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WILKES-BARRE, PA

SPORTS SHOWCASE

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

$1.50

STATE GOVERNMENT FROM THE INSIDE

NCAA FOOTBALL

PENN STATE 13 IOWA 3 IRISH 59 AIR FORCE 33 AHL

BEARS 3 PENGUINS 2 NHL

FLYERS 3 DEVILS 0 DUCKS 2 RANGERS 1 PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

RAIDERS’ DAVIS DEAD AT 82

Al Davis, the renegade owner of the Oakland Raiders who bucked NFL authority while exhorting his silver-and-black team to “Just win, baby!,” died Saturday. He was 82. The Hall of Famer died at his home in Oakland, the team said. The cause of death was not immediately disclosed. Sports, 1C

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett has filled three top positions in his administration with people from Northeastern Pennsylvania. He says he looks for people of quality, but he’s also concerned with geographic balance.

A Northeast flavor

Corbett has 3 from area in top posts By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

INSIDE A NEWS: Local 3A Nation & World 5A Obituaries 2A, 7A B PEOPLE: Birthdays 8B C SPORTS: Scoreboard 2C Outdoors 12C D BUSINESS: Motley Fool 6D E VIEWS: Editorial 2E Forum 3E F ETC.: Puzzles 2F Books 5F Travel 6F G CLASSIFIED

WEATHER Zach Connors Sunny High 80. Low 50. Details, Page 14C

HARRISBURG – Gov. Tom Corbett had many decisions to make when he took office in January, and he looked to Northeastern Pennsylvania to make three of them. Corbett, 62, selected three cabinet members with deep roots in the region. They are: • Dan Meuser, Secretary of Revenue, of Kingston Township. • Richard J. Allan, Secretary of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, who grew up in Wilkes-Barre and worked in the family business, Allan Industries. • Frank Noonan, commissioner of the Pennsylvania State Police, who

By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER tmorgan@timesleader.com

09815 10077

Richard J. Allan heads Conservation and Natural Resources.

State Police Commissioner Frank Noonan has a military background.

has lived in Clarks Summit for 30 years. “All three are good men,” Corbett said. “They possess good character and they have good judgment. And they are personable and can work with people.” Corbett, who served as the state’s Attorney General before taking over the governor’s office, said having

worked with Noonan since 2005 made him an easy choice. Corbett said Noonan is a decision maker who had the background for the job. Noonan is a Marine Corps veteran of the Vietnam War and worked for the FBI before coming to the AG’s office as senior agent/lead investigator. “I asked Frank to become senior

agent when Cliff O’Hara retired in 2009,” Corbett said. “He can work with people, and he can make decisions. And I felt it was important to have a state police commissioner from outside of the state police ranks. Frank brought a fresh perspective to the job.” See POSTS, Page 8A

No joke: Frivolous suits by prisoners costly Inmates have the right to sue, and taxpayers are on the hook – even for the baseless legal actions.

6

Dan Meuser of Kingston Township is Secretary of Revenue.

Luzerne County prison officials anticipated that state prisoners Shawn Quinnones and Anthony Gray would cause problems when they arrived at the county lockup in 2007 to await trial on charges of assaulting a state prison guard. The inmates had numerous incidents of misconduct while housed at the State Correctional Institution, Dallas, and it

was expected their behavior would not improve. County officials never anticipated the roughly 10 months Quinnones and Gray spent at the prison would end up Quinnones costing taxpayers more than $89,000, however. The expense, which continues to grow, has nothing to do with the typical costs associated with housing an inmate, such as security, food or clothing. The entire cost is related to the defense of four lawsuits Quinnones and Gray, either jointly or separately, filed against the

County pays lots to defend offices in suits

prison alleging violations of their rights during their short stints there. The inmates, who are representing themselves, have made myriad claims in the suits, ranging from allegations of abuse to procedural violations relating to deductions taken from their inmate accounts. The cases are among numerous lawsuits that have been filed against the prison and other county agencies in recent years by inmates and others who are unhappy with the judicial or social welfare system. The vast majority of the suits are filed

Luzerne County pays tens of thousands of dollars each year to defend the prison and other county offices against lawsuits filed by pro-se plaintiffs – those who represent themselves without an attorney. The vast majority of these suits are ultimately deemed to be meritless and get dismissed by the courts. The county must

See SUITS, Page 14A

See COUNTY, Page 14A

By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER tmorgan@timesleader.com


K PAGE 2A

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

World of tastiness comes to the area

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THE TIMES LEADER

ON THE ROAD FOR A CAUSE

Lottery summary Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 7-6-7 Monday: 4-9-4 Tuesday: 0-5-9 (1-0-1, double draw) Wednesday: 0-7-3 Thursday: 5-5-5 Friday: 2-7-8 Saturday: 0-1-4

ny. A unique event at Mohegan Sun offers a chance to sample "We wanted to keep it affordable," said iGourmet spokeswointernational foods and wines. man Lisa Griffiths. "It’s a fun

By STEVEN FONDO Times Leader Correspondent

PLAINS TWP. – If you didn’t have a ticket for a quick European getaway this weekend, then the Fork and the Cork food and wine festival at Mohegan Sun at Poconos Downs was a fitting alternative this weekend. The annual festival, organized by iGourmet in West Pittston, had a wide array of wines and spirits, paired with painstakingly-prepared fare with an international flair. For $40, each "passenger" was issued a "passport" at the "customs" counter which granted all-inclusive access to tasting stations representing such distinct culinary destinations as Italy, France, Spain and Germa-

POLICE BLOTTER

Suspicious death under investigation HAZLETON – The Luzerne County District Attorney’s Office and city police are investigating a suspicious death in a residence at 340 E. Chestnut St. “I could confirm a male is deceased. It’s suspicious,” said District Attorney Jackie Musto Carroll. An autopsy will be done at 9:30 a.m. today at the WilkesBarre General Hospital, she said. Police said the death was reported at 6:27 a.m. Saturday and the body of a Hispanic male was found at the scene. The identity of the victim was withheld pending the notification of next of kin. Police cordoned off the 300 block of East Chestnut Street between South Poplar and South Hazle streets with crime scene tape. On Saturday afternoon investigators moved in and out of

night out for a good cause." The food was prepared by local chefs and featured a number of gourmet products, from iGourmet’s eclectic and extensive online selection. "The food is fantastic," said Sally Ann Rehkop of Dalton. "Italy was my favorite so far. I have a weakness for Italian wine." A number of celebrity chefs were on hand to engage the crowds with their culinary acumen and master sommelier (wine steward) Charlie Arturaola was there to dispense advice about the various vintages. Organizers said this year’s event benefits the local United Way with proceeds to remain in the immediate area. Donations can be made at www.forkandthecork.com. the building where the body was found. The state police forensic services unit assisted police at the scene. Police said the district attorney’s office would be releasing any further information on the investigation. “We’re working on it,” said Musto Carroll. She declined to comment further on the investigation. WILKES-BARRE – City police reported the following: • A bullet was shot into a building in the Interfaith Apartments complex on 165 N. Sherman St. early Saturday morning. Police said Charles Sott, 40, was in his apartment and heard a loud bang at 2:49 a.m. He went to the hallway where he heard the noise and saw that a glass door was shot out. Police said they found a bullet lodged in an interior stairwell door, but found no shell casing in the area. • Jason Meade, 30, of Kingston, was issued a citation on public drunkenness after police said he exposed himself and urinated on a vehicle in the area of Old River Road and Marlborough Avenue at 2:19 a.m. Sat-

Margery W. Culp October 7, 2011

M

argery W. Culp, of Kingston, passed away Friday, October 7, 2011, in the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Born in Dallas, Margery was a daughter of the late Ernest and Florence Jenkins Wood. Margery was a graduate of Dallas High School and the Wyoming Seminary Dean School of Business. She was employed as an executive secretary for the Luzerne County Intermediate Unit. Margery loved playing bridge with her friends. In previous years, she enjoyed golfing at the Lehman Country Club and was a former Girl Scout Leader. She was a member of Huntsville Christian Church for more than 50 years. Preceding her in death, in addition to her parents, was a brother, Ernest Wood Jr. Surviving are her husband of 63 years, Royal J. Culp, Kingston; daughter Julianne Bitchko and husband, Eugene W., Clarks Summit; sister, Lois Cook, Dallas; brother, Alan Wood and wife, Barbara, Raleigh, N.C.; as well as five nieces,

eight nephews, seven great-nieces and seven great-nephews. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday from the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shavertown. The Rev. Dr. William D. Lewis will officiate. Interment will be made in Huntsville Cemetery, Jackson Township. Friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home. Memorial donations, if desired, may be made to the American Heart Association, 71 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701.

Charles R. Kearn October 6, 2011 harles R. Kearn, of Bensalem, died unexpectedly Thursday, C October 6, 2011, at Capital Health

System, Trenton, N.J. Born December 22, 1948, in Hanover Township, he was a son of the late Phillip and Kathleen Quinn Kearn. Charles was a graduate of Hanover High School, class of 1967, and served in the U.S. Air Force in the Vietnam War. He retired from the Air Force as a Master Sergeant after 20 years of service. He was a Former Director of Disaster Services for the Lower Bucks County Red Cross. He was most recently employed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation in Philadelphia. Charles was preceded in death by his wife, the former Carol TrumMore Obituaries, Page 7A

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Big Four, Midday Sunday: 5-2-2-5 Monday: 9-7-0-1 Tuesday: 9-0-1-1 Wednesday: 3-6-4-3 Thursday: 2-0-2-5 Friday: 6-8-1-1 Saturday: 6-1-2-9 Quinto, Midday Sunday: 5-9-6-0-8 Monday: 0-7-8-4-4 Tuesday: 5-9-1-7-1 Wednesday: 5-0-3-8-7 Thursday: 0-3-4-5-5 Friday: 6-9-2-3-4 Saturday: 8-0-7-0-1

JACQUELINE LUKAS/THE TIMES LEADER

L

ocal cyclists gathered at Around Town Bicycles for the third Bikes Belong Rally on Saturday morning. The bikers got together and discussed a few local issues, including the Wilkes-Barre bike ordinance, biking awareness and the new proposed River Street project. Riders hope the changes will be bikefriendly. Tom Jones, owner of Around Town Bicycles, organized the event and is looking to bring more biking awareness to the city. The group took a casual ride around Wilkes-Barre. For a video presentation, scan the QR code at left into your smartphone or go to www.timesleader.com. urday. Meade showed signs of intoxication, thought he did nothing wrong and refused to provide identification to police. He was taken into custody and transported to headquarters where he was cited. He was released a short time later to a responsible, sober adult. • Robert Hontz, 55, of Berwick said Friday night a window was smashed on his Nissan Xterra while it was parked at 83 S. Franklin St. Around 9:20 p.m. he reported a laptop computer and bag and dress shoes were taken from the vehicle. • Christopher Snarski, 29, was arrested at police headquarters Friday night on an outstanding warrant receiving stolen property. • Joseph Pashia, 27, of 48 Brookside St. told police Friday that a person known to him stole computer and video equipment from him.

about the damages is asked to contact Hanover Township police at 570 825-1254. PLYMOUTH TWP. – State police reported that four construction barrels with flashing lights on Tilbury Drive were damaged between 1:30 p.m. Friday and 11 a.m. Saturday. The barrels belong to the Plymouth Township Department of Public Works at 925 W. Main St.

PITTSTON – A man was arraigned Friday in Wilkes-Barre Central Court on charges he was intoxicated inside a restaurant and struggled with officers. John Patte, 46, address listed as homeless, was charged with public drunkenness, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct. He was jailed at the Luzerne County Correctional Facility for lack of $2,000 bail. Police allege Patte was found intoxicated and had an open KINGSTON – An adult female bottle of liquor inside Donut Connection on William Street at suffered minor injuries when a vehicle struck a bicycle Saturday about 10:15 p.m. Thursday. Patte struggled with officers when he morning at the intersection of Rutter Avenue and James Street. was arrested, according to the Police said the vehicle, a Ford criminal complaint. A preliminary hearing is Windstar minivan, was traveling scheduled on Oct. 12 before north on Rutter Avenue and appeared to have stopped at the District Judge Fred Pierantoni III in Pittston. stop sign at the James Street intersection, but the male driver WILKES-BARRE – City apparently did not see the wompolice reported the following: an riding the bicycle east on • Al Maurice Ingram, 20, of James Street and struck her. Sambourne Street was charged The woman sustained minor with possession with intent to injuries but did not lose condeliver on Thursday after police sciousness, police said. said he was in possession of Police said the investigation marijuana near the intersection of the incident was continuing of Arch and Bradford streets. Saturday. • Ann Poepperling, 48, of Shavertown reported that the HAZLE TOWNSHIP – State paint on her vehicle was police charged Kevin Thomas Gray, 19, of Lansford, with retail scratched Thursday while it was theft after he allegedly removed parked in the Park and Lock North garage on North Main car parts valued at $40 from Street. Harry’s U Pull It at 2:45 p.m. • Shaheer Downey of 75 Friday. Brown St. reported that he was HANOVER TWP. – Township stabbed Thursday with scissors by a female known to him. She police reported the following: fled before police arrived and • Mark Landi of Church the wound was minor. The inStreet, Dallas said a basement window was smashed sometime vestigation is ongoing. • Police are investigating a in the past week at his residence burglary at Miners Mills Launon Dexter Street. dromat, 94 E. Main St., just after Margaret Crawford of West 2 a.m. Friday. A white male Division Street said Saturday wearing a checkered hooded that the windshield of her Satsweatshirt, jeans and sneakers urn Aura was smashed. was seen running from the busiAnyone with information

ness. Anyone with information about the burglary is asked to contact Wilkes-Barre police at 826-8114. • Police are investigating an attempted burglary at Peter’s Deli, 498 N. Main St., just after 1 a.m. Friday. A camera recorded a white male wearing a striped shirt attempting to smash a window. The man may have sped away in a brown Ford Taurus, police said. Anyone with information about the attempted burglary is asked to contact Wilkes-Barre police at 826-8114. • Police cited Jeffrey Warke, 31, of Garfield Street, Nanticoke, and Sarah Findora, 27, of Govier Street, Wilkes-Barre, with retail theft after they allegedly stole food items from Turkey Hill, North Washington Street, on Friday. • Police said Tyrone Lancaster, 29, of Hughes Street, will be cited with harassment after Amanda Jones, of Hughes Street, claimed he shoved her to the floor of a residence on Hughes Street on Thursday. • Police said a female stole clothing from Addiction clothing store at 41 S. Main St. on Friday afternoon. • James Gronski, 57, of 97 Hillside St. reported Friday that several firearms were stolen from his residence. BEAR CREEK TWP. – State police said a 26-year-old woman reported an iPod, purse and a class ring were taken from her Chevrolet Equinox while it was parked at a residence on Woodland Road in the Forest Park development. The theft occurred between 5 p.m. on Sept. 28 and 7:45 a.m. on Sept. 29. The iPod was black with the inscription “I belong to Someone” on the back. The purse was teal and contained a black wallet with a 1st. Financial credit card and Discover card. The ring was the victim’s 2003 high school ring with “Lindsey” and “Band/Art” on the outside. The stone is a yellow/brown Tiger’s Eye. The ring was valued at $130 and the iPod was worth $350. Anyone with information about the reported theft is asked to contact state police in Wyoming at 570 697-2000.

New gauge offers a better measure of the river

bower Kearn, in 2011. Surviving are children, Cynthia Kearn and her children, Robert, Alexandra and Jesse, of Bushkill; and James and Jennifer Kearn and their children, Jacob and Ryan, of Lexington, S.C.; brothers and sisters, Michael Kearn, Hanover Township; Lynda Dunn, Shavertown; Allen Kearn, Dover, Del., and Colleen Kearn, Hanover Township. Funeral will be at the convenience of the family from the Mamary-Durkin Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home. Those who desire may give donations to The Stroke & Cerebrovascular Center of New Jersey, Capital Health System, 750 Brunswick Ave., Trenton, NJ 08638. AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Tim Driscoll, Mark Beaver and Scott Sorber work on a gauge to measure the water levels of the Susquehanna River. The new gauge will be housed at 48 1 ⁄2 feet, 7 feet higher than the old gauge, giving a more accurate reading.

Treasure Hunt Sunday: 01-02-06-08-23 Monday: 06-15-19-22-29 Tuesday: 02-06-10-16-21 Wednesday: 12-15-16-20-23 Thursday: 07-11-12-21-29 Friday: 03-06-12-23-26 Saturday: 05-10-13-18-19 Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 6-4-1 Monday: 4-8-0 Tuesday: 9-5-3 Wednesday: 1-1-4 Thursday: 7-3-4 Friday: 6-9-1 Saturday: 5-7-6 Big Four, 7 p.m. Sunday: 6-5-0-4 Monday: 0-3-1-9 Tuesday: 7-4-7-6 Wednesday: 6-8-3-4 Thursday: 6-5-4-3 Friday: 2-1-4-8 Saturday: 9-5-5-8 Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 4-0-2-0-5 Monday: 5-6-9-4-8 Tuesday: 7-8-2-7-9 Wednesday: 7-2-5-0-1 Thursday: 9-6-1-4-0 Friday: 6-1-7-7-1 Saturday: 2-8-2-5-7 Cash 5 Sunday: 02-09-30-32-36 Monday: 12-15-27-33-41 Tuesday: 08-09-20-26-32 Wednesday: 07-16-19-34-42 Thursday: 05-09-19-28-31 Friday: 05-25-29-30-32 Saturday: 02-03-12-31-32 Match 6 Lotto Monday: 07-14-17-28-39-41 Thursday: 03-09-23-38-39-47 Powerball Wednesday: 07-20-43-46-54 powerball: 17 powerplay: 04 Saturday: 03-27-35-37-45 powerball: 31 powerplay: 05 Mega Millions Tuesday: 03-26-40-45-52 Megaball: 11 Megaplier: 03 Friday: 05-15-19-23-38 Megaball: 19 Megaplier: 04

OBITUARIES Barnes, Dr. David Beyer, Alice Culp, Margery Goodrich, Tracy Holmes, Katherine Kearn, Charles Maday, Leonard McLaughlin, James Medvec, Stephen Petrillo, Lucy Rukstalis, Robert Sr. Slavinski, William Urban, Wanda Willis, Richard Page 2A, 7A

BUILDING TRUST The Times Leader strives to correct errors, clarify stories and update them promptly. Corrections will appear in this spot. If you have information to help us correct an inaccuracy or cover an issue more thoroughly, call the newsroom at 829-7242.

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YA R D S A L E

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 3A

LOCAL

Red Cross uses proceeds for educational outreach services

Agency encourages HIV testing

By CAMILLE FIOTI Times Leader Correspondent

WILKES-BARRE – “It’s not who you are that puts you at risk for HIV infection, it’s what you do,’’ is the message the Prevention Education Department at the American Red Cross Wyoming Valley Chapter is trying to get out to the public. Proceeds from a community yard sale held on the grounds of the Red Cross on North Sherman Street Saturday will go toward educational outreach services and supplies the department offers.

Providing awareness about breast cancer

Although the event had a low turnout, a few donations were received in advance, said Donna Kearney, coordinator of the department. The Prevention Education Services Department is planning another fundraiser in November at Stanton Lanes. The department offers free confidential HIV testing and HIV/AIDS and STD prevention supplies to high risk people by visiting methadone clinics, jails, shelters and drug and alcohol rehabilitation centers. “We also teach the proper use of

Kearney said she and members of the Prevention Department travel to sites in a six-county area throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania with a van, equipped for one-on-one HIV testing. The Anthracite Newstand on Public Square is one of their regular stops. condoms and abstinence,” she said. Kearney said she and members of the Prevention Department travel to sites in a six-county area throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania with a van, equipped for one-on-one HIV testing. The Anthracite Newstand on Public Square is one of their

regular stops. After taking the test, patients are given the phone number for the Red Cross to get the results, which take two weeks to come back. “If somebody is homeless and they don’t call us back, we go out and find them,” said Kearney.

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WILKES-BARRE

Protest against mayor

A group of about 10 protesters called for Mayor Thomas M. Leighton to resign at a rally in front of City Hall Saturday afternoon. The rally was organized by Frank Sorick, who sought a Republican nomination to run for mayor in the May primary but lost the GOP nod to Lisa Cope. Sorick said he is calling on the mayor to resign in light of a preliminary state ethics probe into the hiring of his children as part-time city emLeighton ployees. Sorick also alleged Leighton campaigned inside a polling station in the May primaries. Also among the protesters was city resident Sandy Fonzo, who gained national attention for her outburst at ex-Judge Mark Ciavarella following his conviction on corruption charges and subsequent efforts to promote juvenile justice reform. Fonzo accused Leighton of nepotism and questioned how many underprivileged children could have used the income from the summer jobs Leighton’s children held. PLAINS TOWNSHIP

Pet balloon launch set

Mountain Top benefit combines health screenings with fun events to help Susan G. Komen for the Cure.

Plains Animal Hospital will host a balloon launch for clients who have lost a pet in the past year at 1 p.m. Oct. 16 in Kirby Park, the Pavilion by the Pond. Memories and present pets are welcome. Balloons will be provided. For further information, call 829-4030.

By STEVEN FONDO Times Leader Correspondent

MOUNTAIN TOP – The pink ribbon of the Susan G. Komen for the Cure was a familiar symbol at the Awareness on the Mountain breast cancer benefit at Crestwood High School on Saturday. The event was sponsored by the Greater Hazleton Health Alliance as part of its regional outreach and education program, with proceeds going to the Susan G. Komen organization and to breast cancer research. "It’s the first time we’re actually doing an event of this magnitude in the Mountain Top area," said Leigh Ann Wiedlich of the Alliance. "We’re excited by the opportunity to educate the community about Wiedlich said breast health.’’ the event was Wiedlich said the event was inspired by inspired by Mountain Top Mountain Top resident and owner of The Fitresident and ness Place, Diane Hanowner of The lon, who was diagFitness Place, nosed with breast canDiane Hanlon, cer in June. "I was dressing for who was diag- work and noticed a lump," said Hanlon, nosed with breast cancer who’s currently undergoing chemotherapy. in June. "Thankfully we caught it early and my prognosis is excellent." Hanlon, the wife of an area physician, stated she’s "absolutely thrilled" with the quality of oncology care available in Northeastern Pennsylvania. The all-day event featured activities for the entire family, including a classic car display, a Matchbox derby, a pumpkin decorating booth and a duck pond, as well as free health screenings and "mini" health care seminars. Hanlon and the staff from The Fitness Place conducted a Zumba class and demonstration for eager participants. "It’s important for people to be proactive about breast health," said Wiedlich. For further information or donations, call the Greater Healthcare Alliance at 570-501-6205 or visit online at ghha.org.

KINGSTON

Firm seeks prom advisers

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Julia Kapustenski, 7, of Mountain Top, draws flowers and rainbows in her square as she took part in the Chalk Festival at the River Common on Saturday.

Making a splash

Outdoor activities spotlight the river By GERI GIBBONS Times Leader Correspondent

WILKES-BARRE – The River Common Chalk Festival gave attendees the opportunity to once again enjoy the Susquehanna on Saturday, despite recent flooding. Millennium Circle was filled with local residents, many of them children, enjoying both the weather, various environmentally based displays, and the opportunity to utilize the chalk provided free of charge to craft little bits of artwork on the massive areas of concrete available at the circle. Area resident Rachel Galassi and daughter Tessa Miorelli said they worked together to add “a triangle of color” to the park. Both mother and daughter expressed gratitude to the organizers of the event for providing a chance for residents to participate in an outdoor activity after recent flooding. “We are really having fun,” said Galassi, hot dog in hand, indicating that they enjoyed both the fun and the food offerings. Organizers of the event agreed with Galassi’s assessment of success in once again allowing area residents to fully enjoy the river area. John Maday, past president of the

“Sure, we know that Millennium Circle will probably flood periodically, but we are prepared to deal with that because of long term planning, both in developing and maintaining the area.” John Maday Past president of the River Common Association

River Common Association, emphasized the three foundational keys to success of the organization: realism, optimism, and pragmatism. “Sure, we know that Millennium Circle will probably flood periodically,” said Maday, “but we are prepared to deal with that because of long term planning, both in developing and maintaining the area.” Frank Pasquini, volunteer with the organization and a director of the Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business andIndustry,reiteratedtheimportance oftheriverfrontandoffundraisinginorder to maintain the area. The Chalk Festival not only provided

area residents the opportunity for splashing chalk-based color along the side of the river, but also for learning facts about local environmental concerns. Penn State Cooperative Extension presentedinformationinregardtorecycling, composting and water shed issues. Roberta Troy, volunteer of the Penn State Extension, said if the environment was preserved in such a way that properties retained water, flooding would be less likely. “We are all part affected by the river,” said Troy, saying that the effects of flooding are often indirect and encouraging property owners to gain an understanding of watershed issues. Other presentations at the festival included the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission presenting information on local fishing opportunities, and fire safety information. Area residents seemed to enjoy all aspects of this year’s Chalk Festival, both artistic and environmental. “It was a pleasure to spend this beautiful day here and we are grateful for the wonderful weather,” said Rick and Jean Rutter, who were accompanied by their four children and granddaughter.

Chain of bras extends the message of breast cancer awareness By CAMILLE FIOTI Times Leader Correspondent

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Hundreds carry a chain of bras along the Market Street Bridge in Wilkes-Barre for the fight against breast cancer.

KINGSTON – Thousands of bras in a variety of sizes and colors lay in a large mound on the pavilion floor at Kirby Park Saturday. Frantically tying the straps together, Michael Valovich, 46, of Hazleton, joined KRZ disc jockeys Sue Barry, Rocky Rhodes and Lissa as they raced to form an enormous chain of bras that would stretch across the Market Street Bridge into Wilkes-Barre and back to the park. More than 300 people attended the third annual Bras Across

the Bridge event, sponsored by KRZ and the American Cancer Society to support breast cancer awareness. Valovich, whose wife, Kelly, is a breast cancer survivor, said this was the second year he, Kelly, and their two sons Michael, 5, and Alex, 4, participated in the event. Sporting a giant pink hat trimmed and a pink feather boa, Kelly said she never felt better. Diagnosed in December 2009, Kelly said she’s been cancer-free for more than a year, adding that she doesn’t take anything for granted anymore. Patty Lunski, 56, and Barb Dorak, 49, both of Hanover Township, dangled a hot pink,

rhinestone studded, size 36DD bra over the pile. Attached to one of the cups was a small photo of Lunski’s sister, Ann Marie Grula, who died from breast cancer in 2008 at the age of 47. As they ceremoniously dropped the bra into the heap, they remembered Grula, as well as Dorak’s stepchildren’s mother who also died of breast cancer several years ago. Roughly 20 long rows of bras were spread out on the grass as the final connections to the chain were made. Many of the bras were inscribed with messages honoring loved ones who fought breast cancer.

The law firm of Fellerman & Ciarimboli is seeking high school teachers, principals, prom advisers and SADD advisers to serve on its Safe Prom Pledge Planning Committee. There will be a meeting to plan for Safe Prom Pledge 2012 on Oct. 20 at 4 p.m. at the offices of Fellerman and Ciarimboli, 183 Market St., Suite 200, Kingston. All interested high school educators from Luzerne and Lackawanna counties are welcome, and responses are required. RSVP to pchaiken@fclawpc.com or call 714-HURT. HARRISBURG

Disaster aid deadline is set

Residents and business owners who sustained damage from Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee have until Nov. 14 to apply for disaster assistance. Anyone who has not yet applied can contact the Federal Emergency Management Agency at 1-800-621-3362. Operators take calls from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week. The deadline to submit a loan application to the U.S. Small Business Administration for disaster-related losses also is Nov. 14. For information, contact the SBA Service Center at 1-800659-2955 from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday. HARRISBURG

Boback wants gaming bill

Rep. Karen Boback, R-Harveys Lake, has introduced legislation to require the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board to report information about its executive sessions to the governor and state legislature, stating it would ensure that the board is appropriately heeding state Right to Know and Sunshine acts. The bill adds language to existing law requiring the board include in its annual reports information about the number of executive sessions it conducted and the Boback agenda of those sessions. The bill is part of a package of legislation largely based on a grand jury recommendations for rehabilitating the board. Other legislation in the 14-bill package would: • Require annual audits of the board by an independent state agency. • Prohibit any person from serving as a member of the PGCB if he or she was an applicant for or holder of a Pennsylvania slot machine license. • Prohibit any board employee from obtaining employment with a gaming entity or associated firm for two years.


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PRODUCE Premium Size and Quality - 5 lb. Bag

SHURFINE FRESH RUSSET POTATOES with Gold Card

99¢

99

¢

ea.

Sanderson Farms Grade “A”

ShurSave Fresh

ALL NATURAL SPLIT CHICKEN BREASTS

80% LEAN GROUND BEEF

2

Large Stalk, Dole Brand

CALIFORNIA PREMIUM CELERY

30 HANOVER ST. WILKES-BARRE 970-4460

ANY SIZE PKG.

49 lb.

with Gold Card

99

¢

ANY SIZE PKG.

lb.

with Gold Card

GROCERY CAMPBELL’S SOUP

Up to 54 Varieties On Sale! Excludes: Tomato, Chicken Noodle, Cream of Chicken, Cream of Mushroom, Cream of Shrimp & Oyster Stew 10.511.5 oz Can with Gold Card

500

5/

RONZONI OR RONZONI SMART TASTE PASTA 12 oz. Smart Taste or 16 oz. Ronzoni

with Gold Card

Locally Grown, Your Choice HALF PECK TOTE BAG - GALA, MCINTOSH, GINGER GOLD, OR RED DELICIOUS APPLES

99

¢

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lb.

ShurSave Fresh FROZEN BONE-IN NEW YORK SELF-BASTING STRIP STEAKS TURKEY BREASTS

1

FRESH EXPRESS BAGGED SALADS 4-13.9 oz. Pkg.

Excludes Bowls, Organic and Garden Salads

500

2/

Top With Ice Cream!

8 INCH APPLE PIE

2

99

Each

lb.

with Gold Card

with Gold Card

BAKERY

5

49

All Varieties

99 lb.

4

149

All Varieties, 26-26.5 oz. Can

500

5/

with Gold Card

STROEHMANN, SUNBEAM OR DUTCH COUNTRY BREAD White King/Ranch or Dutch Country 20-24 oz. Loaf BUY 1, GET 1

OF THE SAME

Regular or Black Pepper

with Gold Card

3

99

Makes A Tasty Sandwich! 6 Count Pkg.

99

lb.

with Gold Card

12 oz. Pkg.

KELLOGG’S CEREAL

16 or 18 oz. Frosted, 16 oz. Blueberry Muffin, 16.3 Oz. Strawberry, 16.5 oz. Maple Brown Sugar, 18 oz. Touch of Fruit or 15.8 oz. Little Bites Chocolate or Original Mini-Wheats, 14.1 oz. Crunchy Nut Golden Honey, 10.8 oz. Crunchy Nut Roasted Nut or 20 oz. Raisin Bran

LEAN CUISINE PANINI OR ENTREES All Varieties, 6-11.75 oz. Pkg.

PUREX ORIGINAL OR COMPLETE LIQUID LAUNDRY DETERGENT 72 fl. oz. Btl. Original or 60 fl. oz Btl. Complete with Zout

with Gold Card

with Gold Card

WOW!

Shurfine Soda

1000

SAVE AT LEAST 3.68 on 4

with Gold Card

with Gold Card

GREEN’S ICE CREAM OR KEMP’S FROZEN YOGURT

5

2/

Assorted Varieties

12 OZ./12 PK. CANS

5/

All Varieties, 1.5 Qt. Cont.

8

4/ 88 $

00

Earn Up To

DAIRY

SHURFINE ORANGE JUICE

25

$

00

OFF

Your Thanksgiving Turkey Dinner Purchases with

Regular, Calcium Rich or With Pulp 64 oz. Ctn.

400

2/

with Gold Card

SHURFINE DRINKS

Rewards!

All Var Varieties - Gallon Jug

4

00

with Gold Card

Delicious Party Trays

MONEY ORDERS

See store for details.

399

TASTYKAKE FAMILY PACKS All Varieties - Excludes Doublicious, Sugar Free Items, and Alex’s Lemon Krimpets 7.5-14 oz. Box

1100

5/

with Gold Card

2.22 EACH

Believe It or Not...It’s Time To

with Gold Card

2/

500

2/

with Gold Card

with Gold Card

FROZEN

with Gold Card

FREE

KUNZLER SAHLEN’S SMOKEHOUSE HAM AUTHENTIC SELECTS CENTER CUT BACON

REGULAR OR WHEAT CLUB ROLLS

500

5/

HUNT’S PASTA SAUCE

with Gold Card

Ham Off The Bone

with Gold Card

Excludes Jumbo Shells & Lasagna

CAPRI SUN OR KOOL-AID JAMMERS JUICE All Varieties - 10 Pk/6 oz. Pouches

4

2/

00

with Gold Card

Whole Kernel Sweet Corn or Cut Green Beans

GREEN GIANT VEGETABLES 4 Pk./ 58-61 oz. Pkg. with Gold Card

299

CHEF BOYARDEE PASTA All Varieties - 14.5-15 oz. Can

500

5/

Just use your Gold Card every time you shop between Oct. 2 and Nov. 12, 2011 to qualify.

with Gold Card

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Obama administration has put long-term care plan on hold

‘Zombie’ program cuts deficit By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press

AP PHOTO

Ready to slide into ski season

A skier jumps in some fresh powder during the opening of ski season at Wolf Creek Ski Area in Pagosa Springs, Colo., Saturday. With a 36 inch base, Wolf Creek is the first resort to turn on its lifts this season.

