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VOLUME 2, NUMBER 7

MAY 2013

TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM SUMMER TIME

Miss Mississippi USA Paromita Mitra

MAY 2013 SCAN FOR ONLINE ISSUE


MAY 2013

Miss Mississippi USA Paromita Mitra

is everywhere you go! Online now at townandgownmagazine.com


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Visit Starkville Academy Plaza Starr Avenue Starkville

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A PRODUCT OF HORIZON OF MISSISSIPPI P.O. Box 1068 | Starkville, MS 39760 www.townandgownmagazine.com

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STAFF

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DON NORMAN | PUBLISHER

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

sdnpub@starkvilledaily news.com

EMILIA MORGAN emilia@ townandgown magazine.com

CLAIRE MASSEY | EDITOR

KELSEY PEDERSON

claire@townandgown magazine.com

LINDSEY JOHNSON SR. ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

lindsey@ townandgown magazine.com

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kelsey@ townandgown magazine.com

INTERNS LIZZIE SMITH CATHERINE STUKENBORG

PAGE DESIGN

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CLAIRE MASSEY

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WRITERS

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MEG HENDERSON JOE LEE HELEN POLK RICHELLE PUTNAM CLAIRE TADLOCK

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PHOTOGRAPHERS

DIVIAN CONNER ASHLEY COVIN LAURA DANIELS ASHLEY MASSEY LIZZIE SMITH CATHERINE STUKENBORG

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ADVERTISING DESIGN

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CHRIS MCMILLEN

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CONTRIBUTORS

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ABBY HATHORN LISA LAFONTAINE BYNUM CHRISTINA LUCAS JIMMIE KAY FISHER AMY TAYLOR LINDSAY JO WILKINSON Reproductions in whole or in part, without written permission, is strictly prohibited. No responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited manuscripts, articles or photographs. We reserve the right to edit submissions before publication. Town & Gown is a free magazine published monthly and distributed in and around Starkville and the Golden Triangle area. Subscriptions are available for mail customers. For subscriptions or inquiries, write Town & Gown Magazine, P.O. Box 1068, Starkville, MS, 39760, or call 662-323-1642. 6

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Get to know our

Sta

Contributors Lindsey Johnson Lindsey is the Senior Account Executive since October 2012. She graduated in May 2012 from The University for Women with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Marketing.

What is your favorite part of working for Town & Gown?

I love meeting so many locals and learning more about the business in the town where I’ve lived my whole life.

Christina Lucas Christina is a Food Contributor since the April 2013 issue. She Louisiana native and Starkville resident, has degrees from LSU (B.S.) and The University of Memphis (M.S. - Leadership and Policy Studies).

What do you like about living in Starkville?

We have been here for a year plus. People here are so genuine and personable. Moving here was a great decision.

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Editor

Letter from the

“Y

ou learn something new everyday”, I can tell you, this is so true! Town and Gown Magazine has brought opportunities I never thought I would have the chance to do. Since graduating from Mississippi State in 2011, I have learned Starkville not only is a city still making history at 175 years old, but it integrates the intellect of the staff and students to make this city unstoppable. This May we have brought two articles that both are working to make this city and surrounding areas national news. Our cover girl, Miss Mississippi USA Paromita Mitra, is making culture and Mississippi State history. She is majoring in aerospace engineering at MSU, is a member of both MSU Fashion Board and the Space Cowboys Rocket Design Team; plus, she will be competing in Miss USA on June 16, 2013. (Page 45 ) Then there is Prairie Wildlife, a wildlife preserve working with MSU for their restoration program. It also is giving others a chance to be involved with exciting quail hunts, Land Rover driving courses, the Orvis Wing Shooting School and more. (Page 20) Graduation is finally here for those senior in high school and college. Now, is the perfect time to know how to plan the parties. To celebrating with friends at the party of the year or just with family in the backyard, we have tips and trades to hosting a party on page 25 and on page 36, see recipes for a backyard luau. It can be stressful graduating from college with all the rules of what to wear, how to act and what needs to be on your social profiles! Stylist Abby Hathorn interviews MSU Career Center Senior Coordinator Kelly Atwood and Designer Joeffer Caoe. (Page 62) Whether its southern class, charm or hospitality, Starkville local, Beverly Jones, has it all. (Page 55) Plus, in our newest section, “Just a Southern Thing”, we have those forgotten Southern traditions everyone must know! (Page 52) We want to hear from you about each issue! So, email us, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and visit us on our Pinterest and Intsagram, and you might just see your comments and post on out newest social media page! Keep those posts and tweets coming! Enjoy!

Claire Massey Editor

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THE LATEST ON INSTAGRAM: Comment or like our post to let us know you’re there! May 2013 TO SUBSCRIBE: Call 662.323.1642

MISS AN ISSUE? Visit townandgownmagazine.com

12 ISSUES - $48 6 ISSUES - $24 1 ISSUE - $4

HAVE A STORY IDEA? Email us at info@townandgownmagazine.com LIKE US ON FACEBOOK! Town and Gown Mag See post about events, magazine content, contest and more. FOLLOW US ON TWITTER! @townandgownmag Follow us for quick view of our magazine’s happenings around town! FOLLOW US ON PINTEREST AND INSTAGRAM! READ THIS YEAR’S & PAST ISSUES ALL ONLINE Read issues as they appear in print at townandgownmagazine.com

THE LATEST ON PINTEREST: Repin to let us know you are there!

THE LATEST ON FACBOOK: Post and see here! Lynn Hamilton “Paromita is a gorgeous young woman!”

Sheila Kelly “Loved it more than any magazine you have done, but that is because I am bias, my hubby Reggie Kelly's Fan Club with Kyvan was in it:) Seriously though, you all have a great magazine with a lot of informative information about all the happenings around GTR area especially during the month of April. Great pictures by Divian Conner.”

THE LATEST ON TWITTER: Tweet us and see here! MS Univ for Women @MUWedu Seen the latest issue of @townandgownmag1 with #TheW Alum @LinkieMarais on the cover!

Blackjack Station @BlackjackStatn @townandgownmag1 The QR code on this month's cover is a hit! People think it's cool. 10

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Table of

Contents

On the Cover MAY 2013

HOME AND GARDEN 16 DIY with Amy Taylor 18 A Stack Attack 20 Upholding Traditions 25 How to plan a: Graduation Party TASTE AND TOAST 30 Canning Strawberries 101 33 A Mother’s Day Toast 36 Backyard Luau

Miss Mississippi USA Paromita Mitra SCAN FOR ONLINE ISSUE

Paromita Mitra, Miss Mississippi USA, will compete in June for Miss USA 2013 in Las Vegas. Page 45

HEALTH AND BEAUTY 40 Generation LIFE AND STYLE 52 It’s a Southern Thing 55 Meet the Locals: Beverly Jones 58 Friendship is More Than Meets The Die 62 Dress to Impress 67 Oh...Just Shopping in Starkville 68 Lindsay Jo: How to pack to travel.

IN EVERY ISSUE 6 Staff 9 Letter From the Editor 70 T&G Wish List 72 Literature 73 Events FEATURES 80 Calendar 45 Paromita Mitra 82 Advertisers

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HOME AND GARDEN

DIY with Amy Taylor

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Taylor, Petal native and Starkville resident, is a Southern Mississippi graduate where she earned a bachelor degree in broadcast journalism and obtained a master’s degree in Agricultural and Extension Education from Mississippi State University. She is an avid do-it-yourself crafter, artist and has passion for home design and projects.

Materials

“Dress up” your flower pots with fun fabric! This is a simple and easy way to re-vamp your outdoor décor. It’s a great idea for indoor plants as well!

Materials: Flower Pot Mod Podge Fabric

Use different fabrics for a colorful, summer yard.

1. Cut the length of the fabric a few inches longer than the top of the flower pot, lay flat and brush mod podge on the fabric and flower pot. 2. Smooth fabric with glue onto the flowerpot. Work out as many wrinkles as you can and let dry. The fabric inside the flower pot will have some wrinkles, but that’s ok. The flowers you place inside will hide them. It’s best to leave the flowers in their original pot when placing them inside the fabric pot, so you can change them out as needed!

Step 1

Step 2

Announce your engagement or wedding with Town & Gown Magazine. 1/3 - $50 1/2 - $100 Full Page - $150 Two Page - $210 Call 662.323.1642 or email info@townandgownmagazine.com.

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A Stack Attack

Russell Hamilton Russell has been the Nursery Manager for Oktibbeha County Coop for 17 years since graduating from Mississippi State University with a major in horticulture. Email: rhamilton@oktcoop.com

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By R ussell Hamilt on Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

believe that two of the most important aspects of a good do-it-yourself project are: 1.) It isn’t difficult to accomplish in a weekend kind of time frame and 2.) Success is almost guaranteed. This month’s project has both. The novice gardener will have a blast putting this project together and a master gardener can up the scale of difficulty to suit the needs of their project with unique plant selections. Wave Petunias have become very popular over the past several years for a lot of reasons. It is hard to go wrong by using them in mixed containers and there are several varieties to choose from. You can use the original Purple Wave trailing petunias or the new Shockwave compact varieties and still get an awesome combination. Pick colors that flow well together and blend nicely with the location you are going to place your stacked planter. The materials for this project can easily be found at your local garden center. And please don’t think you are limited to the Wave Petunias I have chosen for this container. Feel free to experiment with your own combinations. Part of the fun in doing mix containers is picking out the different plants that you will use. A lot of the time our personalities determine which plants we use and that allows the project to gain uniqueness to it. Some other plants you might try would be Bandana or Chipotle Lantana series for really sunny locations. Pazazz purslane can be used if your tendency is to not water frequently. Caladiums and ivy make good selections if you are placing your container in a shady location.

Materials: 5 clay pots in sequential sizes (22”,18”,14”,10”,6”) Wave Petunias ( around 15 ) Potting Soil (2-3 bags) 1 Broom Handle (approx. 50” in length)

Tips for future success include: 1.) Fertilize your pots regularly or mix a slow release fertilizer in the soil before you start. 2.) If you have a tendency to not water your pots enough mix a moisture holding product in your soil such as Hydro-stretch. 3.) Choose plants that have similar light requirements. 4.) Don’t be scared to prune back some of your plants if they seem to be taking over the container. Follow those tips and you are assured success.

Instructions: Clay pots make easy stackers for this five-tiered container. I used a broom handle, cut to appropriate size, to go down the center of the pots to help stabilized the project and keep things centered. Simply start out with your largest pot, filling it full with soil till about the top two inches. Keep repeating the process by sliding the next smallest pot down the broom handle and filling it with soil (Miracle Gro Potting Mix). Once all pots are stacked, simply plant the plants you chose in the different pots. After you are done, water your mixed container thoroughly. Experimenting will make this project fun and exciting. I run into lots of customers who say they just don’t know what plants to choose.

