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Years 4-7

ASIA

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Our Neighbour

Š www.istock/German

By Miranda Mason


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Title: Asia: Our Neighbour © 2013 Ready-Ed Publications Printed in Australia Author: Miranda Mason Illustrator: Alison Mutton

Acknowledgements i. I-stock Photos. ii. Clip art images have been obtained from Microsoft Design Gallery Live and are used under the terms of the End User License Agreement for Microsoft Word 2000. Please refer to www.microsoft.com/permission.

Copyright Notice The purchasing educational institution and its staff have the right to make copies of the whole or part of this book, beyond their rights under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (the Act), provided that: 1.

The number of copies does not exceed the number reasonably required by the educational institution to satisfy its teaching purposes;

2.

Copies are made only by reprographic means (photocopying), not by electronic/digital means, and not stored or transmitted;

3.

Copies are not sold or lent;

4.

Every copy made clearly shows the footnote, ‘Ready-Ed Publications’.

Any copying of this book by an educational institution or its staff outside of this blackline master licence may fall within the educational statutory licence under the Act. The Act allows a maximum of one chapter or 10% of the pages of this book, whichever is the greater, to be reproduced and/or communicated by any educational institution for its educational purposes provided that

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educational institution (or the body that administers it) has given a remuneration notice to Copyright Agency Limited (CAL) under Act. For details of the CAL licence for educational institutions contact: Copyright Agency Limited Level 19, 157 Liverpool Street Sydney NSW 2000 Telephone: (02) 9394 7600 Facsimile: (02) 9394 7601 E-mail: info@copyright.com.au Reproduction and Communication by others Except as otherwise permitted by this blackline master licence or under the Act (for example, any fair dealing for the purposes of study, research, criticism or review) no part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, communicated or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written permission. All inquiries should be made to the publisher at the address below.

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Ready-Ed Publications PO Box 276 Greenwood WA 6024 www.readyed.net info@readyed.com.au

ISBN: 978 186 397 889 7 2


Contents

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Teachers’ Notes Australian Curriculum Links Teaching Ideas

4 5 6

Section One: Getting To Know Asia - An Overview Being A Good Neighbour Collaboration Promotes Global Citizenship Spotlight On The Region Location, Location – Explore The Region 1 Location, Location – Explore The Region 2 North-East Asia 1 North-East Asia 2 South-East Asia 1 South-East Asia 2 South Asia 1 South Asia 2 Papua New Guinea And New Zealand Population Watch 1 Population Watch 2 Language Alert Asian Numbers

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Section Two: The Environment In Asia And Australia Ecosystems 1 Ecosystems 2 Natural Features Urban Environments Disasters And Adaptation Comparing Environmental Problems Endangered And Invasive Species

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Section Three: Collaborating Through Migration, Trade And Aid Migration - Australians Of Asian Heritage Trade – It Matters! Asian Governments – Who Runs The Show? 1 Asian Governments – Who Runs The Show? 2 Aid: How Does Australia Help Asia?

33 34 35 36 37

Section Four: Diversity Different Religions In Asia 1 Different Religions In Asia 2 The Asian School Experience Assorted Working Conditions Asian Influence

39 40 41 42 43

Section Five: Extra Flag Cards The Ultimate Trip Make A Tibetan Prayer Flag Or Lung Ta (Wind Horse) Website Cards Explain It Cards Fast Finishers 1 Fast Finishers 2 Fast Finishers 3 Vocabulary The Great Unscramble

45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54

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55-60 3


Teachers’ Notes

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. We live in a world that is focusing more and more on Asia and the rapidly growing countries in this region. For Australians, the places in Asia have contributed greatly to our development historically and these places will have continued relevance and importance in our future. The Australian land and our history are linked to Asia from ancient times to today. Asian traditions have influenced ours, and there are many Australians who have personal ties with Asia. As our closest neighbour, increasing our understanding of Asian societies, beliefs, systems and environments will help us to make connections between our cultures so that we can participate more actively in our own region. After all, being a good citizen is all about recognising diversity and building harmony between nations. Becoming Asia-literate is a key skill for Australian students and is an integral part of the new Australian National Curriculum. Asia: Our Neighbour is written for students in Years 4-6. It is a flexible resource as teachers can choose to follow the sections chronologically or use the topic pages in no particular order. There is an extensive vocabulary section and additional extension activities at the back of the book. The Website Cards (see page 48) can help with research tasks and can be kept handy at computer stations. Use the Explain It Cards (page 49) as topics for students to reflect on and teach others about, at the conclusion of the unit. Answers to all of the questions and tasks are provided. Have fun! Internet Safety With increasing use of the internet in schools, take a few minutes to teach your class how to stay safe online. Following the five SMART rules is one approach you could take. 1. SAFE – keep safe by not giving out personal information. 2. MEET – meeting someone that you have met online can be dangerous. Talk about this with a parent first. 3. ACCEPTING – opening files, accepting messages, pictures or texts from someone who you don’t know can be a problem. They could contain viruses or nasty messages. 4. RELIABLE – information on the internet may not be true. Check information and see if it is credible. 5. TELL – tell a trusted adult if someone or something makes you feel uncomfortable online or you see someone being bullied. http://www.staysmartonline.gov.au/

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Australian Curriculum Links

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia is one of the Australian Curriculum’s three cross-curriculum priorities that is to be taught across all learning areas. There are eight main organising ideas under three headings:

Asia and its diversity t The peoples and countries of Asia are diverse in ethnic background, traditions, cultures, belief systems and religions. (Ol.1) t Interrelationships between humans and the diverse environments in Asia shape the region and have global implications. (Ol.2)

Achievements and contributions of the peoples of Asia t The peoples and countries of Asia have contributed and continue to contribute to world history and human endeavour. (Ol.3) t The arts and literature of Asia influence aesthetic and creative pursuits within Australia, the region and globally. (Ol.4) Asia-Australia engagement t Collaboration and engagement with the peoples of Asia support effective regional and global citizenship. (Ol.5) t Australia is part of the Asia region and our histories from ancient times to the present are linked. (Ol.6) t Australians play a significant role in social, cultural, political and economic developments in the Asia region. (Ol.7) t Australians of Asian heritage have influenced Australia’s history and continue to influence its dynamic culture and society. (Ol.8) Relevant content descriptions across the learning areas are included in the table below. This is not an exhaustive list as this topic and the resources provided can be used to meet a number of descriptors.

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Science - Earth’s surface changes over time as a result of natural processes and human activity (ACSSU075)

Science - Important contributions to the advancement of science have been made by people from a range of cultures (ACSHE099)

Science - Important contributions to the advancement of science have been made by people from a range of cultures (ACSHE082)

English - Understand that Standard Australian English is one of many social dialects used in Australia, and that while it originated in England it has been influenced by many other languages (ACELA1487)

History - The reasons people migrated to Australia from Europe and Asia, and the experiences and contributions of a particular migrant group within a colony. (ACHHK096)

English - Replicate the rhythms and sound patterns in stories, rhymes, songs and poems from a range of cultures (ACELT1579)

Maths - Use simple scales, legends and directions to interpret information contained in basic maps (ACMMG090)

English - Understand that English is one of many languages spoken in Australia and that different languages may be spoken by family, classmates and community (ACELA1426)

History - Stories of groups of people who migrated to Australia (including from ONE Asian country) and the reasons they migrated, such as World War II and Australian migration programs since the war (ACHHK115)

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5


Teaching Ideas

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Starting a new topic is exciting – harness the curiosity, prior knowledge and enthusiasm of your students with some of these ideas to introduce the topic of Asia to your class. They might help to spark a learning journey that you did not expect!

Create A Word Wall Brainstorm words associated with the topic and display these on the classroom wall. In small groups, ask students to write definitions of a selection of words and add these. Start A Curiosity Corner Hands on items are great learning stimuli. Ask students to bring in any items that they associate with the topic and display them on a table. Investigate your local museum to see if there are any loan kits that you can take advantage of in your classroom. KWL Chart Each student can create their own KWL chart (what I know, what I want to know, what I have learned) to map out prior knowledge, what they want to learn and then later, detail what they have learned. This is a good chance to come up with questions to explore as a class. Class Collage Images are very powerful learning tools. Spend a session finding, printing out and creating a class collage at the start of the unit to examine the students’ prior knowledge of the topic. Library Adventure Make a library booking and give students time to explore the library collection (physical and online) and report back about what resources might be available for this topic. Talk about what might be

needed and where else they could look if there aren’t any materials. The Top Three Game Students think of three things that they know about the topic. Pairing up with another student they exchange their points. They then move on to different pairings to exchange information. Finally have a class discussion about any new things learned or common points that were shared.

Find Out More Poster Display a ‘Find Out More’ poster on the topic and ask students to write down any ‘curly’ questions that they come across during the unit. Revisit them together or use them as fast finisher investigations. Online Blog Show your students how to keep their own blog and keep a class online journal of the topic. Create a roster so that it is updated often and keep a track of the investigations being done. Check out these sites for blogging ideas: www. blogspot.com and www.edublogs.org Newsletter Column Appoint students each week to write an article to be published in the school newsletter which contains interesting findings from the unit. Collate these at the end of the unit as a reflection of the work completed. Ideal App Design Can your class come up with an App that might help people learn about Asia? Brainstorm what it could do and how it might work. Review this at the end of the topic, are there things that need to be altered?

