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Dear readers, The year 2010 is here bringing new hopes, expectations, and plans. So, why not to lean back for a moment and let us inspire your next travel ventures. If you want to try something new but don’t really want to spend hours on the road or in the airport, go for virtual tours. The Forbidden City, Stonehenge and now even Pompeii – all these destinations are just a click away from you. Read more in the Heritage supplement. If you prefer something more real and want to get to know real people and real places, let us invite you to Jordan – the beautiful and unique country in the Middle East. Open the Destination part. If you can’t stand the sad look of your dog any more and want to take Max for vacation this year, read the Professional supplement with numerous smart tips for holidaying with pets. The Transport part looks at the latest trends and challenges of several airport hubs and the Medical supplement is for all those over 50, who want to enjoy their life to the full. The offer of healthy, relaxing tours and retreats as well as medical trips is getting richer and richer. So, just pack your gear and set out for yet another adventure. Milada Sovadinova Editor


CONTENTS

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H E R I TAG E

Virtual traVel: let’s Go online The latest hit of Google’s Street View – virtual Pompeii – is just one example of the growing trend among travelers. If you can’t get to your dreamed destination, explore it in its virtual version right from home..

TRANSPORT

CONTENTS

Airport Hubs: to be or Not to be

Airport hubs are highly important for country’s economy. They are the gate to the world outside. Let’s have a look at the latest developments at Denver, Mumbai or even Lima airports.

HERITAGE: Virtual Travel: Let’s Go Online........................................ 4

TRANSPORT: Airport Hubs: To Be or Not to Be............................... 32

Virtual Tourism: Jetsetting without the Plane Rides. ....................................... 5 Idaho Launched 3D Virtual Tourism System............................................................... 7 Ancient Pompeii Ruins Now on Google Street View. ............................................. 9 Second Life Experiment Shows the Benefits of Virtual Events...................... 11 First Chinese 3D Virtual Tourism Site–Virtual Forbidden Palace. ................ 12

Online Booking and Web Check-In Popular at Mumbai International Airport. ................................................................................................. 33 Denver International Airport: The Primary Economic Engine for Colorado... 35 The Economic Benefits of Britain’s Global Gateway.......................................... 37 Lima: The South American Hub Airport.................................................................... 39

Professional

D e s t i nat i o n

Pet Friendly Holidays

J o r d a n – takes you beyond

Millions of people all around the world share their homes with loving pets – dogs, cats, birds, lizards and many more. The trouble comes when you want to travel. Should you take your friend with you? Is it possible, anyway?

Young and restless – this is Jordan! A country with ancient monuments, unique nature and a government extensively investing in tourism industry is simply destined to success. Let’s get familiar with the capital Amman, the moonscape of Wadi Rum, as well as the Nabatean people.

Professional: Souvenirs All Around........................ 14

Destination: Jordan – takes you beyond........... 41

Dog Friendly Opportunities........................................................................................ 15 Pet Tourism – Challenges and Prospects. ............................................................... 17 Be Responsible and Get Ready for Your Doggy Vacation. ................................. 19 Top 5 Most Pet-Friendly Airlines of 2009................................................................... 21 Pet Friendly Hotels: Help or Hindrance?................................................................ 22

Jordan Shaping Its Destiny........................................................................................... 42 Euromonitor: Travel and Tourism in Jordan........................................................ 44 Amman: Enchanting Mixture of Ancient & Modern............................................ 46 Wadi Rum: Vast, Echoing and God-like...................................................................... 48 Umm Al-Jimal: The Black Gem of the Desert............................................................ 50 Inbound Tour Operators. .................................................................................................. 52

MEDICAL

Fairs & Exhibitions

SeniorS opt for HealtH tourS

T r av e l / T o u r i s m

They are active, enthusiastic and free – the numbers of senior travelers keep going up and tourism industry needs to adjust its services fast. Many tour operators thus offer special tours only for seniors – no matter if the aim is simply to relax, get familiar with new destinations, boost one’s health or even go for some medical procedure.

MEDICAL: Seniors Opt for Health Tours.... 23 Adventure Travel: Prescription for Health......................................................... 24 A Range of Travel Options for Active Senior Travelers................................... 26 Elderly Patients & Booming Medical Tourism Industry.................................... 28 The Case of Mexico: Aging Baby Boomers Heading to the South.................... 30

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Fairs & Exhibitions: Travel/Tourism in JANUARY 2010 by regions........................................................ 54 Western Europe. ............................................................................................................... 55 CENTRAL Europe................................................................................................................. 57 North America.................................................................................................................. 58 Asia & Pacific...................................................................................................................... 59


H E R I TAG E

Virtual Travel: Let’s Go Online The latest hit of Google’s Street View – virtual Pompeii – is just one example of the growing trend among travelers. If you can’t get to your dreamed destination, explore it in its virtual version right from home..


H eritage : Vir t u al Trav el : L e t ’s G o O nline

Virtual Tourism: Jetsetting without the Plane Rides

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here are people gifted with excessive amounts of riches that they can afford to go and visit all the exciting destinations in the world. A few select people have jobs which allow them to live in airports figuratively because they have to go on various locations for business purposes. But well not everyone has that luxury.

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With the current state of the global recession, luxury and leisurely trips are cut down to a minimum. Companies are cost-cutting on travel expenses. Moreover, jet planes can have strong emissions of carbon which is harmful for the environment. So with all these mean world syndrome symptoms, what will happen to tourism?

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Enter virtual tourism. This is one of the perks that can be provided by commercial and free virtual worlds. Virtual tourism, fondly called 3DVT, uses the technology of the New Media, particularly the World Wide Web, to let people experience different parts of the world in the comfort of one’s seat. Call it armchair tourism if you want. This is another interesting aspect of virtual worlds which are only being explored recently. Virtual tourism employs satellite technology in order to render locations anywhere in the world in full three-dimensional glory. It enables people to have a walkthrough of the place only through their personal computer. Google Maps is one of the more popular Web 2.0 applications using this technology. Name any place in the map and virtual tourism just might take you there (with a few exceptions such as the Bermuda Triangle, for instance) So what types of scenarios and situations have been applying virtual tourism? Foremost of these would be the real estate industry. Because the time of buyers may be crucial for real estate agents, they can give a glimpse of the home through virtual tours. This is more useful especially for buyers looking for an attractive location for their families to settle in. Virtual tours can be used to show the environment of the place and how accessible it is to major thoroughfares and vital establishments. Some even dress up their virtual tours by putting in music and narration to the presentations. However, virtual tours are like animations in that the possibilities are endless. Because there is not


H eritage : Vir t u al Trav el : L e t ’s G o O nline

much consideration for logistics, virtual tours can extend to far-off places such as the moon and the planet Mars. With these applications one can experience how the soil can possibly look in these places. Google Moon was launched during the 36th anniversary of the moon landing of Neil Armstrong and Apollo 11 while the data from Mars were retrieved from the NASA missions of the Mars Global Surveyor and 2001 Mars Odyssey. There are more Google applications associated with virtual tourism: Google Ride Finder, Google Transit, Google My Maps, Google Street View and Google Latitude. Different purposes altogether, yes, but they strengthen the potential of virtual technologies and their integration with real life. This virtual aspect is a bit different from usual virtual worlds which create its own community for real-life people to come in and interact. Virtual tour-

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ism uses the technology of virtual worlds for reallife applications. It can give the impression that the real world can be turned into a virtual world-like environment which can be explored in many perspectives  – to even as close as street-level eye views. Although it will never be able to take the place of actual travel, virtual tourism is an excellent alternative option to consider especially if travel costs are an issue. By Aldric Chang Aldric Chang is the Founding Managing Director of the Mediafreaks group and is best described as a creative entrepreneur with business interests in internet marketing, virtual worlds for kids, animation, cartoons, interactive digital media, web 2.0 and music. http://blog.media-freaks.com

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H eritage : Vir t u al Trav el : L e t ’s G o O nline

Idaho Launched 3D Virtual Tourism System

In

November, the Idaho Division of Tourism launched a new 3D virtual tourism system, the SiteSeer3D, which will enhance tourism websites throughout the state with 3D mapping. At the heart of this system is an online database that generates content for the state’s flagship site, VisitIdaho.org. The site provides information on recreation, lodging and events throughout Idaho to consumers and links to tourism businesses and

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local chamber websites. With this enhanced technology, visitors to the site will be able to see aerial imagery of the particular tourism attraction or hotel they are searching for. The virtual tourism system allows the state to leverage its investment in mapping to websites throughout Idaho. This investment includes tourism data as well as underlying aerial imagery. As a result of an economic development grant from Avista

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Corporation, the system will include very high resolution aerial imagery for areas that have not previously been available. The system also enables tourism businesses to independently manage map content about their business and add their branding. For instance, businesses can indicate their location, upload their logo, add a link to their website and draw and label their features and amenities.


H eritage : Vir t u al Trav el : L e t ’s G o O nline

“Maps are the most popular feature on VisitIdaho. org,” said Karen Ballard, Administrator for the Division of Tourism. “The SiteSeer3D virtual tourism system gives context to our tourism industry and leverages the state’s investment in tourism-related information.” This new system has been developed by GeoData Technologies of Sandpoint, Idaho. GeoData Technologies is a recognized leader in geospatial search for the real estate and tourism industries and was recently endorsed by The Leading Real Estate Companies of the World. “Our SiteSeer3D virtual tourism system allows visitors to our State to visualize its natural beauty Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

and attractions in 3D on every tourism related website,” said Mark Williams, President of GeoData Technologies. “Businesses will have the tools to easily create 3D maps and publish them on other websites including VisitIdaho.org.” Because of its rich content, this system is expected to drive more visitors to tourism websites throughout Idaho. The content available in 3D includes: 3,000 attractions and events, 30,000 points of interest, 1,600 campgrounds and parks, 17,000 miles of hiking and biking trails, 6,000 miles of snowmobiling trails, and 400 boating sites. http://www.siteseer3d.com

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Ancient Pompeii Ruins Now on Google Street View

oogle’s Street View service, which lets you zoom into Google Maps and stroll through the city streets in a 3D environment, is amazing in its own right, but it just got twice as amazing with its latest addition. As part of its effort to move beyond roads, and map, in 3D, amusement parks, college campuses, and hiking trails, Google Street View has just added incredible, interactive panoramas of the ancient ruins of Pompeii. Pompeii — the ruined and partially buried Roman city near Naples, Italy — is one of the most amazing sights one can see in one’s lifetime. The city was destroyed during an eruption of the volcano Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D., but after it was rediscovered in 1738 and excavated in the late 19th century, it became one of the most important archaeological finds (and tourist attractions) of all time. Thick layers of volcanic ash kept the town in a remarkable state of preservation. Visitors (and now web surfers) can admire buildings, statues, wall paintings, graffiti, even furniture. The most eerie bits are the plaster casts of the eruption's many victims. Their bodies rotted away and left holes in the hardened ash. Modern archaeologists filled these with plaster to create ghostly images of men, women, and children perishing from suffocation. Thanks to the new images, now you can virtually explore the UNESCO world heritage site in Naples, Italy, with 360 degree horizontal views, and 290 vertical views. Meander through the ancient columns, inspect the worn rock, and clamber around Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

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H eritage : Vir t u al Trav el : L e t ’s G o O nline

the historic site on Google. Of course, the experience is not as good as actually visiting Pompeii in person, but it’s definitely the next best thing. Pompeii and its neighboring town of Herculaneum give an unparalleled look into the daily life of the Roman Empire. The Italian government hopes that having Pompeii on the web it will encourage more visitors.

