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V I CT O R I A R . P L AC H E R


CONTENTS

6 18 28

Architecture Cistercian Monastery The Interchange Student Fabrication Lab

38

Additive Manufacturing Local Motors Screen Wall

48 54 55 56 57 58 60

Mixed Media Immense Towers Venice Raging Waters Cougar in the Forest Neuschwanstein Castle Historical Mining Mural Reflection

62

Photography Abroad Europe


A R C H I T E CT U R E


Cistercian Monastery Fall 2017 | Abiquiu, New Mexico Professor Hansjoerg Goeritz

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The landscape of New Mexico is beautiful and diverse. From lakes to deserts, New Mexico is a harsh environment yet secluded and untouched. The surrounding nature and seclusion is a perfect home for a Cistercian monastery. Down the Chama canyon and along the river, there is not a person in sight. The river is long and winding disappearing into the mountain far in the distance. The first to see is the long bridge connecting to the abbey allowing time to think as one takes their first walk to a new lifestyle. Within the complex, the components frame the natural landscape and encourage one to reach out to the environment.

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This is where the fields and gardens start to bring this monumental landscape to the human touch. The program is arranged around the great cloister to aid in framing the most prominent piece of the landscape. The bridge, the abbey, and the platform are meant to be long-lasting in comparison to the rest of the program. In time, those will be all that is left in the vast nature of New Mexico.

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The structure of the program components apart from the abbey is rammed earth. The monks themselves would help build the structures through the methodical process of using this material. The rammed earth represents something that is strong and heavy. But in time, it will weather down. This creates a temporary characteristic for these particular programs.

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N Apr

N 30

Mar

20°

WIND SPEED

80°°

W

15

09 12

1-4 Calms: 9.39%

The dorms have cross ventilation. With winds from the north the majority of the time, the operable windows in each cell can be useful on a hot day. The wind would flow through the cell and up out of the open-aired sky aperture in the roof. The roof opening also allows sunlight to shine across the shared space for natural daylight and warmth. During very cold moments, radiant floor heating is installed in the cells pumped from the reflecting pool.

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.80”

May

.70” .60” .50”

Jun

.40” .30”

30°

.20”

20°°

.10” .1 0”

Jan

Jul

Jan

Jul

Nov/Jan 120 15

Albuquerque Int’l Airport Annual Average - All Hours Average Speed 7.18 kt

.90”

Mar

Feb

4400°

07:11

16:59 240

S

Mar/Sept E

Jun

50°

Aug/Apr

70°

18

May

60°

Feb

60°

11-17 4-7

05:53 60

50°

17-21

90° 70°

Jun Solstice

40°

>22

7-11

80°

30°

20:24 300

(Knots)

E

Apr

100°

10°

330

15%

W

12

S

Dec

Aug

Dec

Aug

09

150

210

Sept

Nov Oct

Sept

Nov Oct


The abbey is board formed compacted concrete to mimic the look of rammed earth but has a more sturdy structure. The concrete has the strength to withhold against the earth along with supporting the height of the walls creating the high ceiling within the abbey. The weight and longevity of the concrete make the abbey a permanent component in the landscape. In hundreds of years, the abbey will still be there. The concrete also provides thermal mass. The open-aired cross in the roof allows for ventilation. The natural elements are welcomed in this space with drains near the altar in case of excess flooding. This piece along with the small angular window slits along the sides give a powerful natural light in the space.

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The main platform that connects all the program elements is also concrete. The programs that are seemingly permanent are those structured with concrete. Those pieces are the bridge, the abbey, and the platform. Within the great cloister that is framed by the smaller program elements, the fields and gardens flourish. The garden terraces on the south side of the abbey towards the river flow elegantly with the landscape.

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The quarter scale model is made from strips of birch plywood to mimic the look of the layered concrete. As shown, the light shines brightly through the skylight of the cross in the roof. This light gives a powerful atmosphere within the abbey.

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The Interchange: New TVA Headquarters Fall 2016 | Knoxville, Tennessee Governor’s Chair Studio Professor James Rose Partners: Dillon Dunn, Kyle Prichard, Mustapha Williams Nominated by Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill for AIA Middle Tennessee Award Awarded Bronze for AIA Middle Tennessee Award

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The new TVA headquarters represents their purpose in the Tennessee Valley Region by exhibiting new collaborative environments with educational and social programs that serve the surrounding area. The site, plinth, bar, and tower create a sequence of elegant workspace experiences that inspire collaboration and provide recreation in the workplace and community. The form comes from the urban pathways and programs around the site. These elements suggested a program design that serviced the community while freeing up the ground plane. This created usable green space in the heart of downtown. The program is placed within the bar and tower, levitating the mass above an urban plinth that caters to the community.