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6


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' SECTION ONE: book preview.

Getting To Know Asia - An Overview

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 Being A Good Neigbour A neighbour is often thought of as someone or something near or next to another. People can often interpret words differently to others. Words mean many things.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  What does it mean to be a good neighbour? How can the word ‘neighbour’ apply to a country and not just the family in your street? Conduct a class survey to determine how your class define the word ‘neighbour’. Complete the survey by placing ticks or crosses in the boxes to show if your classmates agree or disagree with the statements. Ask them to explain their opinions and write some short notes in the ‘Why?’ section. Idea

Agree

Disagree

Why?

I consider families who live in the streets nearby my neighbours. My family knows our neighbours. People should always get along with their neighbours. Neighbours can be very helpful. Being a good neighbour means being considerate. I have neighbours at school. I say hello to my neighbours when I see them. I can name two of Australia’s neighbours. It is hard work to be a good neighbour. Neighbours must always be friends.  Report Back To The Class. 1. How did most people surveyed define the word ‘neighbour’? ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ 2. Thinking about the survey, how do you define the word ‘neighbour’?

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______________________________________________________________________________

Quote “Don’t throw stones at your neighbours if your own windows are glass.” Benjamin Franklin 8


 Collaboration Promotes Global Citizenship After conducting the survey on page 8, you have probably discovered that being a good neighbour means among other things: t collaborating with one another; t working well as a team; t getting on; t helping each other out. We are all citizens of the globe, therefore we have a responsibility both to each other and to the Earth itself. It is important to work together to tackle injustice, inequality and environmental problems.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. 1. After reading the information above, define the term ‘global citizenship’ in your own words. Read your definition to the class. __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ 2. Brainstorm below how can we work with countries in Asia to promote global citizenship.

3. Below is an image which celebrates global citizenship. Create your own image which advocates global citizenship in the space below. Explain your image to the class.

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 Spotlight On The Region

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Asia is a big place and one that is made up of many different countries located across the eastern and northern hemispheres. This topic is all about the amazing and diverse countries in Asia which are Australia’s neighbours. To set the scene, let’s find out what you already know.

 Answer the questions.

1. Name as many countries in Asia as you can.

2. What do you know about these places? Brainstorm with a partner and write down your ideas.

3. Why do you think we should learn about our neighbouring countries? Can you think of three reasons? Reason 1: ___________________________________________________________________________ Reason 2: ___________________________________________________________________________ Reason 3: ___________________________________________________________________________ 4. Look at the world map below and shade where you think Asia is located.

5. What do you want to know about Asia? Which countries most interest you? Write down four questions that you would like answered while studying this topic. ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________

Newsflash

 Find Out 

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Asia is the largest continent in the world covering 30% of the planet’s land.

Asia is home to about 60% of the world’s population. 10

Is anyone in your class from Asia? What can they share with you? Maybe someone has visited an Asian country. Where did they go? What were their impressions?


 Location, Location – Explore The Region 1 As the biggest continent on our planet it is home to 48 countries and contains all manner of environments including: rainforests, snowy mountains and desert areas. It is a region rich in history, culture and traditions which have influenced the world. Asia is home to billions of people in some of the biggest cities in the world. It is a place of rapid change as development improves the lives of its citizens and problems are addressed.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Grab an atlas and locate as many of the Asian countries as you can on the map below. Tick the countries off as you locate them. When you have labelled as many countries as you can, use three different coloured pencils to shade the three areas of Asia: North-east Asia, South-east Asia and South Asia. North-east Asia:

   

China  South Korea Mongolia  Taiwan Japan North Korea

South Asia:

South-east Asia:

 Indonesia  Myanmar (Burma)  Thailand  Malaysia  Brunei

     

Singapore Vietnam Laos East Timor Philippines Cambodia

   

India Pakistan Nepal Bhutan

 Bangladesh  Sri Lanka  Maldives

East China Sea

Arabian Sea

Pacific Ocean

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Australia

11


 Location, Location – Explore The Region 2

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Answer the questions using page 11 to help you.

1. Only half of the countries in Asia are listed on page 11. How many countries are there in Asia altogether?

__________________________________________________________________________________ 2. Look at the map on page 11. Which oceans and seas border Asia? __________________________________________________________________________________ 3. Look at the map on page 11. What is the largest country in Asia? __________________________________________________________________________________ 4. Look at the map on page 11. Which is the smallest country in Asia? __________________________________________________________________________________ 5. Look at the map on page 11. Which country in Asia marked on the map is the closest to Australia? __________________________________________________________________________________

6. Look at the map on page 11. Which country in Asia marked on the map is the furthest away from Australia? __________________________________________________________________________________ 7. Look at the map on page 11. In which direction do you need to travel to get from the top of Australia to Pakistan? __________________________________________________________________________________ 8. Look at the map on page 11. In which direction do you need to travel to get from the top of Australia to Japan? __________________________________________________________________________________

Newsflash

Click It

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Russia and Turkey consider themselves part of Europe and Asia! Do you know their capital cities? Take your best guess.

12

Visit this site and check out its map. Take the challenge - can you name the countries before you hover over them with the mouse? www.yourchildlearns.com/asia_map.htm


 North-East Asia 1 The countries in North-east Asia are some of the most populous on the planet. They have all been influenced by China’s culture and way of life. Countries in North-east Asia include: China, Mongolia, Japan, North Korea, South Korea and Taiwan.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Read the facts about each country in North-east Asia then grab an atlas and locate each place on the map. Draw straight lines to connect the fact boxes to the countries marked on the map.

NORTH KOREA North Korea is located on a peninsula. North and South Korea were once one country (Korea) before civil war divided it. Relations are still tense today.

MONGOLIA Sometimes considered part of central Asia, Mongolia is covered in deserts and grasslands. Its people were traditionally nomadic and used eagles to help them hunt. The country is rich in natural resources.

Russia

SOUTH KOREA A very mountainous country, this presidential republic has a high standard of living in comparison to its neighbour North Korea. Samsung and LG are South Korean companies selling most of the world’s mobile phones.

Nepal

CHINA The largest country in Noth-east Asia and home to more people than anywhere else on earth.

Bangladesh Laos

JAPAN Phillipines

TAIWAN About half the size of Tasmania, Taiwan is seismically active and one of the most densely populated areas of the world due to its small size.

One of our most important trading partners, Australia and Japan have enjoyed good business relations. Made up of many islands, Japan is rich in tradition and has also developed some of the world’s most innovative technology.

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13


 North-East Asia 2 The countries in North-east Asia are some of the most populous on the planet. They have all been influenced by China’s culture and way of life. Countries in North-east Asia include: China, Mongolia, Japan, North Korea, South Korea and Taiwan.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Use your research skills together with what you already know to complete the fact files on the countries in North-east Asia listed below. Cut the fact files out and staple them together to create a flip book.

China

Mongolia

Capital city: _______________________

Capital city: _______________________

Population: ________________________

Population: ________________________

Two rivers:

Two mountain ranges:

__________________________________

__________________________________

__________________________________

__________________________________

Two famous attractions:

Type of landscape:

__________________________________

__________________________________

__________________________________

Religion: __________________________

Japan

North Korea

Capital city: _______________________

Capital city: _______________________

Population: ________________________

Population: ________________________

Largest island:

Language spoken:

__________________________________

__________________________________

Foods that are eaten:

Form of government:

__________________________________

__________________________________

Two Japanese sports:

Currency:

__________________________________

__________________________________

South Korea

Taiwan

Capital city: _______________________

Capital city: _______________________

Population: ________________________

Population: ________________________

Main exports: ______________________

Language spoken: __________________

__________________________________

Currency:__________________________

Currency:__________________________

National sport: _____________________

Tourist Attractions: __________________

Food Specialties: ____________________

__________________________________

__________________________________

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14


 South-East Asia 1 Moving a little closer to Australia, the countries named on this page and on page 16 are part of South-east Asia. These countries are smaller than those in North-east Asia but each has its own unique features and culture. Indonesia, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore, Vietnam, Laos, East Timor, the Philippines and Cambodia all make up South-east Asia.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Read the facts about each South-east Asia country then grab an atlas and locate each place on the map. Draw straight lines to connect the fact boxes to the countries marked on the map.

THAILAND Headed by King Rama, this monarchy attracts a large number of tourists to its capital and is renowned for its traditional food around the world.

LAOS

BRUNEI

Landlocked by Vietnam and Thailand, it is a mountainous country rich in minerals.

PHILIPPINES

The small nation of Brunei is located on the island of Borneo and surrounded by Malaysia. It has rich oil and gas fields and became independent from the United Kingdom in 1984.

North of Indonesia and prone to earthquakes and cyclones, over 7,000 islands make up the nation.

MYANMAR Also known as Burma, the country has been under military rule since 1962, although this is slowly changing. It is a country rich in mineral resources.

SINGAPORE South China Sea

Made up of 63 islands, Singapore is home to over 5 million people and is one of the busiest ports in the world.

CAMBODIA Over 14 million people live in Cambodia which is one of the few Asia countries to have a royal family. The nation suffered because of war and many land mines are still located there today.

Sumatra

VIETNAM Bordering the South China Sea and originally colonised by France, the country had a major civil war which ended in the 1970s.

INDONESIA With over 17,000 islands the Indonesian archipelago is home to 238 million people and has an incredible biodiversity of species. It is a country that has recently been affected severely by natural disasters.

