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PREMIER ISSUE

10 GREAT SOUTHERN

FOOD & DRINK TRAILS

THERESA MENEFEE, MILL CREEK BREWING CO.

catching

Cabin Fever


A BEER GARDEN. (IN AN ACTUAL GARDEN.)

Cheekwood is proud to introduce our new signature house beers, 1929 Amber Ale and 1929 Perennial Pilsner, crafted in partnership with R.S. Lipman Company. Come experience a beer garden in an actual garden filled with live music, lawn games, and of course, beer, in the greenest place in Nashville.

1200 Forrest Park Drive, Nashville, TN 37205 |

cheekwood.org


to a

New Home

Over 30 years experience servicing all areas of Williamson & Davidson Counties

AnneRuarkHomes.com | 615.210.6966 anne.ruark@sothebysrealty.com


CONTENT COVER STORY

34 STRANGE BREWFELLOWS

FEATURE

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36 CABIN DESIGN 101

22 WHEN ART AND MUSIC COLLIDETEYE GUITARS

44 BEST SOUTHERN FOOD & DRINK TRAILS

56 GNASHVEGAS

60 VON SEITZ

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62 STEEL CITY TAP CO.

S O C R A F T B E E R M AG.C O M

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Featured on The Knot, Southern Weddings, Louisville Weddings, Wedding Row, The Voice, and selected by Frommers as

"Best Wedding Venue in Kentucky 2015"

Theresa Menefee at Mill Creek Taproom at 12 South in Tom Ford camouflage jacket, Theory black riding pants; Nan Fusco fairy cross stone ring (Mednikow)

BEHI N D THE COV ER

STRANGE BREWFELLOWS “There is little doubt that the world of craft brewers is expanding as never before, and Theresa Menefee is proof positive that not all in the industry are rugged or bearded. Yet what she does hold in common with all the rest is her passion for producing great beer.” -Robert Hicks, New York Times Bestselling Author of The Widow of the South and The Orphan Mother

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Todd Pellowe Photography

WALNUT WAY FARM WEDDINGS & EVENTS Direct Inquiries for 2019 Availability: walnutwayweddings@gmail.com 2800 Shelbyville Road • Shelbyville, Kentucky

Now Booking for 2020

502-727-0640


Matt Corbin — The Blue Raven

CONTENT CITY GUIDE

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CHARLOTTE, NC

48 LOUISVILLE, KY

RECIPE

31 SWORDFISH WITH SUMMER SUCCOTASH

BREWERY FEATURE

32 BALTER BEERWORKS

BEER 101

58 HOP TO IT

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HOMEBREW

64 FERMENT LOCAL

ON THE COVER: Theresa Menefee at Mill Creek Taproom on 12 South in Brunello Cucinelli charcoal blouse (Oak Hall); Nan Fusco asymmetric geode/diamond earrings and fairy cross stone ring (Mednikow)

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kentucky RECIPES COME FROM THE LAND AND HEART. Opening my own restaurant — a lifelong dream. Finding the best ingredients and doing as little as possible to them, that’s something special. Seeing a downtown come to life, knowing I’m a part of it. This is what good food can do. Visit BetterInTheBluegrass.com for the full story.


cider should

SOUTHERN

MANAGEMENT

DESIGN

EXECUTIVE EDITOR Craig Disque info@quemedia.press

ART DIRECTION & DESIGN Brian Daniels

PUBLISHER Que Media Press, LLC Craig Disque

CONTRIBUTORS

EDITOR IN CHIEF Didi Rainey didi@quemedia.press LIFESTYLE EDITOR Milton White milton@thefashionoffice

MARKETING SOCIAL MEDIA & MARKETING Kim Stanley kim@tncraftbeermag.com US SALES ACCOUNT MANAGER Didi Rainey didi@quemedia.press

WRITERS Daniel Himes, Amanda Dobra Hope, Lucas Ryan Chambers, Kim Stanley, Bruce Moffett, Julie Holt,Mike Wargo, Dale Mulfinger, Liesel Schmidt, Dennis Malcolm Byron, Shane Gibbs, Kendall Joseph PHOTOGRAPHERS Michael Gomez, Mayur Phadtare, Brian Savage, Merlyn Townley COVER Photographer: Michael Gomez, Westlight Studio Make-up Artist: Andrew Pentcost, Bea Rose Salon Hair Stylist: Alissa Moore, Bea Rose Salon Photo Assistant: Amanda Law, Westlight Studios, Mayur Phadtare, Westlight Studios Fashion Assistant: Erin Casey, The Fashion Office Fashion Stylist: Milton White, The Fashion Office (Also contributed pages 6 & 34)

PAGE 16 Photographer: Mayur Phadtare, NashBox Studios Product Stylist: Amanda Law, NashBox Studios Photo Assistant: Amanda Law, NashBox Studios, Fashion Stylist: Milton White/Fashion Editor, The Fashion Office

priestpointwineandspirits.com

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QUE MEDIA PRESS, LLC 1127 Nashboro Blvd. Nashville, TN 37217

@socraftbeermag.com

be bold Crushed and Crafted to perfection in the blue ridge mountains


EDITOR'S NOTE Hello and welcome to the premier issue of Southern Craft Beer Magazine! We are all very excited for all that the expansion and rebranding of Tennessee Craft Beer Magazine will mean for everyone involved in the southern craft beer scene. So why the re-brand? The word “southern” denotes a region, a lifestyle, and a culture all its own, and it’s all about community. As you know, craft breweries throughout the years have been instrumental in serving their communities— around here, some have even been entirely built by them! Southern Craft Beer Magazine is truly a lifestyle publication, and we want to tell the stories you’re looking for across the entire southern craft beer scene. So rather than just covering Tennessee, we’re now bringing you access to an entire region, because let’s face it, not only do the breweries distribute outside of their own states, but we know you’ve taken a day trip or two to check out all that’s happening in the other southern craft beer communities. Look for new and expanded sections on the creators, food, music, people, travel, and tourism that contribute to what makes craft beer more than just an industry, but truly a community. And there’s even more exciting news! In the fall of last year, we were named one of the top ten beer magazines on the planet by Feedspot, and in March, we shared our insight at the Beer Marketing and Tourism Conference in Boise, ID. With our brand new name and expanded coverage and content, we’re looking forward to continuing to interact with you and providing the same outstanding coverage of southern craft beer and the community that surrounds, supports, and builds it. Welcome to the NEW Southern Craft Beer Magazine, friends! Cheers,

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FE AT U R E

CABIN DESIGN 101 “Cabins can exist for use in two ways. They’re a place we visit in person every time we get a chance. And for some of us, they’re places we visit only in spirit, where we mentally take ourselves during a boring business meeting or whenever the modern world seems too encroaching.”

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INVESTMENT PIECES TEXT BY MILTON WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY BY MAYUR PHADTARE

We have curated some of the best items offered in the region, many crafted by artisans in the south.Whether it be a gift or an heirloom, these pieces are definitely worth the investment!

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1. Harvey Crane black croc flask (ashblue.com) 2. Barton Perreira Lenox sunglasses in black/gold, marine colored lenses (bartonperreira.com) 3. Kahuna sunglasses in combat with bottle green lenses (bartonperreira.com) 4. Bremont watch (mednikow.com) 5. William Henry blazing t-rex apple coral copper knife (mednikow.com) 6. William Henry cabernet abstract amboynas burlwood pen (mednikow.com) 7. Cindi Earl mother of pearl cuff links and studs (cindiearl.com) 8. Brackish Mill Pond feather bowtie (brackish.com) 9. Peter Nappi Julius Goodyear boots in bitter chocolate (peternappi.com) 10. Ermenegildo Zegna navy suit (levysclothes.com)


KENTUCKY

S

avor ...

SCOTT COUNTY

THE SIGHTS & SOUNDS OF GEORGETOWN.

MALL TOWN CHARM. PURE SMALL – Culinary Delights – • Country Boy Brewing • Bourbon 30 Spirits • Cafes and One-of-a-kind Restaurants • My Old Kentucky Foam - OPENING SOON! • Nearby Wineries and Bourbon Distilleries

– Equine Activities – • Minutes from the Kentucky Horse Park • Old Friends Retired Thoroughbred Farm • Festival of the Horse • Whispering Woods Riding Stables

– Picturesque Downtown – • Specialty Shops • Antiques • Scott County Arts and Cultural Center • Georgetown and Scott County Museum

– Other Charming Attractions – • Toyota Motor Manufacturing, KY, Inc. Tour • Golf • Elkhorn Creek • Ward Hall • Close proximity to the Ark Encounter

INTERSTATE

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INTERSTATE

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www.GeorgetownKy.com • 888.863.8600

Tampa's Table TELLS THE TALE

Tampa, home to over 40 local breweries such as Cigar City, Coppertail and Angry Chair, has long been one of our favorite beer destinations. Great people, the weather, the sites...seriosly what's not like? Tampa's Table is a new book that features the area's rich culinary history and exploding food scene. Packed with tasty recipies and indepth articles its the perfect place to start when planning your next trip. For more details and to puchase your copy visit: https://www.visittampabay.com/tampastable/

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Stop by our Visitor Center at 399 Outlet Center Dr.


ALL LOCAL. ALL NATURAL. REAL FRUIT. NO ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS.

THE SMOKING FLOWERS ON THE ROAD TO DISCOVERY BY DANIEL HIMES

T 100 CALORIES • GLUTEN FREE • 2g CARBS 20

PRE M I E R I S S U E

he Smoking Flowers, a duo from Nashville ,Tennessee, began their recording career with their debut album “Sweet as Port” in 2009. On that album, husband and wife team Scott and Kim Collins released a sound that had never been heard before. The intriguing Gothic/Americana sound mixed with rock was the central core of the album and could be best

U.S. again, as well as Canada, they came home to Nashville to take a small break, playing local shows whenever they could. As radio play began to emerge, Kim and Scott also found themselves playing live shows on the air. One such example was “Music City Roots,” a well-known radio show that broadasts live from the famous Loveless Café. Feeling more and more at home, they decided to release a third album in 2018.

heard on the tracks “Sometimes” and “Falling.” After the album and touring the country alone in their ‘93 Volvo for a couple of years, the Smoking Flowers began receiving a great amount of respect and attention. Cities such as Los Angeles and New York were honestly eating them up with a spoon, so in 2013, the pair released their second album as promised. Their second album, “2 Guns” was hailed by critics as “beautiful” and “astonishing.” The vocals were more piercing than ever, and their love for each other and the world continued to fill the glass for anyone who heard them.

The third album, “Let’s Die Together” released the inner punk rock roots that were within them all along. Expressing love with anger in the most authentic way is something that is an everyday reality for these two special souls. Following their third album, they embarked on a twenty-eight day tour of Japan complete with a Thanksgiving Day performance at a U.S. naval base in Hiroshima. The Smoking Flowers fondly remember portions of this tour as the most inspiring times of their lives.

Soon after they recorded and mixed their second album, Kim was diagnosed with breast cancer. She began to use holistic and alternative medicine, as well as a raw food diet (no chemo, no radiation, and no hormones). As she quickly attained remission, they promoted “2 Guns” for about three years. After touring the

As of this writing, The Smoking Flowers are getting back on the wagon, and there is more to come. They plan to continue to tour internationally in Australia and Europe, and back in Japan as well. They will also be playing many shows throughout the country and into Canada on this upcoming tour. Check out The Smoking Flowers on Facebook, Spotify, CD Baby and at: thesmokingflowers.com.