I answer them all the same. I rarely have ever seen a horrible combination so long as you have chosen plants you like and that have similar light and water requirements. If you are not sure about the later, just ask I’ll point you in the right direction. Involve the whole family in the project. Kids love playing in the dirt and they love to watch things grow. Stir up their imagination by letting them help pick out the plants or even do their own smaller scale mixed container.You will be amazed at the magic they come up with. *E-mail in your story and pictures of your favorite mixed container. Russell Hamilton rhamilton@ oktcoop.com. april

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Upholding Traditions "...only through visionary conservation efforts and dedicated community involvement...

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By Joe Lee Pho t og r aph y b y Clair e Masse y & Submitt ed

ucked away in a remote corner of Clay County is a 6,000-acre wildlife preserve that brings hunting enthusiasts to northeast Mississippi from as far away as Alaska, California and Wisconsin. But there’s a lot more to Prairie Wildlife than just a hunter’s paradise. “About fifteen years ago I developed the urge to start quail hunting again, as I did so much in the 1960s and 70’s,” said Jimmy Bryan of West Point, whose family owns the property. “I contacted Dr. Wes Burger with the MSU Department of Wildlife & Fisheries to discuss the possibility of increasing our quail population. “We only had 4-5 coveys on a tract of 3,200 acres of land. Dr. Burger convinced me that we could repopulate the farm by restoring the habitat. He developed a plan that included planting native warm-season grasses, restoring hedge rows, and replacing invasive grasses with native grass and shrubs.” Bryan, now 74, said that after implementing Burger’s program, they saw annual increases in not only bobwhite quail, but in all songbirds, raptors, rabbits, coyotes and even bobcats. “MSU has guided us in the restoration program, and they use the property as a classroom for graduate students. Many research papers on birds, butterflies, grasses, and other prairie habitat have been written about it,” Bryan said. “To help offset some of our conservation expenses, we started selling hunts for quail, rabbits, dove, and deer. After seeing the results of our early conservation efforts, we decided to develop a conservation-driven sporting estate into our cattle and road crop farming operations.” Prairie Wildlife has indeed become a prized location for everything from corporate entertaining and weekend hunting trips to school field trips and Boy Scout jamborees. The main building, Bryan Lodge, will be four years old this fall. It has five bedrooms on three floors and features antique furniture as well as hand-carved pieces created by south Mississippi artisan Bill Ogletree. The new section opened in January and includes a mudroom with its own side entrance. There’s a conference room and even a pro shop, where clothing and a variety of memorabilia is sold. “We can seat up to 24 in the main dining room, which offers a fireplace and leather couches,” said Lodge Manager Harry Pasisis. A resident of Birmingham, Ala., and a professionally-trained chef, Pasisis joined Prairie Wildlife four years ago and brought with him three decades of experience in the culinary and hospitality industries.

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“A large part of our business is word-of-mouth,” Pasisis said. “We’ve hosted marriages on the pier, in front of the fireplace, and at the peninsula. We have big groups of hunters come for the weekend and enjoy social events, such as dove and rabbit hunts. A big favorite is the five stand atop Bryan Lodge; it’s a high overhead shot, and there are six other positions around the horseshoe pond. It’s a warm-up for our hunters and great for corporate entertainment.” For hunters, one of the most popular aspects of Prairie Wildlife is the opportunity to take part in the Orvis Wing Shooting School. PW is one of only four locations in the country that offers the Orvis training classes. “Students are trained and get a custom gun-fitting,” Pasisis said. “The instructors come from Orvis locations in Sandanona, N.Y., Manchester, Vt., and Mays Pond, Fla.. Of the four, we are the only one that hosts a shooting school during the time of year hunting season is actually going on. We’ve just completed our second year of Orvis School. We’re also developing a Land Rover driving course, with 7.5 miles of available driving area and instructors who will come in and teach.”

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There are two other lodging options on the grounds in addition to Bryan Lodge. Magnolia House, which opened in January, is built next to a suspension bridge overlooking the horseshoe pond. “It has four king-size bedrooms and master bathrooms,” Pasisis said. “Guests can sit and enjoy nature, take walks, and hunt. We’ll have couples come up and stay at Magnolia House and just enjoy the peaceful sounds and sights.” Then there’s Pleasant Home, the original overnight spot at Prairie Wildlife. It was opened to guests about a decade ago but was built in the 1840s. A rustic structure and as solid as any building on the facility, Pleasant Home is decorated with framed pictures of the Bryan family over the years and has a full kitchenette. “Pleasant Home is a closed-in dogtrot located in the middle of sixty acres of cedar,” Pasisis said. “It has two floors with porches in the front and back. It has three bedrooms and multiple sleeping options.” Xavier Fairley is the wildlife manager and gives tours of the grounds. Short-legged beagle dogs are kept for rabbit hunts, which, along with quail hunts, are very popular with guests.


The Bryan Lodge dinning room can seat up to 24 in the main dining room, which offers a fireplace and leather couch.

The Pleasant Home, the original overnight spot at Prairie Wildlife. It was opened to guests about a decade ago but was built in the 1840’s.

“There were two or three rabbit hunts my first year,” Pasisis said. “Now we have 35-40 a year. It’s a social event, with 20-30 folks in the field. And they’re talking to each other, having a big time – the socializing aspect of hunting has been missing, and we’re trying to restore it.” “I was invited by a guy about three years ago, and I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been back since,” said Will Pace of Madison. “I enjoy shooting clays and hunting, and I’ve been with my wife and family and I’ve been with groups of guys. It’s a wonderful atmosphere and the facilities are very nice. It’s evident that they have a genuine passion for what they’re doing. Harry is an outstanding cook. It’s a first-rate operation all the way around.” Pace’s brother-in-law, Will Phillips of Yazoo City, brings his family to Prairie Wildlife two or three times a year. They make a weekend of it, leaving on Friday afternoon after school and returning Sunday afternoon. “My daughters are now 22 and 16. They were both in the Orvis School and thoroughly enjoyed it,” said Phillips, an avid hunter of deer, duck and quail who also has a six-year-old son. “The first year, my daughter was the only female in the class, and they worked hard to make her feel included. “We’ve stayed at Bryan Lodge and Magnolia House so far and plan to stay at Pleasant Home, or ‘the cabin,’ as Mr. Jimmy calls it. Harry and the staff are very accommodating and do their best to make you feel at home. The food is great, too. The whole concept is very family oriented.” The social aspect of Prairie Wildlife appeals to Jack Forbus of Starkville, who said he received a blast email a couple of years ago announcing dinner at Bryan Lodge on the last Saturday night of each month. “The cost was $45, and there was a 24-person limit,” Forbus said. “I found this intriguing and called and talked to Harry, who explained why they’d put together what they had. I asked if we could possibly come on a Friday night instead of Saturday, and I wound up bringing five couples and we made up a menu. It was absolutely enchanting.” Forbus plans to dove hunt at Prairie Wildlife this fall, but for now he’s a social guest and is responsible for a good chunk of regular dinner business at Bryan Lodge. “We went out there on Valentine’s Day and had a marvelous meal: New York strip steaks, garlic mashed potatoes, a salad with crab cakes, an appetizer of duck, and Bananas Foster for dessert with little hearts,” Forbus said. “I got to know Harry and eventually told him I could bring 24 people out there at a time and fill their dining room. Now we have a regular group that goes. I get out there about once every three months. You mix your own drinks. You can walk on the grounds and watch the ducks come in, or ride around the facility in a golf cart.” Pasisis sees Prairie Wildlife as a tailgating spot for MSU home football weekends that may rival the traditional, coveted tailgating spots on campus. may

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“Two families came on a Friday afternoon from Birmingham for the MSU-Alabama game,” Pasisis said. “They had lunch; the ladies stayed in, and the men and the kids went out and looked around the grounds and found shark’s teeth and oyster shells. “They had dinner at the Lodge Friday night and breakfast Saturday morning. We weren’t expecting them back until late in the afternoon because they had tickets for the football game, but they sold the tickets and watched the game at the lodge. They enjoyed themselves so much they decided to watch the game from here and let the kids continue to play outdoors.” Bryan, who loved hunting on horseback in his younger days, remains just as invested in the ecological and teaching aspects of the property as he does its commercial and entertainment value. Burger, who worked with him at the outset, said, “Prairie Wildlife has demonstrated a commitment to prairie restoration that is unsurpassed on private lands in Mississippi, restoring more than 900 acres of historic native grasslands.” “We have planted probably 1,000 acres of native warm season grasses, built a lodge overlooking Horseshoe Lake, built additional lodging this past year, and built an addition to our existing lodge,” Bryan said. “Our goal is to develop the nearly 6,000 acres that we have to a successful sporting estate that will continue to grow and develop for many generations, while upholding our sporting traditions and conservation way of life.” Prairie Wildlife is located at 6111 Old Vinton Road, approximately 20 minutes from downtown West Point. Visit www.prairiewildlife.com for information about everything from lodging to the Orvis Shooting School, and call 601-295-7224 to make appointments for a tour of the grounds or to schedule a group hunt or corporate event. “It’s a working farm,” Pasisis said. “There are always MSU trucks out here, with experiments going on and samples being taken and wildlife being observed. It’s a place to hunt, to enjoy nature, and to learn about Mississippi’s Black Prairie and the importance of conservation. And it’s Mr. Jimmy’s legacy.” F 24

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How to plan a:

Graduation Party Today, it is easier than ever to plan a

By Jimmie K a y F isher Pho t og r aph y b y R ut h Br o wn

party. The occasion, location, date and cost have a wide variety of options to create the perfect party.

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Ready… Set…. Celebrate!

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Rules to think about: 1. Having a party today is easier than ever. Access to the Internet gives even the novice planner a professional touch and many opportunities. Take advantage of them. Creating invitations on websites like Shutterfly is easy, fast and affordable. Find interesting venues on your local town's tourism website under facilities. A carousel or a park pavilion are great options and are usually available for a small rental fee. Reserve a tennis court for a “Set and Serve” party, with everyone dressed like a tennis pro. Websites like Pinterest provide images of party favorites, party food ideas (with recipes!) and great decorating pointers.  Imitation is the highest form of flattery.  2. Planning is everything! Plan: theme, location, time, invitations, decorations and menu. Take it easy or make it over the top, but know that the success is in the planning. Use what you have: decorations, food and

Friends.

If you have a friend that loves to cook, ask if she would like to help. Ask a family member who can make great flower arrangements with the flowers in your yard! For example, host a fish fry with drinks on ice in the family boat, fishing hats and lures for decorations, and momma’s hush puppies in a brown paper bag – perfect!

