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TOWN & GOWN MAGAZINE

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Editor

Letter from the

“L

ove is life and if you miss love, you miss life.” Leo Buscagua’s quote is true. How can you live your life when you do not love what you do? This relates to most all stories this month. Open your heart to this issue by starting on page 12. One of Mississippi Business Journal’s Top 50 Leading Business Woman Penny Bowen keeps astonishing people with her expertise in home and interior design locally and worldwide. The love people have for their career is pouring out of this issue including some “Strange Love”. Shane Reed, owner of Strange Brew, brings strange to the next level with his coffee creations. Have you tried his King Cake Frappe? Coffee and cakes are great but sweet treats are even better! Lorie Roach has once again brought us Valentine’s Day eats including her Marshmallow Whipped Cream topping and Roasted Strawberry Blondie Bars Balsamico. Being a hero whether through a good deed or volunteering can change someone’s life in an instant. Sabrina Triplett needed a heart transplant but her health was not pristine. Doctors from UMC in Jackson, Miss., Dr. Yarbrough in Louisville, Miss. and Dr. Starr in Columbus and Starkville, Miss. stepped in to make sure she received a transplant, but the “real hero is the donor.” (Page 34) Although if you are the one to volunteer your time or money, turn to page 38 and “Live Beyond the Cause” by participating in the American Heart Association events or Tupelo’s Project Hope Festival. Then you could be the hero for a heart that needs it. People love to know someone cares and “Pay it Forward” cares. On page 43 see six wonderful photographers and what they have done to give back. Then starting on page 48, Ashley Owen Hill is caring for rescue dogs like no other. This month’s Life and Style section is full of Valentines, but “Darling Element” from modern to classic are making a statement this Spring. (Page52). Lastly, Felder Rushing, a Southern Gardener, and his “Garden Hearts” book represents him “looking and finding the simple and poignant in a world that is too often confusing and hurtful.” And don’t forget “Do what you love and do it often.” - Holstee Manifesto. Please write to us at P. O. Box 1068, Starkville, Ms. 39760. Visit us on Facebook and Twitter for new updates and giveaways and view previous issues at townandgownmagazine.com. Enjoy!

Claire Massey Editor Claire Massey

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Table of

Contents

On the Cover TOWN & GOWN MAGAZINE

HOME AND GARDEN 12 An Eye for Design 19 DIY with Amy Taylor: Valentine’s Hearts

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The love issue will grab your attentionwith Lorie Roach’s “Sweet Eats” Red Velvet Hot Chocolate all starting on page 27.

TASTE AND TOAST 22 Strange Love 27 Sweet Eats with Lorie Roach HEALTH AND BEAUTY 34 One Heart Stronger 38 Living Beyond the Cause LIFE AND STYLE 56 Darling Elements 64 A Cup of Lindsay Jo

IN EVERY ISSUE 8 Staff FEATURES 10 Letter From the Editor 43 Pay it Forward 52 T&G Wish List 48 One Lucky Dog 66 Literature 73 Events 80 Calendar 82 Advertisers

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HOME AND GARDEN

An Eye for Design T

S t or y b y Shea Allen I Pho t og r aph y Submitt ed

here is a reason they say work is a four letter word. For so many, a job is what we labor through five days a week in order to enjoy the sweet reward of the weekend, then it’s back to the grind on Monday morning. Sure, we’re pleased with our work and far be it for us to scoff at any job in this economy, but our hearts do not go pitter patter at the sight of quarterly reports and strategy plans. Then there are those fortunate few who live to work rather than work to live. They are the dreamers who were just crazy and gutsy enough to dive head first into their dream to make it a reality. Penny Bowen is one of those anomalies who truly relish every morning she gets to wake up and go to work. The owner of Penny Bowen Designs, Inc. and Bella Interiors, Penny knew from a ripe old age of pre-teen that design was her passion and that one day it would be her livelihood, but she couldn’t possibly have known then where her career would have taken her. “In middle school, I took a drafting class and immediately fell in love,” Penny said. “I knew from that point that I would definitely go into architecture or design of some sort. I don’t remember ever wanting to do anything else.” 12

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LaRiva Condo dining area in Perdido Key of Pensacola, FL (2012) february

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Lobby of local business in Starkville, Miss. (2012). 14

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A custom designed kitchen in local Columbus, Miss. (2011)

As one of Mississippi Business Journal 2012 50 Leading Business Women, Penny’s designs are notably seen around the world as far as Canada and Mexico. She reached for nature for inspiration bringing the colors of the Caribbean and neutral tones from the sand to the fabrics and textures in the room (next page). Her designs also can be seen close to home in places such as locally owned businesses in Starkville, Miss. (left). Penny’s design inclination started showing even earlier than her middle school drafting class. As an army brat, Penny and her family moved all over the world every few years, and with each move, Penny tasked herself with making her new room home in a way that was uniquely hers. “I loved decorating my room and redecorating my room every time we moved,” Penny said. “My parents always seemed to buy a fixer-upper everywhere we moved, so I always lived in a construction environment.” As a child, Penny’s room was her sanctuary – her constant home base regardless of if that base was in Germany, Guam, or the U.S. – and she credits her military upbringing with molding her into the successful, outgoing, and flexible person she is today. Penny attended the Art Institute of Atlanta and later transferred to Mississippi University for Women to complete her Bachelor of Arts in interior design, which helped her hone the talent that was innate within her. “I have always been an organizer, and I like order and balance,” Penny said. “I believe school is necessary to gain vast knowledge of your career choice, but design is something you must be born with. Thus, to be a great designer, you need both.” During college and after graduation, Penny worked for a local architecture firm where she gained invaluable building design and drafting experience. After five years at the firm and not wanting to neglect the interior designer inside her, she yearned for a hands-on way to combine her two design passions into one career and found herself working for a local flooring company. There, Penny was able to work with clients to add the finishings to their home with everything from flooring, paint, wallpaper and draperies. Armed with construction design knowledge and interior design expertise, Penny started Penny Bowen Designs, located in downtown Columbus, in 1996. “It was a home-based business that specialized in custom home design, drafting and interior design consultation, which utilized both sets of design skills that I love so much,” she said. “It is rare to find an interior designer who has such knowledge of building design and construction. I think it gives us the smart edge over other designers with only artistic abilities.” february

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Outdoor living space in Mexico. (2012)

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Penny is an entrepreneurial triple threat with her architecture experience, design talents, and passion to please her clients. But what has made her most successful are the relationships she builds with each of her clients. It is her ability to listen to her client’s wishes and ideas that has turned her clients into friends. It is that personalized attention to her clients that eventually led Penny to open her second business, Bella Interiors, in 2006. “After years of designing custom homes, additions, and renovations and providing interior design consultation, I saw the need for a one-stop shop for selecting finishes and furnishings to complete the whole design,” Penny said. “Bella is truly a dream come true for me because I love what I do and thrive on the opportunity to help a client from start to finish.” Bella Interiors is Penny’s second business, which focuses more on the interior decorating portion of renovations. It features a unique blend of architectural samples, flooring, rugs, furniture, lamps, window treatments and other home décor items. Penny’s success with Bella Interiors has even surpassed her own expecta-

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tions. Perhaps one of the most surprising accomplishments for Penny is that Bella designs can be seen internationally as she has designed home renovations in Mexico and Canada. One of Penny’s favorite designs was for the Baxter family in their Akumal, Mexico home. Akumal is nestled between Playa del Carmen and Tulum on the beaches of the Caribbean Sea in Mexico. The family enlisted Penny’s help to remodel their bathroom and kitchen. For the job, Penny drew inspiration from the local surroundings while keeping the design modern. The opportunity allowed Penny to travel to Mexico many times throughout the project, which was not only a treat for Penny to work in paradise, but it also served as inspiration for Penny to open her eyes to designs from different cultures. “The owner and I shopped at market in Atlanta and various towns in Mexico to purchase all of the furnishings and accessories for the home,” Penny said. “Whether it be contemporary or traditional, my job is to refine my client’s style and take it to the next level.”