WASHINGTON — They’re calling it the zombie in the budget. It’s a long-term care plan the Obama administration has put on hold, fearing it could go bust if actually implemented. Yet while the program exists on paper, monthly premiums the government may never collect count as reducing federal deficits. Real or not, that’s $80 billion over the next 10 years. The Community Living Assistance Services and Supports program, CLASS for short, may just keep lurching along indefinitely. It would join other peculiar creatures of the federal budget such as “trust funds” that are actually more like

IOUs and Medicare cuts that can be counted twice. “It’s a gimmick that produces phantom savings,” said Robert Bixby, executive director of the Concord Coalition, a nonpartisan group that advocates deficit control. “That money should have never been counted as deficit reduction because it was supposed to be set aside to pay for benefits,” Bixby added. “The fact that they’re not actually doing anything with the program sort of compounds the gimmick.” The program was created under President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul, and arguably provided much of the 10-year, $143 billion in savings claimed under the law. But now some Capitol

Hill aides have dubbed CLASS a “budget zombie.” The administration recently asked Congress to hold off on money for implementingCLASSasittriestofindawayto make it solvent for the long run. The chief financial expert for CLASS left the government, saying the program’s staff was abruptly reassigned. CLASS was a priority of the late Democratic Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts, who envisioned a voluntary, long-term care insurance plan sponsored by the government, without the overhead costs of private insurers, or the rigorous pre-screening they require. CLASS beneficiaries would pay an affordable monthly premium while they were healthy and working. In exchange,

they could collect a modest daily cash benefit if they became disabled. Congress included CLASS in the health care law, specifying it must be self-sustaining. Kennedy’s idea was to give families some financial breathing room. The burden of long-term care is growing. But a central design flaw dogged CLASS from the beginning. Unless large numbers of healthy people willingly sign up during their working years, soaring premiums driven by the needs of disabled beneficiaries would destabilize it, eventually requiringataxpayerbailout.Themainreason the program produced budget savings in its first10 years was a rule that enrollees pay in for at least five years before collecting benefits.

Killing of leader sparks anger

GREED IS NOT GOOD IN PHILADELPHIA

BANGKOK

Floods threatening Bangkok

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hailand’s prime minister is warning that rising floodwaters which have wreaked havoc across the nation are now threatening the capital, Bangkok, as the death toll from the worst monsoon rains in decades rose Saturday to 253. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra said the flooding — which has severed rail links with the north, shut dozens of highways and swamped ancient Buddhist temples in the city of Ayutthaya — has reached a crisis level. Bangkok has so far been spared serious damage, but many fear it could be inundated as large amounts of water flows from submerged northern rice fields toward the Gulf of Thailand.

Security forces fire into a crowd of mourners for opposition leader in Syria.

ORLANDO, FLA.

By ZEINA KARAM Associated Press

Anthony deposed in lawsuit Disguised in sunglasses and a baseball cap, Casey Anthony was deposed Saturday for a civil lawsuit that accuses her of ruining another woman’s reputation. Attorneys for Zenaida Gonzalez used videoconferencing to question Anthony, who was at an undisclosed location in Florida. John Morgan, who is representing Gonzalez, said he asked Anthony about the disappearance of her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee. Anthony told detectives in 2008 that Caylee had been kidnapped by a nanny named Zenaida Gonzalez. Detectives said no such baby sitter existed. Morgan’s client, who has the same name as the fictional baby sitter, has sued Anthony, claiming her reputation was ruined.

AP PHOTO

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eople hold signs as they walk in the street during their march from City Hall to the Independence National Historical Park Saturday in Philadelphia. Organizers of what is being called Occupy Philadelphia say the demonstration is meant to be a stand against corporate greed.

Libyans face resistance in battle for Gadhafi’s hometown Leaders have promised to declare liberation after Sirte is captured, even though fighting continues.

TOKYO

By CHRISTOPHER GILLETTE and KIM GAMEL Associated Press

Japan has grounded its F-15 fighters for the second time in three months after a fuel tank and parts of a mock missile fell off a jet on a training mission, officials said Saturday. Japan Air Self-Defense Force officials said that the flight suspension involves all missions except emergency scrambles and will last until the safety of Japan’s 202 F-15 fighters has been confirmed. No one was injured in Friday’s incident near Komatsu base in western Japan and the pilot landed safely. In July, Japan’s F-15s were grounded after one of the jets crashed into the East China Sea.

SIRTE, Libya — With NATO warplanes circling overhead, revolutionary fighters battled block by block Saturday as snipers rained fire from rooftops in fierce street fighting in Moammar Gadhafi’s hometown — the most important remaining bastion of support for the fugitive leader. ThebattleforSirteiscrucialbecauseLibya’s new leaders have promised to declare liberation after it is captured even though fighting continues elsewhere and Gadhafi remains on the run. That will allow them to move forward with setting a timeline for elections and establishing normalcy in the oil-rich North African nation. Revolutionary forces launched a major attack on Friday, pushing into the Mediterranean coastal city from the west, east

F-15s grounded again

ARBUTUS, MD.

Hazmat sent to bleach fight Authorities in Maryland say two women threw bleach and another chemical on each other during a fight at a Walmart, prompting officials to evacuate the store for two hours and call in a hazardous materials team. Fire officials say 19 people had to be taken to hospitals, although only one was thought to have serious injuries. That person was taken to the Wilmer Eye Institute with a potentially serious eye injury. Fire officials were called to the store in the Baltimore suburb of Arbutus shortly before 11 a.m. Saturday.

Flu Shots Are Here!

Libyan revolutionary fighters fire toward pro-Gadhafi forces in Sirte, Libya, Saturday. Rebel forces have besieged Sirte since mid September but have not managed to penetrate the heart of the city because of fierce resistance from loyalists inside the town. AP PHOTO

and south after a three week siege from the outskirts in which they said they were giving civilians time to flee. Gadhafi forces also remain entrenched in the central city of Bani Walid, but the transitional leaders say they will declare liberation without it because Sirte’s fall will give them control over all seaports and harbors. British Defense Secretary Liam Fox pledged to keep up NATO airstrikes even after Sirte’s fall, saying the international

military action would continue as long as the remnants of the regime pose a risk to the people of Libya. “We have a message for those who are still fighting for Gadhafi that the game is over, you have been rejected by the people of Libya,” he told reporters Saturday in Tripoli. Anti-Gadhafi forces met strong resistance as they pushed to within less than half a mile from loyalist fighters dug in around Sirte’s convention center .

BEIRUT — More than 50,000 mourners marched through the capital of Syria’s Kurdish heartland Saturday in a funeral procession for one of the country’s most prominent opposition figures a day after his assassination. Security forces fired into the crowds, killingfivepeople,witnessessaid. The turnout was by far the The turnout largest in the was by far the Kurdish northeast since the largest in the start of the up- Kurdish rising against northeast President Bash- since the ar Assad’s autocratic regime start of the seven months uprising. ago. Butitremains to be seen whether Friday’s slaying of charismatic Kurdish opposition figure Mashaal Tammo will trigger a sustained, large-scale outpouring by Syria’s Kurds that might bolster the wider uprising against Assad taking place across the nation. Despite the gunfire, crowds pouring into the streets of Qamishli called on Assad to step down, chanting, “Leave! Leave!” — adopting the cry used by tens of thousands of other Syrian protesters during the uprising. Some demanded Assad’s execution; othersrippeddownastatueof hislate father and predecessor, Hafez Assad. Tammo was killed Friday by masked men who burst into an apartment and gunned him down.

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CMYK SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com ROBERT A. RUKSTALIS SR., 73, of John Street, Kingston, died Saturday, October 8, 2011, at the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Hugh B. Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. KATHLEEN M. HOLMES, 51, of Plane Street, Avoca, passed away Saturday, October 8, 2011, at Hospice Community Care, Inpatient Unit, Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre. Funeral arrangements are pending from the George A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley. TRACY C. GOODRICH, 65, of Gill Street, Dupont, died Thursday, October 6, 2011, at Kindred Hospital Wyoming Valley, WilkesBarre. Born in Richmond, Vt., he was a son of the late Tracy and Mary Wilbur Goodrich. He was preceded in death by his son, James Goodrich; and brother, Robert Goodrich. Tracy served in the U.S. Army and was employed as a truck driver for Landstar. Surviving are his wife, Cheryl Yedesko Goodrich; stepson, Damiel Fryzel, Dupont; brother, Charles Goodrich, Buffalo, N.Y.; and sisters, Janet Torrey, Richmond, Vt., and Geraldine Phelps, Florida. Funeral will be held at the convenience of the family from the Yeosock Funeral Home, Plains Township.

Wanda Z. Urban October 7, 2011

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anda Z. Urban, 88, formerly of Exeter, passed away Friday, October 7, 2011, at United Methodist Homes, Wesley Village Campus, Jenkins Township. Born in Philadelphia, she was a daughter of the late Stanley and Veronica Baltanas Zukauskas. She was a member of Our Lady of Sorrows Church, St. Monica’s Parish, West Wyoming, and was a graduate of Hanover High School and Wyoming Seminary Business School. Wanda had worked for the Social Security Administration for over 30 years. She was preceded in death by her husband Peter Urban. Surviving are her brother, Edward S. Zukauskas, Exeter. The family would like to thank the staff of Wesley Village for their professional and wonderfully compassionate care of Wanda during her stay there. Funeral services will be held at 9 a.m. Monday from the Gubbiotti Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exeter, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. at Our Lady of Sorrows Church, St. Monica’s Parish, 8th Street, West Wyoming. The Rev. Leo McKernan, pastor, will officiate. Interment will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. Friends may call from 6 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral home. Memorial donations, if desired, may be made to the American Cancer Society, 712 S. Keyser Ave., Taylor, PA 18517.

Alice A. Beyer

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October 7, 2011

lice A. (Traver) Beyer, 80, of Wilkes-Barre, passed away Friday afternoon, October 7, 2011, at Hospice Community Care in Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre. She was born on March 2, 1931, in Kingston, a daughter of the late Richard and Arlene (Crispell) Traver. Alice was a graduate of Noxen High School and WilkesBarre Business School. Until 1967, she worked at Gambling’s Shoe Factory, Wilkes-Barre. Alice was a member of the Firwood United Methodist Church, Wilkes-Barre, where she also served as a Brownie Leader for many years. She was a loving mother and very devoted to her grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. She was preceded in death by her loving husband of 50 years, Donald G. Beyer, who passed away on March 6, 2003; a son, Dennis Beyer; and one sister. Alice is survived by two daughters, Darlene Roberts and her husband, Arthur, and Susan Stefanovich and her husband, James, both of Wilkes-Barre; a son, Kevin and his wife, Gabrielle Beyer, Richmond, Va.; 13 grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; three brothers; and one sister. The family would like to thank Hospice Community Care and Geisinger Medical Center for the wonderful care they provided for their loving mother. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday from the Kniffen O’Malley Funeral Home Inc., 465 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, with interment to follow at Chapel Lawn Memorial Park, Dallas. Friends are invited to call from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday and from 9 a.m. until the time of service Tuesday. Your condolences for Alice’s family can be left online by visiting our website at www.BestLifeTributes.com.

The family of the late

Charles R. Obaza of Mountain Top wishes to thank all who assisted in any way during their recent bereavement. All who gave Mass cards, flowers, donated food, attended the funeral and sent sympathy cards, gifts and the kind support of family, neighbors and friends.

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 7A

Leonard Mark Maday

Lucy Carolyn Petrillo

September 13, 2011

September 17, 2011

son Ryan Burton, Kansas City, Kan.; four grandchildren, Taylor, Makayla, Justice and Jaxson Burton; sister, Ann Niezgoda and her husband, Thomas, Edwardsville; brothers, John Maday, Wilkes-Barre, and Michael Maday, Edwardsville; niece Leanne Niezgoda Pantoliano and her husband, Matthew, and their son Carter, Bronxville, N.Y.; as well as aunts, uncles, and numerous cousins. A Mass in Leonard’s memory was held in Barefoot Bay, Fla., in St. Luke‘s Catholic Church on September 19. A Memorial Mass will be held at11a.m. Saturday, October 22, 2011, in the Exaltation of the Holy Cross Church, 420 Main Road, Hanover Township. Friends may call at the church beginning at 9:30 a.m. Memorial contributions may be made to the Exaltation of the Holy Cross Church. Arrangements are under the direction of Seawinds Funeral Home and Crematory, Sebastian, Fla. Condolences can be sent to www.seawindsfh.com/obituaries.php.

Richard George Willis October 6, 2011

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ichard George Willis, 57, of Shore Road, Old Lyme, Conn., died Thursday, October 6, 2011, at his home after a brief illness. He was born on December 6, 1953, in Wilkes-Barre, a son of John and Sophie (Casper) Willis. He graduated Plains High School in 1971. Rick played bass in many local bands and also did sign painting throughout the Wyoming Valley. He moved to Old Lyme, Conn., in 1980 where he met his future wife, Laurie A. Bugbee. They married in June of 1986 and had just celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary. For the last 10 years, Richard had been employed by Dealer Trak as a Computer Systems Administrator. People who knew Rick appreciated his keen intellect and wicked sense of humor. A talented musician, he played many instruments but jazz bass was his greatest love. He leaves behind a multitude of dear friends who will miss him greatly. Besides his wife, he is survived by his mother Sophie of Plains Township; his brother, Dave, also of Plains Township, and wife, Karlyn; and their daughter Lacey; his brother, Jack and wife, Maureen, of Orangevale, Calif.; and children, Sherri, David and Caitlin; his mother-inlaw Jane E. Bugbee; his brother-inlaw Richard Bugbee of Providence, R.I.; and his daughters, Jane, Mary and Ellen; his sister-in-law Carol

Cieszynski and husband, Ken, of Naperville, Ill.; and their children, Heather, Kimberly and John. He will also be missed terribly by his beloved dog, Scout. His wife would like to thank dear friends, Pete and Patty Decker and Chris and Sarah May. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, October 15, 2011, in First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, Conn. The Fulton-Theroux Funeral Home, Old Lyme, is handling the arrangements. Please visit www.fultontherouxoldlyme.com for photos, tributes, directions and Rick’s biography. Contributions in his memory can be made to the Old Lyme Land Trust.

FUNERALS BELLUMORI – Theresa, funeral 10:30 a.m. Monday from the Corcoran Funeral Home Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains Township. Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. in Ss. Peter & Paul Church, Plains Township. Friends may call from 4 to 6 p.m. today. BROJAKOWSKI – Phyllis, Mass of Christian Burial 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, in St. Mary’s Church, Nanticoke. Friends may pay their respects at the church beginning at 9:30 a.m. prior to Mass. FISCHER – Margaret, celebration of life 8:30 a.m. Monday from McLaughlin’s, 142 S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre. Funeral Mass at 9:30 a.m. in the Church of Saint Nicholas, Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call at McLaughlin’s from 3 to 5 p.m. today. LEONHARDT – Charles, funeral services 10 a.m. Monday from Mamary-Durkin Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St. Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call from 4 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral home. MELUSKEY – Albert, funeral 9:30 a.m. Monday from the Earl W. Lohman Funeral Home Inc., 14 W. Green St., Nanticoke. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. at St. Faustina Parish at St. Mary’s Church, Nanticoke. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral home. RIBANDO – The Rev. William, memorial Mass 11 a.m. today in the Chapel of Christ the King, North

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October 5, 2011

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eonard Mark Maday passed away unexpectedly Tuesday, September 13, 2011, in his home in Barefoot Bay, Fla. His loving wife preceded him in death on December 26, 2010. They celebrated their 20th wedding anniversary on June 27, 2010. He was born in Wilkes-Barre, on December 27, 1951, a son of the late John and Anna Kulmatiski Maday. Leonard was raised in Korn Krest. He graduated from Hanover Township Memorial High School in 1969 and from King’s College in 1973. During his years at King’s College, he was integral in forming the popular Tom Slick and the Converted Thunderbolt Greaseslappers show band. After playing locally for a few years, he formed the Tom Slick Show Band and had a successful radio show in Denver, Colo. He and his wife, Krista, moved to Barefoot Bay, Fla., in 2000, where he was an active member of St. Luke‘s Catholic Church. Leonard returned to the WilkesBarre area at least once a year to join his cherished friends in the local show band for performances at the Irem Temple Country Club and other local venues. In addition to his show business careers, Leonard also was a teacher at St. Aloysius School in WilkesBarre, and at schools in various other states. For five years, he served as a coach for the Hanover Green Little League and a volunteer for the Hanover Green Ambulance Association. Survivors include his daughter Chassidy Bond, Barefoot Bay, Fla.;

ucy Carolyn Petrillo, 87, formerly of Whitehall Manor, Bethlehem, Dallas and Bear Creek, passed away September 17, 2011, at St. Luke’s Hospice Center in Bethlehem. Born in Wilkes-Barre, she was a daughter of the late Ciro (Jerry) and Mary Altavilla DelGuidice. A graduate of St. Leo’s High School in Ashley and the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing, Mrs. Petrillo was employed for many years as a head nurse on the third floor, East Wing, of the Mercy Hospital in WilkesBarre, until her retirement in 1985. She later worked as a volunteer in the medical records department at the hospital. Lucy and her deceased husband, Michael, were devout parents, emphasizing the importance of higher education in a nurturing environment for all five of their children – four of whom became dentists establishing their own practices and a fifth with an MA who became a teacher and is currently the curator of the new Friedman Art Gallery at Misericordia University. Lucy was a member of Gate of Heaven Church in Dallas and active in parish activities. Preceding her in death, in addition to her parents, were her husband Michael A. Petrillo; brothers, Philip and John DelGuidice; and loving son-in-law, Atty. David P. Po-

r. David B. Barnes, 74, of Albany, Ga., died at 4 p.m. Wednesday, D October 5, 2011, at Willson Hospice

satko. Surviving are her children, Dr. Michael A. Petrillo and wife, Linda; and their three sons, Bethlehem; Dr. Ronald G. Petrillo and wife, Penny; and their four children, San Diego, Calif.; Ms. Dona M. Posatko; and her four daughters, Dallas; Dr. Charles J. Petrillo and wife, Michele; and their three children, Washington Crossing; and Dr. Ann B. DiPietro and husband, Raymond; and their two children, Shavertown; as well as a sister, Victoria Rosetti, Daytona Beach, Fla. A private viewing and funeral for the family was held September 21, 2011, from the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., Shavertown. The Rev. Genaro Aguilar of King’s College officiated. Interment was made in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township.

William Slavinski October 8, 2011 Slavinski, of Hanover W illiam Township, died Saturday, Oc-

tober 8, 2011, at Hampton House, Hanover Township. Born April 12, 1930, in Scranton, he was a son of the late William and Frances Slavinski; and stepmother Gertrude Slavinski. He was a graduate of Hanover High School, class of 1948. He was a U.S. Army veteran with the Military Police, serving in Italy. William was formerly employed by Volinsky Market, Plymouth, and also Fetch’s Market, Plymouth, prior to retirement. He was a member of VFW Post 15040, and also a member of Exaltation of Holy Cross Church, Buttonwood. William was preceded in death by a grandson, Robert Slavinski. William and his wife, the former Evelyn Stamer, celebrated their 59 wedding anniversary June 14, 2011. In addition to his wife, he is survived by children, Doreen and James Ayling, El Cajon, Calif.; William and Pamela Slavinski, West Wyoming; Thomas and Margie Slavinski, Telford; and George and Rosemary Slavinski, Mountain Top; grandchildren, Jessica, Christopher and James Ayling; Eric, Brian, Bran-

October 5, 2011 ames G. “Big Mac” McLaughlin, 82, of Levittown, died Wednesday, JOctober 5, 2011.

don and William Slavinski; and Shannon Moore; seven great-grandchildren; sister, Helen Feldman, Paulsboro, N.J.; as well as several nieces and nephews. Funeral will be held at 9 a.m. Wednesday from the MamaryDurkin Funeral Services, 59 Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in Exaltation of the Holy Cross Church, Buttonwood. Interment will be held in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover Township. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at the MamaryDurkin Funeral Home. The family would like to thank the staff of the Hampton House for their loving and dignified care.

Stephen Medvec T. Medvec, 50, of PittsS tephen field, Mass., and formerly of Ha-

nover Township, passed away September 23, 2011. Born April 14, 1961, in Hanover Township, he was a son of Mrs. Valerie Grego Medvec, of Hanover Township, and the late Andrew Medvec. Stephen was a graduate of Hanover High School, Penn State University, where he received his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering, and Monmouth College, N.J., where he received his MBA. He was an active participant in many marathons and triathlons. Stephen was an aerobic and yoga instructor for several years and was an avid Penn State football fan. Stephen was preceded in death by brothers, George and James Medvec. Surviving, in addition to his mother, are his brother, Andrew Medvec of Virginia; and aunts, uncles and cousins. Family and friends are invited to

House. A native of West Pittston, Dr. Barnes had lived in Albany, Ga., for the past 15 years. David worked as a psychologist for the Dougherty County School System and has served on various Special Olympics’ boards over the past 40 years. David attended The Walk to Emmaus, participated in the Kairos Prison Ministry, and was an active member of Porterfield Memorial United Methodist Church. Survivors include his wife, Cheryle K. Barnes of Albany, Ga.; three sons, David Dreher Barnes and his wife, Joni, of Venice, Fla.; Matthew Barnes and Bryan Barnes and his wife, Kim, all of Albany, Ga.; a sister, Sylvia Richard of Wyoming; a brother, Dr. Willis Barnes and his wife, Linda, of West Pittston; as well as two grandchildren, Annie Barnes and Brody Barnes. A visitation will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. Wednesday in the parlor at Porterfield Memorial United Methodist Church, and the family will receive friends immediately after the service at their residence. Memorial services will be held at 3 p.m. Wednesday at Porterfield Memorial United Methodist Church. The Rev. Jennifer Sherling, Pastor Jim Kirkland and Rev. Gregg Davis will officiate. Those desiring may make contributions to Willson Hospice House, 320 Foundation Drive, Albany, GA, 31721; and/or Porterfield Memorial United Methodist Church, 2200 Dawson Road, Albany, GA 31707. To sign our online registry, or to send condolences to the family, you may visit the Mathews Funeral Home website at www.mathewsfuneralhome.com.

James G. McLaughlin

September 23, 2011 Franklin and Jackson streets, Wilkes-Barre. SUCHOCKI – Robert Sr., funeral 9 a.m. Monday from the Mark V. Yanaitis Funeral Home, 55 Stark St., Plains Township. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in Ss. Peter & Paul Church, Plains Township. Friends may call from 3 to 6 p.m. today at the funeral home. TUROSKI – Henry, funeral 9:30 a.m. Tuesday from the S.J. Grontkowski Funeral Home, 530 W. Main St., Plymouth. Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Faustina’s Parish, 520 S. Hanover St., Nanticoke. Friends may call from 2 to 4 and 6:30 to 9 p.m. Monday. WALKER – Nancy, funeral service 11 a.m. Monday at Christ United Presbyterian Church, 105 Lee Park Ave., Hanover Township. Friends may call from 4 to 8 p.m. today at the Desiderio Funeral Home, 679 Carey Ave., WilkesBarre. WARD – Henry, memorial service 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, at First Presbyterian Church, 97 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. Family will receive friends from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. in the church.

Dr. David B. Barnes

Born in Plymouth, he had been a resident of Levittown for 52 years. He was preceded in death by his parents, Joseph and Agnes McLaughlin of Plymouth; sister, Margaret (Mike) Sipsky; and father and mother-in-law, Albert and Hazel May of Plymouth. Jim was the beloved husband of Hazel E. (May) for 59 years. They met as childhood neighbors and attended Plymouth High School together. He was the loving father of Cindy (Bill) Kee of Rhode Island and Jim II, (Debbie) McLaughlin of Levittown. He was a devoted Pop Pop to four grandchildren, Amanda and Will Kee of Rhode Island and Jim III and Katie McLaughlin of Levittown. Family and friends are invited to call from 1:30 to 3 p.m. today at the James J. Dougherty Funeral Home Inc., 2200 Trenton Road, Levittown, where his funeral service will be held at 3 p.m. Family and friends are also invited to gather from 9 to 9:15 a.m. Monday at the funeral home, with interment to follow in Washington Crossing National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to D.A.V. Chapter No. 117, PO Box 1651, Levittown, PA 19057. Condolences may be posted at www.doughertyfuneralhome.com.

OBITUARY POLICY

attend funeral services at 2 p.m. Thursday in St. Mary’s Nativity Cemetery Chapel, Plymouth Township. Interment will follow in St. Mary’s Nativity Cemetery, Plymouth Township. Funeral arrangements are by the S.J. Grontkowski Funeral Home, 530 W. Main St., Plymouth. Please visit www.sjgrontkowskifuneralhome.com to submit online condolences to Stephen’s family.

The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee. More Obituaries, Page 2A

In Loving Memory of

Leonard J. Guitson Sept. 18, 1929 - Oct. 12, 2010

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Sadly missed by Your Loving Daughters Leslee & Helen and Devoted Wife Mary Alice

It’s almost a year since you went away, With us here I wish you could have stayed. As we watched you go to sleep, Your memories inside us will keep. With a saddened heart we said our goodbyes, As the tears welled up in our eyes. You were strong and brave right to the end, No more for you to pretend. Although we loved you, you could not stay. But we know we’ll see you someday. Your loving heart is beating no more, For you have walked through heaven’s door. Somehow I know this was God’s plan, to make an angel from a great man. Now you watch over us from above, And send down your undying love. Father, Forever in Our Hearts.

Sadly missed and loved by his family.


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Corbett said Noonan has been traveling around the state meeting troopers. “He’s a leader and he’s leading,” Corbett said. Corbett said he met Allan a number of times, but didn’t know him very well. He said he looked at Allan’s background and was certain he was the man for the DCNR job. “Again, we wanted someone who could manage and who could make decisions and Rick fit that bill,” Corbett said. “He had a business background and a lot of community involvement.” Corbett said people skills are important in the DCNR position because of the extensive contact with the public. “The job is all about people enjoying the outdoors,” Corbett said. “Rick understands that and he knows the environment. He’s a sportsman too. And Ellen Ferretti has done an outstanding job as deputy secretary. They make a great team.” Corbett said the state’s parks and forest lands are an integral part of who we are as Pennsylvanians. Corbett said Meuser is facing incredible challenges in the Department of Revenue. He said a major announcement will be coming within the next 30 to 45 days, but the governor wouldn’t tip his hand on what that might be. “Let’s just say we will be enforcing rules that are already out there,” Corbett said. He said one of the areas being looked at is the state lottery system to make it more efficient and increase play. The information technology system at Meuser’s department is antiquated and Corbett said it will take a few years to get it into the 21st century. “We will probably skip about five generations when we upgrade the system there,” Corbett said. “But it’s essential that we get that done.” Corbett looked around his spacious office, adorned with historic portraits and murals, and reflected on his job and the task before him. He said he deliberated long hours before he selected whom he would entrust to help him run the state. “I looked for people of quality,” Corbett, of Allegheny County, said. “And I wanted a geographic balance as best that I could attain. The Northeast did pretty well. They are three great people and that’s why I put them in key positions.” The governor was quick to note that when decisions are made, they are not made by region – they are made in the best interests of the entire state.

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett, in his office at the state Capitol on Wednesday, has chosen three people from Northeastern Pennsylvania for top posts in his administration.

DAN MEUSER • Dan Meuser was nominated by Gov. Tom Corbett on Jan. 18, 2011, to be Secretary of Revenue. • Prior to being nominated, Meuser was with Pride Mobility Products for more than 20 years and is the former president of Pride USA. Located in Luzerne County, Pride Mobility Products Corp. is the world’s leading designer, manufacturer and distributor of power wheelchairs and scooters. • Meuser serves on the boards of the Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the Wilkes-Barre YMCA and Misericordia University. • Meuser attended the New York State Maritime College, then attended Cornell University through a Navy ROTC scholarship where he majored in economics and government studies. • Meuser and his wife, Shelley, reside in Shavertown with their three children.

Meuser has been doing a lot of public speaking around the state, and he meets constantly with his senior staff. The Department of Revenue has more than 2,000 employees. “It’s been a learning experience for sure,” Meuser said. “But the governor didn’t bring Dan Meuser us in to go to school. We’re here Revenue Secretary Dan to get a job done.” Meuser said dealing with a Meuser said upgrading the department’s computer system is state deficit of $4 billion has like going from a hacksaw to a many challenges. He said when he was at Pride Molaser beam. bility, his family’s Meuser, 47, said business in Exeter, the system used to I truly believe everything was about collect state reve- we will be able the future and connue has been runstant improvement. ning on antiquated to do a lot to “We do a lot of computers that improve our things here extremenewly hired emparks and for- ly well,” Meuser said. ployees had never used. He set out to ests. We have a “We have good peoworking here – change that, but lot to offer and ple prideful people, no the upgrade will pun intended. A lot of take six years and we are looking cost $100 million. at all avenues people here could get paid more in the pri“We are responvate sector, but pubsible for bringing in for improvelic service is a big reanearly $30 billion ment.” son why we’re here.” with limited tools Meuser said he has and limited techRichard Allen nology,” Meuser DCNR chief several goals: • To advance cussaid in an interview tomer service, which in his 11th floor office in Strawberry Square. “We will build public trust. Meuser will be going from 1980 into the wants his department to be 21st century with our new inte- looked at as an asset for all grated tax system. We will be stakeholders, especially taxable to see all tax activity of all payers. • To increase efficiency. He taxpayers and reduce errors said like every state department considerably.” “If the system isn’t replaced and agency, reducing the cost of or upgraded, the backbone of doing business is ongoing. He the state tax system would wants to increase collections, break down,” said Elizabeth and he intends to enforce the Brassell, Meuser’s press secre- state’s tax laws in a fair manner. • Enforcement is another key tary. Meuser said he has adjusted to success for Meuser. He said to his new position, noting that having a law enforcement govthe most difficult aspect is time ernor makes this a top priority. Meuser said his department away from his family. He said the internet videophone system also will work to make PennsylSkype has become his daily link vania a more competitive place in the recruitment of companies with his wife and children.

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Looking to make his department more efficient, Secretary of Revenue Dan Meuser faces the task of updating the procedure for collecting and logging revenue.

