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RITES OF PASSAGE

SPRING 2013 ISSUE 1

WITH THESE OLDHANDS

TRANSCENDENT

PORSCHE WEEKEND RACER

VESPA RESTORATION

CREATING AN

E-TYPE

CAT HOT ON A

TIN ROOF PLUS ~

CRITICAL MASS | LONGBOARDING CYCLING UP MT FUJI | ROAD TRIP USA

ICON HANDBUILT IN THE USA


P H O T O :

W V R

Editor’s Letter Spring 2013 Issue 1

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here’s a delicious irony in celebrating the restored, rebuilt and handcrafted machines on a digital device. Traffic Magazine is the first of its type: a digital homage to those mechanical beasts that move us. What we hope to do, in this and future issues, is talk about those relationships between man and machine. The artisans who make them, who restore these things to former and entirely new found glory. And of course those people, 3

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like me, who enjoy the clatter of an engine, the sound of tyres on tarmac, the perfume of rubber and leather and oil. We’re not too bothered by horsepowers or the 0-100 dash. We’re all about the journey, the dress code and the soundtrack. Among the many firsts in this issue, we managed to photograph an E-Type Jaguar on the roof of a building. We explore the voodoo of the perfect paint job, the witchcraft of the internal combustion engine and the black art of the single speed bicycle. And we have only scratched the surface. I invite you to sit down, strap yourself in and enjoy our first issue. JASON BRONKHORST jason@trafficmagazine.co.za

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CONTENTS

SPRING 2013 ISSUE 1

TOUCH AN IMAGE TO READ ARTICLE

COVER FEATURE

CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF FEATURES

Alpha Longboards 4

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M A G A Z I N E

Creating An Icon

With These Old Hands RITES OF PASSAGE


CONTENTS

Transcendent Porsche

SPRING 2013 ISSUE 1

Critical Mass

Biting The Bullit

Up, Up & Only Up

REGULARS ON-RAMP

OFF-RAMP

Gallery

Gallery

Products

Hanging out

Daily Driver

Garagiste

Fashion

Profile

Profile

Film

Road trip USA

Road to hell

Food

Back track

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P HO T O G R A P H Y B Y K I T O AT E S

GALLERY

TANZANIA

BIKER GANGS OF ARUSHA Recently on assignment to photograph local schools and orphanages in Tanzania, Kit Oates, a London-based photographer, noticed many young bikers who lined up along the roadsides daily. Kit was fascinated that the young men didn’t seem to be part of the perpetual scurry to make ends meet and escaped doing hard labour like so many of the other citizens in the area which is rife with unemployment and poverty.

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C L I C K HE R E T O S E E MOR E P HO T O GR A P H Y B Y K I T O AT E S

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REBELLIAN CUSTOM BIKES We spent a morning at the Cape Town hideout of Rebellian Custom Bikes. Devin Paisley and Ian Lindsey are a new movement in motorcycling, bringing custom vintage bikes to Cape Town.

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GGAALLLLE ERY RY

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PROFIL E UP C Y C L I NG

BICYCLED BIKES IRONICALLY, SUSTAINABLE AND CLEAN TRANSPORT IS CREATED FROM THE SCRAPPED REMAINS OF FOSSIL FUEL GUZZLING OLD CARS.

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PANISH creative agency Lola Madrid has conceived an “upcycled” bike made of nothing but materials sourced from cars found in scrap yards. The ad agency who has won awards for putting their creative touch to clients products, have now turned their sights to a higher purpose: creating a sustainable way to produce bikes with their range of Bicycled Bikes. The frame is made from recycled metal from the body of the cars, the chain comes

from a transmission belt, and the reflective lights are made from old indicators. The seat and handlebar are covered with upholstery from the cars. The selling point is that each bike will be unique, since it will be up to the customer to decide what to use in the building process. Each Bicycled Bike can be put together by bike shop owners, and because the parts are made from real cars, no two are the same.

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RENT~A~MERC When brothers George (42) and Nick Acker (37) decided to buy Rent a Mercedes Mercedes, it had only 7 cars left to its name - and all of them were in really bad cosmetic shape. But, with years of valuable experience as established owners of a rental car company, they knew exactly what needed to be done. They sold all the existing cars or scrapped them for parts, replaced them with neater vehicles, rebuilt the booking website - and spread the word. The concept of long-term rentals was not an immediate hit, however, and it took 3 months for them to receive their first enquiry. Now, a decade later, they have a fleet of over 40 vehicles and have found their niche client base who share their passion for classic 80’s Benzes. 1 8

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hen did the idea for Rent a Mercedes come about? Rent a Mercedes was established in 2003 when we found a need for safe, reliable and affordable transport in and around Cape Town. Renting a vehicle long-term is a very cost effective option for tourists. Rent a Mercedes is a budget car rental company with high standards and supply a much needed niche market. I see a lot of 230Es there. What is the reason for mainly stocking this model? We hire out 230Es as well as the 200s and 280s. All these W23 models are very safe, run high mileage and are spacious with big lockable boots for surfing gear, kiting equipment and luggage. They have power steering and are available with automatic and manual transmissions.

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Who is your main clientele? We specialise in renting to European and American students, interns and tourists from abroad visiting Cape Town. Europeans love the Mercedes-Benz, as they are comfortable, reliable and well built cars – and, of course, a trusted brand around the world. We’ve also had a lot of kiters, surfers and windsurfers as clients in the past, and have been honoured to have several celebs renting from us, like Gregory Smith from the TV series Everwood, Lewis Crathern (ex- UK Kiteboard Champion), as well as UK wavesailing champion Jamie Hancock to mention just a few. Are there any challenges with maintaining these vintage models? We have very good, experienced mechanics onsite maintaining our cars. Mercedes parts are unfortunately expensive and some are becoming hard to get. We have built up a large stock of parts over the years, and have had to start importing some parts. We have a good relationship with all our suppliers, and they keep us well stocked. Just like our clients, we love these cars. We’re passionate about them, and about our business so we always go the extra mile to keep them on the road.

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JUST LIKE OUR CLIENTS, WE LOVE THESE CARS. WE’RE PASSIONATE ABOUT THEM, AND ABOUT OUR BUSINESS - SO WE ALWAYS GO THE EXTRA MILE TO KEEP THEM ON THE ROAD.

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WITH THESE OLD HANDS OOM JANNIE ALBERTS IS 82 YEARS OLD. FOR THE LAST TWO DECADES, HE HAS BEEN BREATHING NEW LIFE INTO RUSTED, BROKEN-DOWN VESPAS. words JASON BRONKHORST

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photography WARREN VAN RENSBURG

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you think hard work after retirement means lugging that mammoth novel you never got the chance to read to your armchair, or cleaning the grit from your fingernails after a stint in the vegetable garden, then 82-year old Jannie Alberts will offer you an entirely different perspective. After retiring at 60, he took on a hobby of giving new life to rusted, brokendown Vespas - and it became an ardent passion, now spanning two decades. Known to have a knack for all things mechanical, the former salesman was asked to overhaul a Vespa that was nearly written off in an accident. He explains how he stumbled onto his hobby: “I said: ‘Well, I don’t know anything about these scooters. I do motor cars more in my spare time. In any case, I started on that one. After it 2 2

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Oupa Jannie takes great pride in his work. He cut the Vespa badge out of a piece of tin.

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was finished, I re-sprayed it, made it nice and one day it was standing there waiting for him to come and fetch it. Well, I had the idea of trying it out and what a lot of fun I had!’” Restoring the iconic scooter from complete disrepair to its original form (and perhaps even riding better than ever) has fascinated Alberts ever since. At a townhouse in Roodepoort, Johannesburg where many of the 39 scooters he has restored to date are still kept, he recalls, “That was 20 years ago, and I’ve enjoyed every moment. I didn’t mind buying them and paying to rebuild them.” Fortunately for Alberts, getting his hands on the spare parts he needed to begin his newfound interest wasn’t a major problem. He simply phoned into Iets vir Iets, an Afrikaans radio show purposed as a broadcasted swap meet and explained that he was looking for scrapped Vespas. He received call-backs and in no time amassed himself in “fourteen old pieces of junk and rubbish”, more than enough to get started. Although Vespas are known for their simplicity in design, it was no small feat for self-taught Alberts to learn them inside and out through years of stripping and assembling them from the ground up. His experience as an after-hours grease 2 4

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“WHEN I WORKED FOR COMPANIES, EVERY MINUTE BELONGED TO THEM, BUT AFTER 5PM, I WAS MY OWN BOSS.” monkey working on vehicles as a sideline for most his life was put to good use. “I was working with my hands as a hobby, parttime. I had a job and at night when I got home, I worked. Over weekends (too). I’ve built up the most beautiful motor cars, man.” His passion for restorations began when he worked on his first car at 19, and he says that one of his standout projects was working on a Volvo Amazon B18 (convertible, left-hand drive, 1953 model). He also restored Citroen DS-20s, specialising in their finicky hydraulic suspension systems that they’re so well known for. He takes great pride in his work and likes to share the history of how the various models have 2 6

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landed up in his garage. “I don’t put rubbish parts on and I don’t take second hand stuff. When I rebuild it, when I’m finished with it, it must be like this one, brand new.” He points to a 1984 model bought from a scrapyard now in perfect nick, and motions to another: “That is a 1962 model that’s been running for 12 years.” If there is a secret to a long and healthy life, Alberts may have discovered it through his hard-working outlook and passion for all things mechanical. “When I worked for companies, every minute belonged to them, but after 5, I was my own boss and, you know, it kept me young,” he says. It’s not easy work at his age. “I’ve got to rest, but I’m addicted to work. I can’t get enough of it. I come here before 8 o’ clock and I stay here until 4:30 - and I work,” he says. In the beginning it would take him 3 months to reconstruct Vespa scooters from the “bits and pieces” they were presented to him in, now through experience and a higher demand for his services, it takes him just a matter of weeks, often working on more than one at a time. Inspired by their father, Alberts’ sons formed a Vespa club in his hometown of Roodepoort to 2 7

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“I’M ADDICTED TO WORK, I CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF IT.” pay tribute to his passion for the classic scooter. Gaining popularity for their Sunday tribute runs, the group that now consists of about 20 riders from the ages of 25 and up, became known as the Chicken Runners. Realising they could use the attention to highlight other important issues, they have since contributed to various charitable causes, notably a 10-day journey from Johannesburg to Cape Town to raise awareness and funding for the NPO, Cansa in early 2012. Oom Jannie, as he is affectionately known, was called upon to tune up the group’s fleet of Vespas before the run, and actually joined them for the 2250 km journey on a 1961 model he built himself. Alberts isn’t done yet - he rides his Vespa every day - but says: “I’ll carry on as long as the Lord wants me to, but I’m going to retire when I’m 90.” 2 9

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DOWNHILL LO NGBOARD RA CING IS A GR SPORT IN SOU OWING T H A F R IC A . T HANKS MOST LY TO ONE MAN: KE NT LINGEVEL DT. b y R O B CO CKCROF T

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1999, when Kent Lingeveldt entered the inaugural Red Bull Downhill Extreme in Cape Town, he didn’t realise his overseas counterparts would rock up with such specialised equipment. “Obviously, we didn’t have high-tech longboards. We just thought a board is a board and took the widest board we could find and went down a hill,” he says, laughing. Longboarding had not yet gained much popularity in SA and none of Kent’s fellow skaters had taken up this form of boardriding. He had, however, been street skating for the past five years 3 1

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“I WENT TO A HARDWARE STORE AND BOUGHT A FLAT PIECE OF WOOD, SHAPED A BOARD AND WENT FROM THERE.” and, as he was living in the mountainside community of Woodstock at the time, bombing down perilous gradients at hair-raising speeds was just one of the inevitabilities of his daily commute. On race day he arrived at the top of Kloofnek, the starting point leading down a steep, winding road to the finish line in Camps Bay, and found competitors from the USA and Europe suiting up in full racing leathers and polishing their space-age-looking helmets. Kent, armed in basic protective gear (elbow and knee pads and a helmet) took part on his usual street board. As 3 2

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one might expect, it couldn’t handle the high speeds required – resulting in Kent ‘speed wobbling’ much of the way and taking a few tumbles on the way down. At the end of the day he had earned himself a 12th place finish, but left determined to excel on the downhill racing circuit. To do that, he realised that his first task would be to find more advanced gear.