Jimmie Kay Fisher is from Meridian, Miss. Her expertise include set and costume design, and a former committee member of Meridian Arts Council, volunteered at state and local levels as a board member, At-Large Chairman, Contestant Chairman and Regional Director of Distinguished Young Women of Mississippi program starting in 1999 and is a former member of Meridian Junior Auxiliary. Formerly on the work force for Pretty Presentations Rental and Catering she uses her skills to coordinates individual special events currently and shares her time with planning parties on Board of Director’s for Boys and Girls Club of East Mississippi and her family. may

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3. “It's the thought that counts.” Remember this!! It won't always be perfect. Make it a memory. A party that reflects the honoree and the occasion will never fail. If the graduate loves music, use a church gym with a stage and have a “Grammy Graduate Party” playing music with a possible free concert. If Broadway is the choice: "Breakfast at Tiffany’s" with a brunch and easy props of inexpensive faux pearls, black hats and signature black sunglasses.

Most Important:

Think of the person you are there for!! If your honoree dislikes Mexican food, don’t host a fajita party.   4. Consider who will be at the party, how long it will take for invited people to arrive, and the time a party starts. All of these factors will help determine your menu. Early morning get-togethers feature great breakfast menus that are so cost efficient.  Brunch is a little more elegant than breakfast, yet it provides so many options. Lunches and dinners are often the most expensive parties, but there are ways to circumvent additional expenses. Creating buffets are great when you have help. Share recipes to a group. You can share the cost and work, and it is much cheaper than the pricy restaurant buffets. Know your guests and who has special diets. Try to give at least two options for those that don’t eat meat. Many people have diet restrictions, but it's easy to offer a lighter version for everyone to enjoy. List every dish name with ingredients that may affect allergies. 5. Rentals are a money saving investment due to their variety, accessibility, convenience and affordability. You can turn a garage into a palace or Cajun Café. Linens, serving pieces, dishes and cookware can all be rented.  It is ¼ the cost of purchasing and doesn’t take up space in your attic when the party is over. Some companies will provide rental delivery for no charge. Most importantly, they have staff that can assist with time-saving set up for a very reasonable price. 6. Last, know you are only one person! Planning a lavish party that kills you is not the memory you want. The truth is, the hostess of a party can and SHOULD have fun. Give up some things and ask for help! Most people would love to help, but they may not know what you need. Don’t overbook yourself. Have fun. Take a chance. Think outside the box! F

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TASTE AND TOAST

Fresh Fruit All Year Long:

Basic Canning 101

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S

Lisa LaFontaine Bynum is a freelance writer from Grenada. Her work has appeared in several publications in Mississippi. She is a graduate of Delta State University where she received a B.A. in Marketing and her M.B.A. In her free time, she enjoys food writing and photography and documents her culinary happenings on her blog The Cooking Bride. She currently resides in Brandon with her husband and son. Recipes and photography by Lisa LaFontaine Bynum

pring is our reward for surviving the wet, cold, grey weather that comes with winter. When green buds start forming on the tree branches, it’s like a glimmer of hope has arrived. However, when fresh produce starts showing up at the local farmer’s market, it’s time to celebrate the arrival of spring. Currently, strawberry season is in full swing in Mississippi. Unfortunately, it won’t last for long. Canning is a great way to take advantage of the plentiful fruit that is in our backyard right now so you can enjoy it all year along. Preserving and canning food isn’t just for grandmas anymore. The art has seen a resurgence in recent years due to the increase in the price of food and concerns over the use of artificial ingredients and preservatives. One advantage to canning your own fruit is the quality and freshness of the fruit. Fruit begins to lose nutrients as soon as it is harvested, so the sooner you eat it, the better. Fruit purchased from a local farmer’s market has typically been picked within the last 24 hours. Fruit purchased from a major grocery store chain may have been picked up to a week prior. Sometimes the fruit has been picked before its ripe, in anticipation of the long lead time needed to get it to its final destination, preventing it from fully developing all its nutrients. Canning works by boiling food to kill any bacteria and sealing the can (or jar), creating a completely sterile environment. Because there is no bacteria present, the food does not spoil, allowing home canners to store unopened food for an extended period of time. If you are new to preserving and canning fruits and vegetables, strawberries are a good place to start. Strawberries are naturally high in acid, meaning they can be processed using the water bath canning method and do not require the use of a pressure cooker, as is required when canning vegetables and meat. The only tools you need are a stockpot deep enough to cover your

jars with at least two inches of water, glass mason jars with lids and rings, a jar rack and a basic utensil kit. Most of these items you may already have on hand or can be purchased at your local grocery store. Because the goal is to create a sterile environment for the food, it makes sense to thoroughly clean and sanitize your jars. Check jars to make sure they are not chipped or cracked. Wash jars, rings, and lids in warm soapy water, then sterilize the jars only in boiling water for 10 minutes. Once sterilized, remove the pot from the heat, but allow your jars to stay in the hot water to keep warm. Pouring hot jam into a cold glass jar can cause the jar to shatter. Place jar lids in hot, but not boiling, water. Hot water softens the gummy material on the lid that seals the jar. However, boiling water will activate the lids and render them useless before you even get started. While jars and lids can be reused, lids can only be used once. One term you may come across in canning is “headspace.” Headspace is the space from the top of the jar to the food or liquid in the jar. Too little headspace, and the food may boil over and prevent the lid from sealing. Too much headspace and the jar may not seal properly because the processing time is not long enough to drive the air out of the jar.Food at the top of the jar may also discolor. Most recipes will instruct you on how much headspace to leave. Many basic kits come with a ruler to help you measure headspace. Once the jars have been processed and allowed to cool, check the lids to make sure they do not flex up and down. Occasionally, a jar will not seal. The contents are safe to eat, but the jar needs to be refrigerated and eaten immediately. According to the The National Center for Home Food Preservation, properly sealed jars have a shelf life of at least one year. Once opened, your strawberries should be kept refrigerated and consumed within one month. Taking that first taste of real homemade jam made with fresh strawberries is like nothing you can buy in a store. Once you’ve made your first successful batch, you may find the process extremely rewarding and completely addictive. ✦ MAY

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Strawberry Preserves *Makes 2 pints homemade preserves. 2-1/2 cups sliced strawberries (about 3 pints) 2 tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 3 tbsp. pectin (I used Sure Jell) 3-1/2 cups granulated sugar 2 (12 oz. glass preserving jars with lids and bands Fill a large stockpot with enough water to completely cover the tops of your jars by two inches. Heat water over high heat until it comes to a rolling boil. In the meantime, wash and sanitize your jars. Leave clean jars in warm water until you are ready to fill them. Place lids in a pan of hot (but not boiling) water to soften the gum on the lids. Place sliced strawberries in a 6-or 8-quart saucepan. Crush strawberries using a potato masher. 32

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Stir in lemon juice, then gradually add pectin. Bring mixture to a full rolling boil over high heat, stirring constantly. Add the sugar and stir to dissolve. Return mixture to a boil. Continue to boil for one minute, stirring constantly. Remove pan from heat. Skim foam if desired. Ladle hot jam into two hot pint jars leaving an inch headspace. Wipe the rim of the jar with a clean, damp rag. Center the lid on jar. Carefully screw on the band until fit is fingertip tight. Process jars the pot of boiling water for 10 minutes. Remove jars and allow to cool. Once the jars cool, the vacuum seal will form and you will hear the lids “ping� once the seal is complete. Check the lids after 24 hours to make sure the lids do not flex up and down when the center is pressed.


A Mother’s Day

Toast

R ecipes b y Chr is tina L ucas Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner Location: Magnolia Manor Flo w er s b y The Flo w er Com pan y

Christina Lucas Christina Lucas, Louisiana native and Starkville resident, has degrees from LSU (B.S.) and The University of Memphis (M.S. - Leadership and Policy Studies). She enjoys cooking and creating simple, easy to follow recipes. She is also a yoga enthusiast, artist, and has a passion for keeping life simple and enjoyable. You can follow her on Pinterest at www.pinterest.com/christinalucas/.

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Bloody Mary Punch My take on the quintessential brunch beverage. Serves 8 to 10 1 (46-oz.) container low-sodium tomato juice, chilled 3 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice 1 Tbsp. Tabasco 1 1/2 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 2 tsp. freshly ground pepper 1/2 tsp. Old Bay seasoning 1/2 tsp. celery salt 1/2 cup vodka (optional), chilled Celery sticks (optional) Garlic stuffed olives (optional) Lemon slices (optional)   In a punch bowl or large pitcher, combine and stir all ingredients (vodka is optional). Serve over ice. Garnish with celery sticks, lemon slices and garlic stuffed olives, if desired. TIP: Let your guests decide if they want an alcoholic drink. Serve optional shots of vodka on the side, and let guests add a shot in their glass or not.

Orchard Fizzy The sweet orange soda of your childhood made into a refreshing adult drink. Serves 8 to 10 1 two liter bottle orange soda 1 8 oz. bottle pomegranate juice 1/4 cup lime juice (approx. 2 medium limes) vodka (optional) lime slices for garnish ice In a larger pitcher, combine all ingredients. Stir and serve over ice. Garnish with lime slices.

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Apricot Orange Tea 2 1/2 cups apricot nectar 1 cup orange juice 1 cup water 1 Tbsp. sugar 1 tsp. ground cinnamon 4 lemon slices 12 whole cloves 2 tsp. instant tea Serves 4 Take a saucepan and combine first five ingredients. Take 2 cloves and insert into each lemon slice and add to saucepan. Heat until boiling then reduce heat. Cover and simmer for 5 minutes and stir in instant tea. Serve hot.

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Luau Backyard R ecipes & Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner Dr ink R ecipe b y Or a Lane Ev ent Design b y S is f or Sw ee t - Kisha Landf air

Tropical Pineapple Cream Cheese Dip 1 8 oz. package of cream cheese, softened 2 cups of crushed pineapple with juice reserved Mix both cream cheese and pineapple well. This dip is simple easy and great served with cookies, crackers or as a fruit dip for apples, strawberries. Place dip inside a hollowed fresh pineapple for the perfect presentation. 36

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Luscious Leis 2 oz. Malibu Pineapple Rum 4 oz. Mango Tamipico Juicee 1 oz. grenadine 1/2 oz. Sweet Rose’s Lime Juice Fill glass with ice, add rum, juice, grenadine and lime juice. Do not shake or stir. For green effect: Add 1 oz. melon liquor For blue effect: Add 1 oz. blue curacao Garnish with fruit of choice. For non-alcoholic version: Replace rum with sprite.