S O C R A F T B E E R M AG.C O M

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When Fine Art Music Collide

&

–TEYE GUITARS BY: AMANDA DOBRA HOPE

Art can be visually stunning. It can also take you on a journey. That journey may be mental, emotional, or spiritual—and it can be invoked by a variety of mediums. As we know, “artist” is a word that spans many genres. There are visual artists, performing artists, musicians and songwriters, fashion designers, architects, and many more. In the world of music, though many instruments are indeed visually interesting, one craftsman has taken them to a whole new level. We are talking about merging fine art with top-of-the-line construction— producing a sound that many musicians and art lovers alike can’t get enough of. Teye (he has only one name, like Prince, or Madonna), is a life-long musician whose need to “solve a problem” led to his top-ofthe-line handcrafted guitar company. Born in the Netherlands to an inventor father, Teye discovered his musical passion and talent at a young age. Though he had his eye on the guitar since he was a toddler, his parents insisted he learn the piano first. When he was ten, Teye got his wish and received a classical guitar and lessons to go with it. His parents finally purchased him a Gibson at eighteen, which was quite a sight in the Netherlands. It also ended up in pieces a few hours later as Teye couldn’t help but make some “improvements” so it would create the exact sounds he wanted. “My father taught me that if you have a problem, you should find all the information you can find out about it, and then use that to solve your problem,” he recounted.

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Instead of just playing the instrument, he analyzed it. “Why did they do it that way? What could they have done better?” Though Teye was happy to have a guitar at all, what he really wanted was an electric guitar! In his very early adulthood, he bought his own guitars and took them apart as well. Along the way, Teye and his father built an amp and a guitar to his liking, long before guitar making became this player’s livelihood. The fact that playing the guitar has been Teye’s livelihood his entire adult life is exactly what makes his designs so unique and practical. They were built not by a guitar maker, but a musician! Though he grew up in the Netherlands, the lure of Spanish music and culture has always been in Teye’s heart. As a young boy, his favorite colors were the ones in the Spanish flag, and whenever he was playing with his toys and a Spanish-style guitar song came on, he would stop what he was doing and listen—only returning to his play when it had concluded. In his early adulthood, he went to Spain to learn to play Flamenco guitar. There he met some very important people who would eventually bring him to the U.S., where he became a citizen. In his speech as he was sworn in as a citizen, he remarked that it was very generous of the American people to embrace him and allow him here.

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Design by Adam Jones | ALJ Innovations

We’re thrilled to finally offer our flagship beers Dos Perros and Pale Ale in cans! Look for 12-packs wherever Yazoo Beer is sold.

A Nashville Original. Beginning with a job playing guitar for Joe Ely, and evolving into playing in his own rock band with his Flamenco dancer/rock percussionist wife, the couple formed Barbarians of Sevilla in Austin, and off on tour they went! While they were on tour, Teye built his own amp, and then decided that he needed a guitar that did exactly what he wanted it to, just like his amp did—so he built one. He took it to a Dallas guitar show and everyone was floored. Teye and his wife had begun having children at this point, so they decided to get off the road. As the demand was there, Teye decided to start making guitars for a living. In the beginning, he was making hand inlaid guitars for $8000 each and he had a one-year waiting list. The company as it exists now began in his backyard in Austin, TX. As it grew and Teye realized that he wanted to get out of the business of managing employees as that was not his forte, he decided to team up with Evert Wilbrink, his former record label executive, and start a guitar company.

“Evert’s an amazing CEO. He knows how to make employees feel good while making changes in the company,” Teye stressed. I stopped in at the workshop and got a chance to speak with Wilbrink; Ashley Townsend, musician and International Marketing Director; Kelli Wilson, “Finish Lady” and shop manager; and Seth Williams, assembler, apprentice finisher, and musician. Wilbrink shared his stories of the deliveries he’s made where the guitar’s recipients have literally been speechless as they opened the cases, peeked inside, and shut them again and just stood there in awe for a few minutes. We also talked about art galleries where the guitars have been displayed, people who own them solely to display on their walls, Teye’s proprietary “mojo knob,” and why people love these guitars so much. Later, I also got a phone interview with Micki Free, Grammy Award winner, five-time Native American Music Award winner, and ambassador for Teye guitars. To start my workshop visit, the team had to pull me away from the abalone inlaid guitar that I couldn’t take my eyes off of. Once they pulled me away, we went on to the next room where I chatted up the team. Seth Williams told me all about the amazing sound, and then plugged one of the guitars into Teye’s original hand-built amp. Again, I am certainly more of a music appreciator than music maker, but the quality was immediately evident. These finely crafted instruments, or rather, works of visual and audio art, are only produced at a rate of about one hundred per year, allowing for each one to be hand crafted, equipped, inlaid, engraved, and finished by the expert team. So why do they produce only around one hundred per year? As International Marketing Director Ashley Townsend put it, “It’s a work of art. Nobody’s rushing art.” These guitars have been displayed in galleries around the world, including Amsterdam and Europe, and have also been part of an exhibit at the Rymer Gallery in Nashville. Visually, the guitars are a blend of wood, metal, and stone. Every piece of material, including turquoise, abalone, and mother of pearl, are hand-cut and sanded before they are inlaid piece by piece onto the body. The

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YazooBrew.com


mosaic patterns are done mostly by Sammy Simpson, who wasn’t present the day of my interview. All of the engraved metal plates are made of aluminum to ensure a lightweight feel, and are hand-engraved by Teye and one of his assistants in Spain, also a musician.The wood used is mostly mahogany and Korina, with some maple used on the necks and Spanish cedar used on the Gypsy Queens. The wood used is all lightweight, keeping in mind the functionality of the instrument as well as the beauty, as Teye’s number one concern as a musician making instruments for musicians is their functionality. The wood is finished with oil to help it breathe, which also adds to the purity of the sound, since it doesn’t clog the wood’s pores. Kelli Wilson, the shop manager and “Finishing Lady,” as she calls herself, hand-paints all of the wood to make the exotic colors and patterns that appear in a process she calls “enhancement of the grain.” The finish she paints is so illustrious that she’s even fooled many guitarists and their techs into thinking the guitars were made of very exotic woods rather than the mahogany and maple that is often used. Recalling the story, Kelli told me, “When Rich Robinson (Black Crowes’ guitar tech) came to pick up his guitars in Austin, Teye brought him to the finish room where I was painting a similar guitar. The tech told me that he, as well as the other guitar techs and musicians that worked with the band, could have sworn that that Rich’s other Teye guitar was made of exotic woods all because of my finish. Teye said to me, ‘Kelly, you’ve done well if you’ve gotten that many guys to look at the back of a guitar, and they were wrong.’” As for the designs, every guitar is completely different. Most of them have slight visual flamenco influences, as Teye modeled many of them after his walks around Sevilla. Many are custom ordered, however, so it’s definitely possible for a musician to get the perfect mix of what they are looking for both visually as well as audibly—which leads me to their sound. Seth Williams, assembler, apprentice finisher, and also a musician, told me all about what it’s like to have one on the road. He spoke highly of the company’s proprietary “mojo knob,” which allows the guitarist to switch between sounding like a Les Paul, to a Humbucker, to a Stratocaster. According to the cheat sheet you can get on their mojo knob, you can choose sounds like “Big LP,” “Telle Twang,” “Subdued Rhythm,” “LP Rhythm,” and “Super Funk 1 and 2.” There’s also “B-B-Blues” and “Fuzzy Face,” if you’d like to try those on for size. “When I play big shows, I don’t feel the need to carry multiple guitars with me to change sounds,” Williams shared. “This one does everything. It’s comfortable, lightweight, easy to travel and go through TSA with, and I get more compliments on my sound with this guitar than with any other,” he continued. Teye ambassador Micki Free told me that he has over one hundred guitars, including one that Billy Gibbons from ZZ Top gave him when they were recording in the Bahamas, which is very special to him. That being said, the Native American blues/rock musician noted about his Teye’s look and sound, “It’s everything I dig. From my history as Native American to my love for 70’s rock—and then you play it and it sounds like God. When I want the sound I want I can go to that guitar and it gives me exactly what I need. It’s perfect for my sound. It can go from bitey and gritty to smooth so easily,” he gushed. And the look? “A guitar has to look sexy to me before I’ll play it,” he said. "It looks great in pictures and videos, and the craftsmanship is second to none,” he continued. As a Native American of Comanche and Cherokee descent, turquoise plays a big part in Free’s life, and it is worn as a symbol of prolonged life in

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the culture. “When Ashley (Townsend) sent me a picture of the Apache, she said, ‘We have the Micki Free guitar. It looks just like you look,’” he said. Free has taken the guitar recently to the Canadian Blues Awards and it will also be featured in his upcoming video for “Wounded Knee.” At one of the last shows he played, his guitar tech set up six of his guitars, but he played only his Teye for the entire show. The guitar tech was puzzled, but Free stated that it’s just that versatile. “I’ve played a lot of guitars, and this is probably one of the most superb instruments I’ve ever touched or played. It’s really well made,” he explained. It must be easy to be a brand ambassador when you love the product that much, and he really sings its praises. “I want to take this guitar to Carlos Santana, I think he will love it. I wish I could give it to Prince. Prince would have loved it,” Free mused. Teye Guitars are definitely creating a buzz, as more players than Free are singing their praises. Players like Rich Robinson from the Black Crowes, Johnny Depp, Andy Anderson (Fuel), and Keith Urban are jumping on board as proud owners of these works of musical and visual art, and they’re creating quite a buzz on the road in between stages as well. “When I was going through TSA on my way back from Canada, all of the TSA agents swarmed the guitar and were commenting on how beautiful it was. They were holding up the line!” Free added. The perfect match of musical and visual art, it turns out that an instrument made by a lover of the beautiful Spanish City of Sevilla, who was looking for ways to “solve a problem” as a musician, give something beautiful to people, and provide jobs to American craftsmen and musicians was a match made in heaven for all involved.

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goal though, keeping them affordable to the everyday customer was also something they wanted to keep in mind throughout the entire process. For the industry of pipe-making it was somewhat of a rebirth. There just weren’t any pipe factories left in the U.S., especially any that dealt with large-scale, high-end manufacturing. So, they set out putting together a team of some of the most skilled carvers from throughout the country. These were artists and skilled hand-carvers, whose own work stood out among the rest in their field. While painstakingly designing a catalog of high end pipes (which retail for around one-hundred and fifty dollars), they hand carve each and every one so that the finish and detail is second to none. Each pipe that comes from BriarWorks can last for decades, and many pipe users even pass these down throughout the generations.While they admit that people are sometimes surprised at the cost of a hand-carved pipe, once you consider what you are buying, you realize that you’ve likely just purchased the last one you’ll ever need in your lifetime. BriarWorks has recently expanded their product line, and is now offering their clients new products from around the world. With that growth in mind, they also recently moved to Columbia, Tennessee. The new home of BriarWorks was built during the Industrial Revolution and is located right in the heart of Colombia’s Historic District.

BRIARWORKS

NEW LIFE FOR THE ART OF HAND-CRAFTED PIPE MAKING BY: LUCAS RYAN CHAMBERS

T

here are some things in life that remain timeless classics—good music, fine wine, movies that touch the soul, and now thanks to a team of skilled craftsmen in Columbia,Tennessee, the art of hand crafted pipe-making is climbing to the top of that list. BriarWorks is the brainchild of Pete Provost, who throughout the company’s development has full-heartedly embraced his passion and vision for the future of the industry. Pete, who originally came from Bakersfield, California, brought his vast knowledge and experience in designing handmade pipes along with him and has been making waves ever since. He and his talented team at BriarWorks created a path for what they saw as the future of the industry, and with that, have been influencing the public’s perception of what has long been seen as somewhat of a lost art. Knowing what they wanted for the future of the pipe-making industry wasn’t enough for the BriarWorks team though. They also saw a desire in the market from everyone from aficionados to novices who were looking to get into the fine art of hand-made pipes, so they took their ideas and created a new benchmark for the industry here in Tennessee. That tenacity ultimately led them to building a full production pipe factory in Nashville, where since 2013 they have created some of the finest quality pipes that have ever been made in serial production. Providing customers with a high-end experience wasn’t their only

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The new space also brought with it an outlet for the team to offer an even more unique experience to their customers. They now have a walk-in humidor for their ample cigar selection where you can find selections from over eight brands, everything from Fuente cigars to cigars from Nashville-based company, Crowned Heads. The new space is also the perfect place for you to sample all of their in-house pipe tobacco. They have a special BriarWorks blend that has become a local sensation and even comes in a mason jar. However, if you’re looking for something a bit more exotic, or maybe even something with a specific profile, they offer an array of hard-to-find tobaccos from around the world, like Esoterica and Gawith, which are rare tobaccos imported from Great Britain. One of the most interesting things about the new building is the location. It sits adjacent to Asgard Brewing, who have been wonderfully welcoming neighbors and even offer a few craft beers on tap inside of BriarWorks. The atmosphere they’ve created in their new building is nothing short of welcoming. Provost, who is the president of BriarWorks says, “We wanted to bring a welcoming feeling to our patrons. Cigar lounges have long been seen as intimidating to new customers, and our hope is that even though we kept the original feel of the building, that we’ve found a way to make it more inviting to everyone. We understand that there’s a learning curve with pipe tobacco, and that in itself can be somewhat intimidating, but our goal is to help educate people on the process and along the way break down some of those walls. Our goal is to pair our customers with a product that’s a perfect fit for them, all while making it an enjoyable experience.” Each and every day the team at BriarWorks creates with the future in mind, whether it’s in the durability of the products, bringing new products from around the world for their clients, or finding new ways to make a visit to BriarWorks an even more memorable experience. Currently they are open seven days a week, and with everything from craft beer and darts to their world-renowned pipes, every visit is sure to be an unforgettable experience.You can also find a full selection of products on their website at: BriarWorksUSA.com.

