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OCTOBER 17, 2018 | FRONT

EXPLORING OUR CITY

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IN THE TABLE OF

by lindsay jones

CONTENTS october 17, 2018

assistance league of st. louis

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Maureen Amick was among 60 volunteers who helped outfit 120 students with new athletic shoes and socks during an outing to the Saint Louis Zoo. The event was the league’s third annual Discovery Day.

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st. louis realtors foundation

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Members transformed a vacant parcel in the Greater Ville neighborhood into a community park with urban gardens, flower boxes and accessible walkways. The foundation also donated $25,000 to the project, spearheaded by Rebuilding Together St. Louis.

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kidsmart tools for learning

TOWN TALK 〉〉 4 7 8 10

IN THE KNOW COVER STORY – Forsyth School TALK OF THE TOWNS THE INSIDER

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GUIDE TO SCHOOLS COVER STORY – Villa Duchesne and Oak Hill School SPECIAL FEATURE – Halloween & Harvest Event Listing SPECIAL FEATURE – Turning the Page to Success PARENT TRAP – The Lesson of the Butterfly

on the cover » TOWN TALK + guide to schools

PHOTO ALBUM

STYLE + weddings & celebrations

Corporate teams from event sponsors Emerson, Purina, Edward Jones and others competed during the 14th annual Back to School with Joe Buck Celebrity Feud Event. Since its inception, the fundraiser has equipped students in pre-K through 12th grade with $60 million in free school supplies.

OCTOBER 17, 2018 | FRONT

kornblum jewish food pantry

Students from MICDS teamed up with residents of Crown Center for Senior Living to assemble 200 toiletry and snack packets for the food pantry.

PHOTO ALBUM 〉〉 22 SNAPPED! SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital 23 Humane Society of Missouri 24 St. Louis Press Club 25 Grand Center Arts District 26 THE VELVET HAMMER

STYLE 〉〉

WEDDINGS & CELEBRATIONS 27 FASHION – Dream Day 32 I DO! – Stephanie Wolf & Dan Henschel

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EXPLORING OUR CITY

OPEN HOUSE • SUNDAY, OCT. 21, 3-6 P.M.

FORSYTH SCHOOL, AN INDEPENDENT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IN THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS, SERVES STUDENTS AGE 3 THROUGH GRADE SIX. ITS OPEN HOUSE IS FROM 3 TO 6 P.M. OCT. 21. PICTURED ON THE COVER: FORSYTH SECOND-GRADERS. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 314.726.4542 OR VISIT FORSYTHONLINE.COM. COVER DESIGN BY ALLIE BRONSKY COVER PHOTO BY WHITNEY CURTIS


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THE FACES BEHIND THE SCENE publisher LAUREN B. RECHAN HAIR BY MICHAEL BOWERS | PHOTO BY COLIN MILLER OF STRAUSS PEYTON PHOTOGRAPHY

FROM THEitor

editor in chief

KARYN WILLIAMS

creative director

JULIE M. STREILER

editor emeritus associate editor staff writer staff writer

ed

EDITORIAL

talk of the towns velvet hammer bridge tech talk food critic homework

I’ve talked plenty about how I am inspired by the countless stories that come across my desk of those who are creating change and positively influencing our local community. It’s always especially noteworthy when the person behind the story is one of our youth—not that it should be any surprise. Kids have the best ideas. When their innocence, energy for learning and passion to do good combine, it’s usually a fantastic result. As adults, we’re often discouraged by the risk of starting a project, or often, we’re too jaded to look past what we view as a problem to find a workable solution. Sidney Keys III can teach us all something in that regard. We feature him this issue in Turning the Page to Success. When the Loyola Academy seventh-grader was inspired by a book that he easily related to, he had a simple reaction: wouldn’t it be nice if more kids his age could have the same experience? And instead of just thinking that, he did something about it. With the help of his mom, who obviously is a great encouragement and support, he started Books n Bros, a reading club for African-American boys ages 7 to 13. The group meets once a month and now even has members in other parts of the country! He’s been featured on countless talk shows and news programs and sounds like he takes it all in stride. In his mind, helping others is just something you do. If only everyone thought like that. You can read about his countless other accomplishments and interests in the article as well. It’s amazing that someone so little (purely in stature) can have such a big impact. But really, isn’t that all it takes? Just one small idea can cause change … and good change at that. As you know, we’re getting ready (very, very soon!) to add another little changemaker to our family. While I’m on maternity leave, this space won’t have my thoughts for the week, but I promise to share some pictures! I’m ready for the challenge of encouraging another little one to go big.

—Karyn Williams Editor in Chief

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OCTOBER 17, 2018

CONTRIBUTORS

BILL BEGGS JR. JOAN BERKMAN KENNETH BLAND SHEILA BURKETT JONATHAN CARLI PAUL DOERNER

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COVER STORY

OUT & ABOUT

PHOTO: WHITNEY CURTIS

TOWN TALK

FORSYTH SCHOOL by stephanie wallace

TAKE A PICTURE OF WHAT YOU THINK IS BEAUTIFUL. That’s the task secondgraders at Forsyth School were assigned as part of their social studies curriculum. While exploring seven unique neighborhoods, they were given cameras and instructed to take pictures of whatever stood out to them. The goal was to learn about the communities and their rich histories, and the project is just one way the private school in the city of St. Louis challenges students to expand their understanding of the world around them. Second-grade teachers Anne Simmons and Julia Wilkins created the lesson to teach their students about the diverse cultures that helped build St. Louis and continue to shape it today. “We knew we wanted to visit different neighborhoods,” Wilkins says. “As great as the classroom environment is, we wanted our students to experience the cool and unique things about these little pockets of culture in our city.” The challenge, according to Simmons, was finding an activity that would engage students and transfer to various locations. Photography was the answer. “This assignment really focused their attention on things they may have overlooked initially,” Simmons says. “It was really interesting to see their perspectives. Even though they visited the same places, all of the photos were very different.” Forsyth’s new head of school, Dan Hildebrand, says the project is a perfect example of how the school’s curriculum challenges students to push past their perceived limits and make new discoveries. The emphasis on diversity is especially impactful in preparing students for secondary school and beyond, he notes. “We continuously work to expand our students’ horizons,” he says. “When kids see that neighborhoods do not all look like theirs and learn that each one has a distinct history and culture, they become more thoughtful about the environments in which they live. We hope it

FORSYTH SECOND-GRADERS EXPLORE LOCAL NEIGHBORHOODS THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY.

sparks interest and leads to active, engaged citizenship.” Students aren’t the only ones inspired by the project. Wilkins notes that families and other Forsyth staff have been encouraged to tour the neighborhoods because of it. “It’s nice to witness education beyond our classrooms,” she says. Simmons adds that none of this would be possible without the support of the community. “It’s a testament to our city and how welcoming it can be,” she says. “As a native St. Louisan, it’s nice to see everyone rally around a meaningful and educational initiative.” Some of the students’ photographs are currently on display at The Sheldon Concert Hall and Art Galleries through Feb. 2, 2019. The thousands of photographs taken were narrowed down by local photographer Scott Layne, and students then chose which they wanted to include in the exhibit, St. Louis Through the Lens of a Child: Photographs by Students of Forsyth School. Simmons and Wilkins say the now thirdgraders were so excited when they learned about the opportunity, they practically fell out of their chairs. “They are thrilled to have their work displayed in the gallery alongside professional artists,” Simmons says, adding that the excitement isn’t limited to the students. “Forsyth and our families are grateful for the chance to share what our students are doing with the greater St. Louis community.” &

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ForsythOnline.com 6235 Wydown Blvd. | St. Louis, MO 63105 Wydown-Forsyth Historic OCTOBER 17, 2018District | townandstyle.com | 7


TALK OF THE TOWNS by bill beggs jr.

RICHMOND HEIGHTS 〉〉

CREVE COEUR 〉〉

Here’s what you’ve been missing: the St. Louis Jewish Book Festival, an annual celebration of books, authors and ideas during the first two weeks of November. Say you wouldn’t miss it for the world? Well then, you know the vast range of topics that will be available, including business, economics, cooking, family issues, fiction, history, music, religion, sports, fitness, mystery, etc. Now in its 40th year, the festival at The J pulls in more than 10,000 folks annually. People from all backgrounds and religions come to hear speakers and share their thoughts. This year, journalist, essayist and local author Sarah Kendzior discusses The View from Flyover Country, her account of life in the heartland, a critique of labor exploitation, race relations, gentrification, media bias and other challenges of the post-employment economy. With an updated introduction and epilogue that reflect on how the You-Know-Who presidency was inescapable, the book is essential for anyone who believes the only way to fix America’s problems is to first discuss them with honesty and compassion. Come to Kendzior’s presentation from 7 to 9 p.m. Nov. 3 and ask questions. Say you don’t care about any of that? Why’d you read all the way down to here, then? You’re meshuggeneh, that’s why.

GRAND CENTER 〉〉

Urgent! At 7 p.m. tomorrow, Oct. 18, the Missouri Senate debate between incumbent Claire McCaskill and Republican challenger John Hawley is happening in the studio at KETC Channel 9 in Grand Center. You might be able to watch in person, but time’s a-wasting: You must register for tickets to gather and watch on the large screen outside in the Public Media Commons. The debate will be moderated by Judy Woodruff of PBS NewsHour. Casey Nolen of 5 On Your Side, Nine Network’s Jim Kirchherr and Ruth Ezell, and St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum will get real-time audience perspective before and during the debate and host a live, post-

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OCTOBER 17, 2018

debate analysis show in the Public Media Commons. The debate watch party and post-debate analysis show will be outdoors, weather permitting. Please dress accordingly. Seating is limited, so please bring your own chairs. You also may bring food, and a cash bar will be available. OMG! Who’ll win the election? Only you can determine that. Vote Nov. 6.

KIRKWOOD 〉〉

Seems that the Shop ’n Save on Manchester Road just east of Lindbergh Boulevard won’t be vacant for all too long after it closes Nov. 19 with the other stores that Schnucks hasn’t absorbed. The former discount supermarket’s gigantic shell could have become another hockey rink, but the metro apparently won’t need any more of those because soon there will be one in Maryland Heights and another in Chesterfield. Rumor central has it on unconfirmed suspicion that the space is going to be the site of a self-storage facility, a hoarder’s paradise, because nobody has any room left in the basement, attic or garage for all of that stuff they just might need some day and can’t part with. In the past few years, multilevel storage facilities have become a thing. One took over the lot that was vacated when the Civil War-era home in Rock Hill once occupied by The Book House was demolished in January 2014. (The independent bookstore had relocated to Maplewood in 2013.) It’s a perfectly suitable building, as far as utilitarian structures are concerned, but what’s a company to do when American attitudes shift and people become more comfortable with donating stuff (after the estate and garage sales), realizing that the storage fee sucked monthly right out of the checking account is downright silly? Hey, it could happen. In any case, Kirkwood will be well-served—south of town is another brand-new, multilevel self-storage facility on Big Bend at Interstate 44. Considering all of the Public Storage locations and places like Bob’s E-Z Store, a name we just made up, everyone will have a place to keep extra stuff … you know, until we really, really need it.

A glutton for puns, Mattress Firm is going soft. (Mattress. Firm. Get it?) Well, its gluttony—it paid $780 million for Sleepy’s, a competitor, in December 2015—has been punished by the marketplace. It’s filed for Chapter 11. More than 800 of 1,300 stores will be closed in waves until it gets right-size. Who knew? Well, just about anybody who goes online to buy a bed in a box. Remember, like, 20 minutes ago (and I’m exaggerating only a little) when folks scoffed at an upstart Internet company named Amazon that started to sell books online? Waldenbooks, Borders et al. kept gulping their own Kool-Aid. They’re no longer with us. You can get a book, CD (remember those?), electronics, or practically anything you want or need by tomorrow from Amazon Prime. Except groceries. Order fresh milk, eggs, meat and produce from—well, just pick any grocer that wants to stay in business in our post-retail world, and you’ll probably get them within the hour. Alas, poor Blockbuster; we knew them well. In every other strip center, you could rent a movie on videotape ... we mean DVD. Netflix sounded the death knell. Blockbuster didn’t listen. Today, you don’t even have to count on the U.S. Postal Service for your Netflix fix. Heard of streaming? If you’ll allow us to condescend to you for just a few more lines, it’s nothing like canoeing or fly fishing. Have your kids or grandkids help you figure it out, but you’ll have to get them off Facebook, we mean Instagram, we mean Snapchat, we mean ... oh, never mind. It’s your fault, after all, that they have smartphones and you’re not smart enough to figure out your own. But we were talking about Mattress Firm. Among the first 209-odd stores coast to coast set to close ‘imminently’ is the one in Richmond Heights at 1142 S. Brentwood Blvd. Store associate Marshall said they hadn’t been told exactly when they’ll close for good. Meanwhile, floor models were 50 percent off.

TT TRIVIA | HOW MANY MOSQUITOES CAN A BAT CONSUME NIGHTLY? LAST ISSUE’S ANSWER | SHAKESPEARE NERDS WELL KNOW THAT YORICK IS A CHARACTER IN HAMLET, NOT MACBETH. THE SKULL OF YORICK, THE RECENTLY EXHUMED COURT JESTER, GETS ITS MOMENT WHEN THE TITLE CHARACTER HOLDS IT UP AND SAYS, “ALAS, POOR YORICK, I KNEW HIM, HORATIO …” WE WERE TRYING TO TRICK YOU INTO THINKING THAT GRUESOME IMAGE COMES FROM MACBETH. BUT, ALAS AND ALACK, WE DIDN’T, DID WE?