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If that doesn't give you your fix of historic sightseeing, check out Google Street View's interactive view of Stonhenge, or for something totally different, see the Street View shots of Shamu, leaping dolphins, and more from SeaWorld. http://mashable.com http://www.huffingtonpost.com

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H eritage : Vir t u al Trav el : L e t ’s G o O nline

Second Life Experiment Shows the Benefits of Virtual Events

An

innovative initiative by two meetings and events industry associations has highlighted the ability of virtual events to enhance interaction with delegates and speakers. The findings stem from an educational event on the benefits and applications of Second Life technology, jointly organised by Eventia and the Institute of Travel and Meetings for their members. Entitled An Experiment With Second Life, the two associations ran the same content in both a real-life scenario at Event UK in Birmingham and through virtual Second Life technology the following day. They then surveyed delegates about their experience. Delegates scored registration and joining instructions 11% higher for the live event than the virtual, while speaker feedback was consistently better, with an average 9% higher scores in the real life event over the virtual. However, ease of interaction with delegates and speakers was scored higher in the virtual conference than in real life by 2% and 10% respectively. What’s more, those attending virtually would have expended approximately 690kg of CO2 by attending the real life event. Commenting on the experiment, Paul Tilstone, ITM CEO said: “Those who attended the virtual event seemed to comment very favourably on the format, but there are clearly some lessons to be learned on the engagement with delegates prior to the event, and people preferred hearing from speakers in the flesh. Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

“The statistics on interaction, however, are interesting as they demonstrates that virtual technology actually aids interaction rather than hindering it as one might expect, so clearly this aspect could drive the technology application for certain types of event.” Meanwhile, Eventia’s chief executive, Izania Downie, described the initiative as a really interesting exercise. “It demonstrates the exciting areas where we can work together as two associations, coming at the same space from different angles,” she said. “I think the results highlight that there is a po-

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tential application for the technology in the events arena, but the evidence to date seems to suggest it is predominantly on a complimentary basis to reallife events, and won’t replace the benefits people get from face-to-face interaction.” By Ian Whiteling http://meetingsreview.com


H eritage : Vir t u al Trav el : L e t ’s G o O nline

First Chinese 3D Virtual Tourism Site–Virtual Forbidden Palace What did I do over the last long weekend? Touring in the Forbidden City, literally. In 2008, IBM launched the first Chinese 3D virtual tourism platform–Beyond Space and Time (The Virtual Forbidden City). In partnership with the Forbidden Palace Museum, IBM invested 3 years of time and over 3 million dollars to re-construct a 3 dimensional replica of the world largest Imperial Palace standing today, the Forbidden City of China. The Forbidden City was built from 1406 to 1420, consists of 980 surviving buildings with 8,707 bays of rooms and covers 720,000 square metres. It is also the largest collection of preserved ancient wooden structures in the world. Similar to the Great Wall of China, Forbidden City has been the one of the "must see" tourism places in China. The Virtual Forbidden City enables visitors to interact with others and with a growing knowledge base of the historical site. Learning materials are being generated by tourists, volunteers, staff and data collecting scripts. As they explore the Virtual Forbidden City, visitors can choose to simply observe the buzz of activity, participate in activities that provide insights into important aspects of the Chinese history, or even take guided tours that uncover new insights into the stories of the Forbidden City. It's a combination of 3D Simulation and Machinima experience. There are also a few mini-games embedded in the exotic gardens and amazing architectures to keep the audiences entertained. Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

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H eritage : Vir t u al Trav el : L e t ’s G o O nline

Expert’s Opinion Good: The Virtual Forbidden City is the perfect way to improve your Chinese culture knowledge not only by reading, but also by experiencing and interacting with other persons. The 3D representation gives you a very real space and time feeling. Not only will you be able to take a relaxed tour, but it will also be private and you won’t have to wait in line. Bad: Although the application seems to be encouraging the development of a community of the Forbidden City enthusiasts, the forum discussions are mostly in Chinese, which makes it very difficult to follow if you are a foreign visitor. Softpedia.com

To get started, go to the Registration Page to get an account and an avatar icon. This will allow you to save, share your virtual tourism experience with others. During your visit you will be represented within the Virtual Forbidden City by a figure known as an avatar. Your avatar can take the form of any of several people dressed in Qing era clothing. Registered users can select any of the available avatars and your choice will be saved for future visits. Upon the completion of the simple registration process, you will be lead to a page that allows you to download the software which will run the Virtual Forbidden City tour on your computer. Please note, you don't have to have a registered account, you may visit it as a guest after installing the software.

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To help you find your way during your visits, maps are available to both show you your current location and a history of your journey, and also to help you find interesting places to explore. You can find majestic halls, animated scenes from Qing life, and even activities that give you an opportunity to learn by interacting with computer controlled characters. Another excellent way to explore is to join your fellow visitors on one of the many guided tours that wind throughout the Virtual Forbidden City. These tours cover a range of interesting topics and lead you to places that help explore important themes about the design and use of the Forbidden City.

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As you explore, there are many ways to gain a deeper understanding of the things that you encounter. Many of the most impressive artifacts and buildings have additional information and even photos available to provide a deeper understanding of their purpose and construction–when available, the information is only a mouse-click away. To get an even closer look at the intricate details of select items, you can virtually hold a copy of them in your hands.

http://www.beyondspaceandtime.org http://blog.loaz.com


P rofessio n a l Pet Friendly Holidays

Millions of people all around the world share their homes with loving pets – dogs, cats, birds, lizards and many more. The trouble comes when you want to travel. Should you take your friend with you? Is it possible, anyway?


P rof e s si ona l : Pe t Fr i e nd ly Holi d ay s

Dog Friendly Opportunities

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necdotal evidence shows many dog owners don’t go on holiday because they don’t know what possibilities exist to take their best friends with them. Potential day trippers stay at home, or don’t venture to enjoy a meal after a day out, because they don’t know there are lots of places that will welcome their dog. The truth is there’s ample opJa nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

portunity in the dog friendly tourism sector; it’s just a case of drawing it to the attention of responsible dog owners. Dogpeople Limited, inspired by Hamish (the director’s Airedale Terrier) has something of a mission to help dog lovers find what they’ve been miss-

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ing. They’ve been working on it since 2002. The segment is significant with an estimated 5.7M dog owning households in the UK alone (data from The Pet Food Manufacturers Association). Pet passports freed up opportunity for dogs to travel to and from the UK; British dogs can now travel to Europe and European dogs can enjoy Britain too. EU regulations, on topics like food hygiene (EC 852/204), help intra-European dog loving tourists enjoy consistency of expectation (although not strictly the case, mostly for cultural reasons, dog owning diners should enjoy similar access in Inverness, Keswick, Brecon, Gerardmer or Rimini). So what’s involved in attracting a slice of this steadily growing tourism and leisure segment? Clearly the basic product has to be right, whether accommodation, ‘attraction’ or catering. Businesses have to make their minds about how to position their offer but, if they want to attract dog owners too, they will need to understand their potential needs. Dogpeople developed a unique dog friendly rating system to help its advertisers understand the likely issues and to help them differentiate themselves from the competition. The system can also help guests be responsible during their visit. It draws attention to a range of services many dog owners will find useful including walks and veterinary information, facility to eat breakfast (and other meals) accompanied by one’s dog and emergency food supplies or ‘scoop bags’ in case owners forget to pack them. Providing guests with as much up to date relevant information as possible – both positive and ‘negative’ – enables them to make good choices and generates customer satisfaction by avoiding disappointment. Dog owners too should think carefully about their dogs’ needs on holiday. Firstly there’s the journey. Make sure your dog is properly secured in the car (for both his safety and yours), plan sufficient stops and ensure fresh water is available for him (The


P rof e s si ona l : Pe t Fr i e nd ly Holi d ay s

Blue Cross provide a range of information leaflets, including one on moving home and travelling with your dog). If travelling to or from the UK you’ll need to plan your Channel crossing and find out about pet passport arrangements. Different carriers have different arrangements, some are more dog friendly than the others. Brittany Ferries have thought through the issues and provide information on both the Pet Travel Scheme and its own pet transport conditions. You’ll need to think about your destination, does it have what you need for a canine inclusive holiday or day out? Finally don’t forget to do the dog’s packing for him; among other things he’ll need his usual food, his bed, his lead and scoop bags, some treats and maybe a toy or two. Some accommodation providers make additional charges for dogs but these are generally small

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compared to kenneling. If you take your dog with you on holiday or a short break neither the family, nor you nor the dog will incur the emotional cost of leaving him behind. What is also important, you’ll all enjoy the experience more for being together. There are literally hundreds of cottages, holiday parks, hotels and guest houses who will be delighted to welcome guests with their pets. There are also many pubs (and other places to eat), heritage sites and other attractions that will be pleased to entertain responsible dog owners. Opportunity is plentiful, so too are potential visitors – a well known website is a perfect vehicle for putting the two together and keeping important information up to date. By Alan Nutten (Dogpeople director) www.dogpeople.co.uk

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P rof e s si ona l : Pe t Fr i e nd ly Holi d ay s

Pet Tourism – Challenges and Prospects

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ets are part of the family and the human-pet bond is strong with each partner enriching from the relationship. Pets provide company, security, pleasure and affection to their owners who often carry their picture, believe in their sensitivity, ‘talk’ to them and sometimes allow them in the bedroom. The presence of pets during short visits/long holidays is an established norm and ongoing popu-

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lar fascination since the Second World War. Dogs and cats make popular holidaying companions to smaller pets as birds, rabbits, squirrels, tortoises, hamsters, tropical fish, etc. In U.K., around 2 million dogs and 1 million pets go on annual holidays. Hence, it makes business sense for the tourism industry to accommodate and make the pets feel at home.

