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April 21, 2013

Best Weekly Newspaper in Ohio 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012 Ohio Society of Professional Journalists Awards

A Toledo tradition since 2005 Connect with us: FREE • ToledoFreePress.com

Opinion

KickStart Toledo and a Cherry Street mission Tom Pounds on an idea from Columbus and Michael S. Miller on serving a few guests at dinner. page 3

Nation

Terror in Boston Local nurse crossed marathon finish line minutes before April 15 bombing. page 11

Politics

Candidate Lopez Lucas County Auditor Anita Lopez joins the race to be mayor of Toledo. page 13

Education Star

Crossing Cultures Toledo Museum of Art exhibit focuses on Australian Aboriginal art. page 21

ts n a r u a est tion R 10 Loca 1

Dr. Data

Data drives Romules Durant’s mission to lead TPS. By John P. McCartney, page 6

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Toledo Free Press

A Toledo tradition since 2005 ToledoFreePress.com

April 21, 2013

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April 21, 2013

ToledoFreePress.com

Publisher’s statement

Opinion

A Toledo tradition since 2005

3

DON LEE

KickStart Toledo

H

ere is a promising idea we could pull together for great impact in Downtown Toledo. Columbus recently organized a KickStart Columbus campaign. Columbus City Council and several community development organizations sponsored a contest and awarded free downtown office space for a year. According to a report in The Columbus Dispatch, “The goal is to help fledging local businesses take off, create jobs and make the Downtown corridor more vibrant.” Doesn’t that mission sound familiar? The story read, “15 new or small local companies applied, and four finalists presented their business plans to a panel of judges.” As many as three winners were possible in the competition, Councilman A. Troy Miller told The Columbus Dispatch. After a year of free rent at properties owned by development organizaThomas F. Pounds tion Capital South, the KickStart winning companies pay 50 percent of the lease in the second year and 75 percent in the third year. “Our goal is to have more activity Downtown, and retail is a key part of that,” said Amy Taylor, Capital South’s chief operating officer, in the news story. “KickStart is a wonderful mix of entrepreneurism and a perfect fit for us.” Winning companies also get free mentoring from the Economic and Community Development Institute, a Columbus nonprofit, and up to $1,000 for signage. A similar campaign would bring great attention to Downtown Toledo. A competition organizing space, signage and maybe even utility help could be a huge boost for the right companies. Toledo Free Press will take the lead on starting the conversation with Toledo City Council and the appropriate development agencies. Using KickStart Columbus as a model, we could plan a competition that would offer a head start for a local business and bring further life to our revitalized Downtown. I am open to your input and thoughts on this and will keep you updated on progress as we move the idea from concept to contest to reality. O Thomas F. Pounds is president and publisher of Toledo Free Press and Toledo Free Press Star. Contact him via email at tpounds@ toledofreepress.com.

LIGHTING THE FUSE

I

I parked in the lot at the Madison Street kitchen, as parked at the Cherry Street Mission building and walked to the 17th Street entrance, where a man asked how he dozens of people milled around. The area surrounding the could help me. I told him I was there to help a church kitchen building is a shocking ring of abandoned, crumbling buildings. If you were dropped off in group with dinner service, and he told me I that desolate area, you would never guess was at the wrong location; I needed to be at that just blocks away, thousands of people the kitchen on Madison Street. were taking their seats for a baseball game A man standing at the door said he was in a well-maintained stadium, comfortable walking that way and could guide me there. with plastic cups of beer and overflowing I asked him how far it was; I was not conhandfuls of popcorn and hot dogs. cerned with the walking distance, but I did I walked through a short hallway and into not know how late I would be there on that a large dining room, where scores of people April 15 night and was not comfortable were already waiting. I located the kitchen, with the idea of walking back after dark and where several men were preparing to serve leaving my car in a restricted lot. I told the man, who introduced himself as Michael S. miller a dinner to the Cherry Street Mission guests. I found Norm Carlton, the man from St. Doug, to hop in my car and we could drive to the kitchen. It was a short trip and there wasn’t much time Michael’s in the Hills Episcopal Church, who had invited for conversation, but he mentioned he was suffering from me to help his group serve dinner. back problems and appreciated the ride. n MILLER CONTINUES ON 4 Thomas F. Pounds, President/Publisher tpounds@toledofreepress.com

A publication of Toledo Free Press, LLC, Vol. 9, No.16. Established 2005. EDITORIAL Mary Ann Stearns, Design Editor mastearns@toledofreepress.com James A. Molnar, Lead Designer jmolnar@toledofreepress.com Sarah Ottney, Managing Editor sottney@toledofreepress.com Brigitta Burks, News Editor bburks@toledofreepress.com Jeff McGinnis, Pop Culture Editor PopGoesJeff@gmail.com

A Cherry Street mission

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Toledo Free Press is published every Sunday by Toledo Free Press, LLC, 605 Monroe St., Toledo, OH 43604. Subscription rate: $100 /year. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Copyright 2013, all rights reserved. Publication of advertisements does not imply endorsement of advertisers’ goods or services.


Opinion

4

A Toledo tradition since 2005 ToledoFreePress.com n MILLER CONTINUED FROM 3

MAKE NO LITTLE PLANS

Placement tests

A

lmost all of us born in the past 50 years have taken a particular test given to high school students. It’s called the High School Placement Test. In the most basic terms, this test measures your strengths and skills and spit out an educational track or profession that would fit your individual makeup. How it does this is by asking you a series of questions that it hopes will dig deeply into you passions, ambitions, and the like. This summer, I plan to ride in the National Multiple Sclerosis’s annual Bike To the Bay event. To prepare for this event, it would serve me well to first, dust off my bike, then ride several Will miles per week. I would also implement some sort of diet and step up my exercise regimen. In doing this, it would become evident to myself as well as others that I’m preparing to be successful in a particular endeavor, and that I really wanted to do well. Now, let’s say I tell everyone that I expect to ride in this same event, but I can’t put the doughnuts down. I don’t dust off my Huffy, nor do I attempt to enhance my stamina by engaging in any physical training. It’d be very hard to believe that I planned to be successful. It’d be very hard to believe that I had interest in actually wanting to. The truth is, what we do says so much more about what we want than what we say. We can talk all day long about the lifestyle we want, but if we don’t put effort behind achieving it, do we really want it? What you do says more about where you’re going than what you say. This is the most problematic function of this Placement Test as it bases the recommendation on your input. In other words, what you say. Classana, the website we launched several weeks ago, addresses this issue. When you first sign up, the site, just like the Placement Test, asks you some questions about your interests, experiences, and goals. It presents you with several options for next steps based on this. However, it then tracks your activity to see what you’re actually spending more time with. If you said you wanted to be an engineer, but everything you do happens to be leading to the arts, the site will recognize that and push you in the direction of your more pure ambition. With Classana, your Actions carry more weight than your Answers. What you say is used more so as a starting point. Why is all of this important? Let me first give you some facts courtesy

of American Student Assistance: O 12 million Americans (60 percent of all attending students) borrow annually to help cover costs. O There are approximately 37 million student loan borrowers with outstanding student loans today. O As of the first quarter of 2012, the under 30 age group has the most borrowers at 14 million, followed by 10.6 million for the 30-39 group, 5.7 million in the 40-49 category, 4.6 million in the 50-59 age group and the over 60 category with the least number of borrowers at 2.2 million for an overall total of 37.1 million. O There is roughly LUCAS somewhere between $902 billion and $1 trillion in total outstanding student loan debt in the United States today. O Of that outstanding student loan debt, approximately $85 billion is past due. O Students who drop out of college before earning a degree often struggle most with student loans. This last point is even more disheartening considering about half of students dropout before getting their degree. It’s imperative that we follow educational experiences that really speak to our purest ambition. I don’t mean this to be touchy-feely, but it’s actually the only way I think we can thrive in an increasingly competitive age. Whether or not you believe that the robots are taking over, or it’s the Chinese and their low wages, the jobs that we’ve enjoyed look radically different today than they have for most of our lives. Our ability to innovate and solve problems more easily, cheaply or extravagantly are what provide us an edge in this climate. We all, consciously or unconsciously, wake up in the morning hoping that by the time we return to bed that night that we’re in a better position than we were when we rose. The steps to get there aren’t always clear. It’s up to us to be learning and ever open to doing things differently. A mentor of mine said this once: “At the end of the day, everyone works for themselves.” I’ll never forget those words. O Will Lucas is founder and CEO at Classana and Creadio, and named among Business Insider’s ‘The 25 Most Influential African-Americans in Technology’. He also curates TEDxToledo.

His men’s group, “Mondays at Mike’s,” was serving food prepared by Ida’s Catering, paid for by an offering at the church’s Easter service. The men in the church group were setting up various food stations — a salad area, a place to set fresh-baked dinner rolls, a line to plate goldenbrown roasted chicken, mashed potatoes and gravy and green beans. The kitchen smelled like any suburban home on Thanksgiving afternoon. A few of us were asked to go back to the parking lot to unload cases of bottled water. I would be lying if I denied glancing at my car to make sure it was still in one piece.

Salads and bombs

Back inside, we donned green aprons and clear plastic gloves and began finding ways to be useful. I shook hands with a man named Joe, and we started taking salads to the 100-plus people waiting in the dining area. As others began plating the hot food so it could be taken to the round tables at 5 p.m., Joe and I tried to stay one step ahead with the salads. There was no group prayer, but several groups said grace at their tables as food was placed in front of them. Along one wall, a gigantic Mitsubishi television (surely they do not make them like that anymore; with wheels and a steering column, it could pass for a Fiat) showed continuous coverage of the bombings at the Boston Marathon. The plumes of smoke were shown on a nonstop loop, but few of the people in the room were paying attention; they were there to eat. As I placed small plastic foam bowls of salad in front of everyone, I tried to determine if there were any such thing as a composite of how “homeless” people look. I had no way of knowing who in the crowd was homeless and who just needed a good meal, but the mind goes where it goes, and that was the broad stroke, unjustified label in my head. What do hungry, homeless people look like? They are white. They are black. They are Latino. They are men. They are women. They are thin. They are fat. Some are clean in nice clothes. Some are not clean and wear worn clothes. Some are polite and smile and say “Thank you.” Some are sullen and withdrawn and demanding. It wasn’t much different from navigating a crowd at a Mud Hens game. If the Cherry Street Mission diners were transplanted to Fifth Third Field, most of them could walk the concourse and blend right in. I wish I could have sat at each table and collected stories, drawing sadness and loss from each person like a pain

eater. References to Christ surrounded the diners, and while the group from St. Michael’s embodied His mission, I wondered how much comfort that would provide the guests as their bellies emptied and they sought their next meal.

Seconds and thirds

I did notice patterns of behavior. The older the diner was, the more likely that person was to express thanks for the hot food. The younger the recipient was, the more likely that person was to skirt civility, demanding an extra salad or bottle of water. It was clear there was plenty of food on hand, so I took extra salads to those who asked. As soon as salads were served, we started helping serve plates of hot food. The St. Michael’s volunteers were lined up at the serving window to take two plates at a time to the tables, but I did not notice their organized approach at first and just clumsily went to the window to grab plates and take them out. As plates were cleared, Carlton and other volunteers began walking through the room with ice cream sundae cups, vanilla with either chocolate or strawberry topping; they carried small wooden spoons in plastic wrappers. The crowd was enthusiastic for the hot food, but the reception for the ice cream was intense. Hands flew in the air and people surrounded the men handing out the plastic cups as if they were dispensing cash money. It occurred to me that ice cream of any kind must be a rare treat for the Cherry Street Mission diners, and I was impressed that the Mondays at Mike’s group had thought about that. A few latecomers were served, and then a Cherry Street Mission manager called for attention and asked who wanted seconds. Twodozen hands went up, so we began a second wave of serving. One man had a young girl in a stroller, a pretty girl about 3 years old; I offered to bring him extra food but he waved me off, spoonfeeding her ice cream as he finished his chicken and potatoes. On the antique Mitsubishi, plumes of smoke exploded over and over; people scattered, over and over. The guests began to leave. Many of them resumed their silent vigil in the parking lot, sentries to the creeping decay of urban desolation. Where the rest of the people went, I cannot say.