TOWN TALK

PHOTO: BILL BARRETT

ST. LOUIS 〉〉

Mary Haislip once found a garter snake in

her bed. She didn’t scream. An über animal lover, she picked it up gently and returned it to the great outdoors. One of her dogs had brought it in. She also likes spiders … outside. There’s a photo of Haislip with an owl at World Bird Sanctuary. She’ll take injured songbirds to Wild Bird Rehab in Overland. But she’s most fond of the critters she keeps at home, on purpose. For 25 years, she’s helped rescue dogs and cats by the thousands as a ‘train’ volunteer with Paws on Wheels, or Rescue Road Warriors. On a given weekend, she’ll drive her boxy SUV, packed with as many as eight cages, to Cape Girardeau or Rolla, pick up a load of rescues and transport them to the next driver, who could be as far east as Terre Haute on the way to destinations in the Northeast, from New Jersey to Maine. In rural areas, fewer animals are spayed

or neutered. There, unfortunately, comes the abundant supply. Demand? Populated areas. Haislip helps turn heartbreaking into heartwarming. Dozens of stories start in the Missouri hinterlands. She tells of a dog chained up outside in filth, its owners nowhere to be found, maggots in its bowl. Another, Bruce, needed a $2,000 hip replacement. Through the rescue network, his surgery was covered. Today, Bruce is living the high life in a mansion on the Jersey shore. Most homeless animals aren’t so lucky: An estimated 2.5 million cats and dogs are euthanized every year. “Education is the key,” Haislip emphasizes. She’s fit to be tied about people buying pets when so many could be adopted. “You’ll save two lives,” she points out. “The pet you adopt, and the one you made

room for at the shelter.” She’s reached capacity at home with four cats and two dogs. Betty, the brown dog, came from a high-kill facility in Oklahoma City. Eli, the black Lab mix found wandering a Walmart parking lot? He’s now a therapy dog, adored at nursing homes. Haislip will admit she’s not fond of cicadas. But rodents or possums? No problem. And there’s a bat house in her backyard. The neighbors were cool once they learned how many mosquitos one bat can eat. “When I’m not at work, you’ll find me transporting animals, volunteering at rescue events, fostering, and posting and networking about animals needing placement,” she says. “I wouldn’t mind fostering a pig at some point, although I’m not sure my neighbors would go for that.” Visit roadrescuewarriors.org or Paws on Wheels Transport on Facebook. &

Helping seniors live full, dignified lives

S

ince 1994, AccuCare Home Health Care of St. Louis has tended to the physical, emotional and mental needs of clients, navigating ongoing changes in the nation’s health care system to help them achieve independence and quality of life. Locally owned and RN managed, AccuCare prides itself on treating every client like family. Much of AccuCare’s business involves the medical management of elderly clients, whether they have an ailment or are transitioning from the hospital to their home or a senior living facility. “The main thing is to get them there, make them feel comfortable and reacclimate them to the environment,” says Jacqueline Phillips RN, BSN, AccuCare president and founder. The process may include building back their strength, adjusting to new capabilities or trying to help them reach the same level of independence they were at before. AccuCare caregivers assist with all personal care activities of daily living like

bathing, dressing, grooming, running errands and going to doctor’s appointments. “We try to get them to be as independent as possible because it makes them feel good, but our oversight helps keep them safe,” Phillips says. AccuCare caregivers also deal with the emotional and mental side of client home care that comes with a loss of independence, the death of a spouse, or memory loss due to dementia or Alzheimer’s. Transitions often come with heavy emotions. AccuCare can provide support and respite care to in-home caregivers like spouses or children as well so they can get out and resume their normal activities. Providing nurse oversight sets AccuCare apart from many nonmedical home health care companies, allowing caregivers to take note of medical changes or issues and work directly with clients’ physicians to determine causes and make necessary changes. With 40 years of experience

We try to get them to be as independent as possible… but our oversight helps keep them safe.

10131 old olive st. road • 314.692.0020 • accucare.com

JACQUE PHILLIPS RN, BSN, PRESIDENT/FOUNDER

as an RN, Phillips worked in both hospital and corporate settings. She started her first home health care company with another nurse in 1984 before opening AccuCare. “I’m very passionate about being able to make a difference in people’s lives,” she says. “If I can make the end of life or their elder years better in any way, that makes me feel really good. I couldn’t do it without my caregivers or office staff. It’s a team effort.”

OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

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THE INSIDER A GLIMPSE AT WHAT’S GOING ON AROUND ST. LOUIS AND BEYOND. &

PATTY by patty hannum I LOVE WEDDINGS. I mean, I really love weddings.

I enjoyed every single time I was a bridesmaid. Taffeta is still my favorite fabric. But once you get to a certain age, no one asks you to be a part of their wedding. There are junior bridesmaids; why can’t there be senior bridesmaids? I am a little embarrassed by what I’ve done to try and secure my place in a bridal party. Congratulatory cards with checks enclosed have been sent, parties thrown in honor of the couple, and an occasional snide remark about one of the bridesmaids not living up to their duties and how I could easily step in. Nothing worked. So when my nephew Michael announced he finally was going to marry the beautiful Katie, I changed my approach. I offered to marry them. They were having a destination wedding in Charleston, South Carolina, and before he could say no, I got licensed by two different ministries. Sadly, they knew a minister and preferred to use someone who had been inside of a church in the past 10 years. And then it happened. I am sure you felt it. The earth moved under my feet (just like Carole King’s) on Sept. 15 when my brother John, the groom’s dad, asked if I would transport the wedding gown since I was driving and he was flying. This was significant for two reasons. One, I finally was going to have a role in the wedding! And two, as the youngest of six, my family normally does not think of me as a responsible adult. Maybe because I still say things like, “Don’t ask me. I’m the youngest.” My brother told me I would be listed in the wedding program for my duties, but I needed to figure out what I wanted to be called. He also said I could choose the font and color. That’s when I should have been suspicious. He is never that accommodating. So I thought about my title: wedding gown transporter, wedding dress courier or marriage robe transporteur were some options. I liked the last one because it was French and then I would be Patrice Hannum in the program. Tres chic! I received an email from my great-niece Ally, who was working on the program and needed the exact verbiage. Now, Ally is a freshman in high school and in most families, this would seem a little young to be in charge of creating a wedding program, but our family tends to be great at delegating to anyone and everyone. But as I read further, it appeared that her little sister Bridget was the one who would make sure my name was properly placed in the program. Bridget is adorable, of course, but I am not even sure she is 10. And that’s when I knew my brother had hustled me … some might say lied. You see, I never was going to be part of the wedding party or acknowledged in the program. He had a task that needed to be done that would be a hassle for him since he had to change planes. So he delegated to his little sister. He knew there was no way I could screw this task up. The wedding gown safely arrived in Charleston. I brought my ministry licenses with me just in case the minister became ill; he did not. The programs were lovely but did not include Patrice Hannum. The wedding was perfect. And my brother John is still the King of Delegators.

&

▶ Contact Patty at phannum@townandstyle.com.

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OCTOBER 17, 2018

by julia m. johnson

Start your engines! GATEWAY ▶ MOTORSPORTS PARK owner and

president CURTIS FRANCOIS ACCEPTED THE INNOVATOR AWARD AT EXPLORE ST. LOUIS’ HOSPITALITY HEROES celebration at America’s Center. Francois took over the 340-acre raceway in 2012 and has transformed it into a world-class attraction with Verizon IndyCar Series, NASCAR and NHRA events.

▲ THE REPERTORY THEATRE of St. Louis has announced a $1 MILLION CAMPAIGN TO FUND AN ENDOWMENT IN HONOR OF ARTISTIC DIRECTOR STEVEN WOOLF, who will retire next year after more than 30 years with the theater company. The funds will help The Rep hire talented directors, set designers and actors for future seasons. The Berges Family Foundation is chipping in $350,000 and will match gifts up to that amount.

k c e h c it

▲ Congratulations are in order for FIVE AREA LEADERS WHO RECEIVED CRYSTAL WAGON AWARDS from SSM HEALTH CARDINAL GLENNON CHILDREN’S FOUNDATION . The awards are given each year to innovators who champion children’s issues. The 2018 honorees are state legislators Sen. Jeanie Riddle and Rep. Diane Franklin; SLUCare physician Dr. Robert Wilmott; sportscaster Dan Dierdorf; and SSM Health St. Mary’s Hospital-Centralia president Damon Harbison.

▲ Central West End resident Antony John has penned a new novel, Mascot, the story of a young St. Louis baseball player and survivor of a car accident, who has lost his dad and must face life in a wheelchair. The author spoke and signed copies at a launch party at Left Bank Books. He’s known for his previous novel Five Flavors of Dumb and the Elemental fantasy trilogy. AVAILABLE AT LEFT BANK BOOKS

〈〈〈 THE MAIN EVENTS 〉〉〉 Help support the Endangered Wolf Center’s conservation programs at Wolf Fest Oct. 20. The event will feature several ambassador animals, including a cougar, porcupine, kangaroo and raven. Enjoy live music, food trucks, artist demonstrations, rock climbing, kids’ activities and more.

Support breast cancer patients at The Ritz-Carlton’s Pink Ribbon Teas Oct. 20 and 27. These special parties include pretty-in-pink finger sandwiches, sweet treats and more. Proceeds support Gateway to Hope’s services for those living with breast cancer.

Mark your calendar for the annual

Muddy River Arts Show and Sale Oct. 26 and 27 at the Ethical

Society of St. Louis. The event showcases the work of local artists and craftspeople. An opening reception will be held the evening of Oct. 26.


TOWN TALK

GUIDE TO SCHOOLS SPECIAL SECTION

OPEN HOUSE: Noon to 4 p.m. Nov. 4 A CATHOLIC EDUCATION IN THE SACRED HEART TRADITION FOR BOYS AND GIRLS AGE 3-GRADE 6 AND YOUNG WOMEN GRADES 7-12 OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

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LOVE & LEARN

PHOTO: BILL BARRETT

COVER STORY

VILLA DUCHESNE AND OAK HILL SCHOOL by julia m. johnson

RESEARCH SHOWS THAT YOUR BRAIN RETAINS MORE WHEN YOU LEARN in a positive, creative environment rather than a strict, regimented one. Villa Duchesne and Oak Hill School in Frontenac, an independent Catholic school in the Sacred Heart tradition, believes the best way to transform young people into well-rounded adults is to educate them in a supportive, nurturing setting. It includes a co-ed elementary school for students age 3 through grade six and an all-girls school for seventh through 12th grades. “We are a smaller, more intimate school with a global outlook,” says Pete Schroeder, early childhood and elementary principal. “We believe it’s important to address the whole person and emphasize community. Come as you are, and you’ll be cared for with great love; that’s the foundation of our philosophy.” Small class sizes allow teachers to address students’ needs personally, according to Schroeder. The early childhood program has a student-teacher ratio of 6 to 1, and upper grades are about 8 to 1. “This really helps us get to know and understand the kids in our care,” he notes. An emphasis on STEM is part of the school’s commitment to nurturing critical thinkers and problem solvers. “We offer modalities for every type of learning,” Schroeder says. “We have a maker space with wood shop supplies, computers and 3-D printers; a fully equipped science lab for all grade levels; and outdoor education programs.” The school’s 64-acre campus is a certified wildlife habitat, so students can immerse themselves in nature. “We teach kids how to be plugged in to modern technology and use it wisely, but we also want them to know all of the great ways they can be unplugged,” Schroeder says.

PRINCIPAL PETE SCHROEDER HELPS STUDENTS WITH A PROJECT.

He notes that designing—and redesigning—a variety of projects in different subject areas helps kids learn constructively. “We teach them to plan out each process, fix any problems, learn from what doesn’t work and not give up,” Schroeder says. “This helps them develop resiliency for every aspect of their lives.” Theater and music programs help students express their creativity, and they even write and produce their own stage shows. Hands-on, real-world activities like these are a key part of the educational process, Schroeder explains. “We have studied the differences in how boys and girls learn, and we put that knowledge to work every day,” he says. “Brain-based research helps us apply the best teaching techniques in all of our classes.” Schroeder says faculty and staff also view the world through a faith-centered lens, which encourages charity, kindness and acceptance. “We have a responsibility to make the love of God known to the world,” he says. “We recognize the dignity and value of each person. All are welcome here.” Interested families can learn more about the school’s innovative curriculum and programs at its open house from noon to 4 p.m. Nov. 4, which includes campus tours and interaction with faculty and students. &

VILLA DUCHESNE AND OAK HILL SCHOOL OFFERS A CARING, WELL-ROUNDED EDUCATION FOR STUDENTS AGE 3 THROUGH GRADE 12. PICTURED ON THE COVER: STUDENTS ENGAGE IN HANDS-ON LEARNING. THE SCHOOL WILL HOST AN OPEN HOUSE FROM NOON TO 4 P.M. NOV. 4; NO RSVP IS REQUIRED. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 314.810.3566 OR EMAIL ADMISSIONS@VDOH.ORG. COVER DESIGN BY ALLIE BRONSKY | COVER PHOTO COURTESY OF VILLA DUCHESNE AND OAK HILL SCHOOL

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Halloween & Harvest E V E N T L I ST ING

» boo at the zoo nights

THROUGH OCT. 30 Saint Louis Zoo | 5:30-8:30 p.m. nightly $7 members, $8 non-members | stlzoo.org

» bewitching bugs & botanicals

THROUGH OCT. 31 Missouri Botanical Garden | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $12 adults, children 3-12 free | missouribotanicalgarden.org

» pumpkin patch & harvest market THROUGH OCT. 31 Kirkwood Farmers Market | 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Free | downtownkirkwood.com

» hayrides at queeny park

Children learn by exploring. That’s true for the physical world and the world of ideas. Community School provides the perfect place for that early exploration in a young child’s life.

