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REGIONAL LOOKBOOK

DINNER AT WILLIBALD FARM DISTILLERY

06

THE FOOD ISSUE

TOQUEMAGAZINE.COM


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TAKE YOUR COAT OFF. AND A LOAD OFF. PULL UP A SEAT. THERE’S PLENTY OF ROOM. THAT’S IT - GET NICE AND COMFY. WE DON’T CARE ABOUT YOUR ELBOWS ON OUR TABLE. ALL SETTLED IN? AND READY TO DIG IN? GOOD. NO CUTLERY? NO WORRIES. AFTER ALL, WHAT WE HAVE HERE IS A FEAST FOR THE EYES. AND HANDS. IT’S MORE FOOD FOR THOUGHT, REALLY, THAN FOOD FOR EATING. EYE CANDY. A HEFTY GUIDE – OF TANTALIZING LOCAL DELIGHTS. INCREDIBLE EATS. INSPIRING REGIONAL CULINARY CHAMPIONS. MUST-VISIT FOODIE DESTINATIONS. TO SATISFY YOUR CRAVINGS ONCE WE’VE SPENT ENOUGH TIME TRIGGERING THEM. WORRIED ABOUT DROOLING? DON’T FRET. THESE SEVENTYPOUND SHEETS WILL ABSORB ALMOST ANYTHING. AFTER ALL, THEY’RE STRONG ENOUGH TO SOAK UP ALL THE HARD WORK AND HARD EATING WE’VE BEEN ABLE TO THROW AT THEM THESE PAST FEW MONTHS. OUR EXPERIENCES. AND INVOLVEMENT. OUR STRATEGIC OBSERVATION AND REPRESENTATION. OF THIS REGION. KITCHENER-WATERLOO TO GUELPH; WELLINGTON COUNTY TO HAMILTON. BROOKLYN TO BERLIN. HEY YOU. EAT IT UP. WELCOME TO THE FOOD ISSUE.

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CONTENTS 9. EDITOR’S LETTER: THE FOOD ISSUE 14. G  RAFFITI MARKET: WELCOME TO YOUR NEW LOCAL 26. T HINKING BACKWARDS: FAMILY, COMMUNITY, AND GREAT THAI FOOD IN GUELPH 30. DAYTRIPPIN’ WITH MATTHEW FORBES 34. MEET YOUR MAKER: REIDS CHOCOLATES 36. C  ANOES, KEGS & CAMARADERIE: NAVIGATING OUR REGION WITH ELORA’S FINEST 48. HAMILTON'S DONUT MONSTER: CATCH ONE IF YOU CAN 56. FEATURE: TO PRESERVE & FERMENT 60. THE NEW SCHOOL: MASTERS OF CULINARY EYE CANDY 70. EXPERT OPINION (INVESTMENT): WILL MACTAGGART 72. T WH SOCIAL: UNDERGROUND DIGS FOR UPSCALE COMFORT FOOD 80. FEATURE: #FOODPORN OPEN WIDE 88. POLESTAR HEARTH AND SOURDOUGH BREAD: A REVOLUTIONARY PAIR 92. MORE THAN SOURDOUGH: PIE BY NIGHT 96. U  NCOVERING WELLINGTON COUNTY: BEST BAA DAIRY 98. G  ETTING TO KNOW: 'BREWING CHANGES GUELPH' EXHIBIT 100. MEET YOUR MAKER: FOURQUARTER BUTCHER SHOP 104. ANATOMY OF A BRAND: MERIT BADGE DOUGHNUTS 106. #  PHOTOESSAY: A NORTHERN PILGRIMAGE 117. MEET YOUR MAKER: LEGACY GREENS 118. JAPANESE SOUL FOOD: IZNA DONBURI HOUSE 126. C  AFFEINE & MOTORCYCLES: FINDING HEAVEN AT STEELTOWN 134. FEATURE: #CIDERLOVE 144. MANHATTANS: WHERE PEOPLE WANT TO BE 150. G  ETTING TO KNOW: REN NAVARRO 154. MORE THAN A FARM DISTILLERY: WILLIBALD'S NEW MENU 160. COMIC: GOOSE 162. SANDWICHING 101


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14 BE LM ON

GL

AS

GO

W

V T A E W

KITCHENER

ST

GRAFFITI MARKET:

WELC OME T O YO U R NE W L O C A L BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘It’s even better than I thought it could be,’ I

‘The Pizza Show’ on the Motor City and its

blurt out to restauranteur Ryan Lloyd-Craig

own unique pies. Extra thick but amazingly

between bites. ‘And I expected it to be pretty

light crust with a crispy caramelized bottom.

incredible.’ I chew some more, and then

Toppings layered upside down. Rectangular-

look down at my hands. They’re definitely

shaped from the blue steel pans in which

active participants in this experience. Melted

they’re baked. I’m beginning to understand

mozzarella and brick cheeses run down

why my mom – a bit of a foodie herself –

my index finger. Caramelized onion clings

declares this pizza to be the most delicious in

to my thumb. I feel a bit of what must be

town. (She, of course, eats it with a knife and

braised collard greens on my face. ‘You’ve got

fork.)

something on your cheek,’ Ryan confirms with a grin, before adding: ‘It’s never easy eating one of these things neatly.’ Nor should it be.

I take another bite. And let rich flavours of pulled chicken and smoked bacon dance around in my mouth. Barbecue sauce mingled

One of these things? Pizza. Detroit-style.

with roasted garlic aioli threatens to move

Something I’ve been dying to try since

from my palm down my wrist. ‘We make it

Munchies’ Frank Pinello did an episode of

in-house,’ continues Ryan, referring to the


15


16 delicious sauce, ‘with our coffee porter. Which

Co, and named after the converted railway

we brew in-house.’ He pauses, before adding:

line that runs beside the place. I’m swept

‘With coffee beans that are roasted in-house.’

away by waves of tropical fruit with citrus

A veritable circular food economy, then. At

and peach undertones. I look across the

Kitchener’s Graffiti Market – the most recent

restaurant toward the brewery, which takes

brainchild of Ryan and his Ignite Restaurant

up a substantial portion of the far-left corner

Group business partner (and brother-in-law),

of the space, and spot Red Circle head brewer

Neil Huber.*

Brett Croft – perfectly cropped jet-black beard

The space is definitely something to write home about. Indeed, with 10,000 square feet of craft brewery, bottle shop, produce market, vinyl outlet, ice cream parlour, pop-up stall,

and all – and his right-hand man, the hulking Shane Denison, hard at work. I catch Brett’s eye and, before I know it, he’s on his way over with samples for the table.

swag post and, let’s not forget, restaurant,

First up: ‘Isla,’ a wet hopped pale ale that’s

Graffiti is in a category all its own. ‘And that’s

brewed, Brett tells me, ‘with New Zealand

not including the roastery and bakery just

rakau hops.’ Stunningly good. Next on board:

across the hallway,’ adds Neil, who has joined

‘Cherry Blaster’, a gose with lactobacillus,

us for lunch. Bonkers.

coriander and sea salt. And cherries. Lots of

I wipe my hands on a napkin and take a swig of something special: an ‘Iron Horse Trail’ IPA brewed (you guessed it: in-house) by Graffiti Market’s very own Red Circle Brewing

cherries. ‘Brewed with our friends at Nickel Brook,’ Brett notes of the stuff as he hands me a small glass. ‘We aged it with three hundred pounds of Niagara sour cherries


17


WH AT ’S S O U N I Q U E A BO U T D ET R O I T - ST Y L E P I ZZ A ? 18

1. T HE PAN – Detroit-style pizzas are baked in rectangular blue steel pans (like the ones you’d find in automotive factories)

2. T HE

CHEESE – while the choice of cheese tends to be subjective, the team at Graffiti Market insists that their Detroit-style pizzas are topped with Brick cheese

3. IT’S UPSIDE DOWN – like deep-dish pizza from Chicago, Detroit-style pizzas put the toppings on upside down, with the sauce on top

4.

HYDRATION – Detroit-style pizza dough uses more water for thicker, fluffier results

5. L OCAL

INGREDIENTS – at Graffiti Market, there’s an emphasis on quality local ingredients by local makers


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before dry-hopping it with galaxy and citra

firmly inside the even bigger expanse of

hops.’ As I attempt to envision what three

Kitchener’s magnificent Catalyst137 maker

hundred pounds of cherries might look like,

space. ‘In fact,’ he notes, ‘our first visions of

Ignite Restaurant Group’s culinary director,

Graffiti Market were for an intimate pizza

Brian McCourt, who’s also joined our table,

joint at another location altogether.’ Ryan

jumps into the conversation: ‘We try to

continues: ‘But the concept kept growing, and

incorporate as many of Brett’s beers into our

then the opportunity to locate at Catalyst fell

recipes here at Graffiti as possible. From the

into our lap.’ He pauses, before adding: ‘It’s a

[aforementioned] barbecue sauce made with

good thing we went this big because even with

our porter, to our house mustards fermented

a capacity of over three hundred we’re getting

with Brett’s pilsner, to our mussels prepared

slammed every Thursday, Friday and Saturday

with his blonde ale, to our bread baked with

nights. Folks are waiting for tables up to forty-

his porter – we try to maintain as much of a

five minutes. And coming back again the next

circular food system as possible.’

night – with friends.’

Brian continues: ‘What we’ve got here is

As I finish the last piece of my Detroit-style

special. A restaurant with its own brewery. A

pizza and nod in affirmation, I recall a line

brewery with its own roastery. A roastery with

from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet: ‘He that

its own bakery. A bakery with its own produce

cannot lick his fingers goes not with me.’ I

market. And a market with its own restaurant.

have no trouble at all understanding why folks

All collaborating with each other in a way that

line up here, every weekend, for all of this

hasn’t been seen in these parts – or almost anywhere, for that matter.’ Incredible, really. And spectacularly ambitious. ‘It wasn’t always supposed to be this big,’ Ryan remarks as he catches me gazing across the impressive space – which is itself planted

.

* Ryan and Neil’s other projects include downtown Kitchener’s The Rich Uncle Tavern (formerly The Berlin) and Conestogo’s soon-to-be-opened Crowsfoot Cider House. They’re definitely not sitting on their hands, then.


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TH I N KI N G BACKW A RD S :

FAMILY, COMMUNITY, AND GREAT THAI FOOD IN GUELPH

26 VIC TO RIA

BY GUEST CONTRIBUTOR JONATHON BARRABALL

RD S

YO

RK

RD

GUELPH

There is a little yellow house on York Road in

In 2013 she opened ‘Love at First Bite!’, a small

Guelph, just before the intersection at Victoria.

food stall in the Guelph Farmer’s Market.

It wasn’t always yellow – it used to be red brick,

And then, shortly after, another stall in the

home to a small Portuguese Piri Piri restaurant.

Aberfoyle Market. In 2015 she finally achieved

After the ownership changed hands, a new

her dream of opening a restaurant – albeit a

sign went up on that freshly painted yellow

cozy one, take-out and catering – with half a

house, which read ‘Na-Ha-Thai’s Kitchen,’ and

dozen seats and fewer parking spots.

it wasn’t long before everyone was telling me about ‘the new Thai place’ in Guelph. After my first visit I pledged to join those growing ranks of loyal Na-Ha-Thai patrons who declare this to be really good Thai food.

