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NOVEMBER 2012

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Anniversary YEAR Anniversar


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A Product of Horizon of Mississippi P.O. Box 1068 | Starkville, MS 39760 www.townandgownmagazine.com

{

staff

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Susan O’Bryan Hellen Polk Lizzie Smith Lindsay Jo Wilkinson Milton Whatley

Don Norman | publisher sdnpub@starkvilledaily news.com

Claire Massey | editor claire@townandgown magazine.com

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Jessica Bailey Ann Ashton Jones Lizzie Smith | Intern writers

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Shea Allen Abby Hathorn Meg Henderson Emily Jones Joe Lee

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Divian Conner Ashley Covin Laura Daniels Maggie Harper Claire Massey Debbie Montgomery Lizzie Smith

acctount executives

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ph o t o g r a ph e r s

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page design

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Claire Massey

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advertising design

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Chris McMillen

Reproductions in whole or in part, without written permission, is strictly prohibited. No responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited manuscripts, articles or photographs. We reserve the right to edit submissions before publication. Town & Gown is a free magazine published monthly and distributed in and around Starkville and the Golden Triangle area. Subscriptions are available for mail customers. For subscriptions or inquiries, write Town & Gown Magazine, P.O. Box 1068, Starkville, MS, 39760, or call 662-323-1642.

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Editor’s Note T

own and Gown magazine would like to thank our readers, advertisers, and the community for supporting and reading our magazine for the past year. We have come a long way from when Town and Gown magazine first started and plans continue to grow even more as we move to new and better things in the next year. A quote I love is, “...open your mind, arms, and heart to new things and people, we are united in our differences ... Life is all about the people you meet, and the things you create with them. So, go out and start creating ...” I live by this quote and Town and Gown magazine embodies this. This magazine is created to bring different people, organizations together in one place to show the wonderful aspects we have as a community, bring trends, facts and concepts to our readers to let them know each and every person is unique in their own self, and combine life, opportunities and passion together to make the community stronger as a whole. So, with that said enjoy this month’s anniversary issue and know that Town and Gown magazine is not just a magazine it is something for everyone to read and take ideas from.

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own and Gown’s first anniversary issue will bring those comforts and pleasures we all enjoy during the Fall in one turn of the page. Who doesn’t love the Fall crisp air, leaves changing, hot chocolate by the fire place and a warm blanket wrapped around them? The men in the family can mark their calendars this hunting season for a guys trip to Circle M Plantation and couples, Circle M can offer you an all-in-one wedding venue fit for an outdoor vintage seclusion (read more on page 10). Indulge in the Fall colors with Interiors Etc. on page 15 and get comfy with Simply Home interior decor on page 26. Combining the love for modern sushi and Southern comfort food, turn to page 37 and see Marissa Baggett and her expertise, as a worldly chef, fall out of the pages of Town and Gown and her recently released cookbook Sushi Secrets. Continue to page 42 for a delicious Thanksgiving dinner with all the “fixins”. And, of course Town and Gown tops off this anniversary issue with Fall Fashion to keep all our fashionista readers looking good! We thanks our readers throughout our first year for your loyalty as we grow and wish you will continue to enjoy and pick up each month! Planning a magazine can put you in the spirit early and this year, I was in the Fall spirit around September! I put my creative skills to the test and made a Fall/MSU wreath for my front porch. I wanted colors that would carry into the season and a touch of the Bulldog spirit had to be added! Send in your decorating ideas for the holidays to Town and Gown magazine Facebook page.

Claire Massey Editor Claire Massey

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Contents

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21

37 29


42 On the cover

features 10

CIRCLE M PLANTATION

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INFUSED WITH FALL COLORS

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Anniversary YEAR Anniversar

Our 1 year anniversary cover is designed by S is for Sweet and included their signature banana pudding in mason jars and push-up mini cup cakes. PHOTO BY DIVIAN CONNER

Departments 7

EDITOR’S NOTE

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INSIDE OUT

DECK THE HOME FOR AUTUMN

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EAT DRINK

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LIFESTYLES

TRANqUIL INvITING & COzY

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NEAR FAR

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ON THE PAGE

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OUT AND ABOUT

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SEE HEAR

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MORE

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THOUSAND WORDS

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RECLAIMED PROjECT

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FALL INTO PLACE

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SUSHI SECRETS

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ELEGANTLY THANKFUL


Circle 10

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Plantation

“Truely a Hidden Treasure”


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BY JOE LEE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY DIVIAN CONNER

estled in the woods of Noxubee County, Circle M Plantation is one of the Mississippi wildlife enthusiast’s best-kept secrets. “Some fifteen years ago I was introduced to Circle M by a friend and co-worker. We took a group of customers to shoot quail and not really knowing what to expect,” said Stanley Mangum of Jackson. “We had been to other shooting preserves, but upon arriving we realized we had found our spot. It was like coming home. “I have averaged four trips a year for the past fifteen years. I normally take a group of eight shooters, which enables us to book two wagons and pretty much have the place to ourselves. We arrive at lunch time, shoot targets and then shoot quail in the afternoon. After the hunt we have time to relax with cocktails and fellowship before dinner. After dinner we shoot pool, relax in front of the fire and TV, or play our favorite card game. The following morning we have breakfast before returning to the field to hunt quail again.” Ronnie and Tina Higginbotham have managed Circle M Plantation for the past five years and live on the grounds with their 12-year-old son, Ethan. The home itself, which is decorated with antiques and was built in 1846, was remodeled about 20 years ago. “I think it is worth the drive because our customers know we will have everything ready for them,” said Tina Higginbotham, a native of Louisville. “Our guides have scouted the best possible areas for them to see a deer or turkey. The dogs are trained and ready for a good quail hunt. There is a cold drink, good food, and a warm bed waiting on them when they return.” Lee Burrow of Hattiesburg, who has hunted all over the country for nearly 50 years, learned of Circle M through a friend and has hunted there about seven years.

“I go up once or twice a year and carry customers. I usually stay three days,” Burrow said. “Since they offer so much, you can deer hunt, quail hunt, or fish. Tina and Ronnie really treat you like family. They go out of their way to adjust to your needs. I killed the largest buck there last year, a 14-point that scored a 156. The success rate on deer hunting is usually 50 percent there. If a customer kills a buck deer, he can hunt does, hunt quail, or fish.” Mangum said that he can take a group of clients to Circle M Plantation and they, like him, feel that they’re at their own personal camp. “The food is excellent. Every meal is like it was cooked in your grandmother’s kitchen,” Mangum said. “The birds fly almost as if they were wild birds. Hunting from mule-drawn wagons takes you back to the time that wild birds were plentiful and quail hunting was a gentleman’s sport. Whether you are shooting with friends or entertaining clients, you have time to visit on the wagon. The dogs are handled just as they were in the days of old. The fields are prepared to provide a realistic setting. The staff is well-trained and very personable.” “Our staff anticipates our customers’ every need or desire,” Higginbotham said. “We do everything we can to ensure that their stay is exactly what they want it to be.” Hunting and fishing is only one component of what Circle M offers, however. Imagine traveling to a beautiful bed and breakfast and being the only couple on the grounds. “When someone is looking for a true getaway, Circle M is the place to come,” Higginbotham said. “They can relax in a beautiful, tranquil atmosphere and rest in one of our spacious, newlydecorated cottages. We try to schedule only one couple at a time so they will have the place all to themselves. We provide not only bed and breakfast, but three Southern gourmet meals.” townandgownmagazine.com

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Cottages are adorned with nature and are warm and inviting for any hunter or bride-to-be.

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Then there’s the attention to detail Higginbotham and her staff put into hosting wedding receptions. Brides and their wedding parties often travel several hundred miles to enjoy a truly unique and unforgettable wedding experience. “I first made contact with Tina in January,” said Caledonia resident Jessica Shepherd. She and her husband, Austin, were married in May, and their reception at Circle M took place the weekend of June 16. “Austin and I had been searching for the perfect venue, but everywhere we visited just didn’t feel right. We wanted it to be private and low key. We didn’t want to lose our special day and our precious moments in the hustle and bustle of a big wedding event.” “I love history and all things Southern, and Circle M seems to have everything wrapped into one beautiful package,” said Higginbotham, who recommends that couples book a year in advance. “I never tire of weddings here. Each one is different and the bride is able to use our setting as a backdrop to create exactly what she wants. “We have the facilities for every aspect of the wedding, from rehearsal dinner to reception. Also, and I see this so often, the wedding turns into a weekend family reunion. The wedding party and family get here on Friday and they have everything they need until it is all over on Sunday. Most often, what the bride’s mother tells me is how much they enjoyed the convenience of not having to travel back and forth from one event to the next,” said Higgingbotham. “Tina and Ronnie, as well as the staff at Circle M Plantation, were very helpful in the planning of the wedding and reception,” said Sherry Hyde, Jessica’s mother. “I think it was the feeling of being truly welcome each time we visited the plantation that really sold us on the venue. We were given free rein in setting up both events, and whatever we needed in the days leading up to the reception, Tina took care of.

“It all came off just as planned, and the Lodge was the perfect setting for a vintage wedding reception. With family coming from as far away as Louisiana, it was so convenient to have the use of the cabins on the property for family and guests to stay for the weekend. It saved us a lot of travel time. I truly do not believe Jessie and Austin could have picked a venue that more closely suited their style. I have to agree with my daughter that Circle M Plantation is a hidden treasure.” Circle M Plantation is located on Paulette Road in Macon. Whether you’re interested in taking friends on a hunting expedition, booking the perfect spot for a wedding, or getting away for a long-overdue romantic weekend, Ronnie and Tina Higginbotham will be glad to speak with you. They can be reached at 662-726-5791, or visit online at circlemplantation. com. n townandgownmagazine.com

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The fabulous light fixture by Cyan Designs is perfect in the eating area addition, completed recently. Interiors Etc. has a variety of excellent lighting sources in store.

Infused with Fall Colors townandgownmagazine.com

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A BY MEG HENDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY DIVIAN CONNER

number of signs mark the transition from summer into fall: shorter days, cooler temperatures, and football fever. But nothing epitomizes the fall season like its colors. A palette of robust browns, bright golds, and fiery reds and oranges permeates the landscape. These warm, inviting tones evoke the crackling of logs in the fireplace, the smell of pumpkin pie in the oven, and all the comforts of home and family that the holidays bring. Robin Dungan of Meridian had the vision to create that cozy feeling of fall year-round in the home she and her husband built in 2005. With the help of interior designer Terie Shields of Interiors Etc., they have been transforming their old-world French country style house into a home.