BE E R N OT E S

FIVE BEERS FOR SPRING TIME IN THE SOUTH BY: KIM STANLEY Whether you live in the South or are just visiting, you will likely experience mild winters and hot summers. When deciding which beers to drink in these seasons, the stereotype points to drinking darker beers in winter and lighter beers in summer. But what about the other two seasons? In spring, people typically like to open their light style beers in order to prep for the warmer weather. As for me, I tend to drink what my local brewery or retail store choose to linger before me, and that can range from light to dark and anything in between. This list is a mix for those of you who are like me and want to drink both light and dark beers this spring season. In full disclosure, I like to choose and rate my beer by the bottle or can art as well as by the beer style, the alcohol by volume (ABV), and the ingredients that were used in each particular beer. I love talking about the look and taste of both a beer vessel and its contents, so beer flavor, ingredients, and best time of the day to drink this beer are essential in my recommendations. Of course, this is all based on my opinion, so give these beers a try yourself this spring and be sure to pair them with complimentary foods and daily activities.

TERRAPIN BREWING CO. Beyond the Galaxy IPA BREWERY LOCATION: Athens, Georgia BEER STYLE: Single Hopped IPA FOOD PAIRINGS: Cheddar & Colby Cheese,

Thai Green Curry with Chicken, and Cosmic Brownies. (Found on Terrapin’s Website)

6.3% ABV 69 IBU BEER RELEASE: Spring/Seasonal RATING: 4/5 This beer happens to be the only limited release beer on my list. The single hopped IPA spring release from Terrapin Brewing Co. brings a great hoppy richness and plenty of Galaxy hops. I’m not going to lie; I love the galaxy artwork on their cans. That was one of the first things I noticed when I picked up this beer. The “hops planet” in the center and galaxy background around it just fits with the beer’s style. Drink it on a nice sunny day out with family and friends. It’s great choice for beginning IPA drinkers.

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GOODWOOD BREWING COMPANY Walnut Brown Ale BREWERY LOCATION: Louisville, Kentucky BEER STYLE: Brown Ale FOOD PAIRING: Gouda Cheese, Roast Pork, Grilled

Salmon, and Maple-Walnut Cake. 6.0% ABV 31 IBU BEER RELEASE: All Year RATING: 4.75/5

My first time drinking this beer was at Drake’s, a restaurant out of Chattanooga, Tennessee. They were displaying this beer as their “Beer of the Month” and to delight my eyes, also served it in an awesome barrel shaped glass. This brown ale brings a sweet richness to the oak-aged beer with chocolate and caramel malts that linger. In my opinion, the best way to enjoy this beer would be on a day you just need to sit back and relax. A lot of rain has fallen in the South during the recent winter months, providing plenty of perfect days to sit back and drink this brown ale while enjoying those rainy blues. This is a great introductory beer for those who are just beginning to explore darker beers, and the dark color and sweetness should be inviting enough to entice anyone to give it a try.

VICTORY BREWING Sour Monkey BREWERY LOCATION: Downingtown, Pennsylvania BEER STYLE: Sour Brett Tripel/American Wild Ale FOOD PAIRING: Goat Cheese, Mussels/Other Sea-

food, Egg Dishes, and Fresh Berries and Fruit. 9.5% ABV 10 IBU BEER RELEASE: All Year RATING: 4.5/5 American Wild Ales are the hidden treasure of craft beer in the United States, especially in the Southeast. Maybe I am still new to the craft beer scene, but when I do find a beer in this style, I usually fall in love instantly. This style brings flavor notes that bring your taste buds to a whole new level. This A.W.A. from Victory Brewing is another enhanced version from their Golden Monkey series. It features a lemony sour taste that isn’t dry, but boasts a grain finish that makes you want to have another. This beer doesn’t “monkey around” with the taste of a low ABV, but packs a punch with a high ABV. If you love different styles of sour beers, you’ll want to give it a try. I can never get enough of this beer when I see it on draft or in a bottle. The artwork is psychedelic, and the taste keeps you coming back for more. Find this beer and make it a conversation starter. People will enjoy talking about the unique taste once they have tried it.

SWORDFISH

WITH SUMMER SUCCOTASH BY BRUCE MOFFETT

This is my go-to dish in the summertime, when I gather all that’s good about the season from the local farmers’ market. I use swordfish because it’s always been my favorite, but this recipe works well with other white, meaty fish, including wahoo and cobia. Serves 4

ATWATER BREWERY Java Vanilla Porter

FINCH BEER CO. Skull Hammer

BREWERY LOCATION: Detroit, Michigan BEER STYLE: English Porter FOOD PAIRING: Gruyere Cheese, Smoked Foods Such

BREWERY LOCATION: Chicago, Illinois BEER STYLE: Imperial IPA FOOD PAIRING: Sharp and Rich American Artisanal

as Barbecue, Sausage, Rich Stews and Chili, and Chocolate-Peanut Butter Cookies.

Blue Cheese, Smoked Beef Brisket, Grilled Lamb, and Carrot Cake or Crème Brulée.

5% ABV 13 IBU BEER RELEASE: All Year RATING: 5/5

8% ABV 99 IBU BEER RELEASE: All Year RATING: 4.5/5

This is one of the first sweet porters I can ever remember drinking when I first got into craft beer. This English porter is sweet vanilla coffee goodness straight from the craft beer gods. It’s just the right amount of coffee paired with the richness of the vanilla flavor. This porter brings a traditional English porter with modern ales behind it, featuring burnt flavors, mellow malts, and a dark brown color. The newest artwork behind the beer features a woman drinking coffee by the Detroit River with the downtown skyline in the background. It represents the history of the city the brewery calls home and shares it with beer drinkers across the United States. This is the best beer for coffee lovers and those who need a nice cold porter after a long work day.

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My obsession with skulls attracted me to the can artwork on this beer. I noticed a 4-pack of these 16 oz cans on the shelf, and purchased them instantly. There was no disappointment in taste once I tried the Skull Hammer. If you are an IPA lover and always looking for your next favorite, this is a must try. This beer from Finch Beer Co. brings the extreme in IPA. An Imperial IPA with a sweet flavor and top-notch bitterness, it’s a New England style IPA with Citra, Mosaic, & Simcoe hops. Citra hops are a personal favorite of mine, and the trio brings a great richness of hops and a nice smooth taste. Advanced IPA drinkers need to add this to their “must drink” list. It’s not a beer to keep to yourself, but to share with others— perfect for a weekend party.

FOR THE SUCCOTASH

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 4 ears of corn, kernels cut from cob 1 small yellow onion, diced 3 cups fresh (or frozen) lima beans 1/2 cup cherry tomatoes, quartered 1/2 cup white wine 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

1/2 cup clam juice 1 cup heavy cream 2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more for seasoning 1/2 teaspoon ground white pepper 1/4 cup Basil Pesto, more as desired Black pepper

TO MAKE THE SWORDFISH

TO MAKE THE SUCCOTASH

Preheat the oven to 400°. Heat the olive oil in a large, ovenproof pan over medium-high heat. Season the swordfish with salt and pepper on both sides and add the steaks to the pan. Sear them until a golden crust develops on the bottom, about 3–4 minutes. Flip the steaks, then finish them in the oven, about 10 minutes more. When ready, the fish should be just barely cooked through. Meanwhile, cook the succotash.

Get a pan screaming hot, then add the olive oil. Add the corn and toss the kernels for 2 minutes, until they have a little color. Add the onion and cook for 1 minute, then add the lima beans and cook for 1 minute more, continually tossing. Add the tomatoes, cook for 1 minute, then add the wine, lemon juice, and clam juice.

then add the cream, salt, and pepper, and simmer for 4 minutes. The mixture will reduce and thicken slightly. Once it reduces, turn off the heat and stir in the pesto. Add more pesto, if desired.

FOR THE SWORDFISH

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 4 (1-inch-thick) swordfish steaks Kosher salt and black pepper

Let the wine cook off, about 3–5 minutes,

TO ASSEMBLE

For each serving, spoon some succotash on a plate or into a wide, shallow bowl. Top with a swordfish steak and garnish with extra basil.

From Bruce Moffett Cooks: A New England Chef In A New South Kitchen. Text and photographs copyright © 2019 by Bruce Moffett. Used by permission of the University of North Carolina Press. www.uncpress.org

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A BREWPUB DANCES IN KNOXVILLE By: Rob Shomaker, Certified Cicerone®

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S. Broadway in Knoxville, Tennessee, has seen its fair share of businesses roll through its doors. A garage/gas station was the original tenant, and at the corner of West Jackson and Broadway, it’s sure to have gotten plenty of attention. After the garage doors closed, a rental car company passed through, as did a beer bar with a penchant for cans. Now, locals know this location as the home of Balter Beerworks. “It was a bastard child, an odd property. It looked rough,” shares Will Rutemeyer, Brewer at Balter Beerworks. “We knew we could make it a cool environment. It’s a great location. If it worked for a bar focused on canned beers, we knew it would work for us.” Balter is a verb that means “to dance artlessly, without particular grace or skill but with enjoyment.” While the roots of the garage and gas station are evident in both tone and structure, a sense of warmth is brought out in the colors and textures of the building. Rutemeyer is a Chattanooga native and a homebrewer who, admittedly, was brewing much earlier than he should have been. Regardless, he knew early on that he wanted to brew beer for a living. While he had his sights set on returning home to begin this adventure, a mutual friend introduced him to Blaine Wedekind who, with a background in the beer industry and the partnership of his father, was looking to begin a brewery in Knoxville. He needed a partner who could brew, and Rutemeyer was interested. Early on, a connection was made with Square One Consulting, whose CEO was an old law school friend of Wedekind’s father. The roots of Square One began with Big River Brewery, Rock Bottom, and Gordon Biersch—highly successful brewpubs across the country. So what was their suggestion? A brewpub. That guidance could not have been more spot on. They began with a seven-barrel brewhouse with five seven-barrel fermenters, which were later joined by a 15-barrel fermenter. Without

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going up or down, there was no more room. Rutemeyer brewed for one month prior to the doors opening. Within a month and a half, the eight beers that first greeted visitors were down to one tap. “Several times when we began we had more guest beers than we had of our beers,” says Rutemeyer. “Between the demand and my learning the system, we couldn’t keep up. The fact was that we couldn’t turn the beer any faster.” Zwickelbier got its name from the zwickelhahn; which is an apparatus used for drawing unfiltered beer out of a fermenter. We took a batch of our award winning Nashville Lager Helles style beer and kegged it, unfiltered, straight out of the fermentation tank. We dubbed this beer NashZwickel. It is cloudy, smooth and refreshing. NashZwickel won a bronze medal at the 2018 Great American Beer Festival in the “Kellerbier or Zwickelbier” category.