Perhaps what makes Penny such a successful designer is not her impeccable tastes, but her listening skills. She spends her time getting to know her clients so that she can create designs that mean something to them and that speak to their personalities. Through the time she spends getting to know her clients, she is able to gain a strong understanding of what designs will work for them in their space so that the end result is loved by the homeowner. “I love getting to know my clients personally,” Penny said. “I feel that is the only way to create a personalized space for them.” With all the hard work and success Penny has seen through the years with her two businesses, she is still humbled and honored to be asked to help people with their design needs. “I feel truly blessed to be able to do what I do every day,” Penny said. “It is very satisfying to create happiness for others. My goal in every project, large or small, is to look at each one with individualized focus to make it the best space possible for the owner.” F february

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DIY with Amy Taylor T

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HOME AND GARDEN

Valentine Hearts

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Taylor, Petal native and Starkville resident, is a Southern Mississippi graduate where she earned a bachelor degree in broadcast journalism and obtained a master’s degree in Agricultural and Extension Education from Mississippi State University. She is an avid do-it-yourself crafter, artist and has passion for home design and projects. For more information about DIY with Amy Taylor email Town and Gown magazine (page 8).

ant to give a unique, thoughtful gift this Valentine’s Day? Try a DIY Valentine. Here are some simple steps to a few easy projects. These fast, easy projects will keep you from having to shop for that perfect Valentine’s Day card, and they last a lot longer than chocolate! Whoever receives your DIY Valentine’s gift will be sure to remember it forever.

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Paper Heart Wreath 1. 2.

Fold colored paper in half and cut vertically into pieces.

Using the crease in the middle, make a heart shape with each piece.

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Secure heart shape at the bottom with stapler.

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At both sides of the bottom of the heart shape, place glue. Place the glued bottom of the heart into the top of another. Use a paper clip to secure and let dry.

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Repeat this process to make your heart shape. Secure the bottom of the heart with staple or glue.

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Yarn Heart on Rustic Floral Wire 1.

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Secure the two middle hearts at the top with glue and your paper heart project is complete!

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Shape rustic floral wire into a heart. Secure by twisting it in the middle.

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1

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Cork and Yarn Heart 1. 2.

Use small nails to create a heart shape on cork board.

Tie one end of yarn to a nail and wrap it around each nail in a random pattern.

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TASTE AND TOAST

Strange Love is in the air at Strange Brew…or could it be the smell of freshly brewed coffee?

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Love


Shane

Reed

After graduating in archaeology from Mississippi State University Reed had a hard time finding a good job and got the urge to start his own business. His father had owned the building Strange Brew and Cold Stone now resides in, which was formally a convenience store and sold it when he was in college. In March of 2005, Reed opened Cold Stone Creamery and soon followed Strange Brew in April. His landlord wanted him to sell gas as well and he thought Starkville could use a mesh of all three - coffee, ice cream and gas. “It came out of coffee shops I’ve visited and everything I love about coffee,” Reed said. “It’s kind of crazy, but it worked out.”

S t or y b y Meg Hender son Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

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here’s something strange on the way.” These words appeared in 2004 on a sign outside a small abandoned gas station near the Mississippi State University campus. Today, this site is home to a deliciously unique venue where Starkville residents and visitors fill their cars with gas and their tummies with a variety of tasty desserts and beverages at Cold Stone Creamery and Strange Brew Coffeehouse. This month, love is in the air at Strange Brew…or could it be the smell of freshly brewed coffee? For owner Shane Reed, it is hard to separate the two. He and his girlfriend, Katelyn Ullmer, are excited to bring back their seasonal beverages like the ChocolateCovered Cherry Frappe and the French Kiss, a lighter drink, along with a few surprises. Even your simple latte will come with a heart-shaped artistic touch.

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King Cake Frappe

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“A lot of people come here for their first dates,” Ullmer said. “We had one couple that met at the bar while working on their PhDs; now they’re getting married.” She added, “If anyone needs a place to go on Valentine’s Day, we’ll be open with drinks and pastries.” For Mardi Gras lovers, the King Cake Frappe is back by popular demand. This beverage embodies the decadence of Mardi Gras with bits of real king cake and is topped with homemade purple whipped cream and purple sprinkles. Clearly, the name is not the only thing strange around here; this little coffeehouse strives to offer customers an out-of-the-box alternative to the national chains. Reed says starting with fresh ingredients is key to making the best tasting drinks. He takes pride in Strange Brew being the only coffeehouse in town using Mississippi-roasted beans. “Our coffee is roasted about an hour and a half away. We’ll call our micro-roaster today, and he’ll bring it tomorrow.” Keeping it local is a major priority for Reed and his crew. “We try to use as many local ingredients as we can. We use honey from Columbus. We buy bread from the Mennonite Ole Country Bakery in Brooksville. We’re also going to use Mississippi fruits and kale from Katelyn’s dad’s farm in our new healthy ‘green’ smoothies.” Providing a comfortable atmosphere is also important to Reed. “We wanted Strange Brew to feel like you can get away. We have live music (in our loft), and we’ve even done a wedding reception up there.” And the sign that piqued the public’s interest almost nine years ago continues to lure customers inside. “We use (the sign) to congratulate the Bulldogs and the high school teams. We put up movie quotes and give people a discount on their drink if they get it. When other teams come into town, we put up jokes – it’s all in good fun,” Reed said. In 2013, Reed and his crew are focusing on a wonderfully strange concept: making drinks that are not only delicious but better for you too. Their “green” smoothies will be made with more fresh fruits and less sugar. Another healthy option for 2013 is a line of organic flavored syrups. february

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Strange Brew will also debut a line of frozen yogurt frappes this month. “We’ve never seen anyone do this before,” Reed said. “They’re going to be fat-free, but they’re going to taste amazing. Our King Cake Frappe – we’re going to have a fro-yo version.” Talk about having your cake and drinking it, too. Reed, Ullmer, and the Strange Brew crew invite you to come in, sit a while, and enjoy a cup of coffee, healthy smoothie, or maybe something a bit more indulgent. And you can find out what’s brewing and give feedback on your Strange Brew experience by visiting their Facebook page or following them on Twitter @SBcoffeehouse. F

Chocolate-covered Cherry Latte

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Sweet Eats Like Us

Lorie Roach Lorie Roach is an award winning cook, food blogger and photographer from Buckatunna, Miss. She blogs at Mississippi Kitchen (loriesmississippikitchen.com). february

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Red Velvet Hot Chocolate 4-5 c. of milk 1 c. dark chocolate chips 2-3 drops of food coloring In a small pot heat the milk over medium heat. Add chocolate chips and continue to stir constantly as they melt and incorporate into the milk. Add food coloring. Recipe: abeautifulmess.com

Marshmallow Whipped Cream 1 c. chilled heavy whipping cream 1/2 c. marshmallow cream (fluff), divided Beat heavy cream and marshmallow cream in the bowl of an electric mixer on high speed with the whip attachment until medium peaks form. Keep refrigerated. Recipe: Lorie Roach

