Page 1

Matthews Mint Hill SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2007 • Volume 2/Issue 5 • ALSO Serving Weddington, Indian Trail AND stallings

High School Football Teams kick off new season

Plus:

Return to the Front Porch Habitat for Humanity ReStores Local Fall Festivals

www.MatthewsMintHill.com

MAGAZINE


PRESB-10121


From boo-boo to breakthrough medicine. When it comes to the health of a child, there’s no such thing as a small concern. From minor procedures to advanced

To schedule a tour, call 704-384-8400.

treatments in medicine, Presbyterian Hemby Children’s

1500 Matthews Township Parkway, Matthews www.presbyterian.org/matthews

Hospital at Matthews offers you the specialized pediatric care your children need — right in your own community. We offer a warm, child-friendly atmosphere that reduces the stress of hospitalization for children and their families. Plus, our involvement with Presbyterian Hemby Children’s Hospital in Charlotte ensures that children of all ages will receive remarkable care from our remarkable team.

PRESB-10121 Matt Ped ad MMHM.ind1 1

8/17/07 9:54:18 AM


Publisher’s Notes

[“The only achievement I am really proud of is the friends I have made in this community.” – Gary Cooper] re you looking for a change? No doubt most of us in the Matthews and Mint Hill community will welcome the end of the dog days of summer. This has been one of the hottest summers on record, so a nice crisp, clear fall night of high school football sounds too good to be true. Be sure to take a peek at our cover story by Chay Lee. We have some of the best high school teams in the country right here in our backyard, and Chay talked to the coaches to see what we might expect from this season. Another activity perfect for cooler weather is relaxing on the front porch. It seems the front porch is back in style. In recent years, the front porches on houses were not as wide as the hallways of your typical house. With newer homes, they seem to have come back in full glory, and I’m thrilled about it. Porches give us a sense of community and bring us together. Families gather to enjoy iced tea and lemonade while they watch the kids play. A large front porch gets folks to drift over and visit. And soon, you’ll see pots of fall mums, Halloween decorations and

ON THE COVER

[12] High School Football

Chay Lee interviews coaches from Butler, Independence, Providence and Weddington. Cover from BigStockPhoto.

community [18] Word on the Street

What are your neighbors looking forward to as the seasons change?

trick-or-treaters showing up on front porches around town. These houses are beautiful to look at as well. In this issue, Sharon Mason writes about this wonderful trend back to the front porch. And don’t forget to read Chuck Mobley’s analysis on how a new hobby gave him a new way to look at business. I’ve have been a fan of chess for 15 years now, and I know how it can help improve your strategic thinking. Plus it’s a great way to pass time on your front porch. Get out and enjoy all that Matthews and Mint Hill to offer this fall. From the local festivals to youth and prep sports. Most of all, try to engage in this great community that we call home. Todd Whitehurst, publisher@MatthewsMintHill.com

[20] Matthews History

Local historian Paula Lester shares her knowledge of local landmarks.

[24] Calendar of Events

What’s going on in Matthews and Mint Hill?

mind/body/spirit [26] Homeopathy and Children

Dr. Michael Smith explores how to use this alternative medicine therapy to treat children.

[28] Adult Day Care

Blessed Assurance clients enjoy activities during Adult Day Care month.

business [30] My Next Move

Chuck Mobley shares his story of a new hobby that turned into a life lesson.

[32] Profile

Meet local real estate agent and new Mint Hill Lions President Rich Ferretti.

[34] Sightings: Business Breakfast

Businesspeople gather for “speed networking.”

arts/entertainment [36] Penny’s Place

Good food, a great crowd of regulars and deep Mint Hill roots make Penny’s a classic.

[40] Fall Festivals

September brings Madness to Mint Hill and ArtFest to Matthews – get all the details.

homestyles [42] You Got it at the ReStore?

A new way to remodel your home.

4

[46] Front Porch Living

See what makes them special.

TODD WHITEHURST PHOTO BY RON DESHAIES, TREE PHOTO FROM BIG STOCK PHOTO

A

Contents

Volume 2/Issue 5 • September/October 2007


Volume 2, Issue 5 • September/October 2007 www.MatthewsMintHill.com (704) 846-0477, office • (704) 943-1506, fax PUBLISHER TODD WHITEHURST publisher@matthewsminthill.com

ART DIRECTOR SOMIAH MUSLIMANI somiah@matthewsminthill.com

DIRECTOR OF MEDIA TECHNOLOGY DAVID DIPRIMA david@matthewsminthill.com

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR CYNTHIA CONROW

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS CYNTHIA CONROW CHAY LEE PAULA LESTER RICH LANGE SHARON MASON CHUCK MOBLEY DR. MICHAEL SMITH

ADVERTISING DESIGN JUSTIN GREENBURG ERIC HECHT DANIEL JORDAN

PHOTOGRAPHY RON DESHAIES DAVID DIPRIMA SHARON MASON ABBY WHITEHURST TODD WHITEHURST

carolina

MEDIA

publishing PRESIDENT TODD WHITEHURST publisher@matthewsminthill.com

GENERAL MANAGER ABBY WHITEHURST abby@matthewsminthill.com

ADVERTISING SALES TODD WHITEHURST publisher@matthewsminthill.com, (704) 651-5020

DISTRIBUTION MICHAEL WHITEHURST MATTHEWS-MINT HILL MAGAZINE is published by Carolina Media Solutions, LLC. 325 Matthews Mint Hill Road, Matthews, NC 28105 (704) 846-0477, office • (704) 943-1506, fax This publication copyright 2007 by Carolina Media Solutions, LLC. No part of this publication may be produced, in any form or by any means, without prior written permission of Carolina Media Solutions. MATTHEWS-MINT HILL MAGAZINE cannot be held responsible for any unsolicited material.

6


CMC ad for those you hold close We’re right in your neighborhood.

CMC–Matthews Medical Plaza is now open at 332 Sam Newell Road, giving you and your family access to premier healthcare located right in the heart of Matthews. Our boardcertified physicians in the areas of cardiology, hematology, internal medicine, oncology and pediatrics are currently welcoming new patients. So call today for an appointment. This convenient location also offers an on-site pharmacy and an Urgent Care Center. Internal Medicine Cardiology Oncology

Mecklenburg Medical Group 704-302-8500 Pediatrics

Charlotte Pediatric Clinic 704-512-6820

Pharmacy

CMC–Matthews Medical Plaza Pharmacy 704-512-6870 Urgent Care

Carolinas HealthCare Urgent Care – Matthews 704-512-6850

332 Sam Newell Rd., Matthews, NC 28105 • www.carolinasmedicalcenter.org


8


Distribution Locations Matthews Area AlphaGraphics Beantown Tavern Carolinas Natural Health Center Charlotte EENT Dilworth Coffee – Matthews Grand Slam USA Fuddrucker’s Jonathon’s Restaurant Kristopher’s Matthews Chamber of Commerce Matthews Childrens Clinic Matthews Community Center Matthews Library Matthews Recreation Center Matthews Presbyterian Hospital Panera Bread Peak Fitness Picadeli’s PJ’s Restaurant Presbyterian Urgent Care Renfrow Hardware Showmars Siskey YMCA SportClips Thai House Total Wine Township Grille Vinnie’s Raw Bar Stevens Mill, Idlewild Market Hoods Crossroads, Windsor Square, Sycamore Commons Bellacino’s Best China II Dick’s Sporting Goods Dilworth Coffee - Mint Hill Elliot’s BBQ Emerald Lake Levine Senior Center Pizza Spiga Outback Steakhouse Skinnyz The Divide SOHO Hero Suncom Wireless Store UPS Store - Stevens Mill UPS Store - Sycamore Commons Union Mail Stop