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etting his hands on the new setup proved to be no mean feat. The boards in skate shops were way out of his price range, and he knew no one in the skating fraternity from whom he could buy one secondhand. Kent’s solution: make one. “Being from the Cape Flats, I didn’t really have money,” he says with a wry smile. “You know, your parents are not just going to give you money for a skateboard. So, I went to a hardware store and bought a flat piece of wood, shaped a board and went from there.” S E P TS EP MR BI NE RG

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AT THE END OF THE DAY, HE EARNED HIMSELF A 12TH PLACE FINISH, BUT LEFT DETERMINED TO EXCEL ON THE DOWNHILL. He learnt by trial and error, and gained a great deal of experience as he practiced by shaping boards for friends. One particular challenge was learning how to make concave decks: there were no established shapers around, or DIY websites to turn to, so Kent approached boat builders, who bend wood for features on their watercraft. One of the features of an Alpha longboard is its fiberglass coating, which Kent learnt from local surfboard shapers. He soon got the hang of it, and saw a business opportunity in crafting custom-made boards at prices that were more suitable to the average skater’s pocket. He took the plunge and formed Alpha Longboards in 2001, operating out of his garage. T3 R4 A F F I TC R M A FA FG IA CZ IMN AE G A Z I N E

Kent’s progress in downhill racing and shaping went hand in hand. From 2004, he began competing professionally, which saw him travelling the world. He is also known to be one of the few riders to have partaken in all four Down Hill Extreme races.

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ast-forward to 2013, where sidewalk surfing is arguably at the height of its popularity. While big brands are churning out trademarked planks on an assembly line to meet the heightened demand, Alpha Longboards has managed to stay true to Kent’s S P R I N G

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original and individualistic approach - and it’s starting to attract some very positive attention. Kent recently received the 2013 Constructus Award from The Jupiter Drawing Room, which granted him a hefty sum of money as well as ongoing mentorship with the acclaimed ad agency for his back-tobasics business model which hearkens back to the roots of the sport when individual expression was key. 3 5

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lpha Longboards is now run from 52 Wright Street, a small warehouse nestled in the byways of a bustling part of Woodstock. There’s no specialized machinery doing all the work. “Nowadays you get guys who use plenty machines, that’s not my thing. I work on maybe four boards a day - and that’s a lot,” he says.

Kent only shapes for customers by appointment and each board is handcrafted to meet their unique requirements. “I have about 18 shapes which range from your average street skateboarder who wants to cruise with a kicktail through the streets, up to the guy who wants to seriously bomb and slide, and of course, anything inbetween. So my shapes generally cover almost all aspects of longboarding, but S P R I N G

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52 CREW Kent Lingeveldt studied child and youth development, but didn’t pursue it as a career because all he wanted to do was skate. Now he’s mentoring kids the best way he knows how...on a skateboard. They’re called the 52 Crew, named after 52 Wright Street, Woodstock, where Alpha Longboards resides. The group consists of 8 kids who Kent has taken under his wing to school in the art of sliding and carving the streets up as well as providing guidance as a cool older role model.

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if there’s something different that you want -” he shrugs, “ -then boom.”

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lpha also takes their personalised boards to a new level by offering once-off commissioned art works through a network of artists that Kent has worked closely with since 2009. Since the launch of

the Alpha Art Board series he’s worked with artists closely linked to the Cape Town graffiti and pop art scene such as Atang Tshikare, Nard Star and Khaya Witbooi, as well as photographer Jacob Fullen. Alpha’s flagship art range, the Local Legends series launched in 2011, pays homage to people who have made an impact in our country - icons such as Nelson Mandela, Miriam Makeba, Brenda Fassie and Zola Budd. S P R I N G

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TAP HERE TO VIEW THE ALPHA LONGBOARDS YOUTUBE CHANNEL If you’re looking for an adrenaline boost at work check out this collection of clips that’ll give you great insight as to how it feels to bomb steep hills or weave through heavy traffic while commuting.

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Click the image above to view “Board Games”, a short documentary, available on the Alpha Youtube Channel. Follow Kent Lingeveldt as he goes about his daily business of shaping boards and living the skater lifestyle. The documentary also reveals Kent’s approach which makes Alpha different to other board companies. From using

local wood (SA Pine), carving each board by hand and commissioning once-off artworks, as well as the must-see moment where Kent hands over a Desmond Tutu board as part of the Alpha Art Board series to the Archbishop himself. Touch to visit Alpha Longboards’ website

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W OR D S B Y W E S G A R C I A P HO T O GR A P H Y B Y I C ON

CREATING AN ICON ICON’s co- founder, Jonathan Ward, talks about his company, his design philosophy and why America must return to being proud of our their ability to design and manufacture, to remain relevant in the global economy.

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an you tell us a little about yourself and your companies? I am 41 years old, and have been passionate about industrial design since I was a kid. My wife and I had careers in different industries, yet were dispassionate about our work. While on vacation in South Africa, we decided to start TLC once we returned home. So you started TLC in 1996, what were the early days like? Did people get what you were going for back then?
At first a few people were confused. They said “you are going to do what, to only what?” One later even said that he gave us a few months before we would close. Fortunately, we actually quickly found our footing, as no one was applying proper restoration to classic utility vehicles, as they would 3 9

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to conventional classics. We quickly discovered that there was a significant market who wished for higher standards. Then you started Icon in 2007? Why start another truck company? After a while, we felt as if we were hitting our heads on the ceiling of the brand we had created. We saw that the market, more and more, wanted the classic look and feel, but few had

the patience for the archaic mechanical experience these early trucks provided. So TLC found we were doing less and less stock restorations, and more and more customizing in our style. Our style seemed to be defined by a classic aesthetic, true to the utilitarian roots of these vehicles, but with modern systems integrated where ever possible. After being asked to design the first three pre- production FJ Cruiser design study S P R I N G

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ICON BRONCO: ORANGE, CUT, NO TRIM

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GOOD DESIGN MUST KNOW THE INTENDED USES OF A PRODUCT, AND NEVER LOSE FOCUS ON THOSE CORE VALUES. vehicles for Toyota, then seeing Toyota go in a less traditional direction, we yearned to realize our prototypes ourselves. I had been studying and watching as all sorts of new technologies became available that created new efficiencies in reverse engineering, rapid prototyping and low volume manufacturing. It seemed relatively clear to me that a fresh approach was now possible. Given the possibilities at hand, we decided to define a new brand that would have longer legs, to allow us to start designing and engineering a line of vehicles based on classic transportation designs, revisited in a modern context. My wife came up with the name ICON, and it stuck. Why were the original Toyota Land Cruisers so special? From peace keepers to bad- guys, they have 4 1

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this worldwide reputation for being nearly indestructible. I have done a great deal of travelling in my life. The harsher the terrain, the more remote the locale, the more people relied and cherished their Land Cruisers. At root, I think it is due to the clarity and focused design intent of the original FJ40. I always respected that clarity in design purpose and intent. That ethic still drives my work today.

How did you get involved with Toyota as a consultant? What was it like meeting mr. Toyoda for the first time? We had done several jobs (restorations) for different Do you remember the first time dealers and Toyota executives at TLC. you saw a Land Cruiser? One of the Their headquarters are near us, in cool kids in my high school had one. Torrance Ca. One day we got a call from Mr. Toyoda’s office, wishing to schedule What was the first truck you a meeting. We had no idea at the time that ever owned? I’m assuming you there was a Mr. Toyoda. It was like god modified it?
A 1946 Chevy pickup. visiting the church. He was gracious and Yes, I messed with it. Then a 65 F250 kind, yet did not reveal the purpose of his was my daily driver for a few years. I put visit. We showed him (and his entourage) a Pantera 351 Cleveland in that one. around, and explained our customers. S P R I N G

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Later that week, they communicated that they felt we had a better understanding of the classic Land Cruiser buyer than they did, and they invited me to design a design study vehicle of what I thought a modern FJ40 should be. We traveled to the NUMMI plant where the Tacoma was made in NorCal, and to the Brazilian Bandeirante factory. I picked the components we envisioned right for the job, and had at it, with little direction or interference from Toyota. About two months into the job, they requested two more variants. We had a great time, and learned a lot through that experience.

THE ICON CJ3B is a recreation of the flat fender Willy’s and is dramatically more capable than the original. It seats four with room to spare. Optimal turning radius and maneuverability.

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You’ve said, “you have to understand the clarity and the purpose of the design.” Can you elaborate? Poor design lacks focus on the main uses and utility of a given product. Distractions such as focus groups, marketing departments with irrational goals of creating a one size fits all product, costs savings etc., all take away from what must drive good design. Good design must know the intended uses of a product, and never lose focus of those core values. S P R I N G

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through traditional restoration, so it is a bit easier to find them. Soon we hope that will change, as there is a bill recently introduced in the Senate, that would create a new low volume classification for Vehicular Manufacturers, which would allow us to scale our brand and expand our facility and staff.