“Never be afraid to think outside the box,” Sheilds said. “We used small needlepoint rugs as valances in the master bedroom.” 16

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Shields said, “You can never go wrong with a LEE Industries velvet sofa.� townandgownmagazine.com

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The tailored linen drapes in the dining room are banded with a classic tape. They are simply elegant and timeless Shields said. 18

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“Robin is unafraid to do things differently and stick to her own style,” Shields said. “She is a testament to the mantra ‘Live With What You Love,’” which is Interiors Etc.’s motto. The entryway of the Dungans’ home boasts a spectrum of earthy browns, from the taupe walls to the dark wood floor. In the living room, the focal piece is a hutch painted black with gold trim. This was a collaborative effort between the Dungans, Shields, and Scott Gavin, a master furniture painter. The hutch displays an eclectic array of pottery and antique figures. Above it hangs a bright abstract painting that suggests the bright red hues of a black gum tree in its fall foliage. In addition to the contrast between traditional and modern, the Dungans’ home is a delicate balance of masculine and feminine. Their breakfast room embodies these opposing qualities that are harmonized with a palette of natural tones. The strong wooden beams on the ceiling, the rustic chandelier, and the painting of a deer are paired with an antiqued mirror, a bright green translucent vase on the sideboard, and a valence made from an antique rug remnant.

“I love how she (Robin) mixes contemcontem porary art with antiques,” Shields said of the house that the Dungan family, which includes two dogs, calls home. “It’s a nice house, but it’s not pretentious. It’s very comfortable, and I like that.” The Dungans’ home is living proof that elegance and comfort can coexist. Both the bold red leather sofa in the living room and the soft beige velvet sofa in the master bedroom are beautiful to look at, but they also invite friends and family to sink into them and feel right at home. The infusion of fall colors creates an atmosphere that, just like the holiday season, is full of simple comforts and the beauty and elegance of nature. And the Dungans, along with Shields, remind us of the importance of surrounding ourselves with not only the things but also the people we love most during the holidays and all year long. n The Thibaut Wallpaper used in this powder room is such a “splendid alternative” to just another paint color. townandgownmagazine.com

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STARKVILLE AND COLUMBUS DEEPSOUTHPOUT.COM

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Deck the Home for Autumn

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A

Gloria Reed

BY EMILY JONES | PHOTOGRAPHY BY DIVIAN CONNER

s fall weather descends on North Mississippi, you might be tempted to hang up your trowel and clippers and hibernate until next spring. But not so fast. Several gardeners insist the fall garden can be a show stopper right up until winter. “Don’t miss this opportunity to celebrate fall with a fresh round of color,” says Susan Street, a master gardener and member of Town and Country Garden Club. “We normally think immediately of mums and pansies for fall planting, but there are also ornamental cabbages or kale and many cool season annuals that will brighten beds or containers for fall,” she noted. “And don’t forget containers which can serve as an easily maintained small garden in a pot.” She suggested the “thriller, filler, spiller” rule for building horizontal texture when building a spectacular container garden. “Ornamental grass could be the thriller; snapdragons or mums the filler; and pansies could even be the spiller,” she said. The addition of pumpkins, gourds and colorful squashes add additional texture and color. A popular activity for many local homeowners is to establish an artful tableau of scarecrows, pilgrims, and pumpkins at the entrance to their homes. Gloria and Wesley Reed build a spectacular one each fall in front of their home in the on Cross Creek Road just off South Montgomery. “It takes me several days to build the scene,” said Gloria as she stuffs a weathered plaid shirt and tops it off with overalls. She stuffs the clothing with polyester fiberfill to build a life-sized scarecrow which holds up well in inclement weather. Sometimes she uses a pumpkin as the head, but this year she is using a wooden cutout of a man wearing a pilgrim hat. He sits atop a bed of hay bales surrounded by at least two dozen pumpkins and potted mums. Gloria also decorates her entire house with a collection of pumpkins she has amassed over the years. Most of them are so lifelike, you feel you feel the need to thump them to see if they’re real.


Lucy Hearnsberger is another homeowner who loves to treat passersby to autumn “eye candy” at her Sherwood Forest Home. She has turned the driveway into an outdoor room with garage sale “finds” for seating. It is surrounded by a living wall of potted caladiums and Crotons, providing her with a cozy place to sit and watch the world go by. The garden offers beautiful color throughout the year, but in autumn it shines. Lucy has lined the driveway with potted mums and pumpkins, tucking them in with pine straw so they appear to be growing naturally. A must for both Lucy and Gloria is an annual pilgrimage to Country Pumpkins in Caledonia, Miss. Along with every variety of pumpkins and gourds imaginable, the establishment offers train rides and hayrides through the fields of pumpkins along with other attractions for children.

Lucy Hearnsberger


The autumn display at the entry to the South Montgomery home of Sally and Clayton Richardson has become a family tradition and a treat for the neighbors. “I started doing this for our children when they were small, then for the grandchildren who have reached the age they aren’t all that interested anymore. Today I do it for myself,” declared Sally. “Fall is also a great time to plant new shrubs and trees or to replace ones that have died,” noted Susan. “Garden Centers usually have a good variety of ornamental plants at this time. Just remember to buy healthy plants, prepare the site well and always dig a large enough hole!” She said planting in the fall can give shrubs and trees time to establish roots before spring. “This is not, however, the time to do a lot of pruning on shrubs or trees. James Farmer, the featured speaker for the spring Garden Club fund raiser, has what he calls the “May Rule” for pruning.” In the Deep South, if a shrub blooms before May, Farmer recommends pruning it immediately after blooming or during blooming to take inside and enjoy. If it blooms after May, prune in the winter during dormancy. Winter is also the best time to shape evergreens. Farmer says to prune them and enjoy the cuttings during the holidays! “Herbs that are grown as annuals in our gardens can be harvested in the fall and either dried or frozen for use during the winter months,” Susan added. “Mississippi State University Extension service has wonderful tips on growing and preserving herbs at their website msucares.com or through the Oktibbeha county extension office.” n

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Are you recently engaged or married? Visit our website for more details townandgownmagazine.com townandgownmagazine.com

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Tranquil Inviting &Cozy A

BY SHEA ALLEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY DIVIAN CONNER

s a child, your bedroom has been the one room

in a home that has always been your own. It was the first space you made your own and

took real pride in as the owner of the one small corner of your parent’s home. It’s where you laid your head after a day outside playing with neighborhood friends. It’s where you retreated after a teenage fight with parents. It’s even where you scribbled in your journal after a break up with your first love. It was your room, and it was uniquely you. Even now as adults in a castle all your own, the bedroom still seems to be the one room where the clutter of the work week and children’s toys are not allowed to cross the threshold. It is the room that should be made into your personal oasis – you’re relaxing getaway. 26

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Your bedroom should be your canvas to do with as you please; to again make it your uniquely you space. For some, that might seem like an overwhelming task. Trips to fabric and home good stores can leave you even more confused about what styles speak to you than before you took on the project of redefining your bedroom space. Thankfully, Simply Home, located in Starkville, is a full service interior design firm that has helped clients transform their homes into spaces they love. Designer Cheri Fulgham and her staff enjoy the challenge of balancing the master suite for both occupants. “I feel master bedrooms should be designed with colors and materials that create a comfortable feeling for both husband and wife, meaning a space that is not too feminine or masculine, but the perfect balance,” Fulgham said. “The balance of these master bedrooms, from paint color to fabric, creates a very cozy and comfortable space to enjoy.” For Tommy and Melita Tomlinson, their now tranquil bedroom was inspired by their love of the color – particularly blues and greens. Fulgham encourages homeowners to consider their favorite colors when selecting a theme for a room make-over. “The design of the room started with the fabric of the duvet coverlet,” Fulgham said. “With these great blue, green colors and a great blend of neutral mocha, there was no doubt this was the perfect fabric for their master bedroom.” With strong main colors like blue and green, Fulgahm was cautious not to let them take over the room, so she turned to the more subtle and neutral tans and beiges for many of the main design elements and used soft shades of color for a calm feel. “This allowed the introduction of all the natural linen to be used in areas like the shams and the bed skirt in the bedding assemble,” Fulgham said. “Next, just add a few accents of your main color like we did with the throw pillows.” Fulgham enjoys using duvets because not only is it easy to change out your bedding styles as often as tastes change, homeowners can also change out the comforter inside the duvet as the seasons and temperatures change. For winter, a warm and pillowy goose down comforter is a must for comfort and function. Adding a few cable-knit throw blankets and a soft place to sit, a bedroom becomes not just a place to sleep, but a place to relax, unwind and escape into a good book.

Fabrics Colors

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It doesn’t get much more inviting and cozy than Joe and Beth Ott’s master bedroom retreat. With a custom built fireplace adjacent to the couple’s bed, winter nights aren’t quite so dreary. “Sitting by the warmth of the fireplace in this master suite definitely created a warm and cozy setting,” Fulgham said. “Defining the space in front of the fireplace are two chairs and an ottoman to prop your feet up – it just calls you to sit down and enjoy the glow of the fire.” The wall color was kept simple and neutral to let the decorations of the room take center stage. The addition of the couple’s passion for their collections and antiques is evident from the moment you walk in the room. Family heirlooms add a wonderful personal touch throughout the room, and they are no rivaled by the light and neutral wall color. The Ott’s bedding is also very neutral with the slate colored duvet and shams and a classic, comforting quilt, but a touch of luxury is found in the ruffled edges with velvet trim. The Chambray linen ocean pillows add a pop of color to keep the room from being too muted, yet they don’t take away from the stately, wooden bed. Fleece throw blankets and plush pillows add an extra layer of comfort to the seating area around the fireplace focal point. Having an eclectic mix of old and new, patterns and solids, plush and hard surfaces, the Ott’s bedroom is a perfect assemble of items that speak to them, draw them in and call them to sit and relax. n 28

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Details

Fabrics


Shaw Family: Doug, Emily, Ellliott Douglas and AnnHelen.

BY LIZZIE SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY BY DIVIAN CONNER

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AnnHelen with her mother Emily.

F

or Emily Shaw, adoption is a beautiful way to extend one’s family. Shaw, a student services coordinator at Mississippi State, and her husband Doug have two adopted children now that their daughter AnnHelen became part of their lives in July. Their first son, 6-year-old Elliott Douglas came to Mississippi from Guatemala when he was only five and a half months old. Elliott’s name bears their family background with Elliott being Emily’s maiden name and his middle name after his father. After waiting around 14 months, they found their second love in China – AnnHelen. AnnHelen, 2-years-old, is named after Emily’s mother and Doug’s grandmother with her middle name embodying a feeling. “Her middle name is Hope and that goes without saying. It’s just a good name for her and for our process,” said Shaw.