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TVA’s Interchange exterior was inspired by the idea of geological strata. The bar has a horizontal expression with windows following the eroded spaces of the program inside. The tower follows a vertical striation in the skin but a horizontal striation at the floor plates. Where the opaque skin is carved away to denote the various atria strata, the mullions embrace the modular expression of the fiber cement rain screen, furthering a subtle understanding of erosion within the cladding.

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Just as wind and water erode geological strata in the Tennessee Valley over time, urban trajectories and experiential factors break down the programmatic striation within the project, creating exciting moments of unity. The program is designed around the concept of the tower as the collaborative core that pins the composition together. Within this composition, the bar houses the majority of the open office program and places workers in close dialogue with managerial staff. Just like the limestone cores on the ground plane, the linear core that houses many of the managerial offices and minor collaboration spaces is carved away at key points to create moments of transparency and teamwork within the office floor plan.

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The tower becomes the collaborative fulcrum of TVA’s Interchange. The majority of the tower’s program is communal, with conference rooms and gathering spaces ranging from intimate four-person rooms to grand twenty person rooms. These strata of various scales twist in response to the different views available at various heights, turning to address the extensive view-shed of the region. Each stratum offers a different visual experience.

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The roof of the bar becomes a small recreational area. This program gives workers a fitness area during long shifts. An outdoor cafe seating area also fills the occupiable rooftop.

16'

24


The structure of the top observation deck in the tower consists of 6’ deep pratt trusses allowing panoramic views of the regional view-shed. The tower structure W12 (17”X 16”) steel columns with 4” pour-in-place concrete cover on each side providing the excess of 3-hour fire rating of per IBC 2012 704 Typ. The entry atrium has larger W14 (23”X 19”) steel columns for greater experience in the space. The bar structure has W10 (10”X 11”) steel columns with 3” pour-in-place concrete cover on each side. The head of the bar exists through a floorto-roof truss. This structure supports the cantilever that defines the program and public space below. Reinforced mushroom columns create the basement inspired by natural subterranean structures. Diagrams on the left: HVAC zoning

0' 2' 4'

8'

16'

25


The Interchange reinserts the Tennessee Valley Authority within the region by creating exciting collaborative, educational, and social opportunities that engage TVA staff and the community.

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Water collection system routes excess water throughout the building. Water is delivered to 50,000-gallon cistern for use in irrigation and grey water. Ecoroof™ green roof 4” modular tray system. Ground cover reduces water runoff to be managed on site and reduces the thermal load imposed by roof gain. Acoustic fabric panels suspended from steel decking above. Panels reduce acoustic reverberation within office space to provide more tranquil space. Clerestory windows deposit natural southern light deeper into the workspace, decreasing the need for daytime artificial illumination and energy demand. Tate™ raised floor plenum 2”x2” typ. conceals HVAC, electrical, and plumbing systems. Plenum space is pressurized with conditioned air via centralized heat pumps. American Fiber Cement Company™ “Patina” paneling 5/16” typ. exterior expression of rain screen system. A modular system of three-panel heights (1’–6”, 2’–6”, and 4’–0”) and three-panel lengths (4’–0”, 6’–0”, 8’–0”).

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Student Fabrication Lab Spring 2017 | Krakรณw, Poland Professor Krzysztof Bojanowski

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The beginnings of this project started by looking at the urban surroundings of the University of Technology in Kraków’s architecture building. In a team of two, an elegant design was made to not disturb the existing beauty of the site, allow a space for all, and a connection to the green-way.

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Upon diving into the design stage of the new fabrication lab, the concept of this project arose to be about what is natural and bringing it together with what is man-made. From the organic nature of the pre-existing trees, the project takes on the dynamics of the environment. As the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s footprint approaches the street, it takes on the strict infrastructure of the urban surrounding and the architecture building. It elegantly transforms from organic to rectilinear in form.

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The trees begin to weave into the structure creating an intimate environment within the space. The interior space is open and free for changing. The street entrance gives way to a gallery space that flows directly into the fabrication lab space. A classroom is pulled away from this main space to give a more personal setting. 31


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The relationship between the architecture building and this addition seems to be conflicting but the two balance each other out through this conflict. The architecture building has been around for a very long time and has a set regulated structure. This new space begins to take this and flow it with the existing nature. This gives respect to the old while still appreciating the present and future. With the new fabrication lab, gallery, and classroomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s held with thick limestone walls on the far left and right, it pays homage to the urban history and gives a strong dialogue within the street area.