Cleaning up

As the flurry of activity in the kitchen subsided, cleanup began. We cleared plates, wiped down tables, stacked chairs and swept the

April 21, 2013 floor. As guests left, many stopped to offer a thank you and ask if this group was hosting any other dinners in the near future. Some went to the kitchen serving window and asked for aluminum foil to wrap up leftovers; a few asked for third servings and scraped the food directly into small black containers to take with them. The Mondays at Mike’s men worked hard and were obviously happy to serve, but there was a gravity to their countenances; it was clear there was a great deal of introspection going on and a great many blessings were being silently counted. The entire process took less than two hours, a very small karma offering for the many blessings and good things in life. I thanked Carlton for the opportunity to help, dropped my gloves in the trash and put my apron with the other used ones in a brown grocery bag. I walked out of the kitchen building, as dozens of people milled around in the parking lot. The area surrounding the kitchen building, that shocking ring of abandoned, crumbling buildings, did not look any more pleasant as dusk settled. Just blocks away, thousands of people were taking their seats for a baseball game in a well-maintained stadium, comfortable with plastic cups of beer and overflowing handfuls of popcorn and hot dogs. I looked around to see if Doug needed a ride back to the 17th Street mission, but I did not see him, and I did not dawdle. I would be lying if I denied feeling relieved when I was safely in my car, man and machine in one piece. The guests were unknown and invisible to me before I served them food. As I scurried back to the comfort of my suburban home, I knew their faces and stories were already fading from the forefront of my mind. I drove home, listening to news reports from Boston. I had not eaten in several hours, but I was not hungry. A reporter on the radio said an 8-year-old boy had been killed in the Boston Marathon blasts, moments after hugging his father, who had just finished the great race. My overwhelmed mind conjured the image of a shattered, lifeless body — with the face of the pretty little girl I had tried to get extra food to. I thought I might stop and get an ice cream treat for our little boys — one more blessing in a life overflowing with them. O Michael S. Miller is editor in chief of Toledo Free Press and Toledo Free Press Star. Email him at mmiller@ toledofreepress.com.


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6

Community

A Toledo tradition since 2005 ToledoFreePress.com

April 21, 2013

EDUCATION

By John P. McCartney

Toledo Free Press Staff Writer jpmccartney@toledofreepress.com

Toledo Public Schools (TPS) interim superintendent Romules L. Durant’s office is typical of most professional educators, with books, journals and files tucked away in every nook and cranny. But two things immediately grab a visitor’s attention — the football locker room white board that covers most of the east wall and the four wall hangings of President Barack Obama above that white board. Durant, who describes himself as a passionate man, said his love of football was the ticket to and much of the motivation behind his education and professional career. And the white board he uses to display the data documenting individual school building’s as well as TPS’s overall performance does not come from anything he learned in the classroom between 1982, when he was enrolled in first grade at Holy Rosary Elementary school and 2007, when he was awarded a doctorate in education in administration from the University of Toledo. In the four-plus years he has worked as one of two TPS assistant superintendents, Durant said he has earned a moniker he considers a compliment. “I have my data always at hand,” Durant said. “They don’t call me Dr. Data for nothing. “And when they call me Dr. Data, it’s because I’m always about statistics. I’m a true believer of probability of human behavior. Every one of us has a behavior that we naturally do. You can quantify it.” n DURANT CONTINUES ON 7

toledo free press photo and cover photo by joseph herr

Data fuels Durant’s mission to lead TPS

n

Romules Durant earned a doctorate in education from the University of Toledo in 2007.

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ToledoFreePress.com

UROLOGY

Male Infertility Timothy Schuster, MD, FACS Trying to have a baby can be an exciting time for couples. But, for those who struggle with infertility, it can take a toll both emotionally and physically. Infertility is the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse. There are many causes for infertility in both men and women including environmental, medical, anatomic, and genetic factors. Problems with male fertility can be found in up to 50% of couples struggling with infertility and 30% of those cases are related to male infertility alone. Many of the causes of infertility can be treated. And, an infertility evaluation can give insight to what may be causing the problem. Testing for infertility includes a medical history, physical and semen analysis. These will help determine your treatment options. Behavior modifications, medications, surgery and reproductive technologies are options but choosing the right one depends on your individual situation, treatment costs and expected success rate. It’s important for couples to remember that pregnancy takes time. Don’t rush or stress if it’s not happening right away. Staying positive can help avoid relationship issues and performance anxiety. Dr. Schuster is accepting new patients at ProMedica GenitoUrinary Surgeons. To schedule an appointment, please call 419-531-8558.

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Community

7

n DURANT CONTINUED FROM 6 Durant said he enjoys telling colleagues, parents and students that his use of the white board doesn’t have anything to do with his experiences in any classroom. “I picked this up in football,” Durant said. “This is what they trained us and taught us to do in football. In other words, if we’re playing football, there’s an offensive coordinator sitting up in the press box calling plays. That person has a habit of doing things during certain courses of the game at certain points on the field. When you study them and study their habits when you’re a player, you’re able to predict and have a high probability of [determining] what that person will call and put yourself in a position to make plays. “When you talk about a person being a student of the game, like Peyton Manning, they do so much studying that they have a good indication of probability of those who have an impact on what’s called on the field. You’re able to participate much better than other people that are not students of the game. “That’s the same way with education. The more you’re able to study the habit of a child, or a common habit of children, the better you can anticipate, intervene and change certain outcomes. That’s the whole idea of what intervention truly is.”

‘A great leader’

Durant said the four wall hangings above the white board, featuring 68 different portraits and miniature magazine covers of Obama, are testimony to his deep admiration of the U.S. president. “He’s an example of a great leader in my eyes,” Durant said. “He exemplifies leadership as a game changer. He’s the first African-American president. And it so happens he’s the 44th president and my football number is 44. “It’s definitely the whole family image of his wife and kids and his humbling experience coming up. Michelle said he had holes in his vehicle and lived in a simple apartment that had caught on fire, and he still lived in it. “He is someone who lived so modestly, but at the same time, he was so highly educated he could do anything. He could have went to any law firm. It’s the same way with Michelle Obama. “It shows his heart was to serve the underserved. And that’s kind of one of my mantras. You’re designed to serve the underserved. He kind of lived that.”

The game changers

promedica.org/doctors

A Toledo tradition since 2005

Durant said the first and most important game-changers in his life were his parents, Benjamin and Carolynne Durant. n DURANT CONTINUES ON 8

toledo free press photo by joseph herr

April 21, 2013

7 of Durant’s educational philosophies Use the Strive model

Romules L. Durant is an advocate of the Strive model, based in downtown Cincinnati, which helps schools leverage an area’s resources into improvements in education. “Toledo has an abundance of resources. The Strive model can leverage these resources as a whole city so we’re not duplicating services. We’re allowing ourselves to operate much more efficiently as a city collectively, as opposed to doing the same work in the same area. How can we work together as partners to where I’m leveraging your resources and you’re leveraging my capacity and making this better?” Durant cites the Boys and Girls Clubs at Sherman, East Broadway and Marshall elementary schools as examples of how the Strive model can work in TPS.

Own your data

Durant tells students and teachers that the purpose of data is to motivate them and show the impact and rate of return of their work. “We sometimes have to talk about being on probation,” Durant said. “So I tell the schools, ‘Here’s where you’re at now. What’s your goal for third quarter? Where’s your PI (Performance Index) goal for third quarter?’ “Because now we’re seeing goals should be set at a building level. And I’ve developed a calculator that you can program it all in. So at the grade level, you set a goal. But who’s more important when you set the goal within the teacher’s classroom? The students. “So we call it, ‘What’s your story?’ The student says, ‘Here’s my scale score. My scale score was 363 which put me on a proficient level. I want my scale score for the next bench mark period to be 370.’

“That’s when the teacher says, ‘What are you doing to get there? Here’s what you’re weak at. If you improve some in this area, you can see some growth in your scale score.’ “However, that’s the child owning the data. We’re talking about a system schoolwide and getting to the level where it’s in the child’s hands. Then you really have a good culture and system going because when a child owns it, now they’re motivated and intrinsically moving to improve as opposed to just being pushed along where the teacher says, ‘You’ve got to do better.’ “However, when the child owns the data, the child says, ‘I’m setting a goal to do better and this is how I’m going to do it.’”

Be the LeBron of what you do

Durant teaches students that being outcome-based, bench mark-based and data-driven are the key attributes to being a successful organizational leader. “If you have no bench marks and no goals, what are you working toward?” Durant asked. “I learned that early on. I always appreciated my father. Ultimately, I don’t know where I would probably have ended up without having his presence. By being fortunate to have that, I try to provide that for students. “I’m passionate about that. Any of the kids will tell you, ‘Durant is passionate about what he does.’ So I kind of consider myself the Ray Lewis of education or the LeBron James of education. I tell kids, ‘Be the LeBron of what you do.’ No matter what it is in life, if you always be the LeBron of what you do, you will have that same status but in the field that you choose. More and more, they adhere to that. n PHILOSOPHIES CONTINUES ON 9


8

Community

n DURANT CONTINUED FROM 7 The second of three children, Durant said he attributes his work ethic to his father. “We had somewhat of a strict upbringing in regards to waking up early, running miles, working out,” Durant said. “As children, my father had us run around Collins Park. People in the neighborhood would look out the windows and see these little kids all running around the park. My father always had us jogging. “To this day, when I go into schools, [the conversations about my childhood] will be with kids who are children of those parents. ‘Me and my dad,’ they’ll say. ‘He’s always talking about you guys trucking around the park.’” Durant said his father taught his three children to hold themselves to high expectations and that no one can expect more of them than what they should expect of themselves. “He realized, in some sense, that we needed some discipline in order to be successful,” Durant said. “I tell people that he had a recipe for what I considered to be perfection. And I’ve said, ‘It wasn’t me who earned my doctorate degree.’ I’ve said, ‘My father earned his doctorate degree despite dropping out of high school.’ “At some point, he acquired a GED. The fact of the matter is that he dropped out of high school a young

A Toledo tradition since 2005 ToledoFreePress.com man. My brother is only 11 months younger than me. My sister is only a year older than me. So you’re talking about kids all around the same age. Trying to take care of three kids as a young person and then being involved for some period of time in gangs. He found himself the victim of being shot. “He just wanted better for us than he had, and he was willing to do whatever it took.”

‘A throwback mentality’

Durant’s football career started in the junior league with the East Side Raiders, where he was known as ‘Hit Man,’ a name he picked up from watching Jack Tatum, a former Ohio State free safety, play the game. “He was notorious for being a big hitter,” Durant said. “We always watched football, and so I used him as a role model. I always modeled myself being a ‘Hit Man.’ “On the football field, we wore jerseys, and mine read ‘Hit Man.’ At Friday games, people only knew me as ‘Hit Man.’ Everybody wanted to know who ‘Hit Man’ was. They couldn’t see me under the helmet, but you had this kid running all over the field, hitting people pretty hard. I had an old, throwback mentality about football. That [nickname] just kind of came with it.” As a high school freshman, Durant caught the eye of Dave Pit-

senbarger, who coached him in freshman football and freshman and junior varsity basketball. “I first noticed him when he arrived for summer workouts.” Pitsenbarger said. “He stood out above everybody with his intensity, his workout. You could tell he wanted to be the best that he could. It didn’t matter if it was 90 degrees out or if it was 70, he was going at it, giving it 100 percent.” Pitsenbarger said Durant’s unique eye contact convinced him that Durant was headed for greatness in whatever he decided to do with his life. “Prior to games, and even in practices, when the coach would stand up and speak to the team or try to motivate them prior to the game, it was his eye contact — he was so intent on taking in every detail, every word that the coach had to say. I can still remember the eye contact and him kind of rocking back and forth with intensity and taking in every word. “He was just motivated, ready to hit the field. He was ready to be the leader, to conquer whatever he needed to conquer. You could see he wanted to succeed, and he was going to take in every word that he could that would help him [reach] that level.” Pitsenbarger said that throughout the years, he has invited Durant to speak at basketball clinics. “In basketball, you could see

his intensity and doing whatever it took to win,” Pitsenbarger said. “He wasn’t the greatest basketball player but he did what he could to help the team succeed. At times it looked like he was playing football on the basketball court. He would leave his feet, even dive into the stands. He’d do whatever he could do to get that loose ball. He always wanted to succeed. He’s a hard worker.” Durant describes himself as a focused high school student. “In high school, honestly, I was all about school and athletics,” he said. “On senior skip day, I was the only senior that went to school. “I didn’t go to no parties. I never went out. I didn’t go to dances. It was just school and football and everything that came with it. It became a lifestyle, with working out. Schoolwork and athletics became my priorities in life.”