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The Shaw’s originally wanted to group made up of 19 families, all adopting pursue China for their first adoption ‘special needs’ children. Only two families, including the Shaws, did not have biologiendeavor with Elliott. “When we first went to do Elliott’s cal children. By July 13, 2012, they were back home adoption, we were very interested in China but I wasn’t old enough. Chi- in Mississippi with their 21-month-old na had more strict guidelines,” Shaw daughter AnnHelen. Shaw said AnnHelen and Elliott quickly started acting like a said. Upon learning this, the Shaw fam- family. “It’s funny because here you are bringing ily began to do more research and decided that Guatemala was a perfect in not a newborn but a toddler and a todfit. It came time to pursue another dler with a speech delay and immediately adoption and they looked again to they started acting like brother and sister. Guatemala only to find out that the ‘She started it’ within the first month came country closed inter-country adop- out of my son’s mouth,” said Shaw. The Shaws and other families are part tion in 2008. The Shaws went back to the draw- of Starkville Adoptive Families which is ing board several times and kept a facebook group that supports adoption coming back to China. Once they and adoptive families. “It stretches to the Golden Triangle behad chosen a country, they chose an adoption agency called Holt Interna- cause there are a few adoptive families that tional. Since 1955 this Christian or- we want to include in the nearby area beganization has been giving orphaned cause they need the support, Shaw said. Through mutual friends, Shaw met children a secure and loving place to live by finding permanent loving Meaghan Gordon, another local mother pursuing adoption, while she waited to families for each child. In China, the standard waiting bring AnnHelen home. Gordon and her time to adopt a healthy infant is five husband Wes are Mississippi State graduates and recently moved back to Starkville years. The Shaws decided the waiting in 2011. time was too long and were looking at a range of 0-2 Elliott and his father Doug years. “As first time parents, most people want the experience of a baby and I think the second time we were open because we’ve been through it, understood, and we were more confident as a parents,” Shaw said. They went over many different adoption programs and decided on a unique program, Child of Promise, for minor and/or correctable special needs. They decided to seek a child suffering from cleft lip and/or palate. “You get a sheet with a lot of medical issues on it, and you talk about it with your social worker and research it,” said Shaw. A lot of thought goes into this decision and you say, ‘Yes, I’m willing to consider this condition and even to what degree – minimum, moderate, or major’.” At the end of June, 2012, Emily and Doug flew to China as part of the Holt International travel


Gordon and a few others started the adoptive family group for families with adoptive kids, those who are waiting to adopt, and for those who are just thinking about it. “It’s a support group and it’s also great for a group of moms to get together and have a night out. We also are having a cookout in a couple of weeks in the park,” Gordon said. “It’s important for our kids to see that there are other conspicuous families,” Shaw said. Gordon has two biological children, Mary Reeves, 4, and Murphy, 2. After their second child was born, they wanted more kids but felt the call to adoption. They are going through the adoption process right now and hopefully will receive an infant boy from Ethiopia. They have already picked out a name. “Max is a family name and both of my children’s names are also family names starting with ‘M’. His middle name will be his Ethiopian given name,” Meaghan said. The Gordon’s are huge supporters of adoption: “We feel that its not necessarily about biology but about theology and orphan care is a huge passion for our family,” Wes said. Wes is on the board of a new non-profit group based in Starkville called the ReClaimed Project. “The group plans to provide grants to families to help with costs associated with adoptions and do projects that help vulnerable children locally and overseas,” Meaghan said. Jason Stoker started the project after he became a father and wanted to be the voice for people who didn’t necessarily have one. “I don’t want to sit back and know that someone doesn’t have a parent. It breaks my heart for someone not to have a mom or a dad.” ReClaimed Project is also trying to partner with orphanages with a focus on parts of Africa including Rawanda. “We want to provide long-term stability in that area. We want to teach them how to fish, grow crops so that they can provide for themselves. They don’t have an education so we want to teach them skills.” Gordon Family: Meaghan, Wes, Mary Reeves and Murphy. Stoker thinks Starkville is the best place to start the project with Mississippi State’s agriculture on the cutting edge. “We have some of America’s best and brightest people “Those of us that are putting on The Crucible are also on the right here.” board of Reclaimed Project. We’ve all got a heart for helping with Adopting comes with certain financial burdens and Stoker adoptions and orphan care and a percentage of the gross sales wants to help out as much as possible. for the event will go to Reclaimed Project to help financially with “We want to give grants to people who adopt and of course they whatever it needs,” Jones said. interview to make sure they are legit,” Stoker said. Mississippi State University Kappa Sigma fraternity is also With Reclaimed Project being non-profit, a number of area helping by making the project part of it’s charity. businesses are also helping out. “I would love for Greek life to get behind us and get their hands “Deep South Pout gave a portion of all proceeds to my adoption dirty and potentially go with us on trips. I would love for the and they are just nice people. The owner of Strange Brew is also community to get behind it and make it a bigger project,” Stoker very philanthropic,” Meaghan said. said. Brad Jones, a spokesman for The Crucible, said that a portion Meaghan Gordon also said that there are other ways to support of the sales will go the Reclaimed Project. The Crucible, an ob- orphans if not by adoption, whether through child sponsorship stacle course much like the Warrior Dash, will be at Highlands organizations, foster care, or just supporting adoptive families. Plantation on April 6, 2013, will cover approximately 14 manmade obstacles such as a wall to climb over and barbed wire to To get involved locally, search “Starkville Adoptive Families” on crawl under. Facebook or visit reclaimedproject.org. n townandgownmagazine.com

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DIYwith Amy Taylor Fall Fabric Wall Art Taylor, Petal native and Starkville resident, is a Southern Mississippi graduate where she earned a bachelor degree in broadcast journalism and obtained a master’s degree in Agricultural and Extension Education from Mississippi State University. She is an avid do-it-yourself crafter, artist and has passion with home design and projects. For more information about DIY with Amy Taylor email Town and Gown magazine (page 4).

Directions

1

2

Step 2 - Paint canvas board the color of your choice, and let dry. Spray paint is easiest.

Supplies

Fabric of your choice - faux leather is being used in this example. It’s stiff and easy to work with. Fall leaf stencil or template for tracing Sharp fabric scissors Stapler Pen or pencil Hard-back canvas board Fall adornments (flowers, leaves, twigs, little faux pumpkins, etc.) Industrial strength glue Paint (spray paint or acrylic) *If you choose to work with cloth-type fabric, you will need white school glue (like Elmer’s) to stiffen it. Just mix with water, brush it on the fabric and hang it with a clothes pin to let dry.

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Step 1 - Use a leaf-shaped stencil OR template to trace onto your fabric. To find a template online, simply Google “leaf template” and you will find many to choose from! Print and cut it out.

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Step 3 - With a pen or pencil, trace your leaf from the stencil or template you cut out. Step 4 - Cut 10 leaves. Try to cut inside the line so the ink or pencil mark doesn’t show. And if each leaf shape turns out a bit different, that’s alright! No two leaves are alike anyway. Step 5 - Fold each leaf, down the

middle vertically, placing a staple at the bottom. This will create a crease to give each leaf dimension. Step 6 - Now it’s time to staple the first five leaves onto the canvas board (bottom layer). Place them in a star shape, as shown in the picture. Use staples to secure them to the board. For extra interest, spray-paint the bottom five leaves a cream color. Step 7 - Follow the same steps with the second layer, but stagger them on top. Step 8 - Use industrial-strength glue to secure the adornment(s). To hang: drill two holes or cut them out with an ice pick, then hang with twine or ribbon!


FALL Into Place

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“All those things were headed for the burn pile,” he declared. “I’m glad I got to them first.” The furniture is an eclectic mix of antiques and reproductions collected for many years. “To be honest I collected the furniture first and built the house around it.” The tiny exterior of the structure is deceiving. Only measuring 16 feet wide by 60 feet long, the structure contains a mere 1,000 square feet. Believe it or not, that includes two full baths, two kitchens, two dining spaces and two bedrooms. It is reminiscent of the shot gun homes of old New Orleans in which each room leads into another, and there is no hallway to suck up precious space. “This plan was adapted from the one Governor Haley Barbour commissioned to replace some of the housing on the coast after Hurricane Katrina,” he explained. “There isn’t an inch of wasted space.” The combination of 10-foot ceilings and Haze’s design tricks give the feel of a much larger dwelling. The restful color palette and eclectic furnishings are understated and offer a tranquil backdrop for floral arrangements in each room. Walls are slate gray, with pops of red, oranges and browns throughout. The slate gray concrete floors have been scored in a diamond pattern. “One thing homeowners on a budget can do when entertaining is to come up with four or five floral arrangements and strategically place them around the house. Guests will think there are many more than there actually are,” he advised. When the first blush of cooler temperatures arrive in the state, Haze cruises the countryside gathering natural materials to use in his arrangements.

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BY EMILY JONES PHOTOGRAPHY BY DIVIAN CONNER

or a man whose primary occupation is the creation of eye popping, show stopping flower arrangements, Haze Allsup demonstrates a remarkable flair for repurposing commonplace items many of us would simply discard. The owner and operator of The Flower Company in Starkville said that fall is his favorite time of the year to let his imagination run wild. Besides decorating the homes of his clients for holiday entertaining, he finds time to kick back in his country cabin to savor the textures and colors of fall. “I love entertaining friends in my ‘outdoor room’ which includes the gazebo I built long before the cabin.” The octagonal structure is surrounded by bales of hay which he covered with oversized bandanas to provide extra seating for his latest fall soiree. His ‘outdoor’ room includes 58 acres of hardwoods and pines in the gently rolling hills outside Steens, a stone’s throw from Columbus. “This land belonged to my grandparents, Alta and Clareen Curtis, who farmed here. When I built the cabin I was able to use many of the materials from the old barn,” he said. The “borrowed” materials set the tone for the rustic, and well appointed interior. His kitchen cabinets are constructed of weathered tin from the old barn roof he framed with salvaged barn wood. The window treatments in the living room are handmade shutters from the ancestral home. Baskets salvaged from the attic have been stuffed with organic materials and repurposed as wall hangings. An old double bow saw which belonged to his grandfather forms a sort of cornice over the door to his master suite. townandgownmagazine.com