Naruemon recently had TOQUE in to Na-HaThai’s Kitchen for a lunch that quickly revealed what sets her restaurant apart. Everything she made for us was amazing. I could readily see why pad ga pow – a Thai street food staple

Naruemon, the owner of Na-Ha-Thai’s Kitchen,

featuring ground pork stir-fried with holy basil,

moved to Canada just over a decade ago from

and served with stingingly spicy fresh chili

Thailand, where she worked as a researcher

sauce, steamed rice, fresh vegetables, and

in sustainable agriculture at Chiang Mai

a fried egg on top – is the most popular dish

University. Language barriers made it difficult

in Thailand. Khao soi, Naruemon’s personal

for her to find similar work here, so she turned

favourite, was unbelievable – firm egg noodles

to her lifelong passion for food and cooking.

in a delicately spicy coconut curry broth, with


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chicken, beef, shrimp, red onion, cilantro, and garnished with crispy fried egg noodles. ‘Na-Ha-Thai’s is authentic Thai food, made from scratch by Thai people,’ Naruemon told me. ‘We use organic ingredients everywhere that it’s possible. Our food is healthy, and we try our best to make everyone feel welcome, whether dairy-free, gluten-free or vegan.’ In order to be able to return to Thailand regularly, Naruemon closes the restaurant for a month every summer. ‘Those trips are for two reasons: family and research,’ she told me: ‘I like to keep up to date and bring back new ideas for the restaurant, but for me family is the most important thing.’ So that everybody who works at Na-Ha-Thai can rest and see their families, the restaurant is closed two days a week. ‘I like to think backwards,’ Naruemon told me. ‘I do what I love first and foremost – food, family, sharing – and business and profits come after.’ Owning a restaurant isn’t easy, especially when it serves a specific ethnic cuisine. Expectations and pre-conceived notions of Thai food all too often force these types of restaurants to serve a diluted, Westernized version of their homeland’s dishes. But Naruemon maintains that she wants to continue ‘to share real Thai food with people – especially dishes from Chiang Mai because it’s so beautiful and diverse.’ If

you’ve

tried

Naruemon’s

food

you’ll

understand why there’s a two and a half hour wait for take-out on Friday nights. ‘The community has been so supportive and people can be so patient,’ she gratefully sighs. ‘Good

.

food takes time, and there are just so many orders on a busy night!’

NA-HA-THAI’S KITCHEN 471 YORK RD, GUELPH

nahathaikitchen.weebly.com

29


DAYTRIPPIN’

A L AZ Y S U ND A Y FROM BROOKLYN TO B E R LIN ( AN D B AC K AGAIN )

MATTHEW FORBES

PROPRIETOR AT ‘MATTHEW’S BARBERSHOP’

Matthew Forbes is a man about Guelph. Indeed, it seems there aren’t many Royal City residents who don’t know this former coffee-slinger-turned-barber. And while Matthew spends six days a week cutting hair at his Macdonnell St business, Sundays are for touring – from Brooklyn to Berlin. Wanna know Matthew’s fave haunts? Just follow along:

1. Sunday mornings begin at The Common

T H E C OMMO N

in downtown Guelph. The owner, Kia, is good

36 WILSON ST, GUELPH

people – as are her beautiful staff. I order a ‘Jewel of India’ black tea with milk and a touch of sugar, as well as something sweet or savoury (mood dependent) from Rockwood’s Goodfellows Field to Fork. I pay with cash,

B U T C HE R S HO P AND GR O C E R IE S

chat with friends, collect hugs, and move on.

219 SILVERCREEK PKWY N, GUELPH

2. Next stop is Butcher Shop And Groceries.

30 30

This halal grocery is where I buy hibiscus flowers to make the best blood pressurereducing tea. There’s so much more to this out-of-the-way business – but I restrict myself to hibiscus for my tea.

3. It’s still early, and I drive down the 7 T HE YE T I

toward Kitchener for more hearty fare. My destination: The Yeti. While everything on

14 EBY STREET N,

the menu is phenomenal, I settle on ‘The

KITCHENER

Brekkie’ – eggs any way I like them, choice of meaty deliciousness, potatoes of some sort, and beautiful tomato, avocado, fresh fruit,

X - DI S C - C M U SIC 7 MOYER PL, KITCHENER

halloumi, salad, bagel or thick crust sourdough toast. The food’s incredible. The vibe’s just as delicious.

4. At X-Disc-C Music there are records everywhere. In racks. On shelves. Stacked. Piled. Leaning. Each time I visit I spend about forty minutes browsing. Until I’m overwhelmed. Sometimes I buy stuff. Other times I don’t.


5. After shopping for vinyl I stop for lunch at Mi Tienda Latina – a family-run Latin American grocery store and restaurant where you order in Spanish through a small hole in the kitchen wall. While the papusas and tamales de pollo are phenomenal, I

MI TI ENDA LATI NA

usually settle for the soup of the day and

103 ONTARIO ST S, KITCHENER

whatever giant chunks of meat and vegetable accompany it. I eat at the communal table, chatting with strangers who soon become friends.

6.

Being stuffed from my hearty lunch

doesn’t stop me from perusing the desserts

CAFÉ P Y RU S

at Café Pyrus – organic, vegan, delicious. I

16 CHARLES ST W, KITCHENER

choose something amazing and settle into a cozy spot in the dining area, and read something local.

31

7. Time for exercise. So off to the Huron Natural Area – an amalgam of forest, streams, trails and meadows, lookout areas and boardwalks that comprise Kitchener’s largest and most valuable natural space. Along with other hikers, joggers, photographers and bird watchers, I find myself rejuvenated and refreshed as I move through the great outdoors.

8. I drive back to Guelph for an afternoon siesta. (Midday napping is an indulgence worth taking up.) As evening approaches

H URON NATURAL AREA 801 TRILLIUM DR, KITCHENER

SH AWARMA.G 328 SPEEDVALE AVE E 31A, GUELPH

it's off to Shawarma.G, a new shawarma restaurant in Guelph that’s run by Syrian refugees. While I observe them preparing

.

my authentic Syrian food, I reflect on our common pleasure in this region we all call home

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G

METC

CA N OES , KEGS & C A M A R A D E R I E : ED D ES

ST

36

ST

ALFE

ELORA

NAVIGATING OUR REGION WITH ELORA’S FINEST BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘This really did seem like a good idea when

kegs of Elora’s finest from the downtown

we first came up with it,’ I comment to Elora

brewery to Kitchener’s Lancaster Smokehouse

Brewing Company’s Jenna Harkness while

and, afterwards, the Blackwing Coffee Bar in

we tread ever so gingerly across a thin

downtown Galt.

column of slippery rocks toward a larger cluster of boulders in the middle of the river. A biting wind surges up my sleeves and down my neck. My bare hands – clenched tightly

Our delivery route: the Grand River. Our means of transport: canoe.

to my camera and gear – burn with cold.

Why? Because Elora brewer Mike Brooks

About twenty feet out from the safety of the

thought it would be awesome. (But really – what

shoreline, my right foot mistakes a clump of

doesn’t that guy find awesome?) And because

autumn leaves floating on the water’s surface

when Mike first presented this dream to me

for solid ground and plunges into the drink.

over a couple pints of Elora Borealis – months

‘Not so much any more,’ I add. And then, as

before, on a hot, sunny, summer afternoon at

I pull my frigid sopping foot from the water,

the brewery – I thought it’d be awesome, too.

ask no one in particular: ‘Whose idea was this,

(Like Mike, I’m a glutton for awesome.) Surely

anyway?’

this would be a fun way to further convince

It’s not even nine in the morning. Late October. Wisps of white from the year’s first snowfall still linger in places on the cold ground. My foot is ice. My only dry pair of shoes is back in Guelph. And this adventure has only just begun. The objective? To deliver

folks that our region of communities – Elora, Guelph, Kitchener-Waterloo, Galt, Hamilton and everything in between – can, and should, be traversed. Regularly. Seamlessly. Always. And what better way to do it than on our region’s most majestic waterway: the Grand River. Fantastic.


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‘EVER Y O NE M U S T B E L I E V E I N SO MET HIN G. I BEL IE V E IN C AN O E I N G . ’ - H E N R Y D AV I D T H ORE AU

38


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40

On

that

summer

of

me, shouldering a keg of Three Fields Lager.

navigating the Grand – from Elora’s awe-

Almost at that crop of boulders in the middle

inspiring

like

of the Grand. Brooksy behind – hauling a canoe

Inverhaugh, West Montrose, Winterbourne,

and some paddles. And behind him Elora’s

Conestogo, Bloomingdale, to what would

John Laurencic and Erin Gurr accompanied by

be our first stop at The Lanc – had certainly

TOQUE’s Cai Sepulis and our colleague, Sonia

filled me with delight. ‘We’ll deliver our first

Preisler. Dragging more gear. And breakfast,

keg and stop for lunch there,’ Brooksy had

too – to be enjoyed in the middle of the river

suggested exuberantly. I recall images of

before we head downstream.

gorge

afternoon,

past

scenic

visions towns

brisket, ribs, pigtails, cheesy grits and collard greens dancing through my head. And Elora beer. ‘And then,’ he’d continued, ‘we’ll carry on to Blackwing in Galt for another keg delivery. With full bellies.’ I imagined this second half of our route. Past Kitchener. Through Breslau. Alongside Preston. We would glide into Galt past nineteenth-century limestone buildings and picturesque riverbanks that were most recently made famous on the small screen in the adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’. Fantastic. Idyllic. Dreamy. Fast forward to now. On this cold October morning. Grey. Wet. Dreary. Jenna ahead of

Thankfully, the gorge’s towering cliffs all around us offer at least a wee bit of shelter from the wind, so our mighty crew settles in (so to speak) to discuss strategy while we dig in to fresh cinnamon buns from Elora Bread Company and coffee from our friends at Blackwing. It becomes apparent soon enough that our appetite for what’s estimated to be a nine-hour voyage down the Grand in the biting cold isn’t quite as voracious as our appetite for cinnamon buns. And so it’s not long before I muster the temerity to ask a question that is surely on everybody’s mind: ‘Why don’t we just drive?’


41


42 Which is what we end up doing. Not the

fulfilled I feel – despite our seeming complete

whole way, of course. That would be cheating.

failure to live up to the dreams of that summer

Instead, after transporting our canoes much

afternoon over pints with Brooksy. Because

of the way, we manage to drop them back into

we did something here. We planned. And

the water in Kitchener – to experience what it’s

gathered. And executed a version of our initial

really like to deliver a keg by canoe to The Lanc.

fantasy – to traverse our region from one end

(It’s more difficult than you might think.) And

to the other. A somewhat meager version,

to enjoy heaping plates of meat. And we fully

to be sure. But still. And we’ll be back – to

intend to put those stalwart vessels back in

execute this entire trip. By canoe. On some

the water in Galt, too. To paddle up to our final

long summer day in the not-too-distant future.

destination – Blackwing. But we don’t. Instead, after we’ve stuffed ourselves with pigtails and grits, we drive in convoy to Blackwing where owner Katherine Chiles greets our crew with coffee and treats. And bourbon too.

As laughter and conversation of the day’s adventure fill our cozy Blackwing nook, I look out one of the large plate-glass windows towards our cluster of cars parked outside. And, focusing on the canoes lashed to their

It’s almost five o-clock. And, as the bunch of us

roofs, I chuckle. And then look over at Brooksy,

collapse into a glorious horseshoe of leather

who’s perched himself on an upright keg of

couches and chairs at this most awesome

Three Fields. And, raising my pint to him, I

Galt coffee and craft beer destination, I’m

exclaim: ‘We did something today.’ He meets

embarrassed by how exhausted I feel. After all,

my eyes, raises his bourbon, and affirms

I sheepishly think to myself, we didn’t spend

heartily: ‘We sure did.’

more than a trickle of minutes on the water. But I’m also struck by something else: how

.

We sure did


ELORA BREWING CO. 107 GEDDES ST, ELORA

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It’s about time. Spend it well.

TWOTHIRTYSTRATFORD.COM


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HAMILTON’S DONUT MONSTER: CA T C H O N E I F Y O U CA N BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘What should we grab?’, I ask TOQUE Partner

amazing too. And I’ll need to try the Beeramisu

Cai Sepulis as we work our way closer to the

- and let Grain & Grit’s Joe and Lindsay know

front of the line – a line that keeps growing

how it is. And some for my kids, too, who can

behind us. ‘The Matcha Mint White Chocolate

never get enough of what my four-year-old

looks fantastic,’ she says. ‘I’ll probably get

calls ‘the donut monsters.’ (I can already hear

one of those - and maybe a Beeramisu.’ I

her little voice when she sees the box: ‘Did you

peer through the glass case at the donut

get us the donut monsters, daddy?’ It kills me.

Cai’s pointing to - a gorgeous specimen with

Every time.) ‘Let’s be sure to get enough for

rich mascarpone cream filling infused with

a box,’ I tell Cai. ‘I love their boxes.’ And their

Hamilton brewery Grain & Grit’s double

cups. And everywhere this place – Hamilton’s

chocolate stout and topped with cocoa dusted

storied Donut Monster – puts its distinctive

cream cheese icing capped with a chocolate-

brand.

covered espresso bean. My mouth begins to water.