RICHARD J. ALLAN • Gov. Tom Corbett nominated Richard J. Allan as DCNR secretary on March. The state Senate confirmed the nomination by a vote of 50-0. • Since 1991, Allan has served as executive director for the Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware members of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries, the national trade association that represents the recycling industry. Since 2005, he also has been a consultant to energy producers in the electric, wind, solar and coal sectors. • Allan has served on the boards of the Pennsylvania Environmental Council and Pennsylvania Resources Council since 2000. Allan was also a member of the energy and environmental committees for Gov. Corbett’s transition team. • Allan has long been involved in environmental interests. He was a founding member of Back Mountain Recreation, Inc. He also was a founding member of the North Branch Land Trust, which provides management to more than 10,000 acres of land in Northeastern Pennsylvania. He also has worked with the LACAWAC Sanctuary Foundation. • Allan earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Sciences/Biology from Wilkes University in 1976. He was vice president and general manager of Allan Industries from 1975 to 1991. • Allan and his wife, Patricia, live in Camp Hill, Cumberland County, and have two adult daughters.

looking to relocate. “We have to be more business friendly,” he said. “That’s why we’re here – to move Pennsylvania forward. This governor is about results and we will meet

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Richard J. Allan talks in his Harrisburg office with Deputy for Parks and Forestry Ellen Ferretti.

that challenge.” Meuser notes that Pennsylvania is the 23rd largest economy in the world. But he said the economy is on the decline because of low consumer confi-

dence, uncertainty in world cinder block on it.” markets and more uncertainty Rick Allan in Washington, D.C. “The economy is already on When DCNR Secretary Rick thin ice,” Meuser said. “We don’t want to throw another See POSTS, Page 9A


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FRANK NOONAN • Frank Noonan was nominated by Gov. Corbett on Jan. 18 to be Commissioner of Pennsylvania State Police and was confirmed by the State Senate on April 12. • Noonan is a career investigator with more than 30 years of experience. He began his career in 1971 as an FBI agent, investigating public corruption, drugs, bank robberies and kidnappings. • Following his retirement from the FBI in 1998, Noonan was appointed as Northeast Regional Director for the Attorney General’s Bureau of Narcotics Investigation. After 11 years as regional director, Noonan was promoted to Chief of Criminal Investigations for the Office of Attorney General in July of 2009. • As regional director of the

Allan was growing up in WilkesBarre, his family often visited Ricketts Glen, Hickory Run and Frances Slocum state parks. Now, at age 58, Allan is in charge of those and the other 114 state parks and 2.2 million acres of state forest lands. As secretary of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, he oversees some 2,000 full-time employees and another 1,000 seasonal workers. Allan served on Corbett’s transition team and then was asked to join the cabinet. Allan said he had to step back lar spent in Pennsylvania parks, and evaluate how the post $9 is generated for the local would affect his family, person- economy. He said last year $928 al life and business life. He said million was generated in local he deliberated for a bit and de- communities, supporting more cided the challenge and oppor- than 12,000 jobs. Working on the 2011-12 budtunity were too great to turn get, Allan said revenue from the down. “I’m doing things I’ve never oil and gas industry – in particdone before,” Allan said. “I’ve ular the Marcellus Shale indusworked in Harrisburg for a long try – has helped his department significantly. Allan time, and I have dealt noted that the state with many of the people Recruitment controls 80 percent of I now deal with in this has become the sub-surface minerposition. But the best al rights in the state part about the job is my paramount staff. They are fabulous. with the state forest lands and only 20 percent of those This is their life – they police – rights in state parks. have great enthusiasm He said drilling comand dedication to their troopers routinely visit panies can acquire the jobs.” rights to sub-surface Allan said he hit the college camminerals from private ground running. He has puses and landowners and the visited 22 of 117 state parks and six of the 20 other sites to state can’t stop them. district forests. He talks try to sign up He said there are assurances that the land will to the staff, assesses the young men be restored once the needs at every site and and women. drillers pull out. discusses what works Ellen Ferretti, DCNR and what doesn’t. He said much of the infras- deputy secretary and a resident tructure he has seen is in need of the Back Mountain, said of upgrading. Many of the build- state parks and forests attract ings in state parks were built in many people – residents and outsiders – to Pennsylvania to the 1930s and 1940s, he said. “We are hearing what our enjoy hiking, biking, fishing, park visitors want,” Allan said. hunting and other outdoor ac“They want more cabins, more tivities. Ferretti, 54, said creating new bathrooms, more electrical access and they want Wi-Fi. We trails and maintaining existing will look at everything. Our ones is critical, as well as makgoal is to improve the experi- ing access as easy as possible. “It’s all a challenge – a welence of visiting our state parks.” Allan said that for every dol- come challenge though,” Allan

Northeast region, Noonan oversaw some of the largest drug cases in the history of Northeastern Pennsylvania, including: Operation Bonecrusher, a $2 million cocaine ring; Operation Smackdown, a multi-million dollar heroin ring; Operation Bad Rap, a multi-million dollar cocaine and marijuana ring; and Operation Heavyweight, two violent drug gangs operating in Wilkes-Barre. • Noonan received the Linda E. Richardson Commitment to Excellence Award, which is the most prestigious award given by the Pennsylvania Narcotics Officers’ Association. • He is a graduate of West Chester University. He and his wife reside in Clarks Summit; they have five children and eight grandchildren.

said. “I truly believe we will be able to do a lot to improve our parks and forests. We have a lot to offer and we are looking at all avenues for improvement.” Frank Noonan Corbett said Frank Noonan is the right man for the job – commissioner of the Pennsylvania State Police. A former Marine, FBI agent and Attorney General’s Office lead investigator, Noonan is faced with ensuring the state police ranks are fully staffed. Noonan said there are 4,400 state troopers on staff – about 200 to 300 below full complement, he said. But in the next six to eight months, Noonan said, as many as 800 current troopers become eligible for early retirement. Depending on how many exercise that option, the task of replacing them is daunting. Noonan, 65, said there are two state police classes in session right now – with 90 recruits in one and 42 in the other. He said from the time a recruit enters the academy, it takes 18 months before they are actually deployed on the road. “Looking forward, we could be facing a real crisis,” Noonan said. Recruitment has become paramount with the state police – troopers routinely visit college campuses and other sites to try to sign up young men and women. A person must be at least 21 years old to enroll and no older

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Frank Noonan of Clarks Summit is state police commissioner. Gov. Tom Corbett believes Noonan’s background outside the state police will be an advantage.

than 40. With the state police becoming more and more responsible as the main law enforcement for small communities, Noonan said the demand is great. State police provide law enforcement for 80 percent of Pennsylvania’s land mass, representing 30 percent of the state population. Troopers also patrol interstate highways and the Pennsylvania Turnpike. “We provide a lot of coverage,” Noonan said. “Keeping troopers on the road is our primary concern.” Noonan said state police are the first to respond to emergencies in small communities that have had to reduce or eliminate their police departments due to funding cuts. “It’s problematic when you have to cut back services,” Noonan said. “That’s what I worry about. All emergencies need a prompt response.”

The uncertainty of terrorism is another of Noonan’s concern. He said he works with the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security, the New York Police Department and the New York State Police to meet a challenge that didn’t exist 12 years ago. “You never know when or where or what might happen,” Noonan said. “But the real focus of the Pennsylvania State Police is law enforcement in general. So far, so good; we never want to make a mistake on that.” Noonan said one of his goals is to improve the image of state troopers. Troop commanders have been asked to increase their presence in the community to project a positive image. “Noonan oversees a $900 million budget. He said the administrative aspects of his job – the budget, meeting with legislators and watching the fleet of vehicles, helicopters and airplanes – demands a lot of his

time. Noonan smiles when he talks about Camp Cadet – an chance for young people to experience what law enforcement is all about. “It’s an opportunity for us to give back to the kids,” he said. “But it helps down the road when we are trying to recruit new troopers.” Noonan said he feels very fortunate to have lived in Northeastern Pennsylvania for 30 years. He said he is the state police commissioner for the entire state, but he has a special knowledge of the region and its needs and problems. He said he was honored to have been asked to serve under Corbett, whom he considers a close friend. “When I’m done being the Pennsylvania State Police Commissioner, I want people in the state police to be proud that I served as their commissioner,” he said.

RICHARD S. GROSHEK

WE SALUTE YOU. RICHARD S. GROSHEK BRANCH: US Army

RANK: SP/5

WAR:

Vietnam

HOMETOWN: Hanover Twp.

Years Served: 6 Yrs.

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Corbett wants to fix education By MARC LEVY Associated Press

HARRISBURG — Gov. Tom Corbett is expected Tuesday to put meat on the bones of a top priority — essentially, his vision for how to fix the ailments of public education — as his allies in the Legislature hope he will step more visibly into the battle to win over public opinion in Pennsylvania. Corbett hasn’t yet said exactly what he’ll announce when he travels to a school in York. But lawmakers expect four main points: • an expansion of the $75 million educational improvement tax credit program; • a taxpayer-paid voucher program to help more children attend private schools; • an overhaul of Pennsylvania’s charter school law; and • a requirement that teacher evaluations be based partly on student performance. “Those are the heavy hitters,” said House Education Committee Chairman Paul Clymer, RBucks. While the Republican governor has spoken often on the subject, even sympathetic lawmakers complain that he has not disclosed enough detail about what he wants, and that he has not become engaged in fighting for those initiatives, which may prove a tough sell in some quarters. The details of the proposals may divide Corbett’s fellow Re-

publicans, who control both chambers of the Legislature, and resistance is also possible from school boards, Corbett teachers’ unions and Democrats. So October may be the beginning of that fight for Corbett, after a spring spent battling for a budget that resolved a multibillion-dollar deficit by making deep spending cuts, primarily in state aid to public schools, without increasing state taxes. The cuts in public school funding came as teachers point to the results of this year’s state’s standardized tests as a sign that Pennsylvania’s public school students are showing remarkable performance gains against benchmarks required under federal law. “Restoring these unprecedented funding cuts should be Job 1 for all of us,” said David Broderic, a spokesman for the state’s largest teachers’ union, the Pennsylvania State Education Association. However, Tim Eller, a spokesman for the Department of Education, said the test results were “very concerning” when viewed through a different lens. Although the union says more than 90 percent of school districts were judged to have demonstrated adequate yearly progress, Eller said fewer than 40

percent of individual schools demonstrated such progress by test scores alone. Corbett’s long-term goal is a “school choice” system in which taxpayer money flows not to a public school to educate a child who lives within its geographical boundary but to the student, who then chooses where he or she wants to attend school, whether public or private. “We need to develop a system of portable education funding; something a student can take with him or her to the school that best fits their needs,” Corbett said in his March 8 budget speech. Providing money for vouchers to attend private schools and an overhaul of the state’s charter school law could be a big, first step for Corbett toward that end. A bill sponsored by Senate Education Committee Chairman Jeff Piccola, R-Dauphin, would create new pathways for charter schools to open while also improving their public accountability, proponents say. However, the Philadelphiabased nonprofit Education Law Center of Pennsylvania, which advocates for poor and disadvantaged students, says the bill would fail to fix a myriad of problems with charters schools, which served about 90,000 students last year. “Charter schools can play a valuable but limited role in helping to strengthen public schools

in communities facing complex educational challenges,” the center said in testimony submitted to the House Education Committee this summer. “But taxpayer dollars for education should be invested primarily in public schools that are open to all children and fully accountable to the public through elected school boards.” It’s not clear how ambitious Corbett will be when he endorses a private-school voucher plan. Education Secretary Ronald Tomalis told the House Education Committee in August that the administration supports extending vouchers to low-income students in the lowest 5 percent of schools based on combined math and reading scores. He also told the committee that the Corbett administration supports expanding vouchers later on to students who attend schools where fewer than half of the students are performing at grade level in combined reading and math scores. Money also will be a question; the bigger a voucher program, the more it will cost taxpayers.

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

COURT BRIEFS WILKES-BARRE – A man accused of using his former employer’s gas account to buy $518 worth of gasoline waived his right to a preliminary hearing in Wilkes-Barre Central Court on Thursday. Adam Francis Migatulski, 24, last-known address of Courtright Street, Plains Township, waived 12 theft counts and 11 identity-theft counts to Luzerne County Court. Wilkes-Barre police withdrew 11 forgery counts. Police allege Migatulski used the gasoline account of his former employer, Green Valley Landscaping, to pump gasoline into his own vehicle at the Petroleum Service Co., South Main Street, from April 21 to May 22. WILKES-BARRE – A woman accused of injuring three people with a knife inside a tavern waived her right to a preliminary hearing in Wilkes-Barre Central Court on Thursday. Doreen Smith, 41, last-known address of South River Street, Wilkes-Barre, waived two counts of aggravated assault and simple assault and one count of harassment to Luzerne County Court. Wilkes-Barre police allege Smith injured three people with a knife during a fight inside Godfather’s Bar on Brown Street on Oct. 23, 2010.

WILKES-BARRE – A man accused of spitting blood at officers waived his right to a preliminary hearing in WilkesBarre Central Court on Thursday. Brandon K. Underkoffler, 23, last-known address of Madison Street, Wilkes-Barre, waived two counts each of aggravated assault by prisoner, resisting arrest, four counts of disorderly conduct and one count of public drunkenness to Luzerne County Court. Wilkes-Barre police withdrew two counts of aggravated assault and one count of loitering and prowling at night. Police allege Underkoffler was found covered in blood in the area of Carey Avenue and Academy streets on Sept. 15. He was transported to Wilkes-Barre General Hospital, where he allegedly spat blood at officers in the emergency room, the criminal complaint reads. WILKES-BARRE – Robert M. Gribble, 42, last-known address of Davis Place, Wilkes-Barre, waived his right to a preliminary hearing on charges of burglary and criminal mischief Thursday in Wilkes-Barre Central Court. The case goes to Luzerne County Court Wilkes-Barre police allege Gribble smashed a window at Uni-Mart, South Pennsylvania Avenue, and stole cigarettes on Sept. 26.

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POLITICAL BRIEFS LUZERNE – The Tim Mullen for County Council campaign will have a spaghettidinner fundraiser from 5 to 9 p.m. Oct. 16 at Salerno’s Restaurant at Main and Kelly streets. RSVPs will be accepted at 333-5446, or the $10 tickets can be bought at the door.

By SHEENA DELAZIO sdelazio@timesleader.com

Leighton said the city’s recycling program will soon be changed to be more effective and easier to comply with. “I am proud to announce that starting in January, the City of WilkesBarre will be one of the first communities in NEPA to transition to a single-stream recycling pickup schedule,” he said. The change will allow all recyclable materials to be combined for one collection.The mayor said he would not consider lowering the 3 percent wage tax, as proposed by Summers. “How could we ever make up $9 million? That pays for our fire and police departments,” Leighton said. In response to ongoing criticism over his handling the former Old River Road Bakery building, the mayor said Leo Glodzik of LAG Towing – the tower with an exclusive city contract -- was the third person to make an offer on the former Old River Road Bakery building. He said the first two proposals fell through.

Committee to Elect Jennifer Rogers is seeking residents interested in promoting Rogers’ campaign for Luzerne County Court of Common Pleas judge. Volunteers at least 18 years old who are willing to serve as poll workers can call 825-6300 or 714-8266.

signs in Wright Township. Signs can be no larger than 6 square feet in area. The permit fee is $25, cash only, part of which will be refunded if the signs are removed by Nov. 22. The township will remove signs posted without a valid permit.

WILKES-BARRE – In a meeting with The Times Leader endorsement board, a confident Mayor Tom Leighton touted his record of the last seven years and deflected questions about hiring practices that are now being explored by a state agency and his relationship with city tower Leo Glodzik. “This is the most demanding and yet most rewarding job I’ve ever had,” Leighton said. “I’m proud of my strong record of achievement and I know that the city is better now than it was when I took office in 2004.” Leighton, 51, a Democrat, is seeking his third term as the city’s chief executive. He is opposed by Republican Lisa Cope and Libertarian Betsy Summers. Leighton seemed unfazed by news of a preliminary inquiry by the Pennsylvania Ethics Commission into his hiring practices. A complaint has been filed with the commission regarding Leighton’s hiring of his children and other relatives to summer jobs. “It’s unfortunate that you can’t hire a relative who is qualified for the job,” Leighton said, adding he wouldn’t hire a relative again for a city job – big or small. Leighton made sure to mention the 53 new businesses in the city, revitalizing the Coal Street

LUZERNE COUNTY – The

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 11A

Mirabito cites experience

Complex, the Intermodal Center, Barnes and Noble, Movies 14 and the Courtright development – a housing project on the former site of a lace mill that was ravaged by fire four years ago. Leighton said the number one issue facing the city remains public safety. He said he has hired 29 police officers in his seven years, but believes the city needs more cops on the street that it can’t afford now. More officers will be added when the city can afford them, he said. Leighton said he will continue cracking down on nuisance properties, absentee landlords and disorderly tenants. He said has improved regulations, including mandatory inspections, rental licenses and mandated property managers for out-oftown landlords. The mayor wants to consolidate the health and building code departments, thereby doubling the inspection force to deal with persistent problems in neighborhoods. Leighton also plans to: • Work with the Luzerne County Court to set up a housing court in the fight against blight. • Establish a community development fund pool which would be a 50 percent match program up to $5,000 to fund exterior upgrades such as new siding for homes. • Establish Wilkes-Barre Enhancement Blocks where residents would be eligible for tax abatement on improvements to their homes. The city would waive the reassessment fee normally associated with exterior improvements.

By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

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WRIGHT TOWNSHIP – All political candidates should note that a zoning permit is required to post campaign

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Tom Leighton Mayor of WilkesBarre

TOM LEIGHTON Age: 51 Residence: Reliance Drive Party: Democrat Occupation: Mayor, Realtor Education: Bishop Hoban High School, King’s College Family: Wife, Patty; children, Kelly Lynn, 26, Thomas, 22, Courtney, 20

WILKES-BARRE – An attorney for more than two decades, Molly Hanlon Mirabito has worked in the district attorney’s office, in her private practice since 1987 and most recently tried a death penalty case in county court. “I’ve been preparing for 25 years (to be a county judge),” Mirabito told The Times Leader’s endorsement board. “I’m proud of my career as a whole.” Mirabito, 49, of Forty Fort, is one of seven candidates vying for six open seats on the Luzerne County Court of Common Pleas. Thousands of clients have trusted Mirabito to represent them in court on civil matters, and five district attorneys have trusted her to work in a courtroom to represent the county, and that’s also something the candidate is proud of. In the last five years, Mirabito said, she’s tried six criminal jury trials – two resulting in a first-degree murder conviction, and one bench trial – a case heard and decided by a judge. Mirabito said her legal work is split 50-50 between criminal and civil cases, and that she’s appeared before a district magistrate on a variety of cases, hundreds of times. If elected to serve on the bench, Mirabito said she would support an ethics and personnel policy, but one separate from one drafted by county council members because a “separation of powers is absolutely necessary.” Mirabito said she would advocate reducing costs in the court system, but isn’t sure if sharing law clerks and tipstaffs is the answer because a judge needs to be able to trust the people around them and value their opinions. Mirabito said she would seal court proceedings that are required to be sealed by law, including juvenile and adoption matters, or any criminal proceeding that could be compromised by information becoming public. Setting bail would be determined by a defendant’s prior criminal record, the offense itself and if

M O L LY H A N L O N MIRABITO

Age: 49 Education: Graduate of King’s College and the University of Notre Dame School of Law Law experience: Private practice since 1987; former per-diem law clerk to visiting senior judges in Luzerne County; appointed by county court to serve as a master in divorce and real estate matters Community affiliations: Previously served on the Forty Fort Ambulance Association board and was a member of the Forty Fort Civil Commission; also previously coached Bishop O’Reilly High School Mock Trial Team and has served on a number of boards, including VISION and Family Services Association. Family: Husband, Michael Mirabito

that person has failed to appear before, Mirabito said. When sentencing defendants, Mirabito said she would sentence someone to deter others from committing that crime, and to rehabilitate that offender. Several alternative sentencing programs are currently available, Mirabito said, including Drug Treatment Court, and that she would utilize those if the case called for it. A judges calendar should be available for the public to see, Mirabito said, and court employees should clock in like other county

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Molly Hanlon Mirabito candidate for judge Luzerne County

employees. For the November general election, Mirabito said she expects to spend about $35,000 and is still not accepting contributions from attorneys. Most of her campaign money, Mirabito said, will come from her own pocket. “It’s unseemly to ask people for money when they need to fix their homes (because of the flooding),” Mirabito said. “I’m the one who wants the job. I’m the one who should pay for it.”

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

7TH ANNUAL BUDDY WALK AT KIRBY PARK

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MAKING STRIDES AGAINST BREAST CANCER 5K WALK

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FALL FESTIVAL AT HILLSIDE FARMS

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Jen and Charles Seiger Jr. of Warrior Run, with their children Leo, 1, and Charles, 4

BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Erin McFadden of Scranton, left, Pat McFadden of Hardystown, N.J., and Elizabeth Custeau of Milton, Vt. AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Brett Swaboski, left, Deangelo Aboutanos and Andrew Crossin

Carl Yorina of Wyoming with daughters, Kaylee, 11, left, and Cara, 9

Lisa Sciandra of Dallas, left, Maria Aliciene of Shavertown, and Cari Machulsky of Shavertown Bill, left, Gina and Ryan Murray with Joanne, John and Doug Heitsman

Aly Grindall, 11, of Falls, left, Sydni Johnson, 11, of Falls, and Silly Sally Jennifer Kuna of Scranton, left, Sarah DiGiovanni of Hunlock Creek, and Mandy Fox of Wilkes-Barre

Joseph Scudder, 11, of Spring Hill, Fla., left, and Caleb Keegan, 10, of Hanover Township

Amy George, left, Amber Tosh, both of Wilkes-Barre, and Gina Polidori of Forty Fort

Katie, left, and Abby Haas

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The Times Leader Welcomes Shooting STARZ GYMNASTICS Shooting Starz Gymnastics has rapidly become one of the premier gymnastic schools in NE Pennsylvania. Offering classes for ages 6 months and older, Shooting Starz has classes for all skill levels. The instructors are caring professionals trained to encourage your child to have fun while participating in our motivating gymnastics program.

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CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 13A

Along with many of you, our associates and customers are struggling with the devastation caused by the recent ooding in the Wilkes-Barre area.

We’re all in this together. Raymour & Flanigan is proud to be part of—and serve—the Wilkes-Barre area. To help ease some of your burden and expenses, we’re offering all ood victims our discounted commercial pricing, normally available only to large commercial accounts. We’re also pleased to offer furniture delivery in 3 days or less, so you can get back to normal as soon as possible.

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Quinnones, a transgender who was born a male but lives life as a female, and Gray were held at the county prison at various times between 2007 and Continued from Page 1A 2008 as they awaited trial for by people representing them- assaulting a state prison guard selves and have been deemed to at the state Correctional Institube meritless. But proving that tion at Dallas. Quinnones, who is infected has been costly. The county has insurance to with the AIDS virus, and Gray, cover the lawsuits, but the pol- whom Quinnones has described icies have deductibles ranging as her lover, were accused of from $25,000 to $175,000 per in- spitting on the guard. Both were cident, depending on the carri- convicted of the charges following a trial in September 2008. er. The first suit, which QuinThe county must pay the legal bills until those deductibles nones filed on Aug. 22, 2008, are met, said Attorney Jack alleged numerous guards subDean of Elliott, Greenleaf and jected her and Gray to physical Dean, whose firm is defending abuse and sexually explicit the prison in the Quinnones/ taunting due to their sexuality. Three more suits quickly folGray cases and others. “It’s very frustrating,” Dean lowed: • On Dec. 19, 2008 Quinsaid. “We have to put time and energy to meet with the warden nones and Gray filed a suit aland guards and do an investiga- leging the prison wrongly charged their intion to see what hapmate accounts $5 pened. It’s just a for each misconwaste of time. We “Inmates have duct they received have better things to an awful lot of without providing do, and it takes up time on their them a chance to their time, too.” The situation is hands. They can challenge the policy that permitted particularly frustrat- say anything the fee. ing given the $23.6 • On Jan. 20, million budget hole they want. You 2009 Quinnones the county faces go- get into a ‘he filed a suit alleging ing into 2012. she was injured Dean and attorney said, she said’ when guards used Sean McDonough of situation. It’s excessive force to Dougherty, Levanthal remove her from and Price, which also very difficult to her cell after she handles numerous prove. You have was accused of lawsuits against the having contraband. county, said their to get into con• On May 22, firms have gotten ducting deposi2009 Quinnones most prison litigation tions, filing mo- and Gray filed suit suits dismissed early alleging they were in the legal process. tions, securing denied access to But even suits that affidavits from the law library to are clearly frivolous prepare for the deentail a lot of legal your own clifense in the assault work, they said. ents.” case. Attorneys must, at Sean McDonough Dean succeeded a minimum, file a Lawyer in getting the first motion to dismiss suit that alleged and a legal brief to physical abuse and support their argudismissed three ments. Other times they have to taunting seek a court order to interview months after it was filed based the inmate, or file motions seek- on Quinnones’ failure to comply ing to compel the inmate to re- with an order to cure deficienspond to court filings, Dean cies in the suit. That did not end the case, however. said. “Inmates have an awful lot of time on their hands. They can Reconsideration motion Quinnones filed a motion for say anything they want,” McDonough said. “You get into a ‘he reconsideration and numerous said, she said’ situation. It’s very other court filings. She then apdifficult to prove. You have to pealed the case to the Third Cirget into conducting depositions, cuit Court of Appeals. It wasn’t filing motions, securing affida- finally resolved until June 8, 2009, when the Third Circuit vits from your own clients.” Dean estimated that, on aver- denied the appeal based on age, it costs $3,000 to $6,000 to Quinnones failure to pay a filing file a motion to dismiss. That fee. The law library suit was also increases to about $10,000 if the defense has to take depositions dismissed by U.S. District Judge William Nealon in a ruling isor file other motions. sued in September. Labor intensive In his decision, Nealon said The Quinnones and Gray the evidence was “overwhelmcases have been exceptionally ing” that prison officials providlabor intensive based on the ed Quinnones and Gray “every sheer volume of suits they have opportunity” to utilize the law filed and because Quinnones, library. It took more than two years who authors most of the filings, has become adept at working to get to that ruling, however, based on numerous court mothe legal system.

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COST TO DEFEND PRISONER LAWSUITS Pro-se litigants – those who represent themselves without an attorney – cost Luzerne County tens of thousands of dollars each year in legal fees. Listed below is a sampling of some of the cases handled by the law firm of Elliott, Greenleaf & Dean.

Date suit Date suit filed dismissed

Plaintiff Shawn Quinnones/ Anthony Gray

8/22/08

6/1/09

Shawn Quinnones/ Anthony Gray

12/19/08

Pending

Shawn Quinnones

1/20/09

Pending

Shawn Quinnones/ Anthony Gray

5/22/09

9/20/11

Ronald Weaver

Cost*

$89,170*

TOTAL COSTS 11/30/05 12/19/06

$5,674

Vickie Ashton

6/09/08

7/15/09

$8,696

Anthony Tabit

6/11/08

7/28/09

$5,556

Ramon Cora

10/05/10

7/28/11

$3,700

James DiPietrae

4/30/10

11/02/10

$3,290

Charles Dennis

4/13/09

6/09/11

$11,376

$127,462

TOTAL COSTS *Breakout for each case not available

Source: Luzerne County Controllers office and law firm of Elliott, Greenleaf & Dean STEVE HUSTED/THE TIMES LEADER

tions Quinnones filed. The prison has had to respond to those filings. The two other cases filed by Quinnones and Gray are still pending. In the excessive force case, the prison filed a motion to dismiss the case in May, but a judge has not yet ruled on the matter. In the misconduct fee case, a judge recently dismissed most of the complaint, but allowed the suit to continue on the sole issue of whether the prison has an adequate policy in place that allows inmates to challenge deductions made from their accounts for misconducts. Dean said he believes both suits clearly lack merit and will be dismissed, just as the other two suits were. But that takes time, and money. Legal bill: $89,170 The legal bill for the four cases has reached $89,170 as of July 2011, according to records from the county controller’s office. Quinnones and Gray were last discharged from the county prison in December 2008 and are now housed at separate state correctional institutions. Unfortunately for the county, there’s little officials can do to prevent prisoners from filing a frivolous lawsuit, Dean and McDonough said. The federal court system has taken steps to reduce the number of frivolous cases, including enacting the Prison Litigation Reform Act in 1996. But those measures are far from foolproof, the attorneys said. Any prisoner case that is filed in federal court first goes to a law clerk, who screens the complaint to determine whether it meets the minimum standards

for a federal lawsuit. That standard is fairly low, McDonough said. A suit will pass the initial test so long as a prisoner has alleged a federal constitutional right was violated and provides at least some details of the alleged violation. “A lot of inmates are pretty shrewd. They know how to

COUNTY

The federal court system has taken steps to reduce the number of frivolous cases, including enacting the Prison Litigation Reform Act in 1996. plead a case,” McDonough said. The Prison Litigation Reform Act has helped to a degree, he said. The act mandates, among other things, that a prisoner first try to resolve their complaints through the prison’s internal grievance procedure. If a suit is filed before those actions are taken, the complaint will be automatically dismissed. Another key component is the so called “three strikes” rule. Any prisoner who has filed three lawsuits that have been deemed frivolous by the court is precluded from filing any further lawsuits unless the inmate receives special permission from the court to do so. Unfortunately for the county, the three strikes rule did not apply to Quinnones and Gray due to the timing of the suits, all of which were filed within a one- year period and proceeded simultaneously through the court, Dean said. Despite the frustration meritless lawsuits cause, Dean and McDonough stressed they’re not saying all prisoner litigation suits are frivolous, or that prisoners should be precluded from ever filing a lawsuit. “We’ve all seen instances of errors or negligence that has occurred in prisons. They do have a right to proceed to protect their constitutional rights,” Dean said.

In Luzerne County, there has been least one case in which an inmate prevailed in securing a settlement from the county. That case involved Scott Bolton, who was paralyzed from the chest down after he fell from a window while trying to escape from the county prison in 2003. Bolton’s suit, filed in 2008, alleged the prison failed to provide adequate facilities to accommodate his disability when he was returned there to await trial on another matter in 2005. Agreed to settle The prison, which was represented McDonough, agreed in last year to pay $5,000 to settle the case. McDonough said at the time that the prison was not admitting any wrongdoing. It decided to settle to avoid a prolonged litigation battle. Even with the problems, Dean and McDonough said, overall, they believe the federal court has done a good job in trying to curb frivolous suits given the obstacles. “I don’t know what the solution is,” McDonough said. “The court does its best, but it has a difficult task balancing the object of the statute, which is to weed out frivolous cases, and at the same time give pro-se litigants enough latitude to attempt to pursue a claim that may be meritorious,” McDonough said.

Continued from Page 1A

Since 2005, the county has paid at least $127,472 in fees to the firm for legal work performed on the seven cases.

pay legal fees associated with the defense of the suits until it reaches the deductible on the insurance policies. The exact amount the county pays each year could not be determined because defense of the lawsuits is handled by several different law firms. Bills submitted by the firms do not always identify the plaintiff, or specify if the bill is for defense of a lawsuit or other legal work. But a sampling of just seven of the cases handled by Elliott, Greenleaf & Dean, one of the law firms that represents the county, shows how expensive defending the suits can be. Since 2005, the county has paid at least $127,472 in fees to the firm for legal work performed on the seven cases. The bulk of the money -$89,170 – has gone to defend four lawsuits filed Shawn Quinnones and Anthony Gray, two state prison inmates who were temporarily

housed at the county prison in 2007 and 2008 while awaiting trial on charges they assaulted a state prison guard. The suits allege various violations of the inmates’ rights. Other cases that Dean’s firm has gotten dismissed include: • Ronald Weaver: Weaver sued then district attorney David Lupas and others in 2005, alleging his rights to the court was violated because officials failed to comply with his instruction on how to bind a mail a petition to the U.S. Supreme Court. Cost to defend: $5,674. • Vickie Ashton: Ashton sued the prison in 2008, alleging she was subjected to cruel and unusual punishment after prison officials transferred her from the main prison to the work release building. Cost to defend: $8,696 • James DiPietrae: DiPietrae sued the prison in

2010, alleging he was subjected to cruel and unusual punishment after the prison failed to supply him an antihistamine to treat severe allergies. Cost to defend: $3,290. • Anthony Tabit: Tabit, who was originally represented by an attorney who later withdrew, sued the sheriff’s department in 2008 alleging he was forced to sit in an awkward position in a police car, causing an injury that led to the removal of one of his testicles. Cost to defend: $5,556. • Ramon Cora: Cora sued the prison in 2010, alleging he was assaulted by a guard and denied medical care. Cost to defend: $3,700. • Charles Dennis: Dennis sued the county prison, Children and Youth and several area police officers for false arrest after charges that alleged he had given his young son alcohol were dismissed. Cost to defend: $11,376.

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TOM MOONEY OUT ON A LIMB

Branch out from everyday family research

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And my children run cross-country and track, and I very much enjoy going and watching them, and all of the kids. We’ve got some great athletes here.” Hobbies? Are you a collector? “Mostly stuff with music. I also like unique and individual kinds of art. When I travel, instead of bringing home a goofy coffee mug or a T-shirt, I always like to pick up some art, because when I look at it, it reminds me of that trip or that journey.” Music is a big part of your life. Who are some of your favorites? “I’m a big Beatles fan. And The Ba-

ired of the seemingly endless search for old census records and microfilms? If you’re a genealogist facing burnout, step back from the daily grind and join in these three upcoming events of interest to family researchers. One event is just getting under way. That is the Luzerne County Historical Society’s new exhibit entitled “The Polish in Luzerne County.” It’s at the society’s museum, 69 S. Franklin St. in Wilkes-Barre, just behind the Osterhout Free Library. “The exhibit traces the experiences of Polish immigrants who left their homeland and settled in Luzerne County in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries,” the museum says. “Also featured is a look at the cultural and fraternal organizations which keep the Polish heritage and connections with Poland alive today.” The museum is open Tuesday-Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. Admission is free for members of the society. Otherwise it is $4 for adults and $2 for children ages 6-12. The exhibit will remain through Jan. 31. On Saturday, also courtesy of the Historical Society, you will have the opportunity to explore one of the area’s most important old burial grounds — the Forty Fort Cemetery, resting place for many of Wyoming Valley’s earliest and most prominent citizens. The tours are at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m., with the group meeting at the cemetery entrance, River Street and Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort. The cost is $7 for society members and $10 for non-members. The group is limited to 30 people. For reservations, call 570-823-6244, ext. 3 or go to www.luzernehistory.org for details. No occupation has been more closely associated with this area than coal mining. The next meeting of the Northeast Pennsylvania Genealogical Society will focus on that area of our history with its program entitled “Was There a Miner in Your Family?” Heading the program will be Donald Sanderson, a founding trustee of the new Anthracite Heritage Foundation. He will discuss “the importance of mining as an industry and the need to collect mining history from individual coal miners’ family descendants,” according to the Genealogical Society. The meeting will be at 7 p.m., Oct. 25, in the Burke Auditorium of the McGowan Building, King’s College, West Union and North River streets in Wilkes-Barre. It’s open to the public. Flood Recovery: The West Pittston Library, badly damaged by flooding from Tropical Storm Lee in September, expects to reopen within the week in temporary quarters in the former Blockbuster building (near the Gerrity’s Market, Wyoming Avenue), according to the library’s Facebook page. The generosity of the Insalaco family made the space possible. The opening date will be announced soon. The library, which has hosted my genealogy presentations for several years, is in now dire need of money and other assistance. The flooding cost the library its computer equipment and much of its collection and furniture. For information and for photos of the damage, go to the library’s website at www.wplibrary.org and then click on the Facebook link. Send monetary donations to Luzerne Foundation, West Pittston Library Fund, 140 Main St., Second Floor, Luzerne, Pa. 18709. Call 570 714-1570. News Notes: Well-known local genealogist Karen Branigan Walizer passed away last week at 71. Karen (who was also my cousin and former neighbor) was best known for her regular column in “The Heritage,” the publication of the Northeast Pennsylvania Genealogical Society. She was a caring person, with a passion for sharing her knowledge in the service of her fellow genealogists.

See MEET, Page 6B

Tom Mooney is a Times Leader genealogy columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.