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Angel Fruit Trifle Angel food cake cut into cubes 12 oz. package of frozen blueberries 2 cups sliced strawberries 2 whole sliced bananas 2 16 oz. containers of frozen whipped topping Rinse fruit and let dry. In a deep clear glass bowl or trifle dish, spread a layer of angel food cake cubes. Sprinkle cake with the berries and bananas, then top with whipped topping. Add another layer of cake and then berries and bananas, making the final layer of whipped topping. Garnish with fresh berries. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Grilled Maple-Chipotle Pineapple Rings 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup Juice of 1/2 lime 1 tsp. adobo sauce from a can of chipotle peppers in adobo 1/8 tsp. kosher salt 1 large pineapple In a small bowl, stir together the maple syrup, lime juice, adobo sauce and salt, and set aside. Start heat for grill. Peel the pineapple and slice into thick rings, approximately 1/4-3/8 inch thick. Set the rings on your cutting board. Use a 1-1/2 inch pastry cutter to remove the center core of each slice. Remove the cores and discard. Use a pastry brush to paint the slices on both sides with the maple syrup mixture. Place 3 or 4 rings on the preheated grill. Baste the top of the pineapple rings with the maple syrup mixture every 1-2 minutes; the fruit will cook for 4-5 minutes total. If you like the criss-cross grill marks, rotate the pineapple slices halfway through the cooking. Continue until all of the rings are cooked. Serve warm, or make ahead and chill. 38

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Apple Coleslaw Poppy Seed Honey Dressing: 1/4 cup cider vinegar 1 cup mayonnaise 1/3 cup poppy seeds 1/3 cup honey 2 tsp. kosher salt 1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper Slaw: 1 medium cabbage, cored, finely shredded 2 large carrots, peeled, julienne 1 bunch scallions, thinly sliced 1/2 cup finely minced parsley leaves, optional 4 Fuji apples, peeled, cored, julienne Prepare the Poppy Seed Dressing. In a medium bowl, combine all the ingredients together until well blended. Set aside. Prepare the salad. In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, carrots, scallions, parsley, and apples. Pour in the reserved dressing and toss until well blended. Refrigerate at least 1 hour before serving, mixing the salad at least once to evenly distribute the dressing. Serve freshly made coleslaw on top of pulled pork for the perfect sandwich.

Vanilla Rum Cake For Cake: 3 cups flour 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. baking powder ½ tsp. baking soda 1 cup buttermilk 2 tsp. vanilla 1 cup butter (2 sticks, softened) 2 cups sugar 4 eggs

For Sauce: 1 cup sugar 1 stick butter ¼ cup water 1 Tbsp. dark rum

Stir together flour, salt, baking powder and soda in a bowl. Combine buttermilk and vanilla in another bowl. Cream butter and sugar and beat in eggs one at a time using a mixer. Add flour mixture alternating with buttermilk mixture. Sprinkle bottom of pan with sliced almonds or pecans. Spoon into a well buttered 10” tube pan. Bake one hour at 325 degrees, (test with toothpick.) Cool in pan on rack for 10 minutes then poke holes with a long toothpick or an ice pick. In a sauce pan, melt 1 stick of butter, then add the 1 cup sugar and ¼ cup water. Cook until sugar dissolves then remove from heat and add one tablespoon of dark rum. Pierce cake and spoon rum mixture over hot cake. Cool completely before inverting to a serving plate. may2013

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HEALTH AND BEAUTY

Secrets of the

Generations By Ric helle Putnam I Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

Some people spend a lifetime searching for a fountain of youth. Meet four women from one family that don’t need one. Three generations share their secrets to youthful skin and good health. Get ready. Their answers are going to surprise you!

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Floy Mathis Floy is retired What is your daily routine? I get ready for what the day may hold by staying in a routine. With eight grandchildren and six of those living near her, I have to be organized. What is something your mom always told you? Be sure to clean your face at night with cold water to close the pores. How do you stay in such great shape? I exercise at a gym. Exercise has always been important to me. I do yoga and because I love to dance, I go to line dancing three times a week. What is something you hope your grandchildren will take from you? Always do the best you can with what you have and always put your best foot forward. What are your favorite products and why? When buying products, I do not look for anything in particular but the cheapest and best buy I can find. I do not use expensive name brands either. Liquid or powder foundation? I do not use a base makeup. I use Bare Minerals. How do you keep your face moisturized? Face cream is important so I never forget my moisturizer. However, my beauty collection is a mixture of different products. I like to try new things and look for things on special.

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Lisa Mathis Rooker Lisa is a six grade science teacher at New Hope Middle School. What is your mid-day beauty routine? It is easy to feel drained by lunch so I always keep a compact and lipstick handy. My mom introduced me to Bare Minerals a few years ago and I really like how easily it can be applied. What is a must-have beauty product? My “must haves� are face powder, mascara, and lipstick! What is something your mom always taught you? My mom always said...get up each day, look your best, and put your best foot forward for whatever the day may bring! What hairspray do you use? My mother-in-law, Elizabeth Rooker, always gives me her favorite, Nucleica Botanical. When my husband and I first married, I would always ask to borrow it when I visited. Now she always keeps me stocked! What are you favorite beauty products? Redken hair products, OPI nail polish and Bare Minerals make-up. Foundation or powder? I have a friend, Tracy Davis, who sells Avon and they have some great new products. I love their Avon Minerals Collection. 42

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KathrynMathis Rooker Kathryn is a freshman at Mississippi State University What is your morning beauty routine? I always wash my face in the morning just to wake me up and feel fresh before beginning my day. I never leave my dorm without putting powder on my face and some mascara. You never know what is going to happen or who you are going to meet so you need to give a little effort. What is must-have beauty products? I can not go one day without mascara and lipstick. My friends always make jokes about me always wearing lipstick because I put it on the minute I brush my teeth and I never go out without it. What are you favorite products? Probably lipstick or eye shadow. They are both items that can make great fashion statements. What is something your grandmother always taught you? “Do the best with what you have” and “always make an effort.” I believe no matter what your day entails a little effort can go a long way. What is your favorite shampoo? Dove. It always makes my hair feel so great and smell lovely, too! What ways do you pamper yourself to a spa day? I don’t ever go to the spa or get a pedicure, but getting up early in the morning and taking a shower, putting my make up on and a cute outfit is the best way to make myself feel great. And it’s also bonus points because you never know who you might run into that day! MAY

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Anna Douglass Rooker Anna is a junior at New Hope High School What is your morning beauty routine? I always try to wash my face each morning and night and apply lotion right after especially in the winter because my skin gets really dry. This helps me to feel better about my skin throughout the day. I also apply some powder around noon to keep my skin looking refreshed. What are you favorite beauty products? I love almost all makeup that Ulta (a beauty products store) has to offer. They just have the best products and I’ve never been disappointed. What is your favorite nail polish? My favorite nail polish is definitely Essie. I love all of its colors and it very rarely chips. My favorite is Good Morning Hope. What are beauty products you cannot live without? I cannot live without my Chapstick, mascara, and concealer. Those are usually my go-to products during the summer. What is your must-have beauty product? I never go without mascara, it helps to brighten the eyes. What is your favorite lipstick? Clinique - Think Bronze. Rollers or curling iron? Curling iron. What ways do you pamper yourself to a spa day and how often? Occasional pedicure. I love it when my toes are freshly painted. 44

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Beautiful

Intelligent

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By Ric helle Putnam Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner & Submitt ed

A

erospace engineering and pageants rarely end up in the same conversation – unless you’re talking about Paromita Mitra, Miss Mississippi USA 2013 and Mississippi State University (MSU) senior studying Aerospace Engineering. A fouryear member of the Mississippi State Space Cowboys Rocket Design Team, the number two rocket design team in the nation, Paromita’s dream job is to one day work for Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. “We need more students and young aerospace professionals to follow in Paromita’s footsteps,” said MSU Head, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering Pasquale Cinnella, PhD, PE. The American Aerospace industry has the largest net trade surplus of any field at the present time, and, as Cinnella explained, “we need to maintain and increase our technological and human edge over the rest of the world.” A student in the Aerospace Engineering program since 2009, Paromita maintains a “can-do” attitude that is contagious and electrifies her fellow students. “Ultimately,” said Paromita, “my goal is to be accepted into astronaut school.” Nevertheless, since November 4, 2012, Paromita has been busy preparing for another goal – becoming Miss USA 2013. According to Kim Greenwood, Miss Tennessee USA 1989 and an Executive Director with the Miss Universe Organization (MUO), the titleholders of the Miss Universe Organization personify the combination of beauty and intelligence that defines the 21st Century. The MISS UNIVERSE®, MISS USA® and MISS TEEN USA® Pageants are a Donald J. Trump and NBC Universal joint venture. Three years ago, MUO asked Kim to assume the directorship of Miss Mississippi USA and Teen USA.

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Top left: Paromita at a dress fitting at Alla Mano in Fairhope, Ala. for the Ronald McDonald House Charity Fashion Show in Mobile, Ala. Top right: Josh Rogers, fitness trainer, and Paromita at RESULTS Fitness in Nashville, Tenn. working on her Miss USA fitness. Bottom right: Madison Brock, Miss Mississippi Teen and Paromita in Oxford, Miss. recruiting contestants at an information session for Miss Mississippi and Miss Mississippi Teen USA with Greenwood Productions Inc.

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Bottom right: Paromita with Astronaut Dr. Leroy Chiao on Friday, April 5, 2013 at the US Air Force Academy’s annual “Audience for an Astronaut” event. Paromita had the chance to speak to over 500 children about S.T.E.M. (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) topics and demonstrate a hybrid rocket engine.