‘We worked with Burlington's Insite Design to flush out the visual representation of the

As the couple ahead of us places their order,

customer experience,’ Donut Monster founder

I need to think fast. I want a Classic Apple

Reuben Vanderkwaak tells me when, on

Fritter for sure. And the Double Almond looks

another visit, I ask him about it. ‘They do a lot


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of work with breweries and wineries around

the sense the donut monster is on its quest.

the Niagara region.’ He continues: ‘Most of the

Always lurking. Searching. For donuts.

agencies we approached immediately began creating central monster characters - but I wanted something more subtle,’ he explains. ‘Insite crafted amazing illustrations and built a story around the brand – which had only existed visually as a logo up to that point.’

In the beginning Donut Monster really was an elusive product. That was when Reuben, a former graphic designer and avid cyclist, first began developing his donuts out of his home. He was a stay-at-home dad to a two- and fouryear-old then and his distinctive confections,

Reuben waxes eloquent when we talk about

inspired by the donut shops Reuben and his

his logo: ‘To me, the donut monster represents

family discovered during a hefty cycling tour

a phenomenon we experienced in our early

across America, were a distraction from child

days when folks would scour our distributors

rearing. Those early donuts were distributed

in search of our product. We tended to sell out

only to close friends and family who – as you

really fast, so people started mythologizing

can imagine – were only too happy to serve

the journey to find our donuts. The donut

as his guinea pigs. When it became apparent

monster is always pursuing donuts but rarely

that Reuben’s culinary wares were a hit – and

finding them. There’s a seductive, elusive

could become the focus for a business – he

quality to it all.’ A quality that’s manifested in

sought out a commercial kitchen and, in 2015,

the illustrative elements of those boxes, and

co-founded The Kitchen Collective, a non-

cups, I find so appealing. Bits of hands, or

profit co-op kitchen that serves as a culinary

fur, or other parts of the monster, are made

incubator of sorts.

visible. Poking through. Here and there. Never fully realized. Just enough detail that you get


@DONUTMONSTERHAMILTON


52


After an initial showing at the Hamilton Flea, it wasn’t long before Reuben was baking donuts out of this kitchen and delivering them to a handful of spots across Steeltown – including The Cannon, RELAY Coffee Roasters and Vintage Coffee Roasters. And on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays only. ‘This seemed to work for a while,’ reminisces Reuben, ‘but not for long.’ He chuckles, recalling those early days. ‘We sold out so quickly that it became apparent we’d need to expand. And so, in our first two years, we found ourselves increasing distribution from three locations one day a week to twenty-five locations multiple days each week – across Hamilton, Dundas, Burlington and the Mountain.’ And increased demand didn’t just require more circulation. It also put a strain on Donut Monster’s kitchen situation. Indeed, by 2017 almost thirty aspiring and small businesses used the kitchen as their own, and Reuben simply found himself needing more space. Which is where this gorgeous Locke Street location, opened January 2018, comes in. With these exposed brick walls. And leather-back seats with belt buckle accents. And painted tables and murals decorated with bits of the donut monster. And this line-up. And Cai and me up at the front ordering donuts. I make final decisions – which is not easy with twenty flavours from which to choose. Behind the counter a small army of Donut Monster employees – in various flavours of hipster – are working dutifully and with purpose. I spot Reuben in the back – a cycling cap perched atop his head. I wave – and he returns the salutation. Cai and I grab our box of donuts – as well as a seat near the window. After all, there’s no way we’re leaving without first enjoying the fruits of our labour. Of our pursuit. Of these elusive donuts. I dive into a pear walnut

.

armagnac fritter and, my mouth stuffed with donut, breathe a sigh of relief. The chase is over. For today, at least

DONUT MONSTER 246 LOCKE ST S, HAMILTON

donutmonster.ca


YEARS


P + P = 40 2

2

(passion)

(people)

(years)

When passion for beautiful design combines with the desire to provide an exceptional experience, and you add wonderful customers served by devoted associates, you are delighted to celebrate 40 years! As brothers and business partners for four decades, we have been on an incredible journey that has brought many meaningful relationships into our lives. To all those who have supported us and entrusted us with their most cherished moments and milestones, we thank you.

Greg & Jeff Buzbuzian

G U E L P H • OA KV I L L E • TO R O N TO

KNAR.COM


To Preserve & Ferment PICKLED TU R N I P pickle s eh! M a de in Stratf ord Av ailable at: Leg acy Greens, Ki tchener

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CHAG A K O M B Live Kombucha Made in Gue lph Available at: Market Fre sh, Guelph

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January 24-27, 2019 · Guelph Presenters

Friday, January 25

CONCERT

READING

LECTURE

TANYA TAGAQ

ESI EDUGYAN

HAROON SIDDIQUI

Experimental vocalist and artist Tanya Tagaq won the 2014 Polaris Prize for best Canadian album, Animism. Her first book, Split Tooth, folds memoir with fiction, traditional stories with reality, and poetry with prose. Dark and rapturous, Split Tooth does with words what Tagaq’s music does without, sweeping the reader into a space where life’s artificial constructs hold no claim. Tagaq has spoken of her musical improvisation as a never-ending thread pulled through the needle’s eye; set in a part of the world where a year can feel like one long day, Split Tooth is a rich and startling expression of this continuum, a striking metaphysics that informs Tagaq’s art across forms.

From the author of the awardwinning international best seller, Half-Blood Blues, comes a dazzling adventure story about a boy who rises from the ashes of slavery to become a free man of the world. Washington Black was shortlisted for the 2018 Man Booker Prize, and is a finalist for the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize. It won the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize.

The internet led to the slow death of newsrooms, substituting journalistic institutions with free fake news and celebrity reporting. It let American digital behemoths raid our privacy, sell our private data for unprecedented profits, and pay no taxes. It empowered hate-mongers and populists, poisoned public discourse, divided us into quarrelling tribes, devalued truth, and undermined liberal democracies. Haroon Siddiqui, editorial page editor emeritus of the Toronto Star and distinguished visiting professor at Ryerson University, surveys the ruins and suggests some ways forward.

With a reading from her new memoir, Split Tooth

Presenting her latest novel, Washington Black

Tickets and more information:

Community Partners

Media Partners

Sponsors Get Noticed. Get Found.

Social Media, Populism and the Crisis of Democracy

festival.artseverywhere.ca


#FOOD P OR N TH E N EW S CHO O L :

MASTERS OF CULINARY EYE CANDY WE EAT WITH OUR EYES FIRST. AND, IN TODAY’S SOCIAL MEDIA AGE, I’D HAZARD A GUESS THAT QUITE OFTEN WE EAT – OR INGEST – WITH OUR EYES ONLY. NEED PROOF? DO A CURSORY SEARCH OF THE HASHTAG #FOODPORN ON INSTAGRAM AND WATCH YOUR (APTLY-NAMED) FEED FILL WITH ALMOST ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY MILLION BITE-SIZE IMAGES OF VIS UALLY-TITILLATING, DRO OL-INDUCING EATS.

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INDEED, IT’S ALMOST AS THOUGH THE CELLPHONE HAS USURPED THE KITCHEN KNIFE AS A COOK’S MOST VALUABLE CULINARY TOOL. IN OUR REGION, THERE EXISTS A SMALL HANDFUL OF YOUNG CHEFS WHO ARE ELEVATING THE FOOD PRESENTATION GAME TO NEW HEIGHTS. WITH DISHES THAT ARE EQUAL PARTS MINIMALIST, WHIMSICAL AND MISCHIEVOUS, THESE COOKS ARE CREATING AESTHETIC MASTERPIECES THAT SERVE TO BE PHOTOGRAPHED, POSTED AND DEVOURED WITH OUR EYES AS MUCH AS THEY BEG TO BE CONSUMED BY OUR MOUTHS. OVER THE PAST LITTLE WHILE, TOQUE MANAGED TO TURN THE CAMERA’S EYE AWAY FROM THE FOOD AND ONTO FOUR OF THESE COOKS – AS MUCH VIS UAL ARTISTS AS CULINARY MASTERS. TAKE A GOOD LOOK. AND REMEMBER THESE FACES.

‘ART IS NOT WHAT YOU SEE, BUT WHAT YOU MAKE OTHERS SEE.’ -EDGAR DEGAS


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Elizabeth Street Eatery Chef de Cuisine Zach Stachyra puts the finishing touches on a most exquisite beet salad


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R Y A N DELEO N ,

C H E F D E C U I SI NE Quatrefoil Restaurant, Dundas quatrefoilrestaurant.com


Sometimes life comes with a little turbulence.

@quatrefoilrestaurant


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E M IL Y S CH LI EPER ,

S OU S C H E F Arabella Park Beer Bar, Kitchener arabellaparkbar.com


Your investments need to adapt with you.

@arabellaparkbar


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J OE Y BO RN I N O ,

C H E F & OW NE R Elizabeth Street Eatery, Guelph elizabethstreeteatery.com


We are your navigators.

Financial leadership for your future.

TheMactaggartHrynTeam.com

@elizabethsteatery

Richardson GMP Limited, Member Canadian Investor Protection Fund. Richardson is a trade-mark of James Richardson & Sons, Limited. GMP is a registered trade-mark of GMP Securities L.P. Both used under license by Richardson GMP Limited.


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#winterready 30 Arrow Rd, Guelph, ON

paramountsports.ca


THE RIGHT INVESTMENT RECIPE LETS YOU EXPERIMENT FROM TIME TO TIME WILL MACTAGGART

themactaggartteam.com

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EXPERT OPINION | INVESTMENT

We all know there are various types of home cooks. Among them are people who meticulously follow a recipe, carefully measure ingredients, and diligently set timers. These folks clean as they go, and their kitchen remains tidy and organized. They leave little margin for error, and their results are predictable, reliable, satisfying. Then there are the “no recipe shall contain me” types, the cooks who pull all available ingredients out of the fridge, and then dive in. They follow the fundamental principles of cooking and seem to know which ingredients work well together, but they go their own way, tossing in a dash of this, a handful of that, and hope for the best. Their workspace is chaotic and their results are not necessarily predictable – though every once in a while they create a culinary masterpiece that everyone talks about for days. I’ve seen similar ‘investment chefs’: advisors who have a proven recipe, and those that dabble with the latest flavours in the markets. Their results tend to be the same as we find at the dinner party: trusted and reliable, or hit-andmiss. When the dabbler hits the jackpot, which happens, word spreads fast and everyone wants the ‘recipe’.

While there is room for a little experimenting in the financial kitchen, I tend to caution people against taking too much of a trial-and-error approach. If you follow a recipe that is proven and consistent, the end result can be better predicted, even if you toss in some different flavours from time to time. Stock market volatility, rising interest rates, and political rhetoric all make for uncertain times. The best way to get reliable investment results is to follow a consistent process. A solid portfolio recipe doesn’t preclude fresh possibilities. Just like adjusting the seasoning of your favourite dish, you can take advantage of new opportunities, make adjustments to your asset mix. Investing isn’t so different from cooking. Unless you’re a Michelin Star chef or downright lucky, you generally get better results when you stick to a recipe rather than making things up from scratch. The opinions expressed in this report are the opinions of the author and readers should not assume they reflect the opinions or recommendations of Richardson GMP Limited or its affiliates. Richardson GMP Limited, Member Canadian Investor Protection Fund. Richardson is a trade-mark of James Richardson & Sons, Limited. GMP is a registered trade-mark of GMP Securities L.P. Both used under license by Richardson GMP Limited.


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TW H S OC I AL : UNDERGROUND DIGS FOR UPSCALE COMFORT FOOD

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KITCHENER

‘If I didn’t know better, I’d say this amazing place has a bit of a speakeasy-type vibe going on,’ TOQUE Partner Cai Sepulis whispers as we tuck into our booth for lunch. I nod affirmatively - even though I’ve never actually seen a speakeasy. But I’ve heard enough to have a pretty good idea of what Cai is alluding to. I look around. TWH Social in downtown Kitchener. For sure – posh as it is – this grand old landmark definitely could be said to evoke a certain cloak-and-dagger feel. Like some upscale gambling den. Or exclusive prohibition clubhouse. The underground location beneath the shops that line Kitchener’s downtown core. The exposed brick walls and backlit arched ‘window boxes’ that make up an evocative chiaroscuro. My mind begins to wander. I picture Al Capone lounging in one of the padded leather booths.