MALAYSIA A small nation made up of two geographical parts. Malay is its official language although English is very widely spoken.

EAST TIMOR One of Australia’s closest island nations, East Timor has struggled for independence from Indonesia and is rich in gas resources.

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15


 South-East Asia 2 The countries named on this page and on page 15 are part of South-east Asia. These countries are smaller than those in North-east Asia but each has its own unique features and culture.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Using the information on page 15 together with your research skills, write down three facts about each country in South-east Asia listed below.

Fact 1

Fact 2

Fact 3

Indonesia

Myanmar

Thailand

Malaysia

Brunei

Singapore

Vietnam

Laos

East Timor The Philippines

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Cambodia 16


 South Asia 1 Let’s look at countries in South Asia this time. They are: India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and the Maldives. All of these countries have a rich trading history with Australia.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Read the facts about each country in South Asia then grab an atlas and locate each place on the map. Draw straight lines to connect the fact boxes to the countries marked on the map.

INDIA PAKISTAN

Home to over 1.2 billion people, it is one of the fastest growing countries in the world.

Is a muslim country with English as one of its official languages. Pakistan is geographically diverse and home to the very rare snow leopard.

BANGLADESH A democracy, the country is low-lying and faces challenges of flooding in the future due to climate change. It is home to the endangered Royal Bengal Tiger.

THE MALDIVES A chain of islands once colonised by the British, the Maldives is the smallest Asian nation both in population numbers and land size.

NEPAL

BHUTAN This small, landlocked country features a dragon on its flag and has an economy based on agriculture. It is known as one of the happiest Asian countries.

SRI LANKA This island country is located south of India and has a rich history due to its location. It is an important producer of tea and coffee.

Known best as having eight of the highest mountains in the world, tourism is a major industry in this country.

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 South Asia 2 Countries in South Asia have a rich trading history with Australia. There are seven countries which make up South Asia.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Use the Australian DFAT website to find out and record why each South Asia country is important to Australia: www.dfat.gov.au/geo/

Australian exports

The Maldives

Sri Lanka

Bangladesh

Bhutan

Nepal

Pakistan

India

Australian imports

Why is it important to maintain our relationship with this country?

18

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 Papua New Guinea And New Zealand Let’s get to know the two countries right on our doorstep. New Zealand has long been a very close ally (friend and supporter) of Australia and millions of people move between our nations each year either for tourism or long term opportunities. Papua New Guinea is a developing country that Australia has continually supported by helping to better schools and health care there.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Use your research skills together with what you already know to fill in the facts boxes about each country.

NEW ZEALAND Named by the Maori people “Aotearoa” and thought to mean: home of the long, white cloud. Capital:

________________________ Fact 1: ___________________________________

Government:

________________________

Size:

________________________

Population:

________________________ Fact 3: ___________________________________

Fact 2: ___________________________________

PAPUA NEW GUINEA One of the most culturally diverse places with over 800 languages. Capital:

________________________ Fact 1: ___________________________________

Government:

________________________

Size:

________________________

Population:

________________________ Fact 3: ___________________________________

Fact 2: ___________________________________

 Shade and label Papua New Guinea and New Zealand on the map below. Solomon Islands PACIFIC ISLANDS

1. Which Australian state is the furthest away from New Zealand? ________________________

Vanuatu Fiji

Australia

New Caledonia

2. Which Australian state is closest to Papua New Guinea? ________________________

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3. Shade where you live on the map. Are you closer to New Zealand or Papua New Guinea? ________________________ 19


 Population Watch 1 At the start of the 20th Century, there were less than 2 billion people living on Earth. Today there are over 7 billion of us and our numbers are growing quickly. Asia is the biggest contributor to this growing population. Knowing how to interpret statistics (collections of information and data) is important because this helps us to make sense of our world and make decisions about what we might need to do in the future.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Study the pie chart and the bar graph below, then answer the questions on page 21.

World Population By Continent Oceania 0.53 %

Africa 14.57 %

South A er ic 5.66 m % a North America 7.75 %

Asia 60.67 %

Europe 10.82 %

Population of 20 major countries in 2010 and 2030

1500 1400

Population (millions)

1300

Source: UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (2011).

Tanzania 82 million

Iran 84 million

Turkey 87 million

Vietnam 101 million

DR Congo 106 million

Ethiopia 118 million

Japan 120 million

Philippines 126 million

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0

20

Decrease

Egypt 106 million

100

Russian Fed. 136 million

200

Bangladesh 182 million

300

Brazil 220 million

400

Pakistan 234 million

500

Nigeria 258 million

600

Indonesia 280 million

700

USA 362 million

800

Europe 516 million

900

China 1383 million

1000

India 1523 million

Population in millions

1100

Mexico 135 million

in 2030 in 2010

1200


 Population Watch 2

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Use the pie chart and the bar graph on page 20 to answer the questions below.

1. Which continent has the smallest population?__________________________________________

2. Which continent has the largest population? ___________________________________________ 3. List, in order, five countries that had the highest population in 2010.

___________________________________________________________________________________

4. By 2030 which country is predicted to have increased its population by the greatest amount? Why do you think this is? ___________________________________________________________________________________ 5. What problems does having a large population bring? ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ 6. Some countries have a population policy. Why has China introduced its one child policy? ___________________________________________________________________________________ 7. What do you think about China’s 1 child policy? Do you think that other countries should adopt this policy. Explain your answer. ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ 8. How does the bar graph show the effects of China’s one child policy? ___________________________________________________________________________________ 9. Which countries are expected to undergo a fall in their populations by 2030? Why do you think this is? ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ 10. Do you think that the Australian population will increase or decrease by 2030? Explain your answer. ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________  INVESTIGATE Population numbers are hard to visualise. What could we use to show a million and a billion in an easy way? Sheets of paper? Paper clips? Paddle pops? How many packets would you need? Work out the best way to show a million and make a PowerPoint to explain your concept to the class (take pictures of your investigations).

Newsflash

Click It

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A census is the tool used to determine population and other key information about a country. In Australia the national census is conducted every five years.

Watch this short movie about the growing world population: www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s3354554.htm

21


 Language Alert There are hundreds of languages spoken in Asia and they are quite different from English. Some of them have different alphabetical systems, traditional symbols and sounds. There are local dialects (slight variations to a main language) and like Australia, there are languages that are no longer spoken. In Australia, our indigenous cultures once spoke over 300 different languages but over time these have become less used and many are now obsolete. Language changes over time to reflect culture - new words are created and others are replaced.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Use your online research skills to complete the table.

Language Name

Countries Spoken

How To Say Hello

Features Of The Language

Ni hao

Japan

Indonesian

Selamat pagi

Korea

Tok Pisin



Hanja characters

Gude

Pidgin language or mix

The Australian Government is encouraging students to learn more Asian languages. Do you think this is a good idea? Write your opinion below. DISCUSS IT

Top Three Reasons For Learning Asian Languages

Quote

Top Three Reasons Against Learning Asian Languages

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“One language sets you in a corridor for life. Two languages opens every door along the way.� Frank Smith 22

Click It

Now watch this short clip. Have your thoughts changed at all?

www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s3624406.htm


 Asian Numbers India is one of the most populated and fastest growing nations in the world. Over 180 million people speak Hindi in India and other parts of the world. Numbers in Hindi look very different to the ones that we are familiar with (1, 2, 3, etc.), but just like learning anything else, it gets easier the more you practise. Indonesian is a little easier to remember because the same numbers (1,2,3, etc.) are used.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Trace the numbers in Hindi and see if you can remember how to say and write them. It means that you will be able to communicate with more people and this might even inspire you to want to learn more Hindi, and one day, become fluent.

1

2

3

4

5

Ek

Do

Tin

Chaar

Pamch

6

7

8

9

10

Chay

Saat

Ath

Nau

Das

Number

Hindi

Number

Hindi

 Rewrite the Indonesian words for the numbers 1-10 below. This will help you to remember them. Then count to 10 in Indonesian. Indonesian

satu

dua

tiga

empat

lima

enam

tujuh

Number

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

delapan sembilan sepuluh 8

9

1. _____________________________

6. _____________________________

2. _____________________________

7. _____________________________

3. _____________________________

8. _____________________________

4. _____________________________

9. _____________________________

5. _____________________________

10. _____________________________

10

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Newsflash

Every year India makes more movies than any other country. They are made in Mumbai which used to be called Bombay and this resulted in the studios being known as “Bollywood�. The movies are often full of music and dance with a dramatic storyline.

23


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' SECTION TWO: book preview.

The Environment In Asia And Australia

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 Ecosystems 1 We are surrounded by ecosystems - living things that rely on each other in a particular location. It is a balancing act - when something changes in an ecosystem, other living things have to adapt. Sometimes changes are due to human activity (like new buildings being developed or forests being cleared) and other times by nature (natural disasters).

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Predict what might happen in the ecosystems outlined below. Write your responses in the space provided.

CORAL REEFS: SOGOD BAY, PHILIPPINES What’s the story? t 25% of marine creatures live in coral reefs. t Corals are unique and can be considered animal, plant and mineral. t This ecosystem surrounds the Philippines. t Ocean acidification is impacting the reef and causing corals to become fragile. t The reef is important for people’s livelihood. What impact will the destruction of the coral reef have on people, animals and plants? Write your ideas below. t

____________________________________________________________________________

t

____________________________________________________________________________

t

____________________________________________________________________________

t

____________________________________________________________________________ LOCATE IT!

Find the Philippines on a map.