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“There are so many things you can do with na native plants that grow on the side of the road,” he noted while demonstrating how to create a centerpiece using three graduated sections of bamboo harvested from nature. He cut them on an angle and wired them together. To finfin ish off the creation, he stuffed each section with a combination of goldenrod and Johnson grass. “Yes, it’s plain ole Johnson grass,” he said, admitting that the weed is considered one of the most noxious plant materials in the landscape. Surprisingly, the purple seed heads take on a metallic sheen in the fall and they literally glisten in the deepening fall shadows. He tucks yellow sprays of goldenrod and a few twigs of coreopsis into the vessel and covers the wire with a ribbon. Voila! A centerpiece and a conversation starter is born. “You can use anything as a base as long as you gaudy it up a little,” he added with a grin. “As leaves turn, you can collect them and add them to arrangements. All you need to do is pick up a can of inexpensive hairspray and give it a once over, and they will last for an extended period.” Even foliage long spent can take on a certain beauty. Branches of a seeded eucalyptus from several seasons ago serve as fillers for an arrangement he has stuffed into an antique basket. Haze stumbled into his life’s work not entirely by accident. As a teenager, he landed a part-time job at a florist in his hometown of Macon. He was basically hired to make deliveries (before he even had a drivers license), but when things got hectic – like during weddings and funerals – he was mustered into service as a flower arranger. Apparently he had a God-given knack for the task and he remembers making 98 sprays for a funeral as a 15 year old. He earned a degree in business administration from Mississippi State University in 1994 and enrolled in numerous horticulture courses. “As a college student, my friends would ask me to decorate for their weddings and everything just kind of fell into place,” Haze said. In 1996 he opened The Flower Company in the shopping center formerly known as La Galleria. In 1999 he moved into his current location in the College Park Shopping Center. He is gearing up for the holiday season which he said lasts for about three months. In addition to flowers, the Flower Company keeps a unique stock of seasonal items for decorating the home. For more information call 662 320-9040. n 36

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Sushi Secrets A “Melting Pot� of Japanese and Southern Traditions

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BY MEG HENDERSON | PHOTOGRAPHY BY DIVIAN CONNER

his month, Marisa Baggett, a nationally and internationally renowned sushi chef and Starkville native, will come home to launch her first cookbook, Sushi Secrets. While making sushi may seem like an esoteric process, Sushi this culinary trailblazer reveals the biggest secret of all in her book: sushi is something that all of us can make and enjoy right in our own kitchens. Growing up in a household where spending time in the kitchen was a family affair, Baggett’s passion for cooking is not a surprise. “I was interested in cooking since I was about six or seven. In the summertime, when I was with my grandparents, my grandmother would give us (the kids) something to do in the kitchen to keep us out of the way. For some reason, it (cooking) resonated a little more with me –more than anyone expected it to,” Baggett said. While Baggett’s grandmother was her earliest inspiration, her parents encouraged her to turn her childhood dream into a career. As a high school student, she worked at Sun Hong Kong Chinese Cuisine, and this job strengthened her desire to pursue a career in the restaurant industry. Baggett’s parents wanted to help her see that happen. “I think all well-meaning parents want to see their kids go to a more traditional college,” Baggett said. “After I decided that wasn’t what I wanted to do, they actually encouraged me and helped me open my own business.” Baggett’s first business, which she opened at 22, was The Chocolate Giraffe, a Starkville-based restaurant and catering company. Her business specialized in Southern-global fusion cuisine and desserts. While Baggett was enjoying a successful business in Starkville, her career took an unexpected detour which led her to become a sushi chef. Given that Starkville is hours from the coast, and seafood is not an abundant natural resource here, Baggett calls this moment a “happy accident.” “I had a client ask me if I could do a dinner party for his office. He wanted sushi, and I agreed, even though I had no clue what it was,”

Baggett said. After a lot of research, I thought, okay, I can do this. Somewhere along the way, I fell in love with sushi. It’s so unique and so different and so amazing.” Perhaps it started out accidentally, but Baggett’s success as a sushi chef appears to be a recipe made from ingredients as unique as herself: equal parts of talent, hard work, and ingenuity. Wanting to learn from the best, Baggett studied at the California Sushi Academy in Los Angeles, CA and holds the honor of being the school’s first African-American female graduate. She has had a great deal of experience working for head chefs, teaching classes, and catering events in Los Angeles and in Memphis, TN. Baggett may have been trained by West Coast chefs, but she brings her Southern heritage to the table, quite literally, in her sushi recipes. This twist on traditional sushi fare is reflected in her cookbook. “The recipes in my cookbook are what people would call creative sushi. People have certain ideas about what sushi is, like California rolls. Even though you’ll find some of (those recipes) in the book, I kind of turned that upside down on its head,” Baggett said. The recipes in Sushi Secrets center around ingredients that are af af-fordable and easy to find. Baggett adapts items commonly found in a sushi bar into recipes that everyone can make with a trip to the local supermarket. “Instead of a broiled eel roll, I have a broiled catfish roll,” Baggett explained. “And for me, that’s kind of a fun Southern thing, but you’ll also find that catfish is being embraced in sushi making because it’s a good substitute for eel. You can’t go to your local grocery store and buy eel because it’s not available.” Baggett’s recipes also accommodate those who either do not wish to consume raw seafood or do not feel comfortable handling it. “Sushi doesn’t mean raw fish,” Baggett said. “There are plenty of other things people can try. Actually, something most people don’t know is that a lot of sushi purists in Japan only eat cooked seafood.” Choosing a favorite recipe is not easy when you’re the chef and author, but Baggett adores her pickled okra roll for a number of reasons. “It’s vegetarian, so there’s absolutely no seafood in it, and usually when I get people to try sushi, if they’re against eating raw seafood, they feel comfortable, like I’m not trying to trick them. It’s a pretty roll, easy to make, and delicious. I think it’s kind of my signature roll,” Baggett said. In addition to using accessible ingredients and pleasing a variety of palettes, Baggett’s recipes also reflect an awareness of the tools in the everyday cook’s kitchen. She recalls the intimidation she felt when several sushi cookbooks suggested that she purchase $1,500 worth of tools before even buying ingredients. “Everything in this cookbook was done in my house without the use of professional sushi knives. If you see a knife in a picture, it’s just a regular kitchen knife that anybody might have lying around,” Baggett said. Baggett’s extensive research, training, and experience led her to the conclusion that a lot of sushi cookbooks are intimidating to novices, but they don’t have to be. The accessible ingredients and step-by-step instructions make Baggett’s book one that is truly user-friendly.


Marisa Baggett demonstrates some of her recipes in her cookbook: Sushi Secrets: Easy Recipes for the Home Cook in Starkville at the home of Nelle Cohen on September 6, 2012.

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To those who still might doubt their culinary abilities, Baggett offers some comforting advice. “Realize that no matter what the results are, it’s going to taste good,” Baggett said. “I do a lot of classes with adults and kids, and the kids usually have a better experience because they’re not worried about messing up. As adults, we want to make it perfect the first time. So I would say, just have fun.” So whether you are a sushi bar regular or your taste buds have never ventured into sushi territory, Baggett invites you to open her book, play in your kitchen, and enjoy this cuisine that is, like the world we live in today, both local and global in its scope. The book signing will take place November 13, 2012 at Thyme, located at 402 Lampkin St., near downtown Starkville. n

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November Tablescapes 1

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1 Fall Table Decor Thyme 2 Vietri and Good Earth Pottery Mak B & Co. 3 Vietri, Spode and Reed & Barton Giggleswick 4 McCarty Pottery University Florist

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Elegantly Thankful PHOTOGRAPHY BY DIVIAN CONNER

Design by: S is for Sweet Kisha Landfair, owner and designer at S is for Sweet, and her partner Stephanie Huggins, have 10 years experience as “Modern Day Marthas” Landfair said. S is for Sweet works with clients who need a new and fresh feel to an event and not “cookie-cutter”. Whether it is a wedding, baby shower, social networking party, magazine or company event, S is for Sweet can plan and design most anything in a unique way. Visit S is for Sweet on Facebook.


Red Pepper Butter 1 stick butter, softened at room temperature 1 tsp. McCormick Steak Seasoning Grinder 1 1/2 Tbsp. of red pepper jelly Mix all ingredients well. Use mixer for a more even mix. Once mixed, spread the butter over corn and roast. You can also place the mixture into candy molds and place in refrigerator until hardened, so that guests can have their own cute servings of this sweet and spicy butter.

Bacon Wrapped Asparagus Bundle 1 1/2 lb. asparagus spears Extra-virgin olive oil Black pepper 4 slices center cut bacon Preheat oven (or can be cooked on grill) to 400 degrees. Add extra-virgin olive oil and black pepper to asparagus sparingly. Wrap 5 -6 spears of asparagus and use a slice of bacon to wrap the bundle and secure with a toothpick or decorative utensil. Repeat with remaining ingredients. To grill, place bundles on hot grill and cover. Cook 10-12 minutes until bacon is crisp and asparagus bundles are tender. For oven preparation, place bundles on slotted broiler pan. Bake 12 minutes. townandgownmagazine.com

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Cornbread Casserole 4 eggs 2 boxes of Jiffy cornbread mix 2 sticks butter, softened in the microwave 2 cans creamed corn 1 pt. sour cream 1 tsp. salt Add eggs to a medium-size bowl, and break up yolks. Mix last five ingredients into bowl containing eggs. Put it into a pan, and bake at 400 degrees for 40 minutes. Let it cool and settle for 20 minutes.

Mac and Cheese allrecipes.com

1/2 (8 oz.) pkg. elbow macaroni 1 c. shredded sharp Cheddar cheese 1 c. shredded provolone cheese 1 c. shredded mozzarella cheese 1 c. shredded Colby-Monterey Jack cheese 1 egg, beaten 1 c. milk Bring a large saucepan of lightly salted water to a boil. Place macaroni in the saucepan and cook for 8-10 minutes, or until al dente; drain. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease an 8x8 inch baking dish. Spread the Cheddar cheese over the bottom of the baking dish. Top with a thin layer of macaroni. Top macaroni with Provolone cheese, another layer of macaroni, a layer of mozzarella and a third layer of macaroni. Top with a layer of Colby-Monterey Jack cheese. Pour the egg over all, followed by the milk. Bake in the preheated oven 20 minutes, or until bubbly and golden brown.

Ramon and Broccoli Salad 1 pkg. Ramen noodles 1 bundle of broccoli 3 Romaine lettuce heads 1/2 c. bacon (chopped) Dressing: 1/2 c. canola oil 1/2 c. sugar 1/4 red wine vinegar salt and pepper

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Steam broccoli until tender and let cool. Rinse and chop lettuce and break Ramen noodles apart. Add to bowl with bacon pieces. Add ingredients for dressing in separate bowl and add to salad before serving.


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Go mini! Instead of baking full pies and cakes, opt out for mini versions that are sure to please each and every guest!

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Who ever knew banana pudding could be so easy and quick! Wow and satisfy guests with this easy and delicious presentation. Fill mini mason jars with ready made banana pudding and top with a super cute cookie and slices of banana. Now how simple is that!

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S is for Sweet

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DIY design tidbits

The kids chairs.......Spruce up any kids table by allowing them to add their own special touch. Add a frame of their work of art...They will love showing off what they have done.

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Surprise the little ones at the kids dinner table with a cute little surprise. These corn on the cob party favors are easy to make with tissue paper,corn husks and small toys

For those who love BLING. Add jewelry to your napkin rings. It's the simplest way to personalize and its cheap!

For go the traditional colors of the holidays. Who says you have to have fall colors for your Thanksgiving tablescape. Let your hair down and go for the BOLD!