Or John Dillinger coming out of the bathroom. ‘You’re not too far off the mark about the feel of the place,’ says TWH General Manager Nathaniel Beattie, who strolls over to our booth to welcome us. ‘In fact, they used to film Murdoch Mysteries here. And the old vaults are still in use – now, albeit, as beer fridge and wine cellar.’ Very cool. The restaurant, more than an occasional set for noir-ish worlds, plays double duty as both a stand-alone bistro and the restaurant of downtown’s storied Walper Hotel, which has, over the years, been host to all sorts of characters – including prime ministers, governors general and tech nobility, along with any number of notables and local folk. We look around as we get comfortable in our booth to see if we recognize anyone here today. Craig Beattie, whose Perimeter


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Developments have been instrumental in

to prepare a few dishes for us. ‘To give you

resurrecting the downtown core one project

a taste of what we have to offer,’ remarks

at a time, is seated a couple booths over.

Nathaniel, ‘including a couple items you might

Entrenched in his meal and his laptop. A

have never tried before.’ Sounds good. While

couple tables past him I think I recognize

we wait for the first dishes to come out of the

a familiar face from City Hall, deep in

kitchen, I ask Nathaniel about the particular

conversation. After a few more seconds

character of the restaurant – where he sees

perusing the space, my attention shifts to

it fitting in Kitchener-Waterloo’s burgeoning

Nathaniel, who stands ready to tell us about

culinary scene. He is quick to answer. ‘We’re

the tap list. ‘We actually have twenty taps,’ he

a unique beast,’ he begins, ‘because we cater

notes, ‘all featuring brews from Ontario. As

to everyone from out-of-town hotel guests to

well as a bottle program for some harder-to-

local residents. Our menu certainly reflects

get brews.’ I give the bottle list a once-over:

this. We offer everything from steak and

Burdock’s Ton Ton Saison and Beau’s Tom

eggs and huevos benedictinos for brunch

Green’s Cherry Milk Stout instantly catch my

to Korean steak sandwiches and house

eye. But I select an Amsterdam Space Invader

made korma for lunch to chicken confit and

IPA – big, bold, juicy. Perfect. Cai settles on

poached cod for dinner. In other words, we

sparkling water. She’s driving.

run the gamut of flavours and styles. But we

It’s not long before our drinks arrive, and

attend seriously to each one.’

Nathaniel informs us that the restaurant’s

Nathaniel continues: ‘Our mission is to

co-chefs – Grant Holdbrook (formerly of

create a diverse number of dishes using the

Langdon Hall) and Carlo Atienza (a former

highest quality ingredients – collaborating

engineer and self-taught cook) – have decided

with as many local producers as possible.’


@TWH_SOCIAL

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Like Golden Hearth Bakery, for instance. And

bone on Munchies’ ‘Chef’s Night Out.’’ With

Goodvibes Kombucha. ‘Our partnership with

a little guidance from Nathaniel, I’m soon

Goodvibes is pretty awesome,’ Nathaniel tells

scooping the luscious rich marrow out onto

us. ‘We’ve come up with an entire cocktail

its accompanying Golden Hearth sourdough.

menu using their kombucha – including

And enjoying every morsel. The tartare is also

amazing concoctions like our 'Orchard Bellini'

phenomenal – as are the scallops. Score one

for example, with Pama Liqueur, peach &

(or three, for that matter) for these exquisite

mint kombucha, Prosecco and apple spice. Or

dishes. Elevated comfort food with a twist,

the 'Tom Sour' with Dillon’s dry gin [so good],

indeed.

sour cherry kombucha, lemon and simple syrup.’ I’m keen to try some of these next time we stop by.

As we put away the last remnants of our appetizers, Chef Grant emerges from the kitchen with the main we’ve decided to split:

Nathaniel goes on: ‘You might say we strive

duck breast with brioche bread pudding,

to do elevated comfort food – with a twist.’

honey and thyme roasted sunchoke, swiss

As he finishes this statement, our appetizers

chard and juniper jus. The presentation

arrive. They immediately impress, as Cai and

alone has me excited. The taste – even more.

I learn soon enough that their flamboyance

‘You’ve got yourself quite an amazing place

is matched by their extraordinary flavor.

here,’ I remark to Nathaniel as I load my fork

Lamb tartare with spiced carrot purée and

with some of the bread pudding along with

grilled sourdough. Pan-seared scallops with

some jus-infused duck. And, so delighted and

cauliflower cream, bacon lardon, brioche

content in these extraordinary suroundings, I

croutons and pickled onion. And bone

think to myself: if this is what a real speakeasy

marrow with honey pickled mushrooms,

would have been like way back when, then I’m

cipollini agrodolce and grilled sourdough.

living in the wrong century. But I’m thankful

‘Bone marrow!’ My discernible level of marvel

.

that TWH exists in this one

and excitement has nearby diners turning their heads. I explain to Cai: ‘I’ve wanted to try it since watching Jesse Koide and his culinary crew slurp vodka straight from the

TWH SOCIAL BAR & BISTRO 1 KING ST W, KITCHENER

twhsocial.com


guelph’s premier business District Welcome to the junction

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Book a Tour Today! Mike Taylor mtaylor@granitehomes.ca (519) 400-8527 guelphjunction.ca


EAT YOUR HEART OUT #FOODPORN OPEN WIDE Last year, we tempted you with burgers from five of our most favourite culinary destinations across the region. This year, we’re at it again. So buckle up. But not before loosening your belt a notch or two. You’re gonna need the extra room.


E THE L ’S L O U NG E – F u n ky Bu rger 8oz ALL-BEEF PATTY, SHREDDED LETTUCE, TOMATO, ONION & PICKLE. Pairs with Molson Stock Ale (from the bottle, of course) ETHELSLOUNGE.COM 114 KING ST N, WATERLOO

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LI T T L E L O U I E ’ S BU R G E R JO I N T AND S O U P E RY – Bu i l d Y o ur O w n B ur g er 8oz BEEF PADDY, HAVARTI, SHREDDED LETTUCE, SUN-DRIED TOMATOES, GUACAMOLE & SRIRACHA AIOLI. Pairs with a banana peanut butter malted milkshake

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LITTLELOUIESBURGERJOINT.COM 234 CLYDE RD, CAMBRIDGE

T H E Y E T I CA F É - T he B r ek k i e TWO EGGS SUNNY SIDE UP, CRISPY BACON, AVOCADO SLICES, FRESH FRUIT & THICK CUT SOURDOUGH BREAD. PAIRED WITH COFFEE – BLACK 14 EBY ST N, KITCHENER THEYETICAFE.COM


E L IZA B E TH S TRE E T E A TE RY – Th e Qu een E li zabeth TWO DRY-AGED STRIPLOIN AND CHUCK PATTIES, GOLDEN BUN, ‘E STREET’ SAUCE, ICEBERG LETTUCE & ONE-YEAR AGED CHEDDAR. Pairs with Bellwoods Roman Candle IPA ELIZABETHSTREETEATERY.COM 447 ELIZABETH ST, GUELPH

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C AF É P Y R U S – T H E B U R G E R HENRY’S ORGANIC TEMPEH W/ PYRUS’ SPICE BLEND, ORGANIC KAISER, ORGANIC ROMAINE, TOMATO, AVOCADO, SPINACH, RED ONION, MUSTARD, KETCHUP, ROASTED GARLIC AIOLI & AGED ORGANIC CHEDDAR. Pairs with Live Kimbucha CAFEPYRUS.COM 16 CHARLES ST W, KITCHENER

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T H E Y E T I CA F É - T he B r ek k i e TWO EGGS SUNNY SIDE UP, CRISPY BACON, AVOCADO SLICES, FRESH FRUIT & THICK CUT SOURDOUGH BREAD. PAIRED WITH COFFEE – BLACK 14 EBY ST N, KITCHENER THEYETICAFE.COM


HA MB RG R – LE R OY ALE WI T H C H E E SE HAND-SMASHED PATTY, ‘FRENCH’ ONIONS, MELTED HAVARTI, CRISPY SHOESTRING POTATOES, SMOKED BACON JAM, BLACK TRUFFLE & TRIPLE CRUNCH AIOLI. Pairs with Great Lakes’ Octopus Wants to Fight IPA HAMBRGR.CA 49 KING WILLIAM ST, HAMILTON

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www.royalcity.com

Home is…

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FERGUS: 519-843-1365 | GORDON ST: 519-824-9050

ROCKWOOD: 519-856-9922 | SPEEDVALE: 519-821-6191 Not intended to solicit listings currently listed for sale


88 W

POLESTAR HEARTH AND SOURDOUGH BREAD:

O O LW IC H

R EA

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ST

A REVOLUTIONARY PAIR BY GUEST CONTRIBUTOR JONATHON BARRABALL ‘All sorrows are less with bread.’

-Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

Bakeries smell good. It’s a universal truth. Walking in to the smell of warm bread is a soul cleansing experience that everyone should have on at least a weekly basis. And when you open the door to Polestar Hearth, a sourdough bakery in Guelph, this sensory phenomenon is heightened to such a degree that you might never want to leave. In the words of my girlfriend, Sidey, whom I brought to Polestar for the first time the other week, ‘it

inducing aroma. It began eleven years ago when Jesse Merrill, the owner and creator (then a musical instrument repairman), built a small brick oven in his backyard and began making sourdough. Soon Jesse was delivering fresh loaves of sourdough bread by bicycle throughout his neighborhood. Before long he transferred his operation to a much larger oven he built in his garage, and finally, two years ago, he moved his bread-making activities into his bakery proper, Polestar, which now produces loaves of sourdough – this seemingly simple food composed of

smells so good you could die in here.’

only four ingredients that, when slightly

Polestar Hearth is indeed a special place,

fabulous results – in a warm, cozy, peaceful,

and not just for the thoughts-of-the-after-life

and welcoming space.

manipulated, can produce innumerable


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It’s easy to get caught up watching the bakers

around it,’ he says. ‘It continues to give – and

at Polestar hard at work, folding and shaping

continues to challenge.’

dough or sliding loaves of sourdough in

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and out of the oven. Yet the place has an almost meditative aura, even with a swarm of patrons bustling about on a Saturday morning. ‘Breadmaking is a peaceful, simple process,’ Tobey Deystells, who heads up the baking program at Polestar, tells me. Tobey talks about sourdough as if the bread has its own thoughts and emotions. ‘You form a sort of relationship with the dough,’ she says. ‘So many different factors can have an effect on it: the temperature outside, the humidity.’ She adds: ‘I swear, sometimes it changes based on my mood.’

But bread making isn’t all good smells and tastes; it can be political, too. ‘Choosing sourdough over countless other varieties of bread is something of an ethical choice,’ Tobey observes, adding that ‘in the world of mass-produced and commercialized food products, sourdough (healthy, handmade, and really delicious) is a sort of disruptive anti-technology.’ Jesse, who in spite of being a successful professional baker encourages people to bake at home, concurs. ‘Making your own bread is a sort of form of social resistance,’ he explains. ‘Here’s something you can make with very few ingredients that

Jesse, who developed Polestar’s current

can nurture and sustain your family; it’s sort

starter by isolating yeasts and bacteria from

of beyond commerce.’ For those who don’t

a sunflower and some grapes grown in his

feel revolutionary enough to bake their

own backyard, agrees that the sourdough

own sourdough bread at home, it’s good to

seems to have its own living, breathing soul.

know that on any given day there’s about a

‘Keeping up with the starter all these years

half a dozen different types of beautiful and

has been a huge part of life for my family and

delicious loaves to choose from at Polestar

me,’ he says, adding that he has even brought

Hearth, where just walking in and breathing

the starter with him on family vacations, in

deeply can be a sensual treat, and maybe

order to ensure its quality and livelihood.

even a soul cleansing experience

‘Sometimes it feels like our lives revolve

.