College career

Durant, who graduated from Waite High School in 1994, attended UT on a football scholarship. Tom Amstutz, Durant’s linebacker coach who later became UT’s head football coach, said he knew from the day he met Durant that he would always get his very best effort. “He was a quiet leader, and he had a super intensity on the football field,” Amstutz said. “Off the football field,

April 21, 2013 he was, No. 1, pursuing excellence. He was an excellent student. I expected him to earn mostly A’s, and he did. He was excellent in the classroom. He was an excellent leader. And he did have a special intensity on the field. He was a very tenacious guy.” More than 15 years after a scrimmage, Amstutz said he has a crystal clear memory of a kickoff play that illustrates Durant’s character and passion for life. “Coaches don’t really want the most intense hits during a scrimmage,” Amstutz said. “It’s your team against your team. You want some sort of control. But there was a very loud and fierce hit. And I said, AMSTUTZ ‘Oh, no.’ I looked up, and I saw a player jump up and howl like a wolf. And it was Romules. He was full-go in this, and since it was such a great hit, he got up and just howled like a wolf. I just laughed. The whole team started laughing. “You can’t slow him down. He’s always going to go hard and that just represents what he’s done as an administrator in the City of Toledo. He’s really like a hometown hero to me.” n DURANT CONTINUES ON 9


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n DURANT CONTINUED FROM 8

Orchestrating systems

After his 1998 graduation from UT with a bachelor’s in education, Durant immediately went to work for TPS as a fourth-grade teacher at Nathan Hale Elementary. Willie Ward, principal of Martin Luther King, Jr. Academy for Boys, worked with Durant in those early years. “He was a master at orchestrating systems of discipline and of curriculum,” Ward said. “It was wonderful to see him work. He would command the whole cafeteria. The boys and girls had to walk a certain way. They had to follow specific procedural ways of doing things. “He has structure. He has an innate sense of what needs to be to make things tight, to make sure that they’re organized, succinct and very educational. It’s just how he lets people know what the outcome would be. “That’s why I think he has such a natural feel for the data and how we’re using data within our school buildings.” Ward said Durant’s incorporation of the Student African American Brotherhood (SAAB) organization was “a blessing that transformed the culture and climate of TPS.” “In implementing the core principles of accountability, proactive leadership, intellectual development and self-discipline — particularly in African-American males — Dr. Durant has helped to give students the things they need. “Given our demographics, there are some specific things that need to be in place, particularly a culture and climate that gives students a reason and a purpose for what they’re doing — to think futuristically about why it’s important to dress in business attire, be on time, understand your data and make sure to keep your record and your urine clean.” Ward said Durant will be a “huge asset” to the district. “He has the organizational, people and business skills, and the connections with organizations outside of Toledo, including the national SAAB office,” Ward said. “He’s a highly, highly soughtafter individual. He’s approachable. He’s well-versed in school operations, financial and people management and building networks within a community where the sustainability will take care of itself given his endorsement. The community and the district really have an asset in Dr. Durant.”

Slight reservations

Twila Page, secretary of the African-American Parents Association, said she has a few reservations about the Board of Education’s choice of Durant as interim superintendent. n DURANT CONTINUES ON 10

A Toledo tradition since 2005

n PHILOSOPHIES CONTINUED FROM 7 “We have this model. I say, ‘We walk into a room.’ They respond, ‘We own the room’, meaning there’s a power presence of yourself. You own what you do, and people will see it and see a glow about you they want to be around. “That’s how you develop a positive group. Three hundred kids just didn’t come together in SAAB just to be coming together. They came together because there’s a positivity growing around others. There was a self-righteousness and a business look that the kids are attracted to. “One of the things I tell kids is, ‘Be a game changer about things that you do.’ If you do it to a certain level of perfection, people realize that they have to change the ways they go about achieving certain things.”

toledo free press photo by joseph herr

April 21, 2013

Acknowledge the critics

Durant acknowledged that some critics questioned his suitability as interim superintendent because they mistakenly believe his entire professional educational experience has been limited to TPS and Toledo. Durant suggests a careful study of his resume will alleviate any of those concerns. “It’s not about where you reside,” he said. “It’s about where you’re willing to go to collect information. I go to professional development [across the country], picking up best practices. That’s the diversity. Superintendents have a tendency to bounce all over the place. That diversity doesn’t necessarily bring anything unless there’s a success record based on the trail that you left. “In any organization, your best and most suc-

9

and your conclusion, which is the same as prediction, questioning, clarifying and summarizing in reading. “Kids begin to make that transferrable connection, realizing I can predict my outcome of research in science. I can ask myself guided questions to get to a particular outcome.’ “I tell people, when you can integrate reading and science and predict why chairs roll, let’s read it. Let’s ask ourselves some questions. “So now you’re challenging kids to develop a thinking mechanism within themselves, to think how to think when they read certain things. It will eventually become the skill that they naturally do after they’ve been trained so often in doing it. “When they begin to transfer that to any other situation, that’s the whole idea of execution of education. You may have all the knowledge base, but if you’re not able to transfer it to life, it becomes wasted stored knowledge.”

Justify a renewal levy

Durant said passing a renewal levy will require at least six well-developed strategies: O Continuing to build community trust. O Developing the energy behind TPS. O Establishing and nourishing community partnerships. O Acknowledging those things the district has been doing differently. O Focusing on what future taxpayers can expect from TPS. O Devising a strategic plan for “getting out the word” about the best practices in TPS. “There are a lot of great things going on in the district that are unknown,” Durant said. “There’s the aviation center. Toledo Technology Academy is in the top 10 percent of high schools ranked by U.S. News & World Report. There’s the Early College where our students earn 60 credit hours toward a college degree coming right out of high school. We have close to 60 career tech [programs] within the district.” Durant said few people are aware of the array of programs TPS students can pursue. “You seldom say that you’re doing well in the district,” he said. “You have to brand it. It’s about always putting our best foot forward, announcing these things and always mentioning the positive things going on in Toledo Public Schools. “And safety is our priority, No. 1. We’re the ninth safest school district in country (as reported in the March, 2013 issue of Urban Educator). How many people realize that? “It goes back to if people don’t know that, [then they ask themselves] what is it that they are investing in and getting a return on.”

Community

Delegate leadership

ROMULES L. DURANT cessful attributes are those you’re able to train within you. Because if the person underneath you isn’t good enough to run the organization, what does that tell you about you as a leader? “When I talk about football, some of the best coaches in the NFL have played under [New England Head Coach Bill] Belichick. And they begin to see that there’s a certain level of coaching when you’re able to produce assistant coaches who end up becoming head coaches elsewhere. That probably means there’s something about your leadership that has impacted them that they become recognizable amongst the league. “If you’re not able to produce leaders underneath you, then you have to question your own leadership. “Organizations are sustained based on having leadership in place. In other words, there are all these individuals coming through. You’re recruiting and providing the means to educate them in a way that is competent to the district. Surrounding districts may recruit your administrators, but if you always have a pool [of administrators to choose from], the day doesn’t stop. You still have individuals to put in.”

Encourage reciprocal teaching

Durant says he supports the reciprocal teaching model because it teaches students how to think. “In reading, students are taught to use four guided practices when they read. First, they predict. Second, they question. Third, they clarify. And fourth, they summarize.” In a classroom where reciprocal teaching is used, Durant said, students work in a cooperative learning group. “The kids are in a group being led by a student who watched a teacher model it over the course of weeks. Now, the student becomes the instructor in reading a passage and asking, ‘Who has a question?’ “The questions that are driven are modeled by a teacher. So the students begin to have the good sense of asking, ‘What questions should I be asking when I read something?’ “And at the same time, that predictability becomes a transferrable skill to science. Science is all about prediction, research questions, your findings

Durant said he’s a believer of top-down, pluralistic leadership. “You invest in others what you’re passionate about, making certain things are in your agenda that others are able to lead. And you allow them to lead in that capacity,” Durant said. “But my main thing is being the driving force of a mission. The mission is only as good as those who are part of it and own it. So when it gets down to the very core of students, you have to truly imbed your mission in the minds of those you serve. “That’s the whole idea [behind] the groups that I work with. I have to be grounded with those I serve, meaning those youths of today. I need to be within their grasp of understanding, and that means being around them at different times. “When they own the process, that’s when school districts or organizations are invested. When kids own their data and own their learning, that’s when you’re talking about transferrable skills for jobs and career-readiness. They weren’t just rote. They weren’t just picking up and acquiring certain knowledge. They’ve picked up a certain strategy that allows them to transfer what’s in the career and college world. “Those are the things that are very important. It starts with the mission. It starts with the vision, and then it goes through the execution in regards to how to connect from cradle-to-career in addressing important indications of certain skills, like reading and math. Those things become very important. “I’m very big about cognitive theory in developing a meta-cognition for students to begin to own those processes. Ultimately, that’s what creates a successful person. “It’s not about the GPA. You see a lot of kids with 4.0s, but are they able to transfer certain levels of skills to make them successful within the workplace? I think it’s that process in teaching them how they go about [reaching] a level of comprehension. “I’m a big fan of reciprocal teaching as well as being more student-led in the reciprocal teaching, which actually brings about that. When students begin to lead their instruction based on the modeling of the teacher, you have true learning going on. You also have peer-to-peer learning, which is always the best [way] to leave an impact on learning.” O


10 Community n DURANT CONTINUED FROM 9 “Basically, I didn’t think they had too much of a choice because Dr. Durant, [Jim] Gault, [Brian] Murphy and [James] Gant have basically been running the district. Dr. Pecko gave them wide latitude to run the district, which they have been doing. “For the board to bring in someone from outside when they have someone inside would have been a death knell. For one thing, they will be trying to get a levy [passed]. To go out and do a superintendent search would not have been very prudent.” Page said TPS may have too many long-term problems for anyone to succeed as an interim superintendent. “Their systemic, historical memory — the way they do things — they have to go past that,” Page said. “And although Dr. Durant’s new and young, he still is going to have to make changes as a young man and reject that old thinking of, ‘Because we did it this way 20 or 30 or 40 years ago, that’s the way it’s going to be done — just because it’s always been that way.’ “I think he’s going to have a hard row to hoe. He’s got the teacher contracts coming up. The district’s being investigated by the federal Department of Education and the Justice Department. And although they say things are changing in the discipline, I don’t really see it.” Page said that as long as Durant, Gant, Gault and Murphy work as a team, they “might have a chance” to succeed. “I don’t see it happening, though,” Page said. “They’re going to have to fight the unions. And in the paper, the unions have already started to fight back. “And in order to get that performance audit, with those 169 recommendations, implemented, it’s going to take some strength. And it’s not going to come from just the superintendent. It’s going to have to come from his cabinet.”

Credit where credit is due

Durant was unanimously chosen to be TPS’s interim superintendent on April 8. He is careful to point out that Pecko is the TPS superintendent and that he is only in contract negotiations with BOE president Brenda Hill and TPS legal counsel Keith Wilkowski for the interim position. The earliest the BOE might vote to accept his contract is April 23, at the regularly schedule business meeting. And if his contract is accepted and he officially becomes the interim superintendent, Durant emphasized that Pecko will remain the acting superintendent until he leaves the position July 31. Durant said he gives Pecko credit for much of what he has accomplished in the past few years. “He allowed his administrative

A Toledo tradition since 2005 ToledoFreePress.com team to do what they needed to do and operate,” Durant said. “Many companies would not have allowed their lower executives to pretty much change an entire organization through a transformation plan. “We devised the Transformation Plan and went to a K-8 model. You’re talking about transitioning 50 buildings to the complexity of changing to a K-8 concept. You’re talking about multiple student, staff and community impacts with boundary lines. That was a huge overtaking.”

