” WHEN WAS IT ESTABLISHED? “We started planning the Maffi label as early as 2006, but the first 7", Mikey Murka’s ‘Downpressor Man’ hit the streets in 2008.” WHY WAS IT ESTABLISHED? “We met over Myspace. Initially we were deeply impressed with the Jahtari productions, which we thought were very close to our own sound, except more professional. We first met Jan during summer 2008 - until then everything happened online. Jahtari is extremely well connected, very professional and we basically owe them everything. If it weren’t for Jan and Christoph, Maffi would probably still be some obscure internet project heading nowhere.” WHAT IS THE KEY RELEASE THAT YOU FEEL EPITOMISES THE LABEL? “I think we all have our different favourites, but for me, it’s Solo Banton’s ‘Talk to Me’. Simple, tough, catchy bassline and good lyrics - plus an arp. That’s all I need.” WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST RECENT RELEASE? “For Maffi that would be the newest Pupa Jim 12".”

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WHO’S INVOLVED? “Dispatch was originally set up by myself, Ant TC1, and legendary Metalheadz artists Hidden Agenda. Nowadays, I take care of the label.” WHEN WAS IT ESTABLISHED? “The label was established back in 2011, ten whole years ago!” WHY WAS IT ESTABLISHED? “Dispatch was originally established by Hidden Agenda and myself, with my responsibilities primarily helping out with the management of the label and its day-to-day running. Stress Level and I had our first release on the label in 2002.” WHAT IS THE KEY RELEASE THAT YOU FEEL EPITOMISES THE LABEL? “A tough question! I would say the track that covers all angles, while still paying homage to Hidden Agenda’s sound is more of a recent one ‘Go Back’ by Survival & Paul T. It’s a deep track and you don't hear this sound too often these days; it’s a real strike out. Also, Hidden Agenda’s ‘Daylight’ is another of my all-time Dispatch favourites.” WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST RECENT RELEASE? “We have what seems to becoming one of our biggest-ever tracks on the way - Octane & DLR’s ‘Back In The Grind’ (Cern & Dabs Rmx). Andy C said it’s one of the best tracks he’s heard all year. The crowd seem to go mental for it every time I play it. This could be the anthem of the boat party at Outlook!”


THE ROLE OF RECORD LABELS CANNOT BE UNDERESTIMATED IN UNDERGROUND MUSIC OF ANY KIND, A FACT NOWHERE TRUER THAN THE WORLD OF BASS MUSIC. AN UNKNOWN PRODUCER CAN BE ELEVATED TO MAN OF THE MOMENT WITH THE RELEASE OF JUST ONE TUNE ON THE RIGHT LABEL, AND, LIKEWISE, A MUSICAL GENIUS CAN GO UNNOTICED IF HIS TRACKS ONLY EVER APPEAR ON THE WRONG ONES. HERE WE TALK TO THE PEOPLE BEHIND FOUR SCENE-SHAPING RECORD LABELS TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT HOW THEY STARTED AND WHERE THEY’RE GOING...

BLACK BOX

DEEP MEDI MUSIK

BRISTOL-BASED BLACK BOX MAY BE A RELATIVELY NEW LABEL, BUT IT’S MOST DEFINITELY HERE FOR THE LONG TERM. RENOWNED FOR TURNING OUT THE VERY BEST THAT DUBSTEP HAS TO OFFER, BLACK BOX OWNER DJ THINKING ANSWERS OUR QUESTIONS...

REGARDED AS ONE OF THE FINEST RECORD LABELS IN BASS-CENTRIC MUSIC, DEEP MEDI LEADS WHERE OTHERS FOLLOW. RUN BY MALA OF DIGITAL MYSTIKZ AND DMZ FAME, THIS IS AN IMPRINT WITH A HEART AND SOUL ALL OF ITS OWN. THE MAN HIMSELF EXPLAINS MORE...