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POLESTAR HEARTH 535 WOOLWICH ST, GUELPH

polestarhearth.com


MORE T H AN S OU R DO U G H :

92 W O O LW IC H

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PIE BY NIGHT

ST

Pie By Night is a pop-up pizza joint that happens every Sunday at Polestar Hearth. It is a passion project started by Connor Ross (who is a full-time baker at Polestar during the week)

GUELPH

with the help of Abby Ritcher, Brooke Howard and Jesse Wallace. Living and working in Guelph’s restaurant industry, Connor and his friends noticed there was no one focusing solely on serving high-quality pizza. So, to fix that, they started Pie by Night. Here’s what it’s all about:

1 . Pie By Night serves Neapolitan-inspired

4. The Pie By Night team is the real deal –

pizzas cooked in stone ovens that mimic

comprised of experienced culinary wizards

some of the characteristics of a wood-fired

with culinary and pastry degrees, and years

hearth.

working in top-notch restaurants across

2 . These pizzas, made up of fresh and

Guelph and beyond.

organic ingredients sourced from nearby

5. These folks make seventy five pizzas each

farmers and purveyors, are a locavore’s

Sunday – and they sell out quick. A handful

dream.

of pizzas are reserved for walk-ins, while the

3 . Their dough is hand-stretched to order and created from 00 flour milled in Quebec. The product of countless trials, this flour has been tailored to the exacting specifications of the oven used by the makers of Pie By Night.

rest are reserved as pre-orders by email, Facebook or Instagram. Wanna taste what all the fuss is about?

.

Pre-order your pizza by emailing piebynightguelph@gmail.com or via facebook or instagram


FIVE PIE BY NIGHT PIZZAS THAT WILL HAVE YOU LONGING FOR MORE:

MARGHERITA – tomato, basil, buffalo mozzarella It's simple, it highlights our dough perfectly, and it’s a pizza we will never get tired of making.

FUNGHI – mushroom, garlic oil, thyme, duxelle, ricotta The duxelle provides great texture & incredible taste, while the ricotta adds a complementary mild creaminess.

BROCCOLI & SMOKED CHEDDAR – broccoli, bechamel, smoked cheddar, red onion The bechamel is creamy, the cows’ smoked cheddar has the perfect smoke & the aroma out of the oven is nothing less than intoxicating.

POTATO & RACLETTE – potato, bechamel, raclette, gherkins, arugula Raclette is a beautiful melting cheese with a strong, pungent flavour that matches with the potato nicely, while gherkins go on fresh to add some tang & acidity

Hey #DTK, we’ll see you soon!

BUFFALO CAULIFLOWER & BLUE CHEESE – cauliflower, blue cheese, buffalo sauce, iceberg lettuce, ranch sauce This pizza is as close to a vegetarian chicken wing as you’ll find. As close to a ‘trashy pizza’ as we've made, but still a huge success and a ton of fun

PIE BY NIGHT OPERATING FROM POLESTAR HEARTH 535 WOOLWICH ST, GUELPH

craftyramen.com @crafty_ramen


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EAT I N • TAKE O UT • CATE RIN G

OPENING JANUARY 2019 Get ready to meet your new neighbour: PIRI PIRI CHICKEN, PORK BELLY SANDWICHES, BRUNCH, SALAD BOWLS AND SO MUCH MORE! 294 Woolwich Street, Downtown Guelph 519.265.9002

parkgrocery.ca


UNCOVERING WELLINGTON COUNTY

BEST BAA DAIRY 96

FERGUS

‘We try to keep things as low tech as possible,’ Best Baa Dairy co-owner Nicole Bzikot tells me as we walk through her company’s immaculate Fergus production facility. ‘Our focus is sustainable farming practices, environmentalism, and quality.’ Best Baa products range from tasty sheep’s milk and creamy sheep’s milk yogurt to mouth-watering feta and sheep’s milk cream cheese. Where to buy? The Stone Store (Guelph), Fiddleheads, Full Circle Foods, Healthoholics, The Old Kitchen Cupboard (all in Kitchener), Vincenzo’s (Waterloo) and Mustard Seed Co-op (Hamilton), to start. Like so many other remarkable farms and food businesses that dot Guelph and Wellington County, Best Baa is a partner of Taste Real – a County of Wellington program that promotes local food and facilitates valuable

connections among food businesses, consumers and farmers. Farmers like Nicole and her husband Peter at Best Baa – folks whose enterprises bring flavour to our region. To your plate. Learn more at bestbaa.com and tastereal.ca

.


REC IPE: FRABERTS CHICKEN CURRY by Chef Derek Robers, Fraberts Fresh Foods (a family-run local fresh food market in Fergus)

I N GR ED I EN T S : canola oil (or other vegetable oil) 2 lbs boneless skinless chicken (diced) ½ cup onion (diced) 1 tbsp garlic (fresh minced) 1 tbsp ginger (fresh grated) 1 cup Best Baa plain yogurt 1½ tbsp lemon juice 1 tsp salt ½ tsp ground pepper 1 tsp cardamom ½ tsp nutmeg ½ tsp cloves ½ tsp cinnamon 1 tsp coriander ½ tsp cayenne 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp turmeric 1 tsp curry powder 14 oz can coconut milk 1 cup carrots (shredded) 1 cup frozen peas ½ cup cilantro (fresh chopped)

INSTRUCTIONS: Pour some oil into a non-stick frying pan and cook the diced chicken. Set the chicken aside in a bowl lined with paper towel. In a Dutch oven, add a tablespoon of oil and cook the onions uncovered over low heat until they are translucent. Add fresh ginger & garlic – not browning the garlic. In a large mixing bowl, combine the next thirteen ingredients (yoghurt, lemon juice, and all the spices) & whisk to mix well. Add this mixture to the Dutch oven and bring to a simmer. Simmer for about five minutes. Add coconut milk & chicken, and bring back up to a simmer. Add shredded carrots, frozen peas & simmer for another five minutes. Remove the Dutch oven from heat and add freshly chopped cilantro. Serve atop freshly-made basmati rice.

U PCOMI N G T A S T E RE A L EVE NTS EA T U P YO UR F E B R UAR Y FEBRUARY 1-17 Celebrate Local Food in winter! Discover great winter eats, events and local food deals. Dining – Shopping – Events –

T O P T EN TO U R A ND TA STE A DV E NTU RE S IN W E LLING TON C OUN T Y WINTER IS A GREAT TIME TO SHARE A HEARTY MEAL WITH FRIENDS AND FAMILY. HERE ARE SOME OF OUR FAVOURITE GUELPH AND WELLINGTON LOCAL FOOD & DRINK PAIRINGS TO GET YOU INSPIRED.

1. 2. 3.

Best Baa Dairy cream cheese with Rootham’s Gourmet red pepper jelly served with a glass of Cox Creek Cellars Gewurztraminer Thatcher Farms red wine and garlic pork sausage with Big John’s Country Market roasted squash and Green Table Foods fermented sauerkraut Lau-Tea-Da curried lentil soup with Mapleton’s Organic yogurt served with Polestar Hearth sourdough bread

4. 5. 6.

Zocalo Organics mixed greens with Breadalbane Inn apple cider vinaigrette and Jewels under the Kilt Spicy Caesar roasted walnuts Reroot Organic Farm bacon with Top Market Meats fried eggs served with a freshly-brewed cup of Infusion Coffee Roasting Co ‘El Platanar’ coffee Ell-Crest Farm beef stew made with Wellington Brewery County Ale served with a slice of Elora Bread Trading Co sourdough bread

7.

Ross Enterprises turkey with Everdale Farm roasted rainbow carrots served with Country Flavour spicy fruit jelly

8.

Misty Meadow Country Market butter tart with Organic Meadow whipped cream served with a cup of Planet Bean ‘Freedom Fighter’ coffee

9.

LaFontana fresh pasta and Floralane Farm cherry tomatoes with a glass of Heartwood Farm ‘Hoppity’ cider

10.

Rack of Circle-R Livestock lamb with Corwhin Herbs and Produce sweet potatoes enjoyed with a pint of Royal City Brewing smoked honey ale

Classes – Tours – Deals

Learn more about finding local food, experiences and events in Wellington County/Guelph at tastereal.ca and experiencewellington.ca


98 98

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GETTING TO KNOW: ‘BREWING CHANGES GUELPH’ EXHIBIT INTERVIEW BY SONIA PREISLER

DA WN O WE N, CURATOR OF GUELPH C IVIC M U SE U M , R E CE N T LY N OT E D T H AT ‘ IT ’ S N O T A N O V E RSTATEMENT TO SAY BEE R B U ILT T H IS T OWN .’ IN DE E D, E VE N A C U R SO R Y GL A NCE A T GUELPH ’S CURRENT BEE R LAN DSC AP E ON LY SE E M S T O ST R E N G T H E N D A W N ’ S SU GGE S T IO N. WELLI NGTON BREWER Y . SLE E M AN B R E WE R IE S. R OY AL C IT Y B R E WIN G C O . FIX E D GEAR BREW I NG CO. TH E R E C E N T LY -DE CE ASE D ST ON E H AM M E R B R E WIN G . ( RIP S T O NE H AMMER.) NOT TO MENT ION GU E LP H ’ S G R E AT B AR S AN D P U B S WIT H BE E R LIS T S T HA T CAN MAKE EVEN TH E STO DGIE ST H OP H E AD WE AK AT T H E KN E E S. ON E O F THE CIV IC MUSEUM’S CURRENT EXH IB IT S, ‘ B R E WIN G CH AN GE S G U E LP H ,’ AT T E M P T S TO B O T T L E GUELPH ’S BEER STORY A N D P U T IT ON DISP LAY – F R OM IT S E AR LIE ST BE GINNINGS STRAI GH T TH ROUGH TO T H E ST AT E OF T ODAY ’ S B E E R SC E N E IN GU E L P H . R E CE NT L Y , T OQUE’S SONI A PREI SLER CH AT T E D WIT H G U E LP H M U SE U M ’ S SAR AH BA L L A B O U T T HE EXH I BI T. H ERE’S W H AT S AR AH H AD T O SAY :


SO WHAT’S THE STORY AT THE HEART OF AN EXHIBITION ON BREWING IN GUELPH?

post-1980s breweries and video interviews with

‘Brewing Changes Guelph’ examines the social and

1,500-pound slab of concrete – the name-stone

economic impact of brewing beer in the Royal City

from the once important Thomas Holliday’s

and documents the changes brought about by the

brewery from 1868 – rescued from demolition

rise, fall and resurrection of Guelph breweries.

decades ago and preserved by a family in Paisley. I

Guest curated by Eric Payseur, ‘Brewing Changes

especially love what we’ve labeled the ‘artist wall’ in

Guelph’ is about the present, past and future of

the contemporary brewing installation. It includes a

brewing in Guelph.

number of the process works that go into designing

WHAT SORTS OF INTERESTING TIDBITS MIGHT I TAKE AWAY FROM THE EXHIBIT?

present-day Guelph brewers and other industry movers and shakers. Maybe most notable is a

beer labels, and reflects the creative contributions of local artists collaborating with local breweries.