10

Mint Hill American Community Bank Big Guy’s Pizza Carolina Bagel Co. Cafe Charlotte Children’s Clinic Dr. Lawrence Sladek, DDS Hair-y Care-y Salon Jimmie’s Restaurant Lawyers Glen Retirement Home Mama’s Pizza Mini Mac Storage Mint Hill Family Practice Mint Hill Grill and Deli Mint Hill Library New Asian Cuisine Penny’s Place Rookies That’s Entertainment Seafarer Restaurant Showmars UPS Store - Mint Hill Pavilion Woof n’ Hoof Galleria/Sardis Rd.N. Monroe Rd, Arboretum Boardwalk Billy’s Cartridge World Camille’s Sidewalk Cafe Capt. Steve’s Seafood Greg’s BBQ Matthews Barber Shop Indian Trail/Stallings American Community Bank Clara’s Choice for Herbs Extreme Ice Center Indian Trail Pharmacy Khana’s American & Japanese Grill Trail’s End Restaurant Union Mail Stop Weddington Covenant Coffee Papa’s Pizza-to-Go YMCA Satellite–Weddington UPS Store ADD YOUR BUSINESS! (704) 651-5020


11


COMMUNITY

Weddington coach Phil Williams

High School Football

Varsity teams kick off another exciting season by chay lee

Butler coach Mike Newsome

Independence coach Tommy Knotts

I

t’s early August in the Matthews-Mint Hill community, and even though school’s not in session, there are students showing up on campus, sometimes twice a day. But they’re not carrying notebooks and pencils, and they are not in the classroom. Instead, they don shoulder pads, helmets and a love for the game of football. The quest for the holy grail – the Southwestern 4AA crown – is what drives teams to report to school early and practice hard. Matthews and Mint Hill have two teams that last year were ranked among the best in the nation, so getting to the top of the heap is not going to be easy. As it goes in every football locker room at the beginning of a new season, every coach believes his team has what it takes to go all the way. And now that CMS has thrown the switch on those Friday night lights at the local stadiums, each team will have the chance at the championship.

Weddington High School: New coach starts fresh

Newcomer coach Phil Williams has his work cut out for him. Weddington has struggled in past seasons, but the new Warrior coach hopes he can turn things around. “I had made up my mind not to be head coach again,” says Williams. “This is the only school that would have made me come back.” Williams has more than 30 years of coaching under his belt, with 10 as a head coach. “I have had success as a head coach and I think I’m the right guy to help rebuild here.” Williams knows what he’s up against. But he thinks the level of competition is a good thing. “You want that as a coach,” he says. “It’s a tough league and we are excited about it.” He says he is not really focused on everybody else. “We are going to just go out there on Friday night and be the best Weddington can be.” Last year, the Weddington Warriors only won four games. But Williams is not really concerned with last year. “I know they lost more than they won,” he says. “The team I have seen so far are very hard workers and they are the finest group of young men I have been around in my entire life.” He says he doesn’t know much about star 12

Providence coach Randy Long

Weddington players get in shape to face some tough opponents.


September/October 2007

PHOTOS BY RON DESHAIES

Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

13


COMMUNITY The Providence varsity team readies for the 2007 season.

players but has been impressed with a few guys in the preseason, like running back #42 Stephen Efird. But he really doesn’t like singling players out. “It’s the ultimate team game. If a running back runs an 80-yard touchdown and a lineman jumps offside, he comes back.” Coach Williams speaks highly of his staff as well. “I am working with men of character, integrity, and great skill, ” he boasts. He feels he has what it takes to put Weddington on the map. “We are trying to build a program that the community can be proud of.”

Last year, Randy Long’s Providence Panthers won nine and lost five games and made it to the third round of the playoffs, only to lose a close one to Butler. “That’s about as good as Providence has been in the past,” says Long. This year’s roster is short 32 seniors. “When you lose that many players you have your concerns,” says Long. But he fully expects the new guys to step up. “I have been pleasantly surprised with our other boys. They worked really hard in the off-season.” Long is excited about quarterback #9 Justin Siems. Siems started the last threequarters of the season last year. “We feel really good about him,” says Long. He also likes running back #24 Steven Hatley. Long describes Hatley as strong and intelligent with good vision. He is also confident in his defense. “Eric Semeniuk #10 is going to be big for us,” says Long. “And defensive back #21 Daniel Smith, who has already committed to University of Hawaii, is a strong corner for us.” Long also has high hopes for #2 Matt Hughston, a senior safety. Coach Long says that the team is further ahead now than they were last year. “As far as installation of offense and defense, we just need to slow down and work fundamentals,” he says. Long is excited about the season. He says that, because the competition is so tough, his boys have to come out swinging. “We are in arguably the best league in the state of North Carolina,” he says. “We have to be ready every game, because any team is capable of beating us.” But his expectations are still high. “I think we can win it all.”

Butler High School: Eyes on the prize

Mike Newsome coaches the Butler Bulldogs, the team that sent Providence home during last year’s playoffs. Newsome has been at Butler for 12 years and is in his fifth year as 14

PHOTOS BY RON DESHAIES

Providence High School Hoping to keep the momentum going


Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

September/October 2007

While you are at the game...

...is your business

growing?

704.321.2251

w w w. p a r k e r w e b . c o m

We Put Web Sites To Work

TM

Offering you a holistic approach to beauty! HAIR CARE for men-women-children Introducing Sukesha, the origin of beautiful hair. Hair products made with certified organic extracts. Special offer 10% off Sukesha product thru October 31, 2007 Complimentary Consultations • Walk ins welcome Open Tues. thru Sat. and evenings

IN THe HeaRT Of dOWNTOWN MINT HIll 6914 Matthews-Mint Hill Rd., Suite 140 • Mint Hill, NC

(704) 573-1001 www.hairycarey.com

15


16

Butler quarterback Jacob Charest and teammate Robert Blanton should be standouts for the Matthews team this season.

Quarterback Anthony Carrothers transferred from Vance and leads the Big I in 2007.

head coach. Last year the Bulldogs went 123, tying the school’s all-time win record. “We had a tremendous season,” says Newsome. But Butler fell to Independence in the playoffs. “We really want to get over the hump and beat Independence. And this year I think we are at the point where we can do that.” The Bulldogs were fortunate to lose only six full-time starters to graduation last year. “We really were able to keep the core of our unit,” says Newsome. However, Butler did lose tackles Blake Yarbrough and Lamar Keaton. “Losing two tackles is a big part of our offense. That’s something that we have never had to deal with before, but we have got some guys who will step up.” Butler is also dealing with the loss of Ryan Houston. “He is Mecklenburg County’s all-time leading rusher,” says Newsome. “It’s tough to lose 2,500 yards of offense.” Newsome says you don’t replace a guy like Houston, but you have some guys that can step in and do some things that Ryan couldn’t do. “Ryan was a big guy, not quite as fast. We’ve got some faster guys in there but we lose some of that size.” Newsome thinks his offense can really do some damage this year. Returning quarterback #7 Jacob Charest threw for just short of 3,000 yards last year. “We have also got some bigtime receivers to throw to in Mickey Brewer #84 and Jarrett Boykin #81.” Newsome also expects big things from his defense. “We really have a great unit,” he says. Linebackers #34 Hawatha Bell, and #14 Ray Frost are returning, and Newsome says he really gets solid play from them. And he is excited about his secondary, made up of #12 Robert Blanton, #15 Eddie Whitley, and #21

every year, but they always seem to have kids with the talent to carry them. And this year is no exception. “We have a new quarterback this year from Vance in #3 Anthony Carrothers,” says Knotts. “He is going to be the guy that makes us go this year.” He also mentions #7 Javon Rembert as a big-play receiver who is strong and elusive. And #8 running back Rod Chisholm just transferred from West Charlotte. “It will be a big boost to have him.” Knotts says the anchor of their defense goes by the name of Lawrence “Too Big” Williams #96. Living up to his nickname, Williams is a 6’3”, 300-pound defensive lineman. “He is a great interior player that had a great year for us last year,” Knotts says. “With his counterpart defensive lineman Kortne Briggs # 73, the middle is going to be a tough place to run.” The secondary features defensive back Makiri Pugh #28, who is committed to the University of Georgia. Coach Knotts is confident that they will be able win another championship and remain undefeated. But he admits it won’t be easy. “This is a tough conference,” he states. “Other teams in Charlotte have gotten better. I think that teams have started to catch up with us in the weight room.” He also realizes that because of the year the Patriots had last season, some teams may feel that Independence is beatable. “I’m sure everyone thinks that we have a chink in our armor. But we’ve still got our swagger and a lot of confidence. So bring it on.” MMHM