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Red Velvet Marble Brownies 1 stick unsalted butter, (8 Tbsp) melted 1 c. sugar 1 tsp vanilla extract 1/4 c. cocoa powder pinch of salt 1 Tbsp red food coloring 1 tsp apple cider vinegar 2 eggs 3/4 c. all purpose flour For the cheesecake layer: 8 oz. cream cheese, softened 1/4 c. sugar 1 egg 1/2 tsp vanilla extract Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray an 8x8 baking dish with nonstick cooking spray and set aside. In a large bowl, combine melted butter, sugar, vanilla, cocoa powder, salt, food coloring, and vinegar, mixing after each addition. Whisk the eggs into the cocoa mix. Mix in the flour until lightly combined. Pour the batter into the prepared baking pan, saving 1/3 to 1/4 cup of the batter for the cream cheese layer. In the bowl of an electric mixer, cream together cream cheese, sugar, egg, and vanilla until smooth. Spread the cream cheese on top of the brownie batter in the pan. Put the remaining cocoa batter over the cream cheese layer. Using the tip of a knife, swirl through the cream cheese mixture to create a swirl pattern. Bake the brownies for 30 minutes. Remove to a cooling rack and allow them to cool completely before cutting. Recipe: freutcake.com 40

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Roasted Strawberry Blondie Bars Balsamico

1 lb. strawberries, chopped 3 Tbsp balsamic vinegar 3 Tbsp sugar 1/2 c. of butter, melted 1 c. packed dark brown sugar 1 large egg beaten 1 tsp of vanilla extract 1 tsp almond extract 1 c. of all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp baking powder 1/4 tsp salt

Mascarpone Buttercream

1/4 c. butter, softened to room temperature 4 oz. mascarpone cheese, softened to room temperature 1 tsp vanilla extract 1/2 tsp almond extract 1 1/2 c. powdered sugar 1/2 c. sliced, toasted almonds Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Toss strawberries in a bowl with the balsamic vinegar and 3 tablespoons sugar; transfer berries and liquid to a large baking sheet and spread in a single layer. Roast for 40 minutes, stirring every ten minutes. Meanwhile, spray an 8 x 8 inch baking pan with nonstick cooking spray, then line with parchment paper, letting about 4-5 inches overhang on two opposite sides to form handles so the bars can be lifted out later. Spray parchment with nonstick cooking spray. Whisk together the 1/2 cup melted butter and the dark brown sugar in a bowl. Add the egg, 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, and 1 teaspoon almond extract and whisk until smooth. Stir in the flour, baking powder, and salt until combined. When strawberries are done, stir them in along with the syrup just until evenly distributed. Spread in pan evenly. Bake for 25-28 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Allow to cool completely on a wire rack. While bars are cooling, make the frosting. Beat 1/4 cup butter, the mascarpone cheese, 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, and 1/2 teaspoon almond extract until light and fluffy. Beat in the powdered sugar until smooth and creamy. Remove bars from pan by picking up the edges of the parchment paper and setting on a cutting board. Spread the frosting evenly over the top, then sprinkle with the almonds. Keep refrigerated. Recipe: Lorie Roach 30

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NutellaMascarpone Mousse 1 c. heavy cream 3 Tbsp powdered sugar 8 oz. mascarpone cheese, softened to room temperature 1/2 c. Nutella Beat the heavy cream on high speed with a wire whisk attachment until foamy. Slowly add the powdered sugar and beat until stiff peaks form. Refrigerate until needed. In another bowl, beat the mascarpone cheese and Nutella on medium speed until smooth and creamy, stopping to scrape down sides. Fold in the whipped cream. Chill for 30 minutes. Serve drizzled with strawberry coulis. *Can substitute 8 oz. softened cream cheese for mascarpone cheese.

Strawberry Coulis 3 c. fresh or frozen strawberries 3/4 c. sugar 1 tsp lemon juice Heat the strawberries, sugar, and lemon juice in a medium heavy saucepan over medium heat for 5-10 minutes, stirring frequently or until mixture bubbles and berries are soft. Transfer to a food processor or blender and process until smooth. Cool completely before serving. Store in refrigerator. Recipes: Lorie Roach

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SHOPPING LIST

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Red Velvet Hot Chocolate milk (4-5 c.)

dark chocolate chips (1 c.) food coloring (Red)

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Red Velvet Marble Brownies Butter (1 stick)

Sugar (1 1/4 c.) Vanilla extract (1 1/2 tsp.)

Marshmallow Whipped Cream

Cocoa powder (1/4 c.) Salt (1. Tbsp.) Food coloring

Heavy whipping cream (1 c.)

Apple cider vinegar (1 tsp.)

Marshmallow cream (1/2 c.)

Eggs (3) food coloring (Red)

Sprinkle for decoration

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Cream cheese (8 oz. pkg.)


Roasted Strawberry Blondie Bars Balsamico with Mascarpone Strawberries (1 lb.)

Nutella-Mascarpone Mousse with Strawberry Coulis

Balsamic vinegar (3 Tbsp.)

Heavy cream (1 c.)

Sugar (3 Tbsp.)

Powdered sugar (3 Tbsp.)

Butter (3/4 c.) Brown sugar (1 c.) Egg (1) Vanilla (2 tsp.) All-purpose flour (1 c.)

Mascarpone cheese (4 oz.) Powdered sugar (1 1/2 c.) Toasted almonds (1/2 c.) Almond extract (1 1/2 tsp.)

Mascarpone cheese (8 oz.) Nutella (1/2 c.) Strawberries (3 oz.) Sugar (3/4 c.) Lemon juice (1 tsp.)

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HEALTH AND BEAUTY

One Heart Stronger

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Sabr ina Tr iple tt who r eceiv ed laser per iodonal t her ap y fr om Dr. W alt S t ar r, who has pr acticed in Columbus and S t ar kville since 1988 and beg an tr eating patients wit h laser per iodont al t her ap y in 20 10.


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S t or y b y Joe Lee Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

abrina Triplett of Louisville was in dire physical condition in early 2012. In need of a heart transplant after suffering from an enlarged heart for well over a decade, she learned that being approved for the transplant would hinge on successful periodontal surgery. And even the dental surgery presented its own set of serious problems. “My heart possibly started enlarging after my daughter was born in 1997,” said Triplett, a graduate of Mississippi State University who has a banking and finance background. “My dentist, Dr. Steven Yarbrough in Louisville, found periodontal disease and said that sometimes when you take a lot of medications over a long period of time, there’s a lot of plaque buildup.” Yarbrough sent Triplett to Dr. Walt Starr, who has practiced periodontics in Columbus and Starkville since 1988. Starr knew right away that Triplett wasn’t physically strong enough to handle the trauma from traditional periodontal surgery.