MCT PHOTO

Bryan Brand, organizer of the Jesus Name Project, poses with a billboard, yard sign and bumper sticker. Brand, 67, is a millionaire who lives on a horse farm in Wildwood, Mo. He’s helped raise about 100 Jesus billboards, primarily in the Midwest, since the late 1990s, and distributed countless banners, bumper stickers and yard signs.

BEHIND THE

BILLBOARD

Jesus signs are man’s message to motorists By JESSE BOGAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

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ILDWOOD, Mo. — There’s no phone number on the billboards. No address. Not even an exit to turn off the

highway. Only the name “JESUS” emblazoned in giant, block letters, like a cowboy’s prize belt buckle. The green and white billboards were designed to look like road signs that people are already trained to associate with directions. They seek salvation for high-speed motorists amid other paid advertisements pushing Big Macs and trips to the Pleasure Zone. And they are Bryan Brand’s answer to a call from God.

Brand, 67, is a millionaire who lives on a horse farm in Wildwood, Mo. He’s helped raise about 100 Jesus billboards, primarily in the Midwest, since the late 1990s, and distributed countless banners, bumper stickers and yard signs with the same simple logo. His faith journey, while peculiar, has been traveled by others before. Some go door-to-door with leaflets, or construct giant crosses on mountainsides. Yet Brand said his own efforts haven’t satisfied God’s call. The easy part is spending thousands of dollars on the road signs and their quick campaign for converts.

Building true disciples for Jesus, however, is slow trench work. It takes years to reach people already sitting in the pews. And that effort is now consuming Brand. “I would never try to point a finger,” he said, but many Christians are “under-challenged and under equipped.” “Ministry can’t be done by clergy alone,” he said. “It isn’t intended to be.” Brand has been staring at the name of Jesus since he was a toddler. Growing up the son and grandson of preachers in Flat River, Mo., near See BILLBOARD, Page 5B

MEET MIKE LOMBARDO CLARK VAN ORDEN/ THE TIMES LEADER

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ike Lombardo is the director of business development at Quad3 in Wilkes-Barre. The firm offers architecture, engineering and environmental services. Lombardo, 47, is a graduate of

Pittston High School and received a bachelor’s degree in biology and psychology from Bucknell University and a master’s degree in school psychology and counseling from Bucknell. Prior to his work with Quad3, he worked for 20 years in public education and also served as mayor of Pittston. He later served as Chief Operating Officer and acting CEO at the Greater WilkesBarre Chamber and as Northeast Director under former Pennsylvania governor Ed Rendell. He and his wife, Susan, have twin daughters, Katherine and Kristen, 16. They live in Pittston. You’ve had a very diverse and interesting professional life. What do you attribute that to? “Like everything else, as I’ve moved on in my career, it’s sort of evolved and I’ve really gotten a better handle on what my interests are. The mayoral experience was something that really changed my goals and objectives across the board. I really got interested in community and economic development at that point.” You really seem to be enjoying

your work at Quad3. “I’ve always been interested in architecture. And there’s really a culture of voluntarism and giving back to the community here. And that’s important to me. You see that from our CEO right down to the men and women who work in the offices — the architects or the engineers. I’m very comfortable here. I’m enjoying this experience and I’m learning a lot.” What do you do to relax? “I like to do construction on the side. I’m always tinkering, and I like tools. I just finished remodeling the house that we now live in. I also run a little bit and try to work out when I can. I ran throughout high school and college.


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Stewart, Pugh atalie Stewart and Gregory Pugh N were united in marriage on Sept. 3, 2011, at Emmanuel United Church

Blomain, Dirhan ara Anne Dirhan and Erik Scott Blomain, together with their D families, announce their engagement

and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Coleman Dirhan, Duryea, and Diane Dirhan, West Pittston. She is the granddaughter of Mary Dirhan, Duryea; the late Kalman Dirhan; and the late Frank and Rose Gubbiotti, Exeter. The prospective groom is the son of Dr. Eric and Taryn Blomain, Dunmore. He is the grandson of Ondina Blomain, Dunmore; the late Dr. Emile Blomain; and the late Arthur and Lois Besen, Scranton. Dara, a 2006 graduate of Scranton Preparatory School, earned a Bachelor of Science degree with honors in nutrition and dietetics from West Chester University in 2010. She recently completed a dietetic internship at Geisinger Medical Center in Danville and became a registered dietitian. Dara is pursuing a master’s degree in public health at West Chester University, where she serves as the graduate assistant in the Department of Health Sciences. Erik, a 2005 graduate of Scranton Preparatory School, earned a Bachelor of Arts degree with honors in both biology and classics from Cornell University in 2009. He is currently in his third year of the MD/PhD program at Thomas Jefferson University, where he is conducting cancer research and recently passed his national board exam. The couple will exchange vows Sept. 14, 2013.

The Savignanos anny and Rose Savignano, Marcy Station, Tunkhannock, celeM brated their 50th wedding anni-

versary on July 1, 2011. They were married in Rochester, N.Y., at the Bethel Assembly of God by the late Pastor Phillip Wannamacher. Rose was attended by Darlene Borda, MaryLou Cavuoto and Maureen Nesta. Manny was attended by Steven Grammatico and Angelo Millazzo. Rose’s parents were the late Rev. and Mrs. Mauro Nesta, Rochester, N.Y. Manny’s parents were the late Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Savignano, Wilkes-Barre. They have five children, Eric and wife, Lisa, Meshoppen; Mark, Dallas; Manny and wife, Toni, Pottstown; Dr. David and wife, Crystal, Telford; and Elise MacBello and husband, Thomas, Willingboro, N.J. The couple has eight grandchildren, Joshua, Zachary, Nathan, Jacob, Alyssa, Adriana, Luca and Gabriella. They also have two stepgrandchildren, Nikki and Zakk Finkenbinder. Manny and Rose were surprised by their children with a dinner party at The Inn of the Abingtons. The special occasion was attended by family and friends. Manny and Rose plan to celebrate the occasion with a trip to Italy in the near future.

of Christ, Mountain Top, by the Rev. Penny Dollar. The bride is the daughter of James and Lynne Stewart, Mountain Top. She is the granddaughter of Frederick Carpenter and the late Elizabeth Carpenter, Rockledge, Fla., and Richard and Lorita Stewart, Robinson, Ill. The groom is the son of Lee and Barbara Pugh, Hunlock Creek. He is the grandson of Rachel Martz, Jersey Shore; the late Edward Whitman Sr., West Nanticoke; and the late James and Arlene Pugh, Hunlock Creek. The bride was given in marriage by her father. She chose her sister, Leslie Stewart, as her maid of honor. The bridesmaid was Amanda Eitzen, friend of the bride. The flower girl was Mallory Stewart, cousin of the bride. The groom chose his cousin, Matthew Pugh, as best man. The groomsman was Mick Wildoner, friend of the groom. The ring bearer was A.J. Stewart, cousin of the bride. Readings were given by the parents of the bride and groom. An evening reception was given by the parents of the bride at King’s Restaurant, Mountain Top. The bride was honored at a bridal shower hosted by her sister at Emmanuel United Church of Christ, Mountain Top. A rehearsal after party was given by the parents of the groom. The couple plans to honeymoon on Disney cruise line’s “Disney Magic” cruise ship. They reside in Wilkes-Barre.

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ate Margaret Johnson and George Lewis Wolfe were united in K marriage on June 11, 2011, at All

aura Anne Goodwin and William Joseph Smith III, together with their families, announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Louise Goodwin, Forty Fort, and the late John M. Goodwin. She is the granddaughter of the late Joseph Butkiewicz and the late Nancy Lawlor Butkiewicz; John A. Goodwin, Syracuse, N.Y.; and the late Joan McGeehan Goodwin. The prospective groom is the son of William and Karen Smith, Forty Fort. He is the grandson of Anne Easton, Forty Fort; the late Ralph M. Easton; Mary T. Smith, Wilkes-Barre; and the late William Smith Sr. Maura is a 2002 graduate of Bishop O’Reilly High School. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in marketing from the University of Delaware in 2006, and a Master of Science degree in business administration from the University of Scranton in 2010. Maura is the senior director of client services at Pepperjam, Wilkes-Barre. Bill is a 2002 graduate of Bishop O’Reilly High School. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in communications from King’s College in 2006. Bill is a business manager at Motorworld, Wilkes-Barre. Maura and Bill will exchange vows in June of 2012.

Saints Church, Plymouth, by the Rev. Robert Keheller. Deacon Joseph DeVizia also officiated. The bride is the daughter of Mary Lee Johnson-Harkins, Nanticoke, and Thomas Johnson, Wilkes-Barre. She is the granddaughter of the late Margaret Thomas, Kingston. The groom is the son of Alice Kay, Nanticoke, and the late George Perfetto, Exeter. He is the grandson of Alice Wolfe, Nanticoke. The bride was given in marriage by her father. She chose her best friend, Stephanie Scalfer, as maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Mariah Rhodes and Asia Lefort, friends of the bride, and Holly Rodzon, cousin of the groom. The bride chose her cousin, Kenia Barbecho, as the flower girl. The groom chose his uncle, Walter (Buddy) Wolfe as his best man. Groomsman was Frank Wolfe, uncle of the groom. Ring bearer was Justin Emmet Brewster Jr., nephew of the bride. A reception was held at The Alden Manor, Nanticoke, following the ceremony. The couple honeymooned in Wildwood, N.J., and Ceasar’s Palace, Poconos. The couple will reside in Nanticoke.

Siskovich, Cicierski Eichorn, Poulos

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rissy Kelmer and Frank Knorek Jr., together with their families, announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Charles and Diane Kelmer, Nanticoke. She is the granddaughter of Charles Kelmer Sr., East Brunswick, N.J.; the late Hazel Kelmer; and the late Andrew and Dorothy Dorak. The prospective groom is the son of Frank and Virginia Knorek, Nanticoke. He is the grandson of the late Walter and Dorothy Knorek and the late Joseph and Dorcas Ciglar. Krissy is a 2003 graduate of Greater Nanticoke Area High School. She is a 2006 and 2009 graduate of Luzerne County Community College, where she earned associate degrees in pre-pharmacy and nursing. She is a registered nurse employed at WilkesBarre General Hospital. Frank is a 2002 graduate of Greater Nanticoke Area High School. He is a 2004 graduate of Luzerne County Community College and a 2006 graduate of Wilkes University, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science with a minor in business administration. He is employed by Benco Dental as a purchasing agent. The couple will exchange vows June 30, 2012, at Saint Faustina Parish, Nanticoke.

aria Katherine Poulos and Charles Anthony Eichorn Jr., M together with their families, an-

nounce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of George and Effie Poulos, Woodbourne, N.Y. The prospective groom is the son of Charles Eichorn Sr. and Elena Eichorn, both of Mountain Top. He is the grandson of Dr. Juan and Elena DeRojas, Mountain Top, and the late Karl and Mary Eichorn, Wilkes-Barre. Maria earned a bachelor’s degree in communication sciences and disorders in 2005 and a master’s degree in speech-language pathology in 2007 from Marywood University. She is employed as a licensed speech-language pathologist in a long-term care setting. Charles is a 1999 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School. He earned a bachelor’s degree in human resources management from King’s College in 2004. He is employed as a guest service representative at a leading hotel. The couple will exchange vows Oct. 15, 2011, at Holy Cross Greek Orthodox Church, Middletown, N.Y.

arah Lynn Siskovich and Jacob Cicierski, together with S their families, announce their

engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of William and Carol Siskovich, Plains Township. She is the granddaughter of Agnes Siskovich and the late Theodore Siskovich, and the late Robert and Helen Williams, all of Wilkes-Barre. Sarah is a 1998 graduate of James M. Coughlin High School. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting and a Master of Business Administration degree from Wilkes University. She is employed as a senior auditor by Kronick Kalada Berdy & Co., P.C. The prospective groom is the son of Barbara and Joseph Cicierski Jr., Plains Township. He is the grandson of the late Anna and Joseph Cicierski Sr., Plains Township, and the late Joseph and Alice Savage, Plymouth. Jake is a 1999 graduate of James M. Coughlin High School. He is employed by Home Tech Service Company. The couple will exchange vows Oct. 22, 2011, at Immaculate Conception Church, West Pittston, with a reception to follow at the Appletree Terrace, Newberry Estates, Dallas.

McGlynn, Kleban r. Kristen Kleban and John PaD trick McGlynn, together with their parents, announce their en-

gagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of William and Kim Kleban, Courtdale. She is the granddaughter of the late John and Leona Kleban, Luzerne, and the late Harry and Violet Gardner, Ridgway. The prospective groom is the son of John and Ann Marie McGlynn, Drums. He is the grandson of the late John and Gertrude McGlynn, Kingston, and the late George and Rita McGuiness, Edwardsville. Kristen is a 2002 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School. She earned her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Wilkes University, graduating magna cum laude. She is employed as a pharmacist for Rite Aid, serving as pharmacy manager in Tamaqua. John Patrick is a 2001 graduate of Bishop O’Reilly High School. He attended the University of Pittsburgh, prior to working as a mason for Sam Barbose Masonry and Hardscaping, Courtdale. The couple will exchange vows Nov. 4, 2011, at St. Ignatius Church, Kingston.

Landmesser, Walkowiak illiam and Beth D. Landmesser, Indian Lake, are W pleased to announce the engage-

ment of their daughter, Megan, to Ryan M. Walkowiak, son of Louis R. Walkowiak, Laurel Run, and Darlene J. Perta Walkowiak, Plains Township. Megan is the granddaughter of the late William P. and Rosemound C. Landmesser, Bear Creek, and the late Elsie M. and Ralph J. Deobold Jr., WilkesBarre. Ryan is the grandson of the late Clement J. and Cecelia T. Walkowiak, Hudson, and Vincent P. Perta and the late Jane R. Perta, Plains Township. Megan is a claims representative in the Wilkes-Barre office of the Social Security Administration. She is a graduate of East Stroudsburg University and Coughlin High School. Ryan is employed at Penn State Mechanical Contractors, Plains Township, and is a graduate of G.A.R. Memorial High School. Megan and Ryan have chosen May 12, 2012, as their wedding date. They reside in Swoyersville.

SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES The Times Leader allows you to decide how your wedding notice reads, with a few caveats. Wedding announcements run in Sunday’s People section, with black-and-white photos, free of charge. Articles must be limited to 220 words, and we reserve the right to edit announcements that exceed that word count. Announcements

must be typed or submitted via www.timesleader.com. (Click on the "people" tab, then “weddings” and follow the instructions from there.) Submissions must include a daytime contact phone number and must be received within 10 months of the wedding date. We do not run first-year anniversary announcements or announcements of weddings that took place more than a year ago. (Wedding

photographers often can supply you with a black-and-white proof in advance of other album photographs.) All other social announcements must be typed and include a daytime contact phone number. Announcements of births at local hospitals are submitted by hospitals and published on Sundays.

Out-of-town announcements with local connections also are accepted. Photos are only accepted with baptism, dedication or other religious-ceremony announcements but not birth announcements. Engagement announcements must be submitted at least one month before the wedding date to guarantee publication and must include the wedding date. We

cannot publish engagement announcements once the wedding has taken place. Anniversary photographs are published free of charge at the 10th wedding anniversary and subsequent five-year milestones. Other anniversaries will be published, as space allows, without photographs.

Drop off articles at the Times Leader or mail to: The Times Leader People Section 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Questions can be directed to Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or e-mailed to people@timesleader.com.


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aria Anne Carchilla and Michael Jason Balakier were united in the sacrament of marriage on Oct. 9, 2010, in Holy Family Church, Sugar Notch, by the Rev. Vincent H. Dang and the Rev. Joseph R. Kakareka. The bride is the daughter of Marie and Joseph Carchilla Jr., Hanover Township. She is the granddaughter of Nancy and Albert Walker Sr., Hanover Township; Catherine Carchilla, Charlotte, N.C.; and the late Joseph Carchilla Sr. The groom is the son of Michael and Bonnie Balakier, Sugar Notch. He is the grandson of Henry and Regina Balakier, Sugar Notch, and the late Ann Sawicki. The bride was given away in marriage by her father. She chose her longtime friend, Krista Pointek, as her maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Marisa Michaels, Samantha Verfin and Marissa Walker, cousins of the bride, and Jessica Borrelli and Kiran Adams, college friends of the bride and groom. Junior bridesmaid was Alexandra Kester and flower girl was Skya Lyn Ropietski, both cousins of the groom. The groom chose his brother, Eric Balakier, as his best man. Groomsmen were Joseph Carchilla III, brother of the bride; Donald Embleton Jr., cousin of the bride; Robert Helfrick III, cousin of the groom; and Jim Doran and Jason Swoboda, close friends of the bride and groom. Junior groomsman was Joseph Carchilla IV, nephew and godson of the bride. Ring bearer was Joshua Kester, cousin and godson of the groom, and escort to the flower girl was Brady Fallon, cousin of the groom. Rudy Carchilla, pet dog of the bride, was an honorary groomsman. Readings were given by Nancy Ann Walker, aunt of the bride; Donald Embleton Sr., uncle of the bride; Mary Kay Embleton, aunt and godmother of the bride; and Andrew Reed, college friend of the bride and groom. A prayer of blessing in marriage was given by the Rev. Anne M. Emory, pastor of Christ United Presbyterian Church. Communion gifts were presented by Albert Walker Jr., uncle and godfather of the bride, and David Balakier, uncle and godfather of the groom. Altar servers were Jeffrey Chintalla, Joshua Levi and Noah Yankovich, cousins of the bride. Greeters were Jessica Chintalla, cousin of the bride, and Jacob Kester, cousin of the groom. Special music was performed by Martin Flaherty, soloist and cousin of the groom, accompanied by Mary Kay Plisko, organist, and Karen Zebrowski, violinist. A bridal shower was hosted by the mothers of the bride and groom, aunts of the bride and the bridal party, at Bentley’s, Ashley. The parents of the groom hosted the rehearsal dinner at the Wyoming Valley Country Club, Hanover Township. An evening reception, hosted by the parents of the bride, was held at The Woodlands Inn and Resort, Wilkes-Barre. The bride is a 2001 graduate of Hanover Area High School. She earned her bachelor’s degree in communication sciences and disorders from the University of Pittsburgh in 2005 and her master’s degree in speech language pathology from Marywood University in 2007. She is employed by the Hanover Area School District as a speech and language therapist. The bride is also a per diem employee at Kindred Hospital Wyoming Valley. The groom is a 2001 graduate of Hanover Area High School and a 2005 graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in English writing. The groom is employed by Geisinger Health Plans as a provider relations team leader. The couple honeymooned to the Dominican Republic. They reside in Hanover Township.

Lombardi, Lyons eanna Marie Lombardi and Albert Lyons III were united in D marriage on July 16, 2011, at St.

Nicholas Church, Wilkes-Barre, by the Rev. John Victoria. The bride is the daughter of Andrea Lombardi, Hanover Township, and Joseph Lombardi, Kingston. Deanna is the granddaughter of the late Marie and Leonard Valenti and Angeline Lombardi and the late Raymond Lombardi. The groom is the son of Laurielee and Albert Lyons Jr., Wyoming. Al is the grandson of the late Agnes and Dominick Sarti and Barbara and Albert Lyons Sr., Berwick. The bride was given in marriage by her father. She chose her sister, Dana Lombardi, as her maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Erica Lushefski, sister-in-law of the bride; Crystal Lyons, sister of the groom; and Sarah Arnone, Angela Hagan, Melissa Wenrich and Angela Mushinsky, friends of the bride. Marie Lombardi, niece of the bride, served as a junior bridesmaid. Flower girls were Mary and Nina Lombardi, nieces of the bride. The groom chose childhood friend Pat Mackin as his best man. Groomsmen were Dominic Lombardi, brother of the bride; Dominick Sarti Jr., Ron Walsh and Jay Lyons, all uncles of the groom; and Sam Biscotto and Robb Brown, friends of the groom. Jake Paull, nephew of the niece, served as the ring bearer. Scriptural readings were presented by MaryAnn Spagnuolo, godmother of the bride; Shawn Glaush, uncle of the groom; and Stephanie Sarti, cousin of the groom. Offertory gifts were presented by Henrietta Valenti, aunt of the bride; Scott Paull, brother-in-law of the bride; Margaret Walsh, aunt of the groom; and Bettyjane Jacien, cousin of the groom. A bridal shower and rehearsal dinner were hosted by the mothers of the bride and groom at The Café, Plains Township. A cocktail hour and dinner reception were held at the East Mountain Inn, WilkesBarre. The bride is a 2006 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School, WilkesBarre, and a 2010 graduate of Misericordia University, where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in elementary and special education. The groom is a 2006 graduate of Wyoming Area High School, Exeter, and a 2010 graduate of Misericordia University, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history with certification in secondary education. The couple honeymooned in Las Vegas. They reside in Hanover Township.

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usan Lynn Gagatek and Richard Henry Shubilla were united in marriage Oct. 15, 2010, at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, WilkesBarre, by the Rev. Daniel Gunn. The bride is the daughter of Thomas and Carole Gagatek, Wilkes-Barre. She is the granddaughter of Donald Beynon, Scranton; the late Shirley Beynon; and the late Michael and Margaret Gagatek. The groom is the son of Henry and Rebecca Shubilla, WilkesBarre Township. He is the grandson of Laura Przybyla, WilkesBarre Township; the late Henry Przybyla; and the late Adolph and Theresa Fennick. The bride was given in marriage by her father. She chose her sister, Stacy Rauch, as her matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Heidi Roccograndi and Holly Shubilla, sisters of the groom, and Stephanie Andrejko, Amber Costello and Heather Ricko, friends of the bride. The groom chose his friend, Brian Cilvik, as best man. Groomsmen were Daniel Roccograndi, brother-in-law of the groom; Kenneth Pepperling, cousin of the groom; and Jason Allen, James Gattuso and Steve Ricko, friends of the groom. Scriptural readings were given by Renita Fennick, godmother and aunt of the groom, and Lesley and Jamie Sapak, friends of the groom. A shower was given by the mother of the bride at the Ramada Inn, Wilkes-Barre. The rehearsal dinner was hosted by the parents of the groom at the Ramada Inn, Wilkes-Barre. The couple hosted an evening reception at the Best Western East Mountain Inn and Suites, Wilkes-Barre. The bride is a 2000 graduate of E.L. Meyers High School, WilkesBarre. She is a 2004 and 2006 graduate of Luzerne County Community College with a certification of specialization in dental assisting and an Associate of Applied Science degree in dental hygiene. She is a 2010 magna cum laude graduate of Misericordia University with a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration. She is employed as a registered dental hygienist for Dr. Loren Grossman. The groom is a 1994 graduate of G.A.R. Memorial High School, Wilkes-Barre. He is employed as a certified applicator for Grasshopper Lawns Inc. The couple honeymooned in Punta Cuna. They reside in Plymouth.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 3B

Antosh, Moyer elly Elizabeth Moyer and Joshua Adam Antosh were united in K marriage at 4 p.m. Oct. 9, 2010, at

the Glen Summit Chapel, Mountain Top. The Rev. Ann Marie Acacio officiated. The bride is the daughter of Donna Ratushny, Mountain Top, and William Moyer, Naples, Fla. She is the granddaughter of Lois Walk and the late Lucille and Warren “Bill” Moyer, all of Mountain Top. The groom is the son of Jackie and Fred Antosh, Mountain Top. He is the grandson of Shirley and William Paull and Ruth Antosh and the late Frederick Antosh, all of Mountain Top. Given in marriage by her father, the bride chose her sister, Kristen Moyer, as her maid of honor, and her sister, Lindsay Ratushny, as her bridesmaid. The bride’s daughter, Savannah Eustice, served as flower girl. Michael Stravinski, friend of the groom, served as groomsman. Scripture readings were given by Jamilyn Antosh, sister of the groom, and Kevin Moyer, brother of the bride. Janel Antosh, sister of the groom, served as special attendant. Ceremony music was directed by Shirley Paull, pianist. An evening dinner reception was held at Cavanaugh’s, Mountain Top. All wedding guests were welcomed at the rehearsal dinner held at the home of the bride and groom. The bride is a 2001 graduate of Crestwood High School and is attending Luzerne County Community College pursuing an Associate of Applied Science degree in legal assisting/paralegal studies. The groom is a 2006 graduate of Crestwood High School and attended Luzerne County Community College, where he majored in fire science technology. He is employed as a machinist by Wyman-Gordon and is an active member of the Mountain Top Hose Company. The couple resides in Mountain Top.

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The Engleharts r. and Mrs. Earl Englehart Sr. celebrated their 50th wedding M anniversary on Sept. 23. They were

married in 1961 at the Hunlock Creek United Methodist Church. The bride is the former Delilah Mae Sorber, daughter of the late Esther and Beach Sorber Sr. The groom is the son of the late William and Julia Englehart. They have four children and their spouses, 10 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. They celebrated the special occasion sharing memories with their family at a dinner at Konefal’s Restaurant. Their family is thankful for the values and morals they have taught and for the example they have been. Their example will affect many more generations to come. All because two people fell in love . . .

The Earls r. and Mrs. Joseph Earl, Exeter Township, celebrated M their 25th wedding anniversary

on Sept. 26. They were married Sept. 26, 1986, at Taylor Church of God by the Rev. Merle Davis. Mr. Earl is the son of the late Boyd and Carmela Earl, Kingston. He is the co-owner of Earl and Sedor Photographic, Kingston. Mrs. Lori Earl is the daughter of Tom and Ann Bracey, Taylor. She is employed by Guzek Associates, Clarks Summit. Mr. and Mrs. Earl are both graduates of Wilkes College. They are the parents of two children, Allyson, who is attending Lycoming College, and Joseph Jr.

eth Kwarcinski and Matt Fay, together with their parents, announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. Beth is the daughter of Louis and Joan Kwarcinski, Mountain Top. She is the granddaughter of the late Louis and Catherine Kwarcinski and the late Walter and Betty Lisman, all of Wilkes-Barre. Matt is the son of Thomas and Laura Rose, Wellsboro, Pa. He is the grandson of Winifred Fay and the late Ned Fay, Addison, N.Y. Ms. Kwarcinski is a 1998 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in 2003 from Bloomsburg University and a Master of Science degree from Marywood University in 2005, both in speech language pathology. She is employed by HCR Manor Care, Williamsport, as a speech language pathologist. Mr. Fay is a 1994 graduate of Wellsboro Area High School. He attended Lock Haven University and a Bachelor of Science degree in general studies will be conferred in 2011. He is employed by GIANT food stores. The couple will exchange vows Nov. 5, 2011, at the East Mountain Inn, Wilkes-Barre.

The Hardwicks r. and Mrs. William and Lea-Ann Hardwick, Kingston, will celeM brate their 10th anniversary Oct. 10,

2011. They were united during a candlelit, dusk setting by the Rev. Michael Shambora Jr., who performed the double-ring, traditional ceremony. Mrs. Hardwick is the former LeaAnn Malak-Schumacher and is employed by the Luzerne Intermediate Unit, Kingston. Mr. Hardwick is the son of the late Charles A. Hardwick and Marcia Hardwick, Townsend, Tenn. He is employed by NEPIRC, Hanover. The Hardwicks are blessed with a blended family, which includes four daughters, Jennifer Hardwick Hessman and her husband, Joseph, Exeter; Lyndsey Capral and her partner, Justine Roth, Kingston; Jacqueline Hardwick, Baltimore, Md.; and Allison Hardwick, who attends Albright College, Reading. The Hardwicks are involved in various community boards and organizations, which include the United Way, Head Start, The Junior League of Wilkes-Barre and the Shriner’s Hospital of Philadelphia. They are currently assisting the communities that have been affected by the recent flooding. To commemorate the occasion, the couple is planning a dinner with family and friends and is traveling to the Finger Lakes.

Rice, Jensen icole Jensen and Matthew Rice, together with their families, are N happy to announce their engagement

and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Jack and Dawn Jensen, Oak Brook, Ill. She is the granddaughter of Gordon and June Jensen, Oak Brook, Ill., and the late Clemens and Constance Burkard. The prospective groom is the son of William and Sharon Rice, Dallas. He is the grandson of the late Francis and Helen Moran and Kenneth Rice and Helen Rice Coombs. Nicole is a 2001 graduate of Timothy Christian High School. She earned her bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Elmhurst College in 2006. She is employed as a senior account manager at TCF Inventory Finance, Schaumburg, Ill. Matthew is a 2000 graduate of Dallas High School. He earned his bachelor’s degree in mathematics and economics from The University of Pittsburgh in 2005. He is also employed at TCF Inventory Finance as a portfolio manager. The couple will exchange vows on Sept. 29, 2012, in South Barrington, Ill.


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER

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Carpenter Dental was established in Forty Fort in 1998 by Dr. Charles M. Carpenter and Dr. Chas. M. Carpenter. Prior, Dr. Carpenter Sr. had been a full time partner in Dental Associates practicing at numerous offices around the Wyoming Valley including Back Mountain, Mountaintop, Wyoming Valley Mall, and downtown Wilkes-Barre.

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Service and cutting edge technologies keep Carpenter Dental ahead of the pack. Dr. Carpenter Sr., a fellow in the Academy of General Dentistry and retired Colonel in the United States Army, received his Fellowship and Masters from the World Clinical Laser Institute. He utilizes the most advanced laser tools and techniques daily in his practice. Dr. Chas. is an active sustaining member in the Dr. Charles M. Carpenter American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and an active member in the American Academy of Facial Esthetics. He recently completed training in the administration of Botox and Dermal Fillers to compliment the cosmetic and esthetic demands of his patients. Both doctors have also been trained in advanced cosmetic techniques at the Las Vegas Institute (LVI). Dr. Chas M. Carpenter

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Bryan Brand, organizer of the Jesus Name Project, which erected billboards with the name Jesus, carries posters and bumper stickers in his truck.

he helped Brand in his business he’d help God in his. He said he nearly went bankrupt when he gave up buying and selling securitiesoncommission,insteadcharging clients fees, because he said that’s what Jesus would have done. “As a Christian, the conflict of interest potential is enormous,” he said of financial advising. Then one day he and his wife Vicki were sitting in church when a visiting minister read a verse from a modern translation of the Bible that proclaimed: “Write My answer in large clear letters on a billboard,sothatarunnercanread it and tell everyone else.” They responded by founding “Jesus Name Project,” a nonprofit organization that promoted the billboards. As per the Lord’s wishes, he said, any details other than the name “Jesus” would lessen the impact. He wept at the initial sight of the first sign that went up near Six Flags St. Louis on Interstate 44. “It looked so big and beautiful,” Brand recalled. “I couldn’t safely see to drive.” But there’s disagreement on whether the signs are effective. Just about anyone who has driven across the Midwest has seen “Hell is real.” Other faith-based signschampionslogansthatrange from, “If you die today, where will you spend eternity?” to “Jesus Saves.” But displaying one word — Jesus — seems to create more noise.

Kosloski, Sarah and Joseph, a son, Aug. 23.

Vergara, Remedios and Calixto, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Sept. 25.

Aguilar, Yesenia and Socorro Vazquez, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Sept. 26.

Hammond, Takeya, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Sept. 26. Howell, Leah, Meshoppen, a daughter, Sept. 26.

Decker, Brittany and Robert Newman, Glen Lyon, twin daughters, Sept. 16.

Barber, Nadine and Steven Sr., West Pittston, a son, Sept. 26.

Witthar, Hallie and Thomas Reilly, Ashley, a daughter, Sept. 19. Texis, Lizette and Luis, WilkesBarre, a son, Sept. 19.

“These billboards show how powerful brand promotions have become to every aspect of American life,” Kathryn Lofton, an assistant professor of American and religious studies at Yale, wrote in an email. There are other monuments in the mix. Like giant crosses, small crosses and groups of crosses. “Where people have gotten used to seeing crosses, they are a little less used to seeing great big names of Jesus,” said Thomas J. Davis, a professor at the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture at Indiana University. “There is a specificity there now.” Free-thinking groups have responded with their own campaigns, for instance in Indianapolis where there have been billboards that say: “You don’t need God — to hope, to care, to love, to live.” Center for Inquiry president Ronald Lindsay said in an email that Jesus billboards “will resonate only with those who already believe that Jesus is the simple, uncomplicated answer to everything.” Though catchy, Davis said, peoplewillbecomeaccustomedtothe Jesussignsandwon’tpaymuchattention to them anymore, like crosses on churches. “It will become part of the landscape,” he said.

Mikhalkov, Jennifer and Ruslan, Pittston, a daughter, Sept. 25.

Grandzol, Carrie and Christian, Drums, a son, Sept. 16.

Shotwell, Tiffany, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Sept. 17. MCT PHOTO

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 5B

Estrella, Janeira and Kelvin, Kingston, a son, Sept. 19. Traver, Alicia and Lenny, Auburn, a daughter, Sept. 20. Wagner, Kathleen and Austin, Swoyersville, a daughter, Sept. 20. Hernandez, Idenice and Rafael, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Sept. 20. Degante, Karen, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Sept. 21. Ritz, Katy and Mark Brum, West Pittston, a daughter, Sept. 21. Wilcox, Elizabeth and Scott, Centermoreland, a daughter, Sept. 21. Major, Shelby and Matthew Uronis, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Sept. 22. Finkbiner, Erica and Brian Johns, Hanover, a daughter, Sept. 22. Chismar, Michelle and Joseph, Plains Township, a son, Sept. 22. Hunzer, Dianne and Jason, Plains Township, a son, Sept. 23. Maneval, Rebecca and Jason, Berwick, a son, Sept. 23. Cannon, Xennie and Kevin, Hazleton, a son, Sept. 23. Foust, Felicia and Shane Bayak, Tunkhannock, a son, Sept. 23. Katorkas, Rachel and John Charles IV, Forty Fort, a son, Sept. 23. VanKuyk, Kristen and Arie, Kingston, a daughter, Sept. 23. Kammerer, Christine and William, Forty Fort, a daughter, Sept. 23.