COLD DESERTS: GOBI DESERT, MONGOLIA, CHINA What’s the story? t The Gobi Desert is the largest desert in Asia with one of the greatest temperature extremes (in winter the temperature is below 30 degrees and is above 30 degrees in summer). t It is home to many special plants and animals who have adapted to live in this harsh environment. t Introduced livestock and off-road vehicles have trampled delicate grasslands. t Copper and gold is being mined in some areas of the Gobi. t The Gobi is expanding due to desertification into China and taking over grasslands there used for agriculture. What impact will the expansion of the Gobi Desert have on people, animals and plants? Also consider the impact of the introduction of mining, livestock and off-road vehicles. Write your ideas below. t

____________________________________________________________________________

t

____________________________________________________________________________

t

____________________________________________________________________________

t

____________________________________________________________________________

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LOCATE IT!

Find the Gobi Desert on a map. 25


 Ecosystems 2 Ecosystems are often classified by scientists into biomes. There are different types of biomes: deserts, tundras, tropical rainforests, grasslands, deciduous forests and coniferous forests.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Investigate the areas (ecosystems) listed below using your online research skills. Record your findings in the table provided.

What is changing the ecosystem?

Effects of the changes.

The Jungle Of Kanha National Park, India

The Ganges

Himalayas

Why the ecosystem is special.

Go to www.readyed.net Click It

26

Use this site to explore Biomes further: www.kidsgeo.com/geography-for-kids/0165-biomes.php


 Natural Features Our planet is our only home. It is important that we look after what we have and try to understand more about the Earth. Natural features develop over time because they are not human made attractions like cities and theme parks. The World Heritage List is one way in which leaders try to protect important places.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Answer the questions.

1. What is the difference between natural and human made features?

___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ 2. List two examples of natural features in Australia. ___________________________________________________________________________________ 3. List two examples of human made features in Australia. ___________________________________________________________________________________  Research two of the natural environments listed below. Record your findings in the tables. THE MALDIVES, THE RIVER YANGTZE, FORESTS OF BORNEO, TAKLIMAKAN DESERT  Chosen natural environment: ______________________________________________________

Location

Environmental Problems

Why Is It Important?

Solutions

1

 Chosen natural environment: ______________________________________________________

Location

Environmental Problems

Why Is It important?

Solutions

2

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Newsflash

Cash crops are those that are sold quickly to other countries. Sometimes they are grown on land that was previously forest - hurting local wildlife. Cash crops are often: sugar cane, rubber and pepper.

27


 Urban Environments Urban areas are usually human made cities with high population levels. Urban is a term that can describe small towns as well as large capital cities. Asia is home to huge numbers of people and its cities are extremely busy and diverse places with incredible skyscrapers and new technologies. Urban cities in Asia are home to rich and poorer people and offer a variety of living standards. Urban environments are growing as more people move to cities and away from working on the land.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Fill in the COUNTRY column below and rank the cities from 1-5 (largest to smallest). CITY NAME

COUNTRY

POPULATION (APPROX)

Karachi

21 million

Seoul

23.5 million

Beijing

19 million

Tokyo

32 million

Sydney

4.5 million

RANK (1-5)

 Look at the table and answer the questions. 1. Which city has the largest population? ________________________________________________ 2. Are the named cities in developed or developing nations? ________________________________ 3. Which city is the largest in size?______________________________________________________ There are many small villages in countries in Asia. Many of these focus on making one product to sell (growing food, carving furniture, making handcrafted goods). Workers get little time off and usually all members of the family are involved. 4.

BE A DETECTIVE Look carefully at the images below and list the ways in which village and city

life in Asia would be different for a young boy. Write your answers on the back of this sheet.

CITY LIFE

VILLAGE LIFE

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 Disasters And Adaptation Natural disasters are unpredictable and affect many people. Asia has more natural disasters than the rest of the world because of its location and climate. Because many people living in Asia are not wealthy, they pay a heavy price when disasters strike and it can take years for some places to be rebuilt. Research is currently being conducted so that we can all learn more about disasters, be better prepared, and make changes so that future disasters will not cause as much damage.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Read the information, then answer the questions.

TSUNAMI, JAPAN 2011

FLOODING, SOUTH-EAST ASIA 2011

Around 2pm on 11th March 2011 an undersea earthquake off the Japanese coast triggered giant waves which travelled quickly to shore. The water travelled up to 10 kilometres inland in some places and over 15,000 people were killed. Houses and infrastructure were also destroyed and a nuclear power plant was severely damaged. Two years later the clean up is still underway. This disaster is thought to be the most expensive in the world, priced at over $235 billion US dollars.

The rainy monsoon season in South-east Asia was very heavy in 2011 and millions of people were affected by flooding in the low-lying countries of Bangladesh, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam and Laos. Several typhoons also occurred around the same time exacerbating the floods. Many farmers lost their rice because paddy fields and homes were completely inundated or destroyed. It is a record flooding event that is one of the largest of its type.

_____________________________________

1. How many countries were affected by the rainy monsoon season in South-east Asia in 2011?

2. How many people were affected?

_____________________________________

_____________________________________

2. Why were these countries affected?

3. What was the economic cost?

_____________________________________

_____________________________________

3. List some of the problems that the flooding created for those affected and explain the long term effects of these problems.

1. What was the cause of this disaster?

4. Watch this clip to see what children in Japan think: www.abc.net.au/btn/ story/s3166732.htm 5. If this happened in Australia do you think that the clean up would take so long? Explain your answer. _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________

_____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________

 On the back of this sheet name as many natural disasters as you can.

Newsflash

â˜ş Invent It

Find out how you can prepare yourself for natural disasters.

What could you create that would help people in poor areas adapt to a disaster? Draw a design on the back of this sheet.

Go to www.readyed.net

Visit http://schools.aemi.edu.au/

29


 Comparing Environmental Problems Environmental problems occur when changes impact negatively on landscapes. These changes can be both human made or natural, and can alter the way in which we live. In a world with a changing climate it is important that we understand how our environment is faring and what we can do to help.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Read about three environmental problems below.

DROUGHT – THE BIG DRY

DEFORESTATION

RISING SEA LEVELS

t Australia is one of the driest countries on Earth. Water is very precious in Australia for farming and every day life.

t Clearing trees to convert land to farming or other industry has resulted in the destruction of some of the world’s most important forests.

t Rising sea levels will threaten people living in coastal and lowlying areas.

t Long periods of drought, where regular rainfall doesn’t occur, causes problems like increased bushfire risk, poor crops and in some places can lead to famine.

t Rainforests contribute oxygen to our atmosphere and can help address climate change.

t Increasing sea levels are due to water expanding when it warms and the melting of land-based ice (glaciers and icesheets).

t The Ganges provides water and irrigation for over 500 million people in Asia. Drought here would cause terrible havoc.

t Erosion and changes to the water table also occur when forests are cleared. t Some of the most endangered forests are located in Asia (IndoBurma forest and the Sundaland). t Governments need to help farmers to adapt to better practices and see forests as important.

t Some of the largest cities could be affected by flooding.

 Use the information above to complete the cause and effect chart below. Your completed chart should show how Australia and a country in Asia are affected by human made and natural environmental changes.

Cause

Places Affected

Effect

DROUGHT

DEFORESTATION

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RISING SEA LEVEL

30


 Endangered And Invasive Species With millions of different fauna and flora on Earth, each living thing is important. Endangered species refer to animals at a high risk of becoming extinct. This may be due to human or environmental factors. Conservationists and scientists often join together to raise funds to help protect these animals. Some species are more well-known than others and so it is easier to raise money and awareness to support such species. All endangered species deserve attention because biodiversity is vital to keeping our planet healthy.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Use the websites listed below to make a list of endangered species in the table provided. You might be able to list some endangered species before accessing the websites.  www.earthsendangered.com/continent.asp?ID=3  www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/sprat/public/publicthreatenedlist. pl?wanted=fauna#other_animals_extinct

Endangered Species IN ASIA

IN AUSTRALIA

K

M

Invasive species are those that are dominating an area and causing problems for other species. Sometimes these are introduced plants and animals and sometimes they are native species that have become more dominant.

 Use a highlighter to select the species that are posing problems for Australia. Explain your choices to a friend. deer

cane toads

pigs

kangaroos

cows

prickly pear

cats

geckos

bats

horses

echidnas

sharks

 On the back of this sheet define invasive and endangered species. Use the information on this page to help you create your own definitions. Read your definitions to the class.

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Newsflash

Australia currently has 43 critically endangered fauna species.

Click It

Are you up for the challenge? Can you match the invasive species to the damage that they have caused? www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/nature/invasive-species-game.html 31


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' SECTION THREE: book preview.

Collaborating Through Migration, Trade And Aid

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 Migration - Australians Of Asian Heritage Australia is a very diverse place as people have migrated here from all around the world starting, with the arrival of the convicts transported from Britain in 1788. Later, in the 1850s, a gold rush triggered thousands of people to migrate to Australia from China, Europe, Britain and New Zealand in the hope of seeking their fortune. Today almost 4 out of every 10 Australians are migrants or children of migrants. Many people from Asia have made Australia their home and this means that Australia has accommodated many Asian traditions and beliefs.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. 1. Match each cause with an effect by drawing lines.

Cause

Effect

Civil war breaks out in a neighbouring country in Asia.