“I have literally fallen in love with the amazing ladies of Mississippi,” she said. “Paromita is an extraordinary young woman with a laser focus on her future. She is impressive in every way and I am proud to have her representing my organization.” With a 20 year directorship of Miss Tennessee USA and 10 year directorship of Miss Georgia USA, Kim Greenwood simultaneously has taken on directorship of the Miss Mississippi USA organization as of 2011. “Mississippi is very lucky to have Mrs. Greenwood as our leader,” said Paromita. “She has been awarded “Best Director” by the MISS UNIVERSE® Organization and it was very well deserved. I feel so prepared for the national title with her guidance!” Traveling non-stop to places like Las Vegas and South Carolina for photo shoots and then back to Mississippi to meet with Governor Phil Bryant at the State Capitol would exhaust anyone, but Paromita is simply enjoying another one of her passions: traveling. “I would not change a second of my busy schedule because I want to do my best to make the people of Mississippi proud.” In addition, Paromita has been an active, dedicated member of the MSU Fashion Board, which is made up of MSU students that produce fashion shows on campus and in the Starkville community. “We model clothing from local Starkville vendors and put on two shows a semester with our backstage staff, hair and makeup staff, and models,” said Fashion Board President Bri Stewart, who has worked closely with Paromita. “There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that she deserves her title of Miss Mississippi. She is a very driven individual and couldn’t represent the Fashion Board and Mississippi State any better.” Dr. E. Ann Bailey, Fashion Board Advisor has known Paromita since she was a freshman at MSU. “She is stunning on the runway, on stage, and in person. Her heart is always in the right place,” she said, adding that Paromita has participated in shows and modeled for vendors as needed and has been featured in local area magazines. Ann stated that two Miss Mississippi USA titleholders have been MSU Fashion Board members – Paromita and Keeley Patterson, who was Miss Mississippi USA 2011. “Both young women have been outstanding models,” she said. While it is important for Miss Mississippi USA to be lovely and physically fit, it is equally important and imperative that contestants are passionately involved in their schools, their community, their state and causes that speak to them. The MSU Fashion Board has helped Paromita in that area, providing a service to campus and the community, thus enhancing town and gown relationships, said Ann. MAY

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On the other hand, community service has always touched Paromita’s life. As a doctor in pediatrics in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Dr. Amal Mitra decided to pursue a higher education in America. Through his endeavor to achieve is MD and PhD, he was able to bring Paromita and her family to the United States. Since then, Paromita has traveled back to Bangladesh to teach cleft palette/ lip patients about postsurgery precautions. “I am so thankful that my father brought our family to this country and I am, in turn, trying my very best to give back to this place we call home,” she said. “My background has taught me so much in life and really helped mold me into who I am today.” Before becoming Miss Mississippi USA, said Dr. Cinnella, Paromita was already active in outreach programs to middle and high schools, as part of the Space Cowboys rocket design team that helps teach young students how to design and build rockets. More importantly, the design team exposes students to the amazing things that aerospace engineers can do. Paromita served as a summer camp counselor at Abbie Roger’s Civitan Camp for the special needs community and worked with the rocket team as Miss Mississippi USA to spread awareness of the importance of education and science, technology, engineering, & mathematics (S.T.E.M.) topics. “It is most rewarding to see the expression on a little girl’s face when she realizes that you can be both beautiful and intelligent,” she said. According to Dr. Cinnella, Aerospace Engineering is on the verge of another golden era, dominated by Remotely Piloted Aircraft in aeronautics and private-sector led space exploration in 50

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astronautics. “And Paromita is in the unique position to take this message further, not just in Mississippi, but in the entire Nation. She is doing her part to help secure our future and we deeply appreciate her efforts.” Mississippi State University was Paromita’s school of choice particularly for the school’s highly acclaimed engineering department- Bagley College of Engineering. “Aerospace engineering is my passion,” said Paromita. “Pursuing a higher education [much like my father] has translated confidence into all other facets of my life. I would not be Miss Mississippi USA now without this degree. I am proud to spread the message of the importance of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics.” In early April, Paromita teamed up with The US Air Force Academy (USAFA), the Colorado Springs organization Cool Science at the Academy’s Observatory to help educate 50 local middle school girls about space careers, and to teach them about using starfinders, taking photos of celestial bodies, and how to work with the Academy’s new portable telescopes. She also assisted in the rocket engine test fire demonstration during the Space Foundation’s “Audience with an Astronaut” event that included 500 regional students Preparing for the Miss USA 2013 pageant requires physical, mental and emotional determination and dedication. Paromita’s personal trainer disciplines her through daily cardio workouts, swimming, light weight lifting and stretching and lengthening exercises. Diet is equally important, so she chooses green foods and lean meats and drinks plenty of water. However, to develop and strengthen herself mentally and emotionally, Paromita strives to do positive things for others. One of her favorite quotes is: “The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.” - Mahatma Gandhi.


“I always remind myself of this when going through a tough time, and instantly I remember that being Miss Mississippi USA is a way to give back and show the world how amazing a place Mississippi really is.” But do pageants benefit contestants and cultivate them as individuals? Paromita believes that competing in Miss Mississippi USA has given her confidence as well as humility. “In 2009 I won Miss Mississippi Teen USA. It was then I realized how beneficial this process can be to young women if we all go in with the correct mind set. It is important to know that winning is not the main issue, but to be the best version of yourself, because only one person can truly do that the best.” To be comfortable in your own skin is such a beautiful thing, she said, because in pageants you are surrounded by so many confident girls. “Competitions like Miss Mississippi Miss USA help women grow into the person they want to become,” said Bri. “It’s a great way for women to show their self-confidence and individuality.” Whether contestants win, place, or not, Ann believes young women benefit personally from the preparation and discipline required to compete. Skills acquired and developed include interview preparation, lifestyle and fitness, goal setting, adaptability, and re-grouping when necessary. “Mastering these skills will serve them well as they negotiate life beyond their pageant years,” she said, adding that Paromita should prepare,

prepare, prepare, be focused, stay the course and take direction from state director, Kim Greenwood. Kim’s only advice to Paromita is to “stay true to who she is – bright, beautiful, humble and very grateful to a state and a nation that has given her family a unique opportunity for a better life.” It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to know that Paromita has everything it takes to be whatever she wants to be, including Miss USA 2013. She’s been class president and homecoming queen. She’s participated on the robotics team, cheerleading squad, wind ensemble, gifted art program and speech/debate team. Trained in piano, clarinet, and drums, she has won multiple awards for her oil painting and fashion design pieces. Each year the MISS USA® organization allows fans to vote for their favorite contestant. The girl with the most votes is automatically given a spot in the top 16 at the national pageant. This year voting will start approximately one month prior to June 16th. Through online video “Road to the Crown” interviews and photos, the general public gets to know each girl before casting their vote for Miss Mississippi USA on www.MissUSA. com in mid-May. Miss USA will be aired live in beautiful Las Vegas, NV at Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino on Sunday, June 16th on NBC, 9/8 CST. “I know that if I work for this so hard that I have no regrets,” said Paromita. “I will be happy and rewarded. I hope to remain the same nerdy, quirky girl I have always been.” ✦

Cheer on Paromita Mitra Each year the MISS USA® organization allows fans to vote for their favorite contestant. The girl with the most votes is then automatically given a spot in the top 16 at the national pageant. This year voting will start approximately one month prior to June 16th. Through online video interviews [called “Road to the Crown”] and photos, the general public may get to know each girl.

Give your support and cast your vote mid-May! Vote online at www.MissUSA.com. Scan here.

Watch on June 16th at 9/8 central! Miss USA will be aired live in beautiful Las Vegas, NV at Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino on Sunday, June 16th. You can watch on NBC at 9/8 central.

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Southern Thing

It’s a

By Lizzie Smit h Pho t og r aph y b y Ashle y Masse y

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othing welcomes summer like having friends over for a dinner party. Although dinner parties can be a multitude of fun, hosting it can also be very stressful. To help get your party started, here are a few tips on how to properly set a relaxed dinner setting.

Silverware: For many people, the hardest part of dining is what

fork do I use and where should I place it? When in reality, it’s very simple. Place the silverware around the plate with the golden rule of ‘work from the outside in.’ So from left to right the silverware should be the salad fork, regular fork, knife and then spoon – the cutting edge of the knife should be facing inwards as to not harm anyway when first reaching for it. The silverware should be placed about half an inch away from the plate and the ends of the silverware should all match up.

Dinner Plates: Dinner plates should be about two inches from

the table and centered in the middle of the place mat. You can dress up the cloth napkin by a decorative ring and item of your choice depending on the theme or maybe the season. You can really do anything you want as a decorative piece. You can also place it anywhere around your plate in every pattern direction to have a bit of a twist.

Water glasses: The water glass should be above the plate and

to the right and should be directly above the knife. Add any extra glasses around the water glass as needed.

Bread Plate: The bread plate should be above the plate and to the left with a butter knife laying across it.

Elbows

Elbows should be off the table when you are eating, specifically when you are holding a utensil, food or a cup in your hands. Elbows should be close to your sides- not winged out when you are using your utensils. A proper hold on the utensils and proper poster will help your elbows stay off the table. It is generally okay to have your elbows on the table before or after the meal, in between courses, or if your hands are empty. When in doubt, it is better to keep your elbows off the table.

Excusing Yourself

When you need to get up to go to the restroom, it isn't necessary to say where you're going-a simple "Excuse me, please; I'll be right back" is sufficient. At other times, a brief explanation is in order: "Please excuse me while I check with the babysitter." Leaving without a word is rude.

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Bread Plate Bread Knife Water Glass Wineglass Salad Fork Dinner Fork Dinner Plate Salad Plate Napkin Dinner Knife Teaspoon

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Cleaning

Silverware

lean silverware can be difficult as well if you don’t know what to do or how to start. The best way to clean silverware (you may want to use for the dinner party) is by first purchasing Eagle One Nevr-Dull polish.

1. Nevr-Dull polish gets the grim off and makes the silver gleam. When using it, you may want to wear gloves or it will get on your fingers.

2. Using the specially treated cotton wadding Nevr-dull cloth, keep rubbing until all the tarnish and dirt is gone and you see the shine results you desire. 3. After you get done cleaning with the cloth, finish with a quick wipedown using a clean, dry rag. 1.

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LIFE AND STYLE

Meet the Locals...