Did you know that women were the original

ANY OTHER COOL BITS OF HISTORY THAT MIGHT INTEREST LOCAL FOLKS?

brewers around the world? In early Guelph

For sure. How about this: all modern malting

they brewed domestically as well as in inns and

barley varieties (except for two) are descendants

taverns right up until larger commercial brewing

of ‘OAC 21’ barley – the twentieth-century brewing

operations (usually run by men) were established.

industry standard for over fifty years. This strain

I found it interesting that it was a matriarch of the

was developed right here in Guelph at the Ontario

renowned Sleeman family who was responsible

Agriculture College by Charles Zavitz, who earned

for saving the family recipes back in the 1930s –

several honorary degrees for his work as an

enabling them to be resurrected by John Sleeman

experimental agriculturalist and peace activist.

when he re-started the family business in the mid-

When the Canadian Brewer's Association wanted

1980s.

to present him with an award for his spectacular

THERE MUST BE SOME INTERESTING ARTIFACTS IN THE EXHIBIT. Many. People might enjoy seeing label-making

work on developing so fine a barley for the malting process, Zavitz, a Quaker and a teetotaler, would not accept the award in public.

example, and vintage stoneware beer bottles. Or

DO YOU HAVE TO BE A BEER DRINKER TO ENJOY THIS EXHIBIT?

nineteenth-century brewing & malting licenses

Absolutely not. The exhibition is not about

and invoices that reveal how essential the brewery

consuming beer and, frankly, Guelph’s brewing

industry was in Guelph's early economy. There’s

story is so much more than the great beers that are

an array of tap handles from all of Guelph's

produced here. The brewing industry quite literally

plates from the original Sleeman Breweries, for

put Guelph on the map – from its incorporation GUELPH CIVIC MUSEUM 52 NORFOLK ST, GUELPH

guelphmuseums.ca

.

as a city to the recent ranking by expedia.ca of Guelph as one of the three best beer destinations in Canada

99


MEET YOUR MAKER

100 100

FOREQUARTER BUTCHER SHOP 17 L OU I S A S T . K I TCH E N E R , O N

fqbutchershop.com M OS T U ND ER R A T E D P I E CE O F M E A T? B ee f b l ad e s t e a k L OC AL M AKE R S WI TH WH O M Y O U C OL L ABORAT E ? T he C ul i na r y Stu d io , Th e Ke t c hup P r o j e c t , Pu b lic K itche n & B a r , T a c o F a r m

T H ER E’S A N EW B U T C H ER S H O P I N KI T C H EN ER – A L T H OU G H T H E F O L KS B EH I N D T H I S OP ER A T I O N A R E H A RDL Y N EW T O T H E T R A D E. I N D EED , C OL B Y L EM OI N E A N D W A S EA M M A S R I , OWNEROP ER A T OR S OF F OR EQ U A R T ER B UTCHER S H OP , H A V E A C O MB I N ED T W EN T Y-

& R ed H o u s e

F I V E Y EA R S OF B U T C H ER Y EX P ER I E NCE

W H E RE D O YO U E A T WHE N Y O U

B ET W EEN T H EM. L OO KI N G F OR

N E E D A B REA K ? So n n y ’ s in W a t e r l o o

L OC A L , H I G H Q U A L I T Y MEA T W I T H NO H OR MO N ES OR A N T I B I OT I C S ? H A NDMADE S A U S A G E W I T H H A N D - C R A F T ED S P I CE B L EN D S A N D N O F I L L ER ? T H EN Y OU’VE C O ME T O T H E R I G H T P L A C E. A N D B EC A U S E C OL B Y A N D W A S EA M S P E CI AL I ZE I N W H O L E A N I M A L B U T C H ER Y , I T ’S EASY F O R T H EM T O T A KE A L OT OF C A R E I N G ET T I N G Y OU T H E EX A C T C U T Y OU WANT.


TO PROVIDE MEANINGFUL ARCHITECTURE IS NOT TO PARODY HISTORY, BUT TO ARTICULATE IT. -DANIEL LIBESKIND

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MARTINSIMMONS.C A


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ANATO M Y O F A B R A N D :

ME R I T B A DG E CLIENT: MERIT BADGE DOUGHNUTS DESIGNER: CAI SEPULIS, TOQUE LTD.

THIS NEW AND ADVENTUROUS LITTLE DOUGHNUT COMPANY FROM GUELPH WAS WELL ON ITS WAY TO DEFINING ITSELF AS BOTH QUIRKY AND VIRTUOUS WHEN IT CHOSE THE NAME 'MERIT BADGE'. INSPIRED BY THEIR BADGE MOTIF AND THEIR KITSCHY POSTURE WE DESIGNED THE BRAND FEATURING KITSCH-COOL ICONS WITH A MISCHIEVOUS WES ANDERSON FEEL. WITH A FOCUS ON ALL THINGS NATURAL, WE EXTENDED THE CAMP (AND CAMPY) THEME IMPLIED IN THE NAME 'MERIT BADGE' BY USING KRAFT PAPER BOXES FEATURING A FABULIST TRAIL RUNNING THROUGH A TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP. 104 104

NOT E : M O CK U P O NL Y – FI NA L D E S I GN C H A N G ED SL IG H T L Y W IT H PRIN T ER D IEL IN ES & SPEC IF IC A T I ON S


PLANT-BASED

Quiet Time

Forestry

TEA SWIRL

CHOCOLATE EARL GREY

MATCHA DARK CHOCOLATE

CHOCOLATE

Roll Call!

EARL GREY FILLED

MARSHMALLOW

MATCHA SWIRL

GRAHAM CRUMBS

Campfire S’MORE

Courage

CARAMEL APPLE WHISKY

POACHED APPLE

SHORTBREAD CRUMBLE

CARAMEL SWIRL LAVENDER GLAZE

SMALL BATCH POST E R/BANDA NA

Horticulture

LEMON LAVENDER SHORTBREAD

ARTISANALE

ALWAYS FRESH

CHOCOLATE

105 105


# P HOT OES S AY

A NORTHERN PILGRIMAGE

‘THERE ARE STRANGE THINGS DONE IN THE MIDNIGHT SUN...’ - R OBE R T W. S E R V ICE 106

Along the Haines Highway, YT. 1,396KM

WHAT DOES A LATE SUMMER TOQUE ROAD TRIP LOOK LIKE? IT BEGINS WITH A SHORT LAYOVER IN CALGARY, FOLLOWED BY A 1,752KM JOURNEY FROM WHITEHORSE ACROSS THE YUKON, OVER THE MOUNTAINS OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA, AND INTO ALASKA BY BOAT – BEFORE RETURNING TO WHITEHORSE AND BACK HOME AGAIN. EIGHT DAYS. OF MARVELOUS FOOD. COZY CRAFT BREWERIES. BREATHTAKING LANDSCAPES. ONE BADASS JEEP. AND A CAMERA. ENJOY THE VIEW.


CAL GA RY (F OR A QUICK L AY O VER)

107

BRIDGELAND BREAKFAST BOWL BLUE STAR DINER

THE DANDY BREWING COMPANY

CANNIBALE BARBERSHOP &COCKTAILS

COLD GARDEN BEVERAGE COMPANY FEAT. THE ALL-NIGHTER VANILLA CAPPUCCINO PORTER & CAKEFACE MARZEN-STYLE LAGER


WH ITEH ORSE

(0KM )

108

LADY GREY COCKTAIL WOODCUTTER’S BLANKET

STEWART CROSSING ANALOG (353KM) NAVIGATION (DUE TO SPOTTY CELL SERVICE)


(532KM)

DA WSON CI TY

KLONDIKE KATE'S FLAME GRILLED BISON & ELK BLUEBERRY SAUSAGE, FRIED ONIONS, VEGGIES & CRANBERRY RHUBARB JAM

MIDNIGH T SUN (11:52PM)


WH ITEH ORSE

(1,114KM)

110

DINNER AT BOREALE EXPLORERS (A MOUNTAINBIKING LODGE AT THE BASE OF THE SEVEN SISTERS MOUNTAIN RANGE) FEATURING WILD CHINOOK SALMON & LOCALLY-FORAGED WILDFLOWERS & BERRIES


SKAG WA Y, ALA SKA

(1,289KM)

111

LOCAL POPCORN SHRIMP

KLONDIKE BREWING COMPANY

SKAGWAY BREWING COMPANY

FEAT. WHIPSAW SPRUCE BEER & DEVIL'S PUNCHBOWL LEMON BLUEBERRY WHEAT ALE.


HA INE S, AL ASKA

(1, 312KM)

112

FERRY TO HAINES, ALASKA

SMOKED SOCKEYE FRESH FROM THE DOCKS HAINES PACKAGING COMPANY


CROWLERS OF HAZE JUNCTION IPA WIN TERLONG BREWING COMPANY

MIDNIGHT SUN COFFEE ROASTERS GOLD DIGGER BURGER DIRTY NORTHERN BASTARD

1,752KM

WH ITEH ORSE

(1,724KM)

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FEAST YOUR EYES 49 ALBERT ST. WATERLOO

519.885.2020


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MARGARET ATWOOD From The Handmaid’s Tale to Art & Technology An Evening in Conversation with Dave Bidini

May 30, 2019 | Centre in the Square | 7pm | $60+HST & fees Tickets available at centreinthesquare.com For VIP tickets, contact Arielle.Kadish@THEMUSEUM.ca A portion of ticket sales goes to THEMUSEUM’s Education Programs

Charitable Registration Number: 86950 9554 RR0001

THEMUSEUM.ca

DOWNTOWN KITC H E N E R


Legacy Greens' chef, Erin Felder

MEET YOUR MAKER

DOW N TOWN K IT C H E NE R K E E P S G ET T I N G BETTE R . AN D F R E S H E R . AND T AS T I ER . A N D I T ’S

LEGACY GREENS

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ALL BECAUSE O F INDE P E NDE NT L Y - O W N ED ,

18 ON TARIO ST N , KITCH EN E R

HIG H LY-CURA T E D S H O P S LIK E J OR D A N

legacygreensonline.com

DOLSON ’S LEGAC Y GR E E NS . FO C U S I N G

W H AT IN SPIRED Y OU TO D O WHAT

O N LOCAL FOO DS , S E A S O NAL P ROD U C E

Y OU’RE D OIN G ? T he We st Coast,

BOXES, CATE R ING, FO O D-S O U R C ED G I F T S ,

l o c al f o o d re tai l sc e ne

whe re the re ’ s a we l l -de veloped

AND GR AB & G O S NAC K S , T H IS C O Z Y S P A C E

Y OUR F AVOURITE TH IN G ( S) T O

O FFER S UN I QU E , FR E S H F LAV O U R S T O T H E

G ROW ? Gro und c he rri e s & flow ers

DOW N TOWN C O M M UNIT Y . (O R A N G ET T I

W H AT’S UP W ITH Y OUR PRO DU CE

S Q UASH , AN Y O NE ? ) AND G E T T HI S – M U C H

subsc ri pti o ns f o r pi c k-up w eekly

BOXES? We do 6-8 we e k

O F LEGACY GR E E NS ’ IN-S E AS O N P R OD U C E

at the sto re . B o xe s are season al,

(INCLUDI N G H E R B S , T O M AT O E S , G R OU N D

and e ac h o ne i nc l ude s a fu n

CHE R R I ES AN D, O F C O UR S E , GREEN S ) I S G R OW N AT T H E B U S INE S S ’ O W N S M A L L S C A L E FARM OP E R AT IO NS IN AT W O O D, W H I L E MA N Y O F I TS P R E P AR E D FO O DS AR E CR EA T ED I N THE UPSTAI R S K IT C H E N. S O U ND S L I KE I T ’S TIME FOR A V IS IT , T H E N.

the y f e ature al l -Ontari o produ ce, re c i pe .


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FR

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JAP AN E S E S OU L F O O D:

ST

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IZNA DONBURI HOUSE

N G ST E S

CO

KITCHENER

TT

ST

BY GUEST CONTRIBUTOR JONATHON BARRABALL If I were trapped in one city and had to eat

opened Izna Donburi House is putting

one nation’s cuisine for the rest of my life,

Donburi (or ‘Don’) in the spotlight, alongside

I would not mind eating Japanese. I adore

a number of other traditional comfort

Japanese food. I love it.

foods such as gyoza (Japanese dumplings

-Anthony Bourdain Has it ever occurred to you that there is more to Japanese food than the refined and delicate flavours of sushi or sashimi? Does simple, soul-satisfying comfort food come to mind (ever?) when you decide to go out to eat at a Japanese restaurant? Who knew there was such a thing as hearty, home-style Japanese cooking? Donburi, a dish consisting of meat, fish, or vegetables simmered in sauces and served atop a heaping bowl of rice is what you would most often find on the table of a Japanese home, and recently

or potstickers) or ramen and udon (hearty Japanese wheat noodle soups). Long wooden tables under a canopy of dimly lit red lanterns invite you in to the warm space of Izna, where the wood panel walls are smattered with colourful art, a sort of East meets West. Here Japanese calligraphy and Banksy prints hang side by each. The open style kitchen, a reflection of chef and owner Chris Lee’s years of experience in teppanyaki restaurants, provides its own form of entertainment. At the same time it’s easy to get lost in conversation at the central


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120 communal table, dotted with steaming mugs

Choosing our mains from the voluminous

of green tea and colourful bottles of sake.

menu was a bit of a challenge, but we

Sapporo, available on draught by the pint or

decided to split the katsu don, tonkotsu

schooner, is served frigid and eminently glug-

ramen, and the okonomiyaki. The katsu

able alongside the hot, savoury Japanese fare.