Spencer Adams. “I think we have one of the best secondaries in the country.” Newsome said that he could not sleep the night before the first practice. He says he is just ready to make it happen. “We definitely have the talent to win it all. It’s just a matter if we can pull that talent together and play together as a team instead of playing as a group of individuals.”

Independence High School No rest for seven-time state champs

And then there is The Big I. Tommy Knotts leads the Independence Patriots, who have not lost in 108 games, the secondlongest win streak in U.S. high school football history. This year, the Patriots seek their eighth straight championship and seventh straight undefeated season. “It’s motivating for the kids,” says Knotts, “They don’t want to be the ones that have the streak broken.” Tommy Knotts began at Independence in 2000. That’s the same year Independence lost its last game. Though his team won the state championship last year, Knotts felt like they could have done better. “It was not one of my most pleasing seasons,” said Knotts, adding that confidence can be a double-edged sword. “It makes them feel like they can’t be beat. But on the other hand, too much confidence makes you complacent and makes you think you don’t have to work as hard.” Consequently, he says, his Patriots let some teams come close to beating them. “We feel like it’s not whether you win or lose, but it’s about how you play the game.” Knotts says he loses about 10 to 15 seniors

Got game? The high school football season is already underway. You can find a full schedule on the Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools website at www.cms.k12.nc.us/departments/athletics

PHOTOS - BY RON DESHAIES

COMMUNITY


Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

•

September/October 2007

17


COMMUNITY

Word on the Street

What are you looking forward to about the fall?

>> “Our customers watch and rent more movies!” Mark Stewart, owner, That’s Entertainment >> “Playing basketball.” Alex Stewart

>> “Going to the mountains fishing.’” Leah Jordan, Food Lion >> “I don’t want to see it come. I like it hot!” Kim Patterson, Food Lion 18

>> “The kids go back to school.” Teresa Smith, Earp’s Express

PHOTOS - BY ABBY WHITEHURST

>> “The smell and color of the fall leaves.” Sandy Webb, owner, Hairy Carey Salon


Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

September/October 2007

>> “Getting my driver’s license.” Toni Klimovich, Carolina Bagel Company

>> “Cheaper vacation rates.” Teresa Robinson, Food Lion

>> “The changing of the leaves. It’s just prettier.” Brian Mohrman M.H., Herbal Remedies

>> “People get out more, socialize more. Neighborhood get-togethers.” George Rutter, owner, UPS Store of Mint Hill >> “It’s that much closer to Christmas!” Sherrill Baucom, UPS Store of Mint Hill

>> “I like the leaves; fall is beautiful.” Lydia Osipov, Lydia’s Alterations

19


COMMUNITY

The Matthews School, pictured here in an early postcard, was built 100 years ago.

Celebrating a Rich Heritage

Groups commemorate Matthews history month in October by paula lester

B

y official proclamation from the Mayor’s office, October 2007 has been declared Matthews History Month. The Town of Matthews, the Matthews Historical Foundation and the Matthews Playhouse have scheduled various history happenings during the month.

Matthews School: A century of service

The building known to many area residents today as the Matthews Community Center, at 100 McDowell Street in downtown Matthews, was built 100 years ago as the Matthews School. To celebrate the building’s centennial, the Matthews Park and Recreation Department will host an open house at the Matthews Community Center on October 6. The event will feature a reception and tours, as well as the opening performance of the play “When the Whistle Blows.” See “Matthews History Month Events” at the end of this article for details. 20

A familiar building grows and changes through the years

In 1906, the property for a school building in Matthews was purchased from the Griffin family. A “modern brick building” consisting of three classrooms on the first floor and an auditorium on the second floor was erected at a cost of $14,000. The building officially opened to students in 1907. The 1907 North Carolina General Assembly established a limited number of rural public high schools, placing a free high school education within the reach of all students. Matthews and Huntersville were chosen in Mecklenburg County. The class of 1911 – a group of 12 students who completed tenth grade – was the first to graduate from the school. By that time, the still-modern building was growing inadequate for the thriving Matthews community. To fund additional classrooms and an auditorium, the school board sold

bonds on the New York bond market, and the expansion was completed in 1912. The second expansion to the building was completed between 1921 and 1924, when three primary classrooms were added. A science department and library were established, and in 1924, Matthews High School became an accredited secondary school. By 1928, the school had been enlarged again. This time, six classrooms were added and the façade changed, adding the columns that distinguish the building today. The building continued to be used as a school and eventually was operated by the CharlotteMecklenburg school system.

$1 building + $4 million renovation = One priceless Community Center

In 1983, CMS sold the building to the town of Matthews for $1. The Matthews Community Club maintained it for several years and Matthews Elementary used it for


Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

•

September/October 2007

21


COMMUNITY

some classes and programs until 1997. In 1997, The Matthews Town Council approved a $4 million restoration project, which preserved as much of the original building as possible, including the hardwood floors. The building was modernized with safety and accessibility features and outfitted with an elevator. The project remodeled classrooms, added a multi-purpose room and expanded the auditorium. A new, stateof-the-art stage was installed, along with a control room for lighting and sound, new dressing rooms and 358 new seats. In 100 years, the old Matthews School has come full circle. It was renamed the Matthews Community Center and dedicated November 12, 2000. As it was a century ago, the building is still a very vital part of the fabric of Matthews, not only as an educational venue but also as a performing arts center.

Matthews Historical Foundation marks two decades of service

The Matthews Historical Foundation celebrates its twentieth anniversary this year. Founded by a group of local citizens interested in preservation, the MHF today is a nonprofit organization comprised of dedicated volunteers who serve the community through historical programs and preservation of the Reid House. The foundation took ownership of the Victorian-era Queen Anne-style home at 134 West John Street, in 1987. The group will host a 1900 Day event to celebrate its anniversary on October 20. The Reid House will be decked out in 1900-era finery and open to the public. See “Matthews History Month Events,” for details.

The Reid House: Matthews landmark was once home to a prominent family

22

At the age of 117, the Reid House is a lovely feature of the downtown Matthews landscape. It was built in 1890 by Matthews businessman Edward Solomon Reid, who sold the house to his sister Ellen in 1893, the same year she married Dr. Thomas Neely Reid. Dr. Reid began practicing medicine in 1889 and faithfully tended to the needs of his patients until his death in 1946. Dr. and Mrs. Reid’s youngest daughter Nancy was born in the house in 1898 and grew up to become a teacher. She taught in the Charlotte Mecklenburg School system for 35 years and lived in the Reid House until she passed away in 1986. A year later, the foundation took ownership of the home and its members have been proud caretakers since. MMHM

At the age of 117, the Reid House is a lovely feature of the downtown Matthews landscape.