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“She was in brittle condition and on anti-coagulants,” Starr said. “To make incisions on her – and sedate her – would have put far too much stress on an already damaged heart. With her heart pump not working properly, she could have bled to death or gone into heart failure. I worked with Sabrina’s cardiologist (Dr. Charles Moore of Columbus) to formulate a plan.” Starr began treating patients with laser periodontal therapy in 2010. A procedure called LANAP, or Laser-Assisted New Attachment Procedure, allows him to go in with a laser at a specific wavelength to remove the diseased areas in the pocket around the tooth. This procedure allows the healthy connective tissue to regenerate on its own, as well as stimulate bone growth, which in many cases can save the tooth. The laser periodontal therapy has minimal discomfort, cuts down on treatment time, and ultimately results in less cost to the patient.  Periodontal disease creates pockets that are deeper than can be cleaned at home with brushing and flossing, as the pocket around the tooth gets deeper with the loss of attachment. LANAP, which is FDA-approved, sterilizes the pocket, removes the diseased epithelium lining, and seals the pocket so the patient’s body can regenerate new attachment – which eliminates the diseased pocket. Starr, though, still had to take precautions in using LANAP therapy on Triplett. The entire procedure would have normally taken place in one visit, but putting additional stress on Triplett’s heart was a tremendous concern. He chose to work on her mouth one side at a time, asking her to rest up for a couple of weeks before coming back in and having the other side repaired. “Dr. Starr explained everything, and he and his staff were real nice and compassionate,” Triplett said. “I had the last part of the laser surgery in February, and I was approved for the heart transplant on April 9. The transplant itself took place on May 3.” Triplett’s heart transplant took place at University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson and was installed by Dr. Curtis Tribble, the Chief of the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery at UMC and the Medical Director of Transplantation at the hospital. Tribble estimates that there are about 2,000 heart transplants done in the U.S. each year. “After the transplant operation, the patients go back to being cared for by the transplant cardiologists,” Tribble said. “It is hoped that they’ll be sensible in their lifestyle choices. Usually these patients feel better enough and are motivated enough that they are fairly sensible about what they do. “But no one outlines how many hours of sleep they should get or how much exercise they must do. We require any smokers to have abstained from smoking for at least six months before being listed for transplant. It’s very rare that someone would relapse in that regard, I would say.” While a dental issue – even a serious one – might not seem to have much impact on a pending heart transplant, the risk of infection stemming from Triplett’s periodontal disease could have been life-threatening. The American Academy of Periodontology’s web site includes these comments: “Research has shown that periodontal disease may increase the risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Both periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease are chronic inflammatory diseases, so researchers believe that inflammation may account for the association between the two. Untreated periodontal disease can increase inflammation in the body, which may increase the risk for development of more severe health complications, including cardiovascular disease.”

“The most important issue for a transplant patient is that any source of infection, even one that is normally not that big a deal, is much more of a concern when taking drugs that cause immune-suppression, as these drugs make any infection worse,” Tribble said. “Some women have a condition in which their own immune system attacks their hearts after childbirth, or postpartum cardiomyopathy. Most often, decades elapse between the time that the birth of a child starts this process, and the time that something dramatic must be done.” Tribble said that while heart transplants are exciting enough in the moment, he and his colleagues work to make them as routine and boring as possible. Triplett, who is closing in on a full year with her new heart, said she feels fine and is getting good reports from all over her doctors. “Dr. Yarbrough and I see Sabrina on an alternating basis every three months, which is the recommendation to all periodontal patients by the American Academy of Periodontology,” Starr said. “Last time she walked herself in, hopped up in the chair, and really looked good. It was great to see her healthy. The real hero, though, is the person who donated the heart.” F

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Living Beyond the Cause 38

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S t or y b y Joe Lee Pho t og r aph y Submitt ed

oni Wild of Hattiesburg wasn’t even 30 years old when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1997. She beat the disease with chemotherapy, but was forced to undergo further treatment when a new lump in her breast was discovered the following year. And although she survived that round of chemo, her heart was damaged along the way. In 2009 Wild was hospitalized for weeks after what appeared to be a simple cough and cold never improved. “Doctors told me my heart function had decreased to the point that it was almost incompatible with life,” said Wild, whose first husband was struck by a car in 1997 while changing a flat tire. After he was declared brain dead, Wild donated his organs. “Little did I know that twelve years later I would find myself in the exact same situation, a situation that would require a transplant in order for me to survive,” Wild said. “And lucky for me, there was an individual out there who was generous enough to donate their loved one’s heart to me, to provide me with a second chance at life, and give me the greatest gift of all.” Wild’s story has a happy ending, but heart disease is this country’s number one killer. Not far behind is stroke. The American Heart Association funds cutting-edge research, conducts lifesaving public and professional educational programs, and advocate to protect public health. “The AHA’s Go Red For Women Movement advocates for more research and swifter action for women’s heart health,” said Christiana Williams, Communications Director for the American Heart Association branch in Jackson. “The movement was created by women for women, and with the right information, education and care, heart disease in women can be treated, prevented, and even ended. “It has been proven that women in our community who Go Red are more likely to make healthy choices for themselves and for their families. This is important for Mississippi moms who are fighting to improve Mississippi’s obesity rate and childhood obesity rates.” So how can you get involved and help?

Toni Wild, a national spokesperson for American Heart Association.

Women at the American Heart Association event Go Red held in Jackson.

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The Metro Jackson Go Red Luncheon is set for May 8, 2013 at the Jackson Convention Complex from 10:00 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. There will be breakout sessions, health and fitness experts, medical professionals, and women who will tell their survival stories and provide steps you can take toward better heart health. “The Metro Jackson AHA raises funds, not only for the Go Red For Women Movement, but also to support research and education programs in Mississippi and around the nation,” Williams said. “The AHA puts over two million dollars back into our community for educational programs that provide lifesaving tools and information focused on the prevention aspects of heart disease and stroke. These programs are making it possible for more people to live free from cardiovascular diseases and stroke.” The Meridian Heart Ball, now in its third year, is set for February 16, 2013 at the MSU Riley Center. Over $45,000 was raised for the AHA at last year’s ball, which featured live and silent auctions that brought in close to another $10,000. Survivor Jolie Carle will speak this year, and dinner and live entertainment will be provided by Charles “CC” Carter. The Heart Ball is sponsored by Rush Hospital and Anderson Medical Center.

Women at the American Heart Association event Go Red held in Jackson.

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In Tupelo, Project Hope’s Festival of Hope will take place April 6, 2013. “Founded in 1998, Project Hope is a group of local volunteers dedicated to community health improvement,” said North Mississippi Medical Center spokesperson Liz Dawson. “Because heart disease and cancer are the leading causes of death in the United States, and diabetes can take a devastating toll on a person’s health, Project Hope specifically targets these diseases. Project Hope has become a vital lifeline for people fighting cancer, diabetes and heart disease in northeast Mississippi. “Money raised by the Festival of Hope teams goes directly to organizations that are helping patients in need, or are reaching the community with education or prevention programs. Project Hope also offers scholarships to students pursuing health careers or those whose families have been touched by these diseases.

Participating teams at the Tupelo Project Hope Festival.

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Team winner of the Project Hope Festival.

“Festival of Hope is the annual family-oriented celebration in the fight against cancer, heart disease and diabetes,” Dawson said. “Admission is free for the community, with money raised on-site through the sale of meals and other goodies that various teams offer. There is a children’s area that features games and inflatables, team competitions, survivor recognitions, and entertainment.” “There are a small handful of things that we know for certain can help with heart health over the long term,” said Dr. Larry Creswell, an associate professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at University of Mississippi Medical Center. “The AHA sums them up in ‘Life’s Simple 7’: get active, control the cholesterol, eat better, manage the blood pressure, lose weight, reduce blood sugar, and stop smoking.” Toni Wild was back at the gym six weeks after her heart transplant and is now a national spokesperson for the AHA. “It just goes to show that regardless of the circumstances or any obstacles, you can live with heart disease, and live beyond it,” Wild said. “And that’s my goal: to inspire others and let them know that heart disease does not have to take your life – it can fulfill your life.” To make a donation to the American Heart Association, or to learn about volunteer opportunities throughout Mississippi, visit www.heart.org. Visit www.projecthopems.com for more information. F

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Project Hope Festival’s Cat in the Hat theme cake.


If you don’t have money to give, sometimes your time and attention is all people need, just to know that somebody’s there and cares.

Promotional photography for Pay it Forward. february

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S t or y b y Meg Hender son I Pho t og r aph y submitt ed

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he holidays are always a time for giving. But a group of six local photographers want to keep that spirit of giving alive year-round. In the fall of 2012, Katie McCrary, Renee Reedy, Katie McDill, Masa Kathryn Hensley, Emily Anne Cal laway, and Elizabeth Behm teamed up to give back to their communities in a project they call “Pay It Forward.”