In February, Balter Beerworks celebrated three years of great food, good times and wonderful beer. In their first year they brewed 690 barrels of beer,and in 2018 they closed with a total of 800 barrels, which is the maximum that can currently be produced onsite. The beers include local favorites such as Good Neighbor—a very inviting, crisp and refreshing Kolsch; as well as Bear Blend—a coffee oatmeal porter with coffee beans from local roaster Three Bears Coffee that is sweet, roasty, and warm. “Refine, refine, refine,” Retemeyer reflects. “How can we make the experience better here?” From the addition of the beer garden, to the continual refinement of the menu, to the consistency of the beer and the addition of new beers, Rutemeyer and Wedekind are constantly addressing these issues with their team—answering questions as they expose them to the brewing process. Though the word “balter” does relate to dancing without particular grace or skill, there is also a level of discipline here that creates a high quality, fun, memorable experience with every pour, every plate, and every interaction. A few bikes are parked on the rack. A curly headed toddler meanders close to her parents in play. Peace and laughter waft through the air, past the door and into the main dining room where the lights are a warm hue and the scents of the kitchen tantalize. Perhaps we were never meant to balter down the aisles, in the beer garden or the parking lot. Instead it is evident that there are those whose hearts balter with one another in this place.

NashZwickel G O L D E N U N F I LT E R E D L A G E R

NEW SEASONAL

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NashvilleBrewing

NashvilleBrew

In Stores and on Draft Everywhere all Spring!

How lucky we are.

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Strange Brewfellows

TEXT BY JULIE HOLT PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL GOMEZ

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n a rainy late-October day, I hurried down the streets of 12 South with a new friend. We were both surprised by a sudden downpour, but we quickly found refuge in the warm safety of Mill Creek’s inviting 12 South Taproom. It was no accident that Theresa Menefee and I entered this particular establishment. Mill Creek President and CEO Chris Going awaited us there, with beer samples in hand. If ever there was a demonstration of neighborly southern hospitality, this was it—a welcome in from the rain, a seat at the table, and lively conversation, made even better by the common thread that brought us together—beer. As business partners, Going and Menefee might seem an odd pair. Theresa is put-together, blonde and petite with a warm smile. If she looks familiar, it’s because she’s a stalwart in Nashville society, a regular attender of high-profile events and supporter of many charitable organizations. Chris, the seemingly rare non-bearded brewer, is casual, and has a commanding presence in the quiet taproom before opening time. His affable demeanor, alongside Theresa’s warm welcome, makes the meeting feel like a homecoming with old friends. Theresa Menefee at Mill Creek Taproom on 12 South in Brochu Walker grey and white layered pullover (Oak Hall); Nan Fusco asymmetric geode/diamond earrings, Nan Fusco chain link necklace, Nan Fusco pave’ ID fringe bracelet and Nan Fusco fairy cross stone ring (Mednikow)

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The story of Chris and Mill Creek is a tale as old as time: boy meets beer, boy makes beer in garage, raises money, and starts a brewery. This tale is simple, but not easy. It didn’t take Chris long to perfect the starting beer lineup, but any successful craft brewer will tell you that there’s a lot more to running a brewery than just making great beer. There’s branding and strategy, funding and billing, codes and regulations, daily operation, and staffing. But if you do all of that well, the business of beer is the wizard behind the curtain. While Chris and his team at Mill Creek were refining those inner workings and staying true to their mission, “Less fuss, more beer”, the stars were beginning to align for an ordained opportunity for Going and Mill Creek. Enter Menefee, who admits she had enjoyed a beer or two, but didn’t know a lot about making it. Because of her position as Secretary of the Board at Belle Meade Plantation, Theresa already had a hand in the wine and bourbon businesses. Adding beer would complete the trifecta. On her first visit to Mill Creek’s Nolensville brewery and taproom, she was pleased to find a “clean, organized space. It was pristine, and I was blown away,” she says. Her great rapport with Going and knowing that the brewery was in a growth stage only sweetened the pot for Theresa. Soon after, Theresa joined the board, and that fortuitous opportunity presented itself in the form of restaurant space opening up in 12 South. It was late May when neighborhood hangout and sandwich shop Sloco and The Meet Room publicly announced its doors were closing. Behind the scenes, the wheels were already turning for Chris, Theresa, and the Mill Creek board and staff. Major renovation began, and the team got to work—building tables, pouring the concrete bar top, adding shiplap to walls—everything in the taproom was a labor of love for Chris and his crew. They opened the taproom just over a month after taking ownership of the new space.

It was no accident that Mill Creek originally found its home in Nolensville, a quiet bedroom community southeast of Nashville. In the two and a half years it has been open, the brewery has become a gathering place not just for beer drinkers, but for the community— including children. “I have three kids, so being kid-friendly was a non-negotiable for me,” Chris says. “I wasn’t going to open a brewery that I couldn’t bring my kids to.” This focus only enhances Mill Creek’s vision of being accessible and part of the community. Everything from the brewery to the tap room to the beer and packaging has to be inviting, and not just for craft beer lovers. The vision was no different for the new 12 South taproom. “We want to be the best taproom,” says Theresa. “Anybody can go out and get a Budweiser. It takes effort to come here to this little taproom. We want it to be worth the effort.” Her focus on making everything—the space, the food, the beer—approachable and high quality has resulted in a welcoming and impressive experience in the new taproom. Family-style seating in a thoughtfully designed space with carefully curated beer and food offerings mean that anyone can walk in and feel comfortable. And while the 12 South and Nolensville areas are two very different communities, Mill Creek has found the balance of modern, but comfortable style. While Chris, Theresa and the rest of the Mill Creek team are busy behind the scenes, managing production, branding and business management, those of us on the other side see an easy charm and an approachable place to find common ground over great beer and food in a warm, welcoming space.

CAN’T MISS TAPROOM PAIRINGS If you’re expecting microwaved bar food from a tap room, check your expectations at the door. Mill Creek’s 12 South Taproom offers elevated bar food, and the best burger in Nashville. Try these pairings for the full experience.

Roasted Caulifower with Goalden Ale Perfectly roasted and served with one of two delicious sauces, the cauliflower pairs well with the crisp, clean flavor of the Goalden Ale. Smoked Wings and Landmark Beer and wings are an age-old combination, and these smoked wings and traditional lager deliver a classic pairing that will have you feeling right at home.

The Smashville Burger with Lil’Darlin Voted best burger by the Nashville Scene, this burger, topped with pickles, American cheese, barrel sauce and steamed onions goes down smooth with the bright citrus of Lil’Darlin. The Slaw Dog with Transcendent Served on a New England roll and topped with caraway slaw and mustard, an IPA brings plenty of hops and flavor to stand up to this big dog. S O C R A F T B E E R M AG.C O M

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CABIN DESIGN 101 BY: DALE MULFINGER

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PREMIER ISSUE

THE WHERE: Start by determining the type of place you might want to be in and the reason you would want to be there. For example, skiers might consider a mountain slope and a cabin nestled under the pines. Trout fishermen might consider a location where a gurgling stream awakens them and the path along its shores is easily accessible. For a writer, the cabin may be in their backyard only a few yards from home, but miles away in their imagination. In each of these unique places, there will likely be the demand for a special cabin design informed by things like: topography, weather, sunlight, view, and local building methods. For example, greater snowfall necessitates steeper roof slopes, the view to the trout stream suggests horizontal and panoramic windows, and an introspective author might seek an inglenook. Though the designs may seem very different, it’s entirely possible that all of them might agree on the desire for the smell and crackle of a wood burning fireplace.

THE WHO: The size of the cabin you will need depends on who you are taking with you, if anyone. A few cabins are indeed specifically created for a solo experience, but most take family and friends into account as well. How many might gather around the dining table or bed down for the night is limited only by budgets— as cabins can get quite expansive. It’s also important to note that not all cabin guests need private sleeping rooms or luxurious bathrooms— for many, privacy gives way to social bonding and intimacy when taking in the full experience of a cabin. A sauna is social bathing experience, and a loft can sleep an entire Boy Scout troop.

THE WHAT: The next things to consider are the layout and amenities. A cabin with two bedrooms, a sleeping loft, and two modest baths, along with kitchen, dining, and living space is a pretty versatile arrangement. Built to a size of 1200-1800 sq ft, it is also quite attainable. Add a mudroom/entry, a utility area for the washer/ dryer, well equipment, heating system, and a few storage closets, and the only item remaining is the screen porch! Of course additional buildings might be considered, such as a bunkhouse, a storage shed for water toys or tools, and an open woodshed. If the site has access to water, a dock will also be necessary.

In the summer months, it is even easier to accommodate larger groups of guests when tents and porches also become sleeping zones. Even further extended uses of the cabin’s amenities during summer include things like cooking hot dogs and s’mores around the fire pit, and dishwashing at a makeshift counter of saw horses and 2 x10’s.

THE DETAIL: No cabin is complete without a few character details that make the memories extra special. For example, tree columns can actually hold up a second floor, and stair or loft railings can include cutouts of local wildlife, vegetation, or even star constellations. A weather vane can help the sailor or fisherman navigate, and a local map will be invaluable to hikers,

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RECENT DESIGN TRENDS 1. ALTHOUGH RUSTIC CABINS REMAIN THE NORM, MODERN STYLED CABINS ARE INCREASING IN DEMAND. 2. CABIN DESIGNS SEEK TO ENHANCE THE RETREAT EXPERIENCE. 3. CABINS ARE BEING VIEWED AS FUTURE RETIREMENT HOMES. 4. LOW MAINTENANCE CABINS ARE PREFERRED WHICH IMPACTS EXTERIOR MATERIALS AND UTILITY SYSTEMS.

boaters and bird watchers. Bookshelves are necessary for things like classic novels, mushroom hunting guidebooks, and board games. A blackboard positioned near the entry can score messages from neighbors and tax assessors, and another near the kitchen can inform the next grocery run. Cabins are casual and many items that may be stored away at home are best made visible for infrequent guests. Open shelves in a kitchen can reveal cooking pans and dishware, and a pantry really only necessitates one door to hide food items and beverages. Bedrooms are better served by hooks on a wall and a bench for a suitcase, rather than a closet. Open shelves in the entry should have a place for the cooler needed to

transport food to and from the cabin, and a pair of snow shoes can decorate a wall before being needed to track the fox. THE DESIGN: Want to design your own cabin? To ensure great cabin design what you need most is imagination, and any available pencil and paper will do. Start with an image of what you will want it to look like and then draw the plan, because if you lock onto a plan first you’re almost assured of making it ugly, or at best, common place. Have your child or inner-child grab some crayons to help you out—they know how to make things pretty. To help you imagine your roof design, cut up a cereal box, and assemble with tape to make a model. And to unlock your creative spirit, do all above with the help of some great craft beer!

5. KITCHENS ARE THE HEART OF THE CABIN. 6. SLEEPING NICHES EXTEND CABIN LIVING WITHOUT ADDING BEDROOMS.

Architect and self described Cabinologist, Dale Mulfinger, has written six books on the cabin life to fuel your inspiration. They can be found at your favorite local book seller or online at amazon.com

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GUILD-ING THE BARLEY Pilsner beer originated in the town of Plzen (Pilsen) in 1842. By the end of the 19th century, the popularity of Czech pilsner beer spread throughout Europe and to the U.S. In 1897, pilsner was the beer of choice at the TN Centennial Exposition, celebrating the state’s 100th anniversary. 1897 Pilsner is a traditional Czech pilsner brewed in the traditional Bohemian fashion using pilsner malt and Saaz hops. ABV: 5% IBU: 32

1897 PILSNER

This 1897 painting of Nashville’s Parthenon was used to advertise the TN Centennial Exposition (now Centennial Park)

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NashvilleBrewing

NashvilleBrew

Now Available In Your Neighborhood Kroger!