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Many pets are debarred in hotels due to risks from allergies and diseases, disturbance to guests, damage to furniture, sanitation and safety issues or allowed against pet fee/night or security deposit. Tour promotion materials as brochures, pamphlets and travel pages in newspapers carry little information on pet holidays. However, “Travelling with Pets Guide” and “Holidaying with Dogs” targeted for pet audiences list pet-friendly properties and sometimes regionally accessible facilities (as PetFriendlyHotels.com and petravel.com). Despite the age of global connectivity, comprehensive pet websites are almost limited and lack in vital information. Research data on pet tourism is practically absent and in the developing world pet tourism is yet to gain momentum. Overseas pet travel is often cumbersome. Airlines permit healthy pets with a vet certificate, subject to specific age and weight regulations. Despite International Air Transport Association (IATA) guidelines, individual companies set rules; e.g. American Airlines only accepts cats and dogs (in cabin and cargo), Delta also accepts ferrets, rab-


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bits, hamsters and guinea pigs while Southwest does not accept any. As regards cruises, only the Queen Mary II allows pets on longer voyages besides a few other European ferry liners and smaller local services which are rather pet friendly. On railways, the Amtrak (U.S.A.) does not allow pets other than service animals. Dogs are allowed in France, Germany and Italy (unlike Spain, Norway and Finland) if co-passengers do not complain or put in a travelling container, made to wear a muzzle and a leash. No pets are permitted on the Eurostar. Most coaches prohibit pets and even animal taxi services

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prefer ‘lap dogs’. Pets to U.K. under the Pet Travel Scheme require being ISO microchipped, vaccinated against rabies and blood tested. Quarantine periods are mandatory for pets from countries with high incidence of rabies. Translations of travel documents and customs formalities are also essential from non-EU to EU nations. Despite these limitations, the pet care industry seems booming business availed by a multiplying healthier, ‘cashed up’ senior population. Diverse pet services as hydro bath, professional grooming, in-house training, etc., are available. Luxury resorts

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as the Las Ventanas al Paraiso in Mexico offer special programmes with thoughtfully designed feline and canine menus, special diets served on pet ware and even pet massages. Many posh hotels offer dog suites with artificial fur covers, TV, ceiling fan and light, soothing music and also complementary playtime sessions. Pet weddings, exclusive dog holidays, advice on dog walking services are all reality. Presently, up-scale hotels, self-catering properties, country cottages, farm houses, caravan parks and B&B’s are becoming more pet friendly  – a  clear indication of changing business practices. Likewise, VisitBritian's Pet Welcome Scheme has outlined strategies to make pet stay more comfortable. There are more dog friendly beaches now and many parks, castles and museums allow leashed pets on supervision. Nonetheless, a myopic vision of pets as only dogs and cats exists to this day. It is always advisable to check if your exotic pet – Lester the lizard or Bingo the Burmese python is welcome too; more so in face of changing hotel policies. In the ongoing economic downturn the importance of the pet industry as one of the fastest growing sectors in reaping rich dividends cannot be overlooked and needs to be tapped effectively for carving out a distinct niche for pet tourism. After all, it cannot be denied that the future of tourism is four legs, not two. By Ilika Chakravarty Ph.D Academy of Business Management, Tourism and Research, Bangalore, India 27, Hazeltree Croft Acocks Green B27 7XS Birmingham West Midlands UK ilika_c@yahoo.com


P rof e s si ona l : Pe t Fr i e nd ly Holi d ay s

Be Responsible and Get Ready for Your Doggy Vacation

© godfer / Fotolia

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hen on vacation, every member of the family should find time for those precious moments which are all too rare in everyday life: above all rest and relaxation. But fun and adventure must also be part of your vacation. Dogs are intensely social animals and as such they are an integral part of a family. It is important to dogs that they are surrounded by familiar people. Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

This is why they should be taken into careful consideration when vacations are being planned. Dogs and their masters can spend a wonderful vacation taking walks and frolicking in the fresh air at the seaside. Long walks and cuddling with your dog in the evening can make your vacation extra special. When travelling with a dog, the following points must be considered: Travel itineraries should be

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discussed in advance with your vet. If your dog requires medication, make sure to put it in the first aid travel kit. When travelling abroad you must not forget your dog's EU domestic animal ID, which is issued by the vet. The medical certificate concerning your dog's rabies vaccination must be included in this ID. Dogs also require an identification number in the form of a microchip. Until 2011 the animal’s identification can also be determined by means of a tattoo. This law is designed to prevent the introduction and distribution of rabies. Liability insurance including an insurance number must also not be forgotten. Luggage should contain: vaccination card, collar and extra leash (name, home address and the address of your accommodation), if required: muzzle, brushes, combs and other care products, water and food bowl, tin opener, pre-packaged food, basket, toys, beach gear: parasol, cover, towel and some treats. The journey to your destination must be well organised for the sake of your dog. Travelling by air, for instance, is an unusual experience for dogs. Your vet may prescribe in advance a light tranquillizer for nervous animals. Dogs that are not heavier than four to eight kilos may travel in a basket in the passenger’s cabin but bigger dogs must travel in the luggage hold below. Providing your dog is well accustomed to long car rides, travelling by car should cause no major problems. It is important though to make provi-


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© Martin Valigursky / Fotolia

© falkjohann / Fotolia

sions for breaks. The car is a home on the move for your dog but it is important that you know your dog well and can judge what is a reasonable journey duration. For older dogs it might be better to reach your holiday destination in two rather than five hours. Upon arrival you should take some time to get to know your new surroundings for your dog’s sake and serve its usual food. This will ensure your dog feels secure and well. The following advice may facilitate acclimatization to new surroundings. Firstly it is important that

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the climate of the destination fits the requirements of your dog. In this respect, Scandinavian countries offer fantastic vacations for both dog and master. In the Netherlands, dogs are sometimes permitted to run around freely on beaches and beach bars often have toy balls and food bowls for sale. Southern countries are only advisable in the off-season because the higher temperatures may be uncomfortable for your dog. Before travelling to southern countries, dog owners should familiarize themselves with possible risks and vaccinations. Dogs travelling to the Medi-

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terranean should wear a scalibor collar. The active agent in the collar protects against Leishmaniose disease and fends off parasites. However, it is advisable to test the collar in advance at home. Furthermore, a tick collar protects against the infectious disease Babesiose, which is commonly known as dog’s malaria. So once your vacation with your beloved dog has been well planned and organised, there is nothing which stands in the way of a relaxing and carefree vacation! By Gonhild Pirch (CASAMUNDO GMBH) CASAMUNDO features more than fifty thousand holiday homes of every variety, in locations throughout Europe and the USA. The wealth of experience in the tourism industry has taught the company how to provide holidays with a difference. The helpful customer advisors, proven techniques and safe booking process make CASAMUNDO your ideal holiday partner, providing a service you can trust. http://www.casamundo.co.uk


P rof e s si ona l : Pe t Fr i e nd ly Holi d ay s

Top 5 Most Pet-Friendly Airlines of 2009 Are

you planning your next vacation with your beloved pet and need to fly? What airlines allow large dogs, rabbits, or birds? What are the costlier ones and what are budget friendly? Petfinder.com named the top five pet-friendliest airlines of 2009. 1. Continental – Safety First Continental is proud of its PetSafe program, which has a 24-hour Live Animal Desk (1-800575-3335) that tracks the pets from origin to destination. It's pricier than other programs, but it's climate-controlled, allows roomy carriers and has designated cargo staff. Travelers using PetSafe can even earn miles. The airline also allows small cats, dogs, pet rabbits and household birds to be carried in the cabin on most domestic flights for $125 each way. Pets allowed in cabin: Small dogs, cats, rabbits and birds Pets allowed as checked baggage: No Pets allowed in cargo: Yes, all pets that are checked travel in climate-controlled cargo, not as checked baggage 2. JetBlue Airways – Full-Service Pet Love JetBlue really embraced pet-toting travelers when it launched JetPaws in summer 2008. For no additional cost, JetBlue provides a pet carrier bag tag, two TrueBlue points each way, a welcome email and a free pet-travel guide. However, like other Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

airlines, JetBlue has hiked its in-cabin pet charge: one-way fees range from $75 to $100. Pets allowed in cabin: Small cats and dogs Pets allowed as checked baggage: No Pets allowed in cargo: No 3. Airtran – Budget-Friendly Airtran won't make you break the bank to fly with your pet beside you (well, technically, under your seat). It's currently the least-expensive airline to fly with your small pet: just $69 each way. Pets allowed in cabin: Small dogs, cats and birds Pets allowed as checked baggage: No Pets allowed in cargo: No 4. American Airlines – Zoo-Trusted American Airlines' animal-trained staff has assisted in transporting animals from popular zoos in cargo. While they only allow a limited number of pets in the cabin, they ask pet parents to make special notes for their animal companions flying in cargo and promise to abide by all requests. Pets allowed in cabin: Small dogs and cats Pets allowed as checked baggage: Yes, larger dogs and cats Pets allowed in cargo: Yes 5. United Airlines – Non-Discriminating United Airlines loves animals of all kinds. They accept small cats, dogs and birds in the cabin; rabbits,

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hamsters and guinea pigs as checked baggage and other animals including parrots, cockatiels and ferrets in United Cargo. (Shipping by cargo is for items, like some pets, that you can't check as baggage. Your pet may or may not be on the aircraft with you.) Have a short-nosed dog that you can't bring in the cabin? Check your date of flight; some breeds and mixes are not allowed in cargo or as checked baggage from June 1 through September 30 of each year. Pets allowed in cabin: Small cats, dogs and birds Pets allowed as checked baggage: Depends on the aircraft Pets allowed in cargo: Yes; however, the type of animal allowed depends on destination and arrival locations http://www.petfinder.com


P rof e s si ona l : Pe t Fr i e nd ly Holi d ay s

Pet Friendly Hotels: Help or Hindrance? Europe and the United States. Some say that they have good reasons for this. Cleaners have been known to complain strongly about the presence of pets in hotel rooms, particularly about the fact that the carpet needs to be shampooed on a regular basis and that in-depth cleaning is required much more frequently than for humans. Similarly, although special sleeping areas are usually provided for pets, they often sleep in the same bed as their owners, leading to further problems for the hotel cleaning staff. Another problem surrounds dogs being unattended and barking in rooms. Extra fees for pets tend to compensate for such problems, which arise on a regular basis. However, there is still a huge number of pet owners who wish to go on holiday with their pets. Hence, the P.A.W. (Pets Are Welcome) sign is a frequent sight at many hotel receptions. After all, money is money and the objection is to please the customer.

In

the past three years, an average of 14% of US adults has travelled more than 50 miles on a holiday or trip with their pets. This means that over a million have dared to take their four-legged friends on holiday outings. It is important to say that a lot more would do the same if they thought that their pets would be allowed to enter every hotel and restaurant they were to visit. Indeed, the pet-friendly approach is still quite alien to many large hotel chains around Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

Top 5 Pet-Friendly Budget Hotel Chains 1. Motel 6 2. La Quinta Inns & Suites 3. Red Roof Inn 4. Best Western 5. Candlewood Suites

Hotels have even been known to introduce “pet in room” signs for door in the “do not disturb” mould. Furthermore, grooming services have been made available along with a host of other pet-related services such as dog walking and room service with water bowls. The debate as to whether this should be allowed or not in public places continues to be a hot topic.

Petside.com

http://www.tourism-review.com

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MEDICAL Seniors Opt for Health Tours

They are active, enthusiastic and free – the numbers of senior travelers keep going up and tourism industry needs to adjust its services fast. Many tour operators thus offer special tours only for seniors – no matter if the aim is simply to relax, get familiar with new destinations, boost one’s health or even go for some medical procedure.


M e dica l : S e ni or s O pt for He alth Tour s

Adventure Travel: Prescription for Health

The

next time you head out for a vacation, or just have some free time, consider an active trip in the great outdoors. Whether you head out for a walk in your local park or journey to the Everest Base Camp in Nepal, you’ll come back feeling better – mentally, physically and emotionally. Since 1987 I’ve been leading small group adventures for those who are 50 years of age and better to

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more than 30 destinations around the world. We’ve traveled close to home in Colorado and to the far corners of the planet, including Central and South America, Canada, Europe, Asia and New Zealand. Regardless of the destination, time spent with friends and family exploring the wild outdoors provides an uplifting, soul calming connection with self, others and the land that few other experiences can match.