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Where do you locate all of your trucks? Do you have someone scouring the classifieds fulltime? Many people search us out and bring them to us. For TLC, we have to be very picky about the conditions of what we start with. With ICON, everything is redesigned, so all we need is a crude legal entity, often beyond salvation

Not that there’s ever an average customer, but who is the Icon customer? Mostly men, 35 – 50. A few female owners as well. Some as daily drivers, most used at a specific property or locale, to allow the owner to fully experience that area of the country. We have certain concentrations of ICON in the Hamptons, Florida, Colorado… we have also exported some to distant and varied areas like Columbia, Spain, Greece, Estonia, Canary Islands, Norway. Why did you start building the CJ series? I always loved the original ethics that Willy’s stood for; simplicity, durability, and longevity. I feel those are three points sorely lacking as priorities in modern vehicular design. We also wanted to try and come up with a design S P R I N G

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that got my price point down to remotely reasonable. Given the quality of content and components, plus US manufacture of almost every single component we use, and a trained and well kept SoCal labour force, that is an issue with our products. It frustrates me that our prices must be so high for this to be a proper business, yet I refuse to outsource or lose focus on the quality. We have been fortunate that there are enough people that believe in our principals as we do, to support our brand. Still I find it frustrating because our designs seem to appeal to such a wide range of people young and old, yet we only see a small sliver capable of purchase. Have you ever decided not to sell one of your vehicles to someone? or turn down a request? Yep, I will not do the bling builds, with shiny pimpmy-ride stuff. I also once built an ICON for someone I did not feel really got the brand. As a small business owner, I was not in the place to turn down the sale based on that “vibe”  –  however, I ended up cutting him a check for it in full once it was done, and told him I did not think we were right for him. That was financially difficult for us, 4 4

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but I made it happen and have been very pleased that I did. With a niche brand such as ours, each client is an ambassador for us, and a reflection upon us. You take inspiration from other brands, Leica, Bell & Ross, Caterpillar, Mercedes and apply their aesthetic to your trucks. Can you tell me about that? Just a design geek, that’s it. Nothing more, nothing less. I often see design details, materials, processes and qualities in

other industrial design segments that I think should be applied to automotive arts. It seems the golden era of applying such details in transportation is long dead. I seek to revive it. Watches are a perfect example. No one needs a watch anymore. But the industry flourishes and evolves, not by making the cheapest watches they can, but by embracing craftsmanship and creativity. The art is in the execution now. Pretty soon everyone on this planet already has what they need and much S P R I N G

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more. So why not return to sustainable, quality products? Products that last, are born of passion, with story and purpose? There is too much junk in the world, stuff created with no vision other than a P&L, destined for the landfill. Enough already! Your attention to detail borders on obsessiveness (sun visors that cost you $400 dollars, you custom build some parts) — where does that come from? I want to build something we can be proud of. Considered detail is the mark of quality design. I try to select and design elements for our work that are there because they are the best for each function. Pricing did not matter. Clarity of design and utility trumps! Another detail, at our house we have Chilewich rugs  –  they’re indestructible. I know they’re an option for furniture upholstery, but you’ve got to be the first one to use it in the auto industry.
Yep, and Sandy Chilewich thought we were nuts. At first they would not sell direct to me, so I went to Design Within Reach and bought a bunch of runners and deconstructed them to use. Now we are working close together! 4 5

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IT’S IN THE DETAILS Each engine is hand built and branded with it’s maker’s own unique signature.

Like you, at my high school, the absolute coolest guy had an old FJ. the second coolest guy had a a vintage Bronco. which leads me to, why the Bronco? what do you have in store for the Bronco?
We often get requests from people who follow our brand, who have an idea for our next model. Most popular requests have always been for the Bronco, International Scout, and the early Rovers. Two factors played into choosing the Bronco. First off, is a business reality.

We must find suppliers with business models for creating the new body structures we use. Our volume does not allow for the proper amortization of such an investment over our small production runs, and I have never been interested in selling parts, just turn key creations. So that is a significant limitation. Also, we feel that we are part of a movement, so to speak. A movement of US made products driven by passion to create unique expressions of quality that will last forever. S P R I N G

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TO ME THE CJ IS THE AUTOMOTIVE EQUIVALENT TO A GREAT PAIR OF FLIP FLOPS!

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Marketing chief) asking if we would be interested in doing an ICON Bronco to support a licensing deal they had just made to re- stamp the classic Bronco bodies, I needed little further encouragement.

often worry that our nations leaders focus on short term solutions to sustain our culture. For example, our leaders tell us to go buy things and everything will be alright. Big businesses lobby to support the P&L or share prices, at the cost of outsourcing skills and manufacture to other nations. I feel that if we continue to do so, we will loose any national values other than consumption. We must return to being proud of our ability to design and manufacture, to remain relevant in the global economy, to support our labor force, to have true values in sync with the founding principles of our country. With that in mind, the Bronco is such a core “americana” product, so embedded in our memories. That made it a great fit. When I received an email from Jim Farley (whom I had worked with at Toyota, now the Ford 4 7

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What brand out there makes you smile at their attention to detail? Many watch brands, and niche craftsmen. But in the automotive world? Mostly vintage brands like Voisin, Talbot Lago, Bugatti, Facel Vega, Iso, Buccialli. Given the opportunity, what other Weirdo’s with maniacal focus and design truck brand would you like to values. to redo/ refurbish? A long list, not limited to trucks. We hope to continue to evolve our production line to include various 2WD and 4WD vehicles from the past. Thinking about doing a 1950 Chevy Pickup design next, offered in two and four wheel drive variations. Would love to revisit the VW thing. Citroen 2CV… For now, we do two lines of one- off vehicles by commission. This helps us explore different designs and platforms. We have the Reformers, and The Derelicts*. Favorite detail on the FJ? and the CJ? The FJ possesses amazing versatility. We were careful to design it on the knife edge of compromise: no onroad trait was expanded at the sake of an off- road ability, and vise- versus. To me the CJ is the automotive equivalent to a great pair of flip flops! S P R I N G

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What do you think of the state of the u.s. automotive industry nowadays?
I think that there is a  lot of negativity in our industry right now. I propose a different vantage; we are at the cusp of a new era. If brands can be light on their feet, innovative, and stick to the defining principles of 4 8

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their respective brands, anything is possible. Sort of the dot- com era of our industry. So many opportunities, so much new technology. Soon the old guard will not control the industry. Too many new opportunities to ignore in green tech, manufacturing processes and niche markets.

Biggest thrill about owning your own business?
I get to wear so many different hats every day. Design, copyright, sales, marketing, production, lobbying, promotion, you name it. Love the variety. Dislike the chains of small business with limited capital (financial and personnel) to allow me to execute all of my crazy ideas. S P R I N G

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The Derelicts All of my ICON projects focus on the marriage between classic aesthetics and modern chassis engineering, with the goal of creating unique daily drivers. The Derelicts keep their vintage wabi- sabi patina’ed exteriors, with restored unique interiors, also hiding modern chassis, electrical, and power trains. Then add in a bit of art design with the trim and details, making each one a very unique expression. This one is a 1952 Chevy Deluxe Business Man’s Coupe. A Texas barn- find, with only 8,000 original miles. The Reformers are concours quality restorations, hiding modern chassis, electrical, and power trains. The client can pick almost any vehicle from the 1930 – 1970’s, then we have at it. Most recent is a 1952 Chevy Deluxe Business Man’s coupe. Last one was a 1952 Chrysler Town & Country wagon with a DeSoto front clip, on the cover of Hot Rod magazine last year. It also won the California Design Award from the Pasadena Art Center College of Design. Next is a 1939 Nash, a ‘63 Bentley drophead and a ‘67 Rolls.

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Your favorite tool or machine in your garage is? My plasma cutting pattern table and my 1940’s aircraft Rotex (turret head punch tool). How would friends and family describe you on a good day? (or a bad day?)
Focused, intent, even tempered. Impatient at times… monocular in focus to a fault sometimes as well. What do you drive on a daily basis? I am the ICON test driver, plus my 52′ Chrysler Derelict. your most overused phrase? Utility, utility, utility.

What do you do when you’re not building/ rebuilding trucks? Avid reader, mostly biographical. Occasional What’s next for icon?
Hopefully surfer. Build models and hang with my a wide enough reach to allow us to continue two sons. to stick to our core values and grow our company. I hope to always be able to do Favorite daily- use gadget you the one- off projects while expanding our own?
IPhone. Jonny Ive is a genius. production run models as well! Changed the world. Gadget or object that you’d like to own? About one hundred (more) watches.

www.icon4x4.com

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CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF P HO T OGR A P H S B Y WA R R E N VA N R E N S B UR G STYLED BY C A ND I C E L E E MOOR E

THE E-TYPE IS CONSIDERED THE MOST BEAUTIFUL CAR IN THE WORLD. WE TRACKED ONE DOWN, AND PHOTOGRAPHED IT ON THE ROOF OF HYDE PARK CORNER IN SCORCHING HEAT. by DES BROWN 5 0

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THE PLAN WAS SIMPLE. Place an E-type Jaguar onto the roof of a busy shopping centre and photograph it. Finding an actual example of the iconic British sports car - still in decent shape - was proving difficult, however. We chased several leads, from the rebuilt silver princess hiding away in a small countryside estate, to the sadly neglected once-proud old mare hidden under plastic sheeting in a Midrand warehouse. We finally tracked down this 1971 Jaguar E-type, owned by an enthusiast who uses it as a regular driver. This particular car has a patina that reflects its own personal life story – a fading legacy of glamour, power, fascination, and downright raw sex appeal. Unlike so many modern examples of bland, plasticized motoring pacifism, this car is made out of good old-fashioned metal, and makes a noise when you drive it. It smells of oil and rubber, and growls and purrs, delighting and disconcerting you all at once. Is this an attack, you wonder, or a seduction? 5 1

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The Jaguar E-Type is probably the only car I’ve seen that introduces a sense of centre-stage drama into even the most mundane situations. While watching it drive up the ramp of the car park, I felt a sense of helpless excitement, like a 007 extra waiting for Sean Connery to come running from the elevator brandishing a smoking Walther PPK in one hand and a secret formula in the other. In fact, I wouldn’t have been in the least bit surprised if a black helicopter appeared out of nowhere and hovered menacingly over us. I’m not sure how Philip, the car’s owner, deals with these awesome possibilities on a daily basis. He takes the car out on the bread and milk run every now and then, but I’m willing to bet that he probably has an impeccably pressed tuxedo in the boot, just in case. And then, of course, there’s that strictly enforced international law about not being allowed to photograph an E-Type without having an outrageously beautiful model in the picture. S P R I N G

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Didn’t know about it? Now you do. So, what is it? What sets the E-Type apart from any other car ever produced in England? In a word: rebellion. If you’re looking for the usual understated British dignity and stiff-upper-lip reserve, this is not the car to give it to you. This car is an exuberant love child born in the Swinging Sixties, conceived in a heady mix of aerodynamically precise design and breathtaking artistic recklessness. The E-type is considered to be the post-war icon of the British sportsters – and with good reason. Imagine, for a moment, what it must have been like to walk into a Jaguar garage in London more than half a century ago, a magical snapshot of elegant polished walnut and oiled leather and craftsmen wearing tweed caps – only to be confronted by a car that would forever change the way the world designed its street racing machines. This… was royalty. A muscular punk rocker prince who would provoke arousal and outrage in equal measure, and redefine modern motoring as we know it. When Frank Sinatra saw an E-Type for the first time in 1961, he was so astounded that he exclaimed: “I want that car, and I want it now!” 5 2

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I know exactly how he felt. Here was an achingly gorgeous sportster capable of reaching 150mph, yet offering more and costing less than its much-vaunted rivals, Aston Martin and Ferrari. Such was the impact it made, that when the legendary Enzo Ferrari himself saw it for