Festivals celebrating events like the Chinese New Year are held, and specific religious buildings are built.

Asian migrants bring with them different traditions and religions.

Need for language programs and services to help new migrant families settle into Australia easily.

Large numbers of Asian migrants are accepted into Australia from different language backgrounds.

Australia issues visas to people from Asia seeking asylum status.

2. How have Australians of Asian heritage influenced Australian society and culture? Think about: food, job shortages, language centres, religion, customs, etc. _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ 3. Summarise how Asian migrants affect Australia’s relationship with Asia. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

Newsflash

Click It

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Involuntary migration is when a government forces a large group of people out of an area.

It isn’t just people who have migrated across the world, the plants that we use have been taken by people to other places and introduced to new habitats as well. Explore this site to find out more: http://smithsonianeducation.org/migrations/zoofood/zoofoods.html 33


 Trade – It Matters! Trade means swapping one thing for another. It is an exchange of items or services. For example, one country might trade bananas in exchange for coffee, etc.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Countries sell things that they make in order to receive goods that they need. They export items to other places and import what is required. The ports of the world are incredibly busy with goods travelling around the world on ships, trains and planes. Fair trade is linked to the idea of ‘global citizenship’. It is about making sure that those who produce goods are paid correctly for them. People love a bargain, but sometimes the price a consumer pays doesn’t always cover the costs outlaid by the producer. Look out for Fair Trade logos on packaging.

 Complete the tasks and questions. 1. Brainstorm with a partner: What are the major goods and services that these countries trade?

Australia

China

Indonesia

2. What are three things that could happen to impact the trade of products? _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ 3. Explain how trade betters Australia’s relationship with Asia and promotes global citizenship. _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________

“No nation was ever ruined by trade.” Benjamin Franklin

_______________________________________________________________

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Newsflash

Coffee and chocolate are the most popular fair trade products brought into Australia. 34

Click It

Could you buy and sell a product to make money? Watch how the global economy is faring and make your own choices: www.imf.org/external/np/exr/center/students/trade/index.htm


 Asian Governments - Who Runs The Show? 1 All nations of the world have a government, a system that manages the country. There are different forms of government across the world. Australia is a democracy and follows a federal constitutional monarchy. This means that our Head of State is the Queen and we have an elected Prime Minister. Our politicians make decisions about how our country will work. A monarchy means that a country is governed by a King or Queen such as Thailand. Some countries are run under military rule such as Myanmar (Burma). A country governed by one person or a small group of people is called a Dictatorship (North Korea). Communist countries like China have a government that has one party holding power and has supreme authority. A temporary government which is in place before a permanent one occurs, is called transitional. There is debate in Australia regarding becoming a Republic, a form of government that does not have a monarch as head of state (Fiji and Bangladesh are both Republics).

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Find the terms listed in the wordsearch. L L W L E F E D E R A L I H S

X X N T T E I S H R L P B Y I

G D A R R X F T D I E C C L U

A T E U A D W A F I S A D M E

S J J C N V F G Z V R D O D N

T E P J S M V E S C Q N V G I

U T W P I H S R O T A T C I D

M V S J T N S M S R M S Z K S

T W G S I V E J C K I I B L Z

D B R O O D S H P E L N P B T

A D U R N H Y D W Q I U O R V

X T E V A U C K E N T M S O Q

M C Q Q L R F S Y T A M F B Y

G O V E R N M E N T R O D M X

C I L B U P E R Z G Y C W F N

t Communist

t Military

t Democracy

t Monarchy

t Dictatorship

t Republic

t Federal

t State

t Government

t Transitional

 Answer the questions below. 1. Why is it important that the Australian government has good relations with governments in Asia? ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ 2. Which types of governments might Australia struggle to see eye-to-eye with? Why? ___________________________________________________________________________________

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___________________________________________________________________________________ 3. Over what issues might governments fall out?

___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ 35


 Asian Governments – Who Runs The Show? 2

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  After reading the information on page 35, complete the boxes below.

MONARCHY

COMMUNIST STATE

t Who is in charge?

t Who is in charge?

________________________________

________________________________

t Which countries in Asia are governed by a Monarchy?

t Which countries in Asia are governed by communism?

________________________________

________________________________

t Do you think that Australia has good relations with any of these countries? Explain your answer.

t Do you think that Australia has good relations with any of these countries? Explain your answer.

________________________________

________________________________

________________________________

________________________________

________________________________

________________________________

DICTATORSHIP

REPUBLIC

t Who is in charge?

t Who is in charge?

________________________________

________________________________

t Which countries in Asia are governed by a Dictatorship?

t Which Asian countries are governed by a Monarchy?

________________________________

________________________________

t Do you think that Australia has good relations with any of these countries? Explain your answer.

t Do you think that Australia has good relations with any of these countries? Explain your answer.

________________________________

________________________________

________________________________

________________________________

________________________________

________________________________

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Newsflash

Click It

All Asian countries except Taiwan belong to the United Nations, a global body seeking to advance peace for the planet.

Get the low down on our Australian government. Visit this great site for games and ideas:

Go to www.un.org to find out more.

www.peo.gov.au/

36


 Aid: How Does Australia Help Asia? There are countries that are rich in resources and have high standards of living. These are often called developed nations and Australia and New Zealand are both in this category. This doesn’t mean that people don’t have problems in these countries or that such countries don’t have to make environmental and social improvements, but the problems in developed nations do not affect as many people as those living in developing nations. Developing nations have large numbers of people who struggle each day to access food and shelter. They do not have the luxury of excellent education or health systems. Many countries in Asia are developing, and Australia gives money to these countries to help improve the situation for people living in parts of the Asia region. Some of this money is from our Government via AusAid and the rest is from the public or from corporate donations.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Visit the websites listed below and find out how each group helps people. Write notes about the most interesting things that you find. Organisation

What They Do

Who They Help

UNICEF www.unicef.org

RED CROSS www.redcross.org.au

WORLD VISION www.worldvision.com.au BILL AND MELINDA GATES FOUNDATION www.gatesfoundation.org  Answer the questions. 1. Summarise how Australia helps Asia develop economically. ___________________________________________________________________________________ 2. Why should Australia help Asia develop economically? ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________

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Newsflash

Poverty means living without and not having enough. Aid means to help or support.

Click It

Go the extra mile, plan an activity that would take place at school to raise funds to donate to a developing nation in Asia (a dress-up day, cupcake sale, a movie lunch in the library, etc.). Make a plan and arrange a time to discuss it with your teacher. This website will help you: www.makepovertyhistory.com.au/ 37


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. SECTION FOUR:

Diversity

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 Different Religions In Asia 1 Religion is a set of beliefs that a person or group hold. Choosing what to believe in, is very personal and faith is often very important to people. Specific stories, symbols and traditions often help to explain what religions are about. Some religions may have special places, gods, goddesses and festivals that they worship and celebrate. There are thousands of different religions. Australians are free to choose any religion to worship.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Christianity is the religion of many people in the western world.

Hinduism began in India and is the world’s oldest religion starting over 4,000 years ago. Hindus believe in reincarnation and a universal soul called Braham. Islam is followed by Muslims who believe that there is only one God; Allah. Asia, the Middle East and North African countries are often Islamic. The sacred text for this belief is called the Qu’ran. Muslims are required to pray five times a day, wash before they pray and face the direction of their holy place; Mecca. Shinto is a religion followed in Japan. Spirits called Kami live in natural things and respond to human prayers. They can influence events. People pray at special Shinto shrines which are often beautiful, peaceful places connecting people to nature. There are two holy books: the Kojiki and the Nihon-ji containing ancient myths and stories which were passed down orally before they were written down. Buddhism is the main religion of many Asian countries and started in north eastern India. It is based on the teachings of Siddhartha Gautama, who came to be called the Buddha or “enlightened one”. It is different from other religions because Buddhists do not believe in a personal god, but believe in freedom from suffering. The Tripitaka is their sacred text and there are several different branches of the religion. 1. Unscramble the names of the world’s largest religions and use numbers to put them in order of their popularity. IMSLA

_______________________(over 1 billion people)

JSMIAUD

_______________________(15 million)

CTIAHRIITYS

_______________________(over 2 billion people)

HSMDUINI

_______________________(900 million)

SKIHMIS

_______________________(20 million)

BHDDUSMI

_______________________(370 million)

2. To maintain good relations with our Asian neighbours it is important to respect all religions and allow Asian immigrants to practise their religions in Australia. How can we do this?

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_______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ 39


 Different Religions In Asia 2

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Read the information on page 39 to help you to complete the chart. Highlight the key facts.

BUDDHISM

SHINTO

ISLAM

CHRISTIANITY

Religions

HINDUISM  How does your completed chart highlight countries in Asia as diverse? ___________________________________________________________________________________

Newsflash

Click It

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People who do not believe in a god are sometimes called Atheists. Agnostics are those who think it is impossible to know if there is a god or not. Pantheists believe in the universe and nature. 40

Ramadan is a special month of prayer for Muslims (who practice Islam). Watch this clip to learn more:

http://splash.abc.net.au/media?id=29466&source=search


 The Asian School Experience We sometimes take it for granted that we can go to school each day to learn something new and have fun with our friends. Over 60 million children (that is three times the population of Australia) can’t go to school because they are too poor, have to work, or live too far away. According to the United Nations, of these 60 million children, 26 million live in the Asia-Pacific region.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Read the two stories.