This postcard of the Reid House depicts the home, built in 1890 and now under the stewardship of the Matthews Historical Foundation.

Matthews History Month Events >> At the Matthews Community Center, Saturday, October 6

The public is invited to an open house from 1 – 4 p.m. to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the building. A tour of the building is slated for 1 p.m., and at 2 p.m., the original play “When the Whistle Blows” will debut in the auditorium. The play brings the history of Matthews to life with the help of local actors. Planned for 3 p.m. is an alumni reception. For more information, visit www.matthewsfun.com or www.matthewsplayhouse.com.

>> At the Reid House, Saturday, October 20

To commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the Matthews Historical Foundation, the organization will host 1900 Day at the Reid House, 134 West John Street, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The home will feature 1900-era displays, including Halloween, entertainment, food preparation, clothing and a medical display provided by Mint Hill Historical Society. There will also be period music and activities on the lawn. Details are at www. matthewsreidhouse.org.


Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

•

September/October 2007

23


COMMUNITY

September MONDAY

Visit www.MatthewsMintHill.com for details on these events and more.

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY 1

2

3

4

5

6

Labor Day

7

8

Football: West Charlotte @ Independence

AW Shucks! Corn Maze/Pumpkin Patch Marshville Through 11/18 Sibling Class & Tour Maternity Center Tour Presbyterian Matthews

9

10

11

Mint Hill Women’s Club Fashion Show Mint Hill Town Hall

Introduction to Breastfeeding Presbyterian Matthews

12

13

14

15

Football: Vance @ Independence West Charlotte @ Butler

Fall Consignment Sale Matthews UMC Infant CPR & Safety Presbyterian Matthews

16

17

Mint Hill Women’s Club Symphony Guild ASID Showcase (condos @ corner of Providence & Sharon Amity) Through 10/7

23 Church Ministry Fair and BBQ Christ Covenant

18

19

20

MOMS Support Center Presbyterian Matthews

24

25 Sibling Class & Tour Maternity Center Tour Presbyterian Matthews

26

21

22

Football: Providence @ Weddington

Children’s Fall Consignment Sale, Arlington Baptist Church

Childbirth Preparation Weekend Presbyterian Matthews

Christian Music Day ‘07 Carowinds

27

28

29

Scarowinds Carowinds

Football: Butler @ Providence South Meck @ Independence

Scarowinds Carowinds Yoga Kids CPCC Levine Campus Matthews ArtFest On the green @ Matthews Station Mint Hill Madness Fairview Rd. Park

30 Matthews ArtFest On the green @ Matthews Station Mint Hill Madness Fairview Rd. Park

24


Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

September/October 2007

October SUNDAY

Visit www.MatthewsMintHill.com for details on these events and more.

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1

2

3

4

5

6

Football: Myers Park @ Butler East Meck @ Weddington

Scarowinds Kids Howl-O-Fest Carowinds

Scarowinds Carowinds

“When the Whistle Blows” Matthews Playhouse

Childbirth Preparation Presbyterian Matthews

100th Anniversary of Matthews School Open House Matthews Community Center

7

8

9

10

11

Kids Howl-O-Fest Carowinds

12

13

Football: Providence @ Independence

Kids Howl-O-Fest Scarowinds Carowinds

Scarowinds Carowinds

14

15

16

17

Kids Howl-O-Fest Carowinds

CPCC Fall Break

CPCC Fall Break

CPCC Fall Break

18

MOMS Support Group Presbyterian Matthews

19

20

Football: Audrey Kell @ Providence South Meck @ Butler Independence @ Weddington

Kids Howl-O-Fest Carowinds

Childbirth Preparation Presbyterian Matthews

Scarowinds Carowinds

“The Music Man” Matthews Playhouse

Infant CPR & Safety Presbyterian Matthews

“The Music Man” Matthews Playhouse

Scarowinds Carowinds

21

22

“The Music Man” Matthews Playhouse

23

24

Sibling Class & Tour Maternity Center Tour Presbyterian Matthews

Kids Howl-O-Fest Scarowinds Carowinds

25

26

27

“The Music Man” Matthews Playhouse

Football: Weddington @ Butler Myers Park @ Providence

Kids Howl-O-Fest Scarowinds Carowinds

“The Music Man” Matthews Playhouse

“The Music Man” Matthews Playhouse

Scarowinds Carowinds

Scarowinds Carowinds

28

29

30

31

Kids Howl-O-Fest Scarowinds Carowinds

Mint Hill Women’s Club Auction

Blood Drive CPCC Levine Campus

Blood Drive CPCC Levine Campus

Scarowinds Carowinds

Scarowinds Carowinds

Scarowinds Carowinds

“The Music Man” Matthews Playhouse

Fall Festivals Arlington Baptist Church Idlewild Baptist Church

25


MIND/BODY/SPIRIT

Alternative Medicine D

by dr. michael smith

oes your child have allergies, eczema, earaches, digestive issues, or problems with attention, sleep or eating? Homeopathy can be a safe and effective treatment for these conditions. Homeopathy is ideal for children as it is a gentle, yet highly effective, system of medicine. The mildly sweet pills, powders or liquids are easy to dispense and are more palatable than many conventional medicines. The highly diluted natural substances that form homeopathic remedies mean that they are safe to use in the very young. More than that, homeopathy can raise the immunity of your children to help deal with illness throughout their childhood. Take John, a 10-year-old boy, who has been dealing with seasonal allergies that would often develop into a violent cough and eventually pneumonia. He also had stomach cramps that were unexplained by his pediatrician and nightly leg pains that prevented restful sleep. Dawn, his mother,

brought John in for homeopathy with me after the drugs he had been prescribed only made his symptoms worse. Shortly after being prescribed a homeopathic remedy, John’s symptoms began to improve.

What is homeopathic Medicine?

It is a holistic medicine that recognizes that mental and emotional symptoms coexist with physical symptoms. It can effectively alleviate childhood anxieties, fears, tantrums, hyperactivity and attention deficit disorder without side effects. Additionally, it helps children become more resistant to colds and flu.

How does it work?

Homeopathy turns on the “self-heal” switch. Chinese medicine calls it the “chi.” Naturopathic medicine calls it the “vis.” Homeopathy calls it the “vital force.” They all describe the energy inhabiting the human body that, when stimulated, moves the human system toward greater health. Homeopathic medicines are individually selected based on the unique symptoms and presentation of the child. They are derived from plants, animals and minerals and are understood in the following way: A medicine that can cause symptoms in a healthy child can eliminate similar symptoms in a sick child. Homeopathy addresses a body’s inherited weakness. For example, the triad of allergies, asthma and eczema runs in families. Strengthening a child’s body constitution means they will be less likely to express these familial diseases later in life. Homeopathy works

Micheal Smith, N.D. is the founder of Carolina’s Natural Health Center in Matthews.

fast with children because they are usually full of vitality. Acute conditions such as ear infections, tonsillitis and flu can be resolved rapidly using the right remedies, often avoiding the need for conventional medicines. Homeopathy is a gentle, holistic system of healing, suitable for everyone, young and old. Homeopathy focuses on you as an individual, concentrating on treating your specific physical and emotional symptoms, to give long-lasting benefits. >> Homeopathic treatment works with your body’s own healing powers to bring health and well-being. >> Patients are treated as individuals, not as a collection of disease labels. >> Homeopathy treats all your symptoms - mental, emotional and physical. >> Homeopathic remedies are gentle, subtle and powerful.

How long has homeopathy been used?