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Inspired by the work of Amber Lanning, an Arkansas photographer, these ladies decided to come together to donate their time and talent to struggling families in northern Mississippi who might be uplifted by a holiday photo session. Columbus-based photographer Katie McCrary jump started the program, and the others were eager to join her in the cause. Photographer Renee Reedy said, “So many times, I don’t feel like I have much to give, but I realize how important family pictures can be. I was excited to finally have a way to use my talents to help others.” Photographer Katie McDill added, “Since the economy’s been down in the past few years, and my business has been so good, I felt like I could give back, that it’s the least I could do.”

Promotional photography for Pay it Forward.


Katie McCrary, Renee Reedy, Katie McDill, Masa Kathryn Hensley, Emily Anne Callaway, and Elizabeth Behm february

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Promotional photography for Pay it Forward. 46

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Promotional photography for Pay it Forward.

Look who supports

After pouring through applications in the fall, the ladies chose six families to receive a photo session, one for each photographer. The first photo session went to a girl battling cancer. “It was really hard to decide who would get it,” said McDill. “The family I chose was a single mom with four kids who attend West Lowndes Elementary, where I work as an art teacher. She’s not always in a position where she can give to her kids, but she’s very supportive of them.” Reedy says that in paying it forward, she has gotten so much back. “Many people see us as competitors within the photography industry, but this was a way for us to come together and give back to the community. Out of this project, we’ve become good friends.” The ladies hope to continue and expand their program in the coming year. McDill said, “We’re thinking about how we can fund this project throughout the year, not just at Christmas.” For one, they are taking their “Pay It Forward” challenge nationwide, asking people to use their creativity to spread the word through Instagram. Even Coach Dan Mullen and several MSU football players, as well as Sally Pressman from Army Wives, are on board, getting out the message on Twitter. The photographers are also partnering with two international organizations – Hispaniola Mountain Ministries and Global Connections. They are planning fall trips to the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Africa to “pay it forward” around the world. Their greatest hope is that their project not only brings cheer to the families receiving the photo sessions but also inspires others to use their time and talents to “pay it forward” to their communities. McDill said, “If you don’t have money to give, sometimes your time and attention is all people need, just to know that somebody’s there and cares.” F


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S t or y b y Lizzie Smit h Pho t og r aph y Submitt ed

Teddy relaxing with Ashley Owen Hill.

nimals play a special part in each of our lives as they become our constant companions and our solace in time of need. We all of have fondness for pets that comes in all shapes and sizes and Ashley Owen Hill is no different. Hill, 28, Meridian, Miss., has always had a passion for animal rescue and even hoped to own her animal rescue organization when she was a little girl. She started doing independent rescue by fostering animals, bringing them to health and finding them good homes before an unfortunate final push came from the death of her own special dog named Rudy.

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Rudy was adopted by Hill in 2007 when he was a sore sight for eyes. He was dirty, not cared for, beaten and was severely emaciated before he was discovered and put in the pound. It was there he waited for others to adopt him, but time kept passing and his neighboring dogs were constantly were chosen. She saved and cared for him and he lived out his days filled with happiness and carried a permanent smile on his face until an sudden, unexpected heart attack shortened his life in 2010. “When he died, I felt this huge void in my life, and I needed a way to move forward, while also honoring his memory,” Hill said. In 2010, she opened Lucky Dog Retreat, a dog-boarding kennel for families when they go out of town. Soon after making a living working with the dogs, she was able to start the Lucky Dog Rescue, a non-profit animal rescue group that she founded in early 2011. She was able to provide the space to house rescue dogs and even started a blog to share her own experiences, connect with other rescuers and inspire others to get involved all in the memory of her beloved Rudy.

Penny giving kisses.

Molly posing for a photo.

Although Hill loves all animals, she’s always had a special connection with dogs. “I think it’s their unconditional love and unwavering desire to be loved by us. Dogs exist to be our constant companions, and no matter what you do, they love you. That’s such a beautiful thing,” Hill said. Ashley herself has only two dogs but has around 30 rescue dogs in her care. Through caring for many different types of dogs, each dog manages to steal a piece of her heart and Wink was no different. Wink was her own ‘extra-special baby’ and she had even planned to adopt him one day. After an adoption family, the Clearmans picked Wink and Ashley was devastated. She was extremely happy for Wink and his new family but she still had grown attached to the dog and felt heartbroken. “Even though I had every right to say “No,” I knew they were a great family and the perfect fit for him. Yet, I just couldn’t imagine my life without my Winkle-Jinks. And even though I was insanely happy for him. I simply wasn’t prepared to say goodbye to him, because I’d never planned to let him go,” Hill said on her July 2012 blog post. 50

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Missy Missy is a young female Hound mix that is training to be housebroken. She loves to run and play and really likes other pups! She would like to have a place to run, but loves to curl up on a couch.

Noah Noah is a young male Pit Bull mix that has lived a hard life as a “bait dog” in dogfighting and then was dumped on the street to die. Thanks to Lucky Dog Rescue Noah now is a happy boy looking for a family to love him as much as Ashley does.

Diamond Diamond is a female adult Pit Bull mix that has lived her life in shelters. Diamond thinks that just because he does not listen with his ears, doesn’t mean he cannot listen with his heart!

However when the Clearmans went on vacation, they brought Wink to the boarding kennel where he was once again reunited with Ashley and his best friend, Pinky. Wink and Pinky, both Pit Bull mixes, were such good friends that the Clearmans offered to foster Pinky for a couple of days. A couple of days turned into a longer period then another vacation time reuniting Ashley once more with her beloved pets before she got the exciting news via an endearing Facebook post that Pinky had fit in perfectly as member of the Clearman family and soon they adopted Pinky. Hill immediately began crying not only out of joy but for out of pure love and excitement that Pinky, who had previously been in and out of foster homes for three years, had finally found a great home and with his best friend Wink. Its the experiences like these that Ashley gets to go through each day that makes her job worth doing. It led to her to co-create a Facebook app called Pet Pardons with her friend Chris Hoar. Pet Pardons works by advocating for a pet through sharing on Facebook walls. The more times a pet is shared, the higher likelihood of the pet being seen by someone who can rescue or adopt. “This simple act has saved thousands of lives! This is another great way for people to help, without even leaving their house,” Hill said. There are other great ways to get involved as well. Volunteering for your local shelter or rescue organization by walking dogs, playing with dogs, cleaning, bathing, etc. is a great way to get involved with your community. While fostering an animal for a shelter or rescue group is ideal, you can always help by giving donations. Ashley said that donations are essential to helping her and others like her to continue their mission of saving lives. “No matter what your passion is in life – whether it be saving animals, helping children, feeding the poor – whatever it may be, if a cause speaks to your heart, you should do something to help. Every act of kindness, no matter how small, changes the world for the better,” Hill said. Hill has many rescue missions outside of Meridian and hopes to do it even more on a larger scale one day. For more information on her blog or mission, go to www.luckydogrescueblog.com or on her facebook at www.facebook.com/luckydogrescueblog.com. F

Freddy Freddy is a 2-year-old male black lab mix and was rescued from the pound. He is friendly, outgoing, and loves to run and play with other pups. He loves to cuddle and oh so smart! february

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WISH LIST

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Photography by Lizzie Smith

1. Single Pearl: Pearl necklace, $32; Purple Elephant. 662-324-4008. 2. Walk in Style: Ankle-strap pink shoes, $32. lagreenjewelry.com.