STORY 1 School In Japan: Hanako’s Day

STORY 2 School In Vietnam: Tran Vu’s Day

It’s an early start for me. I take the bullet train (shinkansen) to school and the day starts at 8.30am. We learn English and I really enjoy it. We wear our inside slippers at school and leave our outside shoes in lockers. Everyone has lunch in the classroom and we get a different meal each day. After lunch we have to clean our classroom and we sweep the floors, wipe all the desks and empty the rubbish. After school at 3pm I go to my Juku where I get help with the work that we have been doing. Maybe one day I will be a dentist.

I live in a busy city. Not many people can afford cars and after breakfast my mum drops me at school on her motorbike. We start the school day with language and maths lessons at 7.45am. There are 57 students in my class and sometimes it is hard to hear the teacher. We finish school at 11.30am. Many of the other children go to work after school but I go to my teacher’s house and do extra school work with her. My parents want me to study hard so that I can get a good job one day. I think that I am very lucky to have parents who care about my education.

Learn more about Japanese school life here: http://web-japan.org/kidsweb/explore/ schools/q9.html

Find out about another child’s school life who lives in India. Her name is Yoshita: www.timeforkids.com/destination/ india/day-in-life

 Imagine that one of the students above is your pen friend. In your workbook or on the back of this sheet write your first letter to him. Explain what a school day is like for you.  Complete the table below to compare your school life with Hanako’s and Tran’s. Similar To Me

Different To Me

Hanako

Tran

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Quote

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” - Nelson Mandela

Click It

This clip is all about life for children in Pakistan. Name three ways that their lives are similar to yours: www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s2555081.htm 41


 Assorted Working Conditions The jobs that are found in Australia are found in Asia as well. However, due to poorer living standards, conditions are different in Asia. Workers in Asian cities often have to work for long hours in factories for very little money making goods to sell overseas. Asian farmers use old tools and farming practices on small plots of land to make a living. Often the whole family is involved in working in some way and this can stop children from being able to go to school. People in Asia work very hard to look after their families. Farmers in Thailand use water buffaloes on their rice fields to move timber and pull carts. These animals are very important to the families who depend on them daily. Fishermen in Myanmar have row boats and use hand-made nets to catch fish. South-east Asia is home to thousands of working elephants who haul logs and carry tourists. Each elephant has a keeper and they work as a team. In Laos along the River Mekong, people sift the riverbed using pans to find specks of gold which helps them to buy more expensive items for their businesses or farms.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Use the information above to make a list of the types of technology that could make people’s lives from poorer backgrounds easier. Write the ultimate shopping list below.

Shopping List Rice farmer in rural Cambodia

Rice farmer in Queensland

_________________________ _________________________

 Compare the two people pictured above. 1. How are their working conditions different? ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 2. Who would have to work harder? ____________________________________________________

_________________________ _________________________ _________________________ _________________________ _________________________ _________________________ _________________________ _________________________ _________________________

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____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 42

_________________________ _________________________ _________________________


 Asian Influence Different cultures have different entertainment traditions. These are important ways of celebrating what makes a country special.

This is a Ready-Ed Calligraphy Music Publications' book preview. The art of writing is important to the Chinese, Korean and Japanese cultures. The Korean and Japanese languages have been adapted from Chinese characters which are drawn in certain stroke order. Special ink, brushes and scrolls are used for writing. Learning how to do calligraphy is considered an art form in these countries and is often used for special occasions.

Martial Arts Asia is well-known as the home of martial arts. Martial arts are believed to develop the mind as well as the body. Different countries have their own martial art forms. They are: kung fu (China), tae kwon do (Korea), and Judo (Japan). There are other forms of martial arts that involve using different tools like Kendo from Japan which uses a sword. Martial arts are now practised around the world, including in Australia.

There is an incredible range of traditional musical instruments that come from countries in Asia. Gongs, percussion, lutes and drums all derive from Asia. Each Asian country has its own special musical flavour.

Dance Dance was traditionally a way to tell a story. Asian countries have their own special dances which are often performed at festivals and special national days. Mongolian tsam dances are performed at Buddhist monasteries. The dances wear decorated costumes and masks to show different characters.

Performing Arts Telling a story via the performing arts is popular in Asia. Indonesia’s wayang kulit shadow puppets are controlled by a single person who often uses many puppets for each show. China’s famous operas are very popular and were often used to present political messages.

 Answer the questions. 1. Where in Australia have you seen calligraphy used? ___________________________________________________________________________________ 2. Do you do, or know someone who does martial arts? What martial arts are offered in your local area? ___________________________________________________________________________________ 3. Have you played an Asian musical instrument? Describe this instrument or one of the instruments listed above. ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ 4. Which Asian cultural activity would you most like to try and why? ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________  Write Your Own Japanese Haiku.

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An ancient form of poetry, Haikus are very short. Traditionally they were written about nature and the seasons and are only 3 lines long with 17 syllables. Have a go at writing your own on the back of this sheet.

Summer My nose is peeling (5 syllables) The big waves crash to the shore (7 syllables) Wish I wore sun cream (5 syllables)

43


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. SECTION FIVE:

Extra

Go to www.readyed.net 44


 Flag Cards

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Choose four Asian countries listed below. Cut out the cards and complete fact files on each country. Use them to put on posters, make a display or a flipbook. CAMBODIA EAST TIMOR CHINA LAOS MALAYSIA VIETNAM INDONESIA

NEW ZEALAND PAPUA NEW GUINEA INDIA BANGLADESH JAPAN SOUTH KOREA

VIETNAM SINGAPORE NORTH KOREA THAILAND MONGOLIA PAKISTAN PHILIPPINES Flag:

Flag:

Country:

Country:

Capital:

_______________________

Capital:

_______________________

Population:

_______________________

Population:

_______________________

Languages:

_______________________

Languages:

_______________________

Government: _______________________

Government: _______________________

Currency:

_______________________

Currency:

_______________________

Trade:

_______________________

Trade:

_______________________

Flag:

Flag:

Country:

Country:

Capital:

_______________________

Capital:

_______________________

Population:

_______________________

Population:

_______________________

Languages:

_______________________

Languages:

_______________________

Go to www.readyed.net

Government: _______________________

Government: _______________________

Currency:

_______________________

Currency:

_______________________

Trade:

_______________________

Trade:

_______________________ 45


 The Ultimate Trip

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  You have won $15,000 and the chance to take your family on holiday to Asia. Below are the conditions of your trip. You must: - visit at least three different countries; - include a mix of activities and attractions; - create a map of your trip showing your route. Use the itinerary below to plan your adventure. Day

Location

Activities

Transport And Accommodation

Information Source

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Newsflash

New Zealand is the destination most visited by Australians travelling overseas. 46

“A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step.� Lao Tzu


 Make A Tibetan Prayer Flag Or Lung Ta (Wind Horse) Tibetans make prayer flags to display messages of peace, goodwill and love. They are often on colourful, rectangular fabric and strung up and displayed outside. They are traditionally made in primary colours and in sets of five to represent the different elements:

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. BLUE for the sky/space WHITE for air/wind RED for fire

GREEN for water YELLOW for earth

 Follow this procedure to make your own prayer flag.

Materials t t t t

Pieces of rectangular fabric, 15cm x 10cm in five different colours (red, blue, yellow, white and green). Fabric paint or markers. Safety pins. Thick string for hanging.

Steps 1. Look at examples of prayer flags online. 2. Decide on your design and what traditional elements to use. 3. Use the space below to make a draft of your design and write your blessing or prayer. Think of a goodwill message to spread to the world. They are often blessings about long life, wisdom, good fortune and compassion.

4. Create your flag using the fabric markers. 5. Pin it to the string and hang.

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Tibetan Flag Fact 1

Tibetan Flag Fact 2

A horse, symbolizing speed or transformation, is often placed in the centre of a prayer flag, with four other animals at the corners: dragon, garuda (similar to an eagle), tiger, and snow lion.

Tibetan people believe that when the wind blows, the prayer flag blessing is spread to the world. 47


Website Cards Cut out the website cards. Hold them together with a paperclip or elastic band and pick a different one to complete each time you visit the computer room, finish early or as a homework activity.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' Geology Experiencing An preview. book How The Planet Changes Earthquake In Japan

Natural disasters can cause havoc for people. Watch the video and consider how such an event might impact you. http://splash.abc.net.au/ media?id=29484&source=upperprimary-history

Exploring Countries

Rock formations can tell us a great deal about our Earth. Check out this video and think about the Asian and Australian landscape. http://splash.abc.net.au/ media?id=30618&source=upperprimary-science

A visit To Malaysia

Asia has many countries and they are all different in their own way. This site is useful to start your investigations.

Very popular with tourists, use this site to plan what you would do on a trip to Malaysia.

www.geographia.com/indx04.htm

www.geographia.com/malaysia/ activities.html

Map Maker It used to take surveyors years to create maps before modern technology. Can you find out how they made them? Use this site to create your own special maps of the world and look at the places that interest you.

Sacred Stories Religions retell specific stories that are important for sharing ideas. Watch and listen to these animated stories collated by the British Library from different religions. Do you notice any similarities or differences?

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http://education.nationalgeographic. com/education/mapping/outlinemap/?map=Asia&ar_a=1

48

www.bl.uk/learning/cult/sacred/ stories/


Explain It Cards Get into groups of four. Cut out the cards below and turn them face down on a table. Take turns selecting from the cards. When you have selected a card, explain what you know about the idea. This is a great way to check your understanding and develop your thinking skills.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Why do we need to have good relations with neighbouring countries?