Open House: Nov. 3 at 9:00 a.m. & Nov. 13 at 9:15 a.m. CommunitySchool.com

Simplify the college search. The college search can be overwhelming. Through personalized guidance and an individualized plan, Cindy assists student and family in finding the right college fit. Call for a free consultation. > Build College List > Admissions / Applications / Financial Aid > Resume Development > College Visits and Essay Crafting > Recruiting for Student-Athletes Cindy Zelinsky BAE, MS

THROUGH NOV. 30 550 Weidman Road | 6, 7 & 8 p.m. | $150 per wagon | stlouisco.com

» halloween nights at grant’s farm OCT. 18-21 & 25-28 Grant’s Farm | 6-10 p.m. | Free | grantsfarm.com

» the darkness haunted house OCT. 19-31 1525 8th St. | 7-11 p.m. | $25 | thedarkness.com

» the great go! st . louis halloween race

900 Lay Road

636.346.5313 cindy@absolutecollegeconsulting.com absolutecollegeconsulting.com

Choose

INDEPENDENT EDUCATIONAL CONSULTANTS ASSOCIATION

WHITFIELD

OCT. 21 Downtown St. Louis | 7 a.m. | $15-$80 | gostlouis.org

» trunk or treat for kids & dogs OCT. 21 Purina Farms | 11-11:45 a.m. and 12:15-1 p.m. $10 for kids ages 2-10, $10 for dogs | purina.com

» halloween walk

OCT. 25 Downtown Kirkwood | 5-7 p.m. | Free | downtownkirkwood.com

» ghost stories at jefferson barracks

Join our community of innovation, collaboration, and trust

OCT. 27 Jefferson Barracks Park | 6:30-8 p.m. | $5 | stlouisco.com

» full moon festival

OCT. 27 Schlafly Bottleworks | 4-10 p.m. | $8 | schlafly.com

» pumpkin carving in the park OCT. 28 Suson Park | 1-2:30 p.m. | $10 | stlouisco.com

» science spooktacular

OCT. 28 Saint Louis Science Center | 5-8 p.m. | Free | slsc.org

» old webster trick-or-treating OCT. 29 Old Webster | 3-5 p.m. | Free | yucandu.com

» halloween parade & party

OCT. 31 Lafayette Park Playground | 5:30 p.m. | Free | lafayettesquare.org

Schedule a visit and experience Whitfield GRADES 6 -12

COED

C O L L E G E P R E PA R AT O R Y

175 South Mason Road • St. Louis, MO 63141 • 314.434.5141 • www.whitfieldschool.org OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

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g n i n r

the heart

ENGAGING THE MIND

educating

Tu

JOIN US FOR AN OPEN HOUSE! October 25 • 6:30 p.m. Get to know our teachers in the classroom and tour our campus.

the

Grades 7–12 • Co-ed Town & Country wcastl.org • 314.997.2900

HARPER SCHOOL Academic Preschool in Frontenac

❖ Enrolling for 2018-19 School Year ❖ Full Day and Half-Day Programs ❖ Phonics, Math, and Character Development

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by julia

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m. john

Call Today to Schedule a Tour (314) 738-9560

Conveniently Located in Frontenac at 11155 Clayton Rd.

www.harperschool.org

One summer day two years ago, Sidney Keys III walked into the EyeSeeMe Children’s Bookstore in University City. He picked up the story of an African-American character who loved basketball, running a business and earning money. “It was magical because I could totally relate to the guy,” Sidney says. “It really opened my eyes. I realized everybody should have the experience of being inspired by a book.”

The Loyola Academy seventh-grader says he left the store with the kernel of an idea and decided to turn his love of reading into a calling of his own. He began looking for ways to bring the magic of books to kids who otherwise might not get a chance to catch the spark. With help from his mother, Winnie Caldwell, he founded Books n Bros, a reading club for African-American boys ages 7 to 13. The group meets to discuss books once a month for two hours, often at the library. It has expanded to include students from across the country. Those who live out-of-state get featured books shipped to them, and they join the group’s local discussions by video livestream.

OPEN HOUSE

November 3 • 9 AM - Noon thecollegeschool.org PreK-Eighth Grade 14 |

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The group focuses on stories about African-American figures, and works by black authors also are featured on the reading list. The budding entrepreneur says it’s a great forum to make sure the contributions of African-Americans are talked about year-round, not just during Black History Month. “It’s always amazing to hear about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks, but we also like to learn about African-Americans from different angles, in different professions,” Sidney says. “We want to read about them not just in history books, but in other kinds of stories like science fiction.”


TOWN TALK

age 4 - grade 6 | Creve Coeur

...at who your child will become. Open House Nov. 28 | rossmanschool.org

Expect the Extraordinary

PHOTO: KIMBERLY MUFFERI

ages 3 - grade 6

Open House

“We have voted on books to read in the past, but we also take members’ suggestions and switch up the genres,” Sidney says. “It might be fiction one month, then nonfiction the next. The one thing that makes people hate reading is when they get bored, so we want to keep that from happening.” Members have about a month to complete each book, and there are worksheets to help them retain what they’ve read. Membership costs $25 per month, but families don’t have to pay if it’s a hardship, Sidney says. “Money should never be an issue when it’s about kids reading,” he says. “I wouldn’t want them to miss out on something they love.” Individuals and companies can support the group’s work by sponsoring readers through Chub Cares, a nonprofit Sidney and his mom started. “There are a lot of people supporting our readers because they care about students’ literacy skills,” he says. “We started the nonprofit because we didn’t want kids to have to choose between buying food and paying the membership fee.” Since Sidney launched Books n Bros, his story has been told by Oprah Winfrey, Steve Harvey and others. “We get a lot of new members and interest every time we’re on the news or talk shows,” he says. Sidney’s involvement with good causes doesn’t end with his reading club. Recently, he applied and was invited to join the board of Kidbox, a subscription-based clothing company that also provides apparel for children from low-income families. “I accepted the role because I like the fact that Kidbox is a really big donator,” Sidney says. “The company gives clothes to kids all over the country.” He

attended its annual meeting in New York City this year and says he was inspired by others who love giving back. He met members who design cancer-fighting clothing and raise money to build homes for low-income families, among other things. According to Sidney, he has several other interests outside books and boards. “My mom taught me about photography, and I have my own business taking pictures,” he says. He also loves swimming, soccer, traveling, movies and trying new restaurants. He doesn’t yet know where he would like to attend high school but says he probably will study photography in college. “I want to join nonprofit boards and start another education-based business, too,” he says. “I would like to keep offering a helping hand to kids from my generation because it makes me feel really good inside. I always say, ‘It’s the little things we do for each other that count. Take care of the people in your community, and they will become your family.’” Sidney says he loves hearing tales of how Books n Bros has helped kids find joy in learning. “One member’s grandma told us his reading scores at school have rocketed since he joined the group,” he notes. “This kid always has a positive outlook; he’s never sad or mad. It’s great to see people so happy about something I started.” The young entrepreneur’s plan is to keep Books n Bros growing indefinitely. “We really have something here,” he says of the group. “We want to make it even bigger so people won’t just see what is on the outside— some African-American boys reading literature. We want them to learn about all of the other great things going on under the surface.”

&

October 26 - 9:00am RSVP to 314-434-4349 or www.kirkdayschool.org

each day brings a world of opportunity

Open House • Saturday, Nov. 3 • 8:30am Exceptional education for children age 3 to grade 6 400 DeMun Ave. • Clayton, MO • 314.725.4999 • register at wilsonschool.com

See what makes us

All Heart. Shadow a student and find your place in our community.

allheart.corjesu.org/visit OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

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SCHOOL DIRECTORY COMMUNITY SCHOOL

Community School allows children’s gifts to flourish in an environment of active, experiential learning. Seasoned faculty engage students age 3 through grade six with a challenging curriculum that integrates academics, the arts, physical education and interpersonal skills, all on a beautiful 16-acre campus. 900 LAY ROAD | 314.991.0005 | COMMUNITYSCHOOL.COM

COR JESU ACADEMY

Cor Jesu Academy is a Catholic, all-girls high school. Surrounded by a warm, welcoming community of academically driven young women, students explore passions and embrace ambitions as they become leaders of tomorrow. 10230 GRAVOIS ROAD | 314.842.4429 EXT.115 ALLHEART.CORJESU.ORG

FORSYTH SCHOOL

Forsyth School’s one-of-a-kind campus provides an unforgettable experience for children age 3 through grade six. A challenging and engaging curriculum fosters independence and prepares students to thrive in secondary school and beyond. 6235 WYDOWN BLVD. | 314.726.4542 | FORSYTHONLINE.COM

INDEPENDENT • COEDUCATIONAL • GRADES 7-12

Open House Saturday, October 20

HARPER SCHOOL

Harper School is an academic preschool and elementary school in Frontenac. Half- and full-day preschool programs with afternoon extended care provide an excellent child care option for working parents. Our hallmarks are high expectations, academic success and character development. 11155 CLAYTON ROAD | 314.738.9560 | HARPERSCHOOL.ORG

Pre-register at jburroughs.org/openhouse or at 9 am on the day of the event. JOHN BURROUGHS SCHOOL

Presentation begins at 9:30 am

John Burroughs School 755 South Price Road, 63124 • 314.993.4040

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As an independent, coeducational day school for grades seven to 12, Burroughs provides a core curriculum in humanities and STEM that is balanced by opportunities in athletics and the fine, practical and performing arts. The school emphasizes global awareness and cultural competency, as well as service and sustainability. 755 S. PRICE ROAD | 314.993.4040 | JBURROUGHS.ORG


TOWN TALK

OPEN HOUSE

KIRK DAY SCHOOL

We’re celebrating 25 years as an independent Christian preparatory school that serves ages 3 through grade six. A passionate and nurturing faculty ensures every child is known and loved, and our academic program is grounded in the Christian faith. Open house is Oct. 26. 12928 LADUE ROAD | 314.434.4349 | KIRKDAYSCHOOL.ORG

MICDS (MARY INSTITUTE AND SAINT LOUIS COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL)

MICDS is a college-prep, independent school that offers a dynamic learning environment for students age 4 through grade 12. Join us at our open house Oct. 27 to learn about the ways your child will embark on a life of discovery at MICDS. 101 N. WARSON ROAD | 314.995.7367 | DISCOVERY.MICDS.ORG

LOWER SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE November 28 8:30 - 10:30 a.m. Age 2-Grade 5 RSVP: 314.625.9103

MIDDLE AND UPPER SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE November 4 Noon - 4 p.m. Grades 6-12

Please join us!

Catholic | Independent | Coed Montessori Early Childhood

MIRIAM SCHOOL (PRE-K-8) AND MIRIAM ACADEMY (9-12)

All-Girls Grades 1-12

visitationacademy.org

Miriam School and Miriam Academy provide an innovative approach to unlocking each student’s potential. With small class sizes, dedicated teachers and therapists understand the unique learning needs of each child. Open house is Nov. 4. 501 BACON AVE. | 2845 N. BALLAS ROAD 314.968.3893 | MIRIAMSTL.ORG

ROSSMAN SCHOOL

Educating children age 4 through grade six, Rossman’s exceptional educators are dedicated to discovering and nurturing what makes each student one-of-a-kind. The rich curriculum emphasizes strong academics, character development and leadership skills, preparing graduates to excel in an ever-changing world. 12660 CONWAY ROAD | 314.434.5877 | ROSSMANSCHOOL.ORG

THE COLLEGE SCHOOL

At The College School (pre-k through grade eight), students engage in meaningful, in-depth work, applying skills and knowledge to realworld scenarios and challenges. Through this approach, students discover their passions and the impact they can make on the world. 7825 BIG BEND BLVD. | 314.962.9355 THECOLLEGESCHOOL.ORG

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

a life of discovery OPEN HOUSE

Oct. 27, 2018 Saturday at 9:30am

MICDS is one of the nation’s leading independent schools, specializing in educating students JK-12. Join us at our Open House to learn about the unique classes, extracurriculars, athletics and more that will prepare your child for a life of discovery. 101 North Warson Road, Saint Louis, MO 63124 • micds.org OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

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FOLLOW US ON

THE ST. AUSTIN SCHOOL

The St. Austin School offers a rigorous academic program in the Catholic tradition for boys and girls grades pre-k through eight, with a 9:1 student-teacher ratio. The unique, classical curriculum and pedagogy prepare students to excel at the top high schools in St. Louis. 1809 DES PERES ROAD | 314.580.2802 SAINTAUSTINSCHOOL.ORG

THE WILSON SCHOOL The Wilson School prepares students age 3 through grade six with the knowledge and skills to be successful in school and in life. This is realized through a challenging curriculum of integrated, project-based, technology-enriched experiences, all within a nurturing environment where every student is known. 400 DEMUN AVE. | 314.725.4999 | WILSONSCHOOL.COM

VILLA DUCHESNE AND OAK HILL SCHOOL

Villa Duchesne and Oak Hill School is linked with 147 schools in 30 countries, preparing its students for global careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Families with boys and girls age 3 to grade six and young women grades seven to 12 are invited to join the journey. 801 S. SPOEDE ROAD | 314.432.2021 | VDOH.ORG

WESTMINSTER CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Westminster’s college preparatory program challenges students to grow intellectually, socially and spiritually to reach their God-given potential. Students pursue excellence in honors and AP courses, on stage with an award-winning drama program, and on the field as part of a nationally recognized athletics program. 800 MARYVILLE CENTRE DRIVE | 314.997.2900 WCASTL.ORG

« health leisure « home « community news « fashion « beauty « society news

WHITFIELD SCHOOL

Whitfield is a coed college preparatory school for grades six to 12. Here, each student’s strengths are known, cultivated and celebrated. Our Habits of Mind and Heart curriculum provides a common language for character education and encourages critical reflection for academic and personal growth.

we’ve got you covered!

314.657.2100 | townandstyle.com 18 |

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175 S. MASON ROAD | 314.434.5141 WHITFIELDSCHOOL.ORG

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE


TOWN TALK

More Success with Less Family Stress For the Parents of College-Bound Children with Learning Challenges

Standardized Test Prep Tutoring

PARENT TRAP

Social Skills Advocacy ADHD Coaching ACT/SAT Prep

THE LESSON OF THE BUTTERFLY

Assessment

by dr. tim jordan

College Advising

THERE IS GREAT VALUE IN ALLOWING CHILDREN

to struggle, but it requires mom and dad to parent with the long term in mind. It’s often quicker and easier in the moment to do things for your kids, to rescue them and solve their problems. In the long run, however, you’ll make them dependent and lacking crucial coping skills necessary for a successful life. The following story illustrates this point. A grandfather brought his young granddaughter a cocoon. He instructed her to stay patient and allow the caterpillar to grow at its own pace inside the shell. He told her that at some point, the cocoon would begin to move as the caterpillar transformed into a beautiful butterfly, and that she might be tempted to help him out of his covering. The grandfather encouraged her to let the butterfly come out on its own. Sure enough, a week later, the cocoon began to wiggle, and over the proceeding days, the little girl began to feel sorry for the poor butterfly who was aching to come out. So she took a sharp knife and carefully slit a hole down the side of the cocoon, and a moment later, out popped a colorful butterfly. The creature dusted off her wings and flew a few feet before she plopped onto the table. She tried it again with the same result, and then proceeded to the edge of the table. The butterfly took off and flew a few feet before falling to the floor, dead. The little girl was crushed and began to cry. What she had failed to understand was that the butterfly needed time to push against the walls of her shell to get fluids down the length of her wings, strengthening them so that when she emerged, she would have the strength to fly. It is through this struggling that the butterfly can survive and thrive. And so it is with our children. In the words of Haruki Murakami, “When you come out of the storm, you won’t be the same person who walked in. That’s what this storm’s all about.” Every opportunity kids have to solve their own problems, deal with feelings of frustration and disappointment, pick themselves up and keep at it becomes a building block for self-confidence and grit. They will learn how to handle the normal ups and downs of life, a critical coping skill many millennials lack. Remember the lesson of the butterfly, and parent with the end in mind. &

314.475.5035 SpecialSolutions.com Celebrating Our 10th Year in Business!

Special Solutions Private Learning Center 9225 Manchester Road | Suite 100 St. Louis, MO 63144

TIM JORDAN, M.D., IS A BEHAVIORAL PEDIATRICIAN WHO WORKS WITH GIRLS IN GRADE SCHOOL THROUGH COLLEGE IN HIS COUNSELING PRACTICE AND CAMPS. HIS NEWEST BOOK IS LETTERS FROM MY GRANDFATHER: TIMELESS WISDOM FOR A LIFE WORTH LIVING. FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT DRTIMJORDAN.COM. OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

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GLENNON

USE YOUR The Back Store

The Fur Boutique, Llc

TEMPUR-Adapt™ Cloud + Cooling Pillow

Proud to support Cardinal Glennon Card 2018

-Low profile design great for all sleep positions. -Breathable, high-stretch performance washable cover -Cool-to-touch comfort after every wash -$99.00

Stop in and see Fall & Winter Fashions

Plaza Frontenac | Saint Louis Galleria 314.643.THEB(8432) | stlbackstore.com

9820 Clayton Road | 314.401.0317

Bright Idea Toys

Glenn Betz & Associates Jewelers

2018 Best Toys for Kids Award Winner

Helping you Celebrate Life’s Most Joyous Occasions Since 1941

1050 Schnucks Woods Mill Plaza | 636.386.8300 brightideastoys.com

11776 Manchester Road | 314.984.0040 glennbetzjewelers.com

Marketplace at The Abbey Vintage vinyl floor mats are adorable, easy-to-clean alternatives to traditional rugs— perfect for high-traffic areas.