THIS CAR IS AN ARISTOCRATIC PUGILIST, LAUGHING IN THE FACE OF CONVENTION AND CARVING ITS PLACE IN HISTORY WITH THE EASE AND FEROCITY OF A WILD ANIMAL. the first time, he was momentarily dumbstruck, before turning to those around him, lifting an imperious finger, and declaring: “This… is the most beautiful car ever made.” And who am I to argue? The E-Type carries an aura that leaves you in no doubt as to its pedigree. It demands to be looked at, and is a 5 3

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masterpiece that deserves to be worshipped from every angle. Its skin is pulled taut over its gleaming flanks, like a thoroughbred racehorse, sleek muscles rippling beneath the liquid surface of the paintwork. Sliding behind the wheel of the E-Type is akin to the sensation a fighter pilot experiences when he gears up to break the sound barrier. This car is an aristocratic pugilist, laughing in the face of convention and carving its place in history with the ease and ferocity of a wild animal. In total, 72,000 of these beasts were built, and despite its apparent size, the E-Type is mechanically adept and extremely light on its feet. The star of the 1961 Geneva Salon, the Jaguar E-type redefined what a sports car should be, reducing all the other cars on the road at the time to crude and outdated non-competitors. The car featured in our shoot is owned by Philip Lochner, a retired telecoms engineer currently collecting, rebuilding and generally enjoying his collection of British motoring icons. Among them are an ‘80 Jaguar XJS, ‘86 Daimler Double 6, and more recently, a ‘74 Jensen Interceptor. “I already owned a V12 Jaguar XJS,” says Philip, “… and so the idea of owning the ultimate Jaguar V12 was born.” S P R I N G

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This is a 1971 Jaguar E-type (XKE) Series 3 OTS (Open top two seater) that he found in the online classifieds, for sale by a dairy farmer from George in the Western Cape. The car left the factory with black paint in 1971, but what happened in the intervening years has proven to be a mystery. Philip’s E-Type has undergone some mechanical tweaks to improve general performance in the modern world - partly planned maintenance, and partly the upkeep of a car of this vintage. “I converted the engine to fuel injection,” says Philip. “I just didn’t want to bother with those carbs. I added distributorless ignition, overhauled the engine, the front suspension, brakes, clutch, and added a low mass flywheel. I also replaced several bits of chrome and body rubbers, and repaired the rev counter.” The fuel injection, by the way, was done in such a way that one is able to reverse the process back to carburettor if desired, so as to return the car to its original specification. Our shoot took place on an unusually hot Friday in February, and by the time we kicked off, close to noon, the photographer and his team were already making concerned noises about the light being “too bright”. Of course, we’d planned on an early start, but, in the time-honoured 5 5

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THE BOND BREAKER Cubby Broccoli, producer of the first James Bond movie, Goldfinger, requested 3 E-types to appear in the film. Sir William Lyons refused to give up any of the coveted cars, as sales were brisk. Cubby then turned to his second choice, Aston Martin, and movie history was made.


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tradition of Bond and Bourne, there was bound to be a twist or two in the tale. The sun shimmered off the white paintwork, and once again, there was that sense of time slipping, as the mirage set in: we were sweating in a Casablancan souk while waiting for Monsieur Bond to make an action-packed appearance. Incredibly, Sofie, our Scandinavian model, was dealing with the African sun in the most professional way. As the team wilted, she kept her cool, not even breaking a sweat – even lying on the hot surface of the E-Type as if she were reclining casually on a bearskin somewhere in Norway. By comparison, as the temperature soared and the rooftop turned into an oven, the rest of our crew surreptitiously gulped at their Valpre water while desperately trying to look suave and manly. As the day drew to a close, and as one symbol of desire draped herself elegantly across the other, the photographer squinted through his viewfinder, then ran his hands through his hair and raised an astonished, satisfied eyebrow. PAGE 1 TOP - Z AR A; JACKE T - Z AR A; SHORTS - TOPSHOP PAGE 3 TOP - KLUK C D G T; S H O R T S - T O P S H O P ; S H O E S - E U R O P A P A G E 8 S U N G L A S S E S - M U I M U I

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“Perfect,” he murmured. “Perfect.” And he was right.

SHO T ON L OC AT I ON AT H Y DE PA R K C OR NE R

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TRANSCENDENT

PORSCHE NO LONGER CONSTRAINED TO 1960S TECHNOLOGY, DUTCHMANN EMBARKED ON A FULL REBUILD OF A CLASSIC PORSCHE 912, INTEGRATING CONTEMPORARY PORSCHE COMPONENTS INTO THE CLASSIC '68 SHELL. STORY SEAN O’TOOLE

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PHOTOGRAPHY GAVIN ROOKE

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THERE MUST BE A COLLECTIVE NOUN TO DESCRIBE A GROUP OF PORSCHES.

Rooke is doing to his 1968 model Porsche 912. In a nutshell: “My idea is to take a 1968 weekend racer Porsche, take out its motor, transmission and suspension, and update it with more contemporary components.” Unavoidably, his retrofitted German marque will go much faster. But that’s the least of the story. Porsche officially arrived in South Africa in 1955, seven years after the first 356 was certified for road use in Germany. This was around the same time local urban planner, Maurice Rotival, began work on designing the M1 suburban highway in Joburg. Porsche loves the open road. Luckily, Rooke lives a long drive north out of A gurgle? Maybe. In Gavin Rooke’s case it is Joburg, just off Malibongwe Drive. probably better to speak of a bonanza of Porsches. The five-berth garage on his Monaghan Farm Rooke, a Joburg-based adman and serial property houses two of his three Porsches: a very entrepreneur, currently owns three Porsches: a rare 1968 911S Targa, a kind of coupe with a soft shiny black one, a funny-looking blue one, and rear window, and his black and chrome 1971 911T. a 912 that represents everything its German “It is a full ground-up, classic restoration with creators didn’t foresee happening to their modest matching engine/chassis numbers,” says Rooke entry-level Porsche. proudly of the latter car. “The motor is a 2195cc In layman’s terms, to tune a car means to fiddle (2.2l) that produces 125 BHP. Not super fast in beneath the engine hood to make it go faster. contemporary terms, but a real pleasure to drive.” The word hardly captures the enormity of what Rooke bought the 912, originally launched in

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TIM ABBOT Porsche restoration and performance specialist, seen here with Gavin Rooke (right). 6 0

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1965 as a kind of poor man’s Porsche that was adopted by privateer rally enthusiasts, when he bought his 911. He shelved working on the 912 for three years. Rooke has been a busy guy.

ROOKE BELIEVES THAT HE MIGHT BE ABLE TO RECALIBRATE PERCEPTIONS OF THESE AUTO MECHANICS, ESPECIALLY AMONGST NON-PETROLHEADS. Aside from restoring the 911 and building an efficient concept home on stand 47 at Monaghan Farm, he sold his online marketing agency Trigger to British firm Isobar. What spare time remained he used to develop a variety of art and design projects. In 2007 Rooke opened an art gallery in Newtown. Fokofpolisiekar played live at the 6 1

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first opening. It was rad, to use a popular Rooke expression. At the time he told his options were either to open an art gallery or start a custom bike shop. He name-checked Deus ex Machina, Mambo creator Dare Jennings’s successful motorcycle business that followed on after his irreverent surf brand empire. For a while it seemed that the art business had won, Rooke building the career of Zander Blom and selling photographs by Roger Ballen and members of the Bang Bang Club. A regular exhibitor at the Joburg Art Fair, last year Rooke, originally a Pretoria boytjie, exhibited a series of one-off artist-painted 1975 Pipeline Guns shaped by the legendary surfboard-maker Spider Murphy. Something was shifting. Amongst the people Rooke invited to visit his display at the art fair was Tim Abbot, of Abbot Cars, a well-known restorer of early 911 and other classic Porsche models. “I met Tim Abbott through his dad, John, about 17 years ago,” explains Rooke. “I needed a specific part for an old Porsche 356 and I was referred to him. From there I realised that John and Tim do the best restoration work and ended up working with S P R I N G

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MIKE GULTIG The craftsman responsible for the manual reshaping of the original steel fenders

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them on my first 911, the black one.” You’d think a Joburg grease monkey, even one that works on Porsches, might feel a bit squeamish about an art fair. Not so. “He came along with his wife and really enjoyed it,” says Rooke, whose first rebuild was a 1974 VW Beetle at age 19. Rooke’s intentions in getting Abbot to the fair were unrelated to his current Porsche project. At the time, Rooke was assessing the feasibility of producing a line of handmade bicycles by local craftsmen for inclusion in his Dutchmann project. This entrepreneurial initiative fosters craft-based collaboration and exchange between contemporary designers or artists, and a master craftsman. Like surfing and the automotive industry, South Africa once had a thriving bicycle-building scene. “I wanted to tap into the early 1980s thang we had going,” elaborates Rooke. “Tim is an exSpringbok track cyclist, an Olympian contender no less, and knows Duncan Macintyre very well. Duncan built all of Tim’s bikes, as well as all the bikes for the major South African brands in the early 1980s. I pursued Duncan through Tim for a S P R I N G

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ANTON DEKKER Composite specialist, responsible for the bespoke moulded engine shroud and carbon air filter covers.

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long time, but in the end the economics could not work out as all his jigs and tools had been sold.” This history is not incidental to the 912 rebuild. The conversations with Tim Abbot prompted Rooke to think of the rebuild as more than just some hobbyist exercise. Like his

AS THINGS BECOME INFINITELY MORE ACCESSIBLE THERE IS A RETURN TO THINGS THAT ARE NOT ACCESSIBLE. surfboard project, which repositioned Spider Murphy as a design icon, Rooke wants to shine a light on the small but highly accomplished community of craftsmen who can flare a wheel arch, stitch leather upholstery and work with carbon-fibre. Dotted across Gauteng, Rooke believes that, given an appropriate platform to showcase their skills, he might be able to recalibrate perceptions 6 4

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of these auto mechanics, especially amongst nonpetrolheads. Of course, a lot will depend on what emerges from the rebuild project. Some vital statistics might help with the armchair judging. The original 1580cc 4-cylinder engine has been replaced with a 6-cylinder 1974 2.7 fuelinjected Porsche 911 engine that has been modified to produce over 220 horsepower. “We’re aiming for 240,” says Rooke. “This process involves replacing key parts with contemporary components and a range of handwork by a range of craftsmen.” For example, the casing has been flowed to allow the free movement of air, which increases the horsepower. The pistons and barrels have been resized – the car is effectively now a 2.8 litre. The compression ratio has also been increased. The camshafts have been modified to allow the engine to breathe better. A separate oil cooler has been fitted to keep the engine oil cool. The suspension, gearbox and brakes have also been tweaked. “The end result is a car that weighs just under 1000kgs with over 220 horsepower,” says Rooke, whose father was a bona fide rocket scientist at S P R I N G

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DAVID CORLETT Automotive upholstery specialist

the CSIR. (Long ago, Papa Rooke worked with his son on restoring a Series III Land Rover, Triumph Spitfire and Alfa Romeo Guilia 2000.) Aside from online documentation of the 912 Weekend Racer project in the Dutchmann website, the finished car will be seen in the line up at the Kalahari Speed Week. He is still in two minds about how fast to drive the pimped car down the 7km clay race strip at Hakskeenpan, north of Upington. “The car is fucking expensive to do.” Why get unnecessary dust on it. The rebuild project is complemented by a series of ten specially designed posters in a collector’s portfolio. Modelled after similar customer-only portfolios created by Porsche, this side project was supervised by Durban designer Warwick Kay. He invited contributions by a variety of well-known and emerging graphic designers, including Richard Hart and Brandt Botes. Unlike Porsche, which used the posters to market its vehicles, Rooke isn’t selling anything other than the date of the Kalahari Speed Week in the posters. This is an important point. “Our primary objective is not selling cars,” he states 6 5

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The Weekend Racer 912 at the Kalahari Speed Week, September 2013.