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Beverly Jones may

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S t or y b y Clair e Tadloc k Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

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he South is best known for its sweet tea, fried chicken, hospitality, and Southern women. A true Southern woman radiates with joy; she is humble and confident. Southern women have giving hearts and look for nothing in return. It is more to them then saying yes ma’am and no ma’am in their everyday speech; it is their lifestyle. Beverly Jones of Starkville, Miss. is the best representation of a Southern woman. Her soft, smooth voice may fool you, but Jones is a strong woman who guides her life by her faith and her horses. She is the owner/operator of J-3 Ranch outside of Starkville. Jones, who is 77, will not allow age to keep her off her feet. Jones is the wife of Nelson Jones and the mother of Stanley Nelson, Christy Lawrence, and Jamie Nelson. She is also the grandmother of five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. She was born in Picayune, Miss. but graduated high school from Central High School in Jackson, Miss. after moving there in her youth. Jones then graduated from Mississippi University for Women with a home economics degree. She and Nelson bought the ranch in 1973 from her father-in-law, T.N. Jones, and have resided there since. 56

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“I got a horse in the sixth grade. It was a plow horse. My daddy got him and said ‘here’s a horse and here’s a book.’” This was the beginning of Jones’ lifelong love with horses. Now her ranch expands far beyond just a plow horse. She brought only five horses when her husband and she first moved to Starkville. J-3 Ranch currently has 77 horses, 13 of which are Jones’, hosted on the 700-acre ranch. Jones gives lessons to beginners at J-3 Ranch on her 24 year-old quarter horse, Rusty. All ages come to the ranch to learn the basics of horse riding with Jones. She also used to host equestrian competitions twice a year called the J-3 Ranch Horse Trials. The competitions would be a full weekend event and end with a party that Jones also hosted. The ranch is also a temporary home for horses of Mississippi State University students and professors who have nowhere else to board their horses. Jones explains, “The kids like to come because this is a relaxation place. They’ll come out, and they’ll spend time visiting and riding trails and just being around their horses, grooming them and taking care of them, because, for a lot of the kids, it was a way of life.” Jones finds community service an honor and loves to give her time and effort back to her Starkville community. She is a member of Town and Country Garden Club and of the Fellowship Committee at First Presbyterian of Starkville. In both these organizations she helps plan and coordinate events. She is also a member of the Cotillion Dance Club in Starkville. She travels all over Mississippi and the Southeast in order to dance. In 1962, Jones was chosen as Mrs. Mississippi after submitting a recipe to be judged. During this time, she was living at Columbus’ airport base with Nelson, and her three young children. Jones was also the President of the National Association of Junior Auxiliary during 1986-1987. She also was awarded the Outstanding Community Woman in 1987-1988 that Mississippi State University awards each year. In 1988 Jones was awarded the Mississippi University for Women Alumni Achievement award, and in that same year she was award the T.E. Veitch Community Service Award chosen by the Greater Starkville Development Partnership. One of Jones’ greatest passions throughout the years has been Starkville’s Girl Scouts. She has traveled all over the United States and parts of Europe as a councilor in the Girl Scouts. Her bright green jacket is covered front and back in different badges she has earned since she became a Girl Scouts councilor. Jones says that she loved traveling and watching her daughter and friends grow in such a good organization.

Jones’ fashion is very unique and reflects her career and lifestyle. She has three cowboy hats that she wears on different occasions. Her everyday riding hat is a small, light blue fedora. Her large cowboy hat, worn during horse trials, is white with red, white, and blue ribbons wrapped around the crown representing the colors of J-3 ranch. And her third hat, a straw hat with black ribbon around the crown, is simply for style. These three hats show the different characteristics that Jones’ possess: a hard working woman, a horse instructor at J-3 Ranch, and a stylish wife, mother, and community server. Jones’ truly represents the South and Starkville as the perfect Southern woman. She has worked all of her life to service her community. She trusts in her faith to find strength to battle each day, and she has overcome being a woman in typically a man’s career. Jones says, “You got to keep on keeping on. I want to help as many people as I can and have a happy life; to challenge themselves to do something they didn’t think they could do.” ✦ MAY2013

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Friendship isMore ThanMeets The Die S t or y b y Meg Hender son Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

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unco, a game of dice, is based purely on luck. But this game owes a bit more than pure chance to its growing popularity among ladies’ social groups. Ask any of the ladies in Starkville’s longest-running bunco club why they love the game, and you might be surprised that “winning” is absent from their responses. For those not familiar with the game, it’s easy but exciting because you never know what the outcome will be. Here are the basics: There are multiple tables with four players at each; partners sit opposite each other. There are six rounds. Players roll three dice, the goal being to roll three of a kind of the round number (1-6); this is called a “bunco”, and it earns the player 21 points, ending the round. Whichever team wins the most rounds is the overall winner. As this Starkville bunco group celebrates its 30th anniversary, the ladies reflect on their beginnings, their life changes, and the one thing that has remained constant: their monthly game nights. Melita Tomlinson, one of the group’s three remaining original members, moved to Starkville in January of 1983. She and a few other new ladies established the group to socialize and meet new people. 58

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Hats off to 30 Years


Marianne Ulmer, Cindy Johnson, Melita Tomlinson, the original founders of the Starkville Bunco.

“We originally started with eight members and then expanded it to 12,” Tomlinson said. “We started out having small children, and we’ve advanced and seen each other’s children grow. We’ve gone through a lot of things together – all different stages.” Since the group has remained at 12, each person hosts once a year at their house; she will provide the meal and the prizes for everyone. Marianna Ulmer and Cindy Johnson are also founding members, and Jennifer Blackbourn, the last member to join the group, is going on her eighth year. In total, they have 21 grandchildren and get together not only for bunco but also for children’s or grandchildren’s birthday parties, graduations and weddings. These are not just bunco buddies; they are truly close friends. “It’s hard to count how many people have come and gone over the years, but the three of us have just been here forever,” Tomlinson said. Although some of the names and faces at the bunco tables have changed over the last three decades, all of these ladies have shared the common experiences of marriage, motherhood, and becoming grandparents. APRIL

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Two of the Bunco Recipe Favorites Carrot, Pineapple and Rasin Salad 4 cups shredded carrots 1/2 fresh pineapple (peeled, cored and cut in chunks) 3/4 cup rasins Mix together: 1/8 cup sugar (or to taste) 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1/8 cup of lemon juice Stir into carrot, pineapple and rasin mixture and refrigerate. You can also add chopped walnuts. Make several hours before you serve it. - Marianne Ulmer

Cheese Straws 2 8 oz. packages extra sharp Kraft Cheese 1 stick real butter, unsalted 2 1/4 cups plain flour 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. cayenne pepper Leave cheese and butter out overnight at room temperature. Mix cheese, butter, salt and pepper. Add 2 1/4 cups of plain flour with cheese and mix until dough is soft. Place dough in cookie press and press through. Bake at 350 degrees for 12-15 minutes. *Photos for these recipes are not to left.

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Melita Tomlinson, Cindy Johnson, Cathy Kemp, Kathy Edmondson, Nancy Miles, Marianne Ulmer, Debby Bland, Alicia Rast, Anna Hood, Nancy Willcutt, Jennifer Blackbourn and Marcie Rackley

“When we first started, we had a big joke,” Tomlinson said. “We have a prize for who rolls the big bunco, and whenever a person would roll a lot of big buncos, the next month when they would come, they’d tell us they were pregnant. It would happen every time! Now when someone rolls big buncos, we say, ‘Oh, you must be a grandmother now!’” They love their husbands dearly, but – sorry, gentlemen – only ladies are allowed. “We tried, when we first started, to invite the husbands at Christmas, but we decided to keep it with just us ladies because they didn’t quite get into it like we did, “Tomlinson said. Besides being a ladies-only club, the bunco group has many other traditions, all in the name of fun. The hostesses design the food and decorations around a theme, often relating to a holiday or season, such as Fourth of July, football tailgating, or Halloween. The night always begins with a meal and conversation, then the game begins, and prizes are awarded at the end. Marianne Ulmer, a founding member, said, “Christmas is one of my favorite times of the year. We have our Bunco parties with the hostess’s house decorated with holiday decorations. We draw names before our Christmas Bunco party and place gifts under the tree, and no one knows beforehand who has whom until the night of the party.” Between work and family, life sometimes gets too busy. Bunco plays an important role in the lives of these women because it allows them to take time away from their hectic schedules and reconnect with each other. Because it’s as much, if not more,

about the fellowship as it is about the game. “Some of us don’t see each other except once a month, but we have a close bond,” Tomlinson said. This group has been blessed with a bond that has lasted three decades and will continue for years to come. ✦ MAY

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Abby Hathorn Abby is a freelance writer, stylist, and blogger. Her blog, www.vintageinspiredpassionista.com, is a platform to showcase her love of vintage and modern apparel, fashion tips and trends, DIYs, community, and anything else that strikes her fancy.

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t seems rather simple. Go to college, earn a degree, land the perfect job, and live happily ever after. These days, it is not so simple to get the job after college because of the uncertain economy and wavering job market. It is easy to become discouraged and fearful in a world where unemployment rates are a hot topic; however, with proper planning and a little extra work, there is hope. Seeking advice for what college students should be doing to set them up for success, I interviewed Kelly Atwood, Senior Coordinator at the Mississippi State University Career Center. “Job candidates stand out from the crowd by taking initiative, demonstrating strong communication skills, being a leader, and having experience related to their field of study,” states Atwood. Social networking is an integral part of our everyday lives; however, it is a double-edged sword. On one side, it is an innocent showcase full of memories, events, and videos of silly pet tricks; and on the other, those same memories, events, and videos of silly pet tricks could be a pitfall. “Social media exposes job seekers to potential employers in a way that is often not fully considered. On the most basic level, a profile picture is viewable

to almost everyone and a picture can say a thousand words making a significant impression on an employer or key career contact,” says Atwood. Out of all of the social media platforms, Atwood says that LinkedIn is the best option for college students and graduates because it is a professionally based Kelly Atwood social media. Keep in mind potential employers are looking for completed LinkedIn profiles and not exiguous ones. “You can confidently connect with potential employers and network without worrying that they will see a friend’s tag in a questionable spring break picture,” says Atwood The gateway to getting the job is the interview; however, before getting the interview there are some things a job seeker needs to do to maximize the opportunity and chance of hearing, “When can you start?”

Networking Anywhere and Everywhere:

Fail to Plan; Plan to Fail:

First and foremost, get involved in school and community events by volunteering. “Facebook and Twitter are good for finding out information about career events on campus or in the area, the culture of a company, and some networking.” Atwood states, “Go to career fairs, build strong references, and participate in an internship.” It is never too early to start networking and building relationships. “Attend information sessions and other events to interact with potential employers,” says Atwood. They are great for networking and gathering contact information on companies and managers. Afterwards, send thank you cards to key people thanking them for the time they spent sharing experiences and providing valuable information. This shows thoughtfulness and sincerity which are traits that employers are looking for in associates. Creating a memorable interaction is a guaranteed way to stand out in a field of applicants vying for the same position.

When it comes to planning and preparing for the future, Atwood says that starting early is the key to success. “Set goals and develop a plan, create a resume, participate in career development workshops like dinner etiquette, hone your communication skills, and get business professional attire and keep it on campus,” Atwood states. To get that all-important interview, research and understand what the company does and what the requirements and expectations of the job are. With that gathered knowledge, create a customized resume geared towards the company and the available position. Be sure to highlight specific qualifications and experiences on the resume that are specifically relevant to that job. A generic resume is exactly that-generic.

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Visit the MSU Career Center:

“Job seekers who use Facebook or Twitter to connect with employers or network have to remember that they are giving access to these groups or people to everything, not just related information. That includes being mentioned in a tweet or tagged in a picture which the job applicant does not control,” says Atwood. “When I talk about the impact of social media in the job search process, affectionately called digital dirt, the rebuttal is always regarding privacy. Although there are possible questions of legality depending on how the information is obtained and how it is used, ultimately, if one puts it on the internet consider it public information. Even the highest privacy settings will not protect, especially when one actively uses social media in a job search or even after one has the job.”