THE FLORIDA BREWER’S GUILD

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BY LIESEL SCHMIDT

ver the past twenty years or so, craft beer has become a decided trend in the adult beverage world. The craft beer community has experienced explosive growth, graduating from a handful of independent, small-batch breweries and craft brewers scattered across the country to become a full-blown industry. The industry progressively worked its way from being localized in more progressive, forward-thinking areas that embraced the idea of these offbeat artisans to holding their own in a market once dominated by the big boys. Rather than cowering in the shadows of those well-known, firmly established labels as they pumped out countless gallons of their factory-created suds, the craft brewers rose to the challenge and thought outside the box, creating new blends, new flavors, and appealing to the market by offering something that the major players couldn’t— a hand-crafted product made with locally-sourced ingredients, created by ordinary people, bottled with a story, and labeled with a dream. Much like the ingredients themselves, this tenacity and motivation creates a powerful combination that appeals to a buyer. Craft brewers have run the gamut—offering variations for seasonal blends or simply creating their own version of the classics. What first draws the drinkers is the label— the logo, the city, the name. It’s a marketing ploy that works, and has worked well for craft brewers of all kinds. Naturally, what’s inside that

can or bottle is a crucial player in success or failure as well, as no one is going to pony up and pay for the trendy craft brew in their hand unless it’s got great taste. Smooth flavor, the perfect amount of fizz, and a great finish—it’s a complicated dance of chemistry and ingredients that often takes years to perfect as batch after batch is brewed, tasted, tested, and tweaked to achieve absolute perfection. But how does one even begin to break into the game? It can be a tricky thing, fraught with complications that can derail those without proper plans and enough knowledge to navigate the various legalities that come not only with starting a business, but one centered around alcohol as well. Even for the most determined of souls, it can seem like an uphill battle—which is why it’s so important to have a team of people in your corner who can help demystify all the various steps and offer guidance to help you become more successful. Unfortunately, that network of people doesn’t always exist, therefore the need to lay the groundwork calls to those who march ahead and start clearing the way for others. Clearing that path for aspiring craft brew business owners was precisely the objective of the collective of Tampa-based brewers who founded the Florida Brewers Guild in 1996. Their desire, as they say in their mission statement, is to, “…educate the public about the brewing industry in Florida; promote networking and educational opportunities between

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geeky side– but rather than breaking into the craft beer industry by setting up his own brewery, he broke out the computer and began writing about it. He started by blogging about the topic on his own website and eventually became more active on various other websites, as well as writing features for local and national print magazines that gained him deeper entrée into the beer world. After becoming extremely active in the Tampa Bay area craft beer scene, Nordquist co-founded Tampa Bay Beer Week in 2012 and eventually became the chair of the board of directors before being hired as Executive Director for the Florida Brewers Guild in 2017. Now representing over 200 breweries in the state of Florida, he also works alongside the FBG’s lobbyist and legal counsel, advocating for them at the state level as well as around the country.

brewers, consumers, suppliers, and government regulatory agencies; and continually promote free market access of the Florida brewing industry to the public.” And while it may sound like such a sober undertaking, the seriousness of it all never overshadows the fact that it is, at the heart— and hops—of it all, a creative collective. These are individuals with a love for an honest beverage—a drink that has long held a place in world culture as a way to end the day, to celebrate victories and mourn losses, and to socialize and connect. And while these craft brewers forge their way ahead, having networks in place helps them make greater inroads on local, state, and national levels. “Our work supports and protects the small, independent breweries in the state of Florida and helps to give them a voice in their communities and in the capitols, both state and federal. The Guild lobbies, advises, educates, and supports the craft beer industry in Florida, and we have direct communication with legislators, local governments, consumers, and communities about the positive impact of the craft brewing industry. An important part of our message is the economic and social impact these businesses have for communities and the ways in which breweries are an integral part of affecting those changes,” explains Florida Brewers Guild Executive Director Sean Nordquist. The path is not one without resistance—as it can be extremely difficult to foresee what may arise and where. In so many ways, it’s still a new frontier; and with that new frontier come situational challenges that may not exist in other communities, cities, or states. This is where the work of the Florida Brewers Guild proves so invaluable. “With more breweries than ever and cities, counties, and communities trying to keep up with everything, having a body of knowledge and experience to turn to is critical. Every brewery is different, and so is every community. Each has their own quirks to address and different things like permitting and zoning to contend with, and it can be tough to navigate for all parties involved. A lot of cities are trying to figure out how to deal with having breweries, and they have never had any experience with them before, so we are there to help and advise both sides,” Nordquist continues. With his degrees in Environmental Science and Conservation Biology, the scientific aspects of beer making may likely appeal to Nordquist’s

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Support is important for the brewers as well as for the 100-plus non-brewery members whose names march down the list on the membership roster for Florida Brewers Guild. Depending on your level of membership, they have access to legal counsel, invitations to meetings, voting privileges, discounted tickets to various events and festivals, access to member directories, and—of course—educational resources that help them navigate things like going from the planning stages to the production stages. “For a brewery, being a member of the Guild shows support for the industry as a whole while also providing access to all of the collective knowledge and experience of all of the other members. It’s also the only way to participate in our festivals and special events. For the other members, Guild memberships not only show support for the industry, but they also give these businesses access to the brewery members for their own marketing outreach as well,” Nordquist contends. Clearly, it’s a win-win as the Florida Brewers Guild continues on its path to paving the way for the craft beer breweries and independent brewers making their mark on the beer scene, but it’s those of us who get to experience the fruits of their labor that might be said to have won the most. We get to let the foam tickle our lips and relish the smooth finish of the hops and the barley. But it’s people like these individuals, this collective of people, who make it possible for the beer industry to have become what it is today: true art with heart, soul, and a story—just in liquid form.

RESILIENCE

BREWING FOR A CAUSE BY ART WHITAKER The Camp Fire in California last fall was one of the deadliest and most destructive fires in United States history. Pictures of the fire taken from Sierra Nevada’s Chico brewery were mesmerizing and terrifying as the fire consumed the town of Paradise, took the lives of at least 82 souls, destroyed over 18,000 structures and changed the lives of many people in the area forever. Sierra Nevada opened its doors and fed many of the victims, and then put out a call for breweries around the country to brew Resilience IPA, proceeds from which will go to the victims of the fire.Well over a thousand breweries in the U.S. including many in Tennessee answered the call and brewed the Resilience IPA recipe. A group of homebrewers decided they wanted to participate as well. Members of the Mid-State Brew Crew and the Mid-State Brewsters in Murfreesboro gathered together to brew the recipe. The base grains were donated to the homebrewers by Volunteer Mission Malts and Batey Farms of Murfreesboro and VonSeitz TheoreticAles from Smithville. The caramel malts, hops and yeast were sold at cost to the homebrewers by From the Garage Homebrewing Supplies located in the area. Batey Farms in Murfreesboro has offered its event center, The Grove at Williamson Place, for a tasting event when all the homebrewers have brewed the recipe and it is ready to serve. Patrons of the event, by offering a donation to the Camp Fire Fund, will be able to sample the homebrew and other beer and there will be food trucks and entertainment. A few of the homebrewers are changing up the recipe to offer a little variety, including one homebrewer who is brewing a “brut” version. They hope to be able to serve the Sierra Nevada version as well as one of the local brewery collaborations and will have some other beer at the event for variety. Please keep your eye on the Tennessee Craft Beer Magazine Facebook page for more information regarding the date and time of the event.

SIERRA NEVADA RESILIENCE IPA INGREDIENTS For 5 gallons (18.9 L)

11 lb (4.99kg) Rahr 2-Row (90%) 1.25 lb (0.57 kg) Crisp Crystal 60L (10%) 1.0 oz (28g) Centennial hops @ 80 min (33 IBU) 1.0 oz (28 g) Cascade hops @ 15 min (8.5 IBU) 1.0 oz (28 g) Centennial hops @ 15 min (15.5 IBU) 0.5 oz (14 g) Cascade hops @ Whirlpool (2.6 IBU) 0.5 oz (14 g) Centennial hops @ Whirlpool (4.7 IBU) 0.5 oz (14 g) Cascade hops @ dry hop (0 IBU) 0.5 oz (14 g) Centennial hops @ dry hop (0 IBU) Imperial Dry Hop yeast or American ale yeast of your choice. SPECIFICATIONS Original gravity: 1.065 (16 P) Final gravity: 1.016 (3.9 P) IBU: 64 SRM: 11 DIRECTIONS Mash grains at 152�F (66.7�C) for 60 minutes. If including a mash out step, raise temperature to 168�F (75.6�C) and hold for ten minutes. Sparge with 168�F (75.6�C) water to collect 6.53 gallons (24.7 liters) of wort. Bring to a boil and add hops as indicated. At flameout, stir wort to cool slightly and add whirlpool hops. Let rest for 20 minutes before chilling the rest of the way to pitch temperature. Pitch yeast. Ferment at 60-62�F (15.6-16.7�C). Add dry hops towards the end of active fermentation, when specific gravity is around 1.020-1.024 (5.1-6.1�P). Let rest for four days or until fermentation is complete. Cold crash to drop hops out of suspension. Rack to secondary or keg. EXTRACT OPTION: Substitute 8 lb (3.63 kg) pale liquid malt extract or 7.5 lb (3.40 kg) pale dry malt extract for 2-row malt. Steep crystal malt in brew pot for 20 minutes at 167�F (75�C). After steeping, remove specialty grains and bring water to a boil. Note: when adding malt extract, it is recommended to turn off or remove heat so as not to scorch the extract on the bottom of the pot.

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THE BREWGRASS TRAIL LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY

The legendary birthplace of bourbon (aka the greatest gift to humanity) has quietly grown into a hub of incredible craft breweries. The Brewgrass Trail features fourteen (and growing) breweries in and around Lexington, each one offering up their own unique, ice-cold takes on beer. Pick up a passport and get it stamped at every brewery for the chance to win a commemorative t-shirt.

THE 10 BEST SOUTHERN FOOD & DRINK TRAILS BY MIKE WARGO There are plenty of ways to get to know a region’s culture. You can learn about it through its people or through its history; but far and wide I find the most fun way is to try its local food and drink. Throughout the Southern United States, there are a plethora of organized trails where travelers can learn all about the region and what the locals enjoy. For those unfamiliar with “trails,” they are a conglomerate of restaurants and breweries that celebrate a region’s local ingredients and culinary history. On these trails, you can ask for a “passport” at one of the participating locations so you can check off each location you’ve visited. On some trails, getting a stamp at every participating location gets you a commemorative prize. You can build an entire weeklong vacation around just one great trail. Adventure is one of the greatest gifts in life and exploring these trails is a surefire way to scratch that adventurer itch. Have fun and be safe out there. Cheers! HERE ARE TEN OF THE BEST SOUTHERN TRAILS

CAJUN BAYOU FOOD TRAIL SOUTHERN LOUISIANA

New Orleans is a legendary city and always worth a visit, and they’ve got some great food trails. But if you travel just an hour south of the Big Easy, you’ll find some of the most unique and delectable Cajun food in the South, if not the entire U.S. There’s nothing quite like authentic Cajun cuisine, and you can bet every ingredient will be fresh and local. If that’s not enough to entice you, the incredible views from these restaurants will. Many of them are situated along the Bayou Lafourche, a small river cutting through the area. Sitting back with a po’boy and a beer and watching the passing river is one of the best ways to spend an afternoon.

DOWNTOWN HUNTSVILLE CRAFT BEER TRAIL HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA

Huntsville’s local beer scene is on the rise and this trail has been laid out to help you try them all. With eleven different breweries and bottle shops, this trail makes for a great spring weekend trip. Everything is within three miles of each other, so there’s no need to even drive. Simply park your car wherever you are staying, get a Lyft or Uber to your first destination, and go through the trail. You can easily walk it and work off those beers, or take one of the downtown Blue Bikes, a bike sharing program that can be taken advantage of with the Pace app.

LOWCOUNTRY OYSTER TRAIL THE LOW COUNTRY, SOUTH CAROLINA

There are few things in life that are better than a giant serving tray loaded with oysters on the half shell. The one exception—spending an entire day trying some of the best oysters South Carolina has to offer. The Low Country is famed for its oysters, making this trail a can’t-miss-destination for any foodie.