10090 Manchester Road | 314.965.1400 marketplaceattheabbey.com

Paper Patch HOLIDAYS & CELEBRATIONS BEGIN WITH US! Invitations Stationery Photo Cards Gifts Printing

12009 Manchester Road, Des Peres | 314.821.6561 paperpatchinvitesyou.com

Christopher’s

JAC Designs

Shine Boutique

This pumpkin candle is sure to light up your Fall! Only at Christopher’s!

Fabulous fall pieces arriving weekly. Cozy up in this adorable piece. Available in cream, gray and back, $74.00.

Gemstones and jewels, hamsa necklace, $64.

127 E. Argonne Drive | 314.909.0202 christophersgifts.com

Down by the Station LIZZY JAMES Made in the USA Unique leather wrap bracelets that double as necklaces

150 W. Argonne | 314.965.7833 downbythestation.com

910 Kehrs Mill Road, Ste. 111 | 3148032418 jacdesignonline.com

Lauries Shoes Naturino of Italy, an entire collection of children’s fashion footwear.

9811 Clayton Road | 314.942.3055 shineboutiquestlouis.com

The Service Bureau Fine Stationery & Gifts Stop by for the latest selection of hand crafted Brackish bow ties. Each one made in 4 to 5 hours from sustainably sourced feathers.

9916 Manchester Road | 314.961.1642 lauriesshoes.com

20% SAVINGS OCT 19-28 • 320 MERCHANTS

9773 Clayton Road | 314.991.1104 servicebureaushop.com


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Paperdolls

Sign of the Arrow

Pink Magnolia

The Adhara Solid Cape Shawl $42.50 The Adhara Solid Cape Shawl is a fall essential! It can be worn 5 different ways and is available in 7 colors: Beige, Black, Charcoal, Plum, Ivory, Blush, and Olive.

Celebrate your hometown! Display a silk-screened, 100% cotton hand towel for your guests. Available in many cities and states!

Shop small with Pink Magnolia for everything Lilly Pulitzer! Earn loyalty points and find gifts for the whole family.

Ballwin | Des Peres | Kirkwood | U City 314.394.3303 | paperdolls.boutique

9814 Clayton Road | 314.994.0606 signofthearrow.com

9810 Clayton Rd | 314.997.6161 pinkmagnoliashop.com

CALLING ALL NONPROFITS! Help us spread the word about the needs of your organization this holiday season. TOWN&STYLE WANTS TO KNOW THE TOP 3 ITEMS THAT WOULD HELP YOU BETTER SERVE CLIENTS FOR OUR CHARITY WISH LIST, TO BE FEATURED IN OUR NOV. 14 & DEC. 12 ISSUES.

charity WISH LIST

EMAIL SWALLACE@TOWNANDSTYLE.COM OR WJABLONOW@TOWNANDSTYLE.COM FOR A FORM.


SNAPPED! #651334 #125010 #436076

A KAISER, DANA CHUCK AND LAUR

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SAVE 30%-70%

CHRISTINA SCHELLHARDT, AMY HERTWECK

SSM HEALTH CARDINAL GLENNON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL glennon gallop

ON SELECT ITEMS OCT. 19 – NOV. 10

Treat yourself to decorative lighting and accessories designed to make your space positively delightful.

by bill barrett

S. BRENTWOOD BLVD.

WHERE Kraftig Polo Club WHY The ‘White Hot Affair’

N

MICHELLE AND STEVEN BURGHART 909 S. Brentwood Blvd. 314-222-6300 M,W, F 9-6 • T, Th 9-8 • Sat 10-5

CLAYTON ROAD

Easy access thru CVS off Clayton Rd.

SAINT LOUIS BALLET

supports the hospital’s Danis Pediatric Center, which provides outpatient pediatric primary care services for children, newborn to 21 years of age, regardless of the family’s ability to pay. WHO SSM Health president Laura Kaiser, Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital president Steven Burghart, Cardinal Glennon Children’s Foundation vice president of philanthropy Sandy Koller, event co-chairs Chrissy and Mike Nardini and Doug and Molly Sansone, lunch chairs Mike and Claire Todorovich HIGHLIGHTS Wines from A. Bommarito Wines, luncheon by Bartolino’s, auctions, polo match

GEN HORIUCHI, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

Four performances only

AL AND SANDY KOLLER

NOVEMBER 2 - 4 CLAIRE AND MICHAEL TODOROVICH

CHRISSY AND MI

KE NARDINI

An extremely physical and emotional rendition of the world’s greatest love story by artistic director Gen Horiuchi. As powerful and relevant today as ever before.

Get your Nutcracker tickets now!

13 performances | DECEMBER 14 - 23 TICKETS: 314-516-4949 | TOUHILL.ORG 22 |

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DOUG, ALAYNA AND MOLLY SANSONE

SUSIE AND PETER VON GONTARD

MOLLY AND JOE WAGNER

▶ TO SEE MORE OF THIS PARTY ONLINE OR PURCHASE PRINTS VISIT TOWNANDSTYLE.COM ◀

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PHOTO ALBUM

MARIE-HÉLÈNE BERNARD, RHONDA HAMM-NIEBRUEGGE

PAM NICHOLSON, JOHN

JULIE AND KYLE SNIEGOWSKI

MARLOW, KATHY WARN

ICK

HUMANE SOCIETY OF MISSOURI glow in the park by bill barrett WHERE Art Hill in Forest Park WHY To benefit the

Humane Society’s Animal Cruelty Fund, which is dedicated to investigating, healing and preventing animal abuse WHO President Kathy Warnick, board chair Pam Nicholson, Great Forest Park Balloon Race president John Marlow HIGHLIGHTS Cocktails, dinner, silent auction, balloon glow, fireworks

DEVON AUSTERMANN, KAYLA WING

JEFF AND KIM VAGLIO

ANDREA DOLSON, ALLISON LOY

RIS HARRIS

LEAH AND CH

10502 Manchester Road, Kirkwood, MO 63122

314.822.2221

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RODGER AND CHRIS HOLLENBECK

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SNAPPED!

ELLEN SOULE, MIRAN HALEN, FAITH BERGER, SHERI SHERMAN

we’re

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independent [ a completely st. louis publication

connecting our community.

ST. LOUIS PRESS CLUB beauty buzz by bill barrett WHERE Neiman Marcus WHY To raise funds for media scholarships WHO Event co-chairs Faith Berger, Miran Halen, Sheri Sherman, Ellen Soule; advisory chair Alice Handelman; president William Greenblatt; emcee Jasmine Huda of FOX 2; Neiman Marcus vice president/general manager Cheryl DiMauro HIGHLIGHTS Runway show, brunch bites from The Zodiac, cosmetic giveaways

ALICE HANDELMAN, LEISA ZIGMAN

WILLIAM GREENBLATT, CLAUDIA BURRIS

PAM TODER, PAM TRAPP, ANN HIGBY, SUSAN SHERMAN

121 Hunter Ave. Suite 201 | 314.657.2100 | townandstyle.com 24 |

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FRAN ZAMLER, TOM ESCHEN, JASMINE HUDA


PHOTO ALBUM

SNAPPED!

CAROL AND TOM VOSS

KIM AND TOM CHULICK

FRANCIS SLAY, NANCY

DANA MURPHY, AUGUST SCHLAFLY

KRANZBERG, COLE MC

BRIDE

GRAND CENTER ARTS DISTRICT grand center gala by rick miller WHERE The Big Top WHY To honor Steve Smith, CEO of

Lawrence Group, for his work in the district and to promote the area’s essential role of establishing St. Louis as a world-class arts and business district WHO Honoree Steve Smith; Grand Center Inc. president & CEO Karin Hagaman; board chair Tom Voss; co-chairs Kathie and Richard Winter, Jason Hall, Antionette Carroll; former Mayor Francis Slay HIGHLIGHTS Cocktail reception, live music, award presentation, Fund-A-Need auction, dancing

JASON HALL, KARIN HAGAMAN, KATHIE AND RICHARD WINTER

PETER GALLAGHER, GERRI LYNN ZSCHETZSCHE

KIM AND KEVIN BUIE

AMELIA AND DAN SAETTELE LAURIE LOCK, CHRIS AND SYLVIA SCHMIDT, SEAN LOCK

DR. SHAWN AND MECCA BAKER

ANTIONETTE CARROLL, PHOEBE AND STEVE SMITH

ERIN PRANGE, MIKA CORRINE WEBER, SAYLA FIELDS, RAH BYINGTON

▶ TO SEE MORE OF THIS PARTY ONLINE OR PURCHASE PRINTS VISIT TOWNANDSTYLE.COM ◀

m

OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

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We come to you! - individual or group appointments Bachelorette & Bachelor Parties Any Gathering to Live Smoothly!

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by joan berkman

St. Nicholas Family Life Center 12550 South Forty Drive St. Louis 63141 314.361.6924 www.sngoc.org

Recently, our company underwent a major reorganization. I now report to a supervisor who I think isn’t up to the challenge, and I feel compelled to talk with his boss. Is it ever OK to go over the boss’ head?

E SAV VE SA

0% 2 % 20

G Gle len nC nn no Caard on rd

2018

October

19-28

—NEED ADVICE BEFORE CROSSING THE CHAIN OF COMMAND

Going over the boss’ head is a tough career call. It’s fraught with risks, and, in particular, it brings up such sticky issues as loyalty and ethics. Opinions vary on this touchy subject. Some business cultures encourage skip-level communications; in others, bypassing the boss simply goes against the grain. And, should you decide to go over the boss’ head, you have no assurance that your expressed concerns won’t be shared word for word with your supervisor. That said, how would you feel if someone under you went over your head? My sense is that it would not only make you angry, but it also would make you feel betrayed. More than likely, you’d find it difficult at best to trust or work with that person moving forward. Certainly, if your boss is doing something illegal or unethical, there’s an obligation to speak up. But in this case, the first person you should talk with is your boss. Maybe you’re not assessing the situation correctly, and there’s a good explanation for your supervisor’s managerial direction. If you feel his explanation is inadequate and are compelled to inquire at a higher level, you might say that although you respect his judgment, you’d like permission to discuss this with higher-ups. He might surprise you, but if he says no, I’d drop it there (and hope your résumé is in order). Some other thoughts: If you have a good relationship with the boss’ boss and know that he/she values your opinion, this might provide an avenue for a productive conversation. Or, if your work group shares your opinion about the boss, the entire team might want to schedule a meeting with the boss’ boss. There’s power in numbers. The boss’ boss may be more likely to listen to an entire staff’s opinion versus your individual complaint, especially if he/ she is unaware of the situation. (Regardless, it is important to get to know the boss’ boss. Make sure he/she knows your name and chat when the opportunity presents itself to develop a long-term, mutually beneficial relationship—you never know when you will need a valuable ally). Finally, if your HR department welcomes this kind of input, it might provide another alternative. If not, you’re wasting your breath and probably your future job security. Bottom line: Studies have shown most companies view going over the boss’ head as an act of insubordination. Once you get this label, you’re always at risk because nobody trusts you. In my humble opinion, transferring or even quitting may be more prudent than insurrection.

&

IF YOU HAVE A QUESTION FOR JOAN, SEND IT TO BUSINESS@TOWNANDSTYLE.COM. JOAN LEE BERKMAN IS A MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS CONSULTANT.

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OCTOBER 17, 2018


REAM DDAY BY CHRISSIE WOJCIECHOWSKI | PHOTOS BY SUZY GORMAN

LACE, JEWELS, LAYERS OF TULLE … THESE ARE THE THINGS DREAMS ARE MADE OF. IT’S YOUR BIG DAY, SO IT’S PERFECTLY APPROPRIATE TO CHOOSE THE MOST ELEGANT AND EXQUISITE DETAILS TO MAKE IT (AND YOU) STAND OUT.

BOLD BRIDE

Be unexpected with bold, black details that contrast with a striking color bouquet.

Essense of Australia princess gown, $1,899, Toni Federici veil in pepper, $300; both from The Ultimate Bride  Oscar de la Renta pompom flower beaded earrings, $470, Fallon Monarch Jagged Edge crystal necklace, $295; both from Neiman Marcus  Rhinestone choker, $58 from Shine Boutique  Bouquet by Ken Miesner’s Flowers


FLOWER EXPLOSION

Flowers, flowers everywhere, from the bouquet down to the end of the veil! The monochromatic scheme puts the focus on the beautiful bride. Calle Blanche L’Amour drop-waist gown, $1,599, veil with three-dimensional flowers, $699; both from The Ultimate Bride  Jimmy Choo ‘Andie’ sunglasses, $475, Alexis Bittar choker, $795; both from Neiman Marcus  Rhinestone drop earrings, $36 from Shine Boutique  Bouquet by Ken Miesner’s Flowers


DRIVEN BY DETAILS

A dramatic veil that matches the decorative adornment on the gown ensures the bride is the star of the show.