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Miller, Nicole and Shawn, Dallas, a daughter, Sept. 26. Udomsak, Dina and Patrick, Dallas, a daughter, Sept. 26. Barker, Jamie and Brian, Mountain Top, a son, Sept. 26. Welles, Tammy and John Maciolek, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Sept. 27. Hayslett, Karen Ann and Christopher Siegle, Dalton, a son, Sept. 28. Perry, Larissa and Edward Kilgore, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Sept. 28. Altavilla, Melinda and Scott Wasik, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Sept. 28. Glushefski, Jennifer and Dominick Toback, Nanticoke, a son, Sept. 28. Evans, Brandi and Christopher, Harding, a son, Sept. 29. Hall, Amanda and Patrick, West Wyoming, a daughter, Sept. 29. Zalis, Dawn and Joseph Watson, Freeland, a son, Sept. 29. Smith, Cynthia and Ryan, Glen Lyon, a daughter, Sept. 29. Degnan, Jaclyn and Edward, Kingston, a son, Sept. 30. Tomkins, Christina and Keith, Dallas, a daughter, Sept. 30.

Welch, Ciera and Ibn Montague, Exeter, a son, Sept. 26. Rittenhouse, Lisa and James Oliveri, Pittston, a daughter, Sept. 26. Ankudovich, Tiffany and Kevin Dates Jr., Kingston, a son, Sept. 26. Bowick, Vellownique and Alonzo Johnson Jr., Wilkes-Barre, a son, Sept. 27. Shrader, Renee and Mark, WilkesBarre Township, a daughter, Sept. 27. Kizer, Samantha and Chad Thorne, Plymouth, a daughter, Sept. 27. Krapf, Terri Jo and John, Plymouth, a son, Sept. 27. Whalen, Sara and Edward III, Kingston, a son, Sept. 28. Pawlowski, Sarah and Alex, Mountain Top, a daughter, Sept. 28. Clisham, Stephanie and Phillip Delzeit, Edwardsville, a daughter, Sept. 29. Boice, Cassandra and James Maculloch, Sweet Valley, a son, Sept. 29. Ziller, Mary and Zachary, Drums, a son, Sept. 29. Ent, Stephanie and Eric Conahan, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Sept. 30. Zavec, Mikel and Steven Franklin, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Sept. 30. Milliken, Arianna M. and James R. Jr., Exeter, a son, Sept. 30. Banks, Caitlin and Bryan, West Wyoming, a daughter, Sept. 31.

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Farmington, he said he saw “the best and worst of church.” There weregodlypeople,butalsoinfidelity and hypocrisy. When he was11, he dutifully followed his cousin to the front of a tent revival in Sikeston, Mo., to publicly show that he accepted Jesus Christ as his savior, what evangelicals call being saved. By the time he was a young adult, he was fluent in the church language. He tithed while serving in the Vietnam War, where he was shot in the leg as a rifle platoon leader. He became the dean of admissions for William Carey University, a Christian school in Mississippi. But something huge was missing. “I was a full-blooded Baptist,” he said. “I just wasn’t a full-blooded Christian.” On a business trip to Atlanta in 1974, the facade finally crashed in a flood of cold beer. He got so drunk in the clubs that he kept falling out of a taxi. Nursing a hangover, he questioned the authenticity of his faith. “I woke up discovering what I had always hated as a kid — hypocrisy,” he said. During that same trip he met a recovering alcoholic, whom he described as a charismatic Catholic. The man had what Brand wanted. “He was so full of the joy of the Lord that I found it irresistible,” Brand said. “He had a true, intimate relationship with Jesus.” When he came back home, it was Brand, one of the church regulars, who walked to the front during service to publicly profess his faith. Today, in Brand’s study in Wildwood, there’s a framed picture beside his desk of Jesus sitting down with a businessman. Brand made his fortune at an investment firm called Brand Asset Management Group in Chesterfield, Mo., that he started from scratch. He promised God that if

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

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dlees are one of my favorite bands. Peter Gabriel, James McMurtry, Clapton, Mellencamp, Springsteen ... I really like great songwriters. I really like to look at lyrics.� Follow sports? “I’m a Notre Dame and Penn State fan, oddly enough. I’m not a huge baseball fan, but I like the aura and history of the Yankees. And I’ve been a Miami Dolphins fan since 1969.� Favorite city? “Next to Pittston? I like San Fransisco, because of the art and architecture. And I love New Orleans. Good food and good art, and I try to get to the jazz festival whenever I can.� Favorite food? “Pizza. I could live on it.� First car? “The first one that I owned was a 1988 slate gray Volkswagen Jetta.� Favorite movie? “The Sting.� Favorite TV show? “‘The Killing’ on AMC. It’s a new series. My

favorite of all-time is probably ’The Twilight Zone.’ It’s timeless.� Favorite book? “The Great Gatsby.� Favorite quote? “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. — Margaret Mead.� Defining professional moment? “It happened during my time as mayor, and unbelievably, it’s not the ribbon-cutting of the new library that we built, or any of the things we built. It was probably the most challenging time that I had, and that was the year on the Fourth of July when we had the accident with the fireworks. Because what I realized is that it’s easy to be a leader when you’re cutting ribbons and things are going the right

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way, but it’s not so easy when things don’t go the right way, and you’re looking at a couple of people that were injured, and you planned for all of this time to have something that started out as a great event. You had this sort of polarity of emotions: it starts out really great, we’ve got an incredible crowd, and then — boom — two or three minutes before the finale, we had a serious accident. I spent about 24 straight hours dealing with the situation, and for the first time I guess I believed, myself, that I could be a leader, and felt like I led. When things are difficult, I always look back on that moment.� Alan K. Stout writes about area people for the Meet feature. Reach him at 970-7131.

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KaPow Field Hockey Klub Register Online today at: www.kapowfh.com Ages 5-18: Registration Deadline Dec. 1st • Includes YMCA Membership (October 1st 2011 - September 31st, 2012). Questions or Comments: (301) 928-2200 or directors@kapowfh.com

The premier hockey club for boys and girls ages 5-18 years old. All practices or league games will be held at the YMCA in Wilkes-Barre. Directed by local Olympian Lauren Powley, bringing field hockey knowledge from around the world. “It’s never to young to start playing. Advance your technical skills with our Winter Indoor Training Programs!”

Twinkling Stars Program (Under 7 & Under 10) • Practices held December 4th - February 19th on Sundays from 2:00 - 3:30 PM. • Program Fee - $200.00 Rising Stars Program (Under 12) • Practices held December 4th - February 19th on Sundays from 3:30 - 5:00 PM. • Program Fee - $250.00 • Includes pinny, stick, stick bag, 11 hour-and-a-half training sessions, 1 completion day, coaching fees, facility. The Academy (Under 14, Under 16, Under 19) • Practices held December 4th - February 19th on Mondays from 7:30 - 9:00 PM. • Program Fee - $350.00 • Total of 11 hour-and-a-half training sessions, 2 tournaments, access to college guidance counselor, guest coach appearances, s, facility. coaching fees,

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CMYK PAGE 8B

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Hunter Kotarski

Abigale M. Coburn

Hunter Kotarski, son of Nicole and Justin Kotarski, Allentown, is celebrating his third birthday today, Oct. 9. Hunter is a grandson of Renee and Don Verry, Plymouth; Lee Ann Holub, Luzerne; and James Kotarski, Swoyersville. He is a greatgrandson of Bernie and Elmer Gimble, Plymouth; Leona and Jake Savage, Pringle; and Antoinette Kotarski, Edwardsville.

Abigale Marie Coburn, daughter of Ron and Tammy Coburn, Edwardsville, is celebrating her eighth birthday today, Oct. 9. Abby is a granddaughter of Richard and Margaret Rovine, Kingston, and Joe and Margaret Coburn, both of Hanover Township. She has three brothers, Josh, Jeremy and Lucky, and a sister, Kayla.

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NAMES AND FACES Ellen McLaughlin, Dallas, associate professor of occupational therapy and director of the doctorate of occupational therapy program at Misericordia University, has been named chair-elect of McLaughlin the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE). McLaughlin will serve as the chair-elect and then become chair for the 2012-15 term. ACOTE appoints members to serve on the Educational Standards Review Committee, which conducts a complete evaluation and revision of the accreditation standards for doctoral and master’s degree programs in occupational therapy and for educational programs for occupational therapy assistant. McLaughlin is the past program chair of the occupational ther-

IN BRIEF

Daniel Dorshefski

Alex J. Seymour Alex James Seymour, son of Kevin and Kelly Seymour, Dallas, is celebrating his fourth birthday today, Oct. 9. Alex is a grandson of Andrew and Judith Wasilko, Kingston, and Diane Seymour, Edwardsville. He has a brother, Jacob, 7.

Daniel Dorshefski, son of Diane and Bernard Dorshefski, Ashley, is celebrating his ninth birthday today, Oct. 9. Daniel is a grandson of Marlene Conklin, Ashley; Daniel Conklin, Nuangola; Bernard Dorshefski Sr., Mountain Top; and the late Carol Dorshefski.

Joshua D. Payne

DALLAS: Misericordia University was ranked among the top 28 percent of all master’s degree-granting institutions of higher education in the country by Washington Monthly magazine in a survey that stresses community service and social mobility of students. The university was ranked 158th overall among 553 other colleges and universities in the nation that were recognized in the “2011 Master’s Universities’’ category. The rankings are based on the institution’s contribution to the public good in three categories, social mobility,

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apy department at Misericordia and served as interim dean of the College of Health Sciences. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in occupational therapy from Misericordia University and her doctorate in learning, cognition and development from Rutgers University. McLaughlin also earned a certificate in interdisciplinary infant studies. Karen Stewart, Hazleton, was elected to the Homecoming Court for the sophomore class at Susquehanna University. Stewart, the daughter of Dale and Regina Stewart and the late Analee Arnold Stewart, is an English major at the university and a 2010 graduate of Hazleton Area High School. Kate Slenzak, Wilkes-Barre, is participating in Arcadia University’s First Year Study Abroad Experience. Slenzak, an international studies/pre IPCR major, is spending her first college semester in Stirling, Scotland. She is a graduate of James M. Coughlin High School.

research and service. The rankings appear in the September/ October issue of Washington Monthly magazine. The magazine also ranked Misericordia 20th in the nation for student participation in service and recognized the university for its 73 percent actual graduate rate, which placed 13th in the nation. NANTICOKE: Luzerne County Community College will host a law enforcement seminar for individuals who respond to potentially lethal threats from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 29 at the college’s Educational Conference Center. Lt. Col. David Grossman, U.S. Army (Ret.), will be the fea-

St. Nicholas-St. Mary School student writers chosen St. Nicholas-St. Mary School recently selected the student writers for the school newspaper, ‘The Crescent Crier.’ Students from seventh and eighth grades submitted articles which were reviewed by the moderators of the newspaper. Members of the staff for the 201 1-2012 school year, from left, first row, are Marley Mullery, Olivia Caraballo and Shelby Smith. Second row: Abby Muth, Julia Randazzo and Monica Morrison.

tured speaker. Grossman is the director of the Warrior Science Group, a member of the American Board for Certification in Homeland Security and a member of the American College of Forensic Examiners Institute. He is a former professor at West Point and an Army Ranger. Grossman is an expert in the field of human aggression and the roots of violence and violent crime. He has made contributions to the understanding of killing in war and the psychological costs of war. He has combined his experiences to become the founder of a new field of scientific endeavor termed, “killology.” Participants will receive instruction on self-assessment,

potential areas of improvement and individual capacity to respond appropriately to the risks one faces in violent confrontations. Tuition is $89 per person and lunch is included. For more information, or to register, contact LCCC at 740-0481, or email kflannery@luzerne.edu. PITTSTON: Students from Pittston Area High School recently held fundraisers to help flood victims in their school district. A dress-down day took place on Sept. 23 and the Stand Tall Club collected clothes and nonperishable food items from Oct. 3-7. A total of $1,877.50 was collected.

Joshua David Payne, son of Dale and Rebecca Payne, Kingston, celebrated his 12th birthday Oct. 6. Joshua is a grandson of Albert Endres, Hughestown; the late Mary Anne GlassmanEndres; and Donald and Catherine Payne. He has a sister, Leah, 8.

Women’s networking group offering scholarships Wilkes-Barre Women’s Organization for Networking (WWON) is seeking qualified applicants to compete for 2011 Scholarship Awards. This year two $250 awards will be given to college students who are pursuing undergraduate degrees. The first award is the WWON Adult Female Scholarship, which will be awarded to an outstanding woman who is at least 22 years of age and pursuing an undergraduate degree at Luzerne County Community College, Penn State Wilkes-Barre, Wilkes University, King’s College or Misericordia University. The second award is the WWON Member Sponsored Scholarship, which will be awarded to an outstanding student at least 16 years of age pursuing an undergraduate degree at the above-listed colleges. The applicant for this scholarship must be sponsored by a current WWON member. For details and applications, visit www.WWON.org and click on scholarships. Applications must be received by Oct. 17. Members of the WWON Scholarship Committee, from left: Mary Bartos, Amore Jewelry & Gifts; Heather Dehnel, Event Planning 911; Amanda Salvo, Hilton Garden Inn; and Kim Cavalari, A Photo Affair. Ginny Major, Independent Mary Kay Consultant, and Joann Tomasino, Joann’s Sweets, are also committee members.

Meyers Class of ’66 holds 45th reunion Elmer L. Meyers High School Class of 1966 celebrated its 45th anniversary reunion Sept. 3 at the Genetti Hotel and Conference Center, Wilkes-Barre. There was a cocktail hour followed by dinner and dancing. The highlight of the evening was the crowning of the King, Fernando Monras, 1966 foreign exchange student from Chile, and Queen Joyce Byndas Wise. Classmates in attendance, from left, first row, are Carm Corallo Sosik, Joyce Byndas Wise, Linda Tremayne Wagner, Judy Isaac Seroska, Fernando Monras, Kathy Passiglia Jones, Sheila Hannon Kang and Nancy Kovalcheck Pearson. Second row: Irene Kruger Race, Annette Pearce, Ina Krasno Lubin, Ron Hungarter, Janice Olex Brizgint, George Eget, Janet Achey Holovach, Janice Keiper Baran, Sharon Forlenza Stevens, Ron Stone, Bob Aston, Scott Smith, Diane Holodick Demchak, Judy Cobleigh Ockenfuss, Kathy Simons Weiss, Susan Himmelfarb Murphy, Marie Lavan Harding, Jane Rau Hirel, Helen Nowak and Sharon Dress Johnson. Third row: Robert Koons, Rick Solomon, Marily Davis Kilbourne, Bill Oeller, Jon Schiffman, Dick Kutz, Charles Williams, Ron Lidondici, Mike Johnson, Ned McGuire, Ron Keeney, Jay Brown, Rick Harris, Tony Weiss, Ron Roberts, and Ray Payne. Ken Gordon and Joe Johns also attended.

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CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 9B

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work, treating every client with the same respect that you would want to be treated with, and paying attention to the small details. Pride Builders has received endorsements from some of the nation’s leading manufacturers of quality building products. We take great pride in our preferred contractor status with OwensCorning and Timber Tech. Pride Builders received the 2007 Keystone Award in the “Single Family Home over 4,000 Square Feet, Over $500,000” category, as well as the “Most Creative Display” award at the 2008 BIA Home Show. In 2008, he received the Keystone Award in the “Single Family Home up to 3,000-4,000 sq. ft., up to $350,000. In 2009, Pride Builders received the Builder of the Year Award and an award for a custom deck project. In 2008, he was named Remodeler of the Year. Mr. Piccolotti served on the Northeast Building Industry Association Board of Directors as well as other boards in 2008, served as VicePresident in 2009, served as President in 2010 and is currently President.

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CMYK

SPORTS

SECTION

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011●

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

PENGUINS HOCKEY

Verlander brings rain with him

Bears attack in season opener

EDITOR’S NOTE: At press time, the Texas Rangers were leadig the Detroit Tigers 3-2 in the top of the fifth inning. By STEPHEN HAWKINS AP\Sports Writer

ARLINGTON, Texas — Justin Verlander and the Detroit Tigers were delayed by rain in the opener of a playoff series again — twice. Game 1 of the AL championship series between the Tigers and Texas Rangers was stopped by rain for 41 minutes in the top of the fifth inning on Saturday night. Then, 13 minutes after play resumed, umpires halted the game for the second time. Detroit scored twice after the resumption to close to 3-2, and the Tigers had the bases loaded with two outs in the fifth when play was halted again. Verlander had thrown one inning and 25 pitches in the division series opener at Yankee Stadium on Sept. 30 when that game was suspended. Under a rules change adopted two years ago, postseason games are suspended when called instead of being cut short or wiped out. Verlander came back and started Game 3, which he won, and threw 82 pitches against the Rangers before the delay. After the fourth inning at Rangers Ballpark, the groundskeeper went out and spoke with plate umpire Tim

Late goal by Keith Aucoin on the power play lifts Hershey to victory.

3

HERSHEY

2

PENGUINS

By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE TWP. – The WilkesBarre/Scranton Penguins made one fatal mistake during their season opener Saturday against the Hershey Bears. They gave Keith Aucoin an eternity to shoot the puck. With the game tied 2-2 and the Bears on a power play early in the third period, Ryan Potulny dished a pass to Aucoin, who was alone in the right faceoff circle. Aucoin held the puck and patiently

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Penguins forward Geoff Walker moves the puck past Patrick McNeill of the Hershey Bears on Saturday night.

See PENGUINS, Page 10C

PENN STATE FOOTBALL NITTANY LIONS

HAWKEYES

13

3

Under pressure

Lions blitz Iowa like never before

See ALCS, Page 11C

By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

NFL

Raiders owner Davis, 82, dies

Pioneer helped league blossom into the powerhouse it is today. By JOSH DUBOW AP Sports Writer

OAKLAND, Calif. — Al Davis was a rebel with a cause — “Just win, baby” he exhorted his beloved Oakland Raiders. And as the NFL well knows, he was also a rebel with a subpoena. Davis, who bucked league authority time and again and won three Super Bowl titles during his half-century in professional football, died Saturday. He was 82. The Hall of Famer died at his home in Oakland, the team said. See DAVIS, Page 11C

AP PHOTO

Penn State defensive tackle Devon Still, right, sacks Iowa quarterback James Vanderberg during the fourth quarter Saturday in State College. Penn State won 13-3.

STATE COLLEGE -- The fourth quarter began, and the Iowa boogeyman was still breathing. Penn State led by just three points. The defense dropped a potential pick-six. The offense threw an interception in the end zone. Saturday felt exactly like so many Iowa wins in the series in the past decade. “I said, ‘Geez, I hope this isn’t here we go again,’” defensive coordinator Tom Bradley said. “I thought it could be like that,” said senior captain Drew Astorino, who couldn’t hold onto that interception. “I thought I lost the game.” But those old fears never came. Instead, Bradley cranked up the pressure as much as he has in the past decade and a dominant Nittany Lions defense suffocated the Hawkeyes in a 13-3 win at Beaver Stadium. The defense, sometimes criticized for being too passive, too vanilla in its worst moments, went over the top. With the game on the line and a 6-3 lead in the fourth quarter, the Lions blitzed. And blitzed. See BLITZ, Page 3C

G L E N M A U R A N AT I O N A L I N V I TAT I O N A L

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

Defending champions get off to fast start during Invitational

Thrilling victory for Mountaineers

Brian Brown and Christian Davis combined to shoot 3-under 68 on first day.

By PAUL SOKOLOSKI psokoloski@timesleader.com

round of the second Glenmaura National Invitational. “We actually shot the same first-round score (last year),” Davis said. “Hopefully, that’ll be a good omen.” They’ll find out today, when the two-day tourney concludes with a 10 a.m. start at Glenmaura. Saturday’s 68 was good for a one-stroke lead over Eric Williams and Irv Williams. Davis hit an opening-round low of 32 and Brown finished the first day with a 36. From the fifth through eighth hole, they used three birdies and a couple of pars to get to 3-under. “We played pretty well for the

MOOSIC – The wet grounds at Glenmaura didn’t do much to dampen the day for Brian Brown and Christian Davis. The defending tournament champions simply adapted, adjusted and advanced past most of the 24-team field. They partnered to shoot a 3under 68 and end the first day of play, sharing the lead with the tandem of Mark Bartkowski and Doug Nardella in the opening See GLENMAURA, Page 8C

Spartans go for two-point conversion for late victory, but come up short. By JOHN ERZAR jerzar@timesleader.com

DALLAS – Just three yards and the best player in the area. One of the best in the state for that matter. The equation for victory was there, but it never added up thanks in part to Dallas defensive end Keifer Rogers. Rogers made the initial hit on Wyoming Valley West quarterback Eugene Lewis and his teammates joined in to stop a See THRILLING, Page 6C

C

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Dallas wide receiver Paul Brace breaks the plane of the goal line to score the first touchdown Saturday.

PAUL SOKOLOSKI OPINION

Postseason wishes fell inches shy

THE BALL ROCKETED off the bat as thousands of sullen fans suddenly leaped to their feet, watching gleefully as their renewed hopes soared high and deep toward the right field wall. And that’s where the dreams of the Phillies and Yankees died. They won’t meet in the World Series this year, the way did in 2009. Mainly because baseball’s two best teams were both beaten by a game of inches. Another fraction of an inch of contact may have put the Phillies in the National League championship series which begins today. But Phillies outfielder Raul Ibanez said he knew he barely missed sending his fourth-inning fly over the fence from the moment he hit it Friday. “I thought I hit it too high,” Ibanez said. Still, he elevated the spirits of the Phillies and their second-largest Citizens Bank Park crowd of 50,960 fans – if only for a fleeting second. Because in a decisive National League division series game the Phillies lost 1-0 to St. Louis pitcher Chris Carpenter’s three-hit shutout, one swing almost changed the outcome. Instead, the Phillies stranded runners on first and third when Lance Berkman tracked down the blow by Ibanez just in front of the right field wall. “I hit it well enough where if it was a little more on a line to get it up out of here,” Ibanez said. “But I didn’t.” That turned out to be Philadelphia’s only real scoring opportunity against Carpenter, who set down 15 of the last 17 Phillies batters – starting with the shot by Ibanez that came up just short. “Ibanez skies the ball up, you think it’s got a chance,” Phillies manager Charlie Manuel said. “It wasn’t far enough.” A drive not long enough Neither was Derek Jeter’s drive against Detroit. But the Yankee captain electrified the largest crowd in the threeyear history of new Yankee Stadium with optimism. Doesn’t he always? When Jeter jumped on a twostrike fastball from Tigers reliever Joaquin Benoit in the eighth inning of New York’s 3-2 defeat Thursday, he was hoping to put the Yankees over the top. “A lot of times, it’s a matter of a foot here or a foot there,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said, “and it’s the difference in the game. This situation could have been the difference in the series.” What happened in New York was no different than what happened in Philadelphia. Jeter’s opposite-field blast with a runner on first base was pulled in by Tigers right fielder Don Kelly – who caught the ball with his back against the wall. “I thought it might have a chance,” Jeter said. “I just got it too high.” It dropped the emotions of both teams to new lows. The Phillies were picked to win the World Series, after setting a franchise record by posting a baseball-best 102-60 record during the regular season. The Yankees believed they’d win their 28th world championship after leading the American League with a 97-65 mark. “Baseball, sometimes, is cruel,” Yankees first baseman Mark Teixeira said. The game never plays favorites. It toyed with the emotions of two favored teams, raising their anticipation to new heights with majestic flights toward glory. Like their chances of advancing, both came up just short.


K PAGE 2C

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

L O C A L C A L E N D A R Today's Events COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY Wilkes at William Patterson, 1 p.m. MEN'S TENNIS MAC Tournament at Ralston Complex/Kirby Park

MONDAY, OCT. 10

PGA Tour

H.S. FIELD HOCKEY Montrose at GAR Northwest at Tunkhannock Elk Lake at Berwick Pittston Area at Hanover Area H.S. BOYS SOCCER Crestwood at Hazleton Area, 7 p.m. Dallas at Coughlin Lake-Lehman at Meyers Wyoming Seminary at Holy Redeemer Tunkhannock at Pittston Area Berwick at GAR MMI at Hanover Area Nanticoke at Wyoming Area H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL (4:15 p.m. unless noted) Meyers at MMI Nanticoke at GAR Lake-Lehman at Meyers

TUESDAY, OCT. 11 H.S. FIELD HOCKEY Hazleton Area at Delaware Valley Lackawanna Trail at Crestwood Honesdale at Lake-Lehman Wyoming Seminary at Wyoming Valley West Coughlin at Nanticoke Meyers at Wyoming Area Wallenpaupack at Holy Redeemer Abington Heights at Dallas H.S. BOYS SOCCER Hanover Area at Nanticoke GAR at Wyoming Area MMI Prep at Berwick Coughlin at Holy Redeemer Wyoming Seminary at Crestwood Dallas at Tunkhannock H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL (4:15 p.m.) Dallas at Wyoming Valley West Pittston Area at North Pocono Berwick at Hazleton Area Tunkhannock at Delaware Valley Holy Redeemer at Coughlin MEN'S SOCCER Misericordia at King’s, 4 p.m. Wilkes at DeSales, 4 p.m.

W H A T ’ S

O N

T V

Today's Schedule (All times Eastern) AUTO RACING 2 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Hollywood Casino 400, at Kansas City, Kan. CYCLING 10 p.m. VERSUS — Paris-Tours, Voves to Tours, France (same-day tape) GOLF 8 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Madrid Masters, final round, at Alcala de Henares, Spain 2:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA, Hana Bank Championship, final round, at Incheon, South Korea (same-day tape) 5 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Frys.com Open, final round, at San Martin, Calif. 8:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Insperity Championship, final round, at The Woodlands, Texas (same-day tape) HORSE RACING 5 p.m. VERSUS — NTRA, Spinster Stakes and Bourbon Stakes, at Lexington, Ky. MLB 4 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, National League Championship Series, game 1, St. Louis at Milwaukee 7:45 p.m. FOX — Playoffs, American League Championship Series, game 2, Detroit at Texas NFL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage, doubleheader FOX — Regional coverage 4 p.m. FOX — Regional coverage 4:15 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage, doubleheader game 8 p.m. NBC — Green Bay at Atlanta

T R A N S A C T I O N S BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended New York Yankees minor league RHP Daniel Gil (Tampa-FSL) 50 games for testing positive for a performance-enhancing drug; and Philadelphia minor league RHP Ronald Mendez (Venezuela SL) and LHP Audrys Mora (Venezuela SL) 25 games apiece for violating baseball’s drug policy. Frontier League RIVER CITY RASCALS—Signed SS Bobby Burk and RHP Tony Marsala to contract extensions. Signed RHP Jason Pankau. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS—Signed LHP Shawn Gilblair.

FOOTBALL

National Football League NEW YORK JETS—Placed LB Bryan Thomas on season-ending injured reserve. Signed LB Eddie Jones from the practice squad. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Placed LB Ricky Brown on injured reserve. Activated FB Manase Tonga from the practice squad.

HOCKEY

National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Recalled F Marcus Kruger from Rockford (AHL). Assigned F Brandon Pirri to Rockford. DETROIT RED WINGS—Recalled D Brendan Smith from Grand Rapids Griffins (AHL). Placed D Mike Commodore on the 7-day injured reserve list. MONTREAL CANADIENS—Assigned D Joe Callahan to Hamilton (AHL). ECHL ELMIRA JACKALS—Announced G Marco Cousineau was assigned to the team by Syracuse (AHL). Signed F Riley Armstrong. READING ROYALS—Announced G Karel St. Laurent was assigned to the team by Providence (AHL).

G O L F GLENMAURA NATIONAL INVITATIONAL Saturday's first round scores Brian Brown/Christian Davis Doug Nardella/Mark Bartkowski Eric Williams/Irv Williams Bob Andrejko/Mike Peregrim Brenden Carroll/Mike Cummings Art Brunn Jr./Charles Dennis David Pompey/Evan Joyce Bill Burke/Joe Carroll Justin Masters/Kevin Rossi Frank Osborne/Ken Bolcavage Brian Hoban/Tim Hinton Matt Dougherty/John Emiliani Albert Hazzouri/Mike Jaros Curtis Haley/Mike Heck Dave Osborne/John Pash Gene Chiavacci/Len Coleman John Lasko/John Mulhern John Mikiewicz/Tom Biscotti Matt Hoover/Tony Clapps Gregory Vladika/John Zavada Brian Marzolino/Chris Mathewson Chris Hoban/Ryan Manley John Tolerico/Mario Costa Mark Bonavoglia/Scott Napkori

Today's tee times 10 a.m. John Tolerico/Mario Costa Mike Bonavoglia/Scott Napkori 10:10 a.m. Brian Marzolino/Chris Mathewson Chris Hoban/Ryan Manley 10:20 a.m. Gregory Vladika/John Zavada Matt Hoover/Tony Clapps 10:30 a.m. John Mikiewicz/Tom Biscotti John Lasko/John Mulhern 10:40 a.m. Gene Chiavacci/Len Coleman Dave Osborne/John Pash 10:50 a.m. Curtis Haley/Mike Heck Albert Hazzouri/Mike Jaros 11 a.m. John Emiliani/Matt Dougherty Brian Hoban/Tim Hinton 11:10 a.m. Frank Osborne/Ken Bolcavage Justin Masters/Kevin Rossi

11:20 a.m. Bill Burke/Joe Carroll David Pompey/Evan Joyce 11:30 a.m. Brenden Carroll/Mike Cummings Art Brunn Jr./Charles Dennis 11:40 a.m. Bob Andrejko/Mike Peregrim Eric Williams/Irv Williams 11:50 a.m. Brian Brown/Christian Davis Doug Nardella/Mark Bartkowski

68 68 69 72 72 73 73 73 74 74 74 75 75 75 76 76 77 77 79 79 79 80 80 82

Frys.com Open Par Scores Saturday (a-amateur) Third Round Briny Baird....................................67-69-64—200-13 Paul Casey...................................70-64-68—202-11 Ernie Els .......................................69-66-67—202-11 Adam Hadwin ..............................71-68-64—203-10 Charlie Wi.....................................72-67-64—203-10 Bryce Molder ...............................71-67-65—203-10 Bud Cauley...................................69-66-68—203-10 John Rollins .................................69-70-65—204 -9 Josh Teater ..................................71-68-66—205 -8 Jim Renner...................................75-68-62—205 -8 Chris Stroud.................................71-66-68—205 -8 Will MacKenzie............................73-70-62—205 -8 Kevin Na.......................................69-72-65—206 -7 Brandt Jobe..................................69-72-65—206 -7 Roland Thatcher ..........................69-70-67—206 -7 David Mathis ................................73-67-66—206 -7 Brendan Steele............................67-71-68—206 -7 Shane Bertsch .............................70-68-68—206 -7 Matt McQuillan .............................70-68-68—206 -7 Garrett Willis ................................67-69-70—206 -7 Nathan Green...............................72-64-70—206 -7 Cameron Percy ...........................71-69-67—207 -6 Sunghoon Kang...........................70-68-69—207 -6 Spencer Levin .............................71-67-69—207 -6 Nate Smith....................................72-65-70—207 -6 Lee Janzen...................................70-71-67—208 -5 Billy Horschel...............................72-68-68—208 -5 Matt Jones ....................................68-72-68—208 -5 John Merrick ................................71-70-67—208 -5 David Hearn.................................71-68-69—208 -5 Angel Cabrera .............................74-65-69—208 -5 Chad Campbell ...........................69-70-69—208 -5 Derek Lamely...............................72-70-66—208 -5 Tim Petrovic.................................72-70-66—208 -5 Woody Austin...............................71-71-66—208 -5 Erick Justesen .............................71-67-70—208 -5 Rod Pampling ..............................68-69-71—208 -5 Tiger Woods ................................73-68-68—209 -4 Arjun Atwal...................................71-70-68—209 -4 William McGirt .............................70-71-68—209 -4 Trevor Immelman ........................70-69-70—209 -4 Paul Stankowski ..........................71-68-70—209 -4 Frank Lickliter II ...........................73-70-66—209 -4 Tom Pernice, Jr...........................74-69-66—209 -4 Billy Mayfair..................................71-66-72—209 -4 Vaughn Taylor..............................73-70-66—209 -4 Troy Matteson ..............................68-68-73—209 -4 Michael Connell...........................73-68-69—210 -3 Ricky Barnes................................72-68-70—210 -3 Greg Chalmers ............................69-73-68—210 -3 Chris Riley....................................71-68-71—210 -3 Michael Thompson .....................70-72-68—210 -3 Colt Knost.....................................76-67-67—210 -3 Marc Leishman ............................72-66-72—210 -3 Richard S. Johnson ....................74-69-67—210 -3 Hunter Haas.................................69-71-71—211 -2 Heath Slocum ..............................72-69-70—211 -2 Bobby Gates ................................72-70-69—211 -2 Steven Bowditch .........................68-70-73—211 -2 Blake Adams................................74-69-68—211 -2 Louis Oosthuizen ........................71-70-71—212 -1 Scott Gutschewski ......................70-71-71—212 -1 Rocco Mediate.............................71-71-70—212 -1 Scott Piercy..................................69-73-70—212 -1 Steve Elkington ...........................74-69-69—212 -1 Martin Piller ..................................72-71-69—212 -1 Steve Flesch ................................73-69-71—213 E Justin Leonard.............................70-72-71—213 E Fabian Gomez .............................72-70-71—213 E a-Patrick Cantlay..........................69-74-70—213 E Ben Martin....................................72-71-70—213 E