If the task of the job hunt seems daunting, no need to fear because The MSU Career Center has a variety of resources available to help. “We offer guidance for creating a résumé, cover letter, thank you note, grad school statement of purpose, and other professional correspondence as well as critique these. In addition to conducting mock interviews, we give advice on how to prepare for interviews and how to develop a job search strategy,” states Atwood. “The Career Center hosts several events throughout the fall and spring semesters including career fairs, interview days, dinner etiquette, a professional attire event with a runway show, and employer panels and information sessions. Also, we publish a handbook with résumé and interviewing guidance.”

Clean Up Digital Dirt:

Dress to Impress: In the famous words of Mark Twain, “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” Obviously, a job seeker would not go in the nude to an interview, but not dressed accordingly may hinder as much as a poorly written resume. Employers base their hiring decisions not only on verbal factors, but also nonverbal ones. How one dresses to an interview is just as important as a firm handshake and good eye contact. In a recent interview with renowned Canadian fashion designer, Joeffer Caoc, I asked him how a recent college graduate should dress for interview success. “One cannot go wrong with a tailored black suit It is always important to look simple and clean. If the job candidate wants to show a progressive edge, choose a jacket with contrasting stitching or textured accents such as leather. One can mix and match suit separates as long as it is not too over the top,” states fashion designer Joeffer Caoc. 64

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Designer Joeffer Caoc Spring 2013 Collection Store locator online at joeffercaoc.com

Local Ark & Co. White Blazer; L.A. Green, $68. Blue Slatch Turquoise Top; Deep South Pout, $24.95 Tribal Black Trousers; Sisters Fine Clothing, $62 Nine West Black Pump; Reed’s, $69

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Designer Joeffer Caoc Spring 2013 Collection Store locator online at joeffercaoc.com

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Local Pink Martini Collection Green Blazer; L.A. Green, $86 Karlie Chevron Print Top; Reed’s, $65 Angela USA White Skirt; Cake, $24.50 Jessica Simpson Tan Pumps; Reed’s, $75


Baylie Winston shopping at L.A. GreenWhat are you most excited about for the summer? The Neshoba County Fair because my family goes every year and we stay at our cabin.

Oh ...Just Shopping in Starkville By Catherine Stukenborg

Sara Windham shopping at Deep South PoutWhat do you like about boutiques in Starkville? There is a lot of variety and a lot of options.

Abigail Voller shopping at SistersWhere do you like to shop in Starkville? I like to shop at Purple Elephant and Occasions for gifts and Oh La La for jewelry.

Kate Covich shopping at SistersDo you like when the students are out of school for summer? I do because it’s easier to go out to eat but I also don’t because its so bare, it doesn’t feel the same!

Misty Bailey shopping in R. Tabb & Co.Why do you like shopping in R. Tabb? I’m attracted to this store because I am able to find age-appropriate clothing. MAY

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A Cup of Lindsay Jo

Lindsay is an online lifestyle blogger. Her blog, www.acupoflindsayjo.com, has a primary focus on fashion. Lindsay is a member of the Independent Fashion Bloggers (IFB) and attends various conferences and workshops with other fashion bloggers regularly.

how-to travel. how-topack packtofor travel.

With summer just ahead, it is time to start thinking about vacation. Most of us love the idea of a trip to the beach but dread even the thought of packing. It can become particularly challenging if you are flying to your destination and are limited to a weight limit and number of bags. Not to worry, I’ve got several excellent tips to get you there and back and dressed in style!

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Maxi dresses and skirts: Long dresses and skirts are in style this spring and summer, and they are perfect to pack for a warm weather vacation. They don’t take up much room in your luggage and can be worn casual or for a night out. For a casual look, wear your maxi dress with flats and throw on a coordinating linen scarf or fedora. For a more dressed up look, pair with a tall summer wedge and chunky jewelry. For a maxi skirt, pair with a basic tank top and flats for a daytime look. Trade your flats for an espadrille and layer on more jewelry for an evening look.

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Patterned shorts and wide leg pants: The fall trend of pattern denim has carried into spring and summer, but on shorts. Pack a pair of patterned shorts for your destination. They are perfect as a swimsuit cover-up or to go shopping in, but you can also dress them up with a wedge for a lunch date. Wide leg pants are another versatile trend – wear them out and about with a basic tank top or lounge around in them after a long day in the sun.

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Sandals and Wedges: It is hard to determine which shoes to bring on your vacation. There’s always that temptation to bring them all! Avoid overpacking footwear by choosing one pair of neutral or metallic sandals and wedges. Pick two pairs that will match universally everything in your bag. If you have extra room when you’re done, toss in one pair just for fun.

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Jewelry: If you don’t own a jewelry roll case, it is time to invest in one. This is probably the best way to pack your jewelry, and it saves valuable space in your bag. Pack several bubble and bib necklaces that will add color to your outfits. Pack basic gold bracelets, and for earrings, try a few pairs that will also add a pop of color to your outfits. One pair of basic studs for the beach is a good idea.

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Swimsuits: Like shoes, it’s hard not to pack every one you own. Try to plan one swimsuit per day; anything more than that is just wasted space in your bag. Be sure to pack a wet bag also to place any damp swimwear in upon your departure.

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Here’s a list of things I always manage to forget when packing – sunscreen, watch, hat, sunglasses, self-tanner, handheld steamer (for any silk dresses/tops), small sewing kit, nail polish and remover, blowdryer, straightener, curling iron, makeup, phone charger, and ipod.

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1. 1. School Colors: Vera Bradley Backpack and Lunch Box, $34-99. Giggleswick, www.giggleswick.com. 2. Hangin’ Around: ENO Hammock, $69.99. Sports Center, 662-323-3535. 3. Denim Florals: 5th Culture Shorts, $40.50. Cake, 662-418-7463. 4. Take It Anywhere: KAVU Bags, $39.99. Sports Center, 662-323-3535. 5. Trendy Chevron: Vintage Faith, $25. Polka Tot, 662-324-2114 and R. Tabb & Co., 662-323-4300.

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6. Pocket It: The Frat Collection Shirts, $39. Giggleswick, www.giggleswick.com. 7. Kitchen Must-have: Soap Dispensers, $16. The Purple Elephant, 662-324-4008. 8. Dorm Room Essential: Floral Desk Lamp. The Purple Elephant, 662-324-4008. 9. Summer Outfit: Fanny Bubbles, $58. Giggleswick, www.giggleswick.com. 10. Goin’ Fishing: Flambeau Outdoors Tackle Bag, $27.99. Sports Center, 662-323-3535. 11. Support The Team: MSU Sports Shirt, $65. Sports Center, 662-323-3535.

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Book R e vie w b y Hellen P olk

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As we turn the page on the last month of the school calendar our thoughts turn to summer activities and vacations. Many Mississippians head to the white sandy beaches of the Gulf Coast each year for fun in the sun and surf. We know to pack the beach chairs and towels, the flip flops and swimsuits, and the sunscreen and beach toys. This year make sure to add some great books for yourself and for the children while you relax on those beautiful shores. Everyone loves to see what the waves have brought ashore that will help them remember the time spent on the beach. There are many different seashell guides that will identify these treasures, but most are geared for adults. ... Cooper Square Publishing has an excellent selection of take along nature guides for elementary students on a variety of subjects. Seashells, Crabs and Sea Stars, by Christiane Tibbetts, is a very informative resource for identifying shell and other sea creatures that wash up along the shore. ... For those who are really fascinated with seashells and ocean life, I highly recommend the series of DK Eyewitness books. Ocean and Shell are both filled with facts, color pictures, and illustrations of the many wonders of the sea. These books are also very useful as resources for science reports.

Preschoolers and younger readers will delight in some of the many rhyming books and fascinating stories about the beach. Charlotte Zolotow’s The Seashore Book is a mother’s description of the beach and ocean to her son who has never been to the shore. As she talks with her son, her words help him to feel the warmth of the sun and the cool breezes off the water. It’s a perfect bedtime book for before and after a trip to the beach. ... Eric Carle’s A House for Hermit Crab will captivate children with its collages of the ocean floor and all the sea creatures that live near the hermit crab. While the growing hermit crab moves from one shell to another he encounters neighbors and obstacles that provide him with opportunities to become self-confident, a lesson that will help the reader along the way. ... Older readers may be “too big” for stories about sand castles and beach critters. Lighthouses for Kids: History, Science, and Lore with 21 Activities, by Katherine House, provides a fascinating look at lighthouses and guides to visiting some famous U.S. lighthouses as well as some nautical projects to try. ... Since most beach vacations include at least one rainy day, be prepared to while away those rainy hours with some more nautical crafts and games using the shells found at the beach. Have a contest to see who can make the funniest shell creature. Use the shells for sorting and counting. Make a collage using shells and sand, then write a story to accompany it. Whatever you do on your trip to the beach, stay safe and enjoy the precious family time together. F


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Sleek in the City The Mississippi State University Fashion Board had their annual Spring fashion show called Sleek in the City on Wednesday, April 17m 2013 in the Cotton District. Photography by Cahterine Stukengorg.

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1 Rachael Ivancic, Zayley, Megan Kqasinski 2. Charnetta Harper, Taneja Coleman, Malaina Jennings 3. Sarah Duglas McCall, Sarah Caitlin Wheat and Clara Two 4. Kamau and Dupree Bostic 5. Sara Daws and Michal Hogan 6. Lisa Hankes and Joshua Janes 7. Lee Anderson Roper and Meredith Garvin MAY

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175th Anniversary On Saturday, April 6, 2013, The 175th Anniversary Parade and Block Party was held Downtown Starkville to celebrate the birthday of Starkville. Kids, locals, business owners and students joined the fun that morning. Photography by Lizzie Smith

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1. Ruby Nash Davis and John Robert Arnold, King and Queen. 2.Katie Richardson and Nathan Moore 3. Bill and Rae Nell Crumpton 4. Lorelei Webb 5. Matt, Erin, Miller and Marcy Dorroh 6. Montavius Brooks, Morgan Gray and Keitoria Bailey 7. Julie White and John Byrd with the Cattleman’s Association. 74

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Southern Soiree Palmer Home for Children hosted a Southern Soiree on Saturday, April 6, 2013 at The Stables in Starkville. The Southern Soriee benefitted the Palmer Home for Children through a silent auction featuring a football signed by Dan Mullen and a baseball signed by Roy Oswalt; plus, attendees enjoyed music, refreshments, southern food and more. Photography by Laura Daniels.