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emphatically. Nor, for that matter, is his website simply a sophisticated way of blogging about his hobby. “We are not documenting the nut-and-bolt restoration process for the 912,” says Rooke.

SOUTH AFRICANS OF ALL STRIPES ARE PERCEIVED AS MINEWORKERS ABROAD, LOWLY WORKING CLASS STIFFS. “I don’t feel we have anything to add, and I don’t want this project to fall into pure anorak territory. If you take a look at the likes of Singer Porsche or Deus ex Machina, they focus on the end-result but provide an appreciation for the process. That’s what I’m aiming for.” That, and the reconnection of function and artistry. It is a worthwhile cause to be fighting. South Africans of all stripes are perceived 6 7

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as mineworkers abroad, lowly working class stiffs unskilled in the process of beneficiation. It may be true in broad strokes, but it is an economic generalisation that overlooks the fact that this country had, and still has some very accomplished artisans and craftsmen. Rooke purposefully defines Dutchmann as a craft collective. Think of it as a kind of digitally enabled guild. “It may appear self-conscious but it is not that,” says Rooke in a rare demure moment. “As a marketing guy, I want and need to get very close to what it means to conceptualise and produce something.” Rethinking a car almost from scratch, using men skilled in ways that are becoming increasingly rare and arcane, represents one way of doing that. “We are getting to a time where there is a growing appreciation of, and value attached to things that are not accessible. As things become infinitely more accessible, there is a return to or push back to things that are not accessible.” Things like one-off surfboards and a potentially really fast Porsche minus its old Marie Biscuit wheels. S P R I N G

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On the last Friday of every month, a motley peloton invades the inner city of Johannesburg as part of a global movement that now includes over 300 cities globally.

Photography by Warren van Rensburg


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Part protest and part celebration, the intention is to create an awareness of bicycles as an alternative and sustainable form of transport.

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The event originated in 1992 in San Francisco, and is now a worldwide phenomenon.

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Click here to find a ride in your city.

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THE ROCKABILLY OF RACING IS LIVING A LIFE INSPIRED BY STEVE MCQUEEN. by TREVOR VAN DEN VEN

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photos JASON BRONKHORST

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1985 South African Grand Prix at Kyalami was mired in controversy. Many nations had begun boycotting South African sporting events, and Formula 1 was not immune. Apartheid and racial segregation was the cause, yet despite this, on Saturday 19 October 1985, the Grand Prix went ahead - minus the French teams and some drivers. It would be one of the last to take place on South African soil. In the stands that day stood a little boy. Oblivious to politics, he stood hand in hand with his father. The race cars snaked around the track, exhausts screaming, the sun’s rays beating down on the mesmerized spectators. Formula 1 cars in 1985 were at the pinnacle of 7 6

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automotive engineering. The 1.5 turbocharged engines were the most powerful they have ever been, and still remain so. The small boy was there to watch the duel – man versus machine – in the fifteenth and penultimate race of the 1985 season, a season that was regarded by many to be one of the best and most exciting Formula 1 seasons of all time. Nelson Piquet, the boy’s hero, qualified second in his Brabham-BMW. Starting on the front row of the grid, Piquet even had a good chance of winning.

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n the crowd, the boy waved excitedly every time the Brabham-BMW passed him. Like most kids, he was thrilled to see a great sporting hero. In his mind, his personal gesture of encouragement - however small his hands were - was spurring Piquet on, giving him that extra motivation to finish first. Piquet retired after six laps. As he coasted around the track, victory as far from him as famous motoring life was away from a small boy, Piquet raised his hand out of S P R I N G

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Tom’s Ford Mustang GT350R is finished in the standard Shelby Mustang colours of Wimbledon White with two Guardsman Blue stripes.

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the tight cramped cockpit, motioning for cars to pass. “He waved at me!” the boy said excitedly. “Yes my boy, he is. He’s waving at you. Wave back!” his dad said, instead of correcting him. It is moments like this that shape our adult hood. Tom Falkiner, motoring writer for Sunday

HE WANTED TO BE LIKE PIQUET, AND HE WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH THAT HIS GODFATHER WAS ABLE TO MAKE THAT DREAM REAL.

The 1968 Steve McQueen cult classic, Bullitt, screened that night, and Tom was transfixed. His godfather, a never-married single businessman, was a generous man with a healthy bank account. Not only had he promised – and given – him his 1989 Volkswagen GTi 16V upon passing his driver’s license, but seeing Tom’s appreciation for American muscle cars decided that he would buy a 1968 Ford Mustang. Nearly two. The idea was to turn it into a weekend cruiser come track-day racer, quick but not hardcore.

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even years later, and a complete change of brief, the ‘Stang was ready – a completely gutted, rebuilt from the ground up, dedicated track weapon. And Tom’s name was painted on the driver’s door. Was it the right thing? He’d been a car fanatic from a young age, but his love was music. “I’ve always loved music, perhaps even more than cars sometimes,” he recounts. “I was a drummer in a band; I studied Times and author of The Wheel Deal blog, was copy writing at AAA and deejayed for most of preparing to ride the 94.7 Cycle Challenge in my high school and varsity years. At times wish 2001. He’d stayed at his godfather’s house a I’d stuck it out.” He chuckles, takes a sip of his couple of crank revolutions away from the start line the night before the race; a chance happening Peroni and says: “It may even have paid better.” That’s because Tom is not your average car that would change his life.

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THE ‘STANG WAS READY: COMPLETELY GUTTED, REBUILT FROM THE GROUND UP, A DEDICATED TRACK WEAPON. WAS IT THE RIGHT THING? geek. He knows his stuff and can handle the Mustang around a track. But he enjoys some of the finer things in life too: single speed bicycles, old cars from the 70’s and 80’s and he has a unique style. It’s not Oakley wraparound glasses, sponsor lades overalls and Puma driving shoes that you’ll find Tom in. Rather a grass cowboy hat, Ray Ban Aviators or retro Oakley Frogskins. He’s a reluctant celebrity in the classic car racing world. His Mustang has a loyal following of trueblue Ford fans, but lately he’s been enjoying the anonymity of the drive behind the wheel 8 0

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of a 1978 Mercedes Benz W123 with nearly 800 000kms on the clock. “It’s a fun car,” he tells me. “And part of the inconspicuousness of a beige granddad-spec Merc, what you see is what you get; an 800 000km Mercedes that probably carried its previous owner to work and church for 25-odd years. It’s the urban zombie that the junkyard couldn’t claim.” The track is Tom’s church and he’s brought this down and out old geriatric back to the parish.

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e loves that narrative, always trawling Gumtree for an old unwanted car, a vintage bicycle or toy. There is life in these old things, and they should not be cast out to rot away on a heap unless there is genuinely no hope. As Tom cheered Piquet on back in 1985, he hoped that he would win. His hero, was wounded at Kyalami, his weapon useless. The Frenchman, Alain Prost had wrapped up the championship the race prior. But Tom had hope and that hope had made him a ‘car guy’ for the rest of his life. Bullitt was just the next step. He wanted to be like Piquet, and he was fortunate enough that his godfather made that dream real: real enough to give up on music. S P R I N G

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UP, UP & ONLY UP ON A SOLO BICYCLE TOUR OF JAPAN, SEAN O' TOOLE GETS LOST IN TRANSLATION.

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“WHERE ARE YOU GOING?” asked the 72-year-old man in Japanese, his overburdened touring bicycle parked between his sturdy legs. For a moment I just stared at him. His enquiring smile was a crowded platform of white that a dentist had once failingly tried to correct with gold wire. It was as disorientating as peak hour at Shinjuku station in Tokyo. I smiled back, revealing my own crooked Anglo-Irish ancestry, as disordered as Park Station at five o’clock on a Friday afternoon. “Friends,” I offered. Actually, it was Mount Fuji, but I’m getting ahead of myself. Flying into Osaka the day before, I had decided on a whim to take a highway bus to Takamatsu, a busy port city on the northern tip of Shikoku, the smallest of Japan’s four main islands. From there I would work my way east, first to nearby Tokushima, a docile provincial city 8 2

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where I had lived for two years, then up the Pacific coastline to the mountain whose image appears on the rear of Japan’s ¥1000 note. By car, 625km, give or take, and not all that much more if you opt to skip the overpriced toll roads. But I was on a bicycle. Cycling is ubiquitous in Japan. Gangs of adolescents ride two or three abreast on wide, cycle-friendly pavements to and from school. Mom will nip off to the grocer on a bicycle. Even Dad in his smoke-coloured suit will have one parked somewhere near the main station. Nothing embellished, just some thin-wheeled urban commuter bike with a basket bolted onto the front and the possibility of three gear settings to negotiate any gradients. Known as mamacharis, these utilitarian runabouts rule the roads. Don’t underestimate their strength.

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“SHIKOKU HAS ALWAYS BEEN ASSOCIATED WITH A SLOWER PACE OF LIFE, A FACT TAPPED INTO BY HARUKI MURAKAMI, WHO SET MUCH OF THE ACTION IN HIS 2002 NOVEL KAFKA ON THE SHORE ON THIS ISLAND.” 8 3

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n 2006, when I cycled 1800km around Shikoku, following a thousand-year-old Buddhist pilgrimage route, I met a university student who had pedalled nearly 2000km on a mamachari, from Hokkaido in the north to Takamatsu. A few kilometres later I met another cyclist, a man in his late fifties. He wore black Raybans and an orange cotton T-shirt. “Where are you headed?” I asked at a traffic intersection. “Wherever,” he replied, cool as a cucumber under the hot August sun. The light turned green. Off he went. He made homelessness look like a philosophy rather than a circumstance. Shikoku has always been associated with a slower pace of life, a fact tapped into by Haruki Murakami, who set much of the action in his 2002 novel Kafka on the Shore on this island. At

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one point the novel, the action heads south, to Kochi, the surf and sake paradise on the southern end of the island. It was where the old man with the crowded smile was from. Standing on the side of Route 3, we chatted some more. I summoned words I thought I had forgotten. Mount Yahazu loomed behind us. He pointed to his tent. It was his home away from home. A couple of days later, having cycled up to a mountain-top temple near Tokushima, also to a sad example of a swimming beach on a peninsula in Mie Prefecture, I was on TaharaToyohashi cycling road. This dedicated cycling lane in central Japan follows the contours of the main island Honshu’s Pacific coastline. It is scenic, within measure: everywhere there are concrete bollards. Brand new tsunami evacuation signs clarified the Japanese will to tame, even surpass the ravages of nature.