Homeopathy has been used for more than 200 years and has an honorable tradition

Homeopathy is ideal for children as it is a gentle, yet highly effective, system of medicine. 26

PHOTO OF CHILDREN FROM BIGSTOCKPHOTO.COM/SMITH PHOTO COURTESY DR. MICHAEL SMITH

Homeopathy and Children


Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

September/October 2007

dating back to ancient Greece. It was Samuel Hahnemann, a brilliant doctor working in 1796, who developed the scientific and philosophical foundations of this gentler way of healing. These scientific principles form the basis of successful homeopathic practice today.

What happens when you see a homeopath?

Your homeopath understands that establishing good health involves treating both mind and body, so time is taken to listen to your emotional and physical symptoms. To stimulate your body’s own healing process, a remedy closest to your individual symptom picture is prescribed. Healing begins from within your body, strengthening your health and immune system, without any danger of damaging side effects. Dawn, John’s mother, is now happy to report that “John’s health has continued to steadily improve during the approximately nine months we have been seeing Dr. Smith.” MMHM Sources: SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, August 1, 2007, Nancy Mercer, N.D., naturopathic physician specializing in homeopathy and an adjunct faculty member, Bastyr University Society of Homeopaths, representing professional homeopaths (www.homeopathy-soh.org)

27


MIND/BODY/SPIRIT

1

Blessed Assurance

Providing a safe and welcoming place for your loved ones

B

lessed Assurance Adult Day and Health Care of Matthews serves adults in Mecklenburg and Union counties. The center is under the direction of a Registered Nurse and allows adults to enjoy the day in a secure, friendly and supervised setting. To commemorate September’s designation as Adult Day Care Month, here’s a look at some of the many activities the clients at Blessed Assurance enjoy throughout the year. MMHM Blessed Assurance can be reached at (704) 845-1359 or www.BlessedAdultCare.org

2

1 James Mallas gets a haircut from barber Luke. 2 Martha Oldfield and Blessed Assurance employee Latarsha Davis in the computer center.

4 3

2

3 Judy Cochrane, William Strong and Frank Neil stay fit in the exercise area. 4 Latarsha Davis visits with Pearly Wooley. 5 Hubert Hailey, Artie Levien, the late Harold Chaney and William Green relax in rocking chairs. 6 Corey Evans and John May shoot some hoops. 7 Seymore Lewis and Dorothy Mickens enjoy a game of checkers.

4

6 28

5

7


September/October 2007

PHOTOS COURTESY OF BLESSED ASSURANCE

Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

29


BUSINESS

Chuck Mobley is a regular contributor and a business development specialist with the Sandler Sales Institute.

A new hobby provides life lessons by chuck mobley

I

recently had the burning desire to expand my focus and become more interesting, at least to myself. I felt it was time for a hobby. I looked at the choices I had and chose two that I thought would be fun: Photography and chess. I soon discovered there is way more to this chess thing than first meets the eye. There are 16 pieces, or figures, per side. The game is played on a board with 64 squares of alternating colors. The object of the game is to capture the opponent’s king. No bloodshed! 30

All of your resources should work together, in coordination, to execute the plan. >> You must apply constant effort to improve your position by using what resources you have and maximizing the positive imbalances. >> Do not fear mistakes. Learn from them and move on. Wow. That’s a lot to ask of one game, huh? And perhaps the argument could be made that I need a new hobby. But what does this mean to you, gentle reader? It’s your move! Currently, there are imbalances in your situation; some strong (positive), some weak (negative). Here’s the list you knew was coming: 1. Identify your goal. What do you wish to accomplish? What the heck do you want to do? What’s worth some thinking and effort? Why in the world would you want to do that? If you are happy with your answer, celebrate and move on to the next step. >>

PHOTO BY DAVID DIPRIMA, PHOTO COMPOSITION BY DANIEL JORDAN

My Next Move

As I read and studied this game, an astonishing thing happened. It changed before my very eyes. This game morphed into the most simplistic, beautiful life lesson: >> Before the game starts, there is a balance. It is the only time this balance exists. After the initial move, things are getting better or getting worse all the time. >> Within this perpetual imbalance, we find strengths and weaknesses. >> It is impossible to maintain your position by doing nothing. >> With every move and position of the board, new opportunities arise as others are closed. >> The current situation should dictate your next action. >> If you do not have a plan – an overall strategy of your own – you will quickly become part of someone else’s. >> It is wise to structure your plan around current resources and positive imbalances.


Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

September/October 2007

2. List all of the strengths or assets you have and can use toward the goal. Do these strengths complement the goal? Identify the best use of your positive imbalances. Example: You may not have money (that’s a negative imbalance), but you may possess the ability to influence those who do (that’s a positive imbalance). Or, maybe you’re not very influential, but you have the ability to hire someone who is. 3. List your weaknesses, along with strategies to minimize their dark power. This one is for all you Star Wars fans: Luke Skywalker had a lot of talent, but very little experience. He hooked up with a great coach for talent development, became a Jedi, saved the galaxy – and so on, and so on. 4. Plan. How could you make your advantages work together to magnify their potency? Peter Parker takes photos for the newspaper. Spider Man gets around really fast. Spidey covers a lot of ground, finds the bad guys (and some great photo opportunities) and Peter and Spidey grow in fame and fortune. Together, they are truly a force to be reckoned with! 5. Move. You’ve got your goal; it’s centered on your strengths. You have all your positive imbalances working in one coordinated effort to deliver your hopes and dreams. Reach out and move! You must take action. First things first. 6. Play with gusto. Have no fear! I promise, the worst thing that will happen is that the position of your board will change. New opportunities will open as old ones begin to close. That’s as bad as it gets! To summarize – for all you bottom-line folks – we are not victims. We all have challenges and strengths. Inventory what you have, come up with a plan and get on with it. Take failure as a learning experience. Add the new knowledge to your bag of tricks and make your next move. MMHM Contact Chuck at (704) 363-9131 or chuck@sandler.com. Also visit, www.Heidrich.Sandler.com

31


BUSINESS

Rich Ferretti

Busy Realtor finds time to serve the community by Cynthia conrow

I

32

Rich Ferretti is the new President of the Mint Hill Lions Club.

As a real estate agent, Rich is licensed in three states: North Carolina, South Carolina and New Jersey. He loves helping people relocate and find the home that’s right for them. As a part of that process, he encourages them to investigate every neighborhood. “I’ll say, ‘go to Pineville and have lunch. See Matthews and Mint Hill at dinnertime. Go to different parts of town at different times of day.’ This area has so much to offer and each town is unique,” he says. When he deals with those moving here from up North, he lets them know that they’ll be welcomed warmly – as he was – and he advises them to keep an open mind, try new things and to get involved. That advice has served him well, not only as a newcomer to Mint Hill but as a young Air Force sergeant during the Vietnam war. The transition from New Jersey to North Carolina was not quite as dramatic as what

he experienced when he landed in places like Pakistan, Taiwan, the Philippines and Vietnam. But by the time he moved to North Carolina, Rich had already experienced that rite of passage for Northerners: He had eaten grits. Though he first mistook them for mashed potatoes when he was in boot camp, Rich is now a 30-year veteran grits lover. Rich looks forward to his year as president of the Mint Hill Lions, and to what the coming years hold for his much-loved adopted hometown. “Mint Hill is and will continue to be a great place to live, to raise a family, and to just be a part of the community,” he says. “My hope for the future is that the town will continue to have great leadership and that it will continue to grow and prosper, with an eye on the future.” MMHM