Taxpayer perception

Because taxpayers will face a renewal levy on the ballot in either August or November, Durant wants citizens to feel confident that under his leadership, TPS will invest money wisely. “No. 1, the district is going to be much more outcome-based-driven to provide taxpayers some sort of return in regard to the investment,” Durant said. “No. 2, I want parents to understand that we’re trying to provide a variety of choices for their child. No child is born into one-box-fitsall. We’re providing them with a transformation of choices. They’re allowed to have a child who identifies certain strengths and are able to find [someone or something] in the school system to be able to maximize their potential passion and skill set. “When you find something you’re passionate about, you never work a day in your life. And I think when we begin to identify those things early on — that’s the whole cradle-to-career concept — that you’re able to identify much more in detail certain strengths and weaknesses of children to where they can start to begin to [make] clear college or career tech [choices] earlier than what you see now. “In essence, the district is going to look at the [performance] audit and implement the best suggestions of the audit while providing quality. The main thing is, all decisions are going to be student-driven in the best interest of children.”

Teacher, staff concerns

Durant said he’s confident that all TPS employees know that as their interim superintendent, “I’m going to give them 110 percent. “This job and what I do — I live this. I sacrifice a big portion of all my personal life and time to do this, and that I’m always going to work in the best interest of the children, the best interest of the people. “At the same time, no one works for me. As my dad said, ‘No one’s above you, but you stand above no man or woman.’ “No one in this district works for me, but more importantly works

with me in regards to a plan for a mission to allow our kids to be well-balanced and to be careerand college-ready. It’s going to take a collaborative of all of us in regards to working together to make these things happen. And I will go through all means and will support them in all regards. If they haven’t seen it thus far, they will see it. “There’s going to be a mindset of us coming to them as opposed to them having to come to us.”

Student-driven

Duran said he wants all TPS students and potential TPS students to know “they’re at the heart” of everything TPS does and “that all decisions are made in their best interest. “There’s going to be a continued effort to provide them leadership opportunities. They will begin to own the mission and vision of Toledo Public Schools and the understanding that, yes, they will be well-balanced in life. They will be career- and college-ready based on the

April 21, 2013 quality programs provided here. “But more importantly, it’s going to take effort among them to continue to be part of leadership groups, to be part of some support network, whether it’s the ones we provide or outside of that. “They have a moral and social responsibility to each other, and more importantly, to themselves. That’s going to be the culture and mindset of the district — high expectations for each and every person, always giving 110 percent. Every day is your ‘A’ day.” O


April 21, 2013

ToledoFreePress.com

Community 11

A Toledo tradition since 2005

NATION

By Don Lee

Toledo Free Press Staff Writer donlee@donleecartoons.com

A ProMedica Flower Hospital nurse and her friend from Tecumseh had just finished running the Boston Marathon when two explosions ripped through the finishline crowds. A friend, watching from the sidelines, left the area before the first explosion went off — and narrowly escaped walking right into the second one. Tina Waynick of Adrian, Mich., who was running the marathon for the second time, crossed the finish line at 3:54:55, and made her way past the post-finish-line gantlet toward the bus where runners kept their clothes. She heard the first explosion and police sirens a block away, before being ushered away from the scene. Meanwhile, her friend Becky Baumer, of North Baltimore, Ohio, had left the viewing area an hour before and was waiting at the hotel for her friends. She was in the lobby

when she heard the first explosion. Because she was prevented from going outside, she said, she was not caught in the second blast, right by the hotel. Two bombs, reportedly fashioned from pressure cookers and filled with black powder, nails and pellets, exploded seconds apart, killing three people and injuring more than 175. “People were running in different directions,” Baumer said. “Nobody knew where to go but we knew we had to go somewhere.” Baumer said she saw a woman approaching police officers who was covered in blood; the officers were trying to determine whether the blood was hers or was from someone else they needed to find and help. It was maybe 30 minutes, Baumer said, before she met up with Waynick’s fellow runner, whom she knows only as Jill. According to the Boston Marathon’s website, Jill Stockford from Tecumseh crossed the finish line at 3:39:45. Stockford could not be

reached for comment.) “I finally heard Jill say my name and I broke down and cried,” Baumer said. “When you’re in a room full of people but nobody who you know is there, you’re alone.” Ten minutes after that, Waynick found the two of them. The hotel was brimming with city police, FBI, Homeland Security and National Guard people, all responding to what’s been called an “act of terrorism.” No known terror group has claimed responsibility and authorities aren’t sure whether the perpetrators are foreign or homegrown. “It’s like something you see in the movies or on TV,” Waynick said. “Not something you think you will be a part of.” Once back at the hotel, Waynick said, the people in charge were reluctant to let anyone leave. Once they were allowed out, they were told they wouldn’t be allowed back in. Basically, Baumer said, they took a chance they would be able to make it out of the city. n MARATHON CONTINUES ON 12

photo courtesy tina waynick

Local nurse finished Boston Marathon just before explosions

n

Tina Waynick has completed two Boston Marathons.


12 Community n MARATHON CONTINUED FROM 11 The threesome walked a mile to get to their car, then navigated around blocked-off roads to get out of Boston for the drive home. Despite the death and heartbreak, Waynick said she wants to run the marathon again. BAUMER It’s a sentiment echoed by many runners and the organizers of other races. Already the organizers of races from London — whose marathon is planned for April 21 — to Toledo, where the Medical Mutual Glass City Marathon is slated for April 28, have said their races will go on, albeit with more attention paid to security. “It’s heartbreaking for me to think somebody could be so evil” as to plant and set bombs at such an event, Waynick said. Running again, she said, would be her way of affirming the bomber didn’t take a part of her life away. Baumer found her own little bit of normality to sustain her on their way out of Boston. When they reached the parking garage where their car was stashed, they met a young couple who had run in the marathon. He was in a tuxedo and she was in a white dress, both adorned with their running medals, getting married by a fountain. “It’s just nice to know,” Baumer said, “that normal things are still going on for normal people.”

April 21, 2013

A Toledo tradition since 2005 ToledoFreePress.com

Glass City Marathon ‘Team 8’ is assembling to honor blast victims From Staff Reports A group of 8-year-olds is being assembled to provide tribute to Boston Marathon bombing victims at an event before the Aprll 28 Glass City Marathon. “Team 8,” a group of at least 26 8-year-olds, will run the onemile kids’ race at noon April 27 at the University of Toledo Glass Bowl. “Team 8” is running in memory of 8-year-old Martin Richard, who was killed during the Boston Marathon bombings. Having 26 children, all 8 years old, run a mile each to collectively equal a marathon, is a symbol of supBAUMHOWER port for and unity with Richard’s family, runners worldwide and the City of Boston, according to Team 8 organizer Jeremy Baumhower. “As a father of four, including one who turns 7 years old this week and a 9-year-old, the Boston tragedy could

not have hit home any harder, especially learning the news of Martin Richard,” said Baumhower, a media producer and Toledo Free Press contributor. “Martin was the 8-year-old victim whose only crime was going to a race to cheer on family. How many events do we drag our other children to so they can watch and support a sibling? Hopefully we can raise some money to send it to whatever fund is set up in his name. I just love the thought of 8-year-olds running for a cause, smiling and indirectly showing the complete lack of fear they have against evil and acts like these.” Baumhower said he is looking for donations first to cover the $10 per child fee for April 27, so families do not have to pay to be a part of the event. He is also looking for T-shirts for Team 8. Proceeds will be donated to The Richard Family Fund, which was started with a $5,000 donation by Salem Five, a Boston-Area bank. To contact Baumhower, email him at jeremytheproducer@icloud.com, find him on Facebook or on Twitter @jeremytheproduc. O

Vin Dever Autohaus of Sylvania is offering one of its Detail Bays and equipment for local charities to raise money by washing cars for tips/donations!

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BLARNEY Event Center Thursday

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Two other runners from Adrian crossed the finish line well ahead of the bomb blasts. One, Sarah Kasabian Larson, said she and another runner heard a noise as they were walking away from the finish line but “it didn’t register” until they got back to their hotel — the Park Plaza, close to the finish line — and saw news of the bomb blast on the room TV. She was on the phone with her husband, James, back in Adrian when she heard the news. “This is devastating this could happen on a day when people get together to celebrate the runners’ journeys,” said Larson, a former Adrian College assistant cross country coach who is now a financial aid counselor for the college. This was her fourth Boston Marathon. A third Adrian runner, Ryan Sieler, crossed the finish line at 3:32:11, according to the Boston Marathon web site. Sieler could not be reached for comment. O

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April 21, 2013

ToledoFreePress.com

Community .13

A Toledo tradition since 2005

POLITICS

By Dave Willinger

TOLEDO FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER dwillinger@toledofreepress.com

Lucas County Auditor Anita Lopez, calling herself a “proud daughter of this great city,” kicked off her campaign for Toledo mayor on April 16 before a crowd of about 400 supporters at the Aurora Gonzalez Community Center off South Avenue. Following an invocation and introductions, Lopez, a Democrat, stepped to the microphone at a lectern in the center’s gymnasium and requested a moment of silence for the victims of the bombings at the Boston Marathon. She then launched into a speech touching on a wide range of issues, from potholes, trash removal, crime and neighborhood blight to the overarching economic situation in the region and the Toledo water plant, which the candidate labeled “our greatest liability.” Lopez, who if elected would become the first Hispanic and the second woman to serve as mayor, grounded her platform with autobiographical references. She told her audience she comes from a family of seven children of mi-

grant worker parents who, “taught me the value of hard work.” The candidate spoke of how “all workers deserve dignity” and reminded her supporters of her earlier position with Lucas County Children Services Board. “I started my career protecting the most vulnerable in our city,” she said. Lopez told supporters Toledo is going down the wrong path. She said she would support local businesses, make the neighborhoods “strong and safe” and get the mayoral administration out of One Government Center and into the neighborhoods. Lopez would change the culture, she said, making government “accessible and accountable to the citizens.” Lopez described her vision for Toledo as a “great economic engine throughout the region.” She would “work equally to attract new businesses and make it possible for existing businesses to prosper,” she said, emphasizing the need to remain loyal to local businesses that have remained loyal to Toledo. “It doesn’t do us any good to hand over ownership of Toledo’s assets if we don’t get jobs and … spur economic development,” Lopez said, referencing

in particular the 2011 sale of the Marina District by the Mike Bell administration to a Chinese firm. Proponents of the deal, which envisions the creation of a commercial, entertainment and residential district along the eastern bank of the Maumee River, claim it will eventually bring jobs and development to Toledo. Lopez got applause Tuesday when she told her supporters, “I’m still waiting.” Calling Toledo workers “resilient,” Lopez said she would “fight against attacks on working families” and against attacks that “damage the middle class.” “You won’t find me supporting [Senate] Bill 5,” she vowed, referring to the 2011 law restricting collective bargaining rights for public employees. That law, which Bell supported, was struck down by public referendum in the November 2011 elections by a wide margin. Lopez also pledged to “reduce neighborhood blight,” saying she would address the twin issues of abandoned houses and graffiti. Lopez, who has two sons, said her goal is to “make neighborhoods safe for our children.” n LOPEZ CONTINUES ON 14

toledo free press photo by dave willinger

County Auditor Lopez launches mayoral campaign

n

Anita Lopez announces her mayoral campaign April 16.

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14 Community n LOPEZ CONTINUED FROM 13 The candidate said she would “fight to tear down abandoned buildings” and alluded to a “comprehensive plan to restore and grow our communities.” Lopez called crime a priority, claiming the city’s safety forces are “spread too thin.” The University of Toledo Law School grad also pledged to “prosecute offenders to the fullest extent of the law.” Specifically, a Lopez administration would “not tolerate crimes against women, seniors and children,” she said, and promised to “train and equip our everyday heroes in the safety forces.” Lopez faulted “recent leadership” for having “ignored problems” at the water treatment facility, which must undergo an estimated $264 million emergency repair job as mandated by the federal Environmental Protection Agency. According to city officials, another $50 million is needed to preserve the integrity of the water lines, which are 75 years old on average. Declaring that “water is a human right,” Lopez said, “A full audit and review of the department of public services is in order and I am just the right person for that job.” Lopez chose to make her announcement at the Aurora Gonzalez Community Center because it was there nearly 30 years ago — when the facility housed the Girls and Boys Clubs of Toledo — where the candidate, as a 14-year-old student at Central Catholic High School, got her first

job “helping people,” she said. During her speech, Lopez was forced to pause often for applause from supporters, including many union members and several high-ranking labor officials. Felicia Monday, a retired county employee, also came to the rally. “It takes a woman to get things done,” Monday said when she saw Lopez arrive. “I’m glad she’s running.” Lopez concluded her speech by vowing to “bring my track record of accountability, transparency and customer service to the mayor’s office.”