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LANDSLIDE. CYCLING BACK THE WAY I HAD COME, I SAW THE WARNING SIGNS. THEY WERE ALL IN JAPANESE.

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ot all Japan’s road signs speak in Japanese and English. In Shizuoka Prefecture I cycled 30km up Route 60 into the start of the highlands, where green tea bushes are harvested with semi-circular mowers, only to find the road shut near the top. Landslide. Cycling back the way I had come, I saw the warning signs. They were all in Japanese. These sorts of hazards, if you will, are commonplace. The day before, I had diligently stuck to Route 150, a bland coastal road between Hamamatsu to Shizuoka, only to be frustrated by a tunnel 10km from my destination. The graphic on the road sign was emphatic: no bicycles. Tired, morose, headstrong, I decided to take the first road that looked like it went over the mountain the tunnel burrowed through. An hour later, a few hundred metres

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of climbing, a sinking feeling: I was freewheeling back down to where I had started. A friendly mechanic – he hottedup classic Datsuns and occasionally worked contract on long-range fishing boats – drew a neat map showing me the way around the mountain. Often, though, there is no avoiding the mountain road. Japan is an island state composed mostly of stony outcrops. Mountain is one of the first pictographs you learn when studying the language. (It looks like Neptune’s fork, sort of.) Foremost amongst the many peaks that define Japan is Mount Fuji. It is the apogee, the tallest one, the big dude, the shy queen. Officially, climbing season starts in July and ends in August. During these two months visitors stream to the sacred mountain, standing queue near the summit to see the morning sun.

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“THERE WAS NO APPLAUSE WHEN I REACHED THE TOP, THOROUGHLY SOAKED, CHILLED TO THE BONE. BUT I HAD DONE IT. FOOLISHNESS HAS ITS REWARDS.”

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ituals and customs develop for a reason. Arriving in early June, I caught only glimpses of Fuji: thick clouds persistently shrouded the storied mountain. Perfect weather, however, for attempting the Mount Fuji Hill Climb. This annual road race starts in the town of Kawauchiko and follows the 25km asphalt road up to Fuji’s fifth station, the highest point of vehicular access before everything reverts to foot. I missed the race by a week, but not the climb. The cycle up to Fuji’s fifth station pierces through the Aokigahara forest, also known as the Sea of Trees and Suicide Forest, both for very factual reasons. The climb is unrelenting, a little over double the distance of our own Mast Challenge. The gradients are pretty much the same. The road simply goes up, and only up. Starting at just

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below 1000 metres above sea level, it climbs to 2305 metres, basically from fingerless mitt to winter glove conditions. A day before undertaking the threehour ride up I visited a local tourist office. “Is it possible to cycle up to the fifth station?” I asked. “No!” “But what about the cyclists I saw?” (I had earlier reconnoitred the mountain by bus.) “They are foolish people!” Funny how stern words can be a spur to action: the next morning, the sky sneezing and threatening, I repeated the idiocy of cycling uphill, for pleasure. There was no applause when I reached the top, thoroughly soaked, chilled to the bone. But I had done it. Foolishness has its rewards.

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P R ODUC T S

C OMP I L E D B Y T R A F F I C M A G A Z I NE

SPRING GEAR

Vespa Chair

Spring is here and whether you’re an early Christmas shopper or like to sit back and open a bottled beverage in style, there will be something here that’ll make your life a bit easier

The Vespa Seat is made from original pieces of the legendary Piaggio Scooter. From the front part we created a unique and original model of rotating chair. It is a really comfortable and ergonomic chair leather upholstered. From €1470 Click here to buy online

Turbo Flyer - Classic Black Woooosh! Weeee! Turbo Flyer soars! Get your hands on all four vivid colors of these fun, easy-to-build and collectable balsa model kits for ages 10 and up. This plane is an all-new spin on

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a childhood classic, with spruced-up design and packaging. In field tests, Turbo Flyer has soared for 50 feet. Made in the USA $15.00 - Click here to buy online

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C OMP I L E D B Y T R A F F I C M A G A Z I NE

Alpha Longboard - Local Legend series: Nelson Mandela

MO-TO: Modern Vintage Toy Cars

Legends include Desmond Tutu, Ghandi, Miriam Makeba, Imam Haron and Ashley Kriel. It’s a handcrafted board with a handcut multilayer stencil, painted using spraypaint. All art by Kent Lingeveldt

Heirloom wood toy cars, inspired by mid-century American design and car culture. The dense beechwood gives it unexpected heft, making for highly realistic play scenarios. The water-based paints and clear urethane are safe and environmentally conscious.

R1,700 Click here to buy online

Click here to buy online

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Leatherman Brewzer The only keychain bottle opener you’ll ever need. The multi-purpose flat tip also acts as a mini pry tool. Made from high-grade, heat-treated stainless steel, the Brewzer fits perfectly on your keychain split ring (through the beer-bottle-shaped hole) or in your pocket. RRP - R165

Haynes Workshop Manuals

Audi Quattro Wallpaper

Motorbooks from R455

The design is the work of digital artist and racing professional Cale Funderburk. For a sneak preview you can click below to visit his online store and check out his other fantastic posters.

Click here to buy online

$22.00 - Click here to buy online

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H A NG I NG OU T

EMILE KOTZE

S&H CUSTOM CYCLES BASED AT HUNTER CYCLING IN JOHANNESBURG, THIS NEW CUSTOM BICYCLE SHOP FOCUSSES ON CLASSIC ROAD, CUSTOM SINGLE SPEED, FIXED GEAR AND CYCLOCROSS BICYCLES. TRAFFIC DROPPED BY FOR A BEER.

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WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST BIKE? The first bicycle I can remember is my Redline BMX. It was red with the matching top tube and stem covers. After that I had quite a few different off-road and racing bicycles. HOW DID YOU GET TO KNOW YOUR WAY AROUND A BIKE? My dad taught me everything I know about bicycles. We rarely took our bicycles in for servicing or repairs. We just did it ourselves.

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My first proper racing cycle was also one of the first bicycles I had a hand in restoring. It was an Alpina in Reynolds 531 steel with Shimano 105 components. We stripped the whole bicycle and had the frame painted canary yellow. It was awesome! WHICH BIKE DID YOU BUILD UP FIRST? About 3 years ago I saw all these custom steel bicycles being built overseas, and wondered if anybody was still building steel frames locally. I

found that some of the old frame builders were still around, but not really building anymore. Frame building is an expensive and time consuming endeavor that takes many years to master. I decided to go the restoration route and found an old steel ladies frame in my dad’s garage. I then had it powder coated, polished up some of the bits, assembled everything and gave it to my girlfriend. They say you never forget how to ride a bicycle, but it seems you never forget how to work with them either.

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YOU MOVED TO CAPE TOWN, BUT RECENTLY RETURNED TO JOBURG - WHY IS THAT? The main reason for the move to Cape Town was to get the Starling & Hero Bicycle Cafe going with my high school friend and business partner. Coffee and bicycles ... it works well, but the plan was always to open a custom bicycle shop/workshop in good ol’ Jozi. I really enjoy Jhb; it has a diverse energy which is great to live and work in. I joined the guys at Hunter Cycling in Braamfontein a few months ago. I think together we’ve created something super awesome, with the “alternative” bike shop, clubhouse and workshop. DO YOU CONSIDER JHB AS BIKE FRIENDLY AS CAPE TOWN? It’s probably not as bike friendly yet, but I know that some changes are on the way. Jhb is very different from CT and I don’t think the two should be compared or weighed up against each other. However, bicycle infrastructure in Jozi needs a lot of attention though.

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WHO IN THE INDUSTRY INSPIRES YOU? So many individuals; it’s constantly changing. I recently discovered Sizemore Bicycles; beautiful hand-built frames and bicycles. What Taylor Sizemore is doing seems exactly like something I could do every day. I really like his raw style. FAVOURITE PLACE TO RIDE? I enjoy the leafy streets of Parktown/ Parkview area, but Jhb city is good fun as well, especially at night. In Cape Town, I really dig the MyCiti bike lane out to Blouberg on a sunny Sunday. YOUR ULTIMATE BUILD? Anything for the queen (and she has to ride it to the pub for a pint with the lads). FAVOURITE BAR IN JHB? My kitchen. FUTURE PLANS FOR S&H CUSTOM? Definitely more cyclocross builds and riding.

HUNTER CYCLING, 70 JUTA STREET, BRAAMFONTEIN, JOHANNESBURG Closed on Sunday and Monday What’s on offer: Classic road, custom single speed, fixed gear and cyclocross bicycles. We also do custom SS 29ers and every now and again we have some Fat Bikes. The shop also has a variety of classic new old stock, used and fixed gear/single speed bicycles, bicycle parts and accessories. Hunter Cycling

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1967 VALANT 100

UNO DE WAAL UNO IS AN ONLINE PUBLISHER AND ENTREPRENEUR FROM JOBURG. OTHER THAN A MOTORCYCLE, THE VALIANT SERVES AS HIS DAILY DRIVE. WE ARRIVED EARLY AT 44 STANLEY IN MILPARK AND WENT ON A SLOW CRUISE AROUND THE NEIGHBOURHOOD. BETWEEN NEARLY GETTING SIDE SWIPED BY AN AUDI CABRIOLET AND RUNNING OUT OF PETROL IN A DARK ALLEY, WE HAD TIME FOR A FEW QUESTIONS. photography WARREN VAN RENSBURG

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E LOVE THIS CAR. TELL US A BIT ABOUT IT. I don’t know too much about the motor, but it’s big and powerful, it’s a straight 6. The fuel gauge also doesn’t really work and since it has a leak on the fuel line I haven’t been able to measure the consumption properly. It’s also calibrated in miles so that makes math difficult. The fuel pump has a clicker on it though, so whenever I get low on fuel the clicker goes off and I know to fill up. It uses lead replacement fuel, which isn’t that widely available so I’ve had a couple of close calls driving around hunting for LRP. In the old days, these cars were used as taxis, so they’re part of our history. Everyone can relate to this car, we all have a connection to it. It definitely gets the attention of people wherever I go and I get an offer to buy it almost daily.

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IT DEFINITELY GETS THE ATTENTION OF PEOPLE WHEREVER I GO. I GET AN OFFER TO BUY IT ALMOST DAILY. HOW MUCH DID YOU PAY FOR IT? I got it as a birthday gift from my dad who paid R20 000 for it. He bought it from a priest in Cape Town, who used it to church and back (as the story goes). We then spent R5000 on the interior, and probably another 5 grand maintaining it for the last few years between services. His theory was that it’s cheaper to pay for petrol on an awesome old car than payments on crappy new one. It hasn’t exactly panned out that cheap, but I’m still happy with the decision. A brand new R100,000 Nissan Micra wouldn’t have given me nearly as much happiness as the Valiant.