WHO’S INVOLVED? “The label is run by myself, with the help of my colleague Ian Blackacre who handles the manufacturing and the publishing. I get to make all the fun decisions like who and what to sign and Ian helps with all the boring jobs. I do rely on his advice quite a bit though, and I bounce things off him all the time.” WHEN WAS IT ESTABLISHED? “Planning for the Black Box label started over two years ago, although the first release actually dropped in November 2009.” WHY WAS IT ESTABLISHED? “I work at Chemical Records as a buyer, and I felt that I had enough knowledge of the dubstep scene to A&R a label well, and with Chemical behind me, I have the time to run it properly and efficiently. For me the artists are the main priority - being an outlet for someone's creative work is a big responsibility and one which I take very seriously.” WHAT IS THE KEY RELEASE THAT YOU FEEL EPITOMISES THE LABEL? “So many to choose from, but I think it’s the very first release - DJ Madd’s ‘Someone’ / ‘Someone’ (Breakage's Unspecified Remix). Both sides of the 12" epitomise what I’ve set out do with the label, and each track has the qualities I’m always looking for - they sound timeless, fit into so many different kinds of set, and have DJs returning to them time and time again.” WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST RECENT RELEASE? “There’s a lot to choose from, but maybe Kryptic Minds’s ‘Can’t Sleep’ LP. We were really excited to sign the album as the Kryptic Minds’s sonic aesthetic really fits with the vibe and look of Black Box as a label. It’s a masterclass in production and mood, with big anthems like ‘The Fifth’ and ‘Can't Sleep’ balanced by moments of incredible depth.”

WHO’S INVOLVED? “DEEP MEDi Musik was set up by myself, but for a year or so, no one knew this fact. I wanted the music to speak for itself. Tunnidge illustrates all the producers so they get a MEDi head. He’s an old friend of mine and as kids I always admired his art, so he helped put my artwork concept into reality. Since 2009, Kris Jones has been working for MEDi as label manager.” WHEN WAS IT ESTABLISHED? “The first DEEP MEDi release came in 2006. It was Kromestar’s ‘Kalawanji’ featuring Cessman.” WHY WAS IT ESTABLISHED? “I was doing youth work in the early 2000s in Croydon, running music workshops for youngsters aged 11 to 19. At this time dmz was already moving and I was beginning to get sent so much music from all over the world. The reason I started the label was to offer a home for producers to experiment and expand. I’m not into owning and controlling people. DEEP MEDi is about progression.” WHAT IS THE KEY RELEASE THAT YOU FEEL EPITOMISES THE LABEL? “DEEP MEDi doesn't mean one thing - it’s not a fixed point. It’s something that’s alive and moves, depending on the artist that records for the label. So every DEEP MEDi release is a key and an insight to the label and the many possibilities of universal vibration.” WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST RECENT RELEASE? “Silkie’s ‘City Limits Vol. 2’. This is the follow up to Silkie’s first album that came out two years ago. Since then, he has gone from strength to strength, remixing and producing for other artists… Silkie’s musicality and ability to keep that rudeboy element in his music makes him a prolific producer. He stands firm at the top of list when it come to number of MEDi releases. Serious Levels from the young West Londoner!”

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DON’T BE SILLY... For the team behind Outlook, the year-long process of organising the festival has thrown up many challenges... If you think the last-minute cancellation of a headline act due to visa issues would cause major headaches and un-imaginable stress for you or I, spare a thought for the members of the Outlook team who, on top of all their other worries, have been answering all your emails and endless Facebook enquiries about every detail of this year’s festival. From the mundane and moronic, to the weird and hilarious, you lot have provided the guys in the Outlook office some of the most mind- challenging moments of the whole year. Many of the best ones were lost when the Outlook server crashed, but here we present a few memorable correspondences from over the last few months...


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DOS & DON’TS SIMPLE ADVICE TO MAKE SURE EVERYBODY HAS A SAFE AND (FAIRLY) SENSIBLE OUTLOOK…

PHOTO:

Ashes57


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DRUGS

NO PROFESSIONAL RECORDING

The Croatian authorities take a very strict stance on the use of drugs. We STRONGLY advise that you do not bring drugs to the festival or try to buy drugs here. There WILL be a strong police presence at the festival, both uniformed and plain clothed. If you are caught with drugs or caught clearly under the influence of drugs you will be arrested and taken to police station and at the very least you will spend the night in a cell and be given a hefty fine. Croatian Drug law policy is a lot stricter than in the UK or other European countries, so as a minimum expect to spend the night locked up and in court the next day with a €300-600 fine if you get caught by the police off your head or in possession of drugs.