 What does it mean to be tolerant? Does this have something to do with respect?

 Who are Australia’s closest neighbours?

 In what ways has Asia influenced Australia?

 Australia is a multicultural place – what does this mean?

 How can we show that we care about our neighbours? (Both at school, home and between countries.)

 Choose an Asian country that you know – what are some of the problems that they have?

 What do we mean when we say that Asia is diverse?

 Why is the tourism industry important to Australia?

 Explain the term ‘global citizenship’.

 Choose an Asian country – what are their main industries?

 Choose an Asian country. How is school different in this country to school in Australia?

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Fast Finishers 1 Copy and laminate these cards. Give them to fast finishers, set as homework tasks or as additional activities.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' Crazy Questions book preview. No one has all of the answers and finding out is half the fun! Think back to all of the activities that you have done in class so far and make a list of the questions that remain unanswered. Check your notebooks and ask your friends to jog your memory. There are NO silly questions. Asking questions is how we have discovered so much about the world. Start your list and then work out how you will be the detective and find out answers.

Travel Ad There are so many countries competing for tourist dollars. Choose the Asian country that appeals to you the most and create a travel advertisement to encourage visitors to travel there. Find out about the country’s main attractions, food, accommodation details and transport information. Check out existing travel advertisements - online, in brochures and in the paper to work out how yours could be even better. Does it form part of a wider advertising campaign perhaps?

Be The Expert The best way to strengthen what you know is to try and explain it to someone else. Choose one of the topics that you have learnt about and write out 10 key points from memory. Next, get your audience ready. Ask a parent to listen and ask your questions at the end. Take a deep breath and tell them all about it.

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50


Fast Finishers 2 Copy and laminate these cards. Give them to fast finishers, set as homework tasks or as additional activities.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' Write A Song book preview. Asia is diverse. Can you write a song that tells about the diversity of Asia? Think about food, dress, location, environment and customs. Have a go at recording your song and if you are brave enough, share it with your class.

Donation Imagine that you have $800,000 to donate to an Asian country. Choose a country and say why it is in need of the money. How do you want it to be spent? How will your money make a difference?

Imagine If ‌ You get to be the leader of an Asian country for the day. Choose which country you will lead and do some investigation to write a speech to the public about what makes the country great. Find out what is happening in that country at the moment. What do you as the leader think is important to concentrate on? Issues like poverty, unemployment, looking after the environment or perhaps celebrating a special cultural day?

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Fast Finishers 3 Copy and laminate these cards. Give them to fast finishers, set as homework tasks or as additional activities.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' Differences / Similarities book preview. We have many things that are unique to Australia (wombats and our love of Vegemite). Create a chart that lists the differences and similarities between Australia and one other Asian neighbouring country. Print pictures to help. See if you can find at least 10 differences and 10 similarities.

Cook Up Food is a very important part of different cultures. Meals bring families together and often are times of great celebration. Do some research and find a special traditional dish from an Asian country of your choice and find one Australian dish. Make a list of the ingredients and see if you can have a banquet one night at home. Follow the recipes carefully, take some photographs of your creations and enjoy eating! Show your class the next day. Maybe you will find a new family favourite.

Learn The Lingo It is easy to forget that people around the world speak different languages than English. It is great fun to learn a new language and very good for your brain, not to mention being able to talk with so many more people. Choose an Asian language and create your own ‘important word list’. When you get to travel or maybe choose to study languages later you will have made a start! Use the internet to listen online to beginner language lessons so that you get an idea of how things sound.

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52


Vocabulary With a partner take turns in defining the words below. Use an online dictionary to find out the meanings of words that you don’t know:www.dictionary.kids.net.au

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Core Words artifact

peasant

Kingdom

India

dynasty

belief

Muslim

decade

empire

cuisine

government

state

migrants

neighbour

power

Asia

history

past

dragon

chart

language

culture

religion

travel

farming

employment

cities

economy

environment

trade

craft

art

dance

region

tradition

holy

festival

politics

business

bamboo

location

damage

storytelling

density

import

habitat

export

rural

climate

monsoon

urban

calendar

population

nationalist

ancient

treasure

citizenship

subcontinent

province

Hinduism

imperial

invasion

migration

nomadic

military

Buddhism

literature

philosophy

splendor

artisan

mercenary

tribe

marriage

Islam

karaoke

relic

education

tributary

ancestor

pollution

delta

heritage

equator

temperate

feudal

napoleon

terra cotta

A Little Tricky

Word Wizard archaeologist

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Confucianism

civilization

mosaic

denomination

Taoism

shamanism

species

typhoon

reservoir

agriculture

literacy

pharmaceuticals

prefecture

GDP

arable

peninsula 53


The Great Unscramble Are you a name whiz? It’s important to get the names of our Asian neighbours correct. After all, we do not like it when others make mistakes with Australian names.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. 1. How many can you unscramble?

Scrambled!

Unscrambled!

APJNA

LIAOMONG

GAINERPOS IEMANVT OALS PAAUP EWN NEAUIG DIAIN KISPATAN HICNA PILIHPINPSE 2. Now match the facts to the countries.

Japan

These incredible mammals eat the tender shoots of a grass called bamboo. Farmers are clearing their habitat which has made them endangered.

China

Mount Fuji is one of the most famous volcanoes in the world and the tallest mountain for this country. It last erupted 300 years ago.

Phillipines

This island country is hit by over 20 typhoons each year. The storms cause damage to property and massive landsides.

3. Come up with five of your own Asian names. Scramble them and then swap with a friend. How tricky can you be?

Scrambled!

Unscrambled!

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Answers Page 9 2. Students might make mention of: fair trade, aid (in the form of voluntary work, resources or monetary donations), migration, regular communication and meetings with governments in Asia to ensure that Australia sees eye-to-eye on environmental issues, child welfare and human rights.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Page 10 4. Students’ maps should look similar to the one below.

Page 11

Mongolia N.Korea S.Korea

Japan

Pa ki

st

an

China Nepal India

Bhutan LAOS

Taiwan

BURMA Bangladesh THAILAND VIETNAM

Philippines

CAMBODIA Sri Lanka

MALAYSIA SINGAPORE

BRUNEI

Maldives

INDONESIA EAST TIMOR

Page 12 1. 48 countries 2. Indian Ocean, Pacific Ocean, East China Sea, Arabian Sea 3. China 4. Singapore 5. East Timor 6. Mongolia 7. North West 8. North

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Page 13

Page 17

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. BHUTAN

PAKISTAN

NEPAL

MONGOLIA

INDIA

BANGLADESH

NORTH KOREA

JAPAN

SOUTH KOREA

CHINA

SRI LANKA

TAIWAN

THE MALDIVES

PHILIPPINES

India

CAMBODIA

Pakistan

VIETNAM

coal, gold, copper ores, crude petroleum

linen, rice, cotton, yarn

non-crude petroleum oils, crude petroleum oils, palm oil

Nepal

THAILAND

refined petroleum, medicaments, pearls and gems, motor vehicles

floor coverings and clothing

refined petroleum and vegetables

Bhutan

LAOS

Australian exports

some food and beverage products - there is room for development

vaccines

Bangladesh

MYANMAR

Australian imports

clothing, textiles, fertilizers

vegetables, wheat, dairy products, plastic and oil seeds

Sri Lanka

Page 15

Page 18

tea, clothing and rubber

vegetables, dairy products and wheat

The Maldives

Page 14 China: Beijing / 1.34 billion / Yangtze, Yellow / Great Wall, Forbidden City Mongolia: Ulaanbaatar / 2.8 million / Altai range, Khangai, Khentii / desert, mountain range, plateau / buddhism Japan: Tokyo / 127.8 million / Honshu / Sushi, tempura / Shinto, Sumo North Korea: Pyongyang / 3.2 million / Korean / Juche socialist republic – commonly called a dictatorship / North Korean Won South Korea: Seoul / 10.5 million / machinery, cars / South Korean Won / Deoksugung Palace, Seorak-san national park, historic city of Gyeongju, semi-tropical Jeju Island Taiwan: Taipei / 2.6 million / Mandarin / New Taiwan dollar / baseball / pork, seafood, chicken, rice and soy are common ingredients in dishes - pork geng and prok shiitake geng are popular dishes

fish

BRUNEI MALAYSIA

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INDONESIA

56

EAST TIMOR

staple foods


Page 19 New Zealand: Wellington / parliamentary system, constitutional monarchy / 268,021 km2 / 4.405 million (2011) Papua New Guinea: Port Moresby / unitary parliamentary democracy / 462, 840 km2 / 6,310,129 (2012)

Page 22 t Chinese Mandarin / China, Singapore, Taiwan / spoken by over 955 million people, uses written characters t Japanese / konnichiwa / spoken by over 124 million people, uses Chinese characters t Indonesia and East Timor / spoken by over 140 million people / written with latin script t Korean / anyoung haseyo t Papua New Guinea / developed from local dialects and English DISCUSS IT - suggested answers are as follows: Reasons For Learning Asian Languages t ability to speak with larger populations t job and business opportunities t wonderful skill Reasons Against Learning Asian Languages t a difficult task t English is popular t technology will do it for us

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Papua New Guinea

New Zealand

1. Western Australia 2. Queensland Page 21 1. Oceania 2. Asia 3. India, China, Europe, USA, Indonesia 4. India (the average number of children per family is 6 - there is a lack of birth control or education about birth control, the government has tried to control the birth rate in the past but has failed). 5. Answers will vary (limited resources, fewer job opportunities, increased need for materials, financial pressures, environmental pressures, overcrowding). 6. To control the population and prevent its growth. 7. Answers will vary. 8. China’s population is not predicted to increase as fast as the Indian population. 9. Russia and Japan – they have ageing populations. 10. Answers will vary - students might think about: women having less children or opting to have no children because of work commitments and a shift in values; migration; and the aging population.