WHO SERVICES THE CAR? When I was in Cape Town, Rael from Mendel motors, but I now

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service it at Crusty’s Workshop in Fietas. Crusty’s is also a biker clubhouse, with a mechanic workshop in the front. I still want to end up having a beer back there. I don’t really put strain on the car though; I normally get around on my bike to save time and I escape traffic. WHAT’S THE DRIVE LIKE? IS IT A BIT SLUGGISH? Not really. For a car this big, she’s not that slow at all but what I love about it is that you don’t go anywhere fast. You just lean back in the big leather bench seat and take it easy to your destination. Once the car’s warmed up it’s a really nice, smooth ride. It’s also great because you nearly never drive alone. There’s always someone keen to catch a lift with you. Even though it takes a bit longer you have company. THE BRAKES AREN’T SO GREAT... Yeah, and they used to lock up every now and then. I was living in Cape Town, and my neighbor at the time had an old Corvette. So one day I was coming down High Level Road and he was in front of me. He pulled up at the stop street and as I hit the brakes the car just skidded, all the way down the hill – I must have missed that Corvette by half a metre.

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OLDER CARS AND BIKES ARE MECHANICAL,AND YOU CAN FIX THEM YOURSELF. MODERN CARS ARE BASICALLY APPLIANCES. WHAT’S THE LONGEST TRIP YOU’VE DONE? I used to commute between Cape Town and Stellenbosch while finishing up my studies. I don’t want to take it on any longer journeys than that as it does have a bit of a wobble between 80 and a 100, and after a few hundred kays something might rattle or burn off. I prefer to do long trips on my motorbike so when I moved to Joburg I had it shipped up by train. It was a pretty good sight to see it getting off the carriage and start it up again. WHY DO YOU THINK THERE’S THIS RENEWED INTEREST IN OLD CARS LATELY? Cars and bikes are mechanical, and you can fix it yourself. All these new cars are basically appliances. Old cars have soul, nuances and

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annoying bits but you end up loving them because of it. For a period the car used to cut out when I turned left over a small incline. When I had that fixed I sort of missed it. ARE YOU LOOKING AT RESTORING IT ONE DAY? WILL YOU EVER GET RID OF IT? I’d like to restore it, and I’ll definitely hold onto it. I had the two cars up until March. The other was a Jeep XJ and I had to make a decision to sell one of them. I picked to sell the Jeep as the Valiant is a car you can’t really buy again, not in this condition anyway. And the value increases every year and so does your happiness when you drive it. I’ll fix the slip in the gearbox, and I wouldn’t mind getting the wheels sorted out – the hubcaps come off when I go around corners. And a sound system. I need a proper sound system.

VISIT BETWEEN 10 AND 5

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FA S H I ON

THE FACE OF JIMMY CHOO

KIDMAN + SL A sultry Nicole Kidman stars in the Jimmy Choo Autumn Winter 2013 campaign. The campaign video explores the film noir genre and references the tension of Hitchcock’s empowered heroines to convey the feminine power, luxury, and sexiness evoked by the collection. Nicole’s co-star is the gorgeous Mercedes Benz SL (R107), an incredibly popular open top roadster - well over a quarter-million of them were made between 1971 and 1989. The ride of choice for professionals of the 70s and 80s, the R107 is still an upper-class car.

CLICK TO PLAY THE TRAILER.

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G A R A G I S T E : W H AT ’ S HE B U I L D I NG I N T HE R E ?

NIK EVELEIGH is

THE HOME BREWER ORIGINALLY USED TO DESCRIBE SMALL-SCALE WINE MAKERS IN BORDEAUX, FRANCE, WE DECIDED ‘GARAGISTE’ WOULD MAKE A NICE TITLE FOR OUR COLUMN EXPLORING ALTERNATIVE USES FOR THE SUBURBAN GARAGE.

KEEP ON BUSSIN’ photography TANDOR EVELEIGH

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PPROACHING twenty five years ago I learned to drive in my mum’s Datsun Cherry. This vision of oldgold yellow and rust remained long enough for me to prang it trying to speed-reverse on to my driveway as only teenagers can before it was replaced by a brand new Peugeot 205 which was red, nippy and with a wheel base small enough that it was liable to fall over in a strong breeze. The first car I owned was an old school mini 1000 with a dinky little racing wheel so it could masquerade as a 1275. I vowed that if I ever drove another car it would be a 1275 painted brown so that I could rebel against the plethora of red-hot and white-hot stickers on other minis with my own shit-hot version. In reality the hot was removed but the shit remained. Highlights were an old two litre Rover the size of a small hamlet with the turning circle of Jupiter and a 1.5l turbo diesel Vauxhall Astra

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I’M NOT THE FIRST TO STATE THAT YEAST EATS SUGAR, CRAPS ALCOHOL AND FARTS CO2 BUT IT’S THE CLEAREST AND MOST CONCISE DESCRIPTION OUT THERE.

which married bodywork with a life expectancy of a decade with an engine that is probably still turning over somewhere. This inexorably led to two inescapable outcomes – we are now a two Honda family, and my garage is a place for ABC (Anything But Carstuff). Fortunately my long suffering wife has accepted my general vehicular uselessness and bought me a bucket with a tap along with a bunch of other exciting implements and hey presto a home/garage brewer was born. My current all-grain brewing setup is of the most basic variety. Water gets heated in a very large aluminium pot to about 75 degrees C. This strike water gets poured over a whole heap of malted barley sitting in a mash tun (in my case a pimped cooler box fitted with braided supply hose as a filter and a tap). After an hour of sitting around in hot water getting all malty sweet (the barley grains, not me)

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the first runnings of fledgling beer or wort is drained from the mash tun. The grain bed is then rinsed or sparged with more hot water which is also drained. Our trusty aluminium pot reinvents itself as a brew kettle and the wort is boiled for an hour during which time hops are added at various intervals for style-appropriate bitterness, flavour and aroma (longer boil adds bitterness, shorter boil adds aroma). The wort is then cooled as quickly as possible (quick cooling = clearer beer) to around 20 degrees C. I use a rather nifty immersion chiller designed and built by a 4x4 enthusiast and beer-nut. All that remains is to dump the whole lot in to a plastic fermenter, top it up with cold water, throw in some yeast and leave it to do its thing. I generally ferment in one step and so when fermentation ends (varies depending on style, temperature and yeast – a hydrometer to measure specific gravity is my trusted advisor of readiness) I mix in a sugar solution to allow the beer to carbonate and bottle-condition, bottle

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and then leave it for a few weeks in a dark place‌ a garage for example. After that I save it for a rainy breakdown day when I can use it to bribe people who know stuff about cars. NIK WRITES ABOUT OTHER THINGS TOO. CLICK HERE.

FIELD NOTES Like malt, hops can be used in wildly differing quantities and varietals depending on style. My English Special Bitter uses floral and earthy Fuggles and East Kent Goldings to give a balanced fruity bitterness. By contrast my Early Bird IPA (I started making it at 6am) used clean high acidity Magnum for a bitter backbone followed by copious amounts of Cascade throughout the boil and even in the fermenter for a huge floral, grapefruit hit on the nose.


ROAD TRIP USA

BUDDY MOVIE

KEEP ON BUSSIN’ CIRCLE THE WAGEN is a feature-length buddy/roadtrip/docudramedy that follows Dave, an idealistic adventurer and automotive ne’er-do-well, and his convivial co-pilot Charlie - on their journey down Route 66 in a baby blue 1972 VW bus. Through mishaps and murals, gasoline baths and breakdowns, the two discover a teeming underground of vintage VW diehards willing to help save “The Croc” from the scrap heap and rally her beleaguered owner on to

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HE NAMED HIS “DREAM CAR” CROCODILE ROCKFORD JOBS, AFTER THE SONG THAT WAS PLAYING THE MOMENT HE WON THE EBAY AUCTION.


ROAD TRIP USA

California. Crocodile Rockford Jobs — or “the Croc,” as it’s affectionately known — is a 1972 Volkswagen Transporter Deluxe. After spending its entire life suffering through one harsh midwest winter after another, resulting in significant rust damage around its bottom edges, the bus was put up for sale on eBay by its second owner in November 2006. This is where the Croc was discovered by Dave Torstenson. He found the listing for the bus, and—impressed with the owner’s thorough notes and 100% user rating— placed a bid for $787 in the closing seconds of the auction. As fate would have it, he won. He named his “dream car” Crocodile Rockford Jobs, after the song that was playing the moment he won the eBay auction (Elton John’s “Crocodile Rock”), and in honor of Steve Jobs, founder of Apple Computer, who purportedly sold his VW Bus in 1976 to finance the first Apple computer. Ironically Dave was working for Apple at the time, and sold Apple computers to buy his first VW Bus.

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CLICK HERE TO READ OUR EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

CLICK TO PLAY THE TRAILER.


DR I V E I N

WINNING FORMULA

RUSH

RUSH is a spectacular big-screen re-creation of the legendary 1970s Formula 1 rivalry between gifted English playboy James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth of The Avengers, Thor) and his disciplined Austrian opponent, Niki Lauda (Daniel Br端hl of Inglourious Basterds, The Bourne Ultimatum). Set against the sexy and glamorous golden age of racing, the movie portrays the exhilarating true story of two of the greatest rivals the world of sports has ever witnessed. There are some nice old cars in too, for the anoraks among us. Look out for a chocolate brown Peugeot 405 and driver in matching chocolate brown suit. IN THEATRES: Friday 4th October. RUSH WEBSITE

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T HE R O A D T O HE L L

W R I T T E N B Y R I C K DE L A R AY

A music column dedicated to the soundtrack of the daily commute.

AUDI QUATTRO 1980 LETS

get one thing straight: I don’t know shit about the inner workings of an automobile. I can pump the wheels, and I can check the oil, but that is the extent of my skills. I am however a fan of the classics. The shape, the sound, and the interior is more my thing. When you throw performance out of the window, it all comes down to how good you look in the chosen vehicle and which soundtrack you have compiled to help you reach your particular destination. I would also like to point out that I do

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“ Hallogallo” NEU! – NEU! (1971)

All hail the founding fathers of Krautrock ! NEU! was a German band formed by Klaus Dinger and Michael Rother after their split from Kraftwerk in the early 1970s. Though the band had minimal commercial success during its existence, the list of bands that they influenced stretches six miles long. Like the Audi Quattro, this track was the first one to pop into my mind, and without a doubt,

a true expression of precision and persistence. If you own this car, I would recommend that you play this every time you turn the ignition on. It’s a two-door, which means there is no room for Hans, Otto, Gustav or Helmuth when you hit the town. The passenger seat always remains open because there is no way you are going home alone driving a vehicle like this.