Who doesn't love sweets especially when they are combined with jewels. When designing dessert table add character by using cake stands and platters of various styles. You can't go wrong with sweets!

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Fashionista

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BY ABBY HATHORN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY SWEET SORGHUM LIVING

bby Hathorn is a spunky, fashion savvy sixteen year old blogger who runs the Vintage Inspired Passionista blog. Her blog focuses on vintage and modern apparel, fashion tips, Do-It-Yourself projects, interviews, and community. Abby also writes a weekly column “The Adventures of the VIP” for The Real Story newspaper in Columbus, Mississippi. When she is not writing, Abby enjoys baking cupcakes, watching ‘80s movie marathons, collecting vintage records, and spending time with friends and family. Her fascination with couture began as a toddler playing dress up with her mom’s clothes, jewelry, and strappy high heel shoes and sneaking into the makeup drawer in an attempt to “glamorize” herself. Today Abby is still sneaking into her mother’s vintage wonderland closet and jewelry box in order to give new life to forgotten treasures.

Manic Monday: Taskmaster Tuesday:

So much to do and so little time, this outfit keeps you cute and comfortable as you tackle all the items on your to-do list! A neutral solid cardigan balances the richness of floral jeans while layering on chunky jewelry creates a look you will want to be seen in. Cardigan: Jealous Tomato, Deep South Pout Shirt: JCrew Jeans: BDG, Urban Outfitters Shoes: Sanuk, Reed’s Necklace: handmade by Rachel Leathers of Hearts of Stone Jewelry, Etsy Bracelets: personal collection

An animal-motif sweater and vibrant hue blazer paired with black tailored trousers is a playful, but polished look that will transit from an 8 a.m. board meeting to an 8 p.m. dinner with clients. Black pumps and simple accessories are smart assets worth acquiring. Blazer: Silence+Noise, Urban Outfitters. Sweater: Truly.Madly.Deeply., Urban Outfitters. Pants: Ann Taylor Shoes: BCBG, Belk Glasses: BCBGMaxAzria, Ford Vision Clinic Necklace: Vintage, personal collection


Casual Friday:

Pair a patterned boxy top with a denim pencil skirt to solve the conundrum of what to wear for casual Friday at the workplace. The rich caramel Equestrian boots are comfortable enough to take you from morning meeting to date night with ease. Blouse: Peaches N’ Cream, Fashion Barn Skirt: Gap Boots: Lucky Brand, Belk Necklace: BluKat Designs by Heather O’Cain, Etsy

Travel Thursday:

Work-it Wednesday:

Work your Wednesday in style with the perfect day-to-night outfit that says sophisticated chic. Sultry red mixed with classic black and white creates a no-fail combination that goes from coffee to cocktails in a snap! Blazer: Eduardo Lucero, The Attic Blouse: vintage (no label), SBG Vintage Skirt: Thrifted and altered by Abby Hathorn Shoes: Jessica Simpson, Belk

A single pop of color takes a practical layered outfit somewhere far more exciting than the humdrum of the daily grind. This ensemble is so cozy and sweet that you will forget where you are going. Cardigan: Xhilaration, Target Shirt: Lucky Brand, Buckle Jeans: Ann Taylor Shoes: Jessica Simpson, Belk Long tassel necklace: BluKat Designs by Heather O’Cain, Etsy Handstamped charm necklaces: handmade by Lisa Hamilton of Beadsoul Rings: Beadsoul, Etsy Bracelet: Beadsoul, Etsy


Saturday in the Park:

An adorable animal-themed sweater layered over an irresistible geometric print dress is playful enough for picnicking in the park and flirty enough for dancing the night away. For a more daring look, wear sheer cropped socks with sassy pumps. Sweater: Mossimo Supply Co., Target Dress: YA Los Angeles, Deep South Pout Shoes: original- Material Girl by Madonna. Modified by Abby Hathorn Socks: Xhilaration, Target Hairbow: vintage bandana from The Attic

Sunday Fun Day:

Embrace your fun side by mixing patterns. An oversized stripped cardigan tied loosely at the waist layered over a small print top plays well with a flowy floral skirt or pants. This ensemble carries you effortlessly from lunch at the country club to an afternoon gathering of family and friends. Cardigan: Blu Pepper, Deep South Pout Shirt: Postbella, Anthropologie Skirt: vintage (no label), Ten Dollar Vintage Australia Boots: Lucky Brand, Belk Bag: Patricia Nash, Macy’s Necklace: Handmade by Rachel Leathers of Hearts of Stone Jewelry, Etsy Bracelet: Handmade by Lisa Hamilton of Beadsoul, Etsy

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Lindsay Jo’s Style Update

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hether you are hosting or RSVP-ing to a holiday party, dressing for the occasion can be difficult. From company Christmas parties to casual holiday fetes with friends, we’ve featured six festive frocks to get you from one gathering to the next!

Tweed Lindsay Jo Wilkinson

Lindsay Jo Wilkinson is an online lifestyle blogger. Her blog, acupoflindsayjo.com, has a primary focus on fashion. Lindsay is a member of the Independent Fashion Bloggers (IFB) and attends various conferences and workshops with other fashion bloggers regularly.

Tweed is a classic holiday fabric. Try a bright hued tweed instead of a neutral, and match it with a coordinating blouse. Complete the look with geometric or chain jewelry, and add a pop of color with a colored pump.

Embellished Collars Look ladylike in an embellished collared dress. Choose a structured satchel to continue with the dainty demeanor, and pull a pattern into the look with animal print. Match a metallic cap-toe heel, a prevalent trend in shoes this Fall, to the outfit, and pick simple gold jewelry to accent the look.

Jacquard Pair a basic black turtle neck with a rich jacquard print skirt for the perfect holiday look. Accessorize with gold earrings and bracelets to emphasize the metallic sheen of the fabric. Complete the look with a trendy black tassel heel or black wedge bootie for comfort.

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Burgundy Burgundy tones are hugely popular this Fall. Be on trend with an oversized burgundy draped blouse. Complement a loose fitting top with a tapered straight leg pant while also showing off a fantastic pair of heels, such as these black velvet embroidered driver-inspired pump. Gem stone earrings and a large gold watch polish off the look.

Houndstooth Putting all football aside, houndstooth is an excellent pattern to incorporate into a holiday wardrobe. A houndstooth dress looks perfect paired with a tall black boot. Be sure the dress hits immediately above your knee, and the boot kits directly below. A bow bracelet, knot earrings, and a chain link and stud bag adds the right amount of current trends to this classic pattern.

Sequins You don’t have to wait until New Years to wear sequins! Stick to one sequin piece for holiday dressing. For the ultimate trendsetter, pair a gold sequin embellished top with leather skinny jeans. Black and gold accessories complement the entire look. Wear a black wedge boot that is both stylish and more comfortable than a heel.

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Fall Fashion Western

BY ABBY HATHORN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY LIZZIE SMITH

Cold weather has never looked so good. The rugged beauty of the West captivates while the tribal prints capture the venturesome spirit in this year’s Western-inspired attire.

Western leather and fringe shoulder bag Reed’s

OVI Suede and Fringe Jacket L.A. Green

By Katie blue jean button-up with tribal accent L.A. Green

Sbicca Vintage Collection dark brown suede ankle bootie L.A. Green

Mia ankle blue and brown cowboy boot L.A. Green Blu Pepper tribal print jacket Deep South Pout


Jackets

Outwear is fall’s most overlooked style opportunity. Don’t bundle up with a boring jacket when there is a plethora of wonderful options – ladylike car coats, furry parkas, sleek military, throwback varsity, sophisticated trenches, darling pea coats, and lovely topcoats. How is a fashionista to choose!

Ya Los Angeles hip-length mustard pea coat Deep South Pout

Darling coat with pleating detail L.A. Green

C.Luxe light-brown leather jacket L.A. Green

Ya Los Angeles maroon zipper crop suede jacket Deep South Pout

Blu Pepper brown leather jacket with faux fur detail Deep South Pout


Leather

Shiraleah quilted leather purses Purple Elephant

Turn up the cool factor with leather – so rebellious and fierce and yet so sophisticated and sweet. This season’s leather trend is a dream come true for the girly girl who wants just a touch of tough enough.

Basically black faux snake-skin leggings L.A. Green

MinkPink leather accent dress L.A. Green

Very J teal and black leather open-back shirt Deep South Pout

Double Zero tweed dress with leather accent Deep South Pout


Prints Vibrant hues and daring designs reflect a cheery and free-spirit vibe that beckons to be seen. Leave a lasting impression this fall with bold prints and lively patterns.

Level 99 Janice ultra skinny pant Deep South Pout

Yahada zigzag print pants Reed’s

Lovie Dovie Aztec leggings L.A. Green

Fidelity print scoop rust flower print L.A. Green

Fashionista leopard print pencil skirt Deep South Pout


Embellishments Make a deliberate style statement with bejeweled and embellished wardrobe pieces. Sparkle and shimmer elevate basic tops to spectacularly elegant. No need to pile on accessories – let the scintillating clothes do the talking. Ark & Co. bead-trimmed red chiffon top L.A. Green

Blu Pepper button-up cream top with gold accent Deep South Pout Metallic jewelry Reed’s

Sondra Roberts cream and metal bag Reed’s

Alice Moon chiffon black top with gold accent L.A. Green


Sequins

Ark & Co. gold and black sequin skirt L.A. Green

Brighten up the autumnal gray skies with a touch of glitz and glam. Fall’s sequins are not making reservations for cocktails. Oh, no! They are working and shining all day from work to play. Cluce Bust gold sequin sweetheart dress L.A. Green

Ya Los Angeles taupe top with gold sequin accent Reed’s

Ya Los Angeles sequin taupe dress Deep South Pout

Madden Girl sequin flats with accent zipper L.A. Green Ark & Co. dark brown sequin shorts L.A. Green


Sweaters The classic sweater prides itself on being regarded as the epitome of layering. Swap out drab pullovers for sweet, flattering sweaters without losing comfort or warmth.

Elan U.S.A. star sweater vest Deep South Pout

Elan U.S.A. poncho crop fringe sweater Deep South Pout

Double Zero hoodie with maroon and white accent braid L.A. Green

Ya Los Angeles tribal sweater Reed’s


Fur

A fun and flirty alternative to the marshmallow puffy vest, a fur one provides movement and warmth without all the fluff. Add texture and volume to a solid, silky top and patterned matchstick pants by pairing them with a fabulous fur vest – très chic!

Umgee faux sheep fur vest with brown bow Reed’s

Umgee knit vest with faux fur accent hoodie Reed’s

TCEC faux fur shag crop vest Deep South Pout TCEC faux fur long vest Deep South Pout

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Accessories With showy splendor, turn heads and be the talk of the town. Chunky grandeur statement jewelry is guaranteed to spotlight any outfit. Oh, my! Look at all the glistening arm candy-let them stare.