PHOTO BY TODD WHITEHURST

t’s no secret that new people are moving to the Matthews and Mint Hill community almost every day. It takes most folks a while to learn their way around, make friends and business contacts, and get involved in the community. But not Southern Winds Realty Realtor/Broker Rich Ferretti. He moved from New Jersey to Mint Hill in 2003 and jumped headfirst into community service. Recently Rich was elected President of the Mint Hill Lions Club and is on the Board of Directors of Lions Services. The local chapter of the Lions, like the Lions worldwide, is a community service organization that helps address challenges like blindness, drugabuse prevention and diabetes awareness. Rich and the Mint Hill Lions will be out in force at Mint Hill Madness, selling brooms to support the group’s charitable efforts to help the visually impaired. The Lions will also provide free vision screenings. Along with his colleagues at Southern Winds, including owner Frank Pixley – Rich says you’ll find Frank’s picture in the dictionary under “Nice Guy” – Rich supports Camp Chameleon, a camp for autistic children run by the Siskey Family YMCA. Then there’s the Bainbridge Home owners Association, of which Rich is president. And since he offices in Ballantyne, he’s active in the Ballantyne Business Network – he’s the president of that organization, too. Rich decided to make Mint Hill his home and real estate his full-time career five years ago. This came after a lifetime of living in New Jersey and working for AT&T and later, the AT&T spin-off, Lucent Technologies. Like many empty nesters who relocate to Charlotte, Rich and Carol Ferretti followed on the heels of their sons, Rick and Mike, who moved to Matthews to attend the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. “We had been here many times to visit,” Rich says. “So we knew we liked the area.” And the part of the area they like best is Mint Hill. He says the friendliness of the people here won him over. When asked what’s his favorite aspect of Mint Hill, Rich sums it up: “It’s the small-town atmosphere. Mayberry meets the 21st century.”


Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

September/October 2007

www.MatthewsMintHill.com Go online, PRINT COUPONS, and save big! Pie Safe pies are now available at MATTHEWS MOTOR COMPANY Carolina Bagel Co. café on weekends. COMPLETE SALES & SERVICE CENTER 10501 Monroe Road (Beside Family Dollar HQ)

(704) 845-3070

Vera & More 2585 W. Roosevelt Blvd./Hwy. 74 Monroe, NC 28110 (704) 238-9399

Limited availability while they last

7102 Brighton Park Dr. #500 Mint Hill, NC 704 545-2788 Special Orders Available

4 rounds for the price of 3 Monday – Friday only! Call (704) 573-1000 to make your tee time.

Discount Floor Coverings 3607 Matthews-Mint Hill Rd, Suite 9, Matthews, NC 28105 (704) 846-2755

33


BUSINESS

Sightings

Matthews-Mint Hill Magazine Business Breakfast

B

PHOTOS BY RON DESHAIES

usiness leaders gathered at Jimmieยนs Restaurant in Mint Hill recently for a networking breakfast sponsored by MatthewsMint Hill Magazine. Magazine staffers Somiah Muslimani, Art Director (top right) and Rick Dillsworth, Sales Executive and Todd Whitehurst, Publisher (below) were among the attendees. MMHM

34


Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

•

September/October 2007

How much money has your health insurance made you? For Healthy Individuals and their families: Comprehensive Major Medical Insurance Plans PPO and Health Savings Account (HSA) For people with health challenges: (i.e.Diabetes, Heart Attack, Stroke, even Cancer) Limited Benefit coverage up to $100,000/incident Indemnity policies for individuals with multiple health issues Starting at $160/month Call Tim today to set an appointment!

PHOTOS BY RON DESHAIES

Timothy D. Almond, Agent Insurance Producers of America Agency 10800 Sikes Place, Suite 300 Charlotte, NC 28277 (704) 576-3406

35


ARTS/ENTERTAINMENT

Penny’s Place Good food and good times since 1936 – it’s a Mint Hill Classic

Penny’s Place founder Penny Mullis, right, poses with one of his early stock cars, along with driver Buck Baker and mechanic Joe Rump.

R

ight in the middle of Mint Hill, you can find the authentic heart of Mint Hill. Because for many folks, the town isn’t defined by growth, new shopping centers, or other recent additions. Instead, Mint Hill has always been about people. You can find the real Mint Hill at Penny’s Place. I spent a few hours asking people about Penny’s. I asked 17 people where it was. All 17 knew the exact location, and each happily gave me directions. I asked ten others if they had ever eaten there. Again, a perfect 10 out of 10 said “yes.” And each gave it a glowing recommendation as a “great place” or a spot with “great people.” Big chain restaurants would kill for this kind of familiarity. Penny’s Place lives in an unassuming little building on Highway 51. Almost every inch of wall space inside Penny’s is covered with 36

gas station signs, vintage automobile ads, car memorabilia, and more. As current owner Billy Kiser tells it, the restaurant’s association with automobiles comes honestly. H.M. “Penny” Mullis opened Penny’s Place in 1936. Mullis loved fast cars, and while running his restaurant, he was also running racecars. He drove until an injury forced him to stop, but he didn’t get out of racing. In the 1950’s, Penny was a stock car owner. His 1954 Oldsmobile was piloted by legendary driver Buck Baker. They had success, too – one year they won the pole at Daytona. Through all the racing excitement, Penny’s main business was always the restaurant. Originally, Penny’s Place was housed on the current site in a white building – a former Esso service station. It was a place for Mint Hill neighbors to gather. Penny’s had pool

tables and was known for burgers, hot dogs, and ice-cold beer. Folks who came to restaurant in the 1950’s might not recognize the place today. The Esso building was replaced by a new structure and pool tables are gone. Visitors from any era, though, would feel right at home. Certainly, the food is good, but it’s the people that make Penny’s Place. Billy Kiser and his wife Shirley bought the restaurant from Penny Mullis’ sons in 1992. But the restaurant is still in the family; Shirley is Penny’s daughter. When you talk to Billy Kiser, you instantly know that he loves his restaurant, his customers, and his staff. It is a closeknit group. Linda Simpson and Judy Lance are there every day, serving customers. Zoe Hough runs the grill.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BILLY KISER

by rich lange


Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

•

September/October 2007

37


ARTS/ENTERTAINMENT

Then there are the regulars. Billy speaks fondly of his customers: There’s George Digh and his dog Tag. They drive one of Billy’s cars in the Mint Hill parade every year. George’s dad Reverend Julius Digh officiated at the Kiser’s wedding. Then there are the Dulin brothers, Hamp and Hood, both born on August 24, but seven years apart. They run H&H Plumbing, and eat at Penny’s most every day. Harry Hood is also a regular. His brother Spark was Billy Kiser’s good friend until Spark passed away, but Spark’s image lives on at Penny’s – there is a pencil drawing of him on the wall. Politicians, business owners, construction workers and retirees all make Penny’s Place a regular part of their week. If you know even a little about Penny’s, you know a lot about Mint Hill. If you have never been – or haven’t been lately– you should make a point to drop in on Billy and the gang at Penny’s Place soon. MMHM Want to go? Penny’s Place is in Mint Hill on Highway 51 at N.C. 218. It’s open Monday through Friday from 5 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.; they close at 2 p.m. on Saturday.

PHOTOS BY RON DESHAIES

Above: Owner Billy Kiser with employees Linda Simpson, Beth Johnson, Zoe Hough and Stephanie Strong. Below: Penny’s Place draws a devoted crowd of regulars who come for the food, the camaraderie and the atmosphere.

38


September/October 2007

PHOTOS BY RON DESHAIES

Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

39


ARTS/ENTERTAINMENT

Fall Festivals

Mint Hill Madness, Matthews ArtFest share top billing in September by rich lange

T

he heat of summer begins to mellow, the kids head back to school, and everyone seems to be back on a regular schedule. The month of September ushers in the fall season, which in some communities brings a local fair or small festivals held in schoolyards. But around here, it means some of the largest annual events return to Matthews and Mint Hill. Coming on the heels of Matthews Alive!, the major festival in Matthews that draws nearly 200,000 attendees over Labor Day weekend, Mint Hill Madness and ArtFest of Matthews fill the last weekend of the month with festivities.