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T HE R O A D T O HE L L

sometimes see myself as somewhat of a connoisseur of B sides, rarities and dodgy bars with all the trimmings. In the first article of ROAD TO HELL, I have chosen the AUDI QUATTRO. The Audi Quattro is a road and rally car, produced by the German automobile manufacturer Audi. It was first shown at the Geneva Motor Show in 1980. This fucker was fast and the word quattro is derived from the Italian word for “four”. The name has also been used by Audi to refer to the quattro fourwheel-drive system, or any four-wheeldrive version of an Audi model. It was the first rally car to take advantage of the then-recently changed rules which allowed the use of four-wheel drive in competition racing. And, of course, it won competition after competition for the next two years. The idea for a high-performance fourwheel-drive car was proposed by Audi’s chassis engineer, Jörg Bensinger, in 1977, when he found that the Volkswagen Type 183 could outperform any other vehicle in snow, no matter how powerful. This made

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“Oh Yeah” Tago Mago – CAN (1971)

Founded and formed in Cologne, West Germany, in 1968. They constructed their music largely through collective spontaneous composition. The band differentiated from improvisation in the jazz sense, sampling themselves in the studio and editing down the

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results. That alongside the haunting vocals of a Japanese busker Kenji “Damo” Suzuki and you have the definitive sound of CAN. It shows you’re an eccentric with good taste but still don’t mind strapping on the roof rack for the ski season in the Swiss alps.

“Neon Lights” Man Machine – KRAFTWERK (1978)

Look, if you were driving this car in Germany in 1980, you were definitely hanging out with Architects, Artists and Models (Loads of them!). You would also have a few grams of Peruvian marching powder in a little shiny pouch made out of polished elephant ball sack leather in your matching jacket’s liner pocket.

At this point in time KRAFTWERK was making a name for themselves as the pioneers of electronic music while you were driving home slowly through the city from some late night Discotech, with a very hot woman by the name of Elfriede - with no panties on - in the passenger seat.

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T HE R O A D T O HE L L

it both the first car to feature Audi’s quattro permanent four-wheel drive system, and the first to mate four-wheel drive with a turbocharged engine. Quattro car production was 11,452 vehicles over the period 1980–1991, and through this 11-year production span, despite some touch-ups, there were no major changes in the visual design of the vehicle. The soundtrack to this Avant guard beast has been compiled from a history of mostly German experimental gems, along with some new wave classics and lost rhythms, spanning from the early 70’s to the early 80’s. I recommend that these tracks be played at full volume, as there is no other volume for a car stereo in my opinion. In fact all car Radios should just have one volume setting as far as I am concerned. Doesn’t matter what you roll in - let them know you’re on the road and flip the bird to every speed trap on route – Love Rick

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“Tango 2000” Tango 2000 – NICHTS (1982)

Like most of the bands so far, NICHTS were also from Düsseldorf - which was at the time basically Germany’s answer to Manchester. The short lived career of NICHTS spawned this one classic hit with a clear post punk influence. The combination of the expressive voice of Andrea

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Mothes and guitarist Meikel Clauss’ distinctive style shaped a new sound - called Psychopop. This song was definitely playing when you picked up your new lady friend in the passenger seat mentioned above…

“Düsseldorf” La Düsseldorf – LA DUSSELDORF (1976)

David Bowie went as far as calling La Düsseldorf “the soundtrack of the eighties”… After the “failure” of NUE!, Klaus Dinger went on to form La Düsseldorf with occasional Neu! collaborators Thomas Dinger and Hans Lampe. This time

round, they sold over a million albums between the late 70’s and early 80’s. You were definitely rocking this baby in the tape deck, and there was no time for rewinding or forwarding tracks on the Autobahn.

PS: I will get your coat.

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BACK TRACK

W OR D S B Y R OB C OC K C R OF T P HO T O G R A P H Y B Y M A D S NOR G A A R D

FOOD TRUCKS

THE FINEST FOOD ON FOUR WHEELS 1 1 1

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Far from being a passing fad, it would seem that food trucks are here to stay.

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opularised by the likes of taco trucks and the upmarket grab ’n go fare from the streets of New York, food trucks have become the gastronomic symbol of pop culture. They’re cheaper to set up than restaurants, and are the greener option. There are even reality-TV shows based on food trucks owned by celeb-chefs. South Africa has followed suit with this trend, with its own offering to the street food world - in the form of Limoncello. Locally it’s the first food truck of its kind, a fully-equipped restaurant on four wheels, and it’s setting the Twitterverse ablaze.

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Limoncello is owned by Luca Castiglione, a third generation chef from Napoli, who introduced the gourmet food truck experience to the land of Mzansi in March 2012. Seeking a new challenge after running his family-owned restaurant in Gardens, Limoncello Ristorante, for 12 years, he decided to pack up his belongings and take his business to the streets, after seeing the enormous impact food trucks have made in similarly cosmopolitan cities around the world. He laid his hands on a classic 1978 Ford Motor Home truck which he found on Gumtree, and had it retrofitted with a complete restaurant kitchen which can cater for up to an

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“CASTIGLIONE HAD IT RETROFITTED WITH A COMPLETE RESTAURANT KITCHEN IN WHICH HE CAN CATER FOR UP TO 200 PEOPLE.” 1 1 31 1 / 3 4

T TR RA AF FF FI IC C MMA AG GA AZ ZI IN NE E

astonishing 200 people. For the wooden branding to go with the truck’s retro exterior, he approached the people of the Cape Town-based creative agency GOOD DESIGN. Castiglione prepares all his food fresh; he bakes paninis in the truck’s oven, and collects the catch of the day at the local fish market, which determines his menu for the day. He also serves other types of southern Italian food, like calzone, risottos, pizzas and spaghettis from his truck. Cape Town has proven to be a great starting point for the business as there is a thriving foodie culture and an adventurous spirit when it comes to tasting the culinary diversity this melting pot city has to offer. “Capetonians eat out a lot, and they are spoilt for choice - but they are always looking for new spots and culinary adventures,” he says. “We already have over 2800 followers on Twitter, and we only started a year ago. I think that demonstrates the reaction of the public to our concept.” Castiglione believes that trading from different locations every day as opposed to being confined to the bricks and mortar of his previous restaurant location has been the best lifestyle choice possible. A quick glance at Limoncello’s Twitter page will tell you why. “In Wellington for a wedding looking forward to it see you all on the road next week #ciao,” he tweeted recently. “Menu del giorno, @Oudekraal weather looking good for a meal on the rocks trading from 12 to sunset” reads another update announcing their main trading spot amongst the curio sellers on the seaside road near Oudekraal just outside Camps Bay. They can also be found trading weekly from Harrington Street in the bustling CBD.

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No matter where Castiglione is, his food is always freshly prepared, from paninis baked that morning or fish caught that day.

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Although the novelty of being the first food truck in the land has meant Limoncello has gained much popularity in a short span of time, pioneering this type of street commerce has not come without its own set of challenges. Without the right procedures in place, the City of Cape Town has provided street traders with limited space to operate. Castiglione is working to change this by rallying the troops. He has registered the trademark Cape Town Food Trucks in hopes of expanding and diversifying the local food truck scene. Uniting a fleet of

trucks under one banner will hopefully help the council see the potentially positive effects street trading has on the economy and granting the trucks the liberty to move around more freely in the city could mean better quality foods with a creative touch being brought straight to the consumer. www.capetownfoodtrucks.co.za

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CLICK TO KEEP TRACK OF LIMONCELLO’S WHEREABOUTS ON FACEBOOK AND TWIITER

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C OMP I L E D B Y C H A R L M A L HE R B E

ROADHOUSES

THE APPLE BITE The first time I went to The Apple Bite was in 1979, I was only three at the time. I have stopped off to have a bite many times since then and their food is still exactly as I remember it...

FACTS CITY / TOWN Edenvale, Gauteng ESTABLISHED July 1970 LONGEST SERVING EMPLOYEE Bee - 41 years service

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Contributors Spring 2013 Issue 1

SEAN O’ TOOLE

WARREN VAN RENSBURG

Sean is a journalist, editor and writer based in Cape Town. Born into a petrol-head family in Pretoria, he has since strayed far from the fold. Now a committed cyclist, he has in the past owned a Ducati Monster, spoked 1000cc ironhead Harley and Japan-only 250cc Honda VTR. His taste in cars is far poorer – he once owned a purple Cup Edition Renault Megane.

Originally from Vereeniging, Warren moved to Johannesburg after finishing a degree in photography in 2002. Having documented the Vaal skateboarding scene, his work now includes fashion, rock and roll and portraiture. A Land Rover Defender 90 is his daily drive, and he has been known to punish weaker mountain bikers on the climbs.

SEAN GETS CLOSE TO THE CRAFTSMEN BUSY ON A CUSTOM PORSCHE BUILD AND ALSO CYCLES UP A MOUNTAIN IN JAPAN. ON PURPOSE.

WARREN DEHYDRATED ON THE ROOF OF A BUILDING, VISITED OOM JANNIE FOR A VESPA EDUCATION, FROZE WHILE SHOOTING CRITICAL MASS, AND RAN OUT OF PETROL WITH THE DAILY DRIVER.

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Contributors Spring 2013 Issue 1

ROB COCKCROFT

THE EVELEIGHS

Rob is a freelance journalist based in Cape Town. Currently he owns a purple Uno Cento named Violet. Before that he traversed the streets of Slaap Stad on a longboard. He grew up surfing and getting lifts to the beach in his dad’s unusual vintage cars like the old-school kombi with a double-bed instead of seats and a Toyota truck fitted with a wendy house instead of a canopy.

Nik spends his days as a mild mannered project manager and his nights fighting crime. Sadly his limited edition Honda Civic Batmobile is on a container ship so he is currently a pen for hire, blogger and short story writer in Cape Town. Tandor is a full time mother of two-kids-and-a-husband. She is an avid photographer, an aspiring food stylist and is busy setting up a food blog to combine her passions. Don’t let the Honda Jazz fool you - she once got rid of a Volvo S-40 due to it lacking some oomph…

ALONG WITH SOME BEHIND THE SCENES WRITING, ROB GOT TO GRIPS WITH AN ALPHA LONGBOARD, WENT FOR A DRIVE IN A MERC AND ATE HIS WAY OUT OF A FOOD TRUCK.

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NIK & TANDOR COMBINE THEIR TALENTS ON THE GARAGISTE COLUMN: THE HOME BREWER.

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R I T E S

OF

PA S S A GE

Managing Editor Jason Bronkhorst Creative Director Charl Malherbe

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Writers Rob Cockcroft, Wes Garcia, Sean O’Toole, Gavin Rooke, Trevor van den Ven, Nik Eveleigh, Tandor Eveleigh, Charlie Pecararo, Rick de la Ray, Des Brown, Jenny Gill

Magazine Website www.trafficmagazine.co.za

Photographers Warren van Rensburg, Kit Oates, Mads Norgaard, Jakub Fulin, Tandor Eveleigh

Head Office 3rd Floor, 72 Voortrekker Road, Edenvale, 1609

Fashion Candice Lee Moore, Sofie Nielsen, Charleen Ruthven

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The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of the publisher. All rights reserved. No unauthorised reproduction permitted. Submissions are accepted by email only. While we make every effort to ensure Taffic Magazine is factually accurate, Infiltrate Media cannot be held responsible if factual errors occur. Content is copyright Infiltrate Media, 2013, unless otherwise indicated.

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Traffic Launch Issue  

Rites of Passage: Traffic Magazine is a digital quarterly celebrating the commute and the craftsmen that make it possible.

Traffic Launch Issue  

Rites of Passage: Traffic Magazine is a digital quarterly celebrating the commute and the craftsmen that make it possible.

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