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1 Katie Brown, Jennifer Prather, Emily Moak and Kathrine Hewlett (organizers) 2. Lauren Colby, Meg Ebert, Charlie Thomas III, Lisa Thomas and Katie Lindley 3. Ashley Haeusler, Robert Farris and Katie Palmer 4. Charlie Guest and Joan Lucas 5. Drake Bassett (President of Palmer Home for Children) and Josh Whelan ( Vice-President of Palmer Home for Children) 6. Patsy and William Randle 7. Laura and George Dunn, Cecil and Dora Vaughn MAY

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International Fiesta This annual event held on the MSU Drill Field took place Saturday, April 6, 2013. International Fiesta Day attendees enjoyed and learned about many cultures through food, performances, and games. Photography by Laura Daniels

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Easter Egg Hunt Life Church hosted a community Easter Egg Hunt at McKee Park in Starkville, Miss. on Saturday March 23, 2013. Kids hunted for over 2,000 eggs and enjoyed games, drawings, and snacks. Photography Ashley Covin.

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1 Nhaydia Flowers 2. Abigail Leonard and Hannah Daniels 3. Corey and Wyatt Martin 4. Eisley, Mike and Hillary Cassibry 5. Nathan Bowman, Jeremy Wickman and Nathan Knox 6. Parker and Colton Martin 7. Tammy Allen and Christina Oates MAY

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Head to Toe Starkville Junior Auxiliary presented Head to Toe Health & Wellness Fair on Saturday, March 30, 2013 at the Starkville Sportsplex. Special Guest Patrick House from the Biggest Loser gave his testimony and health tips and attendees had free health information and screenings for the whole family. Photography by Ashley Covin.

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Everything Garden Expo The Starkville Area Arts Council held their annual Everything Garden Expo on March 22-23, 2013 at the Mississippi Horse Park. Visitors had a variety of classes, exhibits, vendors and children activities to be involved in from “Tropical Gardening� presentations to artwork contest and live baby chicks hatchings for the children. Photography by Ashley Covin.

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1 Malinda Orr, Debbie Stafford and Shelia Fulgham 2. Ken and Katherine Ramsey 3. Daphna Cooks and Gayle Stafford 4. Crissy Ogden and Charlyn Ogden 5. Brad and Nilia Mitchell 6. Billy Goodman 7. Allison Pearson MAY

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May 2 Bye Bye Birdie

Beginning Thursday, May 2 through Saturday, May 4, The Lyric Theatre in Tupelo is presenting Bye Bye Birdie, a satire on American society set in 1958 inspired by the phenomenon of popular singer, Elvis Presley. Please contact The Lyric Theatre for more information and tickets at (662) 844-1935 or www. tct.ms.

May 3 Tupelo Blue Suede Cruise

If you like classic cars and rock and roll you won’t want to miss out on the Blue Suede Cruise festival starting Friday, May 3 through Sunday, May 5. There will be a free drive-in movie, bands performing and over 300 classic cars. Admission is free for visitors. For more information contact (662) 213-8873 or visit www.tupelo.net.

May 3 River to the Rails

The River to the Rails Festival will take place the first weekend in May in downtown Greenwood. There will be art, live music and the best barbeque around. Live music and “Que one the Yazoo” barbeque cook-off will be on Friday and Saturday night. For more information visit www.greenwoodms.com.

May 3 Market Street Festival

The 18th Annual Market Street Festival in Columbus will start Friday, May 3 through Saturday, May 4, 2013. Named a “Top 20 Event in the Southeast” by the Southeast Tourism Society for 14 consecutive years, MSF boasts crowds of nearly 40,000 each year who gather to enjoy 250 arts, crafts and food vendors as well as dozens of special events and musical acts. Visit marketstreetfestival.com for all the details.

May 4 Third Annual Kentucky Derby Party

Join the Starkville Junior Auxiliary for their annual fundraiser at 4 p.m. at The Stables on 804 Woodside Drive in Starkville, Miss. to help support the on-going work benefitting the children of Oktibbeha County. Tickets are $40 each and can be purchased from any member of Starkville Junior Auxiliary or by calling 662-312-4212. Dinner and drinks are included with ticket purchase, as is entertainment and plenty of areas to view the race. For more information visit starkvilleja.org.

May 4 Starkville Community Market

The Starkville Community Market will open it’s doors starting Saturday, May 4 through Saturday, July 27, 2013 from 7:3011:30 a.m. Come with friends and pick up fresh fruits and vegetables, plus much more. Go to starkvillecommunitymarket. org for more information. 80

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May 9 The Official Blues Brothers Revue

The MSU Riley Center presents The Official Blues Brothers Revue, a touring show that came to life in a 1970s Saturday Night Live skit featuring dancing, comedy and an eight-piece band. Tickets for the show on Thursday, May 9 are $39-45 and available online at www.msurileycenter.com.

May 10 GumTree Festival

The 42nd Annual Gumtree Festival will be held around the courthouse square beginning Friday, May 10 to Sunday, May 12. This highly respected festival brings an influx of 30,000 people to downtown Tupelo to enjoy artwork of around 100 artists from all over the south. For more information visit www. gumtreefestival.com or call (662) 844-2787.

May 11 Starkville Young Professionals Kickball Tournament

The Starkville Young Professionals will host a kickball tournaments Saturday, May 11, 2013 at 10 a.m. at the Starkville Sportsplex benefiting the United Way. Minimum of 11 players per team with at least four females per team ($150 per team). Tournaments will be double elimination format and every team is guaranteed two games. Sign up now by emailing starkvilleyp@ gmail.com.

May 10 Mississippi State University Commencement

Bagley College of Engineering, Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, College of Veterinary Medicine, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, School of Human Sciences, College of Forest Resources and the College of Education will have their commencement at the Humphrey Coliseum at 7 p.m. For more information visit msstate.edu.

May 11 Hitching Lot Farmer’s Market

The season for Columbus’ Hitching Lot Farmer’s Market is open to the public starting Saturday, May 11, 2013. Favorite vendors will be returning along with new ones with fresh produce to satisfy any appetite. Visit columbusms.org for more information.

May 13 Mississippi State University Commencement

College of Arts & Sciences - Architecture Art & Design, School of Architecture, College of Business and the Adkerson School of Accountancy will have their commencement at the Humphrey Coliseum at 10 a.m. For more information visit msstate.edu.


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May 15 Your Town Workshop

Mississippi State University Stennis Institute will have their Your Town Workshop in Louisville: Community Development Workshop at Lake TiakO’Khata in Louisville, Miss. This workshop will focus on using basic design and planning principles for community development. Visit sig.msstate.edu for more details.

May 16-18 Fanfare Weekend at Dudy Noble Field

ARAMARK Higher Education presents Fanfare Weekend at Dudy Noble Field through May 18th. Enjoy free koozies with any concessions purchase all weekend! On Saturday, the first 1,500 fans receive free tshirts! Also on Saturday, kids can enjoy the Fanfare Fun Zone featuring bouncy castles and more! For game times visit hailstate.com.

May 16 3rd Thursday in Louisville

Downtown Louisville will be open for Late Night Shopping until 8 p.m., downtown restaurants will be open late as well. On this special Thursday, a percentage of purchases will go to “Relay for Life.”

May 16 Business After Hours

Starkville Business After Hours will be from 5:50-7:30 p.m. For location and other information visit starkvilleyp.blogspot.com.

May 16 Bye Bye Birdie

Beginning Thursday, May 16 through Wednesday, May 22, Meridian Little Theatre will be showing Bye Bye Birdie, a satire on American society set in 1958 inspired by the phenomenon of popular singer, Elvis Presley. Please contact Meridian Little Theatre for more information and tickets at (601) 482-6371.

May 16

Jimmie Rodgers Festival Kickoff Featuring bands such as All Night Long Blues Band, Jimmy ‘Duck’ Holmes and Jimmie Rodgers as performed by Britt Gully, the Kickoff Block Party will be held at Dumont Plaza in Meridian, Miss. Join the fun for only $5 as the Jimmie Rodgers Festival begins. See a list of events at jimmierodgers.com.

May 17 The Time Jumpers

The Time Jumpers featuring Vince Gill, Dawn Sears, Kenny Sears and Ranger Doug Green will perform at the MSU Riley Center Friday, May 17 at 7:30 p.m. These talented musicians began playing together in the 1990s and comprise three fiddlers, an accordion and piano player, an upright bass, numerous guitar players and several who sing from Nashville, TN. Tickets are available online at www.msurileycenter.com.

May 17 Mississippi State University Staff Appreciation Day

The annual Staff Appreciation Day hosted by Staff Council will be in The Junction starting at 10 a.m. For more information visit msstate.edu.

May 25 Red Hills Festival

Join the fun at the Red Hills Festival and enjoy an artisan crafts, food, fun, music, antiques, car show, a 5K race and Fun Run for the children and carnival. For more information contact the Winston County Chamber of Commerce at 6629773-3921.

May 28 Love, Loss and What I Wore

Starting Tuesday, May 28 through Saturday, June 1, Starkville Community Theater is proud to present “Love, Loss, And What I Wore” by Nora Ephron and Delia Ephron and directed by Abigail Voller. Please contact the Starkville Community Theatre for more information and tickets at 662-323-6855 or visit their website at sct-online.org.

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R . Ta b b & C o . 210 E. M a in S t. S ta r kville , M S 39759 P. 662- 323- 4300 Re e d ’s 3 0 2 U n i ve r s i t y D r. S ta r kville , M S 39759 P. 662- 323- 2684 2013 U.S. 45 C o lu m b u s , M S 39705 P. 662- 327- 2684 re e d s m s . c o m Ro s e’s C o r n e r B o u tiq u e 515 Main St. C o lu m b u s , M S 39701 P. 662- 328- 2234 S a lo n 28 500 Ru s s e ll S t. , S u ite 2 8 S ta r kville , M S 39759 P. 662- 324- 6900 S im p ly H o m e 306 La m p k in S tre e t S ta r kville , M S 39759 P. 662- 323- 4323 S n a p F itn e s s 100 S ta r r Ave . S ta r kville , M S 39759 P. 662- 323- 5611 s n a p f itn e s s . c o m S u lliva n’s Of f ic e S u p pl y 204 E. M a in S tre e t S ta r kville , M S 39759 P. 662- 323- 5222 s u lliva n s o f f ic e . c o m Th e G ro w th Allia n c e o f West Po i n t 5 1 0 E B ro a d S t . We s t Po in t, M S 3973 P. 662- 494- 5121 we s tp o in tm s . o rg Th e J e we l S h o p p e 215 W. M a in S tre e t Lo u isville , M S 39339 P. 662-773- 3320 th e je we ls h o p p e . c o m Thym e 402 La m p k in S t. S ta r kville , M S 39759 P. 662- 323- 5979

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