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People come back to our trips time and time again. Why? What is it about active travel in the outdoors that is so enticing to us? Beauty, exploration, meaningful connection to self and others, risk, challenge and accomplishment: these are some of the ingredients that make adventure travel one of the fastest growing segments in the world of travel. We grew up, so to speak, in the great outdoors. Our nights were spent around the warmth and security of a campfire with family and friends. By day we were out exploring the land, rivers and forests around us. We were actively involved in every aspect of our lives. Our senses had to be fully awake and we had to be fully aware of our surroundings and intimately connected to those around us. In fact, life required it. There was risk and challenge, yes. Granted, sometimes the risk and challenge were too much, but it was what kept us connected to ourselves, to others and to the world around us. In today’s society the pendulum of risk and challenge has swung in the opposite direction. Now most of us live in climate controlled indoor environments where someone else takes care of most of the daily requirements of life. Food is easily obtained at the grocery, cars move us from place to place and we can do our work without deeply connecting with those around us. We’ve forgotten who we are to some degree. We’ve forgotten our strengths. Forgotten that we are far more capable and strong than we ever be-


M e dica l : S e ni or s O pt for He alth Tour s lieved. Because of this we often limit what we do in our lives, including the kind of vacations and activities we pursue in our later years. The reality is that we can do almost anything we set our minds to. We can have almost any adventure we’re willing to prepare for. The challenge is usually more mental than physical. I’ve seen evidence of this time and again, particularly on one of my favorite trails in Arches National Park in Utah, the Delicate Arch trail. It’s a short trail, 1.5 miles one-way, with a moderate uphill grade. At one point we round a large sandstone fin and are rewarded with a magnificent view of Delicate Arch. However, between the arch and our viewpoint, the trail traverses a short section of fairly steep downward sloping sandstone. While not a vertical cliff, one still has to stop and think before moving forward. At this point in the trail, a few of the group members will say that looking at the Arch from a distance is good enough, that they don’t need to actually reach the arch. My philosophy is to gently encourage each group member to push past his or her perceptions of the difficulty and walk to the arch. Often I’ll walk with them, either walking down slope, to help provide confidence that they’ll be safe in the process. While the distance is small, the shift in mental perception can be great. However, once the decision is made to go forward, and once the arch is reached, life changes, almost instantly. A mental shift occurs. Words like “I can’t believe I did that” and “I wish my kids could see me now” bubble forth. It’s like a whole new world has opened up for these individuals. These same individuals who a moment before were hesitant to walk a short distance to Delicate Arch would now willingly try almost anything. A great many activities can constitute an adventure, regardless of how fit or old a person may be. Rafting down a river, whether actively paddling or Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

In 1985-1986 I served as one of 25 staff for the President’s Commission on Americans Outdoors (PCAO) in Washington, D.C. Our charge was to look ahead for the next 25 years at the state of outdoor recreation and natural resources in the United States and recommend policy to the President and Congress. Research from the PCAO showed a high positive correlation between participation in group outdoor activities and “adjustment to late adulthood and retirement.” As we retire and begin to feel some of the effects of aging, including loss of family and friends and even some of our physical strength, it’s important to maintain a positive mental outlook on life. One way to do that is to head to the wild outdoors, to walk or travel at an enjoyable pace in areas of great beauty with friends and family. The memories we form from active travel in the outdoors when our soul is opened to new vistas, when our muscles are awakened to new strength and when our hearts are touched by others are the deep, enriching memories that carry us through all times. Take a walk on the wild side and you’ll be happier…and healthier. Go out. Seek new adventures…and go out NOW! not, still provides the thrill of the rapids, allows one to feel the coolness of the river and the heat of the sun, hear the roar of the rapids, interact with other passengers, get wet and be exposed to the sublime beauty of a river canyon. Even such a seemingly passive experience opens an individual to the richness of the outdoor environment. Memories are formed, and life is richer for the experience. So the next time you’re planning a vacation or just have a short period of time available, open yourself to new experiences. Let yourself be challenged. Allow a little bit of risk to accompany you on whatever activity you choose. Your life will be richer. Enjoy the experience with a small group of friends or family and your enjoyment will be that much greater.

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By Ward Luthi Walking The World is the premier adventure travel program for those who are 50 years of age and better. Since 1987 we've been offering high-quality, small group adventures to more than 30 destinations worldwide. Our goal is to help you experience the beauty and culture of the world's best destinations. Every trip has been fully scouted in advance, is accompanied by two guides, one a local guide intimately familiar with the people and places we visit and a Walking The World guide to help make sure your trip is safe and memorable. Each trip also includes great fun, great friendships and great adventures. http://www.walkingtheworld.com


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A Range of Travel Options for Active Senior Travelers

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ellness travel has no limits, especially when it comes to age. It’s becoming easier for the 60-plus to venture to vacation destinations with health goals in mind. For those seeking a healthy and wholesome way to spend a week or longer, Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

there is a broad range of travel options. From tours and retreats to getaways and medical centres, active seniors can combine leisurely trips with healing experiences that include relaxation in mineral waters, energy renewal through yoga or massage, and detoxification of the body with holistic treatments. Here’s a sampling of health retreats and tours that cater to the wellness-minded 60-plus traveler:

body needs. The four-day retreat is designed to boost energy levels through increased flexibility, strength and balance. Workshops connect yoga to daily routines, emphasizing how yogic principles produce lifestyle changes. The getaway also focuses on improving concentration levels through a simple meditation technique. Participants are also encouraged to take daily nature walks through the nearby meadows and forests trails.

Binh Chau Hot Spring seniors’ health tour Ba Ria-Vung Tau, Vietnam Thirty-three hectares of hot springs in coastal forest air is the setting for this health recovery tour designed expressly for seniors. The Ben Thanh Tourist Company offers a two-day trip through the Binh Chau Hot Spring Resort and Vung Tau City. Located about 150 kilometers from Ho Chi Minh City, the springs have natural wells as hot as 83 degrees Celsius. Testing the waters – guests buy eggs at the resort and lower them into small hot pools where they boil within 10-minutes. Services include hot mud baths, massages and soaks in hot mineral waters for relaxation.

Space Age Natural Health & Beauty Care Centre Mumbai, India The SpaceAge Natural Health and Beauty Care Centre combines a vacation with a clinic offering holistic, herbal and natural treatments. This centre caters to medical tourists by offering a comprehensive preventive health checkup. Promising to address all chronic health issues, the clinic specializes in detoxification and rejuvenation of the body. Intracellular nutritional treatments focus on cardiac problems and other medical conditions such as diabetes, arthritis and body

Active Seniors’ Yoga Getaway Nevada City, California Nestled in the spiritual community of Ananda Village, located in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains just outside Nevada City, this retreat combines gentle yoga techniques with meditation practices. Cardiac yoga instructors teach guests how to customize yoga postures to suit their own

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M e dica l : S e ni or s O pt for He alth Tour s is working with the National Research Council looking at the health and healing powers of plants in the area. Hills Health Ranch produces its own Rosehip oil used in spa services like scrubs, facials and antiaging treatments. Because the plants grow wild in a pristine environment, the resort says the rosehips have higher than average levels of nutrients.

aches. The clinic also offers anti-aging medicine for all age groups and immunity-boosting programs. The Centre says it does not use drugs, chemicals or synthetic hormones in any of the treatments. Hills Health Ranch Mile Ranch, British Columbia Surrounded by ranchland and wilderness in the B.C. interior, this spa-vacation resort combines outdoor adventures with spa treatments, nutritional counseling, daily fitness programs (such as yoga, Pilates and aerobic classes) and other health and wellness options. Guests can opt to receive guidance from professionals including kinesiologists, body therapists and lifestyle counselors. The spa

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Ban Ing Nam Health Resort and Spa Bangkok, Thailand Fruit orchards, exotic plants and bird life surround this holistic health resort located within an hour’s drive of Bangkok. This resort tailors its programs to the individual requirements of guests. For seniors, those requirements might include high blood pressure control, diabetes management and cardiovascular programs. Fitness activities, like aquatic exercise, also cater to an older guest. Tropical gardens surround the spa, which offers body treatments that include traditional Thai, hot stone and reflexology massages. Wellness health, medical fitness and dietary consultation assessments are available as are scheduled classes such as meditation, Tai Chi and healthy cooking. By Kristy Thomson (Travel to Wellness) Travel to Wellness is a print and online magazine focusing on spas, fitness adventures, culinary activities and other wellness-minded pursuits. Sign up for the free newsletter. http://www.traveltowellness.com

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Elderly Patients & Booming Medical Tourism Industry positively impacted incoming tourist receipts by boosting average spend per visitor and reversed the general trend towards shorter, more frequent breaks. It has also provided an element of stability to the travel and tourism market, as activities are generally in-door thus avoiding the problems and fluctuations of seasonality.

Western Europeans Go East for Medical Treatment

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evolution of the spa concept has, to a certain extent, contributed to the idea of travelling either domestically or abroad in search of medical treatment. It is worth noting, however, that there are many other factors behind medical tourism including the high costs of medical treatment and/or the lack of specialised labour in a home country. Those coupled with the change in demo-

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graphics and the expansion of the elderly population in many regions of the world gave space to a booming medical tourism industry.

Nations Healing Other Nations Many countries now actively market themselves as health and wellness destinations. This further expansion of health and wellness tourism has

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As Western baby boomers go to seed, Eastern European travel and healthcare providers prepare to reap a bumper harvest. As the Western baby boom generation reaches retirement age, the market for both medical and health and wellness tourism is growing. With more cash and free time than ever before the over 50s are looking to enjoy themselves and look after their health. Medical and therapy healthcare provision is often very expensive or inadequate in major Western markets at home, so advanced but more economical facilities in Eastern European countries are moving to supply the need. Previously, the state provision of healthcare in ex-communist countries was very good, and many healthcare professionals, sanatoriums and other facilities have been operating for many years. The process of refurbishment to international standards goes on and many hospitals, clinics and dental surgeries are now doing a roaring trade with Western European health tourists heading east for treatment, lured by the lower surgical costs com-


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Health & wellness tourism Forecast (Retail Value RSP–US$ bn) 2008 2009 2010

Asia Pacific Australasia Eastern Europe Latin America Middle East and Africa North America Western Europe

26.8 27.3 27.7 2.1 2.1 2.0 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.4 3.4 3.6 5.6 5.8 6.2 5.0 5.1 5.2 19.1 19.2 19.5

Euromonitor International, 2009

the UK and Europe and medical treatments cost much less. Most common treatments are heart surgery, knee transplant, cosmetic surgery and dental care.

Americans Travel Abroad to Save Money on Healthcare Treatments

bined with cheap travel opportunities. Fortunately, for many of the Eastern European countries, this development underpins the rapid development of local tourism industries.

The Rise of India as a Medical Tourism Destination India became a major medical tourism destination over the last five years period. According to Euromonitor International, this is explained by the fact that the country has some of the best hospitals and treatment centres in the world. Additionally, the technology adopted corresponds to that in the US,

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As healthcare and insurance costs soar in the US, more people are opting for medical and dental care treatment abroad, thousands of miles from home. Medical tourism became increasingly popular in recent years fuelled by the internet, ease of travel, shorter wait times for appointments and greater international sharing of medical "best practices" outside the US. Additionally, it is also noteworthy that even companies, anxious to lower care costs, are driving the trend by urging people to be treated in one of a growing number of countries that cater to foreign patients.

(Extract from Euromonitor International’s report “Health and Wellness Tourism–World”) http://www.euromonitor.com

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M e dica l : S e ni or s O pt for He alth Tour s

The Case of Mexico: Aging Baby Boomers Heading to the South The

Baby Boomers are best known for the non-conformity of the 1960s when they stood up to a government and a society that they found oppressive. It comes as no surprise that the Baby Boomers continue to redefine what it means to stand up and say no in today's world through their fight against unfair healthcare fees in the United States. More than ever before, American Baby Boomers are flooding south into Mexico hospitals for procedures ranging from the complex and cutting edge to some of the oldest standards that medicine has to offer. In fact, some are even choosing to receive checkups during medical travel to Mexico rather than maintaining a regular doctor stateside. These changes save Baby Boomers hundreds or even thousands of dollars in medical bills every year, even after considering the low cost of airfare between the U.S. and the Mexico hospitals in question.