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While you can experience this trail in the summer, it should be noted that during the summer months (May-August), oysters experience some weight loss and fresh oysters will be smaller than the fall, winter, and spring varieties. But hey, it’s South Carolina, and it’s still plenty warm in the fall and spring, so go when the oysters are plump and juicy!

THE HIGH COUNTRY BEER TRAIL THE HIGH COUNTRY, NORTH CAROLINA

A more ambitious beer drinker could knock out this North Carolina beer trail in about a day, but it’s highly advised that you don’t. Not because that’s a lot of beer for one day, but because you run the risk of missing out on what makes the High Country so unique. On this trail, adventure is the word of the day. This trail boasts some gorgeously scenic mountain and road biking as well as downhill skiing (depending on the season). All that exercise is a great way to justify drinking all those fantastic beers.

BEER CHEESE TRAIL WINCHESTER, KENTUCKY

Though the town of Winchester is only eight square miles, what it lacks in size, it more than makes up for in beer cheese. The birthplace of beer cheese, not only does the town host an annual festival celebrating the spread, but it also has an eight-restaurant trail dedicated to the local favorite. Fun fact: Queen Elizabeth II is a fan of beer cheese. She is known not only to have sampled it, but also to have brought some home after a visit to Lexington. If the Queen likes it, it must be good.

MARGARITA MILE DALLAS, TEXAS

Beer isn’t the only alcohol that boasts some great trails. Down in Dallas, TX, you can explore the official home of the frozen margarita on the Margarita Mile! With over eighteen different spots to sample margaritas, this is a multi-day trail that is not for the faint of heart or liver— but it’s definitely a group trip worth the effort. After all, who doesn’t love margaritas? Last October, Visit Dallas, the organizers of the Margarita Mile, named local chef wunderkind Julian Rodarte as the official ambassador of the Mile. Rodarte has recently been named one of the “thirty under thirty” most innovative chefs

in the U.S. by Zagat. He’s already brought his innovative sensibilities to the frozen margarita with a liquid nitrogen margarita. Who knows what he’ll mix up next?

JAX ALE TRAIL JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

If drinking beers by the beach is your ideal vacation (and why wouldn’t it be) look no further than the Jax Ale Trail. With fifteen breweries to sample and many of them by the beach, what’s not to like about this trail? Visiting just four of the breweries will get you a free beer koozie, while visiting eight will earn you a “Drink Your Trail Off on the Jax Ale Trail” t-shirt. If you visit all fifteen, you’ll win a super secret prize!

HOT TAMALE TRAIL MISSISSIPPI DELTA

You read that right—hot tamales in the Mississippi Delta. Some may be surprised to learn about the huge culinary influence that Latin Americans have had on the Delta, and there is some debate as to how the classic Latin dish took such a strong hold there. Some say it was early 20th century Mexican migrant workers, who, while working alongside African Americans in cotton fields, brought their tamales for meals. Others say U.S. soldiers brought the dish back after the Mexican-American War. Whatever legend is true, one thing can be agreed upon—hot tamales are good eats, and this trail is definitely worth the journey to the Delta. The highest concentration of tamales on the map is in Greenville, MS, so start there and work your way out. To make it even easier for you, The Southern Foodways Alliance made an app with an interactive map so you can easily find your next hot tamale destination.

THE FAYETTEVILLE ALE TRAIl FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS

The brew scene in Northwest Arkansas is bigger than ever with 14 breweries and one cidery. The Fayetteville Ale Trail is a self-guided tour that gives a glimpse into the local craft brewery and cidery culture of Northwest Arkansas. Pick up a passport and get it stamped at each brewery then return or mail your completed passport to the Experience Fayetteville Visitors Center for a prize.

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Let’s Hit the Road:

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA BY DENNIS MALCOLM BYRON, AKA ALE SHARPTON PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY CHARLOTTESGOTALOT.COM / KYO H HAM

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s a freelance beer journalist residing in Atlanta, Georgia, I make it a point to find cities within a decent driving distance—usually less than four hours away—when I want to make a quick

getaway to quench my out-of-state thirst.While the South continues to establish itself as a recognized destination for sipping craft ales and lagers, I recommend taking a trip to another state that is currently sharing the same passion: North Carolina. Specifically, Charlotte, also known as the Queen City, is a highly recommended beer destination. Here’s why...Charlotte is making it a priority to be a legitimate beer town.

According to Charlotte’s Regional Visitors Authority, between 2012 and 2018 the city went from seven craft breweries to nearly 50, an astounding 600 percent boom. Proof enough? In order to cover a lot of ground in one article, let’s take a ride on the new Blue Line LYNX Light Rail, introduced in March of 2018. One of its main functions is to provide Charlotte residents and visitors with easier access to many of its standout breweries. From South to North Charlotte, here are the stations and breweries within close proximity.

SCALEYBARK STATION The German-inspired Olde Mecklenburg Brewery is regarded as the brewery that started the boom in 2009 and now has an 8-acre biergarten that constantly rocks. Their neighbor, Sugar Creek Brewing Co., is all about Belgian tradition with their solid lineup. The new Brewers at 4001 Yancey is a joint venture with heavy hitters Southern Tier Brewing Co. and Victory Brewing Co., boasting a strong focus on pairing delectable eats with their nationally renowned beers. Thirsty Nomad Brewing Co., also new to the scene, brings a chill vibe and dope artwork, while Three Spirits Brewery continues to build their fanbase with their proudly brewed unfiltered sippers.

NEW BERN STATION Triple C Brewing Co. is a Queen City favorite and has recently expanded. Lenny Boy Brewing Co. is a great choice for a group, as they serve up everything from single-hopped IPAs to gluten-free wild ales, organic kombucha and sours. Hyde Brewing is based in the hip The Suffolk Punch­– a coffeehouse, eatery and brewery combination­–and boasts one of the most extensive beer lists in the city, including many in-house creations.

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BLAND STATION The nationally renowned Wooden Robot Brewery kills it in the beer game, and now they have the Kre8 Gastropub serving up mouthwatering fare to seal the deal. Unknown Brewing Co. was the first brewery I ever visited in Charlotte and will continue to be at the top of my list. They have a dedication to creating off-the-wall brews and also host the best tailgate parties, especially for the nearby Carolina Panthers.

25TH STREET STATION Started by brothers Jason and Jeff Alexander, Free Range Brewing is all about family and community. They reach out to partner with various locals on produce, products, charity initiatives, art–you name it. They make damn good beer, too.

36TH STREET STATION I have to hit up Salud Cerveceria whenever I’m in the North Davidson Arts & Entertainment District, aka NoDa. My initial visit welcomed me with a live DJ, coolers of hard-to-find craft beers and numerous taps

pouring liquid bliss. Now there are two floors, a talented kitchen, event space, bar games and a variety of beers they brew on-site. A short ride away is NoDa Brewing Co. with their award-winning Hop, Drop ‘n Roll IPA. Birdsong Brewing Co. brings the heat with their revered Jalapeño Pale Ale and a happening taproom that often hosts live music. Now boasting 30-barrel production on-site, Heist Brewery steadily attracts both craft beer imbibers and cocktail sippers with more than 100 whiskeys, plus tapas to add to the appeal.

SUGAR CREEK STATION I have yet to thoroughly explore this area, but I hear Bold Missy Brewery not only slings great beers, but defies the industry norm with a founder and brewmaster who are both females. If sours and wild beers are your thing, Divine Barrel Brewing Co. is quickly earning its reputation of producing the best. Take a ride on the Charlotte Blue Line LYNX Light Rail and do all the brewery hopping you can handle.

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WHAT’S BREWING IN

LOUISVILLE BY SHANE GIBBS Whether you live in Louisville or are just visiting, you can’t help noticing the local beer scene is rapidly growing. And it doesn’t look like it will be slowing down anytime soon. From the big dog in town, Against the Grain Brewing, to the new kid on the block, Mile Wide Brewing, the beer is flowing and it is oh so good.

taproom inviting. They are currently able to brew about 475 gallons of beer at a time, which goes on tap at their location as well as bars and restaurants throughout Kentucky. Some of my personal favorites consist of Barstow, an American wheat ale, and Idlewild pale ale.

I began my “beer-cation” at Gravely Brewing, which opened in August 2017 and has grown quite the loyal following. Their wall of old-school stereo equipment and custom-built shelving is the perfect backdrop for music-themed beers, such as Power Chord West Coast IPA, Czech One Pils, and Channel Orange IPA.

To round out my adventure, I visited Against the Grain. This is clearly the model that the up and coming breweries in the area can aspire to be in stability and growth. ATG is not only performing well in Kentucky but also across the region and in 21 other countries. A new location in Japan recently opened, and ATG plans to double its current production to 8,000 barrels.

Power Chord was my personal favorite, coming in at 7.2 percent ABV. The combination of the hoppy bitterness paired with malty goodness created a well-balanced brew that makes you want to order a second. Another noteworthy beer was the Brown Paper Bag brown ale, which comes in at 5.5 percent. The malt character gave off a slight roastiness that placed this in my personal top five of brown ales. The second stop of the weekend was 3rd Turn Brewing, located just outside of the hustle and bustle in the Jeffersontown area. Unlike most breweries, 3rd Turn does not have a “flagship” beer. Instead they are all about the experimental offerings and continually honing their beers to perfection. As soon as one keg is done, something else new and exciting is going on. 3rd Turn is located in a former church built in 1878 and still has the huge stained-glass windows that make beer drinking feel almost like a religious experience. Just a few miles from 3rd Turn, the next stop on my beer getaway is Mile Wide Brewing, located on Barret Avenue in an old biscuit factory. They have only been open since December of 2017, but have quite the fan following, and the open seating area makes this

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With their unique styles and eye-catching artwork, they are definitely poised to grow even more than their current plans. ATG’s rotating list of taps and their bonus beers and guest taps mean there is a beer for everyone. Mr. Sweepy’s creamy red ale and the Schon Brau Vienna lager were crowd favorites during my visit. If beer isn’t your thing, pop in anyway and try the mouth-watering food. The pork nachos served on kettle chips with jalapeño and pickled onions were the size of my face and were absolutely wonderful. Given the location and proximity to the Louisville Bats minor league baseball stadium, it makes perfect sense to pop in after the game to wait out the traffic and either celebrate a victory or drown your sorrows depending on which team you were rooting for. Other great points of interest during your next visit to Louisville should include Monnik Beer Company, serving up great beer, food, and beer cocktails; Sergio’s World of Beer; the Holy Grale, which has an amazing tap list and just as amazing food; and Molly Malone’s, where you can walk in and watch a soccer match with your mates and have a few pints.