Mint Hill Madness

Mint Hill Madness happens September 28-30, at The Mint Hill Park on Fairview. Festival hours are Friday, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. See “Let the Madness Begin” for additional information.

40

Art Fest of Matthews

The 22nd edition of the ArtFest of Matthews takes place in downtown Matthews on September 29 and 30. Organized by the Matthews Chamber of Commerce , ArtFest is held outdoors, with white tents dotting the festival area. Artisans travel from across the Southeast to sell their works in this well attended show. Since its beginning in 1986, the attendance at ArtFest has grown steadily; more than 10,000 are expected to visit this year’s event. Shoppers can browse many different types of arts and crafts, including oils and watercolors paintings, prints, photography, pottery, jewelry, woodwork and more. The event is a juried show with artists competing for more than $2,500 in cash prizes. Rising seniors from area high schools can enter their work for a chance at scholarship money. There’s also live entertainment planned, as well as hands-on children’s activities. MMHM ArtFest of Matthews will be held September 29-30 on the square at Matthews Street Station. Hours are Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday. noon to 5 p.m.

Left: Children have the opportunity to learn crafts like pottery at Matthews ArtFest. Above: Scenes from a past Mint Hill Madness.

Let the Madness Begin Here’s a list of events scheduled for Mint Hill Madness: Saturday 9:30 a.m. 1 p.m. 3 p.m. 9 p.m.

Parade Pet Show Dachshund race Fireworks

Sunday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Praise and worship 1 p.m. Beauty pageant* *with special guest Miss North Carolina

ARTREST PHOTOS COURTESY OF MATTHEWS CHAMBER. MINT HILL MADNESS COURTESY OF MINT HILL CHAMBER.

Mint Hill Madness is Mint Hill’s largest annual event. “Madness” was established in 1983, and last year drew more than 65,000 to the park on Fairview. The Mint Hill Chamber of Commerce operates the festival, which depends heavily on community volunteers. Mint Hill Madness includes arts and crafts, food vendors, games and rides, a beauty pageant, fireworks, and more. The Lions Club will offer free vision screenings, and the Mecklenburg County Sheriff ’s Dept. will have several displays and demonstrations, including K-9 units. New this year is a children’s area with a separate stage and food vendors geared toward children. The highlight for many, though, is the Saturday morning parade. The parade brings out police cars, fire trucks, politicians, colorful floats, and beauty queens. It also features dozens of classic cars owned or borrowed by Mint Hill residents, who then show them off in the ride along the parade route, which begins on Evans Rd. near Lowe’s foods, takes a left on MatthewsMint Hill Road and ends at Mint Hill Baptist Church.


ARTREST PHOTOS COURTESY OF MATTHEWS CHAMBER. MINT HILL MADNESS COURTESY OF MINT HILL CHAMBER.

Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine •

September/October 2007

41


HOMESTYLES

The 3 R’s: Reuse, Recycle and ReStore Habitat for Humanity ReStores help the environment and the community

by chay lee

t’s almost 10 a.m., and a line is already forming at the Habitat For Humanity ReStore on Wendover Rd. in Charlotte. Through a window, the waiting bargain shoppers can see a sign that reads Home Supplies on a Budget. This place is kind of a secret,” says Kevin Reed, who has come to pick up shutters for his mother. “And they have really great stuff.” The great stuff includes everything you would need to fix up a house and anything you might want to put inside it – all sold at a hefty discount. Plus, the ReStore salvages items that might otherwise end up in the landfill. With all of that going for it, the ReStore is a secret that needs to be discovered. The two ReStore locations in Charlotte – one on Wendover Rd. and one on Wilkinson Blvd. – help fund Habitat for Humanity projects. Habitat is a non-profit group that builds houses for low-income people around the world. Since most of the materials are donated and the workers are volunteers, the cost of providing the homes is relatively low. Folks who move in also get a zero-percent mortgage. The merchandise at the ReStore is all donated and comes from a variety of sources. “The merchandise comes from manufacturers that have overstocked. It comes from builders who order the wrong thing or a customer that changes their mind,” says Tim Murphy, General Manager of the ReStore on Wendover Rd. The ReStore has just about everything for inside or outside the home, including sinks, doors, cabinets and other building materials. Garth Will is a real estate investor who has been shopping at the ReStore for six years. “They have saved me a lot of money,” he says. “When you have rental property it’s important to get supplies for a good price.”

ReStore customers David Zepeda and Stephanie Simon – assisted by Matthews store manager Norman Belch – pick up furniture for their new business.

42

“This place is kind of a secret…” – Kevin Reed

PHOTOS BY RON DESHAIES

I


Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

September/October 2007

Last year the two Charlotte ReStores deconstructed 112 entire houses and 48 kitchens; that kept approximately 2.5 millions pounds of salvageable material from the landfill. And for Will, the ReStore is like one-stop shopping. “They have good prices and I like to contribute to Habitat. I have bought a ton from them over the years.” For those who just want a price break on household items like vacuum cleaners, furniture or even coffee pots, the ReStore can help. Kane Geathers picked up a washing machine for $200. “They have very nice merchandise and it’s very reasonable, ” she says. Geathers and her family also live in a Habitat house. She is so impressed with the ReStore that she has told other people about it. “For anyone who is on a budget, it’s a good

place,” she states. “I have told my friends about this place. My mom now comes here too. She got a really nice sofa.” The rest of the items come from individual donations. The ReStore can send a truck to have things picked up or folks can drop things off. Diane Whorton has come to drop off a chandelier. “We just don’t use it anymore,” she says. “I figured I could help someone else out.” Mother Nature has to love the ReStore as well. The store’s free deconstruction program takes salvageable things like cabinets, sinks, toilets, windows and other fixtures from

Left: Doors are just a few of the items do-it-yourselfers and contractors can find at the ReStore. Below: Staged room set-ups by a volunteer professional interior designer give ReStore customers ideas and inspiration.

43


HOMESTYLES

Renovating with products from ReStore Real estate investor Garth Will has finished several projects with products from ReStore. Clockwise, from top: This Jacuzzi bath was a former home show display. The island in this kitchen re-do came from the home of a NASCAR driver. Plantation shutters found a new life as a deck surround.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF GARTH WILL, TIM MURPHY PHOTO BY RON DESHAIES

The tankless toilet by Kohler retailed for $700, but Will picked it up for $15 at the ReStore.

44


Tim Murphy is manager of the ReStore on Wendover Road in Charlotte.

houses that are going to be torn down. And the deconstruction program has been busy. Last year the two Charlotte ReStores deconstructed 112 entire houses and 48 kitchens; that kept approximately 2.5 million pounds of salvageable material from the landfill. “We are really trying to get the word out to contractors,” says Murphy. “We are quick, clean and efficient. We do it by the rules.” He says it’s a win-win situation. “We are happy because we get good materials and contractors don’t have to pay as much at the landfill.”

So what kind of deal can you expect to get at the ReStore? On the high end, sofas are $100. Doors range from around $70 down to $5 for a closet door. Hardwood flooring is $1 a square foot. And sinks go for around $30. The store is run mostly with the help of volunteers. Today Monisah Charakpani is working with a group from Wachovia. “We like to volunteer places where we will be needed,” she said. “We definitely are needed here. It feels good to know you are helping a good cause.” The Wendover Rd. ReStore is right across the street from Home Depot, Murphy says that it’s no competition at all. “We actually refer people to them and they refer people to us. They may have a project in mind and may buy one thing here and then go over there to get something else.” In the last 11 years the two Charlotte ReStore locations have helped fund the building of 20 Habitat houses, and this year the organization is on track to build 8 to 10. The ReStore is the ultimate mix of everyone winning, even Mother Nature. “It’s easy to get up and go to work when you know that you are helping out your community as a whole,” says Murphy. So whether you want to save a few bucks on a home improvement project, buy something for your house, help save the planet, or want to volunteer, the ReStore has something for you. MMHM Want to ReStore? Details, including store hours, directions, information about the deconstruction team, how to donate and more – is available at www.charlotterestore.org.