Bell responds

Bell said he respected Lopez’s choice to get into the race but was “not really” aware of what topics she addressed in her speech. When told Lopez spoke about changing the culture of the administration, by making it more accessible, BELL Bell responded by saying his administration is more accessible than ever. The mayor mentioned the city’s website and noted he was answering a reporter’s questions while en route to a town hall meeting that would be his third speaking engagement that day. Bell dismissed Lopez’s statements, saying, “Unless they substantiate what they’re saying, it’s just political rhetoric.” Bell said he would “absolutely” take part in the

McNamara ‘disappointed’

Councilman Joe McNamara, another Democrat in the race for mayor, responded to the Lopez candidacy with the following statement: “The McNAMARA people of Toledo deserve a mayor without serious ethical questions. I was disappointed that Anita Lopez did not take the opportunity presented by her announcement to sign the ethics pledge I signed yesterday. I urge her to sign it immediately. I will bring an accountable, honest and open administration to City Hall.”

‘Not messing around’

Latino youth advocate and Ohio Women’s Hall of Fame member Margarita De Leon introduced Lopez at Tuesday’s rally, noting that the candidate, a “lady from the Old South End who worked her way through law school,” had garnered more votes last November in her run for auditor than any other name on the ballot in Lucas County. “So we’re not messing around.” Independent Alan Cox, Libertarian retired city employee Michael Konwinski and self-described “prophetess” Opal Covey are also running for mayor. O

April 21, 2013

Commissioners endorse proposed marriage equality amendment

candidates’ debates. “I’m actually excited about it,” he said.

From Staff Reports The Lucas County Commissioners voted April 16 to endorse the Ohio Freedom to Marry and Religious Freedom Amendment, becoming the first county in Ohio to officially endorse the proposed amendment. The ballot initiative seeks to overturn a 2004 Ohio constitutional amendment that banned any definition of marriage other than one between one man and one woman. This amendment may be on the Ohio ballot in 2013. If passed, the amendment would create a provision in Ohio law allowing marriage equality for all Ohioans, regardless of sexual orientation, gender or gender identity, while respecting religious freedoms by allowing religious institutions of all types to determine whom to marry and which marriages to perform in their own congregations and buildings, according to a news release from the commissioners’ office. The decision was unanimous.

“Equal protection under the law is a fundamental right of all citizens and we must stand against discrimination and do what is right,” Commissioner Carol Contrada stated in the release. “I support the right of all families to be recognized and respected in Ohio.” “I have been an advocate for civil rights for 50 years and the fight for civil rights does not stop with gender, age, ability or race,” Commissioner Pete Gerken stated in the release. “Now we should extend those rights to marriage equality. What’s right is right is right.” “True acceptance of all citizens includes marriage equality,” Commissioner Tina Skeldon Wozniak stated in the release. “Strong communities, like Lucas County, provide equal opportunity for all citizens regardless of sexual orientation.” In 2010, Lucas County extended health care eligibility to domestic partners of county employees, allowing any employee in a committed relationship to ensure that a partner would receive health coverage. O

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April 21, 2013

ToledoFreePress.com

Community 15

A Toledo tradition since 2005

EDUCATION

Sykes suggests TPS relocate central offices Downtown By John P. McCartney

Toledo Free Press Staff Writer jpmccartney@toledofreepress.com

If Board of Education (BOE) member Larry Sykes has his way, Toledo Public Schools (TPS) will accept Recommendation 6-6 of Evergreen Solutions’ performance audit by relocating the district’s central office staff and functions to the heart of the city. “I would love it if we could be Downtown,” Sykes told those who attended the Ohio School Facilities Commission (OSFC) Building Committee meeting on April 17. Sykes suggested James Gant, TPS chief business manager, have a conversation with Lucas County officials as well as City of Toledo officials to see if either entity owns a building or property in the Downtown area that it might be interested in swapping with TPS. “We should put our feelers out,” Sykes said. “You’d be amazed at the properties the city and county have that we may be able to utilize. I understand time is of the essence, but you don’t jump out of the fire into the fire.” Sykes also suggested Gant look into the Owens Corning Building,

which Sykes said “is probably halfempty.” Owens Corning is located at the intersection of Washington and Summit streets. On its website, Hines, a privately owned, international real estate firm, reports that the building currently has one major tenant and 370,816 square SYKES feet of net rentable office space. Sykes also suggested Gant inquire into whether ProMedica Toledo Hospital or the University of Toledo have any space available. “What about Scott Park?” Sykes asked Gant. “They’ve just about abandoned that facility.” However, UT’s Scott Park campus is not located in Downtown Toledo, but at 2225 Nebraska Ave. Sykes’ suggestion came in response to a discussion between fellow BOE member Lisa Sobecki and Gant about whether to invest approximately $15,000 into temporarily cooling the

Thurgood Marshall Building for the summer months or to move offices to the Summit Annex, 1530 N. Superior St., before June. “I’ve thought about [moving Downtown] myself, but I don’t think I’ve ever heard that from any other board member,” Gant said after the meeting. Gant said moving out of the Thurgood Marshall Building “is the best decision in the long term. We need to be in a more efficient building and utilize the space more effectively.” However, Gant said he had a more immediate concern. “Short term, my problem is my HVAC system is not working,” Gant said. “I have to have temporary cooling or I’m going to be murdered around here. Short-term is just temporary cooling. What I’m suggesting is it may be better to pay for temporary cooling than waste $250,000 in replacing a chiller when we know we need to move.” Gant said he did not think a move to the Summit Annex would be viable because it would mean the loss of about 20,000 square feet of space, which he said is one-third the space available in the Thurgood Marshall Building. However, Evergreen Solution’s

Ready. Set. Go!

performance audit reported that the current central office staff has about 69 percent more square feet per person than most school districts and 170 percent more than optimum for an office building. Sobecki said her biggest concern with moving into the Summit Annex was the cost of “quite a few renovations” that will be needed. Gant spoke of the cost benefits of moving TPS’ central office administration to the former DeVilbiss High School, 3301 Upton Ave., which houses the Toledo technology Academy. “We’re already utilizing that site so the cost of operation will be a lot less,” Gant said. “I’m already operating it right now, so we’re talking about maybe only cooling additional rooms. That is appealing to some respect.” However, the committee dismissed the idea as impractical for three reasons: O The possibility of more student programs being scheduled at the former high school within 12 months. O What Sykes called “a very serious parking issue. There is only one way in and one way out. More traffic would create congestion.”

O Sykes’ concern that “the mixing of adult and student populations could be problematic.” Sykes closed the meeting by telling the group he was attending his first OSFC Building Committee meeting of the school year to ask the committee “to please look into three things I have had brought to my attention recently.” Sykes said the Old West End Academy’s computer lab’s design is so archaic that students sit at computers facing the walls, which prevents teachers from using the district’s technology to instruct the classroom of students. Sykes also said the 200-plus unused phone lines identified in a performance audit as costing TPS at least $45,600 a year need the committee’s immediate attention. Finally, he said, the one boys’ bathroom at Jones Elementary, located on the first floor by the lunchroom, has only one stall and one urinal. “I’ve been over there on a Friday night where they have as many as 200 parents there for dodge ball with their young kids,” Sykes said. “And there’s a line outside that latrine like they were drinking beer.” O

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16 Community

A Toledo tradition since 2005 ToledoFreePress.com

April 21, 2013

Mayor, group deem Germany trip a success By Sarah Ottney

TOLEDO FREE PRESS MANAGING EDITOR sottney@toledofreepress.com

DELMENHORST, Germany — On the last day of a recent trip to Germany, Toledo Mayor Mike Bell and Regional Growth Partnership (RGP) Vice President of International Development D. Paul Zito spoke to local government and business leaders at the city hall in Toledo’s sister city of Delmenhorst. “We’ve made some good contacts here. We can build on those relationships,” Zito said. “A consulting firm, an accounting firm, an automotive manufacturer. That’s not bad for a morning’s work.” The April 15 session was the last official meeting of the trip, but Bell continued promoting the city right up to the boarding gate, chatting up a businessman from Zimbabwe at the Bremen Airport about the benefits of doing business in Northwest Ohio. Bell was in Germany from April 10-15 to attend the Hannover Messe, one of the world’s largest industrial trade fairs, as well as visit Delmen-

horst on the invitation of Mayor Patrick de La Lanne, who visited Toledo last summer. “It’s a very broad industrial trade show so the sectors and the companies that are there fit very much to the strengths of Toledo and Northwest Ohio,” said Zito, who has attended for the past 15 years. In all, Bell met with at least 16 companies and reached out to dozens more, Zito said. No deals or decisions were made, but the series of meetings helped announce Northwest Ohio is “open for business,” said City Finance Director Patrick McLean. “Nobody said [they would be investing in Toledo], but nobody would be expected to say that on the first day. That would be like getting married after the first date. Yeah, it could happen but it doesn’t usually and it’s probably not well advised,” McLean said. “The goal is to lay that foundation. This is just one part of a broader strategy de-

signed to make businesses understand that Toledo exists, that it is open for business.” Others on the trip were Deputy Mayor of External Affairs and Economic Development Paul Syring, Public Information Officer Jen Sorgenfrei, University of Toledo Associate Director of Undergraduate Admission Mark Schroeder and Toledo Sister Cities International Executive Director Susan Miko. The estimated cost per person was $2,200, Sorgenfrei said. Her and Bell’s trip funds came from the mayor’s office budget. Syring’s costs came from the economic development budget and McLean’s costs came from the finance department budget. Everyone else was responsible for his or her own expenses, Sorgenfrei said. On several occasions, Bell addressed those at home who criticize his international trips as an ineffective use of taxpayer money. “Anytime you travel, you’re going

Bell in

Germany

to have your critics because everybody thinks you should just sit at home and things are just going to come to you,” Bell said. “It does not work like that in the real world, I’m sorry. You have to reach out and build relationships. “The problem we have in our city is we make an assumption that everyone knows where Toledo is and what it’s about,” Bell said. “The reason I keep reaching out to these other countries and going everywhere I can is because most people don’t know about Toledo. “I don’t want [a company] to ever say, ‘If only I would have known about Toledo I would have come here,’” Bell said. The average life cycle of a foreign direct investment project is about 18 months, Zito said. “People in Toledo want results really quickly. They are not very patient,” Bell said. Bell, McLean and Syring, who were visiting the fair for the first time, said they came away convinced Toledo needed to have a presence at the fair. “I would recommend the city at a

minimum, if not every year then every other year, send one or two folks to attend and give it a good run going forward,” Syring said. Pursuing direct foreign investment is critical in today’s world market, McLean said. “Capital knows fewer and fewer boundaries these days,” McLean said. “We’re certainly not excluding looking for investment from other U.S. firms. But you don’t want to take the foreign investment off the table if that’s where capital exists right now. It’s shortsighted.” Other Ohio cities — such as Akron, which has a booth at the fair every year and often sends its mayor — have been courting international companies for decades, McLean said. Cleveland’s Team NEO, Columbus 220, Cincinnati USA and the Dayton Development Coalition also attended this year, Zito said. Northwest Ohio is home to more than 150 foreign-owned facilities, employing more than 22,000 people, according to RGP figures. Bell and Syring returned to Toledo on April 15. The others continued on to other business in Europe. O

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***Tickets still available*** The Maritime Academy of Toledo proudly presents The Third Annual Admiral’s Ball Saturday, April 27 at The Fifth-Third Center One SeaGate in Toledo Five Exquisite Dining Stations ● Music & Dancing with “Swingmania” ● Live and Silent Auction For Ticket Information call 419-244-9999 or info@maritimeacademy.us Auction items include a seven-day Great Lakes Freighter Cruise, Tug Boat Cruise for six, Tennessee Getaway Vacation Package, Family Dinner Package from Mano’s Restaurant, Overnight stay at Maumee Bay Resort with Golf Package, Notre Dame Football Tickets, Swim Party for 12, USS Toledo Artifacts, Executive Chef Dinner in your home, Handcrafted 11’ Row Boat & other Nautical Items built by Maritime Academy Cadets, Basket of Gourmet Chocolates, Best of Toledo Basket, Golf Package Basket, and more. On-Line bidding available at www.maritimeacademy.us. Money raised benefits the cadets of The Maritime Academy of Toledo.