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A RESURGENCE FOR CRAFT BEER IN

CLARKSVILLE BY LUCAS RYAN CHAMBERS

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evitalization—it’s a word that’s become synonymous with Clarksville, Tennessee from its bustling historic district to its expansive growth in industry with the recent additions of Google and LG. Clarksville has always been rich in history, being home to not only Fort Campbell Army Base and the 101st Screaming Eagles, but also Austin Peay State University, one of Tennessee’s fastest growing universities. These two unique assets have contributed to the resurgence of the craft brew scene, and with one of the youngest populations in the U.S., the Clarksville scene shows no sign of slowing down in the near future. To begin our craft brew tour of Clarksville, we’ll start on the north side of town, where you’ll find Old Glory Distillery, which is going on its second year in operation and is the first and only distillery in town. While they made a name for themselves with their “Pin-Up” Gin, Tennessee Moonshine, Old Glory Vodka and “Jumpers Stash” White Rum, it’s their bourbon that has the public abuzz. Since they’re 100% grain-to-glass and sourced in-house, the Straight Bourbon Whiskey is just now coming to fruition and will soon be ready for the public. Boasting a 19% rye, owner Matt Cunningham says that you won’t find another bourbon close in taste. Old Glory offers tours and tastings daily onthe-hour and are even on the TN Whiskey Trail and the new State Line Whiskey Tour. Right around the corner from there are two of Clarksville’s newest craft breweries, Gladiator Brewing Company and The Star Spangled Brewing Company. Both are owned and operated by veterans from right here at Ft. Campbell, yet they couldn’t be more different than one another. Gladiator Brewing specializes in small batch, naturally carbonated high gravity beer. With eleven in-house brews, they stay true to the recipes that were derived from the Romans thousands of years ago. Star Spangled goes as far as importing their grains from Europe specifically for their small batches and describes their beers almost the way an artist would describe a painting. Star Spangled Brewing Company shines with its own special uniqueness and flair and has found a way to bring that through not only their beer, but the atmosphere of their establishment. Founded by a Special Forces

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Soldier, comradery is one way to describe the feel of the brewery. Everywhere you turn there is a personal touch added by the thousands of soldiers that pass through its doors each year. It’s also where John Rich of the band Big and Rich had his Redneck Riviera Brew created, which is distributed locally to the greater Nashville area and beyond. When you stop by, keep a look out for the “Beer It Forward” wall and leave a beer for the next soldier that passes through the doors. From there you can head to the Historic Downtown District which is home to some of Tennessee’s oldest and most unique architecture, the Cumberland Riverfront, and about two dozen historical sites all within a short walking distance. It’s also where you can check out one of Clarksville’s oldest remaining Craft Breweries, The Blackhorse Pub and Brewery. I caught up with the Owner, Jeff Robinson, who is also a veteran from Ft. Campbell who decided to lay roots here when he retired. He shared that since 1992, the Blackhorse has been a staple in Downtown Clarksville, with some of the most recognizable beers in the area. While they brew over thirty-five different types per year—the Vanilla Cream Ale, Barnstormer Red, and Blackhorse IPA have remained some of the favorites throughout the years. Besides just beer, they offer upscale pub food, and an after-hours bar with a local feel just upstairs named “The Tap Room.” In response to all of the recent buzz, they’ve also started on a whiskey barrel aging program that will soon be creating some all new brews.

enthusiasts. They already have plans for thirty locally inspired recipes that will be alternated throughout the year on thirteen taps—everything from a “Bun & Cream Stout” to a “Sango Honey Saison.” This place is so family friendly that they even offer a puppy pilsner specially brewed for your four-legged friend, which the head brewer called “essentially a carbonated chicken broth.” If the festival scene is more your speed, you’ll have ample choices in the coming year. With the addition of the Downtown Commons, Clarksville’s newest public park and venue, you can enjoy an experience that’s not often found in other cities. Nestled right in the middle of the Downtown Historic District, its ideal location gives you a chance to get away from the everyday hustle and bustle, while only requiring a short drive from practically anywhere in town. In June the venue will be hosting the annual “Red White and Brew Fest,” which is the perfect summertime festival sponsored by two of the biggest beer distributors in Middle Tennessee, The Hand Family Company and Ajax-Turner Distributing. Coming up in October, you can also attend the 2nd Annual Oktoberfest at the Downtown Commons featuring Polka music, food, dancing, and more. Both events are family-friendly and will have something for everyone, no matter their age.

Just around the corner is the all-new Strawberry Ale Works, a family owned restaurant and brewery that, since its opening, has been one of the hottest spots in town. With a variety of beers and a menu that will blow you away, it would definitely be doing yourself a disservice to miss it. Some of these breweries, (such as Evil Nash Brewing Company that will be opening soon right off of 10th Street), are so new that they haven’t even had a chance to open their doors to the public yet. Lucky for me, there was one brewery-in-the-works owner that I did get the opportunity to sit down with. Kings Bluff Brewery, located just down the street from Austin Peay State University in the same Historic District, it’s a brewery that embraces Clarksville’s uniqueness to the fullest. Even the name itself comes from a popular rock climbing park frequented by local outdoor

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T HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA

A BEER

RUN WITH

KIDS By: Rob Shomaker, Certified Cicerone®

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he trip was inspired by a book. Our oldest, age six, had become captivated by The Usborne Big Book of Stars & Planets by Emily Bone and Fabiano Fiorin. Planets, stars, rockets—what wasn’t there to love? She’d stay awake past her bedtime, in the dark, with a flashlight—we all had at least one book like that as a child. The colors, the statistics, the adventure and intrigue of space—she was hooked. After several weeks of my daughter sharing her enthusiasm, coupled with both my wife’s and my desire to encourage her passions—especially regarding anything in a STEM related field, we determined a visit to the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville was in order. As a child I still vividly remember standing next to the A-12 Blackbird spy plane—its smooth surfaces and wicked stance. It was hard to believe that it was considered “outdated” as I stood there in awe during the late 1980’s. Just as with any excursion, it’s never a bad idea to check out what beer and breweries are in the area. While I’ll admit the U.S. Space and Rocket Center was the primary objective, I was also aware of at least two breweries in Huntsville worth checking out. With these cumulative objectives in mind, this trip became an overnight beer run, with kids. From Knoxville, Tennessee, Huntsville is just over 3 hours away. Rolling into town, we realized that while three hours in a car can be an easy trip with our little ones, that’s also three hours of pent-up energy. To help get the wiggles out, we stopped by the EarlyWorks Children’s History Museum in downtown Huntsville. This stop proved to be thought provoking for all with great displays on African American history, Alabama history, Helen Keller, and a keelboat display—which prompted a conversation about commerce with our oldest.

communicate. Each beer has a memorable story and each that I experienced was memorable in its own right. Just across from Yellowhammer Brewing sits Straight to Ale. They too began with a small 3-barrel brewhouse and a group of homebrewers. As co-founder Dan Perry tells it, “We began in a mill that looked like it had been bombed out!” It didn’t take long for Straight to Ale’s beer to catch on and before they knew it, they needed to expand. Thanks to a closing brewpub, they were able to move into a 10K square foot facility with a 20-barrel system where they grew from 200 barrels per year to over 1,000, before the need to move was upon them again. As the group was evaluating new buildings, they were able to work out a deal with an old school building and a local developer. This arrangement secured Straight to Ale as the first tenant in Campus 805. With 45,000 square feet of space and a 3 vessel 30-barrel system, last year they produced 8000 barrels of beer that went to eight southern states. Again similar to their neighbor, Huntsville’s roots run deep with Straight to Ale—represented by Monkeynaut IPA, their flagship beer. This beer is named for Miss Baker, the monkey that helped pave the way for manned space travel. Straight to Ale isn’t just about beer though, they have a distillery onsite, a killer speakeasy that is creatively hidden, and a fantastic kitchen—get the pork belly tacos, thank me later. We began the pinnacle of our family excursion on the morning of day two—the U.S. Space and Rocket Center. It is hard to miss the giant rockets reaching to space as you approach the facility— my kids went nuts before we were even in the parking lot. As we approached the front door, the rich history was quickly impressed upon us with the large displays towering left and right.

From here we ventured over to Campus 805 which is known as an entertainment venue with great craft beer. In all actuality, there are four breweries within a stone’s throw. Straight to Ale and Yellowhammer Brewing are part of Campus 805, while InnerSpace Brewing Company and Salty Nut Brewery are just northeast of the campus. Yellowhammer Brewing began roughly eight years ago among a group of homebrewing friends. As one of the founders, Don Milligan, celebrated his birthday with friends, those same friends talked him into a brewing venture that very night. With a desire to focus on some of the great aspects of Alabama heritage, the state bird was a logical choice for the name—the Yellowhammer. It all began with a 1-barrel system that gave way a year and half later to a 10-barrel system. Now, four years into their new location on campus, they have a 20-barrel system with 60, 40, and 30-barrel fermenters and a distillery onsite. It’s the continued focus on celebrating Alabama heritage that created the T-Minus Tangerine Kolsch beer. This beer is known as the “Space and Rocket Center Beer” as its proceeds provide scholarships for space camp. Last year it generated $10K—pretty impressive. It’s not all rockets at Yellowhammer though, a tripel named Miracle Worker celebrates Anne Sullivan, who was known as the individual responsible for helping Helen Keller learn to

Every Thursday until November 21, 2019 (with the exception of Sept 12) from 4:30-7:30 p.m., visit the U.S. Space & Rocket Center Saturn V Hall in the Davidson Center for Space Exploration for the German Biergarten. The Biergarten features authentic German cuisine as well as imported and domestic beers and wines from Germany. The event is family-friendly, and leashed dogs are welcome on their Apollo Terrace and Apollo Courtyard.

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Having spent the better part of a day chasing our littles from display to display, three things were impressed upon us. First, the intentionality around preservation of our space story is incredibly well done. Huntsville has played and continues to play a significant part in our space exploration narrative. The effort of the space race was herculean and because of this focus and resolve, much of what our modern-day technology is based on started with these efforts. The giant Saturn V rocket display, Apollo 16 command module, and of course, the A-12 Blackbird were just a fraction of the important historical artifacts and history on hand. Secondly, the opportunities to learn, ask questions, and seek answers are another big part of the experience. These are particularly important for a young, aspiring space explorer, exemplified by hands-on displays as well as docents who not only have hands-on experience with various items on display, but who are also incredibly knowledgeable and willing to answer questions and fan the flames of curiosity. Lastly, the center encourages dreaming. From displays on current and future manned space vehicles to a vast space camp program, The U.S. Space and Rocket Center continues to reach for the stars and to provide the platform for our youth to dream big. Kiddos can even engage with the center from their classrooms via the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp where, during specific times of the year, middle school students can request images from the International Space Station. While kiddos and beer runs rarely go together, our visit to Huntsville turned out to be a memorable experience. While some Alabama beer did make it back to Knoxville, the best part of this adventure was that my oldest expanded her curiosity of the stars and beyond. As I type this, my wife and daughter are in the next room getting a very early start on my daughter’s Halloween costume. While there were several cartoonrelated characters she considered, she has chosen to be the solar system. I’ll drink to that.

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B r ew i ng A nd D i s ti lli ng Ce nte r . co m | 8 6 5 . 6 2 2 . 75 11 | K n oxv i l l e , T N The Brewing and Distilling Center Inc. is authorized for operation as a postsecondary education institution by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission. For more information, visit tn.gov/thec


EV EN TS

GnashVegas Casino Night and Auction PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN SAVAGE

The Nashville Predators made a memorable appearance off the ice at the GnashVegas Casino Night, which raised over $200,000 for The Predators Foundation, a 501 (c)(3) charity that supports numerous Nashville organizations. Attendees tested their luck with casino games and a silent auction boasting incredible Preds memorabilia. Local vendors offered food and drink, while even Nashville’s favorite hockey stars enjoyed a lively evening for a great cause.

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Bottom two S O Cphotos R A F T B Eby E RJulianna M AG.C O MHunter 57


B EER 1 0 1

HOP TO IT! BY: SHANE GIBBS PHOTO BY: MERLYN TOWNLEY

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llow me to preface this article by saying that I personally am a huge hop-head, the hoppier and skunkier, the better. I enjoy pretty much all beer but I certainly gravitate towards the hoppy side of things, specifically West Coast IPA’s.