3. Better in Red: Betsey Johnson quilted heart clutch, $46. lagreenjewelry.com. 4. Drink Up: Broken Vessel Pottery red coffee cups, $24. Culin Arts, 662-494-8969. 5. Keepsake: Red jewelry box, $53. Rose Drug, 662-494-3341 6. Colored Decor: Red vases, $14. Purple Elephant, 662-324-4008. 7. Say Hello: Mini note cards, $2.50. aspenbaycandles.com.

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8. Initial Script: Moon and Lola monogram necklace, $240.

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9. Stylish Money: Euroslide wallets, $44. reedsms.com. 10. Say It With a Towel: Tay Brand tea towels, $10.

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aspenbaycandles.com 11. Be Sassy: Underskies peach Victorian lace top, $42.95. lagreenjewelry.com. 12: Pour To Taste: Patent Design Collection ball wine curator, $37.50; Culin Arts, 662-494-8969.

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1. Coast On: Kelly Fall resin coasters, $3; aspenbaycandles.com. 2. Be Masculine: Leather vintage button bracelets, $90-152. lagreenjewelry.com.

3. Colors of the Krewes: Cross vases, $15-16. Purple Elephant, 662-324-4008.

4. Get in the Spirit: Ya Los Angeles, $42. reedsms.com. 5. Jazz it Up: Cat statue, $9. Rose Drug, 662-494-3341. 6. Heart for Mardi Gras: Brighton jewelry Mantilla earrings, $32. Sisters, 662-323-0995.

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7. 7. A Taste of the New Orleans: Cafe Du Monde beignet mix, $8. Culin Arts, 662-494-8969.

8. Keep it Classy: Beaucoup bracelets, $54. giggleswick.com. 9. Frame the Moments: LRI fleur de lis frame, $27. Rose Drug, 662-494-3341.. 10. Keep Warm: Print yellow scarf, $27. Rose Drug, 662-494-3341. 11. Shimmer in Green: CLuce Scallops green dress, $82. lagreenjewelry.com 12: Rope it Up: Paracord rope bracelets, $12; reedsms.com

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Blue and turquoise sequin wave skirt; $29. Ivory studded top; $39. Free People magenta skinnies; $68. Lime and black crop top; $ 24. Denim crop jacket with studs; $44. Triangle-link necklace, $18. Green Sunglasses, $12.

Vintage

Aztec

Modern retro matched

feminine

CMisouture Bold

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Clothes courtesy of Libby Story Stylist: Abby Hathorn Photography by Divian Conner Models courtesy of MSU Fashion Board: M.E. Clark Victoria Clift


Darling Leona Tunic sequin and lace detailed ivory dress; $104. Bucket brown and leather hat; with buckle; $18. february

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Sleeveless Red dress with detailed gold studs ($34) and floral leather belt. Tulle Ivory Cardigan; $44.


Peach metallic crop sweater; $38. Silver leather shorts with black zipper detail on back; $39. Hobo Face Value purse, $238. Aviator sunglasses, $12.

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Lucca couture dark grey and cream stripe denim pants ($48) with black and gold chain belt. Maroon skull collar top; $19. Black combat boot, $32. Mink Pink Ringmaster black and white print dress; $78. Studded denim vest; $48. Hot Girl red booties, $ 44.

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Mint sweater (no longer available). Aztec black and white sweater skirt; $39. Beaded crystal collar necklace, $28. Retro round sunglasses, $12. february

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BB Dakota stripe dress; $78. Holey neutral knit cardigan; $44. Vintage Star Belt; $26. Vintage button collar custom made by Kelly Quick (kellydquick@gmail. com).

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Ivory studded top with pocket detail; $ 39.

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LIFE AND STYLE

A Cup of Lindsay Jo

Valentine’s Day Essentials Lindsay is an online lifestyle blogger. Her blog, acupoflindsayjo.com, has a primary focus on fashion. Lindsay is a member of the Independent Fashion Bloggers (IFB) and attends various conferences and workshops with other fashion bloggers regularly.

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Garden Hearts

The Garden Guy‌. An Interview with Felder Rushing

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Int er vie w b y Milt on Whatle y Pho t og r aph y Submitt ed

T&G: For those who aren’t totally familiar with you

and your work, where are you from and where were you educated?

FR: I was born and raised in the Mississippi Delta;

three lines of my family have been in Mississippi since the 1700s. I went to Mississippi State University, a little at Louisiana State University, and lots of learning “on the road.” I am a fully retired MSU horticulturist who gardens part of the year in Mississippi and part of the year in England, and I travel and lecture coast to coast. I am a distinctly non-stuffy board member of American horticulture society, and the online Q&A guy for Home and Garden Television, as well as writing and photographing for most major gardening magazines.

T&G: As a tenth-generation Southern gardener,

was there any question that this would be your life’s work?

FR: It used to be that everyone gardened, for survival

and to barter. My horticulturist great-grandmother was a major influence on me, but none of my siblings turned out this way. I guess I was just the lucky one. Though I am a hard core gardener, my work is actually that of garden education.

T&G:

Before your recent retirement you were an Extension Service horticulture specialist. What did that job entail and how long did you work in that position?

FR:

As a horticulturist and garden writer for the Extension Service working out of Jackson, I wrote for statewide newspapers, hosted a television gardening program for several years and have had my weekly radio programs for thirty years now. I have lectured or done workshops on gardening in all but one county in the state.

T&G: What county have you not been to? Maybe this

interview will get you an invitation.

FR:

Let’s just say that if I haven’t worked with gardeners there, I’m sure it’s because the local Extension people and garden clubs are doing a great job!

T&G:

Most people know you from your wonderful program on Mississippi Public Broadcasting, The Gestalt Gardener. How did you come to MPB and how long have you hosted your show?

FR: I have done my weekly radio programs for over 30

years now. While doing a two-hour program on commercial radio stations for many years, I refused to be sponsored by any particular company or product because I like to give plain, non-commercial gardening advice. So, when MPB approached me about eight years ago, I jumped on it as a way to give dependable advice without having to push products.

T&G

: With your hectic schedule, you are hosting your show, speaking before various groups and writing, how often do you have the opportunity to get your hands in the dirt?

FR: Being the founder of the international Slow Gar-

dening approach, I do travel a lot. But when I am home in my celebrated Mississippi cottage garden, which by the way has been featured in numerous magazines including on the cover of Southern Living, I am a real, hands-on gardener. I dig my own dirt, make my own compost, grow my own herbs and some of my vegetables, plant my own flowers, and prune my own roses. I just save time by not having any grass to mow! february

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T&G:

Your last book, Garden Hearts, published in March 2012 by St. Lynn’s Press, is beautiful. It says that the photographs of various hearts in gardens, heart shapes painted on walls, cut in fences, shaped by flowers, were collected by you over a forty year period. Was this book your idea or were you approached by St. Lynn’s Press with the concept?

FR:

I have been fortunate to have competing publishers seek me out for my garden writing, but I specifically sought out St. Lynn‘s Press to do this fun little book. Garden Hearts include some interesting history on the heart shape, and lots of carefully-selected quotes about gardening with love. Each photo, all taken by me, represents my looking and finding the simple and poignant in a world that is too often confusing and hurtful.

T&G:

Garden Hearts is the seventeenth book you have either authored or coauthored. What is your latest book?

FR: I just wrapped up book

number eighteen, Bottle Trees and Other Whimsical Glass Art for the Garden, which was released in January. The book includes all forms of garden glass art, from home-made bottle trees to fantastic Dale Chihuly sculptures, and everything in between, including an entire forest in the German Alps made of tall glass trees! I asked St. Lynn’s Press to help with this and the Garden Heart book because the publisher is a deeply philosophical man who wants to help change the world through beauty and grace. And he “gets” me and my approach to life, without trying to change either. 68

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T&G

: Is there one indispensable garden book that you would recommend to the beginning gardener?