April 21, 2013

ToledoFreePress.com

Health Zone 17

A Toledo tradition since 2005

By Brigitta Burks

Toledo Free Press News Editor bburks@toledofreepress.com

Local therapist Jennifer Dubow has been a longtime fan of therapy games, which help children cope with various issues. Recently, she made the jump from fan to game creator when she released “Stress Quest,” a game that helps teach children ways to deal with anxieties. “I’ve been buying therapy games for the whole time I’ve been a therapist, for the past 24 years. So it’s definitely something I enjoy buying for my practice because kids enjoy playing them. They don’t really enjoy sitting on the couch talking. That’s really boring to them so if you can do something fun with them and they’re learning at the same time, that’s great,” Dubow said. Dubow developed “Stress Quest,” which was officially released in November, while she was a school counselor at the David S. Stone Hebrew Academy. Every year, she’d work on developing a simple cardboard game, based on topics like anger or divorce, with students. “Stress Quest” was a particularly big hit among students, but Dubow said she wanted to see if the game was popular with those who didn’t help develop it. She began taking it to agencies and to her practice. “Other children seemed to like

it, too,” Dubow said. She began the process of turning her “scrappy” cardboard game into the real deal and was able to release her game two years later. Dubow said it was important to her to use local services like Litpac in Taylor, Mich., for printing and artist Paula Ashley from Next Year’s News in Toledo for the game’s artwork. After trademarking and copyrighting her game, Dubow took it out to schools and mental health agencies to show them how it works. She said she has already sold copies to some schools and agencies. The game, which comes in a bag to make transportation easier for therapists, features several prompts. In an attempt to get to the end of the board, players may draw a yoga card, which asks them to do different poses or meditation exercises. “Even if you don’t know yoga and you’ve never done it before, [the poses are] pretty simple and you don’t have to do it perfectly,” Dubow said. Stress Quest also has a relaxation deck with ideas on how to relax and questions for problem solving. There are also prompts for children to discuss what goals they may have and there are also opportunities for kids to learn the difference between good and bad secrets. Then there’s the danger deck, which “challenges kids to think about situations that might be a little risky,

like if someone asks them to steal,” Dubow said. The game also gives children a chance to use their anxietyrelieving techniques. “Actually the game causes a little anxiety because at times, you might get sent back to timeout,” Dubow said. There are chances throughout the game that a player might have their progress set back if he or she gets sent to the “timeout chair,” which is based on a tiny green Adirondack chair in Dubow’s office. Pointing to a spot near the end of the board, Dubow said, “If a child’s way over here and they do not want to lose and they get upset about that, then maybe as a therapist, you can help them utilize the skills that they’ve learned along the way through the game.” Children can face many stressors and may present with anger or irritability instead of obvious anxiety, Dubow said. “As you talk with the child, you really find out they’re worried about something else. They’re really anxious about taking a test; they’re really worried about having to move or there’s someone at school that’s bothering them,” said Dubow, who also works with adults. “Stress Quest” is for sale for $55 and available at buychildtherapy games.com. O

toledo free press photo by joseph herr

Therapist develops game to help kids deal with stress

n

 

Jennifer Dubow created the therapy game ‘Stress Quest.’

CALL FOR NOMINEES Join the American Cancer Society as we celebrate our 100th year and honor the “Faces of Cancer” at our CAttle BARon’S BAll to be held Saturday, September 7 at Centennial Terrace, Sylvania, Ohio.

  CATTLE  BARON’S  BALL  CELEBRATING  100  “FACES  OF  CANCER”  

Nominee   We are looking for people in our community that represent the faces of cancer. Name_____________________________________________________________________________________________  

This includes physicians, health care professionals, caregivers, researchers, survivors, Address____________________________________________________________________________________________   memorials, volunteers and supporters of those dealing with cancer. We would like to take the opportunity to acknowledge and celebrate those in our community that City_______________________________________   State__________________________   Zip______________________   have made a difference in the lives of those fighting this disease. Phone  #______________________________________  email________________________________________________   Please  circle  one  

Please help us by sponsoring someone to be one of the “Faces of Cancer”. Each nominee will be recognized with a picture in our “Faces of Cancer” display.

Physician          Health  Care  Professional          Caregiver  For        Researcher          Survivor          please Memorial          Supporter   more information, contact Beth    

Stutler at 888-227-6446, ext. 5212, email beth.stutler@cancer.org or visit our web site www.cattlebaronsball.org. You

I  would  like  to  recognize  this  person   may also access the nomination form at toledofreepress.com. Return nominabecause___________________________________________________________________________________________ tion form to the American Cancer Society with your payment of $100.00 by __________________________________________________________________________________________________ April 30, 2013. __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Media Sponsor __________________________________________________________________________________________________   Sponsor  Information   Name_____________________________________________________________________________________________  


18 Business Link

A Toledo tradition since 2005 ToledoFreePress.com

April 21, 2013

DEVELOPMENT

By Duane Ramsey

TOLEDO FREE PRESS SENIOR BUSINESS WRITER dramsey@toledofreepress.com

The Marina District project is still alive despite having shown little progress since officials from the City of Toledo and Dashing Pacific held a groundbreaking ceremony there July 2, 2011. Chinese investment group Dashing Pacific continues to work on financing and planning for the Marina District project in Toledo. Company officials provided an update through Rudolph|Libbe of Walbridge, the construction manager for the project. Dashing Pacific is planning a mixed-use development to include both commercial and residential components, such as residential rental and sale properties, retail, restaurants, entertainment, education and offices that could include a corporate headquarters, according to a spokesperson for Rudolph|Libbe on behalf of Dashing Pacific. The Marina District project will incorporate elements of new urbanism and sustainable neighborhood design so that all services required for daily living would be located within walking distance of the site and surrounding neighborhood, said the spokesperson. The goal of the project is to create a long-term destination for Toledo with an emphasis on sustainable energy-efficient buildings and connectivity with the Garfield neighborhood with paths for walking and biking and green spaces along the Maumee River.

Best answer

Larry Dillin, whose firm created the original plan for the Marina District in 2008, said the overall concept plan is still the best answer for the utilization of the site given its proximity to the river and central business district. “We created a master plan with special design controls for the Marina District,” Dillin said. “Getting the property into the

hands of the private sector was a good accomplishment.” When Dashing Pacific is ready to move forward, Toledo can be assured that the quality of the vision is maintained through the architectural review committee process attached to the Marina District property, according to Dillin. Dashing Pacific continues to seek sources of capital and anchor tenants as the first step of the project. It will be planned around the needs of any anchor tenants that become involved in the planning and design. Dashing Pacific reported that it does not have any commitments from investors or tenants at this time. The timeline of the project will depend on such commitments, according to the Rudolph|Libbe spokesperson.

toledo free press file photo

Marina District project progressing but slower than anticipated

10-15 year build out

The entire Marina District project is planned as a 10- to 15-year build out, said the spokesperson. The real estate market is very challenging at this time. It’s very common for large projects such as the Marina District to have changes in schedule, planning and design occur, the spokesperson said. Funding for a project of this magnitude, particularly in Toledo, is extremely challenging, as Dillin said he learned in 2008 as the recession began crumbling the financial underpinnings for real estate projects across the country. His firm was unable to raise the capital to purchase the Marina property from the City of Toledo at that time. “Many people criticize how long it takes. Some judge the plan or who is involved. Others say it cannot be done in Toledo, Ohio,” Dillin said. People who understand the daunting challenges and risks associated with development of privately funded projects realize they take time, according to Dillin. “The Dashing Pacific folks are savvy and experienced investors. And Rudolph|Libbe understands how to assist in proper planning and execution of a complex project like the Marina District,” Dillin said.

n

Dashing Pacific investors with Toledo Mayor Mike Bell at a July 2011 ceremony at the marina district.

Rudolph|Libbe support

Rudolph|Libbe is supporting Dashing Pacific in the planning and design of the Marina District project. The firm reported it has hired a master planning architect and will release them to begin work on the design once anchor tenants have committed to it. MXD Development Strategists, a market study and development strategy firm based in Vancouver, British Columbia, is conducting a market study and providing planning support for the project, according to Rudolph|Libbe.

Privately owned

The Marina District site is privately owned and paying property taxes, which is the first step in the public recouping its investment in that site. Dashing Pacific purchased 69 acres of the Marina District site from the City of Toledo for $3.8 million in 2011. It has an option to purchase an additional 22.75 acres of the site for a reported $1.25 million, according to the City of Toledo at that time. After a 10-day trip to China that

that year, Mayor Mike Bell reported that Dashing Pacific was prepared to invest another $200-$300 million in to the Marina District project. Bell and city officials were not available for comment on the status of the Marina District project. The mayor and three other city officials recently returned from a trip to Germany. Three of the mayor’s top staff, Deputy Mayor Paul Syring, Finance Director Patrick McLean and Public Information Officer Jen Sorgenfrei, joined him on the trip. O

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April 21, 2013

ToledoFreePress.com

TREECE BLOG

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Let us first look at what exactly back the metal at a discounted price. happened to gold. Paul Craig Roberts The panic from April 12 bled over to April 15, and metals commented on the gold prices dropped even market in John Mauldin’s more, which then bled latest newsletter with over to equities. some startling facts. Whatever specifiOn April 12, 500 tons cally caused the drop in of paper gold was sold. metals is not the focus That’s 16 million ounces, of this piece; it is how and at a price of $1,550 an investors responded to ounce, worth $24.8 bilequities. Between April lion. The move brought 11 and 16, the Dow gold down $73 an ounce Ben TREECE Jones fell by a measly 1.75 that day, meaning that the sellers (who theoretically would have percent. After hearing commentators spread their sales out over the course and pundits weigh in following the of the day) lost $1.17 billion. Roberts drop, you would have thought that we asked the important question, “Who were entering an outright depression. We heard everything from “the bull can afford that type of loss?” This is market manipulation at its market in metals is finished” to “the finest, more than likely by the Federal fake recovery comes crashing down” Reserve. It has been contended for to “get out of equities while you still years that the Fed does not have the can,” all over 1.75 percent. Whether you are a professional ingold reserves on hand that it claims, and when the State of Texas wants its vestor or managing your own account, gold reserves back, that can cause a you cannot be afraid to take a little risk. problem. The Federal Open Market The claim that equities are gearing up Committee intentionally drove the for a long-term bear market is unprice of gold down in an effort to buy founded by any data that we have seen.

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If investors are unable to separate the difference between a one-and-done event and long-term economic trends, their portfolios will be in for a world of hurt. Furthermore, if 1.75 percent affects your decisions and can scare you out of a position that easily, equities investing may not be your calling. Long term, this event is merely a hiccup. Our forecast for the U.S. economy is still very positive, and the numbers are starting to reflect that notion. An overnight recovery was not to be expected, and we still have a long way to go, but we are definitely moving in the right direction, despite what the pundits will have you believe. O Ben Treece is a 2009 graduate from the University of Miami (Fla.), BBA International Finance and Marketing. He is a partner with Treece Investment Advisory Corp (www.TreeceInvestments.com) and a stockbroker licensed with FINRA, working for Treece Financial Services Corp. The above information is the express opinion of Ben Treece and should not be construed as investment advice or used without outside verification.