Financial Wisdom: Lower Costs across the Border In America, any doctor has to contend with a myriad of financial constraints that threaten his or her practice and livelihood. Insurance agencies have a large industry presence, crowding out doctors that try to avoid participating in the insurer's costly plans. The result is rising prices for the patient, and increased co-pay amounts due to lower insurance coverage. In short, the amount covered by insurance is falling just as the amount charged Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

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M e dica l : S e ni or s O pt for He alth Tour s

by doctors and hospitals is rising. For many Baby Boomers, retirement expenses do not allow them to cover this gap. Luckily, there are hospitals available just across the border. With medical travel in Mexico, these men and women are able to get the care they need without paying too much for it. They are able to maintain their health without completely losing control of their finances. The main differences between Mexico hospitals and U.S. facilities are the control that insurance companies have over the market and the general cost of living in the area. In Mexico, the medical care industry is not dominated by private insurance or the publicly traded corporations behind it. Doctors are free to set prices as they choose, based upon what they believe their services are worth. There is no upward pressure on prices, and so they remain at a reasonable

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level. The best hospitals typically charge 40%-60% less than the best American hospitals, and 90% of medical travel patients reported in a survey by the Medical Travel Association that the level of care offered was not only comparable to the US, but many times superior. Because of the way Mexican health care is structured, doctors are less burdened and thus able to pass on the good prices to medical travelers. Lower cost of living also plays a role. Doctors tend to charge partially based on what they need to survive, and on what their practice needs in order to stay abreast of the latest technology. In Mexico hospitals, all these costs are lower. From the cost of medical school education to building construction, wages and daily utilities, to some of the most recent equipment technology purchases, Mexican doctors pay less, and medical travel in Mexico reflects those savings as well.

Skilled Surgeons One of the strengths Baby Boomers are noticing in Mexico hospitals is their ability to offer cutting edge treatments, such as spinal stabilization surgery and multifocal LASIK for presbyopia. Many of the doctors these Boomers choose have actually trained alongside the leading U.S. experts, and have the same degree of skill. The Boomers are getting the same quality of care, but the cost is tens of thousands of dollars lower.

A Comfortable Place to Recover In the past, some Boomers might have been concerned to spend the night so far from home.

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But as hospitals have continued to develop, they have become almost indistinguishable from any American hospital. Spending the night after medical travel in Mexico is no different from the night after a surgery stateside, the only difference is that home is a plane ride away rather than a car trip. However, few Boomers seem to be bothered by the idea of distance. In fact, many report better treatment in private Mexico hospitals than in U.S. facilities. Staff is said to be more attentive, doctors more caring, and nurses more focused, with a lower ratio of nurses to patients. Overall, medical travel in Mexico produces as many positive responses in the Boomers as medical treatment in the U.S. and in many cases produces far more.

The Big Picture The Baby Boomers are the first aging generation to have access to the excellent private Mexico hospitals provided by medical travel in Mexico, and they are taking full advantage of everything that America's southern neighbor has to offer. From dental care to checkups to major surgery, the Baby Boomers are filling Mexico's state-of-the-art medical facilities and reaping the rewards. And in the face of rising costs at home, it seems unlikely that they will be returning to their local doctors any time soon. By Paulo Yberri (Angeles Health International) http://ezinearticles.com


TRANSPORT Airport Hubs: To Be or Not to Be

Airport hubs are highly important    for country’s economy. They are the gate to the world outside. Let’s have a look at the latest   developments at Denver, Mumbai or even Lima airports.


T ran sp ort: Air p or t Hub s : To B e or Not to B e

Online Booking and Web Check-In P o pu l ar at M um bai International Airport Atlanta, the world's busiest airport, where the rate was 32.2.%. Overall, preference towards self-service check-in continues to grow at Mumbai up from 60% last year to 68.9% this year compared to a global average of 62.9% across the six airports surveyed. The PSS Survey is an in-depth look at the attitudes and habits of a representative sample of the 232 million passengers who use these six leading international airports: Mumbai International; Sao Paulo Guarulhos, Brazil; Hartsfield-Jackson, Atlanta; Charles de Gaulle, Paris; Moscow Domodedovo; and OR Tambo Airport, Johannesburg. The data is extracted from interviews with 2,193 passengers conducted at the departure gates earlier this year.

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global benchmark survey of leading airport hubs has found that the rates of online booking and web check-in are among the highest in the world at Mumbai International Airport. The 4th annual SITA/Air Transport World Passenger Self-Service Survey (PSS) found that the preference for online booking was higher (77.9%) among Mumbai passengers than at any of the six

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international gateways included in this year's survey. The actual usage rate was 65.9% among those interviewed which is above the global average of 63.7% and an increase from 61.7% recorded at Mumbai during last year's survey. Mumbai also stands out because of the popularity of web check-in which was used by 25.6% of passengers – a rate which was only exceeded by

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The big news for the industry is that the survey completely justifies those airlines who are investing heavily in their web sites and ancillary service offerings. The proportion of passengers buying ancillary services through airline web sites is expected to double in the coming years. In addition, there has been a 20% increase overall in the adoption of self-service facilities which are seen as an essential part of having a pleasant trip and avoiding queues.


T ran sp ort: Air p or t Hub s : To B e or Not to B e

The number one reason cited by Mumbai passengers for not using self-service check-in was that they had bags to check-in (45.2%) as many of them did not see the value of self-service checkin options if they had to go an agent desk to drop off bags. Some also believe that it is not possible or too complicated to use self-service check-in options when there are bags to be checked in. Maneesh Jaikrishna, SITA Director for India and South Asia, said: "This year's survey found that there was a significant increase in both aware-

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ness and availability of self-service check-in for passengers using Mumbai. Awareness of the selfservice option is now almost at 80% and continues to grow." The survey also found that passengers are spending more through airline web sites on ancillary services such as hotels and car hire and their numbers are expected to double. In Mumbai, over 40% of passengers use airline websites frequently or intermittently to book hotel rooms or car rental which is well above the 20% average.

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Jaikrishna added: "It is also interesting to note that Indian passengers have a very high rate of preference, 68%, for an electronic copy of their boarding pass compared to 23% who prefer the conventional paper boarding pass. This is further evidence that India's air travellers are very open to technological innovation that simplifies the passenger journey." The numbers of Mumbai passengers carrying a smart phone has almost doubled to 11.3% from 6.5% in 2008, in line with the global trend. But interestingly, passengers in Mumbai are more inclined to use their mobile phone throughout the travel experience. In Mumbai, 78% said they would use a mobile phone to check-in in the future as against a global average of 45%. Dwell time at the airport is the step of the journey that passengers interviewed in Mumbai Airport would like to change the most with 59% asking for improved internet access capabilities, over 30% asking for digital assistance to find their way and for shopping. Passengers flying on more than 100 different airlines and representing over 80 different nationalities were interviewed during April/June 2009 in this independent survey.

http://www.sita.aero


T ran sp ort: Air p or t Hub s : To B e or Not to B e

Denver International Airport: The Primary Economic Engine for Colorado

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strategic location, strong airline competition and a robust local economy—these are the three main reasons Denver International Airport (DEN) has fared the recession better than many other major airports in 2009. DEN is the fifth busiest airport in the US and the 10th busiest in the world.

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With over 20 airlines serving 161 nonstop domestic and international destinations, DEN continues to grow in importance not only as a major domestic hub but also as an international gateway into Denver, the Rockies and the natural and historical treasures of the Western USA.

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During the recession, DEN has seen real growth in the number of connecting passengers, proof positive that passengers and airlines alike favor the convenience of DEN as a connecting hub, not just for the domestic market, but also for Canadian and Mexican travelers. Located close to the geographic center of the United States and the foot of the Rocky Mountains, we are the largest hub in a 500-mile radius, have ample room for expansion and offer a very convenient passenger flow—all aspects that make DEN a very attractive airport for both passengers and airlines. While passenger traffic at DEN this year will fall slightly short of 2008’s record-breaking 51.2 million passengers, 2009 saw the airport’s busiest month ever in July, and the busiest month of August in DEN’s history. We’ve also already seen some very positive developments at DEN in 2009 that we believe will continue to exert a positive effect on the travel market in Denver into 2010: our home carrier, Frontier, emerged from bankruptcy this autumn to remain a viable and strong competitor here at Denver International Airport; and Southwest and United have expanded their route networks out of Denver, increasing choice for travelers while also making ticket prices for our passengers more competitive. The City of Denver has also fared the recession better than most US cities in terms of unemployment and other economic indicators. Denver is a


T ran sp ort: Air p or t Hub s : To B e or Not to B e

dynamic and sophisticated city of around 1.3 million inhabitants that enjoys one of the most diversified economies in the US. Denver also has a highly educated workforce, a housing market that hasn’t been hit as hard as elsewhere in the country, and the Rockies at its doorstep. As the airport’s routes network expands, US and international companies are increasingly interested in moving their headquarters and operations to Denver and Colorado. What are our challenges ahead? Just ahead of its 15th anniversary in February 2010, Denver In-

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ternational Airport is poised for the next phase of development and expansion. As the newest major hub airport in the United States, we are fortunate to already have very modern infrastructure in place. Denver International Airport generates over $22 billion in annual economic impact for the city of Denver and state of Colorado and is the primary economic engine for the state, so expansion and improvements must balance current and future needs to ensure that DEN remains a competitive and strong gateway for the city, state and region. Our 53-square-mile site provides us with ample space for the expansion of both aviation and nonaviation facilities. Denver International Airport is the only commercial airport in the US with room to double its existing six runways into 12 and also add more concourses and terminal space. Concrete investment in infrastructure for 2010 includes breaking ground on a Westin Hotel slated to have 500 rooms, a spa and conferencing and event facilities. The hotel is one element of the South Terminal Redevelopment project, which will include a train station for the new FasTracks light rail line that will connect the airport with the downtown Union Station. Connecting the airport with the public transport rail system is vital to DEN remaining

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a competitive and modern hub at an international level. The South Terminal Redevelopment project also plans for a plaza with shops and restaurants to be built a level above the FasTracks station as well as changes to the existing Jeppesen Terminal to reconfigure it to better suit how people will be travelling in the future. By Erica Gingerich http://www.flydenver.com


T ran sp ort: Air p or t Hub s : To B e or Not to B e

The Economic Benefits of Britain's Global Gateway

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eathrow is one of the UK’s most important economic assets. It is the busiest international airport in the world and plays a unique role as the UK’s only hub airport. Heathrow’s route network stretches around the planet, with 90 airlines serving 180 destinations. Two-thirds of all long-haul flights in the UK depart from Heathrow and seven out of the top ten business routes in the world have Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

Heathrow at one end. It acts as the UK’s gateway to the global economy and gives businesses access to markets and customers around the world. Business passengers know that they can go where they need to in the world, when they need to, directly from Heathrow. They do not have to spend time and money going elsewhere first. In today’s globalised economy, the UK has to complete