FR: Not really. Most garden books cover the same

basic stuff. Two of my most popular, Slow Gardening and Tough Plants for Southern Gardens, were written after trusting editors started letting me express my own personal, practical, no-nonsense “spin” on gardening, like a real gardener, not like a horticulturist. But I do use the Southern Living Garden Guide every time I need dependable information about how to select and grow particular plants.

T&G: Do you have a favorite of your own books? A

friend of mine, Lynette McDougald, the Business Manager at The University Florist at Mississippi State and floral instructor at Mississippi State is partial to your Passalong Plants.

FR: Passalong Plants, which I co-wrote with Steve

Bender from Southern Living was named the “Best Written” garden book by the Garden Writers Association and I am working on a second volume of that now. If I had to pick a favorite of my books, it would be my partly howto, part-philosophical Slow Gardening book. It is probably my last pure gardening book. With Slow Gardening, I think I finally said it all like I wanted to, which is why I am now concentrating more on the simplicity and love of garden-variety gardens, not the how-to of horticulture. february

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T&G:

What is the mistake most often made by novice gardeners?

FR: It’s worrying about the rules, or

messing up. Instead of following the advice of jaded garden writers with agendas, I recommend sticking with what has worked down through the ages. Most successful gardening has boiled down to choosing dependable plants and setting them in wide holes green side up. And keep trying if something doesn’t work.

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T&G:

Is there one piece of advice you would give to someone who wants to start a garden, a flower bed or just make their yard more appealing?

FR:

Make a wide bed or hole, mix in a little compost to the native dirt and stick in a variety of plants – doesn’t matter what specific plants, just a small tree, a flowering shrub, an evergreen shrub, a couple of hardy perennials, and some seasonal annuals. Expect some of it to die, then replace it. And always add some sort of art, to personalize it or give it a theme. For more information on Felder’s radio program, his garden, lots of gardening odds and ends, and photographs taken all over the gardening world, go to www.felderrushing.net F 40

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LITERATURE

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Book R e vie w b y Susan O’Br y an

ebruary is a month marked by romance, valentines and relationships. Its cold nights give way to reflection on the impact others have on our lives and how they enrich our souls. If you need inspiration or a way to kick start your thoughts, sit back with a mug of hot tea and enjoy Sara J. Henry’s novels, A Cold and Lonely Place, released this month, and Learning to Swim from December 2011. Both feature heroine Troy Chance, a single, fiercely independent woman who thrives as a freelance journalist and photographer for her small town’s newspaper. Henry has selected the Adirondacks as the setting for both novels, quickly immersing readers in the sense of isolation that comes with frigid winters and somewhat remote locations. However, it’s a setting that also relies on community support as well as individual self-sufficiency to survive, a combination of strengths universal to us all. We are introduced to Troy in the award-winning Learning to Swim when she rescues a child tossed into icy Lake Champlain. Why has this boy named Paul, who speaks only French, been bound in an adult sweatshirt and left to drown? When he finally confides in her, Paul relates a tale of kidnapping and possible murder. A maternal instinct that Troy didn’t know was within her kicks in, and Troy is determined to protect him at all costs. Her commitment pulls her from the sanctuary of the boarding house she owns to the wealthy – and dangerous - privileged neighborhoods of Quebec and Ontario, Canada, and then in Vermont. After she locates Paul’s family, she is torn between a growing fondness for his father and the unraveling deadly truth about his mother. Learning to Swim is a lesson in relationships, or rather the importance of them. Troy learns that her life is much richer when it includes love and compassion for - and from - others.

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The impact of strong relationships is taken to the next level in A Cold and Lonely Place, a heart-wrenching tale about the strength of family and friends and the damage caused by long-kept secrets. Troy is photographing the construction of a lake ice palace for winter carnival when a body is found embedded in the ice. She’s assigned to write an in-depth series on the victim, a man she thought to be an emotional deserter, but in reality is the son of a wealthy Connecticut family. Delving into his past with the help of his sister, Troy finds that the present is always haunted by the past and the “what ifs” of life. It’s an emotional journey circling around which family secrets to keep, which truths to expose and how far loyalty can stretch. As one reviewer wrote, “author Sara J. Henry brilliantly draws us into a terrifying, but ultimately affirmative novel about love, friendship and shining truth about who we really are.” ***** Children can learn more about relationships – and first experiences in general - in an entertaining series of interactive e-books by Nicole and Damir Fonovich that feature a little boy, Luca Lashes, whose magic eyelashes give him special powers. The first in the series is Lucas Lashes the Brown-Eyed Boy. Readers can follow him as he makes friends, faces fears and gains confidence with new experiences, such as learning to swim, going to the doctor and visiting the dentist for the first time. The series also plays up the importance of special people in Luca’s life. The books, available by cell phone, table and e-reader apps, are offered in English, French, Italian and Spanish. They are appropriate for ages 0-4, and a new book is added about every two months or so. F


Starkville City Christmas Party The 4th Annual Christmas Party honoring the Board of Alderman and city department heads was hosted at the home of Starkville Mayor Parker Wiseman and Lindsay Wiseman on Wednesday, December 19, 2012. Photography by Ashley Covin

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1. Starkville Mayor Parker Wiseman and Lindsey Wiseman 2. City officials with their spouses and children. 3. Jermiah Dumas and Hope Dumas 4. Terry Kemp, Georgia Lindley, David Lindley, Lynn Spruill and Sandra Sistrunk 5. Emma Gandy, Rodger Mann 6. Georgia Lindley, Edward Kemp, David Lindley february

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Starkville JA Christmas The Junior Auxiliary of Starkville had their annual Christmas party held at Central Station Grill on Wednesday, December 19, 2012. Photography by Ashley Covin

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Meridian MLK Cele Celebration Meridian Community College’s Martin Luther King Commemorative Celebration held at McCain Theater on Monday, January 14, 2013. Guest speaker for the event was Dr. RoSusan D. Bartee, professor and program coordinator of Educational Leadership at the University of Mississippi. Photography by Preston Cooper

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1. Shana Carter, Krystal Pruett 2. GaBnelle Kelly, Zamien Hopson 3. Recordo Dean, Nate Latham, Ladurus Henry 4. Angel Lewis, Brandon Wilson, Jasmin Lawson 5. LaQuanda Harvey, Akeem Barfield, Shunda Fox 6. Miranda Chatham, Kittra Hudnall, Aliesha Houston 7. Suzette Underwood, Jona N. Hams february

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Golden Triangle Kennel Club Clu The Golden Triangle Kennel Club Dog Show was held at the Mississippi Horse Park on January 12-13, 2013. Photography by Ashley Covin

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The Boys in Autumn The Company of Angel, Inc. presented The Boys in Autumn at the Temple Theater in Meridian, Miss. on Saturday, January 5, 2013. Photography by Preston Cooper

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1. Tony Sansone, Elliott Street 2. Jan Gibson, Betty Hardan, Ouida Powell 3. William Nix, Liz Nix, Ronnie Miller, Judith Miller 4. Josh Luke, Andian Anderson, Elena Lopez Burnside 5. Steve Nabors, Gwen McShepard 6. Richard House, Jennie Sherven, Tammy Gardiner, Ileah Rocha 7. Terren Sande, Maggie Craze february

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EXPRESS! Yourself The T.K. Martin Center’s Project EXPRESS Yourself! was held at the Rosenzweig Arts Center on Thursday, January 3, 2013 and was featured through January. Photography by Lizzie Smith