ZenuFashion bangles Deep South Pout Green pendant necklace Reed’s

Blue chunky necklace Purple Elephant

Orange-beaded necklace with gold chain Deep South Pout

Golden stella bangles Deep South Pout

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Boots Step up this season’s wardrobe with boots. No matter personal style, there is a pair that is right for everyone-from traditional riding boots that transcend time to edgy moto-inspired ones that elevate any look.

Naughty Monkey brown combat boot with suede and leather accents L.A. Green

Anne Michele brown suede bootie with Aztec accent Deep South Pout

Diba beige tall boot Reed’s

Pink and Pepper leather boot with tribal accent on back L.A. Green

Bamboo chestnut and grey riding boot Deep South Pout


An Evening With The Stars

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BY EMILY JONES | PHOTOGRAPHY SUBMITTED

n evening of dining, dancing and appreciating the arts in all its many forms will be staged by the Starkville Area Arts Council when it presents its10th annual “Excellence in the Arts Gala.” The premier arts event will be held at the Hunter Henry Center on the campus of Mississippi State University from 6-10:30 p.m. on Friday, December 1.  It is open to the public and tickets are on sale for $75. “This will be a night in which the cup of creative expression will overflow,” said Armando de la Cruz, event chairman. “The Arts Gala is one of our major fundraisers, but more importantly, it is our op62

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portunity to celebrate the arts with an elegant banquet and popular silent auction of original works of art.” “We have such a wealth of creativity and talent in the Starkville – Mississippi State University Community,” de la Cruz noted.  “A full evening is being planned including dinner, dancing, shopping for art and libations.”  A special activity known as a “Tombola” will give guests an opportunity to acquire valuable set of pearl jewelry.  Musical entertainment will be provided by a local group known as “Kanna Wermz.”  It features Bill Cooke on guitar, Chuck Schimph on strings, Mark Tribble on upright bass, and Bobby Shannon on keyboard and saxophone.


Cooke, who was recently named head of the Geoscience Department at MSU, and other band members have full-time day jobs, but have become a popular dance band by night. Schimph is an agent with Reynolds Insurance Agency and Tribble owns a barbershop (The Liberty Bell), and Shannon is a local electrician. “We play a little of everything including bebop, swing, rock & roll, blues and country,” Cooke said. The evening will begin at 6 p.m. with hors d’oeuvres and a silent auction in the entrance hall of the Hunter Henry Center. The event will feature a variety of art treasures and special gifts provided by local businesses and individuals. The banquet hall will open at 7:30 p.m. and dinner will be served at 8 p.m. “We will present the medal of excellence in the arts to this year’s recipient during the evening celebration. The musical entertainment will begin at 9 p.m.,” said de la Cruz. “We are purposely keeping the program very brief and limited to the silent auction, tombola, and presentation of the annual award.” Whether you’re an emerging artist or someone who appreciates the finer things in life, the SAAC welcomes the participation of all Starkville area citizens. Established in 1996, the council serves as the premier umbrella for a multitude of arts organizations and activities. The event will help fund other projects of the arts council including the Magnolia Film Festival in February, Everything Garden Expo in March, the Cotton District Arts Festival in April, Art in the Garden in May, the annual membership party in June, Forks & Corks in July, and the Gala in Nov./Dec. Ongoing programs include the Art Partnership, Art in Public Places, and the awarding of grants and scholarships for the local schools and emerging artists. For more information call 662-324-3060. n

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{On the Page Reading Aloud

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BOOK REVIEW BY HELLEN POLK

hether you will be trekking across the country, the state, or across town for Thanksgiving, sharing time with family and friends during the holidays is magnificent. Starkville has its share of children’s book authors and illustrators, so, get cozy and take some time while the turkey is roasting to enjoy a good book with that special child in your life. Written by long-time Starkville resident Carolyn Katz and beautifully illustrated by Starkville native Nel Slaughter, The Peddler is the tale of the American dream lived by Carolyn’s f a t h e r - i n - l a w, Thomas Katz. An immigrant from Lithuania, Mr. Tom traveled the roads of Oktibbeha County for four years, peddling his wares to county folks who couldn’t get to town often. Readers young and old learn the magnitude of the American dream and what it meant to people like Mr. Tom. The story shares Mr. Tom’s desire to become an American citizen and to open his own business, which he accomplished in 1904 on Main Street in Starkville. The Peddler is a lovely tale that is both historical and uplifting. Mississippi-born Missy Hopper, a professor at Mississippi State University, has two children’s books to her credit. She heard many tales as she was growing up about her parents’ childhoods in the Mississippi Delta and finally decided to record these adventures. Chasing Bandits is the story of Theodore Roosevelt Hollumway Jones and John Hart, two young Delta boys who were great friends in the summer of 1938. The delightful story of Missy’s father, John Hart, combined with Nel’s classic illustrations take us back to those hot summer days when life was a little less hurried, children used their imaginations to while away the time, and families reminded their children to stay out of trouble and mind their manners. Missy’s mother, Peggy Sue, shares the limelight in the next story, Peggy Sue and the Pepper Patch. Peggy Sue goes off to the garden with her friend, Mr. Henry, to pick peppers. In the process she gets into the 64

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hot peppers and winds up doing the “hot-pepper-quick-step dance” all the way home because of her burning, itchy skin. Starkville artist CeCelia Bowden provides the descriptive illustrations to the story so that the reader can just see how Peggy Sue danced her way home for some relief. The last page of the book includes a song that children can sing to remind them of Peggy Sue’s lesson learned in the garden. Two Starkville residents, Serina Bowlin and Brian Thrasher, combined their talents as writer and illustrator of the rhyming tale of Wandering Sam, a lonely squirrel who lives in the forest. When Sam decides that his problem is that he is all alone, he packs his sack and goes on an adventure through the forest to meet new friends. With his toothbrush and clothes in tow, Sam has great fun and learns the value of lifelong friendship. Children will love the cheerful rhymes and inviting illustrations while they also learn the value of friendship. For readers of chapter books and historical fiction, long-time Starkville educator Denise Rowan has recently published another book until the pseudonym of Denise Cecile. The Bully and the Ghost addresses a problem many children face in school – the bully. Joey is the target of Hank’s bullying in junior high. Rowan utilizes her many years of educational experience as she writes about Joey and his friends, Caleb and Wyatt, and their dealings with Hank, the new boy who thinks he is the next football star. Historical descriptions of “haunted” antebellum homes and the Siege of Vicksburg during the Civil War are interwoven in the story as the junior high boys learn throughout the school year to handle Hank and his improper bullying. Starkville resident Angel Martin and Rowan’s son, Tom, provide the artwork that accompanies the story. As you can see, Starkville has been blessed with many talented authors and illustrators of books for children and adults. Browse our libraries and bookstores to find these and more great reads while supporting our local residents along the way. n


{On the Page BOOK REVIEW BY MILTON WHATLEY

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ho hasn’t seen the movie Rudy? The number must be very small. Since its theatrical release in 1993, it has been seen by and inspired millions of people to dream big dreams and set big goals. Rudy’s story is much more than the 27 seconds and three plays he experienced on the field the only time he was allowed to dress for a Notre Dame football game. Daniel “Rudy” Ruettiger’s life has been one of persistence. It is that story of persistence that you find in the new book Rudy, My Story by Daniel Ruettiger with Mark Dagostino. What the movie couldn’t tell in less than two hours, you find in the book. You find the story, the whole story of Rudy. You learn of his family in Jolliet, Illinois where he was born the oldest of 14 children to working class parents. In school, Rudy was not a good student and sometimes a disciplinary problem. It was only in college that he discovered he had a learning disability and began to address it. He excelled in sports with grit and tenacity, overcoming his small size. Sports enabled him to learn focus and became an outlet for personal expression. After high school you learn that before heading to South Bend, he spent several years in the Navy where he continued to develop the perseverance and discipline first taught him by his parents. It was that perseverance that brought him to college where even with his poor high school grades, he was able to get into Holy Cross (on probation) which was a preparatory college for Notre Dame. After Holy Cross and several rejections, he finally made his way to Notre Dame and a place on the scout team for the Fighting Irish. His never-give-up attitude got the attention of the coach who appreciated his spirit. It was in the last game of his senior season that a special dispensation was made for Rudy so that he could suit up once for the team. The film portrayed that event a bit differently and is well worth reading about, in particular the number of players who were willing to give up their jerseys on that game day and how Rudy was truly regarded by Coach Dan Devine. It was while watching the movie Rocky that Rudy was inspired to believe that his story was worth sharing with the world. His story, like Rocky’s, was the tale of an underdog who through per-

sistence, focus and hard work gained more than anyone thought they ever would. It took Rudy literally years of telling his story over and over for it to get the notice of Hollywood. Eventually the same producer and writing team that brought Hoosiers to the big screen, developed the movie Rudy. The road to the 1993 release was anything but easy but the persistence of Rudy paid off with a film that many view as a classic. The book tells Rudy’s life story before and after the movie and it is as inspiring as the movie itself. Rudy is able to go into detail and answer questions about his life and the movie that people have had since its theatrical release. Where so many people would have given up their dreams long before he did, Rudy refused. Because of that we have the benefit of a book and a movie of a life that can say something to us all. n townandgownmagazine.com

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{On the Page

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BOOK REVIEW BY SUSAN O’BRYAN

reativity can take many forms – and many years – before it reaches maturity. The process of growth is one that Michael Kardos of Starkville knows well. Since 2007, he and his wife (poet Catherine Pierce) have been on faculty at Mississippi State University, currently serving as co-directors of the creative writing program. With the release of his debut novel, Kardos now can add “getting published” to the course syllabus. Although he has had several short stories and collections published through the years, The Three-Day Affair is his first venture into the world of crime thriller fiction. It’s a step that readers will be glad that he has taken. The novel, which took Kardos three years to complete, is a taut tale and character study with an ending that blindsides readers. Will Walker is a Princeton University graduate trying to make it in the music recording industry. He is looking forward to the guys-only weekend with several of his college buddies. The only items on the agenda are golf, drinking, eating and more golf. His friends have achieved post-college success while he struggles to find his niche. Their ranks include politician, litigator and .com millionaire. That’s OK with Will, though, as he hopes to receive their financial backing to open his own recording studio. What should have been a simple stop at a convenience store changes everything. Kidnapping, extortion and violence were never part of their weekend plans, but what choice is there after friends take that first step over the fading line of right and wrong? It all comes down to choices. Responsibility and consequences. Unfortunately, the more the group (described as a gallery of lovable losers by Kirkus Reviews) tries to resolve the situation, the worse the problem becomes. One wrong step leads to another, yet the guys think they can still talk their way out of trouble, just like they used to do in college.  This isn’t a college prank gone wrong, but rather a young woman’s life that has been put at risk. In Will’s eyes, he is the only one with a conscience, a sense of decency that now is being beaten down by the savage actions of his friends. 66