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not just on producing high-value, highly skilled products and people, but also on the ability to get them to where they need to be – particularly to the emerging markets of India and China Hub airports are important because only they have sufficient volume of traffic to offer passengers and freight the wide variety of destinations and frequency of flights needed in today’s world. Heathrow’s hub status is vital to business and a key component in ensuring that the UK remains internationally competitive in the long-term and at the heart of the international economy, as well as ensuring that the citizens of the UK have direct routes to their family and friends abroad. Heathrow relies on transfer passengers for the viability of its hub status. To those who question what value the UK derives from a passenger who flies in from Seattle, changes planes at Heathrow, and flies out again to Bangalore, the answer is surprisingly simple: without transfer passengers, the UK would not have flights to Seattle nor Bangalore. These routes would simply not be economically viable without the high proportion of transfer passengers that support these flights. And that is true of many of other flights as well. Two-thirds of flights at Heathrow depend on 25%–40% transfer traffic. Transfer passengers underpin two critical factors – network diversity and frequency. One of Heathrow’s strengths is its frequency of flights on key business routes compared with other European cities. In addition, Heathrow offers flights at times of day when no other competitor has flights. Unsur-


T ran sp ort: Air p or t Hub s : To B e or Not to B e

prisingly, these are critical concerns for business travellers who make up 40 per cent of Heathrow’s originating traffic. The evidence around Heathrow’s hub status is clear. Heathrow accounts for only one-fifth of UK flights but two-thirds of all our long-haul flights. It operates the UK’s only direct air links to world cities such as Mumbai, Shanghai, Beijing and Sao Paulo. Seven out of the top ten business routes in the world have Heathrow at one end. No other airport in the UK can sustain the longhaul routes that Heathrow can. If airlines could operate profitable, direct long-haul flights from other UK airports then they would. But, if you look at the

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long list of destinations served by other UK airports, you would be hard pushed to find a flight east of Dubai or south of the Caribbean. If airlines can’t fly from Heathrow, they will fly from another international hub instead, taking their business outside of the UK. Maintaining Heathrow’s international hub status in not just important for the airport business. The bigger a network of its direct air routes, the more attractive a city and a country become to domestic business, overseas tourists, and foreign investors seeking locations in which to site their business. http://www.futureheathrow.com

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T ran sp ort: Air p or t Hub s : To B e or Not to B e

Lima: The South American Hub Airport

P

eru’s privileged geographical location at the center of the South American continent, and that of the capital, Lima, on the central coast and at sea level, have combined to make this city the region’s most important interconnection center. Today, Lima is the South American hub airport for two airlines which are not based in Peru – LAN

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and TACA – with turn around times of 30 and 45 minutes. Also, both of them have registered 24% and 33% operational growth respectively over the past 3 years, reflecting the benefits reported from centralizing their operations in South America in Lima. In 2009, in spite of the international financial crisis, the Peruvian economy continues to grow, and by the end of the year the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is expected to have risen by 3%. According to the investment bank Credit Suisse, Peru’s economy will grow by 5% in 2010 and lead the recovery of the economies of Latin America. At the same time, it is estimated that next year inflation in Peru will rise to 2.5%, making it the lowest in the region. On February 14th 2001, Lima Airport Partners (LAP) took over the concession to run Peru’s leading air terminal, the “Jorge Chávez” International Airport. Currently, the main shareholder in LAP is Fraport AG, the German airport operator which is in charge of Frankfurt Airport and other important airports located in Egypt, Bulgaria, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, China, Senegal and India. The other two partners are the International Finance Corporation, which is a member of the World Bank Group, and AC Capitales SAFI, an important Peruvian investment fund. Eight years after the “Jorge Chávez” concession was awarded, Peru now has a world-class airport which is modern, safe and efficient and has just been selected by Skytrax Research, the renowned

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Route Development Forum Lima Airport Partners is an active participant in the Route Development Forum, as well as in the regional meetings which this group organizes in the Americas, and in February 2010 it will play host to the regional meeting (Routes Regional Americas), in preparation for the global meeting which will be held in Vancouver.

English market research company which specializes in issues associated with airports, as the Best Airport in South America. In addition, it has also received the very special distinction of being named the airport with the Best Airport Personnel in the region. And recently, the “Jorge Chávez” International Airport has been selected as South America’s Leading Airport – 2009 by “The World Travel Awards”, a series of prizes which have been described by “The Wall Street Journal” as the “Oscar” of the travel and tourism industry, by virtue of being the most complete and prestigious awards of their kind. In the last three years, the volume of passengers has grown by a rate in excess of 10% per annum. In 2008, “Jorge Chávez” received 8.3 million passengers, and this year, in spite of the international financial crisis, a growth in passenger figures of almost 7% on last year’s figures is being recorded. In this context, the numbers of business people arriv-

15 international carriers operate 405 weekly frequencies in Lima, as well as 5 domestic carriers operate 430 weekly frequencies.


T ran sp ort: Air p or t Hub s : To B e or Not to B e

ing from all over Latin America have experienced particular growth. Between January and November 2009, international traffic from and to the city of Lima recorded a load factor of more than 70%. However, in some regions, principally in Europe and North America, load factors were above 80%, showing that there is enough demand to justify airlines increasing the frequency of departures.

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In terms of domestic flights, the load factor is similar to that recorded for international flights, at around 73%. It is important to highlight the fact that the privatization of Peru’s regional airports has had a positive impact on improvements in services and connectivity at a national level. http://www.lap.com.pe

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D esti n atio n J o r d a n – takes you beyond

Young and restless – this is Jordan! A country with ancient monuments, unique nature and a government extensively investing in tourism industry is simply destined to success. Let’s get familiar with the capital Amman, the moonscape of Wadi Rum, as well as the Nabatean people.


De s tinati on : Jord an – take s y ou b e y ond

Jordan Shaping Its Destiny

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aving been through a quantum leap in terms of development in recent years, Jordan’s tourism industry is vying for the international recognition it deserves. Jordan is fast emerging as a tourism powerhouse in the Middle East, according to managing director, Jordan Tourism Board (JTB), Nayef Al-Fayez, who told TTG: “It is the host of world-class facilities and some of the most amazing tourism attractions, in addition to being the host of one of the New Seven Wonders of the World, the ancient Nabatean Kingdom of Petra.”

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Priding itself on the ability to cater to a full gamut of tourism experiences, Al-Fayez summarized the categories constituting the country’s diverse tourism product: history and culture; religion and faith; fun and adventure; eco and nature; conferences and events; and leisure and wellness. “Historically and archaeologically speaking, Jordan is very rich,” agreed manager, Toledo Hotel, Hakam Barakat. “Medical tourism is huge here, with many facilities and experts. But it still needs to be tweaked. Likewise, I think that only 20 per cent of Petra’s potential has been discovered – it is still under-serviced at the moment and so we are considering another Toledo property there. Jordan as a whole is very much under-appreciated, and undermarketed,” he told TTG. While all of these categories hold equal weight, JTB – more than aware of the need to market the destination and its tourism potential – is currently focusing on prospecting business from the highend niche market. “We are marketing Jordan as a boutique destination to serve a high-end niche, which therefore dictates the strategy we have,” he confirmed. While JTB drives forward with its online marketing activities, it is simultaneously committed to maintaining a strong presence at crucial trade exhibition events. “Furthermore, our tourism offices and representatives abroad are continuously working with international tourism organisations, hotels, tour operators and travel agents in order to provide high quality services that will help Jordan raise its travel destination image internationally,” Al-Fayez said. Given the country’s proximity to many of its source markets such as Syria, Lebanon, and the Kingdom

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of Saudi Arabia, most of the arrivals to and almost half of the departures from Jordan are carried out by land. However, with interest climbing on an international level, the country’s aviation sector is enjoying success too. “The air transportation category is also booming thanks to the increasing number of arrivals from and departures to long-haul destinations. The increase of business tourism to Jordan also means that air travel will gain an increasing importance,” said Al-Fayez.


De s tinati on : Jord an – take s y ou b e y ond

Arrivals to Jordan have indeed been on an upward spiral, according to Al-Fayez, who confirmed that in 2008, Jordan received 7.1 million international tourists with overnights of 3.7 million and a revenue growth of 27 per cent over 2007. Aside from maintaining strong figures from within the region, JTB is actively pursuing business from further afield. “The tourism board is promoting itself in 11 international countries, namely the UK, the US, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Benelux, Switzerland/Austria, Russia, and the GCC countries.” JTB is also tracking the development of new markets such as China and South America, while India marks the first destination in the Asian market where Jordan is being promoted. “Talking specifically about the Indian market, JTB is looking to position itself as a short-haul niche

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destination. It plans to attract leisure, wellness, adventure, MICE, history and culture, as well as religious traffic from India,” Al-Fayez told TTG. Confident of JTB’s efforts in boosting visitor numbers, the country’s hotel sector is poised for substantial growth, with international chains such as Mövenpick Hotels & Resorts, Starwood Hotels & Resorts, and InterContinental Hotels Group all looking to solidify their presence. Commenting on why such hotel giants are spreading their Jordanian footprint, Al-Fayez commented: “Jordan is considered a very safe destination for foreign travellers and acknowledged as safe by most of the travel advisories. For centuries, Jordan has always proved to be a stable and safe tourist destination that is quickly becoming the jewel of the Middle East, with a great diversity of attractions to offer the foreign visitors. Its strategic location makes it a favourable business and tourism hub for neighbouring and international markets.” Supporting this sentiment, chairman, National Corporation for Tourism Development, H.E. Mazen Al-Saket told TTG: “We want to promote Jordan worldwide as a safe destination. We want people to understand our culture. From medical tourism to religious tourism, from leisure to business, from history to archaeology, Jordan has much to offer.” (Text shortened) http://www.ttgmena.com

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De s tinati on : Jord an – take s y ou b e y ond

Euromonitor: Travel and Tourism in Jordan ism, ranging from archaeological attractions, religious tours, MICE and sports to adventure as well as eco-tourism. These activities have encouraged a wider range of nationalities to visit the country, and as such Jordan is slowly moving away from relying on its neighbours for tourism revenues, although visitors from these countries still remain the most numerous.

Accommodation and transportation boom The development of the travel and tourism infrastructure in Jordan reflects the success of the National Tourism Strategy. As a result of the increased visitor numbers, over 20 hotels are being built around the country, in an increasingly diverse range of destinations, widening the tourist reach. Transportation options are also improving, with an increasing number of flights to the country, many due to Gulf low-cost carrier airlines. Roads are also

Widening its appeal According to Euromonitor International, tourism in Jordan had a successful last five years period, and appears to have totally recovered from the bomb attacks of 2005. The country’s tourism strategy has focused on developing niche areas of tourJa nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

being improved, and there is a plan to build a rail link within the country, which would vastly improve some of its traffic problems.

Government incentives The Jordanian Government has demonstrated strong commitment to encouraging the growth of tourism. To this end it has committed in allocating 4% of national tourism receipts for international marketing, and the development of both products and human resources. The National Tourism Strategy of 2004 to 2010 has proven extremely successful, with the goal of doubling the contribution of tourism to GDP having been achieved before the end of the project. A new strategy will be introduced. This will start in 2010 and is expected to build on the success of the current development programme.