H O R S E

R A C I N G

POCONO DOWNS ENTRIES Tuesday Oct 11, 2011 Post Time: 6:30 PM First $9,700 Pace 1. Boys Of Fall (Simons) 2. Chicago Hanover (Kakaley) 3. Hurricane John (Simpson) 4. Jb’s Beach Iscape (Lancaster) 5. Savvy Savannah (Schadel) 6. Eastwood Blue (Napolitano) Chip 7. Max Mike And Ggb (Buter) Second $9,700 Trot 1. Mr Hobbs (Simons) 2. B Contemporary (Taggart Jr) 3. South Jersey Flash (Schadel) 4. Unefoisdansmavie (Buter) 5. Tv Mom (Pavia Jr) 6. St Giannis (Kakaley) 7. No Doze (Irvine Jr) 8. Thors Hammer (Morrill Jr) 9. Florida Mac Attack (Napolitano) Third$10,000 Pace 1. Steuben Jump(Simons) injack 2. Patient Major (Taggart Jr) 3. Hey Scoob (McCarthy) 4. Skymeadow Joseph (Morrill Jr) 5. Major Speed (Romano) 6. Kanjo (Buter) 7. Prince Sail On (Napolitano Jr) 8. Stop Payment (Kakaley) 9. Terror On My Side (Simpson) Fourth$12,000 Trot 1. Definitely Mamie (Pavia Jr) 2. I’ve Got It All (Buter) 3. Intimidator (McCarthy) 4. Badboy Paparazzi A (Simons) 5. Captain Brady (Norris) 6. Self Professed (Parker) 7. Around And Over (Napolitano) 8. Staying Smooth (Kakaley) 9. The Count (Morrill Jr) Fifth $9,700 Pace 1. Misty’s Delight (McCarthy) 2. Add A Little Magic (Nickle) 3. Purple Mcrain (Schadel) 4. Newspeak (Napolitano Jr) 5. Coastal Storm (Parker) 6. Zambrano (Kakaley) 7. Joe Rocks (Buter) Sixth $9,800 Trot 1. Crystal Sizzler (Romano) 2. Litigator (Napolitano) 3. Twocarlane (Morrill Jr) 4. Fox Valley Smarty (Kakaley) 5. Like A Lexis (Irvine Jr) 6. Calchips Muscle (Pavia Jr) 7. Lucerne De Vie (Buter) 8. Allways Secret (McCarthy) 9. Lukas Rossi (Schadel) Seventh $18,000 Pace 1. Bad To The Bond (Napolitano Jr) 2. Pride And Glory (Romano) 3. Panfully Cool (Pavia Jr) 4. Juxasport (Buter) 5. Medoland J T (Kakaley) 6. Supreme Court (McCarthy) 7. Prince Polaris (Simpson) 8. Fox Valley Renoir (Morrill Jr) Eighth $15,000 Trot 1. Smooth Muscles (Taggart Jr) 2. Peace Bridge (Schadel) 3. Lord Burghley (Napolitano) 4. Miss Wapwallopen (Simons) 5. Carscot Nexus (Napolitano Jr) 6. Romeo Star (McCarthy) 7. Fortissimo (Buter) 8. Justherighttouch (Kakaley) 9. Fuel Cell (Morrill Jr) Ninth $14,000 Pace 1. Giant Cooper (Napolitano) 2. Saywhatuneedtosay (Simons) 3. Betterthanlynx (Simpson) 4. Bungleinthejungle (Romano) 5. Beckys Dreamboat (Buter) 6. Stonebridge Deco (Antonelli) 7. The Pan Flamingo (McCarthy) 8. Tiza Mojo (Taggart Jr) 9. Martial Bliss (Parker) Tenth $24,000 Pace 1. Abominable (Simpson) Snowpan 2. Border Fighting (Napolitano Jr) 3. Loadedupntruckin (Morrill Jr) 4. Mustang Art (Buter) 5. Four Starz Alex (Pavia Jr) 6. Andy Baran (Kakaley) 7. Sleek Hunter (McCarthy) Eleventh $9,700 Trot 1. Stogie Hanover (McCarthy) 2. Marion Matilda (Wasiluk) 3. Beatitude (Simons) 4. Asolare (Parker) 5. Clock Stopper (Buter) 6. A Real Laser (Napolitano Jr) 7. Thergosmyvacation (Petitto)

6-1 5-2 8-1 12-1 9-2 7-2 3-1 10-1 9-2 20-1 8-1 4-1 3-1 7-2 15-1 6-1 5-2 6-1 5-1 4-1 12-1 20-1 7-2 15-1 8-1 3-1 8-1 6-1 4-1 10-1 9-2 15-1 7-2 20-1 5-2 8-1 9-2 3-1 6-1 7-2 12-1 4-1 6-1 3-1 5-2 5-1 20-1 15-1 12-1 10-1 8-1 5-1 3-1 12-1 7-2 4-1 10-1 9-2 10-1 4-1 8-1 20-1 3-1 6-1 15-1 9-2 7-2 3-1 5-1 8-1 12-1 6-1 20-1 5-2 15-1 4-1 7-2 2-1 5-1 12-1 6-1 3-1 10-1 7-2 4-1 8-1 9-2 6-1 3-1 20-1

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8. Alarming Quick (Ingraham) 9. Mablesimamazed (Morrill Jr) Twelfth $14,000 Pace 1. San Antony-O (Buter) 2. Caerleon Hanover (Kakaley) 3. Voice Of Truth (Napolitano Jr) 4. Shadows Dream (Morrill Jr) 5. Heart Of Rocknroll (Parker) 6. Avantage (Ingraham) 7. Art Two D Two (Pavia Jr) Thirteenth $9,700 Trot 1. Money Machine (Morrill Jr) 2. Jon Win (Simons) 3. Funny Briefs (Parker) 4. Rodeo Red (Simpson) 5. Berndt Energy (Napolitano Jr) 6. Billboard King (Kakaley) 7. Skit Er Done (Buter) 8. Barely Famous (Napolitano) 9. Donnegal (Wasiluk) Fourteenth $4,800 Pace 1. Matt’s Pick (Kakaley) 2. Mr Socks (Pavia Jr) 3. Cannae Rocky (Napolitano Jr) 4. Mcardles Charm (Parker) 5. Lifetime Louie (Romano) 6. Leutenant General (Napolitano) 7. Fox Valley Verbeau (Simons) 8. Mister T-Rex (Clarke) 9. Jellis As Hecht (Simpson)

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

BULLETIN BOARD

15-1 10-1 7-2 9-2 5-2 3-1 6-1 12-1 8-1 9-2 4-1 8-1 3-1 7-2 15-1 20-1 6-1 10-1 3-1 7-2 6-1 10-1 9-2 4-1 20-1 8-1 15-1

H O C K E Y

AMERICA’S LINE

CAMPS/CLINICS

By ROXY ROXBOROUGH

Calgary

The Rock Rec Center will be holding their annual Fall Basketball Clinic October 17 though 26 at 340 Carverton Road. The clinic is open to girls and boys K though 6th grade. The clinic will provide preseason preparation and conditioning, equal playing time for each participant, drills, games and skill development for every child regardless of experience. Professional and knowledgeable staff and each player also receive a Rock Rec B-Ball t-shirt. The early registration cost is $40 before October 10, after the 10th the cost is $50. Space is limited, for more info contact the Rock Rec at 570-6962769 or TheRockRecCenter@bmha.org. LEAGUES

CIRCULAR REPORT: On the NFL board, the Steelers - Titans circle is for Pittsburgh QB Ben Roethlisberger (probable) and LB James Harrison (out). INJURY REPORT: On the NFL board, Houston WR Andre Johnson is out. BOXING REPORT: In the WBO welterweight title fight on November 12 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Manny Pacquiao is -$800 vs. Juan Manuel Marquez +$550. PATRIOTS

BASEBALL

8.5

Jets

Chargers

4

BRONCOS

American League Championship Series

Packers

6

FALCONS

Tigers

Monday 5

Bears

Favorite

Odds 7.5

Underdog RANGERS

LIONS

NFL Favorite

Points

COLTS

2.5

Chiefs

3

Cards

Bye week: Ravens, Browns, Cowboys, Dolphins, Rams, Redskins. CFL

BILLS

Favorite

VIKINGS Eagles TEXANS

2.5 6

Underdog

Raiders

Points

BR COLUMBIA

Underdog

3.5

Monday

Saints

6.5

PANTHERS

JAGUARS

2.5

Bengals

MONTREAL

13

Toronto

STEELERS

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Titans

EDMONTON

5

Saskatchewan

GIANTS

10

Seahawks

49ERS

3

Bucs

Home Teams in Capital Letters

National Hockey League EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia ..................... 2 2 0 0 4 5 1 Pittsburgh......................... 1 1 0 0 2 4 3 N.Y. Rangers ................... 2 0 0 2 2 3 5 N.Y. Islanders .................. 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 New Jersey ...................... 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Buffalo .............................. 2 2 0 0 4 8 3 Toronto ............................. 2 2 0 0 4 8 5 Boston .............................. 2 1 1 0 2 5 3 Montreal ........................... 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 Ottawa .............................. 2 0 2 0 0 8 11 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Florida............................... 1 1 0 0 2 2 0 Washington...................... 1 1 0 0 2 4 3 Tampa Bay ....................... 2 1 1 0 2 6 5 Carolina............................ 2 0 1 1 1 4 9 Winnipeg .......................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit ............................... 1 1 0 0 2 5 3 Nashville........................... 1 1 0 0 2 3 2 St. Louis ........................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Chicago ............................ 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 Columbus......................... 2 0 2 0 0 4 7 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Minnesota ........................ 1 1 0 0 2 4 2 Vancouver........................ 1 0 0 1 1 3 4 Calgary ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Colorado........................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Edmonton......................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas................................ 1 1 0 0 2 2 1 Los Angeles..................... 2 1 1 0 2 5 6 Anaheim ........................... 2 1 1 0 2 3 5 Phoenix ............................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 San Jose .......................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday's Games Buffalo 4, Anaheim 1 Los Angeles 3, N.Y. Rangers 2, OT Tampa Bay 5, Carolina 1 Detroit 5, Ottawa 3 Nashville 3, Columbus 2 Dallas 2, Chicago 1 Saturday's Games Anaheim 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, SO Buffalo 4, Los Angeles 2 Boston 4, Tampa Bay 1 Toronto 6, Ottawa 5 Philadelphia 3, New Jersey 0 Washington 4, Carolina 3, OT Florida 2, N.Y. Islanders 0 Minnesota 4, Columbus 2 Nashville at St. Louis, late Dallas at Chicago, late Detroit at Colorado, late Pittsburgh at Calgary, late Phoenix at San Jose, late Today's Games Montreal at Winnipeg, 5 p.m. Pittsburgh at Edmonton, 9 p.m.

American Hockey League EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA St. John’s................... 2 2 0 0 0 4 5 1 Portland...................... 1 1 0 0 0 2 4 2 Manchester................ 2 1 1 0 0 2 5 3 Worcester .................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Providence ................ 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 4 East Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Hershey ..................... 2 2 0 0 0 4 6 4 Norfolk........................ 2 2 0 0 0 4 10 8 Syracuse.................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Penguins .................. 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 3 Binghamton ............... 2 0 2 0 0 0 4 6 Northeast Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Adirondack ................ 1 1 0 0 0 2 6 3 Springfield ................. 2 1 1 0 0 2 8 8 Albany ........................ 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 6 Bridgeport.................. 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 4 Connecticut ............... 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 6 WESTERN CONFERENCE Midwest Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Milwaukee.................. 1 1 0 0 0 2 4 1 Rockford .................... 1 1 0 0 0 2 3 2 Charlotte .................... 2 0 1 1 0 1 8 10 Chicago...................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Peoria......................... 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 4 North Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Hamilton..................... 1 1 0 0 0 2 5 2 Toronto....................... 1 1 0 0 0 2 3 2 Grand Rapids ............ 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 3 Rochester .................. 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 5 Lake Erie.................... 2 0 2 0 0 0 1 3 West Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Abbotsford ................. 2 2 0 0 0 4 3 1 Houston ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Oklahoma City .......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 San Antonio............... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Texas ......................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for an overtime or shootout loss. Saturday's Games Abbotsford 1, Lake Erie 0 Springfield 6, Albany 3 St. John’s 1, Manchester 0 Hamilton 5, Rochester 2 Portland 4, Bridgeport 2 Adirondack 6, Connecticut 3 Toronto 3, Binghamton 2 Hershey 3, Penguins 2 Norfolk 4, Charlotte 3 Milwaukee 4, Peoria 1 Chicago at San Antonio, late Rockford 3, Grand Rapids 2 Today's Games Bridgeport at Albany, 4 p.m. Worcester at Providence, 4:05 p.m. Connecticut at Penguins, 5:05 p.m. Rockford at Peoria, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Texas, 6 p.m. Chicago at Houston, 6:05 p.m.

F O O T B A L L Pennsylvania Prep Scores Academy Park 27, Chester 0 Archbishop Wood 57, Mastery Charter North 0 Bishop Guilfoyle 17, Bishop Carroll 0 Blacklick 20, Conemaugh Valley 6 Blair, N.J. 42, Mercersburg Academy 6 Burgettstown 14, Quaker Valley 7 Calvary Christian 34, Morrisville 6 Cardinal O’Hara 54, Mastbaum 0 Chambersburg 9, Harrisburg 7 Coatesville 42, Bishop Shanahan 21 Cornell 32, Shenango 7 Dallas 28, Wyoming Valley West 27 Delaware Military Academy, Del. 48, Academy of the New Church 29 Lake-Lehman 35, Northwest Area 7 Mahanoy Area 69, Carson Long 0 Malvern Prep 28, Monsignor Bonner 7 Mercyhurst Prep 41, Oliver 28 Muncy 28, Canton 7 Nanticoke Area 52, Holy Redeemer 36 Nazareth 56, Bethlehem Catholic 28 North Star 29, Rockwood 17 Pen Argyl 14, Northern Lehigh 8 Penn Charter 41, Archbishop Carroll 21 Pope John Paul II 31, Pottstown 16 Pottsville Nativity 35, Columbia Montour Vo-Tech 12 Shaler 41, Erie McDowell 28 Springdale 61, Geibel Catholic 13 St. Joseph’s Prep 31, Archbishop Ryan 3 Susquehanna 32, Scranton Holy Cross 21 University Prep 24, Pius X 12 Valley View 33, Abington Heights 7 West Chester East 37, Avon Grove 21 Wilkes-Barre Coughlin 24, Stroudsburg 21 Wyomissing 48, Hamburg 14 York County Tech 32, Hanover 15

NCAA Scores EAST Albany (NY) 38, Duquesne 10 Alfred 32, Hartwick 29 Assumption 41, Pace 10 Bloomsburg 45, Cheyney 10 Brown 20, Holy Cross 13 Bryant 42, Stonehill 7 Buffalo 38, Ohio 37 CW Post 24, Millersville 6 California (Pa.) 33, Gannon 6 Clarion 54, Lock Haven 6 Colgate 26, Monmouth (NJ) 14 College of NJ 26, Brockport 17 Delaware 21, William & Mary 0 Endicott 51, Nichols 14 Georgetown 24, Wagner 10 Harvard 41, Cornell 31 Hobart 41, Union (NY) 24 Lebanon Valley 24, Albright 17 Lehigh 30, Bucknell 6 Lycoming 42, King’s (Pa.) 10 Mass. Maritime 23, Worcester St. 19 Montclair St. 34, Cortland St. 33 New Hampshire 47, Villanova 17 Norwich 40, Castleton St. 21 Old Dominion 31, Rhode Island 23 Penn 35, Fordham 20 Penn St. 13, Iowa 3 Rowan 30, William Paterson 21 Rutgers 34, Pittsburgh 10 Sacred Heart 34, Columbia 25 Slippery Rock 24, Edinboro 23 Southern Miss. 63, Navy 35 Stony Brook 42, Presbyterian 24 Trinity (Conn.) 35, Hamilton 0 UMass 42, CCSU 26 Utica 38, RPI 28 Wesleyan (Conn.) 28, Colby 21 West Virginia 43, UConn 16 Westminster (Pa.) 30, Bethany (WV) 27 Widener 55, FDU-Florham 3 Yale 30, Dartmouth 0 MIDWEST Adrian 56, Olivet 18 Albion 27, Alma 26 Ashland 70, Tiffin 13 Augustana (SD) 27, Northern St. (SD) 24 Baker 37, Avila 20 Bemidji St. 20, Concordia (St.P.) 7 Benedictine (Ill.) 26, Aurora 19 Bethel (Minn.) 41, St. John’s (Minn.) 20 Carroll (Wis.) 67, Lawrence 17 Central 33, Buena Vista 30 Chicago 38, Denison 23 Coe 54, Luther 20 Concordia (Ill.) 29, Wis. Lutheran 17 Concordia (Moor.) 26, Carleton 7 Concordia (Wis.) 59, Maranatha Baptist 7 Defiance 23, Mount St. Joseph 13 E. Kentucky 48, E. Illinois 16 Emporia St. 31, Missouri Southern 24 Eureka 31, Martin Luther 21 FIU 27, Akron 17 Findlay 43, Ferris St. 35 Grand Valley St. 42, N. Michigan 7 Gustavus 37, Hamline 0 Huntingdon 38, Wittenberg 20 Illinois 41, Indiana 20 Illinois College 48, St. Norbert 34 Illinois St. 38, Missouri St. 13 Indianapolis 38, Northwood (Mich.) 7 Kansas St. 24, Missouri 17 Lake Forest 27, Beloit 17 Lakeland 32, Rockford 0 Mac Murray 62, Greenville 7 Macalester 31, Hiram 14 Miami (Ohio) 35, Army 28 Michigan Tech 44, Saginaw Valley St. 41, OT Monmouth (Ill.) 42, Ripon 17 N. Dakota St. 9, S. Illinois 3 N. Illinois 40, Kent St. 10 N. Iowa 23, Indiana St. 9 NW Missouri St. 38, Cent. Missouri 20 North Dakota 42, Montana Western 9 Northwestern (Iowa) 51, Midland 14 Notre Dame 59, Air Force 33 Ohio Dominican 43, Hillsdale 42 Ohio Northern 32, Capital 20 Ottawa, Kan. 41, Southwestern (Kan.) 19 Purdue 45, Minnesota 17 Robert Morris-Chicago 37, Concordia (Mich.) 7 S. Dakota St. 35, Youngstown St. 28 SW Baptist 35, William Jewell 0 SW Minnesota St. 45, Minn. St.-Moorhead 13 San Diego 55, Valparaiso 14 Simpson (Iowa) 42, Cornell (Iowa) 22 South Dakota 24, S. Utah 19 St. Ambrose 28, McKendree 7 St. Cloud St. 31, Minn. St.-Mankato 13 St. Francis (Ind.) 42, Walsh 41, 2OT St. Mary (Kan.) 35, Bethany (Kan.) 32 St. Scholastica 35, Northwestern (Minn.) 7 St. Thomas (Minn.) 17, Augsburg 0 St. Xavier 52, Malone 10 Temple 42, Ball St. 0 Toledo 54, E. Michigan 16 Trine 20, LaGrange 14, OT Upper Iowa 31, Minn.-Crookston 21 W. Michigan 45, Bowling Green 21 Wartburg 42, Dubuque 39 Washburn 42, Truman St. 14 Wayne (Mich.) 45, Lake Erie 24 Wayne (Neb.) 31, Mary 24 Westminster (Mo.) 27, Minn.-Morris 14 Wheaton (Ill.) 49, Elmhurst 21 Wis.-LaCrosse 42, Jamestown 6 Wis.-Oshkosh 23, Wis.-Eau Claire 16 Wis.-Stout 22, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 19 Wis.-Whitewater 42, Wis.-River Falls 10 SOUTH Alabama A&M 37, MVSU 14 Campbell 38, Butler 23 Carson-Newman 55, Catawba 21 Cent. Arkansas 37, Nicholls St. 31 Clemson 36, Boston College 14 Cumberland (Tenn.) 21, Shorter 17 Drake 41, Morehead St. 26 Edward Waters 14, Livingstone 13 Elon 38, W. Carolina 31 Georgetown (Ky.) 31, Campbellsville 6 Georgia Southern 28, Chattanooga 27 Georgia Tech 21, Maryland 16 Hampton 28, Princeton 23 Howard 29, Florida A&M 28 Jackson St. 48, Ark.-Pine Bluff 10 Jacksonville 34, Dayton 26 Kentucky St. 25, Fort Valley St. 24 LSU 41, Florida 11 Lane 26, Albany St. (Ga.) 24 Lenoir-Rhyne 33, Brevard 27, 3OT Liberty 35, Gardner-Webb 3 Lindsey Wilson 28, Pikeville 24 Maine 25, James Madison 24, OT Marist 13, Davidson 9 Maryville (Tenn.) 26, Methodist 24 Miles 19, Clark Atlanta 16 Mississippi St. 21, UAB 3 Morgan St. 44, Savannah St. 17 Murray St. 48, Georgia St. 24 NC A&T 22, Bethune-Cookman 3 NC State 38, Cent. Michigan 24 Norfolk St. 38, Delaware St. 21 North Carolina 14, Louisville 7 S. Virginia 55, Guilford 24 SC State 49, NC Central 38 Samford 26, Furman 21 South Carolina 54, Kentucky 3 Thomas More 37, Grove City 7

Trinity (Texas) 27, Sewanee 9 UT-Martin 61, Austin Peay 23 Urbana 45, Kentucky Wesleyan 9 Va. Lynchburg 34, WVU Tech 6 Virginia Tech 38, Miami 35 Wake Forest 35, Florida St. 30 Winston-Salem 35, St. Augustine’s 28 Wofford 43, The Citadel 14 FAR WEST Arizona St. 35, Utah 14 Louisiana Tech 24, Idaho 11 Montana St. 38, Portland St. 36 Oregon St. 37, Arizona 27 Sacramento St. 14, N. Colorado 0 SOUTHWEST Alabama St. 43, Texas Southern 29 Oklahoma 55, Texas 17 Oklahoma St. 70, Kansas 28 Rice 28, Memphis 6 Sam Houston St. 45, Stephen F. Austin 10

S O C C E R Major League Soccer EASTERN CONFERENCE ......................................................... W L TPtsGFGA Sporting Kansas City ....................11 912 45 47 40 Philadelphia ...................................10 714 44 41 34 Columbus .......................................1212 8 44 38 41 New York........................................ 9 716 43 49 42 Houston ..........................................10 913 43 40 40 D.C. ................................................. 91011 38 46 46 Chicago .......................................... 7 816 37 40 40 Toronto FC..................................... 61313 31 33 56 New England ................................. 51512 27 36 53 WESTERN CONFERENCE ......................................................... W L TPtsGFGA x-Los Angeles................................18 410 64 46 25 x-Seattle..........................................16 6 9 57 51 33 x-Real Salt Lake............................1511 6 51 43 35 FC Dallas .......................................1311 7 46 36 34 Colorado.........................................11 912 45 42 40 Portland ..........................................1113 7 40 38 44 Chivas USA ................................... 81212 36 40 39 San Jose......................................... 71114 35 35 41 Vancouver ...................................... 51610 25 32 50 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. x- clinched playoff berth Tuesday's Games New York 2, Los Angeles 0 Thursday's Games Vancouver 3, Real Salt Lake 0 Saturday's Games San Jose 2, New England 1 Philadelphia at Seattle FC, late Wednesday, Oct. 12 FC Dallas at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. D.C. United at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Friday, Oct. 14 Real Salt Lake at Colorado, 10:30 p.m. Houston at Portland, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15 New York at Sporting Kansas City, 4 p.m. Toronto FC at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Columbus at New England, 7:30 p.m. Chicago at D.C. United, 7:30 p.m. Vancouver at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m. San Jose at Seattle FC, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 16 Chivas USA at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.

T E N N I S

The Rock Recreation Center will be hosting a Fall High School Girls Basketball League. The league is open to all high school girls basketball teams. All games will be played on Sunday evenings from October 23 through November 13. This is a great pre-season warm-up before the Nov. 18 official start of the regular season. The cost for four games is $175 per team, which includes referee fees and there is no admission fee for spectators. For more information, please contact the Rock Rec Center at (570) 696-2769. MEETINGS Duryea Little League will hold their monthly meeting on Sunday, October 16 at 7 p.m. at the Duryea VFW. Final nominations for 20112012 board seats will be accepted and voting will take place. Nanticoke Little League will hold its monthly meeting on October 11 for 7:30 p.m. at the Nanticoke Little League Field House. Elections of Officers will take place. REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS Hanover Area Youth Basketball will be holding registrations for boys/ girls grades three through six at Memorial Elementary Gym October 12 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Coaches and sponsors needed/ Any questions call 822-8797 or e-mail jimkim1020@verizon.net.

Bulletin Board items will not be accepted over the telephone. Items may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.

A U T O

R A C I N G

ATP & WTA

NASCAR Nationwide Series

China Open Results Singles Men Semifinals Marin Cilic, Croatia, def. Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, 6-4, 6-3. Tomas Berdych (3), Czech Republic, def. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (1), France, 6-4, 4-6, 6-1. Women Semifinals Andrea Petkovic (9), Germany, def. Monica Niculescu, Romania, 6-2, 6-0. Agnieszka Radwanska (11), Poland, def. Flavia Pennetta, Italy, 6-2, 6-4. Doubles Men Semifinals Michael Llodra, France, and Nenad Zimonjic (3), Serbia, def. Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 10-3 tiebreak. Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Horia Tecau, Romania, def. Marin Cilic and Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, 6-4, 6-7 (9), 10-6 tiebreak. Women Championship Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, and Katarina Srebotnik (1), Slovenia, def. Gisela Dulko, Argentina, and Flavia Pennetta (3), Italy, 6-3, 6-4.

Kansas Lottery 300 Results (Start position in parentheses) 1. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 200 laps, 150 rating 2. (1) Carl Edwards, Ford, 200, 122.5 3. (12) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 200, 114.4 4. (4) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 200, 117.2 5. (9) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 200, 104.3 6. (19) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 93.9 7. (8) Joey Logano, Toyota, 200, 110.7 8. (14) Brian Vickers, Chevrolet, 200, 94.9 9. (17) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 91.3 10. (3) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 200, 95 11. (21) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 84.5 12. (7) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet, 200, 100.9 13. (10) Jason Leffler, Chevrolet, 200, 92.9 14. (6) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 200, 85.5 15. (15) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 200, 76.7 16. (25) Michael Annett, Toyota, 200, 78.1 17. (5) Brian Scott, Toyota, 200, 96 18. (28) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 200, 74.3 19. (11) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 200, 79.1 20. (16) Steve Wallace, Toyota, 199, 72.1 21. (13) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 199, 68.1 22. (23) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 199, 67 23. (27) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 199, 63.4 24. (32) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 199, 54.2 25. (18) Blake Koch, Dodge, 198, 55.1 26. (24) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 198, 55.4 27. (33) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 198, 50.3 28. (37) Kevin Lepage, Chevrolet, 197, 47.6 29. (41) Joey Gase, Ford, 196, 46.6 30. (39) Derrike Cope, Dodge, 193, 40.5. 31. (36) Eric McClure, Chevrolet, 188, 37.7 32. (42) Angela Cope, Chevrolet, accident, 167, 41 33. (40) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, engine, 138, 43.3 34. (31) Timmy Hill, Ford, engine, 87, 58.2 35. (35) Matt Carter, Ford, suspension, 18, 39.2 36. (22) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, overheating, 13, 42.9 37. (38) Carl Long, Ford, rear gear, 13, 37.1 38. (34) Johnny Chapman, Chevrolet, vibration, 12, 36.1 39. (26) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, ignition, 10, 40.5 40. (30) Charles Lewandoski, Chevrolet, vibration, 5, 34.9 41. (20) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, vibration, 3, 35 42. (29) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, vibration, 3, 33.4 43. (43) J.J. Yeley, Ford, electrical, 2, 31.8 Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 125.757 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 23 minutes, 8 seconds. Margin of Victory: 2.795 seconds. Caution Flags: 6 for 30 laps. Lead Changes: 9 among 5 drivers. Lap Leaders: C.Edwards 1-2;B.Keselowski 3-41;J.Clements 42;C.Edwards 43-44;B.Keselowski 45-89;A.Almirola 90-100;B.Keselowski 101-175;J.Leffler 176-178;C.Edwards 179-186;B.Keselowski 187-200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): B.Keselowski, 4 times for 173 laps;C.Edwards, 3 times for 12 laps;A.Almirola, 1 time for 11 laps;J.Leffler, 1 time for 3 laps;J.Clements, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Stenhouse Jr., 1,064;2. E.Sadler, 1,044;3. R.Sorenson, 994;4. A.Almirola, 984;5. J.Allgaier, 972;6. J.Leffler, 916;7. K.Wallace, 866;8. S.Wallace, 839;9. B.Scott, 838;10. M.Annett, 832. NASCAR Driver Rating Formula A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race. The formula combines the following categories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.

ATP World Tour Rakuten Japan Open Results Singles Semifinals Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Mardy Fish (4), United States, 7-5, 6-1. Andy Murray (2), Britain, def. David Ferrer (3), Spain, 6-2, 6-3. Doubles Semifinals Frantisek Cermak, Czech Republic, and Filip Polasek (4), Slovakia, def. Marcelo Melo and Bruno Soares, Brazil, 3-6, 7-5, 10-7 tiebreak. Andy and Jamie Murray, Britain, def. Robin Haase, Netherlands, and Viktor Troicki, Serbia, 6-3, 1-6, 10-6 tiebreak.

B A S K E T B A L L WNBA Most Valuable Player's since 1998 2011 — Seimone Augustus, Minnesota 2010 — Lauren Jackson, Seattle 2009 — Diana Taurasi, Phoenix 2008 — Candace Parker, Los Angeles 2007 — Lauren Jackson, Seattle 2006 — Lisa Leslie, Los Angeles 2005 — Sheryl Swoopes, Houston 2004 — Lisa Leslie, Los Angeles 2003 — Lauren Jackson, Seattle 2002 — Sheryl Swoopes, Houston 2001 — Lisa Leslie, Los Angeles 2000 — Sheryl Swoopes, Houston 1999 — Yolanda Griffith, Sacramento 1998 — Cynthia Cooper, Houston WNBA Champions since 1998 2011 — Minnesota Lynx 2010 — Seattle Storm 2009 — Phoenix Mercury 2008 — Detroit Shock 2007 — Phoenix Mercury 2006 — Detroit Shock 2005 — Sacramento Monarchs 2004 — Seattle Storm 2003 — Detroit Shock 2002 — Los Angeles Sparks 2001 — Los Angeles Sparks 2000 — Houston Comets 1999 — Houston Comets 1998 — Houston Comets


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 3C

McGloin pilots offense during game’s key moments By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

STATE COLLEGE -- The coaches won’t acknowledge it. Not just yet. But Penn State may have taken a big step to solving its quarterback quandary on Saturday In a three-point game, it was Matt McGloin leading the offense for all but one drive in the second half. Even more telling, perhaps, was what happened after McGloin threw his first interception of the season -- in the end zone, no less -- at the end of the third quarter. Penn State’s defense came up with a turnover of its own on the ensuing drive and McGloin went right back out there, capping off the drive with a 2-yard touchdown pass that sealed things up for the Nittany Lions. “I didn’t expect to come back off the field” and be replaced by Rob Bolden, McGloin said. “We were moving the ball very well. The interception -- it happens. What are you gonna do? The guy made a great play. “I was real proud of the way the offense responded after that and pushed the ball right down the field.” The offense again seemed to respond to McGloin, who had taken the Lions out from their 4-yard line in the third quarter. McGloin and the Lions drove

PENN STATE

Bradley said after the game that he expected Lynn to be able to return next week against Purdue. Tailback Brandon Beachum also missed a second straight game with a foot injury. Wideout Curtis Drake (leg) also did not play. Senior Stephfon Green made his 2011 debut after being suspended twice since the summer. The tailback touched the ball once, losing 4 yards on a screen pass.

NOTEBOOK 90 yards to the Iowa 6, only to see the Hawkeyes’ Micah Hyde read a fade to Derek Moye in the back corner of the end zone, timing his jump perfectly to come up with the pick. But while the Penn State coaches had switched quarterbacks following a turnover several times already this season, they kept McGloin in to lead the offense. Though Penn State ran the ball on 10 straight plays on that ensuing drive before McGloin’s touchdown pass, teammates lauded McGloin after the game for his leadership in the huddle. “You’ve got to keep your emotions in check, obviously,” McGloin said. “(The Hawkeyes) were getting tired as the game went on. … You could just tell by their body language. We were coming up to get set and I was trying to push the pace a little bit and get guys going.” McGloin finished 12-of-19 passing for 133 yards. Bolden, who started for the sixth straight game, was just 3-for-7 for 31 yards while adding 13 yards on the ground. Despite the disparity in playing time between the two, Joe Paterno wasn’t willing to say anything had changed with the

AP PHOTO

Penn State quarterback Matt McGloin looks to pass against Iowa during the second quarter Saturday in State College.

quarterback rotation. “I don’t know,” Paterno said. “We’ll have to look at that.” Infirmary report Penn State looked to come out of the game relatively unscathed. One slight surprise was that junior cornerback Stephon Morris did not play after injuring his ankle last week at Indiana. With D’Anton Lynn out for a

second straight game as he continues to undergo concussion tests, the Lions went with true freshman Adrian Amos starting opposite Chaz Powell. “He played a heck of a football game. He played the whole game,” defensive coordinator Tom Bradley said. “Steph, his ankle, he hadn’t practiced all week. Wasn’t taking a chance. Amos did an outstanding job today.”