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Kardos plays on the relationship that the friends built during their Princeton years. Loyalty, jealous and youthful zeal create the foundation that crumbles in their adult years. What was once a strong bond becomes a thin line stretched to its breaking point as past indiscretions and accusations become the elephant in the room that can’t be ignored. As the novel unfurls toward a totally unexpected end, readers are reminded time and again that true friendships are built on honesty, and that deceit can be deadly, figuratively and literally. For more information, including signing dates and locations, visit www.michaelkardos.com. n  


Town&Gown

Best of 2012 a azine

Photo submitted

By Emily Jones

Facebook for recent promotions and announcements! There are many ways you can join so If you have question about whether you are eligible for membership, please stop by our office or call and we will be happy to assist you. The financial institution is located at 333 Hwy 12 West, in front of UMI’s Japanese Steakhouse. We welcome your calls at 662-323-5020. Photo by Blake McCollum

Best Bank Statewide Federal Credit Union

In business since 1949, Statewide merged in 1994 with the Government Employees Credit Union at Mississippi State University. The Starkville branch and its eight employees have been proud to serve its members located throughout the Golden Triangle Region for the last 18 years. The full-service financial institution offers savings accounts, checking accounts, Visa Debit, Visa Credit Cards, Loans of all types, Certificates of Deposit, IRA’s, online banking as well as mobile banking and much more. Statewide serves many individuals, businesses and organizations throughout Oktibbeha County including the MSU faculty, students and alumni, Oktibbeha County School District, Starkville Public School District, Starkville Academy, government employees and faculty of OCH Regional Medical Center, assorted manufacturing businesses throughout Oktibbeha County and many, many more! Statewide is a firm believer in giving back to the communities it serves. “We have raised the most money (among all Mississippi credit unions) for the Children’s Miracle Network, and we proudly support Relay For Life and the American Cancer Society,” noted Gary Allen, branch manager. “I believe that we were awarded this great honor because of caring employees who go out of their way to offer the very finest in customer service,” said Allen. “Our motto is ‘People helping people’ and ‘Not for profit but for service!’ We also offer very attractive interest on all our loan products as well as investment products.” “I think another big factor is that we are able to offer our members over 4,400 branches across the United States in which they can access their account and conduct transactions,” he added. The Starkville location is open Mon.-Fri. from 8:15 a.m.-4:45 p.m., but the drive-through stays open until 6 p.m. on Friday. For more information visit statewidefcu.org. Be sure and follow us on CORRECTION TO BEST OF FOR OCTOBER ISSUE

Best Frame Shop Neblett’s

Carrie Copeland (middle) and her employees Brandon Wigginton and Brittney Ward.

John and Carrie Copeland purchased Neblett’s in 2007 and Carrie started there part-time in 1996. Neblett's was first opened in Starkville in 1983 and has been in business for almost 30 amazing years. “We offer custom picture framing and can assist our customers by taking into consideration price point, style, color and project deadlines. Anyone that works here is more than willing to help our customers with frame design, mat colors, glass options and conservation practices. We also offer a large selection of in-stock frames,” said Carrie who operates the business. “We have been, and are constantly, blessed by our customers. I feel honored to be given this award and believe we were selected to receive this honor because we strive to always follow the Golden Rule, to treat everyone with kindness, to do our work with diligence, courtesy, and excellence in customer service,” she added. "I'm thankful for my super understanding and supportive husband and my amazing kids, Kennedy and Jackson. My staff is part of my family and I am so very thankful for them, they add an enormous amount of joy and creativity to this job. Most of all, I'm thankful that God has placed me where I am to be able to bless others and be blessed in return." Store hours are 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri.; and 10 a.m.–2 p.m. on Saturday. Located at 448 Hwy 12 W, Suite 4, Green Oaks Plaza. For more information call 662.323.2001. townandgownmagazine.com

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Bubbles, Baubles, Bling & Beauty Photography by Claire Massey Christine’s Couture located in Starkville had a Jewelry Trunk show of the newest trends in jewelry straight from market. Attendees also enjoyed mini makeovers, refreshments and discounts throughout the store.

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1. Shagla Jefferson, Rhonda Jefferson 2. Jennifer Burt, Christine Tibbett 3. Casie Mahalitc, Kayla Gilmore, Sally Evans 4. Sarah Hay, Molly Mitchner 5. Jennifer Patterson, Kristin Biondi, Christine Tibbett 6.Joyce Thompson, Vanesha Williams 7. Sloan Malin, Susan Robinson, Suzanne Malin 8. Beth McDougald, Brittany Sims, Sarah Gordon 9. Amanda Pugh, Christine Tibbett, Charlotte Magnussen

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50th Anniversary of MSU Phi Mu Photography by Debbie Montgomery Mississippi State University Kappa Alpha Chapter of Phi Mu Sorority celebrated it’s 50th Anniversary on the MSU campus with a banquet at the Colvard Student Union on September 29, 2012.

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1. Diane Bounds, Brenda Nowell, Beth Ramsey, Jennifer Bounds, Jamie Methvin, Heidie Lindsey 2. Sydney Lesniewski, Caroline Coleman, Hannah Farris, Lindi Morgan 3. Elena Marchak, Kaeley Gemmill, Alyssa Davant, Josey Frazier, Erin Curran 4. Liz Grimes, Pat Johnson, Courtney McShan, Lauren Springer, Ginner Rogers 5. Janie Kennedy, Drew Morgan, Shelby Baird 6. Bree Bratton, Bonnie Bennett, Madeline Hawes, Jourdan Schulte, Ashlyn Watkins 7. Janet Ehret, Pam Maddox, Karen Templeton, Diane Eggert, Phi Mu National President Kris Bridges of Atlanta 8. Cathy Godwin, Jean Bush, Lydia Rogers, Nancy Magee, Linda Davis 9. Chelsea Griffin, Alex Robinson, Anna Lucovich, Kaitlyn Vassar, Faith Westby, Katelyn Goff, Meghann Jimerson 10. Mary Margaret Arthur Troxell, Jamie Davis, Susan Ehret and MSU Phi Mu chapter charter members: Tomzie Crowson Bershire, Martha Ruth Malone Parvin 11. Bonnie Bennett, Bonnie Noe Woodall, Lisa Lake, Olivia Haskins, Melinda Lucas townandgownmagazine.com

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Queen City Race for Life & Street Strut The Queen City Race for Life was a 5K Run/Walk, 1 Mile Run/ Walk and High Heel Dash. Runners could decorate an umbrella in honor or in memory of someone, and strut their stuff around the gazebo at Dumont Plaza. This event was for Making Strides Against Breast Cancer American Cancer Society.

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7 1. Gaye Harper Hess Team. Photo submitted 2. Divas on the Run. Photo submitted by Rod’s Racers. 3. Racers ready for the Queen City Race. Photo submitted. 4. Tammy Moffett, Bully, Ashley Warren. Photo submitted. 5. Betty Phillips, Myleia Holyfield. Photo submitted. 6. Christy Bennett, Karen Wedgeworth. Photo submitted. 7. Dendall Dunnam, Cale Carson, Cindy Kane Schrock, Briley Carson, Judie Bounds Rutledge, Amber Carson, Cane Carson. Photo submitted. 8. Phyllis Holliday, Bully, Mayor of Meridian Cheri Barry 9. Dr. Mark Elliott, Danny Hill 10. Ashley Warren, Russell Huntley. Photo submitted. 11. Gay Moore Lewis, Bully, Stephanie Lewis. Photo submitted. 70

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Bully Bloc Photography by Ashley Covin Bully Bloc is a group of friends and alumni of Mississippi State University who share a passion the our university. It is a non-partisan political action committee committed to electing political leaders who will make sure that the interests of MSU and all of higher education are advanced.

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1. Lisa Hankes, Gavin Barnett, Lindsay Linhares, Delia Turner 2. Charlie Donald, Rodney Montimer 3. Mattie Carter, Brent Thompson 4. Sarah Daws, Anne Wallis Eubanks, Frank Bradford, Lizzy Stawn 5. Rick Faucette, Mike Dunlap 6. Reed Nelson, Tom Walker, Zach Greene 7. Ruby Guest, Patricia Ruby 8. Spence Flatgard, Drew Hardin, Reed Nelson 9. Spence Flatard, Lynda Forbes, Jack Forbes 10. Taylor Clanton, Rayner Sullivan, Rachel Faulkner

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MSU Tailgating Tailgaters at the MSU football games show off their Bulldog spirit at various games this season.

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1. Grant Patterson, Tina Le, Jodi Griswold, Eric Pepples 2. Alexa Chisolm, Kathryn-Mathis Rooker, Chandler Jones, Holland Rountree, Avery Senter 3. Jessica Fulgham, Amy Taylor 4. Morgan Daly, Elizabeth Anderson 5. Andrew Simmons, Anna Dathryn Rinehart, Anna Jamieson, Daniel Young 6. Kyla Morgan, Jada Mcmullen, Kaitlin Baker 7. Stephannie Jellenc, Bailey Putnam, Leigh Hamburg, Abby Winn, Brooke Mayer 8. Ragen Sistrunk, Hunter Hart, Karla Easterling, Morgan Daly, Eric Ryan Avent, Nick Hollingsworth, Elizabeth Anderson

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MSU Drive in Movie Photography by Laura Daniels MSU students enjoyed the Drive in Movie event featuring “Footloose” at the Templeton Athletic Center September 27, 2012.

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1. Nikki Robinson - Director of Outdoor Films at MSU, Hannah Moore, Haley Berry Hill, Victoria Stein, Catherine Knight, Erica Ring 2. Zach Guest, Shelby Gibson - Assistant Director of Outdoor Films 3. Allison McCarver, Tiffany Jones, Mary Kathryn Fairley, T. Willie, Luke Enzor, Joshua Rushing 4. Josh Bedi, Sydney Stone, Kristin Cody, Zach Snyder 5. Cody Burnett, Kathleen Simmons 6. Heather Haynes, Liz Brazelton 7. Victoria Clift, Jonathan Lindsey, Paige Staton 8. Katriana Fields, Chevel Brister 9. Mitchell Winstead, Elizabeth Koury 10. Lourain Bobbitt, Larry McGee 11. Andrew Hurper, Shelby Sims 12. Jonathan Ashley, Lane Godwin, Steven Tucker 13. Allison Davis, Erica Satterfield, Peri Fewell, Emmy King

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Downtown Pumpkinpalooza Photography by Ashley Covin The Greater Starkville Development Partnership held the annual Pumpkinpalooza in downtown Starkville on Mainstreet on October 12, 2012. The official MSU vs. Tennessee Bulldog Pep Rally featuring MSU Cheerleading and Bully and MSU Fashion Board posted in merchant’s windows with the latest fashions.