don was hearty, fried pork cutlet heaped

We started with a couple classics – gyoza and karaage. The gyoza were monstrous, lightly fried and stuffed to the point of bursting. While karaage most often involves chicken, we went for the shrimp, which was so gratifyingly crunchy it made me reevaluate years of opting for its gastronomic cousin, tempura. The entrees soon followed, served on giant, lavish cafeteria style trays, each lined with horoscope paper – a sort of tongue-in-cheek homage to the classic place setting one might come across at one of those old school Chinese buffets. Each dish was accompanied by house made kimchi and pickled radish. The kimchi – funky fermented cabbage, both spicy and fresh-tasting – was sublime.

on top of rice, with egg, a tangy aioli, and a generous garnishing of scallions. The flavours all melded harmoniously into one, while the contrasting textures of the crispy pork, soft rice and creamy aioli made me almost forget there was anything else on the table. The tonkotsu ramen warmed the soul, with its rich fatty broth made from pork bones, and firm, chewy hand-stretched noodles. The real star, though, was the okonomiyaki, a self-described ‘Hiroshima style Japanese pancake’ – a layered affair with equal parts deliciousness and ludicrosity. The base was composed of crispy matchstick potatoes, onto which bacon, cabbage, and eggs were layered respectively. Describing it as something along the lines of a pancake-omelette hybrid does not do it justice, but gives something


121 of a reference point. The layers formed a mountainous wonder atop which was a drizzle of both a rich savoury “okonomiyaki sauce” and a sharp aioli – all capped by a heaping pile of bonito flakes. It was enormous, about ten inches in diameter and six inches thick, served pre-cut into quarters. I mean, they gave us a pie lifter just to try and get at this thing. My shock quickly turned to elation as I tucked in to this delicious stack of scrumptiousness. Izna Donburi House is a welcome reminder that there is more to Japanese food than simply stuffing yourself at just another all-youcan-eat sushi joint. This is real, handmade, heartwarming soul food. The portions are generous and the food is executed with

.

aplomb. Come with an open mind, and you will certainly leave with a full and happy belly

IZNA DONBURI 137 KING ST E, KITCHENER

PHOTO THE RICH UNCLE TAVERN | 45 KING ST W


here to help.

sa le s r e pr e se ntative a ndra a r no ld. com


local. quality. custom.

g ue l p h c usto m ho m e s. ca d a n@ d a nclay to nho m e s. ca 5 19-830-3797


BAR

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CAF FEI NE & M OT O R CY CLE S : FINDING HEAVEN AT STEELTOWN GARAGE COMPANY

JAM

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ST

E

HAMILTON

BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘This is the spot I’ve been waiting for someone

large wooden countertop. A small mountain

to create,’ I murmur reverently to TOQUE

of shiny black espresso mugs – many of

Partner Cai Sepulis when we step through an

which are emblazoned with the tagline ‘Death

admittedly unremarkable doorway off Barton

Before Decaf’ – are stacked on this workhorse

Street in Hamilton. And into my personal

of a machine. Vintage motorcycle helmets are

heaven. I stop in the entrance and breathe in

paraded on the wall behind it. The soul of the

rich scents of coffee, and notes of some of my

joint. An experienced barista deftly prepares

other favourite smells – conditioned leather

espresso-based drinks – americanos, lattes,

and, yes, motor oil. All together they produce

cappuccinos – for a handful of folks gathered

an intoxicating aroma. Of comfort. And

at the counter. Folks who, I must say, all

nostalgia. And aspiration. ‘If our magazine

look to be straight out of a Herschel Supply

was bricks and mortar,’ I continue, ‘this would

catalog. Or Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Or TOQUE

be it.’ Cai nods in agreement. ‘This is it,’ I

Magazine, for that matter. I revel in the

add, a bit quieter this time, and in a state of

unanticipated familiarity.

reverie.

A restored 1976 Honda cb750 Super Sport

To our right, a gorgeous turquoise La

motorcycle is positioned centre stage. This

Marzocco espresso machine dominates a

beast, a perfect blend of patina’d original


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127

‘LIVE, T RA VEL, A DVEN T URE, B L ESS, A N D DO N ’T BE SORRY.’

- JACK KERO U A C


128 yellow paint, refurbished chrome, custom

co-owner Jeff Campagna answers when I

pipes and retrofitted knobbies could very

put the question to him. ‘We’re a bunch of

well be my spirit animal. The walls all around

things at once. A retail store. Coffee bar.

the rig are festooned with the hippest

Hub for motorcycle and gasoline culture

merchandise I can imagine. Deus Ex Machina

in downtown Hamilton. And a place to

duds. (I quickly snag the last ‘Deus Custom’

connect with friends and strangers over

ball cap – before Cai can take it for herself.)

shared passions – whatever they may be.’ I

Levi’s denim. Red Wing boots. Schott New

am entranced when Jeff, a former journalist

York leather jackets. Iron & Air magazine. The

who wrote for organs like The Daily Beast,

aforementioned Herschel collection. An entire

The Atlantic, Delayed Gratification and more,

wall designated to new motorcycle helmets

begins to tell me about when and how he

and supple leather riding gloves. And other

and his wife and business partner, Tania,

desirables that might complete any café

came up with the concept. ‘We lived abroad

racer’s uniform.

for a decade – in Central and South America,

I wonder whether we’ve just stepped inside the coolest coffee shop inspired by motorcycle culture – or into a badass lifestyle shop that just happens also to sell great coffee. No matter, we’ve stepped through the looking glass. And it’s good. ‘It’s neither one nor the other,’ Steeltown

Indonesia, and other places,’ he tells me. ‘And I became enthralled with the old school, hard core motorcycle culture that pervades much of that part of the world.’ He continues: ‘In Panama I started working on old bikes – creating custom beach blasters for sand and stuff. When we moved back home in 2014, I brought this passion for motorcycle


@ STEELTOWNGARAGE

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130

and gasoline culture back with me. And reincarnated it here, in 2017, as Steeltown Garage Company.’ Tania, who has offered me a glorious espresso with homemade biscotti, enlarges the story: ‘While this place is our physical address [a space that Tania, an interior designer, envisioned and executed], our brand has gone international. We’re pretty excited that especially our in-house Steeltown merchandise – available through our online shop – has developed a following all over the world.’ This isn’t at all surprising. After all, even a cursory glance at the Steeltown brand reveals a design and application that effectively convey what these two are about. Cohesive. Fresh. Inclusive. Hip. As Jeff reveals: ‘Everything about what we produce articulates a particular narrative that’s rooted in our passions. For bikes. Caffeine. Past and

and Tania and the hordes of folks across this region – and around the globe – who have

.

been waiting for something like Steeltown to come onto the scene. A very particular and

compelling version of (my personal) heaven

present. Nostalgia.’ I recognize in these people and this place a tapestry of shared passions. Between Jeff

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MANH AT T ANS :

144

GOR

WHERE PEOPLE WANT TO BE

DON

BY CHRIS TIESSEN

ST

KORT

R IG H

W T RD

GUELPH

‘My friend – you’re an exquisite anachronism,’

a natural at making people feel at home at

I propose to Thomas Aldridge – or ‘Big Daddy

Manhattans – in some ways the Royal City’s

T’, as he’s had me address him over the

best kept secret. Indeed, the restaurant,

years. I raise the flute of champagne he’s

located in a strip mall along Gordon Street

just poured me, and continue: ‘A veritable

somewhere between the heavily-promoted

throw-back to figures who once inhabited

downtown core and the heavily-populated

some fabulous romantic age. Like Fitzgerald’s

South End, is perhaps Guelph’s most

Gatsby. Hemingway. Or,’ I add, ‘Morrissey.’

underappreciated culinary and entertainment

We’re standing by the bar at Manhattans

destination. Despite its (relatively) obscure

– Thomas’ pizza bistro and music club in

location, this beautifully appointed

Guelph’s Midtown district. It’s early afternoon,

establishment is the ideal destination for

and the restaurant won’t open for another

anyone looking for a great place to eat. The

couple hours. Yet Thomas – ever the vigilant

perfect place for anyone who loves to listen

host – is making sure that I’m being taken

to live jazz (on Thomas’ one hundred-year-old

care of.

Steinway, to boot). An uncommon retreat for

Which is nothing new for this elegant, eloquent man. Indeed, Thomas is more than

anyone who enjoys the diversion of stand-up comedy. Indeed, there’s live entertainment almost every night at Manhattans.


145


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And it’s become a destination not only for its

First up: steak tartare with gherkins,

devoted patrons but also for such featured

shallots, garlic aioli, tomato jam and quail

shows as CBC’s Laugh Out Loud, the Guelph

egg served with crostinis – fantastic – and

Jazz Festival, various Musagetes events,

Ontario burrata with roasted grape chutney,

vinyl nights (with Manhattans own Edwin

pistachios and house pickles with grilled

Hammond), and more.

baguette. ‘Fresh burrata is so seductive,’

‘Are you hungry,’ Thomas asks. ‘I can have the kitchen whip something up. A pizza, perhaps? Pasta? Salad? How about a pizza with some pasta and salad?’ Just then TOQUE Partner Cai Sepulis sweeps through the front door. ‘Well,’ Thomas remarks, ‘now that it’s a party, we have to eat.’ So he pours a flute for Cai and encourages Claire Mussar – his partner in life and business and the glue that binds us all – to put an order in. And so begins a somewhat familiar – and altogether satisfying – ritual. Of ‘Big Daddy T’ hosting. And entertaining. And, for the next couple hours, while Thomas

remarks Thomas as I plunge my knife deep into the fresh cheese. Stracciatella and cream pour out from the mozzarella shell. I load my fork with pistachios, a house pickle, some chutney, and loads of burrata, and take a bite. ‘This is phenomenal,’ I exclaim. Like out of this world. ‘It’s straight off our new menu,’ Thomas says with pride, ‘created by our new Chef – the fabulous Kyle Smith. We’re switching things up around here – moving away from being so pizza-centric to a more varied, elevated menu.’ I’ll say, I think to myself, and dive back into the burrata.

might better be spending his time getting the

I finish the dish, and Cai manages to polish

restaurant ready to open for the inevitable

off the tartare. And our mains arrive. Seared

dinner rush, he envelopes Cai and me in a

pickerel with cauliflower, brussels sprouts

most glorious afternoon.

and pancetta with caper brown butter for me.


@ MANHATTANS_GUELPH


148


Ricotta dumplings with squash puree, oyster mushroom, black truffle and shaved pecorino for Cai. And, for good measure, a Manhattans pizza – the Sonny Rollins, topped with tomato sauce, spicy sausage, ricotta, chilies, mozzarella and honey. As I dig into my pickerel, I ask Thomas what Manhattans means to him right now. After all, he started the restaurant back in 1994, managed to rebuild and re-open the place after a fire destroyed much of it, and continues to refine the model with no apparent end in sight. He looks down at the floor. And then towards

L AU N C H I N G JAN UARY 2 01 9

the bar. And fixes his eyes on the piano – centrally located on the restaurant’s low stage. And, after a long draw of champagne and with a twinkle in his eye, he answers – slowly: ‘I’ve been at this game for a long time now. And

11 Quebec St. Downtown Guelph

I’ve seen trends come and go. Restaurants come and go. And I’ve reached a point in my career as a business owner where I’m ready to spoil myself – with this place, and its food, and everything else it has to offer.’ He pauses, and then continues: ‘For me, Manhattans is where I want to be. Which is also, I hope, where other people want to be, too.’

discover that it’s less than an hour until the place will open its doors for dinner. And yet Thomas remains ever present. After all, he’s doing what he does best – making people feel

Perhaps not so much an exquisite

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I glance at my watch and am startled to

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manhattans.ca

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STU D I OS H I B U I .C A | 51 9 - 8 3 0 - 0 432


150 150

GETTING TO KNOW:

150

REN NAVARRO INTERVIEW BY GUEST CONTRIBUTOR JONATHON BARRABALL

RE N N A V A R RO, CO -F OU N D ER OF THE SOC IETY OF B EER DRINKING L ADIES A N D A L L A R OU N D BEER G U RU K NOW N AND L OVED B Y JUST AB OUT EVERYON E W H O H A S E VER WORK ED IN T H E ONTARIO C RAFT B EER INDUSTRY, REC ENTLY J O I N E D B E E R AF ICIO N AD O J ON ATHON B ARRAB AL L TO DISC USS HER L ATEST PR O JE CT – BEER. D IVERSIT Y . – T H E SUB JEC T OF REN’S M ANY REC ENT PUBL IC PR E S E N TA TIO N S ON AN D IN VARIOUS M EDIA, FROM RADIO AND TEL EVISION TO PO D CA S TS AN D MAG AZ IN ES. H ERE’S W HAT SHE HAD TO SAY:


JB: WHAT IS THIS UNDERTAKING YOU CALL BEER.DIVERSITY.? AND WHAT ARE WE TO MAKE OF THOSE PERIODS/DOTS IN THE TITLE YOU’VE GIVEN YOUR PROJECT?