Ecotourism paradise One of the key tourism niches that Jordan is keen to promote is eco-tourism. An increasingly popular

Jordan’s hotels outperform economic crisis Jordan has reported a positive increase in overnight stays for 2009 despite the global economic downturn. Overnight stays increased 1.5% from January to September compared to the same period in 2008. The Jordan Tourism Board plans to grow its source market base in 2010 and look to alternative or emerging markets such as Scandinavia, India and South America. 50% of the overnight visitors are from Arab market. Over the next five years the country’s total room count will hit 30,000 compared to 23,000 at present, while Amman’s new international airport will open in 2011 taking capacity from around five to nine million passengers. Hoteliermiddleeast.com

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De s tinati on : Jord an – take s y ou b e y ond

Top 10 Source Countries for Jordan Tourism (‘000 people) Arrivals to Jordan Syria Saudi Arabia Iraq Egypt USA Turkey Kuwait Lebanon Bahrain Germany

2008 795,3 443,0 370,9 168,0 104,3 84,8 81,5 68,9 44,1 23,9

©2009 Euromonitor International

activity worldwide, the country has huge potential to develop eco-tourism as a key offering. Despite being thought of as a desert nation, Jordan has an amazingly diverse environment which lends itself to animal and bird watching, adventure tours, trekking, snorkelling and diving in the Red Sea. It is also possible to camp in some of the eight nature reserves in the country, and a number of tour operators offer trips to eco-tourism attractions.

Visitor numbers hold strong According to Euromonitor International, despite the global economic downturn, Jordan’s tourism industry remains strong, and has not as yet seen a significant drop in numbers. However, it is predicted that numbers may decrease in 2009, but with

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resilient growth predicted in future. The country is working hard to attract visitors from a wide range of destination in order to become less reliant on its traditional visitor base. Asia is becoming an area of focus, with a recent easing of visa restrictions for visitors from China and India. (Extract from Euromonitor International’s report “Travel and Tourism in Jordan”) http://www.euromonitor.com

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De s tinati on : Jord an – take s y ou b e y ond

Amman: Enchanting Mixture of Ancient & Modern galleries and museums. Shopping amenities vary from old markets and souqs full of gold and spices to modern boutiques offering local handicrafts and imported fashions. Towering above Amman, the site of the earliest fortifications is now subject of numerous excavations, which have revealed remains from the Neolithic period as well as from the Hellenistic and late Roman to Arab Islamic Ages. Most of Amman’s noteworthy historical sites are clustered in the downtown area. The ancient Citadel, which towers above the city from atop Jabal al-Qala’a, is a good place to begin a tour of the city. The Citadel is the site of ancient Rabbath-Ammon, and excavations here have revealed numerous Roman, Byzantine and early Islamic remains. The most impressive building of the Citadel, known simply as al-Qasr ("the Palace"), dates back to

A

mman is the modern, as well as the ancient capital of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, spreading over 19 hills, or jebels. Known as Rabbath-Ammon during prehistoric periods and later as Philadelphia, the ancient city that was once part of the Decapolis league, the city now boasts a population of around 2 million. Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

Often referred to as the white city due to its low size canvas of stone houses, Amman offers a variety of historic sites and modern facilities that is complemented by wonderfully gracious and welcoming people. Amman is a busy commercial and administrative center with many fine hotels, restaurants, art

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De s tinati on : Jord an – take s y ou b e y ond

the Islamic Umayyad period. Its exact function is unclear, but it includes a monumental gateway, an audience hall and four vaulted chambers. A colonnaded street also runs through the complex. To the north and northeast are the ruins of Umayyad palace grounds. Close to al-Qasr lie the remains of a small Byzantine basilica. Corinthian columns mark the site of the church, which is thought to date from the sixth or seventh century CE. About 100 meters south of the church is what is thought to have been a temple of Hercules, today also known as the Great Temple of Amman. The temple was built in the reign of the emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180 CE), and is currently under restoration. At the foot of the Citadel there lies the 6000 seats Roman Theatre which is deep-sided bowl carved into Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

the hill and still used for cultural events. Another newly restored theater is the 500-seats Odeon, which is used for concerts. The three museums found in the area offer a glimpse of history and culture, they are the Jordan Archaeological Museums, the Folklore Museum and the Museum of Popular Tradition. Amman is an excellent base to explore the environs and many interesting half-day or full-day trips can be arranged. The ancient town of Salt and the traditional villages such as Fuheis and Kan Zaman, are less than an hour away and feature traditional restaurants, handicrafts complexes and picturesque streets from ancient times. Photos: TR, Jordan Tourism Coalition http://www.jordantc.com http://www.kinghussein.gov.jo

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De s tinati on : Jord an – take s y ou b e y ond

Wadi Rum: Vast, Echoing and God-like

enigmatic British officer T.E. Lawrence, who was based here during the Great Arab Revolt of 191718. Much of David Lean’s “Lawrence of Arabia” was filmed in Wadi Rum. The main route to Wadi Rum, and the small village of Rum, branches east off the Desert Highway about five kilometers south of Quweira and 25 kilometers north of Aqaba. From there the road extends about 35 kilometers through the desert to end at Rum. It is best to take your own vehicle to Rum, as public transportation to the village is very difficult. The village consists mainly of several hundred Bedouin inhabitants with their goat-hair tents and concrete houses, a school, a few shops and the headquarters of the famous Desert Patrol. There are several options available for exploring Wadi Rum. At the Government Rest House, located just inside the village, you can rent out a fourwheel-drive jeep with a Bedouin driver for short or longer day tours of the area. Also available are camels, which you can hire for short excursions or for the desert trip to Aqaba. The only accommodations in Rum are in the Government Rest House, where tents are available. For those with a bit more time and/or sense of adventure, the best way to see Wadi Rum is by hik-

Bedouin People

S

tunning in its natural beauty, Wadi Rum epitomizes the romance of the desert. With its "moonscape" of ancient valleys and towering sandstone mountains rising out of the sand, Wadi Rum is also home to several Bedouin tribes who live in Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

scattered camps throughout the area. Climbers are especially attracted to Wadi Rum because of its sheer granite and sandstone cliffs, while hikers enjoy its vast empty spaces. Wadi Rum is probably best known because of its connection with the

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The Bedouin people that inhabit the area still maintain their semi-nomadic lifestyle. They are hospitable and offer a friendly welcome to visitors, often inviting them to sit and enjoy a coffee or even a meal. However, always remember to ask permission before taking photographs of the local Bedouin people. Visitjordan.com


De s tinati on : Jord an – take s y ou b e y ond ing and camping in it. Indeed, the vast silence and grandeur of the landscape is best experienced on foot. All you need for hiking in Wadi Rum is plenty of water (at least 2-3 liters per day), some food, good shoes and a sleeping bag. Those with a four-wheel drive, a map and plenty of fuel can see more of the landscape, while saving their energy for spectacular hikes such as the Rock Bridge of Burdah, one of Wadi Rum’s most popular attractions. True adventurers can test their skills and endurance by climbing Jordan's highest mountain, Jabal Rum. The climb is a grueling and treacherous challenge which should only be attempted by those of stout heart and indomitable will. A guide is recommended for the ten-hour round trip to the summit, and arrangements should be made the previous day at the Government Rest House. Offroaders should exercise care in staying on the tracks to avoid plowing over desert vegetation. Don’t venture too far away from Rum, and remember to bring plenty of water. Highly recommended for adventure-seekers are Tony Howard's detailed Treks and Climbs in the Mountains of Wadi Rum & Petra or the less extensive Walks & Scrambles in Rum. Photos: TR, Jordan Tourism Coalition http://www.kinghussein.gov.jo

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De s tinati on : Jord an – take s y ou b e y ond

Umm Al-Jimal: The Black Gem of the Desert structures, until its probable decline and gradual abandonment in the late 8th century. Today archaeological and other research continue to piece together Umm el-Jimal’s fascinating story of everyday ancient life. Although located on the semi-arid plain of the Hauran, its residents devised an ingenious water storage system. Canals and reservoirs collected runoff water from kilometers away, enough to sustain thousands of people, their animals, and agriculture.

Umm el-Jimal is both a modern town and archaeological site of unknown name, located about 70km northeast of Amman and just south of the Syrian border. Umm al-Jimal is now known as the Black Oasis because of the black basalt rock from which many of its houses, churches, barracks and forts were built. In ancient times the site was occupied from roughly the 1st to 8th centuries CE. After its decline Umm el-Jimal’s dark basalt architecture lay silent for a thousand years, until the Druze reoccupied it following World War I. Ja nu a r y, 2 0 1 0

Umm el-Jimal was a frontier town in the desert, likely first inhabited by Nabataean traders caravanning between Petra and Damascus. With the arrival of Rome in the second century CE the village eventually became part of the Limes Arabicus—the line of garrisoned forts that protected Roman Arabia. Umm el-Jimal’s inhabitants existed in relative autonomy, and by the 5th and 6th centuries it peaked as a prosperous Byzantine town of five to ten thousand souls. Over the following centuries Umm elJimal’s residents remodeled and reused its stone

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De s tinati on : Jord an – take s y ou b e y ond

Mother of Camels Under the Nabateans, the city played host to a great number of trading caravans. Indeed, the name Umm al-Jimal means “Mother of Camels” in Arabic. The large vacant area in the town center was reserved for traveling caravans stopping in Umm al-Jimal.

Umm el-Jimal is also home to a unique architecture. Ancient denizens used abundant black basalt from the region’s volcanic plain to construct sturdy, cool structures reaching up to six stories skyward. Techniques such as corbelling allowed most buildings to contain multiple floors, while cantilevered stairways provided access. Built in, ground-floor mangers provided for family livestock. On the edge of empires, for hundreds of years Umm el-Jimal’s citizens successfully created a thriving home.

Kinghussein.gov.jo

http://www.ummeljimal.org

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I n b o u n d To u r O p e r a t o r s

De s tinati on : Jord an – take s y ou b e y ond

ABERCROMBIE & KENT JORDAN - Jordan | P.O. Box 831421 Amman 11183

GREEN MEADOWS TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 182154 Amman 11118

ABOUD TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 211045 Amman 11121

GUIDING STAR AGENCY - Jordan | P.O. Box 2768 Amman 11181

ADONIS TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 142930 Amman 11814

HASHWEH TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 850322 Amman 11185

ADVENTURE TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 187 Amman 11941

HUSSAM TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 184337 Amman 11118

AL THURAYA TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 1883 Amman 11821

INTERNATIONAL ASHTAR TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 425114 Amman 11140

AMANA TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 851759 Amman 11185

INTERNATIONAL TRADERS - Jordan | P.O. Box 408 Amman 11184

AMANI TOURS - Jordan | 950548 Amman 11195 Jordan

ISSAM TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 840332 Amman 11184

AMIN KAWAR & SONS. T. & T. - Jordan | P.O. Box 7806 Amman 11118

JOINT TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 14254 Amman 11814

AMIRAL TOURS AND TRAVEL - DMC. LTD - Jordan | P.O. Box 661 Amman 11810

JORDAN HOLIDAY TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 941589 Amman 11194

ATLAS TRAVEL & TOURIST AGENCY - Jordan | King Hussein Street, P.O.Box 7131 Amman 11118

JORDAN NATIONAL TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 960804 Amman 11196 JORDAN SELECT TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 183764 Amman 11118

BASHA TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 146 Amman 11831 BAWAB TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 213485 Amman 11121

JORDAN SINAI HOTELS & TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 1305 Aqaba

BLUE BELL TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 2923 Amman 11181

JORDAN TOURS FOR TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 112 Wadi Rum