Unauthorised professional cameras and video/audio equipment are prohibited. Live video/audio recordings made without the permission of the artist/promoter are prohibited.

NO FOOD/DRINK

Food and drink may not be brought inside the festival site, including bottles of water, but there are several water pumps inside the site.

NO FLIP-FLOPS/SANDALS IN FORT OR HARBOUR

Flip-flops/sandals are strictly forbidden inside the FORT/HARBOUR. You must be wearing trainers or some other form of sturdy shoe in order to be allowed entrance. This is for your own safety as the ground isn’t suitable for unprotected feet and we do not want hundreds of stubbed toes, bruised heels and sprained ankles!

NO SPRAY CANS

TIDY-UP. There are bins provided USE THEM!

There is no excuse to leave litter everywhere. Clean up after yourselves, don’t leave it to someone else - take responsibility for yours and your mates’ rubbish, pick it up and take it to a bin so this beautiful festival site stays that way and can be enjoyed by everyone else as well.

BE COURTEOUS

Please be respectful and courteous to all those around you, staff and fellow festival-goers, visitors and Croatians.

STICK TO PATHS

Please don’t wander off into the undergrowth and try to keep to paths, this region of Croatia has a number of scorpions, spiders and snakes that do bite. Areas signed ‘off limits’ or ‘out of bounds’ are not safe for public access.

WEAR INSECT REPELLENT Anyone caught with spray cans will have their wristband taken off them immediately and will be escorted away from the festival by the police. Graffiti of any sort is absolutely unacceptable either in or around the festival. It’s vandalism and will jeopardise Outlook being able to return to this beautiful site.

If you don’t want to be eaten alive, please wear insect repellent or cover bare skin from the early evening onwards. The mosquitos can be right little fuckers!


TRANSPORT

HOW TO GET TO THE FESTIVAL, AROUND CROATIA AND, MOST IMPORTANTLY, HOME…

AT OUTLOOK:

LEAVING OUTLOOK:

SHUTTLE BUSES: Bus stop: There is a bus stop right outside the Outlook Festival Campsite (Camp Puntizela).

SUNSHINE BUS: Departure from Pula – Tuesday 6 September.

Price: About €2 per journey. But those who booked their accommodation through Outlook Festival will receive a Shuttle Bus Pass (except for Pula apartments or the Verudella Holiday Village). DAILY LINE: Verudella - Pula centre 2A - every 20 min Pula centre - Outlook Campsite (Camp Puntizela) 5A - every 30 min NIGHT LINE: Verudella - Outlook Campsite (Camp Puntizela) 62 - every 90 min TAXI SERVICES: Taxis will be hanging around outside the festival campsite, but if you wish to order one, Outlook has a partnership with the following company with the agreed prices below: Company: ERICA AUTO-TAXI OBRT Tel: 00385 (0) 52 - 223 228 Mob: 00385 (0) 98 - 440 844 Outlook Campsite (Camp Puntizela) to Stinjan = 50kn Outlook Campsite (Camp Puntizela) to Valbandon = 50kn Outlook Campsite (Camp Puntizela) to Veli Vrh = 60kn Outlook Campsite (Camp Puntizela) to Fazana = 80kn Outlook Campsite (Camp Puntizela) to Pula centre = 80kn Outlook Campsite (Camp Puntizela) to Verudela = 130kn Outlook Campsite (Camp Puntizela) to Peroj = 130kn Outlook Campsite (Camp Puntizela) to the Airport = 130kn Airport to Pula Centre = 100kn Airport to Outlook Campsite (Camp Puntizela) = 130kn