Fiore Couture ‘Jordan’ sweetheart gown, $1,999, Fiore Couture cathedral veil, $599, En Vogue Bridal Accessories gold-leaf headband, $135; all from The Ultimate Bride  Dannijo ‘Petunia’ cuff, $243 from Neiman Marcus


FANCY FLOW

Layers upon layers of tulle and sequins allow for perfect movement on the dance floor.

Fiore Couture gown, $2,099, crystal sash headband, $104; both from The Ultimate Bride  Split crystal bracelet, $12 from Shine Boutique  Pearl earrings and shoes, model’s own

SPECIAL THANKS TO: Location: MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN Model: ANNA ZENG, COURTESY OF WEST MODEL & TALENT MANAGEMENT Hair and Makeup: CARMEN CURRIE Style Coordinator: EMILY McGEHEE


You are invited to our Estate Sale TOWN TALK

featuring exclusive jewelry out of Beverly Hills.

October 17� - 24�

JEWELRY

As always, we buy gold, platinum, diamonds, colored stones, watches and unwanted jewelry. We will separate your real from costume. Buying since 1976. Stop in and inquire about our Estate Planning Jewelry Portfolios.

9711 Clayton Road | Ladue 63124 | 314.997.1707 | albarre.com | Monday – Friday 10 to 5:30 | Saturday 10 to 4

OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

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I D❤!

STEPHANIE WOLF & DAN HENSCHEL

AUGUST 11, 2018

by julia m. johnson | photos by laura miller photography STEPHANIE WOLF AND DAN HENSCHEL’S ROMANCE started in true St. Louis fashion: at a Cardinals game. They met up at Helen Fitzgerald’s before heading to Busch Stadium with a mutual friend. “We had a lot of fun together, and started seeing each other regularly after that,” Stephanie recalls. Many dates later, Dan secretly planned a romantic proposal at Chandler Hill Vineyards. “He reserved an area at the winery and invited family and friends to attend,” Stephanie says. “I thought I was just going on a girls’ trip that day, and he was going to golf with friends. But as I walked around a corner, a trail of roses appeared, and Dan was standing there with a ring.” After an emotional proposal, the pair walked up to the main building where loved ones were waiting to celebrate with them. “He did a great job of organizing everything,” Stephanie says. “The day was so lovely. It was almost like a mini wedding!” The couple said their vows at the Shrine of St. Joseph and adjourned to nearby Union Station for a Grand Hall reception. “The hall is so beautiful on its own, it really didn’t need much decoration,” Stephanie says. “We did bring in special candelabra and eucalyptus accents for the tables and chairs, and used some of the bridesmaids’ bouquets as centerpieces.” Surprisingly pleasant weather allowed for a photo session in Forest Park. “We were afraid it would be really hot and humid that day, but it was just perfect—85 degrees and breezy,” Stephanie recalls. For the reception, her dad choreographed some fun father/daughter and bride/groom dances set to Stevie Ray Vaughan and Stevie Wonder tunes. Stephanie says the day was extra special because while the groomsmen were getting ready, her future brother-in-law took her dad aside and asked permission to marry her sister. “My father referred to our big day as ‘the second royal wedding’ because we kind of resemble Prince Harry and Meghan Markle,” Stephanie laughs. “Everything went perfectly, and we had a wonderful time!” The couple jetted off for a Mexico honeymoon shortly afterward and now live in Sunset Hills. &

« resources wedding party » ceremony | Shrine of St. Joseph reception | Union Station gown | Vera Wang cake | Made by Lia florist | Bloomin’ Buckets music | Push the Limit, Landolfi Quartet honeymoon | Quintana Roo, Mexico

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OCTOBER 17, 2018

maid of honor | Jackie Wolf bridesmaids | Emily Henschel, Abby Andrade, Tierney Davis, Suzy Gill, Shannon Phelan, Madison van Stone, Jessica Sullivan, Caroline Ragsdale, Maddie Moore best men | Rich Henschel, Kevin Henschel groomsmen | Elliott Wolf, Drew Andrade, Timmy O’Neill, Josh Syberg, Joe Dodd, Eric Fuchs, Tony Scotino, Billy Feicht, Doug Devine, Tyler Brady, Rob Mitchell, Zach Manwaring bride’s parents | Drs. Michael & Bernita Wolf of Sunset Hills groom’s parents | Rich & Judy Henschel of Clayton


TOWN TALK

Schedule an Appointment for our next Trunk Show

STELLA YORK DESIGNER WEDDING GOWNS

November 16 – 17

VOTED BEST ST. LOUIS BRIDAL SALON!

Best of The Knot St. Louis Magazine A List Award Best Bridal: Best of the Best Award

1115 South Big Bend Boulevard @ I-64 /40 www.TheUltimateBride.com 314.961.9997 Call us for your appointment today!

OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

| 33


Making your event

PHOTO: WHITE-KLUMP PHOTOGRAPHY

&

D ivine!

Aaren Muex

OWNER

FOUNDER

Contact us today!

info@mydivineevents.com MyDivineEvents.com / 314.669.5933

THE SHELDON ART GALLERIES

A N N I V E R S A R Y C E L E B R AT I O N Join us for a unique music and art event commemorating the 20th anniversary of the SHELDON ART GALLERIES and honoring past and present board presidents. Enjoy themed music, dinner and cocktails to celebrate the many cultures that

THE SHELDON ART GALLERIES

CO N N E

A N N I V E R S A R Y C E L E B R AT I O N

contribute so much to the vibrant fabric of St. Louis!

C TI

N O V E M B E R 1 AT 6 PM

NG

THE SHELDON ART GALLERIES

OU

CO - C H A I R E D BY DAV E & B A R B G I FF O R D A N D M A RY S T R AU SS

R

CO

M

M

UN

IT Y

TO

YE THE W O R LD FO R 20

A

RS

Patron tickets are $175, $300 and $500 and include complimentary parking, pre-concert cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, dinner and live music by The Sheldon’s World Music Ensemble. Sponsorships are $2,000 and $5,000 and include a Table of 10.

S P O N S O R E D BY DAVE & BARB GIFFORD, MARY STRAUSS, NANCY & KEN KRANZBERG AND CREATIVE PL ANNING

Call The Sheldon at 314.533.9900 to reserve your tickets or table. Proceeds benefit the exhibitions and programs of the Sheldon Art Galleries!


TOWN TALK

OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

| 35


Brides

for

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OCTOBER 17, 2018 | FLIP

MAKE A PLAN. MAKE AN INVESTMENT. MAKE A DIFFERENCE. WE CAN HELP.


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Celebrating 30 Exceptional Years

A lifestyle customized exclusively for seniors. 314-993-0111 TheGatesworth.com The Gatesworth is committed to equal housing opportunity and does not discriminate in housing and services because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.


the flip side

DOROTHY TOWN

TABLE OF

CONTENTS october 17, 2018

next issue october 24

F7

by dorothy weiner

LAST WEEK I DECIDED TO EXERCISE MY CIVIC DUTY

and volunteer to canvass for the candidate of my choice for U.S. Senate. It is one of the many privileges we enjoy as members of a democracy. Plus, I’ve always wondered what it would be like. The assignment was phone canvassing, and to be honest, I wasn’t exactly looking forward it. I expected people either to not answer their phones when they saw an unfamiliar number or to summarily hang up if they were of a different political persuasion. What I really did not foresee was the civics lesson it turned out to be. It was enlightening in ways good, bad and ugly. For one thing, I got a glimpse of how robocalling—the bane of everyone’s existence—works. The system used in this case was Hubdialer, and we canvassers had no idea who or where we were calling. Phone numbers did not display, so I didn’t realize I was calling Independence, Missouri, until I asked respondents where they lived. Like Martha, who greeted me with, “Hallelujah! This candidate helps the people and the veterans who need support. Bless you for calling.” She assured me that both she and her boyfriend would be voting for my candidate. Martha is 80 years old. Then there was Nadine, who turned out to be a fellow canvasser from Kansas City. We chatted for quite some time, comparing notes on our experiences with the voters of our state. We lamented that many of our calls went to voice mail, mostly because people were at work (and many don’t have land lines anyway). The folks who are home tend to avoid calls by simply not picking up the phone. Nadine told me she also had worked on the campaign four years ago. She’s 81—you go, girl. There were some ugly calls, too. Like the woman who told another canvasser to “go to hell”—which is where she said our candidate also should go. Or the respondents who said, “Sure, I’ll talk to you, but you won’t like what I have to say,” and then went on to excoriate the candidate and the party for “not caring about our veterans” among other complaints (but mostly for just being). Those conversations usually ended in abrupt termination, i.e., a hang up. How did I feel about being rebuffed by slamming phones? Surprisingly unfazed. I was there as an advocate, not a provocateur. So no matter how rude someone was, I thanked them for their time. And if they stayed on the phone long enough, I added, “Have a nice day.” After a couple of hours, I realized I wasn’t going to change any minds. But I might have swayed one voter who “only goes to the polls for presidential elections.” I told her down-ballot elections are just as important. Maybe more so. And I learned that canvassing on behalf of a Senate hopeful calls for dignity, even if the effort isn’t met with the same.

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OCTOBER 17, 2018

F16

F4 F5

DOROTHY ABOUT TOWN COVER STORY – HighTower St. Louis Wealth Advisors

LEISURE 〉〉

F10

on the cover » LEISURE

HEALTH&BEAUTY

T&S HOME

OCTOBER 17, 2018 | FLIP

F6 ON THE TABLE – Copia F7 SPECIAL FEATURE – A New Lens F10 DRIVEN – Maserati Levante S

HEALTH & BEAUTY 〉〉 F12 HEALTH – Ask the Specialists F14 BEAUTY – What’s Hot For Cool Temps

T&S HOME 〉〉 F16 PICTURE THIS F18 SPECIAL FEATURE – What’s in a Name? F20 HOMEWORK F23 OPEN HOUSES SOLD! F22 CLASSIFIEDS

MAKE A PLAN. MAKE AN INVESTMENT. MAKE A DIFFERENCE. WE CAN HELP.

HIGHTOWER ST. LOUIS WEALTH ADVISORS IS LED BY BARBARA ARCHER, CFP, CLU, AEP; CAROL L. ROGERS, CPWA; AND OMAR QURESHI, CIMA, CPWA. THE FIRM ADVISES CLIENTS ABOUT INVESTMENT, TAX, ESTATE PLANNING, CASH FLOW, PHILANTHROPY AND RISK MANAGEMENT MATTERS. PICTURED ON THE COVER: BRIAN COPELAND, BARBARA ARCHER, OMAR QURESHI AND CAROL ROGERS. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 314.598.4060 OR VISIT HIGHTOWERSTL.COM. COVER DESIGN BY ALLIE BRONSKY COVER PHOTO BY TIM PARKER PHOTOGRAPHY


IT'S OUR 25TH ANNIVERSARY! PHOTO: TIM PARKER PHOTOGRAPHY

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HIGHTOWER ST. LOUIS WEALTH ADVISORS by julia m. johnson WHEN A WEALTH MANAGEMENT PROFESSIONAL RETIRES, it’s important to ensure his or

her clients make a seamless transition to another adviser at the firm, says Barbara Archer, partner and managing director at HighTower St. Louis Wealth Advisors in Brentwood. According to a recent study published by Deloitte, it’s an issue that is gaining a lot of attention as wealth advisers are aging out of the field faster than they can be replaced. Archer says HighTower avoids disruption by using a collaborative approach to client service. “We are structured differently than a lot of other wealth management providers,” she explains. “As an ensemble firm, we work as a team as opposed to siloed firms where advisers are in competition with each other. At HighTower, we cross over for the benefit of clients because we want them to have access to all of our diverse areas of expertise.” The firm’s eight-person wealth adviser group is an even mix of men and women, and four administrative team members assist them in providing a high level of client attention, according to Archer. HighTower offers services in investment, taxes, estate planning, giving, cash flow and risk management. The firm starts planning for smooth transitions at the outset of each client relationship. “When a new client comes in, we prepare a smartboard presentation and have two or three professionals present, including a lead adviser,” Archer notes. “As we get to know the client, these staff members also attend strategic review meetings so the relationships stay firmly in place. We create a detailed financial plan for each client, and we all listen carefully to his or her needs.” That way, if a transition is necessary, the team is highly familiar with the client and family and can continue providing advice without interruption. A common concern among clients is how to properly entrust a business or portfolio to the next generation. “We have a lot of experience helping families succeed,” Archer says. “Many of our clients are self-made business executives, entrepreneurs, lawyers, doctors and CPAs. We help with long-range planning and even use the services of a psychologist to determine which family member might be best suited to take over a business. We follow a very thorough and thoughtful process.” The firm’s commitment doesn’t stop at the office. HighTower staff members serve on nonprofit boards and spend many hours outside of work helping clients engage in community activities as a way of giving back. “Too often, members of our industry focus only on monetary treasures,” Archer says. “It’s important to us, though, to make sure people think about community treasures like the Shakespeare Festival, zoo or art museum. We enjoy putting on client events that tie in with these institutions, and we think it’s especially important to involve young family members. It’s easier to give guidance on invested dollars when we can see firsthand what is meaningful to the people we serve.” &

FA L L P E R F O R M A N C E S C H E D U L E : TENGYUE ZHANG

Saturday, October 20, 8pm The Ethical Society “Tengyue played magnificently, like a true & deep artist, with courage, dedication, beautiful musicianship & stunning virtuosity, all in the service of the music.” —SHARON ISBIN, Professor at The Julliard School of Music

LOS ANGELES GUITAR QUARTET (LAGQ)

Thursday, November 8, 8pm The Sheldon Concert Hall

“Anyone can dabble in unfamiliar styles and produce something resembling music... only a scant number of top classical music virtuosos can hop genres as effortlessly and convincingly as these players do...” —DAVID NOEL EDWARDS, The Berkshire Edge

JEROME MOUFFE

Saturday December 8, 8pm The Ethical Society “A brilliant virtuoso with a personal theatrical flair.” —ELIOT FISK, Professor at The New England Conservatory

TICKETS: STLClassicalGuitar.org or call 314.567.5566 OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

| F5


ON THE TABLE by jonathan carli | photos by bill barrett

COPIA first impression »

The second location of Copia, a popular wine bar/steakhouse on Washington Avenue, opened in May in the former Morton’s spot in Clayton. It has great ambience in a clubby, dark-wood kind of way, and the menu (on the pricey side) has plenty of variety, with steak, pasta and fish dishes, many with a Creole bent. The service was friendly, but still somewhat disorganized well into late summer.

must try

WATERMELON GAZPACHO SOUP ▶ $5 Deliciously sweet

and cool, it had a pleasant blended-veggie chunkiness with well-balanced savory and sweet flavors.