Split duty once again For the third straight week, Paterno spent the first half on the sideline before adjourning to the coaches booth for the second half. Paterno, who still isn’t 100 percent after injuring his hip in August in a collision with a player in practice, said he felt pain when he had to get out of the way of a play in the first half. “They almost ran over me once,” Paterno said. “I came out and I made a couple quick moves to get out of the way. I just don’t want to be in the way. I don’t want those kids looking around to see where I am. “But I was hurting. I’m hurting more now than I have in a week, and that’s because I made a stupid move. I’ll be all right tonight.”

BLITZ Continued from Page 1C

“How much did we go after them? I think I called every one we got in our repertoire for the game,” Bradley said. “Called ‘em a number of times. We were getting after it pretty good. “We’ve never gone that much (blitzing) in a long time.” Iowa, which had won eight of the last 10 and three straight against Penn State, wasn’t expecting it. The sudden aggressiveness caught the Hawkeyes off guard, as the Lions (5-1, 2-0 Big Ten) came up with four sacks and three turnovers in the final frame -- none bigger than the one that came at the start of the fourth quarter. On a third-and-7 at the Penn State 45, strong-side linebacker Nate Stupar showed blitz. But it was the weak-side man, Gerald Hodges, who came instead. The confused pass protectors never picked him up, and Hodges blindsided quarterback James Vandenberg for a sack, jarring the ball loose. “There wasn’t a blitz that we have in there that (Bradley) didn’t call,” Hodges said. “He might’ve even made up some at halftime.” OK, it certainly seemed like the Lions blitzed much more than usual. How much more? “Oh, way more,” Hodges said. “Ten times more. We never blitzed that much. I’ve never even seen it watching Penn State football before I came here.” It was Stupar who came up with the loose ball at the Iowa 49, and the Lions finally delivered a knockout blow to the Hawkeyes. Resisting the urge to take a shot deep right after the turnover, Penn State called 10 straight run plays right at a worn-down Iowa front seven, taking it down to the Hawkeyes’ 2-yard line. The Lions had stalled twice inside the 5 in the first half, settling for two Anthony Fera 20-yard field goals. This time, Penn State went play-action. It worked to perfection as Matt McGloin took a few steps to his right after faking the handoff and hit wide-open tight end Kevin Haplea for the game’s only touchdown. Now up 13-3 with 8:08 to play, Penn State kept coming. Malcom Willis and Nick Sukay came up with interceptions to end Iowa’s next two drives. On the Hawkeyes’ last chance, the Lions came up with three straight sacks sandwiched around a procedure penalty. Iowa’s final play was a fourthand-39 from its 2. “I think that Coach Bradley really wanted it this week,” senior defensive tackle Devon Still said. “He just went full tilt today. He

AP PHOTOS

Penn State defensive back Jordan Bernstine (4) breaks up a pass intended for Iowa receiver Evan Lewis (7) during the fourth quarter Saturday in State College. Penn State won 13-3.

Penn State tight end Kevin Haplea, rear left, celebrates with Andrew Szczerba after catching a 2-yard touchdown pass.

sent as many blitzes as he could.” Still estimated the Lions blitzed on at least 30 percent of the plays throughout the game, with that number ramping up dramatically after halftime. Stupar, in his fifth year with the program, said he couldn’t remember the defense ever being so aggressive. “No. But we have the athletic ability, the persistence, the determination to get to the quarter-

back,” Stupar said. “I’m glad to see Scrap have that faith in us to do our job.” What could have been another demoralizing loss to Iowa instead became a statement for the Lions. “We are dominant,” Still said of the defense. “We put our minds to it that no team’s gonna be able to move the ball on us. “That’s the type of victory you Penn State running back Silas Redd (25) rushes during the need to keep the team moving.” fourth quarter against Iowa. Redd rushed for 142 yards.

PENN ST. 13, IOWA 3 Iowa.......................................... 0 3 0 0 — 3 Penn St.................................... 3 3 0 7 — 13 A—103,497. Iowa PSU First downs ........................... 16 21 Rushes-yards ....................... 30-84 46-231 Passing.................................. 169 164 Comp-Att-Int ......................... 17-34-2 15-26-1 Return Yards ........................ (-4) 4 Punts-Avg. ............................ 4-39.5 5-43.8 Fumbles-Lost........................ 2-1 2-0 Penalties-Yards.................... 3-15 5-50 Time of Possession ............. 24:06 35:54 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Iowa, Coker 18-74, Vandenberg 12-10. Penn St., Redd 28-142, Dukes 9-60, Bolden 3-13, Lewis 1-8, Suhey 2-7, Zordich 1-4, Team 2-(minus 3). PASSING—Iowa, Vandenberg 17-34-2-169. Penn St., McGloin 12-19-1-133, Bolden 3-7-0-31. RECEIVING—Iowa, McNutt 4-73, K.Davis 3-26, Coker 3-23, Z.Derby 3-21, Martin-Manley 3-21, Gimm 1-5. Penn St., Brown 3-42, Suhey 3-33, Moye 2-42, Szczerba 2-20, Redd 2-8, De.Smith 1-21, Haplea 1-2, Green 1-(minus 4).

FIRST QUARTER PSU -- Anthony Fera 20-yard field goal, 1:36. Drive: 18 plays, 88 yards, 8:16. Comment: Plenty of good fortune leads to a long drive but only three points for the Nittany Lions. Rob Bolden was nearly intercepted twice and had a third pass take a crazy bounce off of a foot into the air where it was caught by tight end Andrew Szczerba. Then on fourth-and-4 from the Iowa 17, the entire stadium was puzzled when benched kicker Evan Lewis came out for a 34-yard try. While everyone was trying to figure it out, the snap went directly to Lewis, a former all-state athlete at Gettysburg High School, who sprinted up the middle through traffic to pick up the first down.The gamble only led to a field goal, however, as Bolden’s third-down scramble was stopped at the 3. PENN STATE 3, IOWA 0. SECOND QUARTER UI -- Mike Meyer 23-yard field goal, 10:51. Drive: 12 plays, 72 yards, 5:45. Comment: Now it’s the Hawkeyes’ turn to cap off a long, plodding drive with a breakdown in the red zone. A false start penalty turns a thirdand-3 to a third-and-8, and it costs Iowa as Drew Astorino makes a good play to bring down Marvin McNutt out in the left flat after a gain of just 4 to bring on the kicking team. PSU 3, UI 3. PSU -- Fera 20-yard field goal, 4:59. Drive: 12 plays, 81 yards, 5:41. Comment: Matt McGloin takes over at quarterback as the Lions’ second drive actually comes in the second quarter. McGloin connect on two tough sideline passes to Justin Brown and then heaves one up to Derek Moye with three Iowa defenders in the vicinity, only to have the big senior go up and bring it down for a big gain. Penn State once again takes it down to the Iowa 3, and on third down McGloin rolls left and considers making a break for the end zone but pulls it down and fires incomplete, trying to fit a tight throw in there to Szczerba. Dueling field goals it is. PSU 6 UI 3. FOURTH QUARTER PSU -- Kevin Haplea 2-yard pass from Matt McGloin (Fera kick), 8:08. Drive: 11 plays, 49 yards, 6:04. Penn State’s defense comes up with yet another enormous fourth-quarter play. Emerging linebacker Gerald Hodges demolishes James Vandenberg, sending the quarterback and the ball flying toward the Iowa sideline. In a frantic pile-up it’s senior Nate Stupar who escapes with the ball at the Hawkeyes’ 49. From there, Penn State ran straight at a worn-down Iowa defense, running it 10 straight times down to the Iowa 2-yard line -- 11 if you count a Silas Redd touchdown run that was called back on two separate holding penalties. On the final play, Penn State went play-action, easily beating a defense that sold out against the run. Haplea was wide open in the back of the end zone for his first career touchdown. One demon down. PSU 13, UI 3. PLAY OF THE GAME The beauty of Gerald Hodges’ huge sack and forced fumble in the fourth was that defensive coordinator Tom Bradley had Iowa completely fooled. Calling more blitzes than he has in years, the man they call Scrap emptied his playbook, calling every blitz he had in his repertoire. On this one, the Hawkeyes expected the pressure to come from Nate Stupar on the strong side, only for Hodges to fly around the corner from the weak side and crush James Vandenberg to jar the ball loose. Credit Stupar for coming up with the ball and setting up the clinching score.


CMYK PAGE 4C

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

The news that we have reached agreement with CVS Caremark to extend for 15 years the company’s lease of our 160,000 square foot facility in Hanover Township is a tremendous shot in the arm for our local economy. CVS Caremark is a Fortune 50 company and is the largest pharmacy health care provider in the United States. The company will be expanding its mail service pharmacy within our building and will be retaining and creating hundreds of jobs for pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, supervisors, materials coordinators, materials handlers, automation mechanics and canister technicians. Many of these positions will be filled by area graduates, including some with degrees from Wilkes University’s pharmacy programs. We thank CVS Caremark officials for working with us to make this important agreement possible and we salute Mericle’s talented team of professionals for designing, constructing, and maintaining such a quality facility. More than 12,000 people work in the 16 million square feet of space Mericle has developed in Northeastern Pennsylvania. We’re proud of the role we played to help save and create hundreds of jobs at CVS Caremark and we look forward to providing new homes for many more job creating companies. We would also like to thank the Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry, The Governor’s Action Team, the Hanover Township Board of Commissioners, the Hanover Area School Board, and the Luzerne County Commissioners for their help and cooperation.



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COLLEGE FOOTBALL ROUNDUP

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 5C●

NOTRE DAME FOOTBALL

LSU, OU looking out for No. 1 The Asscociated Press

No. 3 Oklahoma made a case to reclaim that top ranking with a Red River Rivalry rout. Then No. 1 LSU showed that it was, indeed, a worthy No. 1. The Sooners smoked No. 11 Texas 55-17, ripping up their heated Big 12 rivals by Landry Jones and a defense that scored three touchdowns. Texas came to the State Fair in Dallas undefeated but not yet tested by a ranked team. The Longhorns, with their inexperienced quarterback combination of David Ash and Case McCoy, couldn’t up with Jones and his talented receivers. All-American Ryan Broyles had 9 catches for 122 yards. In Baton Rouge, La., LSU had little trouble with a Florida offense playing with a freshman quarterback who had never taken a snap in a college game. Jacoby Brissett, playing because both John Brantley and Jeff Driskel were hurt, couldn’t muster any offense against the Tigers. It was the second straight week Florida was pounded by AP PHOTO an SEC West heavweight. The Florida running back Mike Gillislee is tackled by LSU’s Stefoin Francois (23) and Eric Reid (1) durGators were trounced by Alabaing Saturday’s game in Baton Rouge, La. ma 38-10 last week. No. 1 LSU 41, No. 17 Florida 11 BATON ROUGE, La. — Spencer Ware rushed for 109 yards and two scores and each of LSU’s quarterbacks passed for touchdowns. Jarrett Lee gave the Tigers (6-0, 3-0 SEC) the lead for good on their second offensive play, hitting Rueben Randle deep over the middle for a 46-yard touchdown. Jordan Jefferson used a jump pass to Mitch Joseph for another score. No. 2 Alabama 34, Vanderbilt 0 TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — AJ McCarron passed for careerhighs of 237 yards and four touchdowns for Alabama. Trent Richardson rushed for 107 yards and a touchdown in his fifth straight 100-yard effort for the Crimson Tide (6-0, 3-0 Southeastern Conference). The Commodores (3-2, 1-2) trailed by only seven points until the final minute of the opening half, then Alabama took over with four straight touchdown drives. No. 3 Oklahoma 55, No. 11 Texas 17 DALLAS — Landry Jones threw for 367 yards a three touchdowns, Dominique Whaley ran 64 yards for another touchdown and the Oklahoma defense scored three more touchdowns. Having slipped from first to second to third over successive weeks, Oklahoma (5-0, 2-0 Big 12) stomped its top rival almost as easily as it did lowly Ball State the previous week. The Sooners wound up with their most lopsided win in this series since 2003, when they won by a series-record 52 points. No. 7 Stanford 48, Colorado 7 STANFORD, Calif. — Andrew Luck threw for a seasonhigh 370 yards and three touchdowns, and Stanford stayed perfect. With former Stanford standouts Tiger Woods and John Elway joining the crush of NFL scouts on the sidelines, Luck

completed 26 of 33 passes with a rare interception to extend the nation’s longest winning streak to 13 games. No. 8 Clemson 36, Boston College 14 CLEMSON, S.C. — Tajh Boyd threw for a touchdown and ran for another before leaving with a hip injury. The severity of Boyd’s injury was unknown. He came in leading the Atlantic Coast Conference in total offense and has been the catalyst for the Tigers’ first 6-0 start in 11 years. No. 6 Oklahoma State 70, Kansas 28 STILLWATER, Okla. — Brandon Weeden threw for 288 yards and five touchdowns playing less than a half and Oklahoma State had its highest scoring game since 1970. Jamie Blatnick recovered a fumble and leaped to tip an interception to himself for two of the Cowboys’ four first-half takeaways, and Oklahoma State (5-0, 2-0 Big 12) scored touchdowns on all eight of its possessions before halftime against the nation’s worst defense. No. 10 Arkansas 38, Auburn 14 FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — Tyler Wilson threw for 262 yards, completing 19 straight passes at one point for Arkansas. Wilson, who set a school record with 510 passing yards in a win over Texas A&M last week, ended the first half against the Tigers by completing 18 straight passes. That included a 5-yard touchdown pass to Jarius Wright in the second quarter that gave the Razorbacks (5-1, 1-1 Southeastern Conference) their first lead at 21-14.

holding off the Terrapins’ fourth-quarter comeback. No. 16 West Virginia 43, Connecticut 16 MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — Geno Smith threw for 450 yards and four touchdowns and West Virginia navigated through another slow start to win its Big East opener. West Virginia (5-1, 1-0) struggled to a 10-9 halftime lead before erupting for 23 points in a 7:35 span of the third quarter to take control. No. 18 South Carolina 54, Kentucky 3 COLUMBIA, S.C. — New starting quarterback Connor Shaw threw for 311 yards and four touchdowns for South Carolina. Shaw, a sophomore who took over as starter this week from fifth-year senior Stephen Garcia, completed 26 of 39 passes and had no interceptions. No. 20 Kansas State 24, Missouri 17 MANHATTAN, Kan. — Collin Klein ran for three touchdowns and the Wildcats, who nearly blew a big second-half lead, improved to 5-0 for the first time since 2000. No. 21 Virginia Tech 38, Miami 35 BLACKSBURG, Va. — Logan Thomas ran 19 yards for a touchdown with 56 seconds to play, capping a wild fourth quarter for Virginia Tech. The Hokies (5-1, 1-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) rescued their chances of contending in the Coastal Division with the dramatic rally, and may have killed the hopes for Miami (2-3, 0-2).

No. 22 Arizona State 35, Utah 14 SALT LAKE CITY — Brock No. 13 Georgia Tech 21, Osweiler passed for 325 yards Maryland 16 and three touchdowns and ATLANTA — Tevin Washing- Arizona State forced five turnton ran for 120 yards and two overs. touchdowns and Georgia Tech’s Jon Hays threw three inleast impressive offensive show- terceptions in his first majoring of the season was enough. college start for the Utes (2-3, Georgia Tech led 21-3 before 0-3 Pac-12).

Osweiler had the third 300yard game of his career to lead the Sun Devils (5-1, 3-0 Pac-12). Wake Forest 35, No. 23 Florida State 30 WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — Tanner Price threw three touchdown passes, Josh Harris rushed for 136 yards and Wake Forest beat Florida State. Price was 21 of 35 for 233 yards with touchdowns covering 22 yards to Chris Givens, 2 yards to Tommy Bohanon and 8 yards to Terence Davis to give the Demon Deacons (4-1, 3-0) their best start to ACC play in school history. No. 25 Baylor 49, Iowa State 26 WACO, Texas (AP) — Robert Griffin ran for a season-high 107 yards and Terrance Ganaway rushed for a career-high 200 yards for Baylor. Tevin Elliott returned a fumble 86 yards for a touchdown for the Bears (4-1, 1-1 Big 12), who bounced back from a 36-35 loss last weekend to No. 20 Kansas State. No. 25 Baylor 49, Iowa State 26 WACO, Texas — Robert Griffin ran for a season-high 107 yards and Terrance Ganaway rushed for a career-high 200 yards for Baylor. Rutgers 34, Pittsburgh 10 PISCATAWAY, N.J. — Freshman Gary Nova threw two third-quarter touchdowns in his first start and Rutgers’ ballhawking defense intercepted four passes with Logan Ryan returning his second of the game 45 yards for a touchdown in a 34-10 victory over mistakeridden Pittsburgh on Saturday. Miami (Ohio) 35, Army 28 OXFORD, Ohio — Zac Dysert threw three of his four touchdown passes in the second half Saturday, rallying Miami of Ohio to a 35-28 victory over Army that got Don Treadwell his first victory on a day honoring the Cradle of Coaches’ history.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Notre Dame receiver Robby Toma, left, celebrates with tight end Tyler Eifert after scoring against Air Force on Saturday.

Irish run wild in triumph over AFA

Both teams post at least 560 yards of total offense while combining for 92 points. The Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Tommy Rees threw four TD passes in the first half, Notre Dame built a big early lead and the Irish rolled to their fourth straight victory Saturday, routing Air Force 5933. It marked the most combined points ever for a game at Notre Dame Stadium. And the 59 points were the most by Notre Dame since beating Rutgers 62-0 in 1996 in Lou Holtz’s final home game as Irish coach. The two teams combined for 1,125 yards total offense — 565 by Air Force and 560 by Notre Dame. Rees’s four TD passes went to four different receivers and he completed 19 of 25 for 208 yards in the first half. He finished 23 of 32 for 261 yards. Notre Dame (4-2) scored on all six of its first-half possessions and led 42-16 at the intermission. Air Force tried everything — a no-huddle and option offense that ran up big yards, an onside kick the Falcons’ didn’t recover, a fake punt that resulted in a 19yard gain. Air Force finished the first half with 311 yards and was 5-for-5 on fourth down conversions in the game. But the Falcons (3-2) were simply no match physically for the Irish, especially Notre Dame’s big offensive front that allowed Rees ample time to find wide open receivers and running backs to dance through huge holes. And two turnovers, a fumble by Asher Clark on Air Force’s first play from scrimmage and an interception, helped send the Irish onto TD drives. The Irish also showed a new wrinkle and a new weapon in coach Brian Kelly’s spread of-

fense when sophomore Andrew Hendrix was inserted as a change-of-pace quarterback in place of Rees. Hendrix completed all four of his passes and broke off a long run to the 2 in the fourth quarter, giving a glimpse perhaps of the Irish’s future. Hendrix finished with six carries for 111 yards. Jonas Gray ran for two Notre Dame touchdowns. Tim Jefferson’s 6-yard TD pass to Ty MacArthur, set up after punter David Baska’s 19-yard run and another 30-yard jaunt by Mike DeWitt, got Air Force within 35-16 in the second quarter. But just as they did all day, the Irish played pitch-and-catch and went right down the field for another score. This time it was Theo Riddick — who finished with eight receptions — catching a pass over the middle as Rees was hit. Riddick sailed through the defense on a 24-yard play that made it 42-16. Notre Dame scored on its first drive and kept going. Michael Floyd leaped high over Air Force’s Bobby Watkins III to grab a pass from Rees at the front pylon of the end zone. Initially ruled a touchdown, the play was reviewed — and even though replays showed that Floyd’s left foot appeared on the line — the score was upheld. The 34-yard TD pass capped an 81-yard drive, one that took under three minutes and also included a Rees-to-Riddick hookup of 24 yards. Moments later, on the Falcons’ first scrimmage play, Clark broke off a 29-yard run but fumbled at the end of it and Robert Blanton recovered for Notre Dame. A 20-yard run by Gray set up a 5-yard TD pass from Rees to Tyler Eifert. After a field goal by Air Force’s Parker Herrington, the Irish got a 40-yard kickoff return by George Atkinsson III and moved in for another TD in four plays.

B I G 10 RO U N D U P

Illini steamroll mistake-prone Hoosiers; Michigan rallies past Northwestern The Fighting Illini (6-0, 2-0 Big Ten) are off to their best start BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Illinois’ Nathan Scheelhaase and since the 1951 team went 7-0, a mark they can match next week A.J. Jenkins made Indiana pay when Ohio State visits Chamfor its mistakes Saturday. paign. First, they hooked up on a Scheelhaase finished 12 of 22 77-yard scoring pass. Then they for 210 yards with three TD hooked up on a 66-yard TD passes and sealed the game with pass. And finally, Scheelhaase his third-quarter scoring run. jogged into the end zone on a Jenkins, the Big Ten’s leading 9-yard scoring run. receiver, lived up to his reputaIt was too much for the reeltion, too. He had six catches for ing Hoosiers. 182 yards, blowing past the No. 19 Illinois used three Hoosiers’ secondary on both scoring plays of 66 yards or longer to rally from an early 10-0 scoring plays. deficit and rout Indiana 41-20. Indiana (1-5, 0-2) has lost The Associated Press

three straight overall and 13 in a row against ranked opponents, dating to a 31-28 victory over then No. 13 Iowa on Oct. 14, 2006. No. 12 Michigan 42, Northwestern 24 EVANSTON, Ill. — Denard Robinson threw for two touchdowns and ran for two more, helping No. 12 Michigan come back from a 10-point halftime deficit to beat Northwestern 42-24 Saturday night to remain unbeaten. Robinson matched his season-

high by throwing for 338 yards and ran for 113 as Michigan (6-0, 2-0) scored on its first three possessions of the second half. The Wolverines trailed 24-14 after a first half in which Robinson threw three interceptions. No. 14 Nebraska 34, Ohio St. 27 LINCOLN, Neb. — Taylor Martinez ran for a touchdown and passed for two others while bringing No. 14 Nebraska back from a 21-point second-half deficit, and the Cornhuskers

defeated Ohio State 34-27 Saturday night in the biggest comeback in school history. Rex Burkhead scored the go-ahead touchdown on a 17yard run with 5:10 left. Ohio State (3-3, 0-2 Big Ten) built a 27-6 lead behind freshman quarterback Braxton Miller. Miller injured his right leg in the third quarter, and the Buckeyes’ offense went dormant with backup Joe Bauserman. After Lavonte David stripped the ball from Miller, Martinez ran 18 yards for a touchdown to start the rally. He threw a 36-

yard TD pass to Quincy Enunwa to pull the Huskers to 27-20, and he tied it with a 30-yard catchand-run to Rex Burkhead. Purdue 45, Minnesota 17 WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Akeem Shavers caught a touchdown pass and ran for another score to help Purdue beat Minnesota 45-17 on Saturday. Caleb TerBush completed 14 of 21 passes for 140 yards and a score and O.J. Ross caught five passes for 63 yards and a TD for the Boilermakers (3-2, 1-0 Big Ten).


CMYK PAGE 6C

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

W Y O M I N G VA L L E Y C O N F E R E N C E Division 4A .................. W L PF PA CP Wyoming Valley West . 5 1 225 104 42 Hazleton Area .............. 3 3 129 182 25 Williamsport .................. 2 4 77 137 17 Division 3A .................. W L PF PA CP Dallas............................. 6 0 219 101 50 Crestwood .................... 5 1 212 83 42 Coughlin........................ 3 3 133 121 26 Berwick.......................... 3 3 166 159 24 Pittston Area................. 2 4 138 142 17 Tunkhannock................ 0 6 64 247 0 Division 2A-A.............. W L PF PA CP GAR ............................... 5 1 236 113 33 Wyoming Area ............. 4 1 217 73 28 Northwest (A) ............... 3 3 131 151 21 Lake-Lehman ............... 3 3 178 139 20 Hanover Area ............... 2 4 126 229 14 Nanticoke ...................... 2 3 121 138 14 Meyers........................... 1 5 66 231 7 Holy Redeemer ............ 0 6 139 295 0 NOTE: CP is Championship Points toward the divisional title. Teams get nine points for defeating a Class 4A opponent, eight for a Class 3A opponent, seven for a Class 2A opponent and six for a Class A opponent. The team with the most Championship Points is the division winner. Friday's Results Berwick 35, Tunkhannock 17 Crestwood 48, Hazleton Area 14 GAR 53, Hanover Area 20 Williamsport 20, Pittston Area 14 OT Wyoming Area 44, Meyers 17 Saturday's Results Coughlin, 24, Stroudsburg 21 Dallas 28, Wyoming Valley West 27 Lake-Lehman 35, Northwest 7 Nanticoke 52, Holy Redeemer 36 Friday, Oct. 14 Berwick at Williamsport Coughlin at Pittston Area Hazleton Area at Wyoming Valley West Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Area Lake-Lehman at GAR Meyers at Hanover Area Northwest at Nanticoke Pocono Mountain West at Tunkhannock Saturday, Oct. 15 Crestwood at Dallas, 2 p.m.

Ground attack stymies Rangers

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

STROUDSBURG VS. COUGHLIN

H.S. FOOTBALL

Crusaders clamp down in win

Trojans hold off Royals

Defense corrals Stroudsburg quarterback Robbie Bennie on late fourth down run. By JOHN ERZAR jerzar@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE – Stroudsburg quarterback Robbie Bennie torched Coughlin at times Saturday night, but not when he needed to the most. Coughlin wrapped up the elusive senior on a fourth-and-6 with less than two minutes to play and also wrapped up a 24-21 victory in a non-conference football game. “He is an outstanding player,” Coughlin coach Ciro Cinti said. “We remember him from when he played in biddy football. Some of our kids played against him years ago (when he played with) the Monroe Saints. He gave us fits last year.”

Bennie did it again as he rushed 21 times for 210 yards. He needed four more to keep Stroudsburg’s chances for victory going. Instead, linebacker Zac Evans got the first hit on Bennie on the fourth-down play, staggering him. Defensive lineman Brad Emerick finished him off. “That’s a huge win because it’s a lot of (state) points,” Cinti said. “It’s 160 points and puts us right back where we want to be.” The victory will move Coughlin (3-3) from seventh to fourth in the District 2 Class 3A race for four playoff spots. Stroudsburg (4-2) took a hit in its run for a D2/4-11 Class 4A berth. The Crusaders finished off the Mounties with a couple runs by tailback Joe Parsnik. Parsnik finished with 173 yards on 22 rushes and two touchdowns. The biggest offensive play,

though, came from an unlikely ple errant throws. source – Coughlin’s passing Coughlin 24, Stroudsburg 21 game. Stroudsburg .......................... 7 0 7 7 — 21 7 7 0 10 — 24 Two plays after Parnsik re- Coughlin ................................ First Quarter STR – Patterson 35 pass from Bennie (Ellison turned a punt 33 yards to the kick), 7:34 Stroudsburg 46-yard line, sophCOU – Parsnik 80 run (Bednarczyk kick), 1:35 Second Quarter omore quarterback Tim Pilch COU – Parsnik 1 run (Bednarczyk kick), 5:39 Third Quarter lofted a pass down the right STR – Bennie 1 run (Ellison kick), 9:50 Fourth Quarter sideline to wingback Russell STR – Patterson 53 pass from Bennie (Ellison 9:50 Monroe for a 44-yard TD with kick),COU – Monroe 44 pass from Pilch (Bed4:51 to play. It was only the sec- narczyk kick), 4:51 COU – Bednarczyk 21 FG, 3:38 ond touchdown pass all season Team Statistics Stroud Coughlin First downs ......................... 15 13 for the Crusaders. Rushes-yards..................... 39-281 47-240 Hunter Bednarczyk’s extra- Passing ............................... 109 57 Yards ......................... 390 297 point tied the game 21-21and his Total Comp-Att-Int....................... 4-18-1 2-5-1 0-0 1-4 21-yard field goal at 3:38 won it. Sacked-Yards Lost............ Punts-Avg. .......................... 4-39.8 2-29.5 Defensive back Frankie Mah- Fumbles-Lost ..................... 3-0 2-1 4-27 moud set up the kick by return- Penalties-Yards ................. 13-105 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS ing an interception 41 yards to RUSHING – Stroud, Bennie 21-210, Brome 1665, Karstendiek 2-6. Coughlin, Parsnik 22-173, the Stroudsburg 8. Evans 14-47, Monroe 5-23, Pilch 3-(minus-3), Cole team 2-(minus-2). Bennie did damage through 1-2,PASSING – Stroud, Bennie 4-18-1-109. Coughlin, Pilch 2-5-1-57. the air as well, connecting on RECEIVING – Stroud, Patterson 2-88, Savioa McDonald 1-7. Coughlin, Parsnik 1-13, Montouchdown passes of 35 and 53 1-14, roe 1-44. INTS – Stroud, Patterson. Coughlin, Mahmoud. yards. But he was plagued by MISSED FGS – none. dropped passes and finished just 4-of-18 for 109 yards. Coughlin also nearly intercepted a cou-

N O RT H W EST VS. L A K E- L E H M A N

Lake-Lehman rushes for more than 400 yards against Northwest in 35-7 victory. By JOHN MEDEIROS jmedeiros@timesleader.com

LEHMAN TWP. – Lake-Lehman made ball control a key component of its game plan for Saturday’s matchup against Northwest. Then the Black Knights went out and executed that game plan to perfection, running the game’s first 19 plays, chewing eight minutes off the clock, and holding a two touchdown lead before the Rangers got the ball. Lake-Lehman dominated the first half, cruising to a 35-7 victory over Northwest. “They are a grinding team and our No. 1 goal was to control the clock,” Lake-Lehman coach Jerry Gilsky said. “We had the ball for 90 percent of the first quarter, the first half. We put a new scheme in and the kids handled it well.” The Black Knights scored the game’s first 28 points and had 14 first downs to Northwest’s two in the first half. Lake-Lehman’s offense rolled up 333 yards in the first half, and its defense limited the Rangers to 31 yards. “This was a real big game for us. We want to get into the playoffs, and we needed this,” said senior Nick Shelley, who ran for 99 yards and two scores. “They couldn’t stop us. Once we distributed the ball like we did, they didn’t know where the ball was

THRILLING Continued from Page 1C

two-point conversion run with 1:04 to play, preserving Dallas’ 28-27 victory Saturday afternoon in a Wyoming Valley Conference interdivisional game. The win left Dallas (6-0) as the lone WVC unbeaten, while Valley West fell to 5-1. “We controlled the fourth quarter for the most part,” Valley West coach Pat Keating said. “Three yards to win the game, let’s go for it.” The Spartans cut Dallas’ lead to 28-21 at 5:51 of the fourth quarter on a 2-yard run by Lewis. Then after forcing Dallas to punt on its next possession, Lewis returned the ball 34 yards to the Valley West 48-yard line. Only Shane Dunn’s shoestring tackle prevented the

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Lake-Lehman’s Nick Shelley carries the ball for Lehman against Northwest. Shelley ran for 99 yards and two touchdowns in the 35-7 victory over the Rangers.

and they couldn’t stop it.” Northwest’s defense struggled with the misdirection of the Lake-Lehman ground game, which averaged 7.4 yards per carry. Twelve plays run by LakeLehman in the first half gained at least 13 yards. Overall, the Black Knights faced a lot of short-yardage situations, converting 6-of-11 third downs, and an impressive 4-of-4 fourth downs. “You put your offensive line at a disadvantage when you go to one guy all the time,” Gilsky said. We were second in the league in rushing and the offensive line didn’t get much credit. That’s the way we were last year (distributing the ball), and that’s the way we’ll be the rest of the year.” Shelley might have had the biggest game of all the backs,

scoring on a 19-yard run around the right side and a 3-yard plunge in a four minute span of the second quarter – the last touchdown making it 28-0. “My sophomore year, we just got crunched by them,” Shelley said. “Now it’s our turn. The last two years (21-12 in 2010) we’ve beaten them and it feels good.” Dustin Jones had three bruising carries and a 19-yard reception on the game’s first drive, which ended on his 2-yard touchdown run. Junior Brent Hizny recovered an onside kick after the score, and quarterback Jared Novitski ran a bootleg to the right for a 19-yard touchdown and a 14-0 lead. In all, four Lake-Lehman runners gained at least 50 years, paced by Novitski’s 107. Eight rushers had a carry of at least 7 yards.