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For return coaches to both London and Manchester please meet at the central car park by the festival campsite at 11.00. AIRPORT TRANSFERS - AWAY FROM OUTLOOK FESTIVAL OUTLOOK FESTIVAL – LJUBLJANA AIRPORT Monday 5th – Pick-up time – 12:00 (for flights departing Ljubljana at 16:00 or later) Tuesday 6th – Pick-up time – 12:00 (for flights departing Ljubljana at 16:00 or later) Wednesday 7th – Pick-up time – 12:00 (for flights departing Ljubljana at 16:00 or later) OUTLOOK FESTIVAL – ZAGREB Monday 5th – Pick-up time – 07:00 (for flights departing Zagreb at 13:30 or later) Tuesday 6th – Pick-up time – 02:00 (for flights departing Zagreb at 08:30 or later) Wednesday 7th – Pick-up time – 08:00 (for flights departing Zagreb at 14:00 or later) OUTLOOK FESTIVAL – TRIESTE Monday 5th – Pick-up time – 13:00 (for flights departing Trieste at 18:00 or later) Tuesday 6th – Pick-up time – 09:00 (for flights departing Trieste at 14:00 or later) Please note that Outlook can take no responsibility for people missing their transfers. If you miss your transfer you will have to make your own way to the airport by other means of public transport. PUBLIC BUS SERVICES: Once in Pula, there are numerous connections to other cities from the bus station (060 304 091; Trg 1 Istarske Brigade), located 500m northeast of town centre. TRAIN SERVICES: Bus services are generally much better than trains in Croatia. Pula Train station is less than 1km north of town, near the sea along Kolodorvska. Services include: Ljubljana - 1 direct train daily (144KN, 4.5hrs) Zagreb - 3 daily (140KN, 9hrs) (but must board a bus for part of the trip) Buzet - 5 daily (55KN, 2hrs)


ESSENTIAL INFO

ALL THE IMPORTANT INFORMATION YOU’LL NEED FOR YOUR STAY IN CROATIA...

BELONGINGS/VALUABLES: Leave passports/valuables in a safe place. Beware of bag and mobile phone snatchers. Ensure you know whom to contact to obtain emergency credit cards and replacement cheques if they are stolen. Report the loss of valuables to the Festival Welfare Points who run Lost Property, and the local police and obtain a written police report. ELECTRICITY: Electrical supply is 220V, 50Hz AC. Croatia uses the standard European round-2-pronged plugs. HEALTH: It’s safe to drink tap water throughout Croatia, except on the small islands. With the Croatian sun it’s easy to get sunstroke, sunburn and dehydration, so please drink plenty of water and apply sun cream regularly. It’s advised to wear flip-flops or jelly shoes when swimming in rocky areas to protect your feet from sea urchins. INTERNET ACCESS: Internet is available in the campsite. There are also internet cafes in some of the local villages and in Pula. MONEY: Currency - The Croatian currency is Kuna. The exchange rate is roughly 8.5KN to £1, or 7.5KN to 1€. (A few places might accept Euros but generally you need Kuna.) ATMs/Cash Machines (Bankomat) - There is an ATM in the Festival Campsite, as well as in the local villages such as Stinjan and Fazana, and of course in Pula. Tokens - The Outlook Festival bars and stalls all use a token system. You can exchange your Kuna at Token Points all around the site, and then use your tokens to pay for drinks etc.

PHONECARDS: You’ll need a phonecard to use public telephones, available to buy at any post office and most tobacco shops and newspaper kiosks. They’re sold according to impulsa (units); cards are available in 25 (15kn), 50 (30kn), 100 (50kn) and 300 (100kn) units. A 3-minute call from Croatia using a phonecard will cost around 12kn to the UK and Europe. Local calls cost 0.80kn whatever time of day. Many phone boxes are equipped with a button on the upper left with a flag symbol. Press the button for instructions in English. EMBASSY INFO: In case of emergency, please seek help from one of our helpful Outlook staff members at one of the Welfare Points. However, here are the British embassy’s contact details should you need them: British Embassy Ivana Lučića 4 10000 Zagreb, Croatia Tel: + 385 1 600 9100 ZAGREB.CONSULAR@FCO.GOV.UK WWW.UKINCROATIA.FCO.GOV.UK WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/UKINCROATIA