Page 25 Coral Reefs (answers will vary) t no reef, no fishing industry t interruption to the marine ecosystems (other larger animals’ food supply altered) t corals are important fish nurseries t reduced tourism if reef is damaged Cold Deserts t sensitive ecosystems damaged t loss of habitat for local species t potential for waste from industry to damage environment t tourism could be impacted

Mongolia Gobi Desert

China

Philippines

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Page 26 HIMALAYAS

THE RIVER YANGTZE Location: Longest river in Asia located in China Environmental Problems: Industrial run off and pollution poisoning species. Why Is It important? Impacting on human health. Solutions: Government regulation for companies using the river. FORESTS OF BORNEO Location: Borneo. Environmental Problems: Deforestation of the rainforests in order to plant crops. Why Is It Important? Displacing species like orangutans and elephants, adding CO2 into the atmosphere. Solutions: Government protection, sustainable forestry encouraged. TAKLAMAKAN DESERT Location: Northwest China. Environmental Problems: Largest shifting-sand desert in the world, little vegetation, generates huge dust storms, limited water available. Why Is It Important? Harsh environment for people, not suitable for farming, dust storms impact human health, not enough water to meet demand. Solutions: Restrict the use of water.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Why the ecosystem is special: Highest mountain in the world, important tourism location, home to many unique species.

What is changing the ecosystem? Increasing tourism impacting on ecosystem, climate change altering the ice and snow.

Effects of the changes: Degradation, pollution and rubbish increasing. THE GANGES Why the ecosystem is special: Important river system, provides food for many people, home to unique animals and plants. What is changing the ecosystem? Increasing demands on the water, increased pollution. Effects of the changes: Less water in the rivers due to increased demand from people, pollution dangerous for species living in the river. THE JUNGLE OF KANHA, INDIA Why the ecosystem is special: Important sanctuary for Bengal tigers and other Indian wildlife. What is changing the ecosystem? Impact of climate change, increased tourism and potential poaching. Effects of the changes: Tiger population under threat. Page 27 1. Natural features come from the environment and are not created by humans. 2. Uluru and the Great Barrier Reef (answers will vary). 3. The Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Opera House (answers will vary). THE MALDIVES Location: Located in the Indian Ocean. Environmental Problems: Sea level rise due to climate change. Why Is It important? Damage to people’s homes and infrastructure. Solutions: World reduces carbon emissions, population relocates.

Page 28 CITY COUNTRY POPULATION RANK NAME (APPROX) (1-5) Karachi

Pakistan

21 million

3

Seoul

South Korea

23.5 million

2

Beijing

China

19 million

4

Tokyo

Japan

32 million

1

Sydney

Australia

4.5 million

5

1. Tokyo 2. Developed except Karachi. 3. Sydney has the greatest area, although it has the smallest population. 4. City life: the boy would be accustomed to crowds, pollution and noise from traffic, possibly live in a high rise small apartment, use public transport or travel by car, buy food from supermarkets, and work in an office in a variety of industries. Village life: the boy would be accustomed to a quieter

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58


life and used to open spaces. He would more than likely travel by boat or on foot, eat vegetables that he has grown and fish that he has caught, live in a single story house/hut and work on the land.

Asia migrants bring with them different traditions and religions = Festivals celebrating events like the Chinese New Year are held Large numbers of Asian migrants are accepted into Australia from different language backgrounds = Need for language programs and services to help new migrant families settle into Australia easily 2. Australians of Asian heritage have enriched Australian society and culture by introducing their foods, clothes and religions to Australian society. They have not only filled jobs but have created them too. Australians of Asian heritage add to the multicultural flavour of Australia. 3. Asian migrants help strengthen Australia’s relationship with Asia. They help Australians understand peoples of Asia and their culture and visa versa.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Page 29 Japan 1. An undersea earthquake which caused a tsunami. 2. Over 15,000 people were killed but more would have been affected. 3. Over $235 billion American dollars. 5. Probably not as we have more money and resources. South-East Asia 1. Bangladesh, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam and Laos. 2. They are low-lying countries which were experiencing typhoons at the time of the floods. 3. Farmers lost their rice and homes were destroyed. Long term this would have affected people’s income, exports, livelihood and food resources available.

Page 30 Drought Australia and The Ganges Affects farming and increases risk of bushfires in Australia. In The Ganges it would affect food supply and could lead to famine. Deforestation Indo – Burma forest and the Sundaland Climate change, changes to the water, destruction of endangered forests. Rising Sea Level as the Maldives islands.

Low lying countries such Flood houses or wipe out

Page 31 Endangered Species (list is not exhaustive) Asia: Asian Elephant, Argali, Dhole, Brown bear, Cheetah, Asian Golden Cat, Dugong, Giant Panda, Mongolian Beaver, Tiger, Snow Leopard, Wild Yak Australia: Numbat, Tasmanian Devil, Bridled Nail-tailed wallaby, Grey Nurse Shark, Northern Hairy-nosed wombat, Mary River turtle

Page 34 1. Australian imports: manufactured goods such as textiles, aircraft, telecommunications equipment, computer accessories, vehicle parts, medical equipment. Australian exports: coal, iron ores, tin ores, wool, beef, barely, raw sugar, liquefied natural gas. Chinese imports: oil and minerals fuels, metal ores, plastics and organic chemicals. Chinese exports: electrical goods and other machinery, textiles, iron and steel, optical and medial equipment. Indonesian imports: oil and gas, machinery, electrical equipment, iron and steel, vehicles. Indonesian exports: oil and gas, mineral fuels and oils, fats, oils and waxes, electrical equipment and machinery, rubber and rubber articles. 2. A natural or human-made disaster; an economic crisis; war; conflict; break down in relations between two countries. 3. Trade necessitates communication and a good working relationship. Fair trade between countries promotes global citizenship because a developed country can help a developing country’s economy through trade by supporting their industries.

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Page 33 1. Civil war breaks out in a neighbouring country in Asia = Australia issues visas to people from Asia seeking asylum status

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Page 35 L L W L E F E D E R A L I H S

X X N T T E I S H R L P B Y I

G D A R R X F T D I E C C L U

A T E U A D W A F I S A D M E

S J J C N V F G Z V R D O D N

T E P J S M V E S C Q N V G I

U T W P I H S R O T A T C I D

M V S J T N S M S R M S Z K S

T W G S I V E J C K I I B L Z

D B R O O D S H P E L N P B T

A D U R N H Y D W Q I U O R V

X T E V A U C K E N T M S O Q

M C Q Q L R F S Y T A M F B Y

G O V E R N M E N T R O D M X

C I L B U P E R Z G Y C W F N

Page 39 1. Unscramble: Islam Judaism Christianity Hinduism Sikhism Buddhism 2. Construct a variety of religious buildings which serve the needs of certain religious groups; allow religious groups to pray at certain times of the day and respect their cultures, beliefs and religious holidays.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Page 42 1. The rice farmer in Cambodia has to farm the rice by hand, whereas the rice farmer in 1. To establish and maintain trade relationships; Queensland uses machinery to harvest the to promote global citizenship; to prevent rice. conflict and wars; to encourage tourism. 2. The rice farmer in Cambodia would have to 2. Governments which do not share the same work harder because she would have to work fundamental values as Australia, such as: longer hours to pick the same amount of human rights, child welfare and equality. rice as the rice farmer in Queensland and her 3. Unfair trade; terrorism; unfair treatment of work would be more physical. citizens; mistreatment of the environment. Page 36 Monarchy: King or Queen; Thailand; It depends on the policies of the Monarch – if she/he rules in a fair way and is willing to communicate with Australia. Communist: One party who holds all power; China; Australia does have a working relationship with China but both countries have to work hard to maintain the relationship as their ideologies differ. Dictatorship: One person or a small group of people; North Korea; Australia may have strained relationships with such countries as their rulers are often power hungry and self-serving and can jeopardize the welfare of their citizens to meet their own needs. Republic: Usually a Prime Minister; Fiji and Bangladesh; depends on the policies of the leaders.

Page 54 1. Japan, Mongolia, Singapore, Vietnam, Laos, Papua New Guinea, India, Pakistan, China, Philippines. 2. CHINA These incredible mammals eat the tender shoots of a grass called bamboo. Farmers are clearing their habitat which has made them endangered. JAPAN

Mount Fuji is one of the most famous volcanoes in the world and the tallest mountain for this country. It last erupted 300 years ago.

PHILLIPINES

This island country is hit by over 20 typhoons each year. The storms cause damage to property and massive landsides.

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Page 37 1. Through fair trade; aid in the form of food, financial assistance and voluntary workers. 2. Because we are all citizens of the globe and we are each responsible for helping every citizen have access to basic needs and rights. 60


Asia: Our Neighbour, for ages 9-12 years