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20 Sports

A Toledo tradition since 2005 ToledoFreePress.com

HOCKEY

Walleye end season with OT playoff loss By Vincent D. Scebbi

Toledo Free Press Staff Writer vscebbi@toledofreepress.com

In the closing minutes of Game 6, the Toledo Walleye led the game 3-2 and were on the verge of forcing Game 7 in their Kelly Cup Playoff series with the Cincinnati Cyclones. But with five seconds remaining, Cyclones forward Garrett Wilson fired a desperation shot from behind Toledo’s goal that deflected off Toledo defenseman Max Nicastro and into the net, tying the game and stunning the 4,333 spectators at the Huntington Center. “That’s a kick in the stomach, it really is,” said Walleye head coach Nick Vitucci. “Because we did play hard and play well and even that particular play, VITUCCI guys are trapped down there and couldn’t get off and gave everything they had. They were blocking shots and they were digging there in the trenches in front of Jordan there, trying to clear pucks out of the way and they just found a way to get it to the net and it bounced off one of our guys and went into the net.” Three minutes into overtime, Cincinnati captain Mathieu Aubin forced the puck from the left side of the net past goalie Jordan Pearce, clinching the series for the Cyclones and ending Toledo’s season. “It’s unfortunate, ending our season that way,” Vitucci said. “I thought it was a great series and I thought the guys showed a lot of courage coming back. They very easily could have given up and waved the white flag, but we competed until the last shot.” After dropping the first three games of the series, it looked as if the Walleye were buried too deep to put up a fight against their ECHL North Division rival, let alone turn it into a series. However, after replacing Kent Simpson with Pearce as starter between the pipes, Toledo took Games 4 and 5 in Cincinnati. The Walleye won their first elimination game April 12 in double-overtime, avoiding the series sweep, and took Game 5 the next night by a score of 3-1. “We were down 3-0 and the boys came together and stayed positive even

though we were down and look what happened, we’re here in Game 6,” said Toledo captain Kyle Rogers, who netted the game-winning goal in Game 4. Pearce led the charge defensively for Toledo, finishing the playoff series with a 1.95 goals against average and .935 save percentage. “You always want to go out fighting,” he said. “Honestly, it was a tough situation but when your back’s against the wall, you have nothing left to do but go out there and play as hard as you can.” This year was the Walleye’s second postseason appearance since Toledo returned to the ECHL in 2009. Toledo made the playoffs in their inaugural season as an eighth seed and dropped the best-of-five series 3-1 to the Charlotte Checkers. The last two seasons saw the Walleye miss the postseason, posting a 33-33-6 record in the 2010-11 season and going 28-38-6 the next year. “I think it’s a big step for this program,” said Walleye forward Joey Martin, who finished the series with five points (3 goals, 2 assists), including the go-ahead goal in Game 6. Vitucci took a different approach this season, bringing in veterans such as forward Randy Rowe and defensemen Wes O’Neill, Phil Oreskovic and Cody Lampl to lead the team. “We went with a veteran style and we had four guys and we had older guys who were veterans and we built off that. It’s a learning process, we had ups and downs throughout the year but it builds character in the locker room,” Rogers said. “Everybody learned something from it; I learned some things this year from these younger guys coming up.” The combination of veterans, younger players and rookies gave the Walleye different layers of age and experience, something Vitucci hopes will act as a foundation for future seasons. “You look at the makeup of this team and the young guys, the Novaks, the Martins, the guys who are in their first or second year and what they did for us,” he said. “You’ve got the next level of seasoned guys, the Lampls, the Rogerses who’ve been pro players for three or four years. Then you’ve got the Oreskovics and O’Neills and Randy Rowes and you’ve got the young kids. “I’m proud of these guys and I’m proud of the makeup of this locker room and what everybody put forth.” O

April 21, 2013

SHAG ON SPORTS

O

We’re all Boston fans

ne of 1370 WSPD’s sister stations, Fox Sports 1230, time to sing those “So Good, So Good, So Good!” lines in recently launched a new show, meticulously named the middle of the third inning. If anybody could sympathise “It’s Just Sports.” I say “meticulously” because Pro- with what Boston was going through, it would be New York. The NBA and NHL also followed suit. The Bruins and gram Director Eric Chase knows how people get when it comes to talking ball. Any argument can become very, very Celtics each canceled games on Monday and Tuesday for overheated. Who should have won AL MVP? Who’s the security purposes, but many teams that were playing observed moments of silence. On April 17, the better running back in college ball? Could Bruins played at the TD Garden in Beantown, Mike Ditka wrestle a bear? Especially in the coming out of the locker room to the powerful talk radio world, people elevate these topics chants of The Dropkick Murphys singing “For to levels of importance that rival some poBoston” (look it up, it is amazing). After the litical topics. Combine that with the type of game, despite losing to Buffalo in a shootout, ego that would work in a business where you both teams came to center ice to salute the speak into a microphone, only to hear it fed fans. The Celtics were on the road in Toronto, back to you in your headphones ... and you but the Raptors also took heed, playing “Sweet can see how an inane topic like sports can Caroline” as they announced the starting start to sound self-important. lineup. A message shone on the scoreboard: This past week, the world of sports sent “Tonight, we are all Boston fans.” me a message that it can be important. Not Shaggy CULBREATH These gestures don’t mean that we’re actively rooting necessarily on the field, but in the community. There are the obvious reasons — the economic benefit for Boston’s teams to win against our favorite guys. No, of people working at the stadiums, a reason for people to once the game starts, then Pedroia is a bum, the Celtics come to town and eat at restaurants or pay for parking. are old and the Patriots are a bunch of cheaters. There is a There is also the intangible: civic pride. When we put our difference, though, between rooting against the Red Sox name on a team, we expect it to represent us. Win or lose, and cheering for Boston. Again, we expect these teams to it exemplifies the city. When people talk about our base- represent our cities, whether collegiate or professional, ball team, sure they can talk about “the Mud Hens,” but and so when the visiting teams come into town, we treat they can also simply say “Toledo,” and that means more them as we would treat the regions they represent. Yes, it’s just sports. But when the nation needs to heal than just the guys on the team. These civic organizations made their voices clear this (an all-too often occurrence these days), it’s these athletes week after the tragic events in Boston. One by one, orga- who reach across borders to tell those who may be hurting nizations stepped up in support of their brethren. It started “We’re with you, and we got this.” They put on a show that Tuesday when teams across baseball took time out of their distracts us from our worries, at least for a little while. We may not be Red Sox fans, or Bruins fans or Celtics games either for a moment of silence or to play a few bars of Neil Diamond’s “Sweet Caroline,” a Boston Red Sox favorite. fans ... but we are all Boston fans. O The Cleveland Indians hosted the BoSox on April 16, and showed their respect by flying their flag at half mast. Even Matt “Shaggy” Culbreath is sports director at 1370 WSPD. the New York Yankees, hated rival and “evil empire,” took Email him at shaggy@wspd.com.

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April 21, 2013

ToledoFreePress.com

Star 21

A Toledo tradition since 2005

EXHIBITS

By Brigitta Burks

Toledo Free Press News Editor bburks@toledofreepress.com

The Toledo Museum of Art’s (TMA) latest exhibit, Crossing Cultures, is a collection of contemporary Aboriginal Australian artwork that connects the past with the present for TMA Director Brian Kennedy. Kennedy served as director of the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra from 1997 to 2004 before becoming director of the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College. In 2006, his connection to Australian art deepened when he met Aboriginal art collectors Will Owen and Harvey Wagner while putting on an exhibit. A portion of Owen and Wagner’s collection is now on display at TMA. Kennedy said of the Toledo exhibit, “It’s quite emotional and I just know that people will be influenced by it, the Aboriginal connection to the land and the culture. The story is so powerful that it cannot help but make us think about our own.” The exhibit features 120 pieces of contemporary indigenous art, mostly from post 2000. Artists include Michael Riley, Shorty Jangala Robertson, Danny Gibson Tjapaltjarri, Destiny Deacon, Walangkura Napanangka and Christian Thompson. Stephen Gilchrist of the Hood Museum curated the exhibit, which is expected to find a permanent home at Dartmouth when it reopens there. Each room in the multimedia exhibit, which includes sculptures, paintings, videos and photos, represents a different region. There are about 550,000

indigenous people in Australia, representing about 2.5 percent of the population, Kennedy said. Much of the exhibit deals with the indigenous people’s relationship to the land and also their oppression and colonization. The exhibit starts with a room dedicated to the Stolen Generation, when Aboriginal children were taken from their families and placed in institutions or with other families in an attempt to squash their culture. Crossing Cultures ends in a room called “Crying for Country.” Gilchrist said he hopes the show inspires Toledoans to think about indigenous Ohioans and to expand their minds in other ways. “It’s a really good exercise in cultural relativism,” said Gilchrist, a native of Western Australia. “Especially at a gallery in a museum of art, we’re not always confronted with the things that are familiar. There’s a lot that can be learned from experience with the unfamiliar.” Kennedy said he believes the region’s last Australian Aboriginal art show was nearly 25 years ago so most people will learn something new. “The museum is a place that engages with all the countries of the world back through civilizations and so bringing art here from around the world just helps make our people more diverse and encourages tolerance and those aspects that we hold dear,” he said, adding that the show could spark a movement toward Aboriginal art collecting in the area. “I’ve never seen a major Aboriginal art show that didn’t encourage some

toledo museum of art

Toledo Museum of Art hosts Australian Aboriginal art

n

‘Freshwater Crocodile’ by Craig Koomeeta.

people to collect Aboriginal art. It has that sort of visceral connection with some people,” he said. Owen recalled his “dumb luck” in the late 1980s when he and Wagner first came across Aboriginal art in New York City. “We were so taken with it that two years later, we went to Australia and bought our first painting,” Owen said, adding that he’s attracted to the variety found in indigenous art. “One of the things that we wanted to do in building this collection was really try to represent all the very, very different kinds of art making that goes on in Aboriginal Australia,” he said. “I think people expect it to be old and [depict] animals, kangaroos and turtles and things like that so I hope they just learn how beautiful and how diverse it is.” Crossing Cultures includes a number of talks and activities, Kennedy said, adding that he thinks the free ad-

mission will encourage attendance. “It encourages people to engage with a different kind of art form that they may not be familiar with and to enjoy it, so I think we’ll get a very large number of people,” he said. He said the Toledo Zoo’s May 24 debut of Wild Walkabout, an Australian exhibit, could encourage attendance. “Both the Toledo Zoo and the Toledo Museum of Art are incredible organizations that are respected by their peers worldwide, and beloved by their communities,” said the zoo’s Executive Director, Jeff Sailer, in a news release. “By working together and sharing our talents, we’re able to offer all our guests an even more meaningful experience.” Crossing Cultures includes free presentations and other related programming like “Symbols, Stories & Social Justice,” an exhibit in the Community Gallery for which University of Toledo art students created personal symbols from their own lives

inspired by Australian Aboriginal art. At 7:30 p.m. May 31, Kennedy will present “In the Eye of the Storm: Aboriginal Australian Art Today” in the museum’s Little Theater. Owen will host a gallery talk, starting in Libbey Court, at 2 p.m. June 8 and 15. Gilchrist will host another at 7 p.m. June 14. The exhibit also features several free film showings. “Art+Soul: A Personal Journey Into the World of Aboriginal Art” is at 1 p.m. April 20. The three-part series depicts curator Hetti Perkins’ journey through Australia, speaking to different artists. For additional programming and to learn more, visit www.toledomuseum. org/exhibitions/crossingcultures/. The museum is located at 2445 Monroe St. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. Sunday and closed Mondays and major holidays. Crossing Cultures runs until July 14. O

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22 Star

April 21, 2013

A Toledo tradition since 2005 ToledoFreePress.com

TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART

Circle 2445 presents Run for the Roses party May 4

PHOT BY TINA G.

It’s off to the races for the Toledo Museum of Art. Its Circle 2445 encourages everyone to dress in their best for the running of the 139th Kentucky Derby. The party, Run for the Roses, is scheduled for 4 p.m. May 4 in the Peristyle Theater at the Toledo Museum of Art. “The main point of the event is to get dressed up and have a fun afternoon at the museum,� said Dustin Hostetler, co-chair of Circle 2445, in an email. “While I’ve never been to the actual Kentucky Derby, I am certainly a fan of this event. Our first Derby party at the TMA in 2011 was a blast and I can’t wait for this year’s party.� The event will include Southernstyle appetizers, a cash bar featuring mint juleps and live music by Ken-

A special promotion offers anyone renewing or buying a membership with the museum, along with joining Circle 2445, a free ticket to the Derby

party, said Marketing Communications Coordinator Jenny Fogle. To join or renew a membership to the museum, you can contact the in-

formation desk. Anyone interested in joining Circle 2445 can contact Coordinator Jackie Tussing at (419) 255-8000. O

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tucky Chrome. The Derby activities will be simulcast on a big screen. Circle 2445, led by Hostetler and Amir Khan, is a group that promotes involvement with the museum. They plan programs targeted to appeal to young adults. The name of the group comes from the museum’s address, 2445 Monroe St. and reflects the 24-45 age demographic. “It is of course important for the museum to engage with this demographic because these people will become the next generation of leaders, philanthropists and patrons of the arts in Toledo,� Hostetler said. “We need to support them as they do us.� Tickets cost $40 in advance or $50 at the door. They can be purchased online at toledomuseum.org/circle2445 or by calling the Toledo Museum of Art’s information desk at (419) 2558000 ext. 7546.