ReStore in Matthews The Matthews affiliate of Habitat for Humanity has a small ReStore in downtown Matthews. Though it doesn’t have the amount of fixtures and other merchandise that the larger Charlotte stores do, the Matthews ReStore offers household items, furniture, lamps and small appliances. On a recent visit, we noticed a few cabinets and windows and lots of lighting fixtures, too. Habitat Matthews has a deconstruction program, a truck for picking up items and accepts drop-off donations. Visit the Matthews ReStore at 136 E. Charles Street in downtown Matthews; phone (704) 845-2509. For more information, see www.habitatmatthews.org. 45


HOMESTYLES

Return to the Front Porch Today’s homeowners value this neighborly Southern tradition

by sharon mason

The Mullis home in Mint Hill, which is approximately 200 years old, features a classic wrap-around front porch. Trends in new homes hearken back to styles like this from days gone by.

46


Matthews • Mint Hill Magazine

September/October 2007

MULLIS HOME PHOTO BY TODD WHITEHURST, DOUBLE PORCH PHOTO BY SHARON MASON

Y

ears ago, the front porch was as much a staple of Southern life as sweet tea and Moon Pies. It was deep and wide, with plenty of room for extended families to gather and cool off after the evening meal. Neighbors out for a twilight stroll would stop a while. Couples courted on the porch swing, and the neighborhood busybody used hers as a place to keep an eye on the rest of us. Gradually air conditioning, televisions – and later, computers and video games – kept people indoors. Home designs kept pace with the indoor lifestyle, and the front porch eventually shriveled to nothing more than a covered entry just large enough to keep off the rain as someone rang the doorbell. A large, welcoming front porch became a place associated with days gone by. But things are changing. Now baby boomers and generation-Xers are reclaiming the front porch, making it one of the hottest trends in the current housing market. According to the National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB) 50 percent of all new single family homes are being built with front porches. And, looking to the future, the NAHB interviewed 500 architects, designers, manufacturers and marketing experts about what they expect to find in upscale housing by 2015 and found that 70 percent expect a front porch to become standard. According to the association’s research, the number of homes with front porches has increased 11 percent in the past decade. When Charles and Clara Stering moved from California, they chose a home with a front porch in Mint Hill’s Brighton Park community. The Sterings are active, sociable people who are too young to be retired. “We didn’t want to be so isolated,” says Clara. “We were there in our house in California for 21 years and we never knew more than a few of our neighbors.” Sacramento was too hot, too buggy and too wet in the winter to sit outside, but Mint Hill’s climate and the rural feel of their community make it pleasant to sit outside on their shady porch almost every day.

“I want a town like Mayberry”

Carol King of Keller Williams Realty says that her customers are attracted to front porches. “People like other amenities, but they get excited about front porches.” King notes that many baby boomers are downsizing and a front porch offers more living space with very little upkeep. Nowadays people are staying home more, and they like the sense of community and nostalgia a welcoming front porch provides.

Double porches are a hallmark of the low country style home, popular in newer neighborhoods as well as historic ones.

47


HOMESTYLES

Nowadays people are staying home more, and they like the sense of community and nostalgia a welcoming front porch provides. One of King’s customers told her, “I want a town like Mayberry.” Suburban new home communities featuring generous front porches and rear-entry garages aimed at “empty nesters” have sold briskly because people like a small-town feel without giving up the amenities of a larger city.

This isn’t your grandmother’s front porch

Full-Service & Professional

Tree and Plant Care Protect Your Investment with Tree and Plant Health Care Management Unhealthy Tree

Arbor

Solutions

of Charlotte

Deep Root Fertilized Tree

The front porch unplugged

Elegant or rustic, funky or formal, the front porch is making huge impact on the housing market and the appeal is obvious. In a fastpaced world where we’re bombarded with media and tethered to cell phones, what would be better than to be able to grab a glass of fresh lemonade, set a spell on your front porch and say “hey” to all the neighbors? MMHM

Commercial Residential HOA

Licensed Bonded Insured

48

"Specializing in Deep Root Fertilization"

- Improve Root Structure & Density - Increase Tolerance to Disease & DROUGHT - Improve Soil Condition - Increase Nutrients - Faster Growing..... Healthier and Longer Life

Free Consultations & Estimates (704) 906 - 1672

Locally Owned and Operated

PHOTOS BY TODD WHITEHURST

Today’s front porch can take many shapes. Depending on the community’s style, it can resemble the double-porch style of Charleston’s historic Rainbow Row homes. Or it can be a wraparound country porch, or a formal portico supported by columns. Today’s porches are often made of aluminum, vinyl, stucco, brick, or synthetics such as fiber cement siding products, for durability and low maintenance. Traditional rockers, wicker settees and containers of flowers are still popular fixtures on the modern front porch, but outdoor decor has evolved. Outdoor areas often look more like open-air rooms than porches. High-tech fabrics designed for outdoor use look just like indoor fabrics but resist sun and mildew. There is even fringe and cording for pillows that gives a luxurious designer feel to casual furnishings. On the horizon, brighter colors are expected to eclipse the muted colors that have been popular for the last few years. “We’re seeing brighter colors in outdoor fabrics, stripes, patterns, even polka dots,” says Amy Poole of Summer Classics, an outdoor furniture showroom near downtown Charlotte. Despite the brighter color palette, the furnishings themselves are more substantial than typical patio furniture. Some homeowners are becoming even more daring. Sculptures, vibrant fabrics, art and eclectic furnishings are becoming popular as residents seek to add personality to their entryway and hint at what may lie inside. “We see more funky, colorful kinds of décor, especially in the very colorful Charleston types of homes. Thirty-somethings want a bright, fresh look and are willing to do something a little more fun,” says Poole.


Facing page: Kevin and Gina Mullis enjoy spending time on their front porch with their son Corey Mullis and dog Daphne. Above: Georgia Miles and her daughter, Sammie Miles, relax on their front porch in the Mint Hill neighborhood of Ellington Farms.

Spruce up your front porch Here are some simple ways to make your front porch a more pleasant and welcoming place.

>> Restain or repaint the porch

itself. It is a simple fix, but it can brighten up the space and create an inviting feel.

>> Add plants and flowers. Breathe a little life into your porch with beautiful annuals and greenery.

>> Remove excess, like mis-

matched decorations or old metal railings. This will make your entrance more sleek and stylish.

>> Swap out old furniture with

something new. Relax in your rocker and enjoy your new porch. Don’t forget the lemonade! 49


Your Home • Your Design • Your Lifestyle

plantation falls estates From the $500’s 3 lots from .75 to 2.5 acres

7908 Plantation Falls Lane Directions: Take Exit 44 from 485 (Highway 218), go east one mile, Plantation Falls Estates is on the left.

3

Mint Hill, NC 28227

Sales Model (704) 545-7575 Office (704) 841-2074

3

Toll free (877) 367-4292

Kathie McDowell Kathie@thehomegroupinc.com

3

(704) 201-6257

www.thehomegroupinc.com

Keith Johnson 498 River Highway Mooresville, NC 28117 johnsoke@firstcharter.com 704.688.4719 704.664.4455 fax 704.213.2163 cell

Site Plan for Plantation Falls Estates


MMHM Sep 2007  

Community magazine for the the towns of Matthews and Mint Hill, North Carolina

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you