JB: ARE THERE ANY BREWERIES CURRENTLY SETTING A GOOD EXAMPLE FOR SUPPORTING DIVERSITY?

RN: Beer.Diversity. is a project I started in order to address

have supported diversity from the beginning. The

the lack of diversity in the craft beer industry. The periods

folks at Dominion Brewing are amazing at community

definitely serve a purpose, as they help highlight the project’s

engagement. This year they did a collaborative brew

two objectives. I want to talk about beer, I want to talk about

for Pride, and an awesome spin on the ‘Buck a Beer’

diversity. I want to talk about the diversity of beers (the rich

campaign that supported refugees in Ottawa. For the

assortment of craft beers, with different varieties that appeal

last two years, Royal City Brewing has done a collab

to different folks), and I want to talk about diversity (a full

with The Black Heritage Society called ‘Lantern Ale.’

range of actors) in the beer industry.

In both cases, the collaborations are immersive and

JB: WHAT WAS YOUR MOTIVATION FOR STARTING BEER.DIVERSITY.? RN: Over the last six or seven years I have worked for a number of craft breweries as a sales rep. At the beginning, I realized that I was the ‘unicorn’ of craft beer – a black gay female slinging beers in a predominately white male industry. I thought that things might change, but after all these years I am still one of the only black women in craft beer. Being a co-founder of the Society of Beer Drinking Ladies, and an active member of Queen of Craft, I’ve seen women take

RN: Absolutely! There are a few places in the area that

experiential, and people are informed both about how these efforts help and where the donations go. Wellington Brewery has also always been huge on having diversity in staffing and in the charities they support. These breweries tend to fly under the radar about their contributions to diversity – and that’s kind of the point. It shouldn’t be about photo ops and grandstanding. The places that are good at promoting diversity are transparent, open, honest, and, most important of all, consistent.

Diversity. for a long time. I’m hoping that Beer.Diversity. can

JB: HOW CAN MORE CRAFT BREWERIES WORK TOWARDS FACILITATING THE SORTS OF DIVERSITY YOU’RE PROMOTING?

help inspire and stimulate more representation in the craft

RN: It’s all about engaging a greater range of

beer world from folks of a wide range of sexual, racial, and

communities. I don’t think we need to entirely re-

ethnic backgrounds – and, at the same time, introduce a

structure the industry; we just need to create space.

more diverse audience to craft beer.

Imagine the brewing industry as a big family table.

steps toward getting their deserved representation within the industry. So I’ve been thinking about a project like Beer.

You’re sitting there with everyone, and it’s mainly white dudes with beards and a few women. I’m not BEER DIVERSITY (REN NAVARRO)

Beer-diversity.com

asking anyone to get up and leave the table – there’s plenty of room. All we need to do is to open things up a little, to move over a bit so that a greater diversity of

.

people can also pull up a chair – a greater diversity of people working in the craft, and a wider variety of folks enjoying a draft

151


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MORE T H AN A FA R M DI S TI L L E R Y :

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Y RD REID

WRI

SVIL D LE R

AYR

DIGGING IN TO WILLIBALD’S NEW MENU BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘Hey! Where’d you get that gorgeous wood-

Chef Byron Hallett preparing a spectacular

burning oven?’, I ask Willibald Farm Distillery

charcuterie board that TOQUE Partner Cai

co-owner Jordan van der Heyden – a wash of

Sepulis and I – along with Jordan, Willibald

curiosity and familiarity overtaking me. ‘I think

co-owner Cam Formica, and front of house

I recognize it.’ I am flooded by memories

manager Katie Irwin – will soon be enjoying

of my tenure as wood oven-fired pizza and

together. In the early afternoon. Before

bagel maker at Kitchener’s City Café Bakery.

Willibald’s newly-minted restaurant opens

At the corner of Strange Street and Victoria.

for dinner service. Cured pork belly. Coppa.

‘We actually got it from the former City Café

Lonza. Pork rillettes. Grainy mustard, pickled

Bakery location in Cambridge,’ Jordan replies.

beans and natural dill pickles. Willibald gin-

‘For a song.’ He pauses, before asking: ‘You

pickled apples. Plum and habanero jam.

know the place?’ I nod reverently, and saunter

All handcrafted in-house. Like just about

slowly towards the impressive piece of

everything at Willibald. I can feel my mouth

equipment for a closer look.

watering. Then. And now – writing this.

As I pass through the threshold separating

‘Hey man, I love your oven,’ I remark to Byron

Willibald’s gorgeous dining room from its

– albeit hesitantly, even sheepishly. Fanboying.

newly-minted professional kitchen, I spot

I can’t help it. This is, after all, the same Chef


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156

Byron who helped put Arabella Park on the

charcuterie board, of course. And

map with his playful, fanciful, elevated bar

aforementioned sourdough too. With honey

food that put so many other restaurants to

butter and salt. The most glorious hunk

shame. And now he’s here. In Ayr. Doing his

of pork belly with brussels sprouts, purple

thing. ‘Thanks, my friend,’ Byron replies. ‘It’s

sauerkraut, fennel mustard, sweet potato and

a pretty incredible piece of equipment.’ As if

pickled kohlrabi. Leaks and mushrooms with

in sync, we both turn to the oven’s opening

parsnip, oyster mushroom, onion variations,

– zoning out on the glowing embers that rise

sage and garlic crouton. And a pizza straight

and fall like some primordial heartbeat. He

from the wood oven: Willibald’s ‘Meatza’,

continues: ‘During the day, we bring it up to

topped with pepperoni, mozzarella and ‘nduja

around nine hundred degrees for the pizzas.

– a fiery Italian salami from Calabria with a

And overnight we simply let the embers die

soft, spreadable consistency.

down on their own. By morning the oven’s still five hundred degrees – perfect for making our sourdough.’ Byron’s sourdough. Honestly, there may not be much in this world that I enjoy more. Add Byron’s house-made honey butter and coarse salt and leave me to die happy. Fast forward a few minutes and I’m sitting in the distillery dining hall – a converted barn with glorious vaulted cathedral ceiling – with Jordan, Cam, Katie and Cai. Set in front of us: an array of dishes that Byron and his team have prepared. The aforementioned

And cocktails. Glorious cocktails. Of course. Because Willibald. Katie’s creations: a classic ‘negroni’ with gin, campari, and vermouth rosso; an ‘early cuttings’ with rum, gin, aperol, lemon, grape and rosemary; an ‘ossington fizz’ with gin, pimms, lemon, sunflower, egg white and salt; and a ‘twice removed’ with gin, blanco vermouth, dill and lemon. The common denominator between all these drinks: Willibald’s fantastic barrel-aged dark gin.


GETTING TO KNOW WILLIBALD CHEF BYRON HALLETT Interview by Chris Tiessen SO, WHAT CAN WE EXPECT ON THE NEW WILLIBALD MENU? The menu is selfish, plain and simple. While this may sound abrasive, it’s not meant to. In essence, the menu reflects what the team and I like, what we want to cook, and how we want to cook it. Self-interest and creativity are what make a small handful of restaurants great. The team’s current selfish obsessions? Sourdough. Wood-fired pizza. In-house charcuterie. And anything that’s seasonal or that inspires us. WHAT EXCITES YOU MOST ABOUT WORKING AT WILLIBALD? Honestly everything about this place excites me. The cattle raised onsite. The gin distilled onsite. The honey created by bees that live onsite. The creative cocktails. The vibe of the whole place. The beautiful kitchen that was built for me. Everything. I’m very lucky – and proud – to be part of this venture. YOU’RE FAMOUS AS THE ARABELLA PARK CHEF WHO CREATED PLAYFUL YET ELEVATED DISHES. DO YOU BRING THE SAME CULINARY PHILOSOPHY TO WILLIBALD? Famous? That’s a stretch. While the two places couldn’t be any more different, my attitude towards food remains the same. It’ll come with me wherever I go – whether I like it or not. WHAT’S YOUR MOST ESSENTIAL KITCHEN UTENSIL? My Sous Chef – Mike Gibner. While he’s technically not a utensil, he’s definitely essential to me. A DISH YOU COULD MAKE FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE WITHOUT TIRING OF IT? Sourdough, butter and salt.

157

WHAT ARE YOU EATING WHEN YOU GET HOME? Usually a fermented barley soup – oftentimes heavily dry hopped. But really, my amazing girlfriend does a lot of the cooking at home. She’s good – like really good. WHAT SHOULD EVERY DINER WHO COMES TO WILLIBALD ORDER AT LEAST ONCE? A cocktail, for sure. Also some sourdough, charcuterie, and – without question – a pizza. The mains are also pretty delicious. The large format farmhouse options are great for bigger groups. The desserts are pretty fun, too. Maybe I should stop here?


158


‘This is one of the best meals of my life,’ I declare to our group as I savour a bit of the pork belly. ‘Do you eat like this every day?’ Jordan chuckles, ‘We’re only open Wednesday through Saturday, so no – not every day.’ He continues: ‘And I’m happy you’re enjoying yourself. We put a lot of effort into our kitchen program – focusing on authentic farm to table menus.’ How authentic? Let’s just say the Willibald crew doesn’t call themselves a ‘farm distillery’ for nothing. From the botanicals they grow for their spirits to the chickens they keep for eggs to the Ayrsyde Galloway cattle herd used for beef to the bees that produce honey to the herbs and spices and vegetables they use for various dishes, Willibald’s small but mighty team keeps as much as they can in-house. ‘In fact,’ Jordan tells me, ‘the only thing we don’t make here is the cheese we serve. But there are a number of great local cheese producers

Buy local. Bank local.

we’re happy to feature.’ I take a sip of my negroni – which Katie has

159

prepared with a glorious chunk of hand-hewn ice – and look around the dining room. While the vaulted ceiling must rise at least thirty feet into the air, it does not diminish this remarkably intimate gathering space. Indeed, with room for just under forty guests on any given evening, visiting for dinner is bound to be a cozy affair. Especially with the wood-fired oven going. And the lights dimmed. ‘Do you take reservations,’ I ask, ‘or can people simply walk in for a meal?’ I’m already thinking of my return visit. ‘It’s always best to call ahead,’ Jordan tells me. ‘We’re getting busier each week.’

.

Just before I leave I pull out my phone. To input Willibald’s number

WILLIBALD FARM DISTILLERY & RESTAURANT 1271 REIDSVILLE RD, AYR

drinkwillibald.com

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160 G O O S E 'B O O K S ' B Y CA i SE P U L iS


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SA N DWI C H I N G

10 1

WITH RYAN GOODFELLOW, GOODFELLOWS FIELD TO FORK

‘TOO FEW PEOPLE UNDERSTAND A REALLY GOOD SANDWICH.’

-JAMES BEARD

FOR THIS ‘FOOD ISSUE,’ WE DECIDED TO PAY OUR PALS AT GOODFELLOWS IN ROCKWOOD A VISIT – SO THEY COULD SHOW US A GOOD SANDWICH (AND, AS ALWAYS, A GOOD TIME). AFTER SOME RUMMAGING FOR INGREDIENTS, HERE’S WHAT RYAN CAME UP WITH:

'THE SPECIAL'

• house-made sourdough ciabatta • summer sausage from Top Market Meats • ‘June 2018’ cheese from River’s Edge Goat Dairy • house-made roasted & pickled cremini mushrooms from W&T Mushroom • house-made pickled foraged ramps • organic pea and sunflower sprouts from Nature’s Nourishing Farm • hot sauce from the Rockwood community garden • house-made hummus • house-made whole grain mustard Suffice it to say, this sandwich took longer to make than it did to devour.


HANDCR AF T ED CHAIN & POWER ROCKS

Profile for Toque Magazine

TOQUE Magazine - Issue 6 - The Food Issue