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Located along the green-way of the city, the new building will exist without disruption of the old but will bring a new sense of life to the community and reestablish the importance of such green-ways.

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Additive Manufacturing


Local Motors 3D Printed Screen Wall Fall 2016 | Knoxville, Tennessee Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chair Studio Professor James Rose Partners: Dillon Dunn, Kyle Prichard, Mustapha Williams

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The fall 2017 Governor’s Chair studio was challenged to design a screen wall for the company Local Motors. This screen wall was to be placed in their work environment to divide the open room for a small meeting space.

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The form was abstracted from the research of bone structure at a skeletal level. The twisted triad creates a structure that can only be easily constructed through 3D printing. This is the appeal of such a dramatic form.

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The screen wall was printed in three segments and then stacked on top of each other. It was very important in the design process to make sure it could 3D print on a larger scale. Printing the wall in three segments made this possible.

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The screen wall elegantly sits in the workspace. The weaving structure creates a dramatic division and spatial quality. The meeting space becomes more intimate and incites imagination.

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The final product is currently on display in the Local Motors new micro-factory in Knoxville, Tennessee. This design shows the intriguing capabilities of the rising 3D printing technology.

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M i xe d M e d i a


Sketching Fall 2017 | Abiquiu, New Mexico

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4 49


In the midst of New Mexico, a series of structures stand high against the monumentality of itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surrounding.

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The tremendous objects change in shape based on the distant natural landscape. One travels through with a sense of awe and wonder.

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The towers create a monumental atmosphere outside but an intimate atmosphere within.

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The interior spaces become dramatic with light. Just as the exterior is monumental, the interior atmosphere breeds wonder from the immense spaces within.

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Painting Venice Oil on canvas

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Raging Waters Acrylic on canvas

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Cougar in the Forest Acrylic on canvas This painting is currently on display at the local high school Copper Basin High school in Copperhill, Tennessee.

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Neuschwanstein Castle Acrylic on canvas (in progress)

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Historical Mining Mural Paint on concrete wall This 210-foot long mural represents the historical mining in Ducktown, Tennessee located in the heart of the town. The mural was a group project with other local artists in the area.

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Photograph Reflection In the reflection of the eye, another cat is in view. Won a local award in Copperhill, Tennessee.

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Photography Abroad


Throughout my college career, I studied abroad twice. This gave me the opportunity to explore different cultural stories and photograph inspiring architecture that influenced my design thinking.


Iceland Cities: Hella, Reykjavik, Vik Harpa Concert Hall in Reykjavik

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France City: Paris The Louvre

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Poland Cities: Bialowieza, Bialystok, Belzec, Frampol, Gdansk, Gdynia, Hajnowka, Katowice, Kock, Krakow, Lodz, Narew, Oswiecim, Poznan, Rydzyna, Sandomierz, Sopot, Torun, Tum, Tykocin, Warszawa, Wroclaw, Zakopane, Zamosc Auschwitz-Birkenau Concentration Camp in Oswiecim

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Hungary City: Budapest Buda Castle

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Slovenia City: Ljubljana Ljubljanica River

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Slovakia City: Bratislava UFO Observation Deck

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Italy Cities: Cinque Terre, Florence, Pisa, Rimini, Rome, Urbino, Venice Countries: San Marino, The Vatican Ara Pacis Museum

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Austria Cities: Graz, Salzburg, Vienna Library and Learning Centre University of Economics in Vienna

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Czech Republic City: Prague Old Town Square

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Spain City: Barcelona The Sagrada Familia

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Portugal City: Lisbon Champalimaud Foundation

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The Netherlands Cities: Amersfoort, Amsterdam EYE Film Museum

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Belgium Cities: Brussels, Ghent City Pavilion in Ghent

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Germany Cities: Berchtesgaden, Berlin, Dresden, Munich Museum of Military History in Dresden

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V I CT O R I A R . P L AC H E R

P. O . B o x 7 2 8 , D u c k t o w n , T N 3 7 3 2 6 | 8 6 5 . 3 3 7. 0 4 6 7 | v p l a c h e r @ v o l s . u t k . e d u


Victoria Placher | Portfolio 2018  

Selected architectural works and artwork at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville College of Architecture and Design.

Victoria Placher | Portfolio 2018  

Selected architectural works and artwork at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville College of Architecture and Design.

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