CAESAR SALAD ▶ $8

It delivered the salty creaminess diners look for in this traditional bed of dressed romaine. The

pieces of lettuce were well-dusted with parmesan, and while the rich Mayfair dressing was good, there needed to be more of it.

ALASKAN HALIBUT ▶ $33 Fresh and pan-

seared in butter, it came with a sweet strawberry coulis and fruit salsa, which worked well with the

buttery fish. Accompanying grains of quinoa and an arugula-orzo medley added a touch of bitterness to offset the butter.

translation of étouffée) by herby, brown, Cajun gravy. The sauce was heavily flavored with bell peppers, tomatoes and spices.

CREOLE WHITEFISH ÉTOUFFÉE ▶ $25

ROASTED ORGANIC CHICKEN ▶ $23 Also

Spicy and creamy at the same time, the dish had blackened cod sitting on a bed of dirty rice smothered (the literal

trending Southern, this was the essence of comfort food, with half a chicken hidden under a pool of andouille and

Wash It Down:

Copia shines when it comes to spirits. The wine list is enormous, and some of the beer offerings are hard to turn down. Like the Elysian Superfuzz, a blood orange-infused pale ale from Seattle. It was malty and sweet with a definite orange aftertaste. There also are hundreds of wine varieties, plenty offered by the glass.

roasted corn gravy. The flavors were great; I only wish the chicken skin had been browned first. The dish came with a creamy mash of Yukon Gold potatoes, perfect for the gravy.

GOOEY BUTTER CAKE ▶ $9 It's atypical

here, but very good. More of a custard sitting on top of a buttery graham

cracker crust, it was decadently sweet—just what you want in a dessert.

CINNAMON APPLE BREAD PUDDING ▶ $7.95 If you like things less sweet, order this. It’s chewy with plenty of punch from nutmeg and cinnamon.

Slow-Roasted Prime Rib with broccoli and Yukon creamy buttered mash

overall »

Copia has a high-end ambience, yet the menu is varied enough to appeal to a wider audience than its predecessor, Morton’s. In identity, it’s part chop house, part Creole, part wine bar.

7822 BONHOMME AVE. 314.241.9463


A NEW LENS: A LOCAL FILMMAKER SHINES A LIGHT ON HOMELESSNESS

B Y S T E P H A N I E WA L L A C E

PHOTO: MARK OGIER

SCREENCAP FROM LIVING IN TENTS IN TENTS

PHOTO: MARK OGIER

BLAKE, A RESIDENT OF THE TENT CITY

SPARTA RESIDENT WULF AND DIRECTOR PAUL CRANE

S

even years ago, if you traveled north of Lumière Place and the America’s Center Convention Complex, you would find something unexpected along the banks of the Mississippi: a tent city. The homeless community was dismantled by the city in 2012, but St. Louisans still can get an intimate look inside the encampment thanks to local filmmaker Paul Crane’s documentary, Living in Tents. The film offers an insightful perspective on homelessness in St. Louis and its residents who survive without permanent shelters or resources. Crane, who grew up in Olivette, says homelessness wasn’t on his radar before his experience with the tent city. “I didn’t know anything about it before this project,” he explains. “That is what really interested me in telling the story. I was curious to learn about the homeless, why people would choose a tent city over a shelter and why they are allowed to.” Crane encountered the encampment by accident. While looking for inspiration for a photography class he was taking, he came across a collection of tarps, tents and shacks on the riverfront. “I was out taking pictures and just stumbled upon it,” he recalls. “I was hesitant to approach,

but I did eventually.” The tent city was divided into three smaller camps, each with its own name and leader: Sparta, Hopeville and Dignity Harbor. The first person Crane met was Wulf, the man in charge of Sparta. He showed Crane around and explained some of the camp’s rules. While he had little documentary filmmaking experience at the time, after regular visits, Crane was inspired to chronicle day-to-day life in the community. He was a fan of Marc Singer’s documentary Dark Days, which followed a group of people living in an abandoned section of New York’s subway system and felt he could do something similar. “There were so many stories in the camps,” he says. “The people living there, the volunteers who worked there—it was a lot of material to work with. Making a film seemed like the obvious thing to do, and I was super excited about the project.” Living in Tents follows five residents of the tent city and five volunteers who worked with the homeless living there. As part of the process, Crane temporarily moved into Sparta in January of 2011. He had a tent set up for three months and would spend two nights a week there. “It wasn’t an experiment in trying to be homeless,” he says. “I wanted to earn people’s trust and capture as much that happened as I could.” He admits now that he was probably a little naïve initially, but the camaraderie he built with Wulf and others made him feel safe. While filming, Crane not only captured the daily existence of the residents and their stories, but also the city’s response to the tent city, including interviews with Bill Siedhoff, director of the department of human services for the city of St. Louis at the time. While the encampment was founded with good intentions, the film documents its eventual decline. Fires, infighting and even a homicide all played a role in the city’s decision to shut down the three camps.

The residents weren’t simply left out on the street. Through private funding, the city placed them in apartments with the hope that after a year, they would find employment and take over payment of rent and utilities. Crane was on hand to document the transition from tents to apartments and also followed up once the one-year deadline had expired. “Originally, I didn’t expect filming to last several years, but I thought their continued journeys were important to capture,” he says. “When I put the film together, it was really cool to see all that happened and what people had gone through.” Eight years after stumbling across the tent city, Crane is still in contact with many of its former residents. He says the experience taught him about the struggles the homeless deal with every day, including addiction, mental illness and past trauma. “I’d like to think I was already compassionate, but making Living In Tents gave me a deeper understanding of why homelessness happens and will continue to happen,” he notes. “I want the film to be an opportunity for people to get know these individuals and learn about them and their problems.”

&

LIVING IN TENTS ▶

is now streaming on Amazon and will be screened as part of the St. Louis International Film Festival at .ZACK

NOV. 4.

OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

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PHOTO: SUZY GORMAN

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9 1 | SSM HEALTH CARDINAL GLENNON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

10 4 | ALBARRÉ

The Glennon Card is a fundraising program organized by the SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children’s Foundation and the Glennon Guild to support SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital.

Our estate sale Oct. 17 through 24 features exclusive jewelry from Beverly Hills! We buy gold, platinum, diamonds, colored stones, jewelry and watches. Please ask about our estate jewelry planning portfolios.

1465 S. Grand Blvd. 314.577.5600 | glennoncard.org

9711 Clayton Road 314.997.1707 | albarre.com

2 | THE EYE BAR

5 | ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH

Check out durable and amazing Germandesigned ic! berlin frames at The Eye Bar during the Glennon Card fundraiser. Eye exams and same-day, single-vision lenses are available. 401 N. Euclid Ave. | 169 Carondelet Plaza 314.367.1848 | theeyebar.com

3 | SIGN OF THE ARROW Beatriz Ball pumpkin bowls with spoons make wonderful hostess gifts for autumn celebrations and are ideal for serving up everything from tangy cranberry sauce to fiery salsas. 9814 Clayton Road 314.994.0606 | signofthearrow.com

Join us for the annual Grecian Kitchen Holiday Open House with luncheon and boutique shopping from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 3 at the church. sngoc.org

6 | CHRISTOPHER’S You’ll fall in love with our autumn and Halloween decor. This witch is awfully sassy as she repeats everything you say;  $28. 127 E. Argonne Ave. 314.909.0202 | christophersgifts.com

7 | HIGHTOWER ST. LOUIS WEALTH ADVISORS

10 | SECOND SITTING CONSIGNMENTS

Congratulations to Zach Ungerott and Laura Boedges and on gaining their Certified Financial Planner™ accreditations!

We have provided consignment of high-end furniture and home furnishings for the last quarter century! Get 15 to 50 percent off current prices in October and come to our retirement sale in November before we close our doors Nov. 30.

1401 S. Brentwood Blvd., Ste. 550 314.598.4060 | hightowerstl.com

8 | SPECIAL SOLUTIONS Our popular standardized test prep programs include SSAT, ITBS, PSAT, SAT, ACT and others as requested. 9225 Manchester Road 314.475.5035 | specialsolutions.com

14081 Manchester Road 636.527.4747 | secondsitting.com

11 | TMS THERAPY CENTERS OF SAINT LOUIS

Velvet pumpkins are great fall decorations that create a warm and cozy statement. They are lush to touch, and the feathers and stem add natural texture.

We offer TMS therapy (transcranial magnetic stimulation), an FDA-approved alternative treatment for mood disorders such as depression, anxiety and bipolar disorder. It helps restore the normal function of underperforming brain cells to relieve debilitating symptoms. Pictured: Owner Kim Mercille, RN

10502 Manchester Road 314.822.2221 | bdaviscompany.com

10420 Old Olive St. Road, Ste. 104 314.736.5999 | tmshelps.com

9 | B. DAVIS DESIGN

12 | M1 BANK M1 Bank and the Poteet family have gifted 501 N. Hills to Life Arts for a future 17,000-square-foot arts academy campus. 112 S. Hanley Ave., Ste. 120 314.721.2265 | m1bank.net

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LEISURE

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13 | SAINT LOUIS BALLET

16 | ABSOLUTE COLLEGE CONSULTING

Join us Nov. 2 through 4 for an emotional and physical rendition of Shakespeare’s greatest love story, Romeo & Juliet, set to a lush Prokofiev score. Seniors over the age of 62 can use the promotion code SENIOR to save on afternoon performances.

The college search can be overwhelming. Owner Cindy Zelinsky guides students and families through the process from search to decision. The initial consultation is free.

Touhill Performing Arts Center 314.516.4949 | touhill.org

17 | BELSONO HEARING CENTERS

14 | WILSON LIGHTING The Golding pendant is a refreshing update on a classic midcentury modern statement piece. With a mixed metal finish, this fixture is perfect for your modern home and will match multiple finishes throughout your space. 909 S. Brentwood Blvd. 314.222.6300 | wilsonlighting.com

15 | THE ULTIMATE BRIDE This relaxed gown has off-the-shoulder straps embellished with hundreds of glistening pearls. Schedule an appointment at our Stella York Trunk Show Nov. 16 and 17.

Have a new doctor, new practice, or new health & wellness business?

636.346.5313 | absolutecollegeconsulting.com

We are offering free hearing screenings, demonstrations and special offers at all of our locations during the month of October. Call to find your closest clinic. Ellisville, St. Louis, Richmond Heights 888.373.0061 | belsonohearing.com

18 | ST. LOUIS CLASSICAL GUITAR We promote positive community impact through classical guitar performance and education. Our Great Artist Series showcases the best guitarists in the world, and Guitar Horizons supports education programs in more than 20 schools. 3547 Olive St., Ste. 204 314.567.5566 | stlclassicalguitar.org

1115 S. Big Bend Blvd. 314.961.9997 | theultimatebride.com

19 | WAX N GO

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

1.844.9.WAXNGO | waxngo.com

Forget about the candle and cooking parties; pamper yourself for once! Call Wax N Go to book your group event. Our registered, licensed estheticians come to you.

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Contact TOWN style at sales@townandstyle.com to learn how you can introduce yourself to our curious readers! Be a part of our HEALTH & WELLNESS special sections. They run in every issue, and all editorial is written by our local staff of professional writers.

314.657.2100 |

m townandstyle.com

OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

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townandstylE.Com

CHECk out

DRIVEN

digital edition

MASERATI LEVANTE S by robert w. paster “MY MASERATI DOES 185. I LOST MY LICENSE, NOW I DON’T DRIVE.” Fortunately, these

! d e p p a Sn parties

special e calenvdeanrt

are the lyrics to a classic ’70s rock song and not biographical facts. The rebellious, bad boy Maserati spirit still lives on today. As a sign of the times, its contemporary manifestation takes the form of a stylish and powerful SUV, the Levante. As expected from an Italian automaker, the Levante is a sleek SUV with a gaping grille, vent holes, and a curved character line below a sharply raked rear window. Italian style abounds inside as well, where sumptuous, two-tone leather envelops the dash, side panels and seats. A panoramic sunroof above both seat rows lets in lots of light, and a heated, electrically adjustable steering wheel and dual automatic climate control provide year-round comfort. An air-conditioned storage area in the front armrest ensures your Snickers won’t melt, even on a hot St. Louis day. Other than the hard button controls for the ventilation system, most other systems operate through the 7-inch touchscreen that displays navigation, audio, phone and vehicle settings. Concentric knobs between the front seats control volume and also can be used to manipulate the screen. Rear seat leg room is surprisingly plentiful, but two passengers would be more comfortable than three. Behind the 60/40 foldable rear seat that includes a long object pass-through, there’s decent cargo room, but the slope of the rear hatch limits the height of objects that can be carried. A nice, small, covered area in back provides plenty of safe, secure storage. Of course, being a Maserati, the Levante is also a kick to drive. Perhaps its most distinctive feature is its sonorous exhaust note, which can be enhanced by pushing a sport button on the center console to open the exhaust. It’s a fabulous sound that will turn heads and ears. Try that in a Tesla. Pressing the button a second time stiffens up the suspension and steering to give the Levante a sportier feel, and it pays off with pool table-flat cornering in tight curves. Combined with good brakes, a stiff yet comfortable suspension, and gobs of power from the 430-horsepower, twin turbo, V6 engine in the S version, the Levante is fun to drive for an SUV, though power steering seemed a bit overboosted. The only other issue is the 8-speed automatic transmission, which seemed to be reluctant to upshift sometimes. It’s possible that it was trying to adapt to my driving style, which can be a bit aggressive. Using the paddle shifters to shift manually alleviated the problem. Under hard acceleration, the engine pops when shifts are done manually, creating an attractive sound. The auto shut-off when you come to a stop can be annoying but can be defeated. An active air suspension provides five ride heights depending on need or preference. Front and rear parking sensors, blind spot detection and a reverse camera aid parking ease, but automatic emergency braking is an option; it should be standard on a $90,000-plus vehicle. According to Matt Kalina, sales executive at Jim Butler Italia, “The Levante represents a real value compared to other vehicles in its class; you get Italian style and flair for less money than its German competition. It looks different, sounds different and has its own performance personality.” &

technicals 〉〉 LEVANTE S PRICE:

▶ BASE: $86,000, INCLUDING DELIVERY ▶ AS DRIVEN WITH OPTIONS: $96,400

314. 657.2100 F10 |

TOWN&style

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| townandstyle.com

OCTOBER 17, 2018

GAS MILEAGE:

▶ 14 CITY ▶ 19 HIGHWAY

▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

DRIVETRAIN:

FRONT ENGINE; ALL-WHEEL DRIVE 3.0-LITRE, TWIN TURBO, V6 ENGINE 424 HORSEPOWER 8-SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION

ROBERT PASTER (ROBERTPASTER.COM) IS ALSO AN ATTORNEY IN PRIVATE PRACTICE, CONCENTRATING IN ESTATE PLANNING AND PROBATE.