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1. Lynn Cain, Dick Cain, Dannell Irving 2. Kim Fobian and Abby Malmstrom 3. Kelly Martin, Dale Guadagno 4. Katie McDill, Patty Thrash, Becky Swords, Marie Burgess 5. Laurie Craig, Nikole Roberts 6. Ralph Null, Beth Sims, Fred Kinder 7. Garthia Elena Halbert, Jeff Moran, Rebecca McGavock, Gavin Mendus 78

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All That Jazz The Starkville-Mississippi State University Symphony Association presented All That Jazz at First Baptist Church on Saturday, January 12, 2013. Photography by Ashley Covin

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1. Ashton Taylor, Haley Moore, Erin Weaver 2. Bonnie Feig, Diane Freeze, Marty Friend. 3. Ed Frey, Loretta Frey, Rayburn Arnold, Carolyn Arnold 4. Gretchen Passons, Peyton Passons 5. Karen Brown, Fairfax Montgomery 6. Ruth Jernigan, Margaret Weinineg 7. Tayler Tingle, Elizabeth Foster

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A Product of Horizon of MississiPPi P.O. Box 1068 | Starkville, MS 39760 www.townandgownmagazine.com

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don norMAnn | publisher sdnpub@starkvilledailynews.com

clAire MAssey ssey | editor claire@townandgownmagazine.com

lindsey JoHnson nson | account executive lindsey@ townandgownmagazine.com

eMiliAA MorgAnn | account executive emilia@ townandgownmagazine.com

lizzie sMitH H | intern cAtHerine stukenborg | intern

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sHeAA Allen Meg Henderson Joe lee susAn o’bryAn lizzie sMitH Milton WHAtley lindsAy Ay Jo Wilkinson Ay

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diviAn conner Preston cooPer AsHley covin lizzie sMitH

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clAire MAssey

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cHris McMillen

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contributors

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Abby HAtHorn lorie roAcH AMy tAylor A Reproductions in whole or in part, without written permission, is strictly prohibited. No responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited manuscripts, articles or photographs. We reserve the right to edit submissions before publication. Town & Gown is a free magazine published monthly and distributed in and around Starkville and the Golden Triangle area. Subscriptions are available for mail customers. For subscriptions or inquiries, write Town & Gown Magazine, P.O. Box 1068, Starkville, MS, 39760, or call 662-323-1642.

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CALENDAR

By Lizzie Smith

February 1 Tupelo First Friday

February 12 Clifford the Big Red Dog

Tupelo’s First Friday offers a complimentary breakfast, business networking and will present featured speaker, Mr. Sid Salter, Journalist in Residence, from Mississippi State University. For more information, call 662-842-4521.

You may remember Clifford the Big Red Dog but never quite like this. Clifford the Big Red Dog, Live! is a family show that follows Emily Elizabeth as she tries to stage a musical revue while she and her friends learn valuable lessons about friendship and teamwork while also following Clifford’s life from puppyhood. The show is at the MSU Riley Center in Meridian and starts at 7:00 p.m. Tickets range from $10-18. For more information go to www.msurileycenter.com.

February 2 Classes at Mississippi Homestead Center Mississippi Modern Homestead Center is having classes on yoga, herbal series, knitting, coffee talk, composting and wild child in February and going throughout the year. To check out these classes and more, go to www.msmodernhomestead.com.

February 7 The Fantasticks Starkville’s Community Theatre will be presenting The Fantasticks, a play that tells the story of a young man and the girl next door, whose parents have built a wall to keep them apart. The show will run from Feb. 7-10 and Feb. 12-16 with shows starting nightly at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. For more information, visit www. sct-online.org.

February 8 Women Leaders in Philanthropy Advancement Luncheon The Women Leaders in Philanthropy Advancement invite you to our networking luncheon* on Friday, February 8, 2013 from 10:30am1:30pm at the River Hills Club in Jackson, MS featuring Cynthia Cooper as the keynote speaker. Ms. Cooper, 2002 Time Magazine Woman of the Year, will share her story and discuss how to turn your passion into philanthropy. WLPA was created in the College of Business at Mississippi State University to educate, enable, and empower a community of women. New members are welcomed. For more information, contact Meagan Coughlin at 662.325.9082 or mcoughlin@cobilan. msstate.edu. Fee: $45, includes lunch Registration: 10:30

February 14 Letters from Shakespeare If you’re looking for alternate Valentine’s Day plans look no further than Mississippi State’s Love Letters from Shakespeare: A Night of Music, Dance and Sonnets. The play will go through the transitions of all stages of love from the first crush to finding new beginnings. The show runs from February 14-16 and starts at 7:30 p.m. General Admission tickets are ten dollars. For more information, contact Donna Clevinger at dlc64@comm.msstate.edu.

February 16 A Back to the Future Affair The MSU Symphony Association Presents: A Back to the Future Affair at the Starkville Country Club. There will be dancing, heavy Hor D’ oeuvres and also complimentary wine to dine on while listening to soothing music. A cash bar will also be available. The show starts at 7:10 p.m. and the tickets are $60. For more information, contact Robert Phillips at 323-8075.

February 16 Meridian Heart Ball

a.m. Speaker 11:00 a.m.

The Meridian Heart Ball presents “The Beat goes on” at the MSU Riley Center. The night promises to be engaging and exciting while also bring philanthropic leaders together all in the sake of heart research. The event starts at 6:30 p.m. There will be a dinner and a an auction to follow. Tickets are $50. For more information, visit www.heart.org/ meridianheartball.

February 9 PAQUITA

February 17 Cyrano

Civic Ballet in Tupelo’s Civic Auditorium will showcase repertoire and the second act of PAQUITA. It starts at 7:30 p.m. and general admission is $10. For more information, call 662-869-7264.

The MSU Riley Center will host Cyrano in Meridian. The shows starts at 6 p.m. and tickets range from $21-27. For more information, visit www.msurileycenter.com.

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February 21-22: Shakespeare Center Workshops The American Shakespeare Center will be having workshops for high school students and college students as part of the Shakespeare from Page to Stage project. It will be in both Starkville and Columbus and the workshops will include Shakespeare’s music, basic stage combat and advanced staging. All of these fun activities are leading up the American Shakespeare Center’s performance of Twelfth Night on February 22 at 7:30 p.m. at the Bettersworth Auditorium in Lee Hall on the Mississippi State campus. For more information regarding the Page to Stage project or any other Shakespeare questions, contact Dr. Donna Clevinger at dlc@comm.msstate.edu.

February 21 16th Annual Magnolia Independent Film Festival The 16th annual Magnolia Independent Film Festival will be showcasing independent filmmakers from all around the world. It was the very first film festival to be held in Mississippi and is still thriving to this day. The festival will be at Hollywood Premier Cinemas and will be from Feb. 21-23. or more information regarding the film festival, visit www.magnoliafilmfest.com.

February 22 Christopher Robin and all his pals Corinth theatre will be presenting The House at Pooh Center where you can see Christopher Robin and all his pals Pooh, Piglet, Eeyore, Tigger and the rest as they try to run away and the adventures that follow. The show will run from Feb 22- 24 with shows starting at 7:30 p.m. and a Sunday matinee at 2 p.m. For more information, visit www.corinththeatrearts.com

Visit our website for previous issues and Facebook and Twitter for updates on the latest posts.

February 23 Art for Meridian The Museum of Art will be having the Art for Meridian at Northwood Country Club. It’s sure to be lots of fun with a gourmet dinner and cocktails as well as having entertainment with a silent auction and a live art auction. This fun festivity starts at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 601-693-2787.

February 23 DRUMLine The MSU Riley Center will be showcasing DRUMLine Live in Meridian. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. and tickets range from $37-43. For more information, visit www.msurileycenter.com. february

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