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7 1. Amanda Richmond, Shannon Sullivan, Caroline Gilbert 2. Abbie Strickland, Maggie Miller, Katherine Walters 3. Ashley Mulloy, Kasey Fulgham, Rebecca Tabb, Margaret Allison, Katie Venson 4. Carson Mullen, Jackie Mullen 5. Emily Waters, Ray Waters 6. Emma King 7. Lillie Grace Shelton, Ella Elliott 8. Haley Fye, Molly Beth Covin, Katherine Dumas 9.Sally McAfee and Brittney McAfee 10. Peyton Curtis 11. Reese McAfee 74

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Golden Triangle Recovery Project Photography submitted

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This event raised awareness about substance use disorders and treatment, to serve as a community relations day for local law enforcement and fire protection agencies, to raise money for the recovery fund and to have fun. The Starkville Cup consisted of local law enforcement and fire department in a friendly competition of tug-of war, homerun derby and simulated rescue at the Starkville Sportsplex. Proceeds of this event benefitted the Recovery Fund operated by the University Baptist Church which will provide collateral for interest free loans to pay for addiction treatment.

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1. Black Voices Choir 2. Mary Damm, David Shinger, Allie Coughlin, Maria Marinara, Carlos Day, Asia McIntyre, Nancy Brownlee, Jamie Walker, Johnny Wells, Heather Ashley, Tyler Yates, Lauren Smith, C.J. Lee, Kristen Davis 3. McClain Mullins, Chief Georgia Lindley, Emmit Smith Jr., Lauren Smith, Sgt. Virginia Rich, Bryan Frrar 4. Tyler Davis, Derek Nelson 5. Michael Valentine 6. Mike Sullivan, Mary Margret Sullivan, Bully, Scott Lipsey 7. Sgt. Virginia Rich, Michael Valentine 8. Lauren Smith, Alex Baldwin, Michael Valentine 9. Jenna Sullivan, Maddie Kirker townandgownmagazine.com

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Starkville Young Professionals Photography by Debbie Montgomery Starkville Young Professionals had their November social at Zorba’s Greek Tavern from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on Thursday, November 8, 2012. The group of professionals meet with the GTR Young Lawyers Association and had the opportunity to meet new people. Door prizes, Clark beverage cart and appetizers were available.

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1. Jennifer Burt, Rebecca Tabb, Christine Tibbett, Amanda Edwards 2. Jay Hurdle, Haley Brown, Hays Burchfield 3. Starkville Young Professionals officers: Amanda Pugh, Maggie Christopher, Lee Beck, Nathan Chaney, Stefanie Shackleford Not pictured is Carey Edwards. 4. Kaile Minor, Vanessa Shaffer, Vanesha Williams 5. Susannah Mays, Arma de la Cruz, David Mays, Lauren Lang, Marty Haug 6. Anna Campbell, Jonathan Henry, Meggie Devine 7. Ashley Eason, William Craig, Brandon Langford, Katie Moulds 8. Kyle Schooar, Keith Kakadia, Lauren Lang, Ben Lang 76

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Business After Hours Photography by Maggie Harper The Greater Starkville Development Partnership hosted the Business After Hours: Black & Orange Ball at Buffalo Wild Wings on Thursday, October, 18, 2012.

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Beehive Marketplace This annual event will be held at the Mary Ricks Thornton Cultural Center in Kosciusko on Nov. 2 from 6-8 p.m. and Nov. 3 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. The event will consists of demonstrations, booths by Attala County and area artists, Country Store and a silent auction. Admission is free and call 662-289-4761 for more information. Columbus Christmas Open House Columbus merchants will open their doors for those early Christmas shoppers. Enjoy food and drink while shopping and get in the spirit with holiday lights and decorations throughout all the stores. For more information visit columbusmainstreet.com. 13th Annual Bulldog Bash Make plans to be in Starkville’s Historic Cotton District on the eve of the Texas A&M vs MSU football game for the 2012 Bash headlined by Neon Trees, Andy Grammer and Gloriana. For more information visit msubulldogbash.org.

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LEO Run to Remember Meridian’s first marathon and half marathon will benefit the Alzheimer’s Association, Mississippi Lions Sight Foundation, Hope Village and Camp Eagle Ridge. Food and entertainment at Northeast Recreation Park will be from 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Awards ceremony will follow even and fees and registration information can be found at leoruntoremember.org. Earth’s Bounty A Farmer’s Market Meridian Main Street and the Meridian Area Farmer’s Market invite the community to shop and enjoy the first Saturday of each month at the in-season festival of fresh produce and the best in local products, including baked goods, flowers, jams, jellies and much more from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. at Singing Brakeman Park. For more information visit meridiandowntown.com.

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NOVEMBER

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Bulldog Brunch & Browse Starkville Main Street will open their doors to the public from 12-5 p.m. The stores will only open each of the seven Sundays of home football game weekends.

students and Starkville residents who come out and visit all three art galleries on campus and get to enjoy food, fun and art. All exhibits are free and open to the public. For locations visit msstate. edu or call 662-325-2973.

Starkville Arts Council Holiday Art Exhibit The SAAC in Public Places committee presents the annual art exhibit showcasing works by local artists at the Greater Starkville Development Partnership from 5-7 p.m. Works include paintings, photographs, drawings and sculpture. The winner of the Cotton District Arts Festival poster contest. Come and enjoy an evening of art in the heart of Downtown Starkville and purchase a enjoy one-of-a-kind work of art to gift this holiday season! For more information call 662-3243080.

Neshoba Artists’ Guild Presents The Depot Artists Starting at 6 p.m. in The Depot, Hilda Stuart will be signing her book Choctaw Gardens. Great music will be provided by her country music star son Marty Stuart and Connie Smith. For more information on her book, contact choctawgardens.com

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7th Annual Christmas Handworks Bazaar Starkville First United Methodist Church will be hosting this event benefitting Habitat for Humanity from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Christian Life Center at the church. There will be vendors from across North Mississippi and a bake sale, frozen casseroles, holiday entertainment, and a sandwich shoppe. For more information call 662-323-5722.

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Philadelphia Open House Come to the Holiday Open House in Historic Downtown Philadelphia for an assortment of gift ideas. From 1-5 p.m., stores will be open to help you find exactly what you are looking for. MSU Bachelor of Fine Arts: Fine Art Thesis Exhibition Graduating seniors in the MSU Department of Art Bachelor of Fine Arts program will be exhibiting the culmination of their artistic career through Nov. 17 at the MSU galleries open Tues.-Fri. from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. This exciting event for

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Trees of Christmas Opening Gala Candlelight opening of the 44th Annual Display of themed Christmas Trees. The theme this year is Broadway Lights. More than 20 trees showcase creativity of schools and organizations with their original renditions of Broadway musicals for the spectacular holiday display complete with wine, champagne, heavy hors d’oeuvres and musical entertainment from 6-9 p.m. at Merrehope. Cost is $25 per person and more information can be found at visitmeridian.com.

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4th Annual Depot Artists Show and Sale The fourth annual Depot Artists Show and Sale features the Neshoba Artists’ Guild and the wide range of work from jewelry, pottery, glassware, paintings and much more! This free event will also feature Christmas decorated products from the artists and a chance to win what’s on the Christmas tree. For more information, call 601-656-1000 or visit www.neshoba.org.

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Columbus Holiday Farmers’ Market Columbus area farmers invite the community to shop and enjoy fresh produce at the Holiday Farmer’s Market from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. at the Hitching Lot.


SeeHear NOVEMBER

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Christmas Open House Starkville merchants will open their doors for those early Christmas shoppers. Enjoy food and drink while shopping and get in the spirit with holiday lights and decorations throughout all the stores. For more information visit starkville.org. Cookies with Santa Santa will be at the Polka Tots with cookies and milk ready for all the children to sit on his lap. For more information visit starkville.org.

LIVE Music Schedule Nov 2

Gunboat at Zorba’s Jason Miller Band at Rick’s The Mississippi Shakedown at Dave’s Dark Horse Tavern Hobo Hippie at Cowbells Photo submitted.

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Starkville Christmas Parade The Starkville Christmas Parade will be “Polar Express” theme and all can get in the Christmas spirit with themed floats, bands and other organizations throughout the community which will be involved. For more information visit starkville.org. MSU Bachelor of Fine Arts: Graphic Design Exhibition Graduating seniors in the MSU Department of Art Bachelor of Fine Arts Graphic Design program will be showing off their original designs and products, which include everything from book covers and posters to beverage labels and menus at the Visual Arts Center Gallery on University Drive through Dec. 4. Gallery is open from Tues.-Fri. from 10 a.m.-4 p.m and Saturday from 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Come and see the future of design! The exhibit is free and open to the public. For more information call 662-325-2973.

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Starkville Holiday Bazaar Holiday shopping made fun and easy at the Christmas fair with over 150 artisans displaying handmade goods. The Bazaar will be held at the Starkville Sportsplex through Nov. 29 and shoppers can find everything from food products to hand-painted pottery. For more details on vendors and time please visit starkville.org.

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Splendid Chaos at Cowbells DJ Will D at Zorba’s

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Papadosio at Rick’s Honey Island Swamp Band at Dave’s Dark Horse Tavern

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The Real Brown Sugar at Zorba’s

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Rico and the Border Patrol at Cowbells

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Cole Taylor at Cowbells Jamie Davis and Soul Gravy at Rick’s Good Paper at Zorba’s

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Denton Hatcher and the Soap Box Blues at Zorba’s Park Band at Cowbells

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Wedding and engagement announcements Copy, photos and payment must be received no later than the December 5 for inclusion in the January Bridal issue of Town and Gown Magazine.

Wedding: Contact name: Phone:

Email:

How to submit an announcement: • Email a wedding announcement by following the attached form. Please type in paragraph form as you would like for it to appear in the magazine. Email to claire@townandgownmagazine.com with the name of the wedding in the subject line, (i.e. Smith-Jones Wedding). • Email 2-3 vertical professional high-resolution (at least 300 dpi) photographs of the bride and/ or groom or submit on CD, non-returnable. One photo will be chosen. • Include payment in the form of a check made payable to Town & Gown Magazine. We also accept all major credit cards (see below). Space will not be reserved until payment is received.

COST: $100 half page announcement $150 full page announcement

Name Billing Address City

Mail to: Town and Gown Magazine P.O. Box 1068 Starkville, MS 39759

Phone Number Payment Enclosed Card Number

State

Zip

E-mail Charge my Visa/MC/Amex/Disc Expiration Date

For Wedding and Engagement Announcements Templete visit townandgownmagazine.com. Deadline for all submissions is December 5, 2012. 80

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A Thousand Words

The singing of the Maroon and White Alma Mater after Mississippi State University beat Alburn 28-20 on September 8, 2012. Photo submitted.

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Town and Gown Magazine  

November 2012

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