ASK

THE SPECIALISTS

SEASONAL ALLERGIES Dr. Hamsa Subramanian, allergist and immunologist

Signature Medical Group

Andrew Menatti, Ph.D., clinical neuropsychologist

St. Louis Center for Cognitive Health

Q: A:

A:

Some allergy patients say they don’t like to take medications because they worry about ingredients like steroids or side effects such as drowsiness. Unlike some other health conditions, prevention doesn’t lead to a cure because you often can’t escape what causes your allergies. Researchers think symptoms are increasing because ozone levels, rising temperatures and smog contribute to high pollen concentrations. My first advice for people with symptoms affecting quality of life is to see a physician and follow his or her instructions. This especially includes patients with allergy-related conditions like asthma, insomnia, headaches, sinus infections and ear problems. A number of medications are known to be safe and effective, but those who still don’t want to take them may find allergy injections a good alternative. The first year of therapy can be time-consuming because you have to build up the dose weekly in the beginning, then switch to every two, three and then four weeks. But after treatment, many people only need medication occasionally and some can wean off of it altogether. Patients also can try changing their habits and surroundings to reduce the effects of allergies. It’s not a perfect solution to the problem, but it may help. Try grooming household pets often, and keep them out of the bedroom. Keep windows closed, wear sunglasses when outdoors, use artificial tears, and stay informed about pollen counts. Pollen levels tend to be lowest before dawn, in the evening and after rain showers, so plan your outdoor exercise and activities accordingly. An honest conversation with your doctor is the most important part of the plan. A good allergist will listen to the patient’s concerns, dispel any misconceptions and create a treatment plan to fit the person’s lifestyle and preferences.

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NEUROPSYCHOLOGY

Q:

I always have had seasonal allergies. This year has been worse than ever, but I really don’t like to take medicine. Is there another therapy you recommend?

TOWN&style

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OCTOBER 17, 2018

BY JULIA M. JOHNSON

I am in my 40s and have noticed that occasionally, I become disoriented and turn the wrong direction or misplace things. I am concerned; my mother developed dementia in her 70s. What tests do you advise, if any? In my practice, I often see patients with questions like this. I wouldn’t be concerned about dementia or testing in your 40s; neurodegenerative disease isn’t generally problematic until your 70s or 80s. With that said, many people your age become concerned if they can’t focus or remember things as well as they used to. That’s very common. It’s important to realize that as magnificent as our brains are, they are far from being perfect storage vessels. They have a lot to process! In the days of early cave-dwellers, people hunted, picked berries and did the same simple things all of the time; their lives were not cognitively demanding. Now, however, we multitask with phones and computers and have to be in several different places each day. In some ways, it seems that modern life has outpaced the brain’s capacity to stay on top of things, but there are techniques we can use to stay on track. It’s an issue of organization and knowing what factors affect your memory. My first question to patients in their 40s is: How organized are you? Do you use a calendar, smartphone, to-do lists and GPS to help you stay on track? If not, put those aids in place. Do you have major drama or stress in your life? Are you only getting a couple of hours of sleep at night? These factors can affect your thought processes as well, which means you have less thinking power to keep track of car keys and highway exits. It’s a good idea to ask a family member—someone who will be objective with you—if you have seemed more forgetful lately. If so, you may want to talk with your doctor. Use these suggestions first, and if problems persist, your doctor can order testing for neurological disease later. If you undergo tests and the results are normal, that’s good news; now you have baseline data for doctors to look at if issues arise 20 or 30 years from now.


HEALTH & BEAUTY

C A R D I A C H E A LT H

Begin Your Journey to Better Hearing! SPECIAL HEARING EVENTS Ellisville October 22nd, 24th & 26th 636-591-1705 Richmond Heights October 18th 314-896-2008 St. Louis October 15th & 17th 314-730-0013 Call today!

SLUCare Physician Group

Q:

My father is 75 and had bypass surgery when he was 70. I am 42 and wondering if I should have a heart screening. If so, what tests should I have, and what will they show?

PHOTO COURTESY OF SLUCARE

Dr. Michael Lim, cardiologist

Call today!

Call today!

A:

This is always a good question to ask. With heart health, there always are opportunities to avoid following the same paths as our predecessors; it’s all about being proactive on your own behalf. The disease process that leads to heart attacks generally happens over many years with the accumulation of cholesterol and buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries. It may even start in your 20s and progress slowly, so you shouldn’t wait until your 50s or 60s to give it some thought. It’s a great idea to talk with a cardiologist about your family’s history and your own health. Things that increase risk include high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, high cholesterol and lack of exercise. Look at the history of these things in first-degree relatives. Human nature often makes us want to test everything, but if you have no symptoms that suggest narrowing of the arteries, tests actually may not be helpful. They don’t always lead doctors to the ‘pot of gold’ and should only be done selectively. A well-known example is that of TV commentator Tim Russert. He had a stress test right before the heart attack that took his life, but it didn’t show anything major. That’s the conundrum of testing procedures; having a lot of them done doesn’t mean you are better off than if you only have them performed selectively. If your 10-year risk of heart problems is low, doctors can suggest proactive methods like improving your diet and sticking to an exercise regimen. If your 10-year risk is intermediate or high, we can work on lowering blood pressure, controlling diabetes and bringing cholesterol down. If you are concerned because a relative has had heart problems, don’t be afraid to ask your doctor whether testing is needed. We are great coaches and want you to have the best chance at good health.

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www.belsonohearing.com

When dealing with adolescent depression there is an alternative PHOTO: SUZY GORMAN

DEPRESSION AND TMS Kim Mercille, RN, founder and CEO

TMS Therapy Centers of Saint Louis

Q:

I deal with depression on a daily basis and haven’t found any medication that really seems to help. What does TMS (transcranial magnetic stimulation) therapy involve, and how long would treatments last for a long-term solution?

A:

Depression, a debilitating condition, affects more than 16 million American adults and about 20 percent of adolescents, and suicide is the third most common cause of death in people ages 10 to 24. Not included in these statistics are all of those who suffer silently for a variety of reasons. TMS therapy was approved by the FDA in 2008 and offers an effective alternative to conventional therapies like antidepressants. Most major insurance carriers and Medicare cover the treatment for adults who haven’t benefited from medication. TMS is a noninvasive, highly safe, outpatient therapy that takes about 20 minutes, doesn’t require sedation or surgery, and doesn’t cause any systemic side effects. The patient is seated, and the system delivers pulsed magnetic fields to stimulate specific neurons in the brain. After repeated stimulation, the nerve cells begin to ‘wake up’ and produce chemicals called neurotransmitters that are thought to be lacking in people with depression. Patients receive treatment five days a week for about six weeks. It’s not a permanent cure, but results can last up to two years. About 84 percent of patients receive significant benefits, and more than 74 percent achieve remission for a period of time. Maintenance therapy sessions may be required if symptoms begin to reappear. Alternatives like TMS are important because many people have treatment-resistant depression that does not respond well to antidepressants. These patients battle persistent sadness, sleep problems, fatigue, low energy and suicidal thoughts despite trying multiple medications. Over the years, antidepressants actually have become less effective and sometimes they even make symptoms worse, but they used to be the only option. TMS is an important solution that improves quality of life and saves patients’ lives.

Kim Mercille Founder & President

Grant Mercille Youth Brand ambassador

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive procedure that stimulates neurotransmitters in the brain to greatly reduce depression and anxiety.

TMS is a noninvasive holistic treatment that has close to an 80% rate of efficacy with patients experiencing either complete remission or a significant reduction of symptoms.

TMStherapyhelps.com

&

10420 Old Olive Street Rd. Ste. 104 Creve Coeur, MO 63141 314-571-7810 OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

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WHAT’S HOT COOL TEMPS

FOR

1. TEXTURED PONY & WAVES

Oribe Dry Texturizing Spray Beach waves are still in, and loose ponytails that look effortless are all the rage. Use a texturizing spray, like this one that holds your style while adding body and shine, to make it seem like you just threw your hair up without a second glance.

by karyn williams | photo by bill barrett

$46 AT ORIBE.COM

JUST AS EVERYTHING ELSE CHANGES FOR A NEW SEASON—the

2. DARK LIPS

Honest Beauty Lip Crayon Berry and wine shades are what should grace your pout this season for a true fall vibe. Honest Beauty keeps it clean with demi-matte crayons that offer lightweight, high-impact color full of moisture-locking ingredients. Shown in Mulberry and Marsala.

weather, your wardrobe— so should your beauty routine. There are lots of new trends to try and bold colors to embrace.

Here are just a few!

$12.99 AT HONESTBEAUTY.COM

3. NUDE AND NEAT

Algenist ALIVE Prebiotic Balancing Mask At countless runway shows, skin was kept clean and glowing without much fuss or color. To be able to pull off the natural look, prep your skin with this vegan, color-changing mask that balances, detoxifies and boosts radiance for a visibly healthy complexion. $38 AT ULTA BEAUTY

4. SPARKLE!

Stila Glitter & Glow Liquid Eye Shadow Set Layer glitter shadows over soft shades on your lids, or rock them solo. Either way, a dusting will make a statement that complements an otherwise minimal makeup look.

$25 AT SEPHORA

5. POWDER PIZAZZ

Marc Jacobs O!Mega Shadow Gel Powder Eyeshadow Get the glitter feels with a powder eyeshadow as well. Swipe on the corners of your lids or all over for a special golden accent. Shown in Brav-O!

$29 AT SEPHORA & NEIMAN MARCUS

6. LINER LOVE

Marc Jacobs Highliner Glam Glitter Gel Eye Crayon Bold, bright eyes are in, and eyeliners can achieve various looks. Models sported deconstructed lines in bold shades like peacock blue, candy pink and metallic green, as well as flashes of bright colors on the top or bottom lash line to create just the right flair. Shown in (Gem)Stoned and Glam Jam. $25 AT SEPHORA & NEIMAN MARCUS


HOME

The Beauty of Fall


PICTURE THIS by lauren rechan

BOHO CHIC 〉〉 Lately, the boho chic look has taken over shelter magazines and the blogosphere. It’s an eclectic mix of retro styles, brightly colored botanical prints, Turkish rugs, rattan and velvet. Because it’s so whimsical and mixes so many elements, it’s not that easy to pull off, but even a few items can create a cheerful, cozy space.

Stack pottery, earthenware and china in various patterns and colors on open shelving or in a china cabinet.

Not matching everything is a consistent theme. In this adorable kid’s room, even the headboards are different!

For those who like a colorful kitchen, this one checks all of the boxes. Use a variety of gorgeous Turkish runners set back to back on a staircase.

Pick up a colorful Turkish rug for your kitchen, hallway or front entry if you just want a touch of boho. A Moroccan rug and ottomans team with a traditional leather couch and coffee table to give the room a fresh look.

Mixing chairs and fabrics in the dining room has become popular; these bright, eclectic choices create a fun vibe.

Drag your kilim rugs and poofs outside, light candles and string lights for a Bohemian party outdoors—ingenious and intimate!

This room combines midcentury, Asian, European and Turkish styles—astounding and not easy to pull off!

Each piece of furniture has a different fabric, which layer to create the perfect effect.

*ALL IMAGES ABOVE FROM PINTEREST.COM

SHOP THE LOOK〉〉 F16 |

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OCTOBER 17, 2018

Combine layered, mismatched pillows, a Suzani throw and a midcentury modern bench in the bedroom.

Hints of colorful fabrics, tribal art and a Moroccan rug add a boho twist to a traditional white bedroom

Vintage Turkish rug

Synchronized wallpaper

ETSY.COM

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JUST LISTED

What’s in a Name? BY STEPHANIE WALLACE

I F I T ’S B E E N SA I D O N C E , I T ’S B E E N S A I D A T H O U SA N D T I M E S : St. Louis is a city of neighborhoods. With 79 unique ones and many beautiful suburbs, it is built of vibrant communities, each with its own fascinating history. We explored the local lore of a few iconic areas to discover the origins of their names.

D O GTO W N A grisly urban legend links the name back to the 1904 World’s Fair. According to the story, the indigenous peoples on display at the exhibition kidnapped dogs from homes around Forest Park to eat. Thus the area earned the epithet Dogtown. But like with most urban legends, the truth behind the name is a lot less sensational and macabre. The name predates the World’s Fair; references to it can be found in newspapers as early as 1889. It most likely comes from the neighborhood’s mining history in the mid-1800s. ‘Dog’ is found widely in mining terminology, and ‘dogtown’ specifically was used to refer to a group of small structures near a mine.

13346 Fairfield Square Drive Town and Country | $550,000

Enjoy the convenience of having a yard and pool without the responsibility of maintenance? This charming condo provides the best of both worlds! With two patios and one deck, you can enjoy nature at your leisure while the interior provides large, light and bright rooms. Never walk a flight of stairs in this main floor master suite with kitchen, living spaces and laundry room! Visit this incredible spot today!

Ann Farwell 314.973.3407

Rex W. Schwerdt 314.800.4755

K I R K WO O D Gladysmanion.com | 314.721.4755 Proud to be Locally Owned and Operated Since 1936

n i s ’ t a ? h c i t W r At you

Established in 1853, Kirkwood was the first planned suburb west of the Mississippi River and as such, is known as the ‘Queen of St. Louis Suburbs.’ As evidenced by the historic train station, the area’s history is closely tied to the railroad. The community was formed around the building of the Pacific Railroad, and its namesake is James Pugh Kirkwood, chief engineer of the project. His many responsibilities for the railroad included making the first survey west from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains, determining possible routes and managing construction.

L A FAY E T T E S Q UA R E The area that is now Lafayette Square had less than glamorous beginnings as communal pasture for livestock at the beginning of St. Louis’ history. The land was not privately owned and became the hunting ground of criminals who would rob travelers. In part to drive the thieves out, the commons were sold in 1835, but 30 acres were set aside for a community recreational area. The resulting park was named after the Revolutionary War general (with a really long name!) Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, known in the U.S. (and by Hamilton fans) simply as Lafayette. The famous Frenchman had visited St. Louis during his 1824-25 tour of the U.S.