Toledo Free Press Staff Writer

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April 21, 2013

ToledoFreePress.com

Star 23

A Toledo tradition since 2005

NONPROFITS

By Joel Sensenig

Toledo Free Press Staff Writer news@toledofreepress.com

A local charity is hoping its latest fundraiser will leave a lasting mark on its participants. Elias Adin’s Comforting Hearts, a nonprofit dedicated to comforting children battling cancer, is teaming up April 27 with Bowling Green’s Studio 14 for “Tattoos for a Cause.” During the event, the tattoo parlor will be donating 100 percent of its proceeds from tattoos of cancer ribbons or the Comforting Hearts logo, which includes a heart and a ribbon. The event begins at 9 a.m. at the 125 N. Main St. shop, and doesn’t end until the last person leaves — which organizers are hoping is well into Sunday morning. “We’re hoping to do around 500 tattoos,” said Studio 14 manager Tyler Brott, who will have at his disposal all four of the shop’s tattoo artists, plus a friend who will be pitching in as well with the ink art. “We’re talking about 100 per artist. … We’re hoping to be

done sometime Sunday.” The inspiration for “Tattoos for a Cause” comes from Kele Pallitta, founder and president of Comforting Hearts, an organization she started in 2011 after losing her 7-month-old son, Elias, in 2008 to a cancerous tumor in his brain. The organization’s mission is to comfort children and their families as they battle cancer. Comforting Hearts serves four hospitals in Ohio — Mercy Children’s Hospital, ProMedica Toledo Children’s Hospital, Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus and the Cleveland Clinic — providing care packages to children and their families. After Pallitta got a tattoo several months ago of the Comforting Hearts logo at Studio 14, she decided a tattoo fundraiser would be a unique way to raise money. This event allows anyone touched by cancer to take part, she said. “Different cancer charities are often so separate, with breast cancer and ovarian cancer and everything,” Pallitta said. “This is one event that

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everyone can come together for, no matter what kind of cancer you’ve been affected by. … I do feel it will be a really cool day to have everyone come together, telling their stories. We’re trying to encourage people to bring a picture of the person they’re honoring by getting their tattoo.” Brott said he was eager to help out. “We didn’t have to put any thought into it, really,” he said. “She had the idea and we went with it, we all thought it was a good idea.” Further helping “Tattoos for a Cause” become a reality was Kingpin Supplies in St. Petersburg, Fla. The tattoo shop supplier donated 100 percent of the items needed for the event, a gift worth $1,400. The event isn’t going to be without its challenges for the tattoo artists, however. Studio 14 averages about five tattoos a day. Brott hopes to do 100 times that amount for the fundraiser. “We’re going to be wiped out, that’s for sure,” he said. Tattoo prices will be $40 for a ribbon and $50 for the Comforting Hearts logo. Because the event is firstcome, first-served and the line for the tattoos could be lengthy, Studio 14 will take cellphone numbers of those stopping by and call them when it’s time to get under the needle. Each tattoo will take less than 30 minutes, Brott said. For the slightly less committed

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crowd, temporary tattoos will also be offered. Additionally, the charity’s T-shirts, reading “I wish cancer got cancer and died,” will be available for $15. Door prizes from Bowling Green businesses will also be awarded during the event. Pallitta sais she hopes hopes the event reaches a wide segment of the population. “Our goal is to reach out to different people so everyone gets to enjoy doing these events with us,” she said, noting the organization has also

conducted a bachelor and bachelorette auction, a celebrity fashion show, a scavenger hunt and a 5K obstacle course in the past year. “Our goal is to kind of be the cool, new charity that does different events instead of the more usual ones.” Brott said interest among customers has already been high, with 15 people not able to attend the April 27 event already getting their ribbon tattoos. For more information, visit www. comfort-hearts.com. O

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State-of-the-art facilities On-site lab & x-rays Surgery & Dentistry Spay & Neuter Vaccinations Boarding

OPEN 6 DAYS A WEEK!

Walking Routes available Please call 419-241-1700 ext. 221 Toledo Free Press publishes classified ads and cannot be responsible for problems arising between parties placing or responding to ads in our paper. We strongly urge everyone to exercise caution when dealing with people, companies and organizations with whom you are not familiar. All real estate advertised in this paper is subject to the federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, in the sale, rental, or financing of housing. This Publisher will not knowingly accept any advertising that violates any applicable law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this paper are available on an equal opportunity basis. If you believe you have been discriminated against in connection with the sale, rental, or financing of housing, call the Toledo Fair Housing Center, (419) 243-6163.

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1837 W. Alexis Road, Toledo, Ohio

419.475.8387

Thank you for giving us the opportunity to serve you and your pets.


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BRINGING THE FLAVORS OF

Loma Linda

Bienvenidos A Celebrating C elebrating 5588 yyears. ears. migos!

stt ToledoRe’sstaBures a t an Mexican y arss!! o er 58 ye for ov for

10400 Airport Hwy. (1.2 miles east of Toledo Express Airport)

419-865-5455

HOURS: M Mo Monday-Thursday onday nd day ay-T -Th Thu hurs hurs rsd day 11 da 11 aa.m. .m. .m m. – 11 11 pp.m. .m m. d 11 a.m. – Midnight Mid i h | Sunday S d Closed C Cl Friday-Saturday

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mexico

to northwest ohio THE ORIGINAL MEXICAN RESTAURANTE & CANTINA IN TOLEDO

7742 W. Bancroft (1 Mi. West of McCord) 419-841-7523

Open Monday to Saturday 11 a.m. Closed Sundays &10” Holidays x 10.25” ad


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9 pm

9:30

April 27, 2013

10 pm 10:30 11 pm 11:30

Ready Full Plate Country Show Splash (CC) X Games Foz do Igaucu. From Brazil. (CC) News ABC Insider Lottery Bet on Your Baby (N) ››› Over the Hedge (2006) Premiere. News Castle PGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf Zurich Classic of New Orleans, Third Round. (N) News News Wheel Time Mayweather (N) (CC) Criminal Minds 48 Hours (N) (CC) News CSI MLB Baseball Regional Coverage. (N) (S Live) (CC) Leverage (CC) Burn Notice (CC) Burn Notice (CC) NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Toyota Owners 400. (N) (S Live) (CC) News Seinfeld Track and Field NHL Hockey New Jersey Devils at New York Rangers. (N) (CC) News News Academic Academic The Voice (CC) Smash (CC) Saturday Night Live News SNL This Old House Hr Cooking Quilting Hammer-Steel Alfie Boe: Live Costa Rica Steves Travels Lawrence Welk History Detectives Antiques Roadshow As Time... Wine Masterpiece Classic The First 48 (CC) The Killer Speaks The Killer Speaks The Killer Speaks Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Housewives/OC Top 10 Weddings Tabatha Tabatha Takes Over Tabatha Tardy Tardy Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Housewives/OC ›› How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days (2003) Kate Hudson. How Lose ››› Clueless (1995) ›› Coneheads (1993) Dan Aykroyd. (CC) ›› Idiocracy (2006) Luke Wilson. (CC) ›› Dinner for Schmucks (2010) Steve Carell. (CC) Jeff Dunham Gabriel Iglesias: Aloha Fluffy (N) ›› Dumb & Dumber ANT Farm ANT Farm Good Good Good Austin Austin Austin Good Dog Austin Gravity Gravity Gravity ››› Monsters, Inc. (2001) Jessie Austin Austin Austin Austin 2013 NFL Draft From Radio City Music Hall in New York. (N) (Live) (CC) NBA Basketball First Round: Teams TBA. (N) (CC) NBA Basketball 102 Dalm ›› Richie Rich (1994) Macaulay Culkin. ›› The Little Rascals (1994), Bug Hall ›› Gnomeo and Juliet (2011), Emily Blunt › Yogi Bear (2010) Premiere. ››› The Lion King (1994, Musical) ›› Happy Gilmore The Spot My. Din Restaurant: Im. Restaurant Stakeout Diners Diners Iron Chef America Chopped Diners Diners Diners Diners Giving You the Busi Restaurant: Im. Iron Chef America Love It or List It (CC) Curb... Curb... Income Property Income Property Income Property Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl Love It or List It (CC) Love It or List It (CC) Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl ››› What She Knew ›› She’s Too Young (2004, Drama) (CC) ›› Terror in the Family (1996, Drama) (CC) Stolen Child (2011) Emmanuelle Vaugier. A Sister’s Revenge (2013) Brooke Burns. Dirty Teacher (2013) Josie Davis. (CC) Teen Mom 2 Teen Mom 2 Teen Mom 2 Teen Mom 2 Teen Mom 2 Teen Mom 2 Girl Code Ke$ha Teen Mom 2 Teen Mom 2 Teen Mom 2 Teen Mom 2 ›› Life as We Know It (2010) Katherine Heigl. Raymond Friends Friends Friends Friends King King Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang MenLaugh Murder ›› Tarantula (1955) John Agar. The Incredible Shrinking Man ››› Five Million Years to Earth (1967) Monster-Challenged Wrld ›››› Giant (1956, Drama) Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, James Dean. (CC) Rio Bravo Jonah Hx Tip-Off NBA Basketball First Round: Teams TBA. (N) (CC) NBA Basketball First Round: Teams TBA. (N) (CC) ›› The Next Three Days (2010) Russell Crowe. ›› The Next Three Days (2010) Russell Crowe. ››› Blood Diamond (2006, Adventure) (CC) NCIS “Silent Night” NCIS “Bounce” (CC) NCIS (CC) NCIS “See No Evil” NCIS (CC) NCIS “Blackwater” NCIS “Love & War” NCIS “Jurisdiction” G.I. Joe: Cobra Live Life On Spot Game Raceline EP Daily EP Daily ’70s ’70s Rules Rules Two Men Two Men Big Bang Big Bang Movie Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Futurama Futurama

Come to The Blarney .... Go From There! G e!! e

facebook.com/blarneytoledo

601 Monroe St. Right Across from Fifth Third Field

Friday, April 26th Saturday, April 27th

MAS Fina

HAPPY HOUR Mon-Fri 4-7 pm Live Entertainment Thurs-Fri-Sat

CORN HOLE 2013 Presented by NWO Cornhole

At The Blarney Event Center

PREMIER DOWNTOWN EVENT AND ND RECEPTION CENTER

601 Monroe St., Toledo, OH 43604

SATURDAY, RDDAY AAPRIL 27TH - $30/team pre-registered - Bomb Box Challenge / - $40/team at the door Cash Prize - Cash Prizes for 3 teams - Private Bar and Food - 50/50 Raffle Proceeds from raffle & “Bomb Box” benefit local Charity For more info or to pre-register: http://sites.google.com/site/nwocornhole/ For que Fo questions email NWOcornhole@mail.com or call 419-913-4709

WE’LL ’L CUST CUSTOMIZE USTOM OMIZ IZE FOR YOU OU

Fundraisers • Holiday Parties • Celebrations Reunions • Sports Banquets • Corporate Retreats Summer Picnics • Employee Appreciation Events Client Appreciation

www.theblarneybullpen.com 10” x 10.25” ad 419-481-5206


April 21, 2013

ToledoFreePress.com

A Toledo tradition since 2005

Toledo Free Press 27


28 Toledo Free Press

A Toledo tradition since 2005 ToledoFreePress.com

FACT: Every 34 seconds, someone has a heart attack.* Which means every 34 seconds, someone has a choice to make.

Learn the warning signs of a heart attack and complete our heart assessment survey at promedica.org/hearthealth. *In the U.S., according to the American Heart Association website.

If you are experiencing a medical emergency, please call 911.

800-PPG-DOCS

Š 2013 ProMedica

Choose the region’s only hospital with a cardiologist here 24/7.

April 21, 2013


Toledo Free Press – April 21, 2013