Working in the beer industry, I’ve noticed a large number of people that will only drink specific IPA’s or do not drink any because they do not like the bitter taste that hops can give off. I intend to educate you on some of the more commonly used hops in your favorite beers so that you can begin to identify them for yourself and maybe expand your variety and excite your palate.The different forms of hops are ever-growing and to list them all would require me to write a book and not an article, so instead I have chosen a few of the most commonly used and well-known hops.They are: Cascade, Centennial, Citra, Galaxy, Hallertauer and Mosaic. Before getting into the styles, let me tell you why hops are used in the first place. Humulus Lupulus, or hops, are flowering plants which are used in the brewing process. They prevent spoilage due to wild bacteria, help with head retention, and act as a natural filter for your beer. They also give you the plethora of flavors that you can experience from each of the different styles of beer. Now, on to the hops: CASCADE: The cascade hop is named after the Cascade mountain range that runs through Washington, Oregon, and British Columbia. It was first utilized by New Albion Brewing Company back in 1976 in its American Pale Ale. The distinct medium strength aroma gives off characteristics of a flowery, spicy, grapefruit flavor. It is most commonly used in hopped-up West Coast brews. The Sierra Nevada Pale Ale is a perfect example of this. Others include Deschutes Brewery’s Mirror Pond Pale Ale and Anchor Brewing’s Liberty Ale. CENTENNIAL: The centennial hop, also referred to as “Super Cascade” has been on the market since 1990 and has a pleasant floral aroma with less grapefruit or citrus notes than the cascade hop. Obviously, it is utilized for bittering but is also widely used for dry hopping or late additions when brewing beer. The centennial hop is definitely highlighted in beers such as Bell’s Two Hearted Ale, Deschutes Brewery’s

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Green Lakes Organic Ale, and Highland Brewing’s IPA CITRA: Citra hops were created in 2007 for aroma and flavor. They are known to give off tropical fruit aromas of citrus and peach. The greatest examples of beers that use citra hops are Three Floyds, Zombie Dust, and Victory Headwaters. If you happen to get your hands on some Zombie Dust, I will gladly give you my mailing address. GALAXY: Galaxy hops are out of this world, pun intended, because they actually hail from the land down under. Australian brewers began using the galaxy hop back in 2009 and it quickly gained popularity. They provide a unique aroma of citrus and passionfruit which can be quite intense but does subside as the beer matures.You may even notice hints of pineapple or tropical fruit. Unlike other hops, you will not notice the floral or piney flavors. You can experience this unique taste in Devil’s Backbone Tasmanian Pale Ale, Clown Shoes’ Galactica, Terrapin’s Recreation Ale, and Tallgrass Brewing’s 8-Bit. HALLERTAUER: Hallertauer is a classic German hop most often used in Bavarianstyle lagers. It has a distinctive and intense, yet pleasing bitterness. It can be described as a mild hop with floral and citrus notes. It is utilized in Empire Brewing Company’s Empire Summer Ale, the Hofbrau Munchen, and Kona Brewing Company’s Wailua Wheat. MOSAIC: The mosaic hop is one of my absolute favorites. Released in 2012, the aromas given off from this hop are a cornucopia of goodness. You may pick up scents of blueberry, tangerine, papaya—even an earthy pine. One of the most popular uses of this hop in Tennessee can be found in the Bearded Iris Homestyle. Other great examples are: Founders Brewing’s Mosaic Promise, Surly Brewing Company’s Todd the Axe Man, and of course Russian River’s Blind Pig. As I stated earlier, there is no way that I can possibly list all of the different hops on the market, but maybe this list will inspire you to research your favorite beers and do some side by side comparisons between the different hop profiles. After all, craft beer life is all about tasting and trying new things in the beer world. If you have other Beer 101 questions or perhaps a specific topic you would like discussed, please feel free to contact me at agentgibbs@quemedia.press.


their focus on the eccentric side of flavor, using herbal, sour, and wild flavors, they prefer to produce extremely limited batch releases in order to include as many local-aged and foraged ingredients as possible. When each batch only produces fifty cases or less at a time, getting your hands on some is something to be proud of all in itself. Sticking to the science of mixed fermentation,Von Seitz has broken down the elements of beer to their simplest form: water, grain, yeast, and hops, and from there they begin the process of creating their ales. By implementing foraged ingredients,Von Seitz has been able to include local flavors in their recipes and apply the various seasons to the taste— their latest creation, “Tennessee Terroir-Out Standing in Their Fields,” is a prime example.

A TRUE TASTE OF TENNESSEE

VON SEITZ THERORETICALES-TENNESSEE TERROIR

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BY LUCAS RYAN CHAMBERS

mithville, Tennessee is a small town located right in the heart of the state, with a population of only around 5000. It’s known by most for being the hometown of country music stars like Alan Jackson, John Anderson, and Aaron Tippin. This small southern town even had a mention in the 1949 John Wayne film, “Sands of Iwo Jima.” Though to be known by these standards is quite exciting in itself, these days Smithville is becoming known for something even more unique and exciting—Von Seitz TheoreticAles. Founded by Alex Seitz, a scientist by day and brewer by night, the ingenious flavors of these ales are produced through a combination of his love of both beer and theory. Von Seitz TheoreticAles, as they are aptly named, have already had quite the success. The distinct small batch beer has already been distributed within Tennessee by Grassroots Distributing as well as nationally by Shelton Brothers Importers, and now they’re taking things one step further by partnering with Drikkeriget in order to distribute the ales internationally. The ales are currently being distributed to two continents, served on three, and are available in fifteen countries throughout Europe, with that scope broadening daily. With only a four-barrel system, each batch is hand crafted from scratch and the recipes are truly some of the most unique in the world. With

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With their new Tennessee Terroir recipe, they have what is believed to be the first commercial 100% Tennessee ingredient beer. For the first time ever, local brewers are able to get 100% Tennessee-grown malts from places like Volunteer Mission Malts and Batey Farms. Combining these local malts with hops that are also locally grown,Von Seitz has also been able to use Tennessee native yeast strains that have been collected over the past years to create the base for a unique Tennessee taste. Any water used is locally-sourced from some of the State’s purest springs, which also allows the use of a vast array of Tennessee’s botanicals. Herbs such as lemongrass, sorrel, yarrow, and lemon balm are used to add a full flavor that’s true to the state, giving the beer its own distinct identity. To add even more to the unique flavor, they’ve topped it all off with paw-paw fruit and Tennessee’s famous local honey. According to Art Whitaker, one of the associate brewers at Von Seitz, this brew should be ready by the time you finish reading this article, and will certainly extol the virtues of the Volunteer State.

The promise of The promise of an exceptional an exceptional experience. experience. At Auto-Owners, we understand

While you are anxiously awaiting the Tennessee Terroir, you can head over to Von-Seitz’s tap room to try some of their award-winning recipes. Their location at the Burlap Room Beer Garden and Tap House is an experience in itself. Located in a renovated drive-in theatre at Bert Driver’s nursery in Smithville, the tap room sits directly where the former projector room and snack bar stood. There you can try beers like Arcadium Gruit, Amarillo Afternoon, A Moment in Time, Never Leave Amsterdam, and variety of other concoctions specially brewed by Von Seitz TheoreticAles. Be sure to check their website and Facebook page for current hours.

the importance ofwe delivering on At Auto-Owners, understand a promise. We have designedon a the importance of delivering coverage help ensure a promise.package We havetodesigned a that you can continue to do what coverage package to help ensure you create the finest that do youbest can –continue to do what quality hand-crafted beer. you do best – create the finest quality hand-crafted beer.

If you’re traveling abroad this June and can’t make it down to their location in Smithville, you can also find them at the opening party for Carnivale Brettanomyces in Amsterdam, a prestigious, invite-only event that brings together some of the most unique beers in the world. The processes Von Seitz uses to create their beer, as well as their use of Brettanomyces and other rarely used yeasts have put them in a level of botanical brewers that is seldom seen here in the U.S. This is exactly why they’ve been invited for the past few years now, enabling them the opportunity to offer travelers from around the world a taste of Tennessee.

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STEEL CITY TAP CO. YOU BREW THE BEST. WE'LL HANDLE THE REST. Did you know that for only about $.15 more than what you would pay for tap handles from China, you can get a custom designed, guaranteed tap handle made by top quality American designers right here in the South? Top brands like Heineken U.S.A., Good People, Monday Night Brewing, Scofflaw, and New Castle are trusting Steel City Tap Co. with rush orders, large orders, and even refinishing orders of their existing taps. Owner Brad Lugar shares a story illustrating the over-the-top craftsmanship and service you can expect from Steel City Tap Co. “We helped one client design a better built tap than what they had previously imported from China. The logo character kept popping off the tap. When I brought in our prototype to show the client, I threw it at the floor to demonstrate how it would stand up to the near constant use by bartenders and servers in busy bars and restaurants. We secured a 1,000 piece order.” Another story from the brand’s humble beginnings tells of a client who recently had a logo designed and was still waiting on a prototype from another company. Lugar asked for the chance to prove his new company, and the client was floored when he showed up four hours later to put the prototype on her desk. As the business evolved, Lugar began helping breweries with other branding and marketing needs as well. Sitting in a meeting with a client one day, Lugar began to sketch out a tap design based on the company’s mascot character that was displayed on the wall next to where they were sitting. The client fell in love with the design, and Steel City was not only employed to produce their tap handles, but to work on graphic design for them as well. Moving forward, Lugar began working with other marketing objects as well such as keg collars, koozies, coasters, shirts, and bottle openers. As their services to their clients evolved, so did Steel City Tap Co.’s slogan. “You brew the best, we’ll handle the rest,” became Steel City’s calling card and their pledge to customers that they could really, seriously, leave almost everything about their company besides the brewing of great beer to them. Lugar says, “We don’t want businesses to worry about design, marketing their products, etc. We want them to make great beer because we love great beer. We work to develop seamless relationships with our clients so they don’t need to worry about when their product will be developed—we just handle it.” Lugar goes on to inform potential customers that when you call Steel City Tap Co, you’re calling the owner, not a large corporation. If their customers ever have an issue, it is taken care of immediately. Steel City Tap Co. wants people to see that good products can be made in America. Great products, great service, and great relationships—make an appointment with Lugar himself and allow Steel City Tap Co. to prove it to you.

Brewhouse South is your Tennessee craft beer destination.

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televisions

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come for the beer, stay for the food Our menu ranges from Cajun to American classics.

1855 Galleria Blvd. Franklin, TN 37067 • 615-778-1860 • @BrewhouseSouth


HOMEBREW

FERMENT LOCAL BY: KENDALL JOSEPH

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omebrewers live by a do-it-yourself creed. Many got into the hobby so they could brew the beer they wanted to drink. This DIY ethos leads many to make their own brewing equipment, saving money and creating a custom system. Some even sample and grow their own yeast, rather than buying it. Jeff Mello is one of those guys. He turned his passion for yeast into Bootleg Biology. Mello was a non-profit fundraiser in Washington D.C., but left to pursue his passion for locally harvested yeast. He started by collecting yeast in his backyard and relied on internet research on how to use wild yeast to brew beer. Bootleg Biology started in 2013 as a website about collecting wild yeast. Mello’s initial goal was to help homebrewers capture and brew with locally sourced wild yeast. The project grew into a business that provides products and services to hobbyists and professional brewers. Sampling, growing, and brewing with wild yeast sounds complicated, but it is not. Mello demonstrated the process and it is quite simple.You can swab flowers and fruit, or leave an open container of wort in your backyard. The process isolates a culture from a mix of microbes, then grows a pure culture and brews with it. Bootleg’s Local Yeast Project is collecting yeast samples from around the world. Mello has an ambitious goal of banking wild yeast strains from every zip code in the United States. When he comes across an interesting or unique yeast strain, he sends it to the University of Washington Yeast Resource Center for further analysis and classification. The Backyard Yeast Wrangling Tool Kit provides do-it-yourself microbiologists with tools to capture local yeast. Homebrewers can use the kits to collect and isolate several yeast cultures, and refill kits are available. They also provide homebrewers with unique yeast unavailable from other yeast companies. Tennessee homebrewers now have yeast options from a local supplier, and they can even brew with native Tennessee yeast. Bootleg Biology’s commercial brewery services help Tennessee breweries get the yeast cultures they want, without paying shipping costs to the West Coast yeast companies. The company also provides local brewers quality control lab and analysis services. They are partnering with Nolensville’s Mill Creek Brewing to help with their yeast culture management and will use the brewery equipment to do larger yeast propagations. Cottontown’s BriarScratch Brewing was the first

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commercial brewery to brew with wild yeast harvested by Bootleg Biology. Jeff met with founder and brewer Brad Singleton and gathered yeast samples from trees, fruit, plants, and even a briar bush, on Singleton’s farm. Brewers, both at-home and the pros, increasingly want the ability to do everything themselves. Self-sufficiency runs deep in the art of brewing, and sourcing local ingredients is appealing. Now, with Bootleg Biology’s help, they can brew with local yeast.


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