CARDO TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 35112 Amman

KARMA HOUSE FOR TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 926316 Amman 11190

CREATRAVEL - Jordan | P.O. Box 850337 Amman 11185

MA'AB TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 950358 Amman 11195

DAHLAN TOURS AND TRAVEL - Jordan | P.O.Box: 96157 Amman 11196

MAGIC JORDAN TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 1342 Amman 11118

DAKKAK TOURS INTERNATIONAL - DMC - Jordan | P.O. Box 910902 Amman 11191

MALHAS TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 9870 Amman 11191

DAOUD TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 142342 Amman 11814

MALTRANS TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 921805 Amman 11192

DARNA TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 8049 Amman 11121

MILLENNIUM TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 960804 Amman

DISCOVERY ECO TOURISM, JORDAN CIRCLE TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 840618 Amman 11184

NAFFA' TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 925863 Amman 11190 NATIONAL TRAVEL & TOURISM SERVICES - Jordan | P.O. Box 2020 Amman

EASTERN TRAVEL AND TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 20487 Amman 11118

NAWAS TOURIST COMPANY LTD. - Jordan | P.O. Box 968 Amman 11118

FRIENDS TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 961412 Amman 11196

NEAR EAST RESOURCES TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 815434

GAIA TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 430054 Amman 11143

NEBO TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 910043 Amman 11191

GOLDEN CROWN TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 183522 Amman 11118

NEPTUNE TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 3207 Amman 11821

GOLDEN HOLIDAY TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 841104 Amman 11184

NET TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 9327 Amman 11911

GREEN ARROW TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 6902 Amman 11118

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I n b o u n d To u r O p e r a t o r s

De s tinati on : Jord an – take s y ou b e y ond

ORIENT EXPRESS TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 182215 Amman 11118

TANIA TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 2586 Amman 11181

OSCAR TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 1623 Amman 119

TEAM TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 921513 Amman 11192

PAN EAST TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 182478 Amman 11118

TERHAAL TRAVEL AND TOURISM - Jordan | P.O.Box 911558 Amman 11191

PELLA TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 1848 Amman 11118

TRAVEL & TOURISM HOUSE - Jordan | P.O. Box 3278 Amman 11181

PETRA CARAVAN TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 77 Petra

TRAVEL ONE TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 921763 Amman 11192

PETRA MOON TOURISM SERVICES - Jordan | P.O. Box 129 Wadi Mousa 71810

TRAVELLERS INTERNATIONAL TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 27 Amman 11118

PETRA TRAVEL & TOURISM "PETRA TOURS" - Jordan | P.O. Box 19185 Amman 11196

TROPICANA - Jordan | P.O. Box 6413 Amman 11118

PLAZA TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 950531 Amman 11195

TRUST TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 941511 Amman 11194

PROFESSIONALS TRAVEL COMPANY (PTC) - Jordan | P.O. Box 840319 Amman 11181

TWO'S COMPANY TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 3418 Amman 11118

REFADAH TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 960475 Amman 11196

TYCHE TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 960376 Amman 11196

RIMAL TRAVEL & TOURISM - Jordan | P.O. Box 1075 Amman 11953 ROYAL TOURS - Jordan | P.O. Box 815433 Amman 11180

UTA - THE DESTINATION MANAGEMENT COMPANY - Jordan | P.O. Box 35241 Amman 11180

SARAYA HOLIDINGS - Jordan | P.O. Box 815321 Amman 11180

YOLLA MOON LIGHT TOURS - Jordan | Jabal Amman, Kalboneh Center 2nd floor

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Fairs & Exhibitions T r av e l / T o u r i s m

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Western Europe

 ReiseMarkt Rhein-Neckar-Pfalz  Location

Mannheim / Germany

Start / End

08 January 2010 / 10 January 2010

Provider

TMS Messen

Contact

schurzky@tmsmessen.de

 REISELIV 2010  Location

Lillestrom / Norway

Start / End

14 January 2010 / 17 January 2010

Provider

Norges Varemesse

Contact

ten@messe.no

 Ferienmesse Bern 

  Prospects for Tourism  Location

London / UK

Start / End

07 January 2010 / 07 January 2010

Provider

Tourism Society

Contact

daniel@tourismsociety.org

 Chemnitzer ReiseMarkt  

Location

Bern / Switzerland

Start / End

14 January 2010 / 17 January 2010

Provider

FairCom AG

Contact

info@ferienmesse.ch

 Ferien-Messe Wien  Location

Vienna / Austria

Start / End

14 January 2010 / 17 January 2010

Provider

Reed Exhibitions Messe Wien Reed Exhibitions Companies

Contact

info@messe.at

  Belfast Telegraph Holiday World Show 

Location

Chemnitz / Germany

Location

Belfast / UK

Start / End

08 January 2010 / 10 January 2010

Start / End

15 January 2010 / 17 January 2010

Provider

TMS Messen

Provider

schroeder@tmsmessen.de

Business Exhibitions Limited

Contact

Contact

eileen@bizex.ie

  London International Boat Show 

  Vakanz Tourism Fair 

Location

London / UK

Location

Luxembourg / Luxembourg

Start / End

08 January 2010 / 17 January 2010

Start / End

15 January 2010 / 17 January 2010

Provider

National Boat Shows Ltd

Provider

LuxExpo

Contact

info@boatshows.co.uk

Contact

valerie.schiel@luxexpo.lu

  More events related to Travel/Tourism can be found here   If you are an event provider you may consider to place your event in the above category, please click here   If your event already is in the list you may consider using the enhanced listing. For replacement just click here

— 55 —


Fair s & E x hi b ition s : JA N UA RY, 2 0 1 0  Monte Carlo Travel Market  Location

Monaco / Monaco

Start / End

15 January 2010 / 17 January 2010

Provider

Monte Carlo Travel Market

Contact

info@mctm.mc

 CMT International Exhibition for Caravanning,     Motoring and Tourism  Location

Stuttgart / Germany

Start / End

16 January 2010 / 24 January 2010

Provider

Messe Stuttgart International

Contact

info@messe-stuttgart.de

 Nordic Travel Fair MATKA 2010  Location

Helsinki / Finland

Start / End

21 January 2010 / 24 January 2010

Provider

The Finnish Fair Corporation

Contact

matka@finnexpo.fi

 Caravan Helsinki  Location

Helsinki / Finland

Start / End

22 January 2010 / 24 January 2010

Provider

Suomen Messut

Contact

info@finnexpo.fi

 Adventure Travel Live  Location

London / UK

Start / End

29 January 2010 / 31 January 2010

Provider

Escape Events Ltd

Contact

adventure@escapeevents.com

  More events related to Travel/Tourism can be found here   If you are an event provider you may consider to place your event in the above category, please click here   If your event already is in the list you may consider using the enhanced listing. For replacement just click here

— 56 —


Fair s & E x hi b ition s : JA N UA RY, 2 0 1 0

CENTR AL Europe

 GO International Travel Trade Fair  Location

Brno / Czech Republic

Start / End

14 January 2010 / 17 January 2010

Provider

BVV (Brno Trade Fairs and Exhibition)

Contact

go@bvv.cz

 Annual IH&RA Congress: ‘Redefining Excellence in     Hospitality’  Location

Belgrade / Serbia

Start / End

18 January 2010 / 20 January 2010

Provider

IH&RA

Contact

info@ih-ra.com

  More events related to Travel/Tourism can be found here   If you are an event provider you may consider to place your event in the above category, please click here   If your event already is in the list you may consider using the enhanced listing. For replacement just click here

— 57 —


Fair s & E x hi b ition s : JA N UA RY, 2 0 1 0

North America

 Adventures in Travel Expo  Location

Chicago, IL / United States of America

Start / End

09 January 2010 / 10 January 2010

Provider

Unicomm, LLC

Contact

sales@adventureexpo.com

 All-Canada Show - Indianapolis, IN  Location

Indianopolis, IN / United States of America

Start / End

11 January 2010 / 13 January 2010

Provider

All-Canada Show

Contact

info@allcanada.com

 All-Canada Show - Chicago, IL 

 Nashville Boat & Sportshow  Location

Nashville, TN / United States of America

Start / End

06 January 2010 / 10 January 2010

Provider

National Marine Manufacturers Association Inc. (NMMA)

Contact

support@discoverboating.com

 All-Canada Show - St. Louis, MO 

Location

Chicago, IL / United States of America

Start / End

14 January 2010 / 17 January 2010

Provider

All-Canada Show

Contact

info@allcanada.com

 All-Canada Show - Milwaukee, WI  Location

Milwaukee, WI / United States of America

Start / End

21 January 2010 / 24 January 2010

Provider

All-Canada Show

Contact

info@allcanada.com

 All-Canada Show - Madison, WI 

Location

St. Louis, MO / United States of America

Location

Madison, WI / United States of America

Start / End

08 January 2010 / 10 January 2010

Start / End

25 January 2010 / 27 January 2010

Provider

All-Canada Show

Provider

info@allcanada.com

All-Canada Show

Contact

Contact

info@allcanada.com

 McAllen International Travel Show  Location

McAllen, TX / United States of America

Start / End

08 January 2010 / 09 January 2010

Provider

McAllen Chamber of Commerce

Contact

jdeuser@mcallencvb.com

  More events related to Travel/Tourism can be found here   If you are an event provider you may consider to place your event in the above category, please click here   If your event already is in the list you may consider using the enhanced listing. For replacement just click here

— 58 —


Fair s & E x hi b ition s : JA N UA RY, 2 0 1 0

Asia & Pacific

 India International Travel Mart - Cochin  Location

Cochin / India

Start / End

19 January 2010 / 21 January 2010

Provider

GTFC

Contact

info@iitmindia.com

 ASEAN Tourism Forum 2010  Location

Bandar Seri Begawan / Brunei Darussalam

Start / End

21 January 2010 / 28 January 2010

Provider

TTG Asia Media

Contact

atfmedia@ttgasia.com

 Hosts 2010 

 Mumbai International Tourism Expo (MITE)  Location

Mumbai / India

Start / End

07 January 2010 / 09 January 2010

Provider

CEMS Pte Ltd.

Contact

bernice@cems.com.sg

Location

Mumbai / India

Start / End

27 January 2010 / 30 January 2010

Provider

H&FS India Pvt Ltd

Contact

pallavi@hostsindia.in

 India Travel Mart - Ahmedabad  Location

Ahmedabad / India

Start / End

29 January 2010 / 31 January 2010

Provider

India Travel Mart

Contact

indiatravelmart@airtelmail.in

 Travel & Tourism Fair - Chennai  Location

Chennai / India

Start / End

08 January 2010 / 10 January 2010

Provider

Fairfest Media Limited

Contact

fairfest@vsnl.com

 Travel & Tourism Fair - Bangalore  Location

Bangalore / India

Start / End

15 January 2010 / 17 January 2010

Provider

Fairfest Media Limited

Contact

fairfest@vsnl.com

  More events related to Travel/Tourism can be found here   If you are an event provider you may consider to place your event in the above category, please click here   If your event already is in the list you may consider using the enhanced listing. For replacement just click here

— 59 —


iŃ ons

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Sightseeng

Adventure

Business

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Budget

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Expertise

Destination

General

Figures Economy

Security

New service

Problems

Transport

Transport

Ecology

People

Events

Special

TR Partner

Media Partner

Alarm

Advice

Polls Awards

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Tourism Review Online Magazine - 01/2010