HAVE A treasure IN YOUR ATTIC YOU’D LIKE EVALUATED? CONTACT TELLUS@TOWNANDSTYLE.COM SO WE CAN CONNECT YOU WITH AN APPRAISER AND FEATURE YOUR ITEM IN AN UPCOMING ISSUE!

B E N TO N PA R K

314.657.2100 |

m townandstyle.com

While Lafayette Square had ignoble beginnings as grazing land, Benton Park’s origins are a little on the morbid side. The area, which famously attracted breweries thanks to its underground cave system, used to house something much different. The land was first used as a city cemetery in the mid-19th century. After the founding of Bellefontaine and Calvary cemeteries, the area was turned into a neighborhood in 1866. (Don’t worry; none of the original residents remain. Those buried in the cemetery were relocated in 1865.) Originally called City Park, it was renamed to honor Thomas Hart Benton, the first senator from Missouri. SOURCES: STLOUIS-MO.GOV, KIRKWOODHISTORICALSOCIETY.COM, WEBSTER.EDU

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OCTOBER 17, 2018


3 EDGEWOOD LANE | LADUE | $2,750,000

Located in premier Ladue location, this stunning 5 bedroom, 5.5 bath home sits on two manicured acres and features intricate crown molding and custom millwork throughout with updated kitchen and lovely master bedroom suite. Gorgeous slate patios, PebbleTec pool & 3-car garage. Immaculate grounds offering extreme privacy throughout. Truly a statement home in a beautiful setting!

Proud to be Locally Owned and Operated Since 1936

314-721-4755 | gladysmanion.com

= UNDER CONTRACT $ = NEW PRICE

NEW LISTINGS 13346 FAIRFIELD SQUARE DR. | $550,000 Main level living in this Town&Country condo w/ updated kitchen, finished LL & great outdoor spaces!

CLAYTON/RICHMOND HEIGHTS 8018 CRESCENT DR. | $699,000 Renovated mid-century 4 bed modern home in desirable Davis place w/ beautifully updated kitchen and baths. 7704 COUNTRY CLUB CT. | $525,000 Captivating 3 bed, 2 bath home in ought-after Country Club. Short walk to downtown Clayton!

HUNTLEIGH 2 RADNOR ROAD | $2,100,000 Elegant custom-built 1.5-story home on 3 acres w/ extensive details throughout. Beautiful PebbleTec pool & 3-car garage.

LADUE/OLIVETTE/FRONTENAC 42 COUNTRYSIDE | $2,950,000 A McAlphine architectural masterpiece on a private 1.45 acres. Creatively designed w/ 5-star outdoor amenities. 12 APPLE TREE LANE | $2,599,000 Entirely reinvented estate on 1.8 rolling acres offering luxury living & the utmost privacy. Formal gardens, PebbleTec infinity

61 OVERHILLS DRIVE Rare opportunity to build custom estate on 3 private acres in one of Ladue’s most established neighborhoods.

$ 1448 WILTON LANE | $525,000 Wonderful multi-level, 4-bed home on .940 acre w/ open flr plan, updated kitchen & 2-car garage.

$ 14 CLERMONT LANE | $1,595,000 Secluded English-Tudor estate on 2.27 acres. Outstanding gardens, multiple outdoor terraces & pool.

CENTRAL WEST END

1126 BELLA VISTA | $1,195,000 Exceptional Frontenac open w/ open flr plan & walk-out LL. Spacious deck & large stone fireplace.

TOWN AND COUNTRY

10116 FIELDCREST | $899,000 Custom home in heart of Ladue coming soon by MC Modern Concepts. Walk to local shops & restaurants! 23 DEER CREEK WOODS | $645,000 Situated on over half acre, 34-year-old custom home w/10 ft ceilings, main flr master & 2-car garage.

CHESTERFIELD/BALLWIN 14202 DINSMOOR DRIVE | $439,000 Beautifully renovated 5 bed, 3.5 bath on .47 acre w/ spectacular master bed suite & outstanding baths.

BRENTWOOD/KIRKWOOD $ 20 YORK DRIVE | $875,000 Newer 5 bed, 4.5 bath custom built-home in York Village Neighborhood. Finished LL with deck overlooking backyard.

CONDOS/TOWNHOMES

4509 PERSHING PLACE | $869,000 Beautiful federal-style 6+bed home in CWE restaurant & gallery district.

$ 12045 GAILCREST | $2,600,000 Spectacular home w/ updates galore with master suite & beautiful vaulted kitchen. Pool, putting green & hot tub. 12247 CLAYTON ROAD | $1,699,000 Sophisticated 6 bed, 6.5 bath home w/ main flr master, beautiful kitchen, pergola & PebbleTec pool..

CREVE COEUR 12365 MULBERRY TREE COURT | $850,000 Spectacular 1.5-story 5 bedroom, 4.5 bath executive home with 6300+SF in exclusive Questover Subdivision.

ARNOLD 2856 FOX MEADOW | $279,000 2-story home w/ 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, kitchen with breakfast area & finished LL.

WILDWOOD/ELLISVILLE 3660 BOUQUET | $5,900,000 Exquisite Equestrian Estate nestled on 70+ rolling acres. Elegant yet functional describe this quiet retreat.

CLAYTON 50 BRIGHTON WAY UNIT 1N | $785,000 Luxurious condo in heart of Clayton with 2 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, eat-in kitchen and 2 large patios areas. 4415 LACLEDE AVE # 3 | $199,000 Quaint 2 bed, 1.5 bath condo in great location. Updated w/ detached garage.

CENTRAL WEST END 378 N. TAYLOR AVENUE, 1E | $250,000 Updated 3BR, 3BA condo. Open plan, beautiful millwork & hardwood flrs. Finished LL. Private gated parking.

CREVE COEUR 329 CARLYLE LAKE DRIVE | $849,000 Renovated 4BR townhome w/ gallery-style lighting features main level living, updated kitchen & two patio areas. 3-car garage


HOMEWORK

DEAR HOMEWORK,

The spider door must go! We would like to differentiate this home from its neighbors and address its curb appeal. We are retired and on a fixed budget; however, we do see the need to refresh and rejuvenate. We appreciate your advice on a door selection and landscaping updates. Sincerely, —BRING US OUT OF THE ‘80s PLEASE

DEAR BRING US OUT OF THE ‘80s PLEASE,

I agree with you that the existing front door and sidelights don’t complement the rest of the architecture. I have drawn the sidelights as simple glass rectangles and replaced the front door with one of solid, stained wood with a rectangular molding to create a simple, classic look. The landscaping could use just a little help as well. You will notice that I have removed the bushes and rock area at the entry walk and replaced them with a mass of ornamental grasses. I also placed two much larger flower urns flanking the front porch. Since your photo cut off everything below the entry walk, I show a circle drive as an alternative to complete that part of the picture. These few changes allow you to see the continuity of the façade. They impart a more contemporary feel that allows the architecture and landscape to work together for a unified composition. Thanks for asking, —HOMEWORK

&

FOLLOW US ONLINE HOMEWORK IS PENNED BY PAUL DOERNER, FOUNDING PARTNER OF THE LAWRENCE GROUP. IF YOU WOULD LIKE YOUR HOME CRITIQUED, CONTACT US AT HOMEWORK@TOWNANDSTYLE.COM.

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33 Picardy Lane | Ladue

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mcafee | janet OCTOBER 17, 2018 inc. l 9889 clayton road l saint louis, missouri 63124 l 314.997.4800 I www.janetmcafee.com


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cleaning services

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home improvement Leave it to Weaver

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home improvement Rotted Wood, Painting, Tile, Drywall, Floors, Electrical, Power Washing, Carpentry, Plumbing, Insured. Free Estimates. 40 Years Experience. Don Phillips 314-973-8511

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THE GUTTER GUY

Cleaning, Repairs, Drainage Solutions, Screen Installation & Window Cleaning

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OCTOBER 17, 2018

LEAF CLEAN UP & REMOVAL Firewood, Leaf and Gumball Clean up. Planting, Sodding, Seeding, Mowing, Mulching, Edging, Spraying, Weeding, Pruning, Trimming, Bed Maintenance, Brush Removal, Retaining Walls, Paver Patios & Drainage Work

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Fall into Tune! Bill McGreevy Associate Member Piano Technicians Guild 314-335-9177 wrmcgreevy@gmail.com

real estate

tree services

Call Jamie at 314-997-1707

gutters/roofing

Complete Lawn Maintenance for Residential & Commercial

Are you interested in selling your home in Clayton AS IS andavoiding commissions and showings? Flexible close dates to work with your needs. If so, call Mike @ 314-374-3846 Michael Lauren Development LLC 121 Hunter Ave, Ste 201 St. Louis, MO 63124

Complete Tree Service for Residential & Commercial Tree Pruning & Removal, Plant Healthcare Program, Deadwooding, Stump Grinding, Deep Root Fertilization, Cabling & Storm Cleanup Cary Semsar ISA Board Certified Master Arborist OH-5130B Free Estimate, Fully Insured Call 314-426-2911 info@meyertreecare.com www.meyertreecare.com


OPEN HOUSES « sunday 10/21 »

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63073 〉〉

236 Merlot Lane | $570,000 1-3 p.m. | 314.997.4800 | janetmcafee.com

63131 〉〉

2216 Croydon Walk | $729,000 1-3 p.m. | 314.997.4800 | janetmcafee.com

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63005 〉〉

1048 Keystone Trail Drive | $471,000 Pr/SqFt: $167.62 Coldwell Banker Premier Group Real Estate Agents: Mark and Neil Gellman 17723 Birch Leaf Court | $635,000 Pr/SqFt: $154.69 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Select Properties | Agent: Kara Kaswell

63011 〉〉

254 Meadowbrook Country Club Estates Drive $870,000 | Pr/SqFt: $397.99 Coldwell Banker Gundaker Real Estate Agent: Kathleen Pecher

63017 〉〉

COMP-ANNE-ION CARE

Seniors needing an activity-based companion? I’ll come to your home or facility and brighten your day with outings, games, or help with errands. Call or text Anne 314-825-4068

window cleaning M & P WINDOW WASHING & GUTTER CLEANING Reasonable Rates, Free Estimates, Angie’s List, Insured, Dependable, 30+ Years of Experience & Ref’s. Call Mark, 314-805-7367 or Paul, 314-805-6102

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6 Ladue Manor Drive | $729,000 1-3 p.m. | 314.997.4800 | janetmcafee.com 3 Conway Lane | $899,000 1-3 p.m. | 314.997.4800 | janetmcafee.com 15 Pine Valley Drive | $3,250,000 1-3 p.m. | 314.997.4800 | janetmcafee.com

15805 Stonebriar Manor Drive | $650,000 Pr/SqFt: $170.51 Coldwell Banker Premier Group Real Estate Agents: Mark and Neil Gellman 1063 Nooning Tree Drive | $675,000 Pr/SqFt: $155.10 Bratton Realty | Agent: Shellie Bratton 815 Fairfield Lake Drive | $685,000 Pr/SqFt: $195.77 RedKey Realty Leaders Agent: Cheryl Nelson

63021 〉〉

1527 Carman Road | $646,000 Pr/SqFt: $260.69 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Select Properties | Agent: Teresa Lessaris

63038 〉〉

2924 Country Point Court | $675,000 Pr/SqFt: $146.48 Experience Realty Partners Agent: Kathy Helbig 1116 Shepard Oaks Drive | $1,100,000 Pr/SqFt: $200.29 Re/Max Platinum | Agent: Joe Coyne

63105 〉〉

7457 Cromwell Drive | $765,000 Pr/SqFt: $258.45 Keller Williams Realty St. Louis Agent: Sabrina Robb 6345 Alexander Drive | $1,090,000 Pr/SqFt: $276.30 Dielmann Sotheby’s International Realty Agents: J. Warner and Sam Hall 144 N. Bemiston Ave. | $1,200,000 Pr/SqFt: $343.54 Janet McAfee Real Estate Agent: Marcy Byrne 233 Woodbourne Drive | $1,600,000 Pr/SqFt: $331.26 Dielmann Sotheby’s International Realty Agent: Stephanie Oliver 4 E. Brentmoor Park | $1,975,000 Pr/SqFt: $168.20 Janet McAfee Real Estate Agent: Wayne Norwood

63108 〉〉

59 Maryland Plaza, Unit A | $727,500 Pr/SqFt: $316.86 Coldwell Banker Gundaker Real Estate Agents: Amy and Paul Mittelstadt 51 Westmoreland Place | $1,835,000 Pr/SqFt: $146.80 Janet McAfee Real Estate Agent: Kevin Hurley

63122 〉〉

1398 W. Adams Ave. | $540,000 Pr/SqFt: $290.32 Keller Williams Realty Chesterfield Agent: Lucinda Seymour 816 N. Geyer Road | $689,188 Pr/SqFt: $268.06 Cottage and Castle Real Estate Agent: Nikki Mahn 449 Oakshire Lane | $749,900 Pr/SqFt: $240.35 Re/Max Results Agent: Marty Ribaudo

63124 〉〉

54 Picardy Lane | $715,000 Pr/SqFt: $214.91 Janet McAfee Real Estate Agent: Margaret Wright 30 Upper Ladue Road | $4,000,000 Pr/SqFt: $455.22 Janet McAfee Real Estate Agent: Marcy Byrne

63131 〉〉

12330 Borcherding Lane | $540,000 Pr/SqFt: $196.22 Laura McCarthy Real Estate Agents: Lynn Andel and Zachary White

63132 〉〉

20 Enfield Road | $512,000 Pr/SqFt: $219.37 Janet McAfee Real Estate Agent: Tricia Kolbrener

63141 〉〉

12808 Coulange Court | $475,000 Pr/SqFt: $206.97 Dielmann Sotheby’s International Realty Agent: Ted Wight 169 Belle Maison Lane | $1,164,500 Pr/SqFt: $290.83 Murphy Realty Group Agent: Daniel Murphy

63144 〉〉

10 Cricket Lane | $725,000 Pr/SqFt: $218.51 Laura McCarthy Real Estate Agent: Jill Azar

OCTOBER 17, 2018 | townandstyle.com

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Town & Style 10.17.18  

Style, Town Talk, photos and more!

Town & Style 10.17.18  

Style, Town Talk, photos and more!

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