GENERAL COSTS: Main dishes in restaurants range from 70KN to 150KN / Pizza - 40-65KN / Sandwiches - 30-50KN / Beer - 20KN for 0.5Litre (approximately 1 pint) / Cider - 25KN / Spirit + Mixer - around 25KN / Cigarettes - 20KN

TELEPHONE: Mobile phones: If you have an unlocked 3G phone, you can buy a SIM card (roughly 50kn with 20 mins time included, networks: VIP, T-Mobile, Tomato or Tele2). Mobile and phonecard packets are available to buy from any telecom shop (about 150kn, including some connection time).

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MONDAY M ONDA Y

TUESDAY T UE ESDA Y

WEDNESDAY WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY T HURSDA SDAY

FRIDAY FRIDAY

SATURDAY SATURDA DAY y Allbury

08:00 08:00 Scratcha Breakf fast Show — The Grimey Breakfast 09:0 0 09:00

SUNDAY S UNDAY Allbury

09:00 09:00

Able

10:00 10:0 0 11:0 0 Crises 11:00

l Ill u Blu

i Monki

Dappa

Uncle Dugs

be Good Vi Vibe Clive

16:00 16:0 0

k Bok Bok L-Vis 1990 + L-Vis Br raiden / Braiden

17:00 17:0 0 Vectra

Ros ska Roska

15:00 15:0 0 Teaser

Angie B + iun Dogtaniun

Brack kles Brackles

o Marco Horno Del Horno

Funk Butcher

ocial Anti–Social

19:00 19:0 0 Perempay

y Better Boy Kno ow Know

o Spyro

Marcus Nasty

Bushkin

16:00 16:00

17:00 17:00

JJ + Julie

18:00 18:0 0

14:00 14:00

15:00 15:00

Karnage A Plus

12:00 12:00

13:00 13:00

Tubby

Shox

SK Vibemaker

14:00 14:0 0

der Alexander Nut

Suppl lier Supplier

Sia an Sian

10:00 10:00

11:00 11:00

Fingaprint

12:00 12:0 0 13:0 0 Kumfy 13:00

08:00 08:00

MA1

18:00 18:00

19:00 19:00

20:00 20:00

20:00 20:0 0 21:00 21:0 0 Skream

N —T Type N—Type

Distance / Chef

Zinc / Redli ight Redlight

Kismet

Mark d Radford

Plastician

21:00 21:00

22:00 22:00

22:00 22:0 0 23:00 23:0 0 Youngsta

Num mbers/ Numbers/ SBT TRKT SBTRKT

D&B Rotation*

24:00 24:0 0 01:00 01:0 0 Seb Chew

Sta amina Stamina

Teddy Music

Hessl le Audio/ Hessle Loefa ah / Dusk Loefah Blackdown + Blackdown

Music Man

Elija ah + Elijah Skill liam Skilliam

Wonder

Daniel Ward, Hermit ok + Mr Coo Cook

Oneman

oyants Clairvoyants

The Heatwave

23:00 23:00

24:00 24:00

01:00 01:00

02:00 02:00

02:00 02:0 0 03:00 03:0 0 Donald Mack

Sco ore Five Score

04:00 04:0 0

Tender Ed

y Josey Rebel lle Rebelle

Podcasts + Pre–Recorded shows

ts + Podcasts corded Pre–Recorded shows

Big Beatz

03:00 03:00

04:00 04:00

05:00 05:0 0 Podcasts + Pre–Rec corded Shows Pre–Recorded

05:00 05:00

06:00 06:0 0

06:00 06:00

07:00 07:0 0

07:00 07:00

*(D&B Rotation) *(D&B 1: 1 : Autonomic / 2 2: :Sho Shogun ogun Audio / 3: 3 :F Flight light / 44::Digita Digital al Soundboy

/ 106.8 106.8fm f / ww www.Rinse. w.Rinse.fm



Trap Magazine Outlook Festival Guide 2011