“Cole Barbacci doesn’t get that 8-yard touchdown. many carries, but he had a couple of big ones for us,” said Shel- Lake-Lehman 35, Northwest ley, noting the depth the Black 7 Northwest ............................ 0 0 7 0 — 7 Knights displayed. Lake-Lehman...................... 14 14 7 0 — 35 First Quarter Northwest opened the second LL – Jones 2 run (Novitski pass from Shelley), half with a 66-yard kickoff return 7:51 LL – Novitski 19 run (pass failed), 4:04 by Tony Politz to the Black Second Quarter LL -- Shelley 19 run (Novitski kick), 4:11 Knights’ 11. After a 5-yard run by LL – Shelley 3 run (Novitski kick), :27 Third Quarter Politz, Austin Mazonkey NW – Mazonkey 4 run (Foley kick), 9:56 LL – Butler 8 run (Novitski kick), 7:02 punched in a 4-yard score on a Team Statistics NW LL fourth down play. First downs................................ 8 22 ........................... 28-47 55-404 “We had to take their1-2 punch Rushes-yards Passing ...................................... 74 50 121 454 away from them. Politz and Total Yards................................ Comp-Att-Int.............................. 4-13-0 3-6-0 (Gunner) Majer are the majority Sacks-Yards Lost..................... 2-15 1-6 of their offense,” Gilsky said. Punts-Avg.................................. 2-33.5 1-40.0 Fumbles-Lost............................ 1-1 3-1 “That’s what we want. The de- Penalties-Yards........................ 3-15 9-67 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS fense the first three weeks didn’t RUSHING – NW, Politz 9-36, Mazonkey 7-21, 1-2, Majer 10-(-11), Team 1-(-1); LL, Novitski have it. We’ve had to rehearse all Feno 11-107, Shelley 12-99, Butler 8-87, Jones 9-50, Co. kinds of plays and situations, and Barbacci 2-20, Hillman 3-11, Donovan 2-10, Wright 2-8, Sayre 3-7, Jayne 2-6, Team 1-(-1). we saw the results.” PASSING – NW, Majer 4-13-0-74; LL, Novitski 3-5-0-50, Hillman 0-1-0-0. Lake-Lehman needed just six RECEIVING – NW, Foley 2-35, Dunay 1-34, Rit1-5; LL, Jones 1-19, Cu. Barbacci 1-18, plays after the Rangers’ score to tenhouse Shelley 1-13. INTERCEPTIONS – None. answer, with Brady Butler runMISSED FIELD GOALS – None. ning a sweep to the right for an

Penn State recruit from scoring. Eight plays later, Valley West faced a fourth-and-12 from the Dallas 24. Lewis dropped back, evaded blitzing linebacker Jim Roccograndi and launched the ball into a group of three receivers and three defenders. Wideout Lucky Williams emerged with a TD catch, moving the Spartans within 28-27 with 1:04 to play. Then came the decision to go for a two-point try instead of an extra point. Lewis rolled right, with the option to run or throw. With the latter unavailable, he made a dash for the pylon, but Rogers wrapped him up around the shins and several other Mountaineers jumped aboard. “My job was to contain and I knew I just had to do my job and beat the guy blocking me to the outside,” Rogers said. “That happened and that’s how we met right there.”

Valley West tried an onside kick, but touched the ball before it went 10 yards and Dallas ran out the clock. “I admire what he did,” Dallas coach Ted Jackson said of Valley West’s decision to go for two. “We did the same thing down at Berwick (in 2009) and lost. It’s a heartbreaking way to lose, but with an athlete like that he certainly made the right decision.” The rally attempt seemed unlikely after Dallas went up 28-14 on Roccograndi’s 11-yard touchdown run with 7:49 remaining. Roccograndi finished with 109 yards on 19 carries, with only one rush going for negative yardage. “They’re huge up front,” said Dallas center F.J. Costantino, who helped open holes for Roccograndi’s fifth 100-yard game of the season. “The coaches stressed we had to fire off the ball and attack them early. They have big guys up

front that are really strong. I think on 34 carries. Dallas 28, Wyoming Valley West 27 we did pretty good for the most Wyoming Valley West....... 0 7 7 13 — 27 Dallas ................................... 14 0 7 7 — 28 part.” First Quarter DAL – P.Brace 15 pass from Zapoticky Meanwhile, Valley West was do(Napkora kick), 6:06 ing a terrible job protecting the DAL – Dunn 10 pass from Zapoticky (Napkora kick), 0:15 ball, The Spartans had four firstThird Quarter WVW – Lewis 15 run (Ultsh kick), 8:59 half turnovers – two leading to DAL – Zapoticky 1 run (Napkora kick), 0:39 Fourth Quarter Dallas scoring drives – and five WVW – Lewis 18 run (Ultsh kick), 10:25 overall. Dallas linebacker Jason Si- 7:49DAL – J.Roccograndi 11 run (Napkora kick), WVW – Lewis 2 run (Ultsh kick), 5:51 monovich made the most spectacWVW – Williams 24 pass from Lewis (run ular of three interceptions, spear- failed), 1:04 Statistics WVW Dallas ing a pass over his head with one Team First downs.............................. 18 13 hand at the Dallas 5 in the third Rushes-yards ......................... 46-203 36-180 Passing.................................... 181 115 quarter. Total Yards.............................. 384 295 Comp-Att-Int ........................... 15-22-3 7-11-1 The Spartans were also hamSacked-Yards Lost ................ 1-5 0-0 pered by the loss of standout run- Punts-Avg................................ 2-32.5 3-27 4-2 2-1 ning back Tashawn Bunch, who Fumbles-Lost.......................... Penalties-Yards...................... 6-35 2-20 injured his shoulder in the first INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – WVW, Lewis 34-163, Bunch 3-8, quarter. Simms 8-33, team 1-(minus-1). Dallas, J.Roccograndi 19-109, Zapoticky 9-11, Artsma 2-49, “It hurt them losing their tail- P.Brace 2-10, Wanek 1-3, Rogers 1-0, team 2-(miback,” Jackson said. “Lewis be- nus-2). PASSING – WVW, Lewis 14-21-3-181, Baur 1Dallas, Zapoticky 7-10-0-115. P.Brace 0-1came the primary runner and we 1-0-0. 1-0. RECEIVING – WVW, Lewis 1-0, Flayhart 6-65, knew that. That was very unfortuSimms 3-37, Williams 2-30, Coleman 2-14, Oritz 1nate for them, but an advantage 35. Dallas, Dunn 4-51, Simonovich 2-49, P.Brace 1-15. for us.” INTS – WVW, Lewis. Dallas, Wanek, K.RoccoLewis finished with 163 yards grandi, Simonovich.

Nanticoke erases halftime deficit versus Holy Redeemer with 22-point third quarter. By JIMMY FISHER For the Times Leader

WILKES-BARRE – If it wanted to be a playoff contender, Nanticoke needed a victory Saturday at Wilkes-Barre Memorial Stadium. Trailing by six at halftime to a motivated Holy Redeemer squad, the Trojans rallied to win a shootout over the Royals 52-36. The Royals (0-6) controlled much of the first half over the Trojans (2-3) as sophomore quarterback Jimmy Strickland connected with senior quarterback David Gawlas for a 29-yard touchdown pass on Redeemer’s first possession after a blocked punt. Gawlas ran for two touchdowns, to put Redeemer up 22-16 going into halftime. He accounted for 33 yards on 13 carries and three touchdowns, and two receptions for 38 yards and one touchdown. As a passer, Gawlas was 4-for-9 for 129 yards and one interception being picked off by Nanticoke senior Jeff Jezewski. Strickland went 12-of-19 passing for 206 yards with three touchdowns and two interceptions. The Trojans were playing with heavy hearts after the passing of one of their assistant coaches, Hank Trauski, on Saturday. They would not back down as they came out running in the second half, scoring two touchdowns in the third quarter behind senior running back Brian Maslowski, who had touchdown runs of 48 and 25. Overall Maslowski had 20 carries for 197 yards and four touchdowns. “It was all for coach Hank,” said Maslowski. “We played for him today.” Adding to the lead, senior Zak Matulewski, in his first start at quarterback, hooked up with senior wide receiver Jeff Jezewski for a 67-yard touchdown pass to go up 44-22. In the fourth quarter, the Royals almost staged a comeback. Behind two touchdown receptions, by junior wide receiver Thomas Cosgrove, one of which was for 58 yards, The Royals found themselves down 44-36 with 6:02 left in the game. Nanticoke managed to hang on, and put the game away with a 12-yard touchdown run by Maslowski with 1:20 left to play. “We played a great effort, but our kids were playing with heavy hearts,” said Nanticoke head coach Ron Bruza. “They were motivated, but at the same time they were still playing with heavy hearts with (Trauski) on their minds. We said ‘Just keep plugging away and good things will happen.’” The Royals have lost 17 straight games dating back to the end of the 2009 season, but first year head coach Joe Ostrowski is optimistic about his younger players. Nanticoke 52, Holy Redeemer 36 Nanticoke ........................... 8 8 22 14 — 52 Holy Redeemer ................. 16 6 0 14 — 36 First Quarter HR – Gawlas 29 yard pass from Strickland (Strickland run) 8:28 HR – Gawlas 19 yard run (Gawlas run) 1:57 NAN – Hempel 42 yard run (Vitale run) :38 Second Quarter HR – Gawlas 35 yard run (run failed) 10:46 NAN -- Jezewski 20 yard pass from Matulewski (Maslowski run) 2:39 Third Quarter NAN – Maslowski 48 yard run (pass failed) 9:11 NAN – Jezewski 67 yard pass from Maulewski (Maslowski run) 4:05 NAN – Maslowski 25 yard run (Maslowski run) 1:03 Fourth Quarter NAN – Maslowski 34 yard run (run failed) HR -- Cosgrove 58 yard pass from Strickland (Ligotski pass from Gawlas) 7:55 HR – Cosgrove 30 yard pass from Strickland (run failed) 6:02 NAN – Maslowski 12 yard run (Colatosi run) 1:20 Team Statistics Nanticoke Holy Redeemer First downs ........ 18 11 Rushes-yards .... 41-382 19-54 Passing............... 87 335 Total Yards ........ 469 389 Comp-Att-Int ...... 2-10-0 16-28-3 Sacks-Yards Lost ..................... 2-9 2-15 Punts-Avg. ......... 3-31 3-25 Fumbles-Lost .... 7-1 1-0 Penalties-Yards 6-45 12-110 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – NAN, Maslowski 20-197, Hempel 10-138, Kasprzyk 3-14, Decker 1-15, Vitale 4-12, Matulewski 3-9; HR, Gawlas 13-33, Strickland 2-14, V. Villani 3-2, Martin 1-2 PASSING – NAN, Matulewski 2-8-0-87, Decker 0-2-0-0; HR, Strickland 12-19-2-206, Gawlas 4-9-1129 RECEIVING – NAN, Jezewski 2-87; HR, Cosgrove 4-105, Tarselli 3-88, V. Villani 2-41, Gawlas 339, Ligotski 1-33, P. Vilanni 1-19, Shandra 2-11 INT’S – HR, Strickland, Gawlas MISSED FG’S -- None


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 7C

NASCAR

Busch looking to Kansas Speedway for Chase push The championship season did not start well for the driver, who was 26th at Chicago.

The Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Kan. — Kyle Busch stood outside his hauler in the infield at Kansas Speedway this week, wearing shades on an overcast day. Busch looked comfortable, breezily answering questions, even though he acknowledges the stress that weighs on him. This is supposed to be the year he finally wins a Cup title. He’s married now and has mellowed slightly, showing more maturity on and off the track. He’s won four more times to push his career total to 30, and started the Chase as the “top seed.” But Busch has gotten off to a

mediocre start through three races coming into Kansas, where his season has gone bust his last few title runs. He’s eighth entering Sunday’s race in the tightly bunched Chase standings, 15 points off co-leaders Kevin Harvick and Carl Edwards. “There’s 43 guys out here every week that if they don’t win, they didn’t meet the potential they wanted to,” Busch said before qualifying third for Sunday’s race. “There’s been times we won races and we didn’t feel like we reached everything we needed to reach,” Busch said. “It’s high pressure, it’s high stakes. There’s a lot on the line and this is a performance business, and you’ve certainly got to make the most of it. We’re trying every week.” It just hasn’t been quite good enough.

The 26-year-old Busch started the Chase with a 26th-place run at Chicago and finished 11th at New Hampshire before a sixthplace run last weekend at Dover restored some confidence. He had hoped to get off to a better start, knowing Kansas Speedway is rarely kind to him. Busch came to the 1 1/2-mile tri-oval just 10 points out of the Chase lead in 2007, his final year with Hendrick Motorsports, when he got tangled up with Dale Earnhardt Jr. Last year, Busch was sitting third in the standings when he spun David Reutimann early in the race. Busch called it unintentional contact, but it didn’t sit well with Reutimann. He got payback with 122 laps left when

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Busch was running seventh, hitting the outside of his car and forcing him into the wall. Busch finished 21st in the race and dropped all the way to seventh in the standings. In June, a simmering feud between Busch and Richard Childress Racing really ignited. Busch had bumped into Childress driver Joey Coulter on a cool-down lap after the Trucks race. The 65-year-old Childress

showed his displeasure by assaulting Busch, earning a $150,000 fine from NASCAR. It added another reason for Busch to dislike coming to Kansas. “When it’s one of your least favorite racetracks, it’s not beneficial to come here twice,” he said. “We’ll work hard and take what we can get out of this weekend. We know it’s going to be a hard one for us, and we’re really going

to have to dig in.” Busch got off to a good start with a solid qualifying effort Friday. He’ll roll off alongside Matt Kenseth, who is just ahead of him in seventh in the Chase, with twotime Kansas winner Greg Biffle and Chase co-leader Edwards on the front row. Chase co-leader Harvick struggled on a windy Friday and qualified 14th in the 43-car field.


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

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COLLEGE ROUNDUP

Misericordia’s perfect men’s soccer run ends

The Times Leader staff

Misericordia suffered its first men’s soccer loss of the season, getting shut out by Manhattanville 2-0 on Saturday afternoon. The Valiants broke a scoreless tie with a pair of goals in the final 16 minutes of the first half.

and 16 digs on the day to lead Misericordia. Krystal Burford added 16 kills while Kristin Hoffman had 44 assists and 15 digs. PSU-WB wins two

Penn State Wilkes-Barre won both of their matches against Penn State New Kensington King’s 3, Delaware Valley 0 (25-12, 25-14, 25-5) and Penn Joey Bender tallied two goals State Beaver (25-12, 25-15, 25-20). to lead the Monarchs. Kevin Abigail Collins led PSU-WilkesBuchanan contributed with a Barre with 30 service points and goal, the first of the game. seven aces. Meghan Murtagh had Mark Labbadia had one save 64 assists, and Tiffany Dennyand picked up his sixth shutout of Rochester added 12 kills and nine the season. blocks.

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Misericordia 5, Manhattanville 0

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Ken Bolcavage of Crystal Lake (left) starts his down swing on the tee shot on hole No. 6 during The Invitational on Saturday at Glenmaura National Golf Club in Moosic.

Sam Helmstetter netted two goals to lead Misericordia. Courtney Dillon, Erin McGreal and Laura Roney all had a goal and an assist for the Cougars. Delaware Valley 2, King’s 0

GLENMAURA

King’s was unable to hold off Delaware Valley. Lauren Duguid made four saves in net.

Continued from Page 1C

front nine, just missed a birdie on (hole No.) 9,” Brown said. “Chris played really solid on the back.” If only their footing seemed as sturdy. Many competitors complained after a summer of rainy weather left the course soggy and soft – although they were quick to credit Glenmaura’s grounds crew for making it playable at all. “It played pretty tough,” Brown said, noting the course seemed “pretty wet.” And heavy rains last month, which extended into Monday, also soaked the preparation plans of tournament participants. “Just being wet and not being able to golf the last couple weeks kind of made the situation more difficult,” said Mario Costa, who joined his partner John Tolerico in a grouping with Davis and Brown. “Obviously didn’t affect those guys.” Oh, but it did. Davis said an afternoon of sunshine kept the course in a constant flux throughout the day. “You could see a difference from the first hole to the 18th,” Davis said. “The ground started Art Brunn Jr. of Hanover Twp. tees up his ball on hole No. 4 durhardening later in the day. It was ing The Invitational at Glenmaura National Golf Club. still soft, though.” That only made Brown and Davis toughen up. They turned the opening round into a friendly rivalry with Costa and Tolerico – who play a lot of golf with Brown. “There are definitely some situations where you find yourself competing with the guys you’re with,” Davis said. “You want to make sure you don’t fall too far behind them.” That wasn’t a problem for Davis and Brown. Their group mates finished with a score of 80 – one of the highest during the field’s first day. “Anytime you tee it up with these guys, they’re the team to beat,” Costa said. “It’s nice to play in a group with them. You try to elevate your game. It wasn’t our day today.” Costa and Tolerico did get to feel like winners on one hole, beating Brown and Davis on the 13th. “We punished them on that hole,” Costa laughed. The rest of the time, he admitted, he could barely look at the shooting comparisons. “I try not to watch them,” Costa said. “I can’t do what they do.” Evan Joyce of Moosic plays from out of the greenside bunker on No. 2 on Saturday afternoon.

FIELD HOCKEY

Eastern 2, King’s 1

Jenera Quinones scored King’s only goal in a rematch of last season’s Freedom Conference championship game. Megan Withrow kept the game close, making 18 saves. Misericordia 2, Manhattanville 1

Tom Biscotti of Mountain Top plays his third shot to the green on No. 1 during The Invitational on Saturday at Glenmaura National Golf Club.

Katie Gabrielle and Samantha Sorokas each struck net for the Cougars. Sorokas’ game-winner came with 18 minutes remaining in the second half. Haley Brandt made 10 saves for Misericordia.

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL Monarchs drop two

King’s College fell to Elmira and Penn State Berks by identical 3-0 scores at the Susquehanna Invitational. Lauren Rockhold led King’s with 11 kills on the day. Emily Heimbecker had eights kills and 16 digs, while Amanda Horton had nine digs. Misericordia splits

The Cougars split a pair of matches at the Lycoming Invitational, losing to Ithaca 28-26, 25-11, 18-25, 25-14, and beating McDaniel 25-8, 25-23, 25-13. Cailin McCullion had 19 kills

King’s at MAC Tournament

After one day of the MAC Individual Championships, King’s advanced three singles players and two doubles teams into the semifinal round. Chris Cozzillio picked up a win by scores of 6-2 and 7-5 in his quarterfinals match against Bryan Arnett of Eastern. Chris DiMino defeated Arcadia’s Jeremy Garcia 6-1, 6-1 as well as Ryan Kearns from FDU-Florham 6-0, 6-3 to advance. The final singles player to advance was Jake Rohring, who beat Mitchell Nazarov from Arcadia 6-3, 6-0 and Tony Donato 7-6, 7-6. The doubles team of Cozzillio and Tim Caroll, as well as the duo of Tony Bevevino and Rhoring, also advanced to the semifinals.

COLLEGE CROSS COUNTRY DeSales Bulldog Invitational

King’s, Wilkes and Misericordia each competed in the Bulldog Invitational at DeSales. Michelle Wakeley led the Colonels in 10th place with a time of 24:43. Marina Orrson (23:41) finished second overall to lead Misericordia to an 11th place finish out of 23 teams. The King’s women finished in 21st place, led by Allison Gardiner (30:05) and her 144th place finish. The Misericordia men’s team finished seventh of 23 teams, led by A.J. Limongelli (27:40), who finished 24th. The team from Wilkes placed 15th. They were led by Tim Jurkowski, who finished with a school-record time of 29:04. The King’s men finished 19th, led by Vince Battipaglia (31:21), good for 157th overall.

HIGH SCHOOL ROUNDUP

Royals shock Spartans with second half outburst Kevin Rossi of Scranton plays his approach to the green on No. 3.

The Times Leader staff

WILKES-BARRE—Marnie Kusakavitch scored the first goal of the game from an assist by Mallory Kuskavitch to help lead Holy Redeemer to a 2-1 victory over Wyoming Valley West in high school field hockey Saturday. Lauren Bernardi added a goal for the Royals. For the Spartans, Erika Stefanides netted a goal.

Holy Redeemer .............................................. 0 2 — 2 Wyoming Valley West................................... 0 1 — 1 First half: 1. HR: Marnie Kusakavitch (Mallory Kusakavitch) 8:34; 2. HR: Lauren Bernardi 24:29. Second half: 1. WVW: Erika Stefanides 25:38. Shots: HR 9, WVW 7; Saves: HR 6 (Elizabeth Nicholas), WVW 5 (Kait Smicherko); Corners: HR 11, WVW 11.

GAR 6, Berwick 0

Tim Hinton of Dickson City plays his second shot on hole No. 1 during Saturday’s round.

Brea Seabrook and Jordan Liguori each netted two goals to lead GAR. Samantha Kirchner and Samantha Bryan each added a goal.

GAR ................................................................. 6 0 — 6 Berwick ............................................................ 0 0 — 0 First half: 1. GAR: Brea Seabrook (Jordan Liguori) 24:40; 2. GAR: Liguori (Tara Kolativa) 21:47; 3. GAR: Samantha Kirchner (Liguori) 16:00; 4. GAR: Liguori (Seabrook) 8:50; 5. GAR: Seabrook 4:02; 6. GAR: Samantha Bryan 2:51. Saves: GAR (Elissa Domzalski); Corners: GAR 5, BER 3.

Northwest 6, Millville 0

Morgan Price scored four goals to lead Northwest to a victory. Glenn Carr and Colleen McCoy also struck net.

Northwest........................................................ 5 1 — 6 Millville ............................................................. 0 0 — 0 First half: 1. NW: Morgan Price (Glenn Carr) 0:15; 2. NW: Price 19:47; 3. NW: Price 17:14; 4. NW: Price 14:02; 5. NW: Carr (Jenna Morris) 1:00. Second half: 1. NW: Colleen McCoy (Carr) 18:28. Shots: NW 23, MIL 5; Saves: NW 3 (Alivia Womelsdorf), MIL 14 (Sarah McHenry); Corners: NW 18, MIL 7.

BOYS SOCCER

Wyo. Sem. 8, Wyo. Area 1

Eric Williams (right) of Honesdale relishes a birdie putt he made on No. 8. Behind Williams is Dave Osborne of Carbondale.

MENS TENNIS

John Tolerico of Carbondale follows the flight of his tee shot on the first tee during play at Glenmaura National Golf Club.

Austin Shin had three goals to pace Wyoming Seminary.

George Parkhurst followed with two goals, while Julius Rodatz, Ander Gonzalez and Minh Tran each scored one. For Wyoming Area, Nate Brague had a goal.

Wyoming Area ........................................ 1 0 0 0 — 1 Wyoming Seminary................................ 3 5 0 0 — 8 First half: 1. SEM: Julius Rodatz (Greg Gilmore) 31:18; 2. SEM: George Parkhurst (Malcolm Lumina) 14:53; 3. WA: Nate Brague (Brian Wisowaty) 12:48; 4. SEM: Austin Shin 9:20. Second half: 1. SEM: Shin 31:46; 2. SEM: Shin 20:01; 3. SEM: Ander Gonzalez (Gilmore) 11:12; 4. SEM: Parkhurst (Minh Tran) 6:11; 5. Tran (David Choi) 1:46. Shots: WA 1, SEM 29; Saves: WA 14 (A.J. Lenkaitis), SEM 0 (Reilly Breig); Corners: WA 0, SEM 11.

Tunkhannock 5, Meyers 3

Ryan Karnopp kicked three goals to lead Tunkhannock. Jacob Hughes and Dean Mirabelli each added a goal. For Meyers, David Oram had two scores.

Meyers............................................................. 1 2 — 3 Tunkhannock .................................................. 3 2 — 5 First half: 1. MEY: Billy Trowbridge (Cal Lisman) 8:00; 2. TUN: Jacob Hughes (Zach Benedict) 16:00; 3. TUN: Ryan Karnopp (Eric Stamer) 28:00; 4. TUN: Karnopp (Dean Mirabelli) 36:00. Second half: 1. MEY: David Oram (Trowbridge) 45:00; 2. MEY: Oram (Trowbridge) 47:00; 3. TUN: Mirabelli 67:00; 4. TUN: Karnopp (penalty) 78:00. Shots: MEY 12, TUN 19; Saves: MEY 10 (Tony Morrash), TUN 9 (Zach Daniels); Corners: MEY 7, TUN 5.

BOYS WATER POLO Gov. Mifflin 12, WVW 6

Despite three goals by Adin Greenwald, Wyoming Valley West lost. Ibrahim Ismail, Alex Himlin and John Plucenik also scored for the Spartans.

GIRLS WATER POLO Hill School 8, WVW 7

Nicole Holena had two goals in Wyoming Valley West’s loss. Desiree Holena, Shelby Zimmerman, Nicole Chipego, Brianna Gaylets and Morgan Hanadel each added a goal for the Spartans.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 9C

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

NFL SUNDAY A F C

Week 4 Quarterbacks Att Com Yds TD Int Brady, NWE .................... 163 109 1553 13 5 Hasselbeck, TEN ........... 132 88 1152 8 3 Schaub, HOU.................. 113 74 961 7 3 Fitzpatrick, BUF .............. 145 92 1040 9 3 J. Campbell, OAK .......... 121 79 928 4 3 Rivers, SND .................... 157 107 1286 5 6 Orton, DEN...................... 142 85 945 8 6 Roethlisberger, PIT........ 138 85 1148 3 5 Flacco, BAL..................... 140 69 973 7 3 Henne, MIA ..................... 112 64 868 4 4 Rushers Att Yds Avg LG TD D. McFadden, OAK........... 75 468 6.24 70t 3 Jones-Drew, JAC .............. 77 391 5.08 41 1 F. Jackson, BUF ................ 64 369 5.77 43t 4 Benson, CIN....................... 77 348 4.52 39t 1 Be. Tate, HOU.................... 68 321 4.72 20 1 R. Rice, BAL....................... 66 297 4.50 53 2 Mathews, SND ................... 61 288 4.72 21 3 McGahee, DEN ................. 69 259 3.75 28 1 Addai, IND .......................... 50 230 4.60 15 1 Dan. Thomas, MIA ............ 41 202 4.93 14 0 Receivers No Yds Avg LG TD Welker, NWE...................... 40 616 15.4 99t 5 M. Wallace, PIT ................. 25 454 18.2 81t 2 And. Johnson, HOU .......... 25 352 14.1 48 2 Tolbert, SND ...................... 25 206 8.2 21 2 St. Johnson, BUF............... 24 314 13.1 44 3 N. Washington, TEN ......... 23 320 13.9 57 1 B. Marshall, MIA ................ 22 313 14.2 31 1 D. Nelson, BUF .................. 22 251 11.4 35 1 V. Jackson, SND ............... 20 374 18.7 55t 3 Decker, DEN ...................... 20 270 13.5 52t 4 Punters No Yds LG Avg Lechler, OAK............................. 17 947 77 55.7 B. Fields, MIA............................ 15 774 70 51.6 Moorman, BUF .......................... 20 1022 65 51.1 Sepulveda, PIT ......................... 14 700 66 50.0 B. Colquitt, DEN........................ 17 844 65 49.6 McAfee, IND .............................. 23 1066 59 46.3 Hartmann, HOU ........................ 15 685 69 45.7 Punt Returners No Yds Avg LG TD Decker, DEN ...................... 5 128 25.6 90t 1 Arenas, KAN....................... 6 124 20.7 37 0 Jac. Jones, HOU ............... 10 149 14.9 79t 1 A. Brown, PIT ..................... 11 161 14.6 41 0 Cribbs, CLE ........................ 10 128 12.8 43 0 Edelman, NWE .................. 9 105 11.7 18 0 Kerley, NYJ ........................ 9 105 11.7 53 0 Bess, MIA ........................... 5 57 11.4 22 0 L. Webb, BAL ..................... 6 59 9.8 29 0 Kickoff Returners No Yds Avg LG TD D. Manning, HOU .............. 8 240 30.0 46 0 Cribbs, CLE ........................ 7 199 28.4 52 0 A. Brown, PIT ..................... 6 170 28.3 41 0 Cosby, DEN........................ 5 134 26.8 37 0 Edelman, NWE .................. 9 214 23.8 37 0 McCluster, KAN ................. 8 190 23.8 35 0 Cromartie, NYJ .................. 7 165 23.6 46 0 Br. Tate, CIN....................... 9 208 23.1 35 0 R. Goodman, SND............. 7 157 22.4 27 0 Arenas, KAN....................... 8 179 22.4 35 0 Scoring Touchdowns TD Rush Rec Ret Pts Decker, DEN .................. 5 0 4 1 30 R. Gronkowski, NWE .... 5 0 5 0 30 Welker, NWE.................. 5 0 5 0 30 Chandler, BUF................ 4 0 4 0 24 F. Jackson, BUF ............ 4 4 0 0 24 D. McFadden, OAK ....... 4 3 1 0 24 R. Rice, BAL ................... 4 2 2 0 24 Tolbert, SND .................. 4 2 2 0 24 Britt, TEN ........................ 3 0 3 0 18 M. Bush, OAK ................ 3 3 0 0 18 Kicking PAT FG LG Pts Rackers, HOU ...................... 11-11 10-10 36 41 Cundiff, BAL.......................... 12-12 9-11 41 39 Lindell, BUF .......................... 16-16 7-8 43 37 Nugent, CIN .......................... 6-6 10-10 47 36 D. Carpenter, MIA................ 6-6 9-12 51 33 Janikowski, OAK .................. 12-12 7-8 63 33 Folk, NYJ............................... 11-11 7-7 50 32 Gostkowski, NWE ................ 16-16 5-6 47 31 Bironas, TEN ........................ 10-10 6-8 46 28 Vinatieri, IND......................... 6-6 7-9 52 27

N F C

EAGLES VS. BILLS

L E A D E R S

L E A D E R S

Week 4 Quarterbacks Att Com Yds TD Int A. Rodgers, GBY............ 141 103 1325 12 2 E. Manning, NYG ........... 125 80 1066 8 2 Brees, NOR..................... 174 120 1410 10 4 Stafford, DET .................. 161 100 1217 11 3 Ale. Smith, SNF.............. 107 72 795 4 1 Romo, DAL...................... 152 99 1273 7 5 Vick, PHL......................... 129 79 1021 6 3 Kolb, ARI ......................... 130 80 1049 5 4 M. Ryan, ATL .................. 164 102 1135 6 4 C. Newton, CAR ............. 163 97 1386 5 5 Rushers Att Yds Avg LG TD A. Peterson, MIN ............... 81 376 4.64 46 3 L. McCoy, PHL .................. 66 363 5.50 49t 4 Forte, CHI........................... 60 324 5.40 46 1 B. Wells, ARI...................... 59 321 5.44 39 5 M. Turner, ATL .................. 68 304 4.47 61 3 Blount, TAM........................ 67 294 4.39 35t 3 Gore, SNF .......................... 74 275 3.72 40 2 F. Jones, DAL .................... 56 241 4.30 40 1 Hightower, WAS ................ 67 233 3.48 22 1 Bradshaw, NYG ................. 55 228 4.15 37 2 Receivers No Yds Avg LG TD Witten, DAL ........................ 27 366 13.6 64 1 Maclin, PHL ........................ 26 334 12.8 43 2 Forte, CHI ........................... 26 310 11.9 56t 1 R. White, ATL..................... 26 302 11.6 30 1 Sproles, NOR..................... 26 224 8.6 36 1 G. Jennings, GBY.............. 25 366 14.6 49t 3 St. Smith, CAR................... 24 530 22.1 77t 2 J. Graham, NOR ................ 24 367 15.3 59 3 H. Nicks, NYG.................... 24 347 14.5 68 2 Ju. Jones, ATL ................... 24 342 14.3 49 0 Punters No Yds LG Avg A. Lee, SNF ............................... 22 1148 68 52.2 McBriar, DAL............................. 15 743 68 49.5 Morstead, NOR......................... 11 533 59 48.5 J. Ryan, SEA ............................. 26 1236 77 47.5 Kluwe, MIN ................................ 20 934 58 46.7 Koenen, TAM............................. 17 793 58 46.6 Donahue, DET .......................... 23 1034 60 45.0 Punt Returners No Yds Avg LG TD Sproles, NOR..................... 6 107 17.8 72t 1 P. Peterson, ARI................ 11 175 15.9 89t 1 Sherels, MIN ...................... 9 122 13.6 53 0 Ginn Jr., SNF ..................... 14 150 10.7 55t 1 L. Washington, SEA.......... 9 94 10.4 33 0 P. Parker, TAM................... 7 73 10.4 23 0 Banks, WAS........................ 14 145 10.4 35 0 Weems, ATL ...................... 8 69 8.6 19 0 Ross, NYG.......................... 5 43 8.6 18 0 Logan, DET ........................ 11 90 8.2 20 0 Kickoff Returners No Yds Avg LG TD Cobb, GBY ....................... 6 242 40.3 108t 1 Harvin, MIN ...................... 5 177 35.4 103t 1 Ginn Jr., SNF ................... 9 309 34.3 102t 1 Booker, MIN ..................... 6 178 29.7 68 0 Jefferson, ARI .................. 7 203 29.0 51 0 Sproles, NOR................... 9 251 27.9 57 0 Je. Norwood, STL ........... 6 156 26.0 31 0 Dev. Thomas, NYG......... 8 208 26.0 36 0 Logan, DET ...................... 6 150 25.0 28 0 D. Hester, CHI ................. 8 197 24.6 73 0 Scoring Touchdowns TD Rush Rec Ret Pts Ca. Johnson, DET ......... 8 0 8 0 48 L. McCoy, PHL............... 6 4 2 0 36 B. Wells, ARI .................. 5 5 0 0 30 Mi. Austin, DAL .............. 4 0 4 0 24 T. Gonzalez, ATL........... 4 0 4 0 24 C. Newton, CAR ............ 4 4 0 0 24 Jacobs, NYG .................. 3 2 1 0 20 Blount, TAM .................... 3 3 0 0 18 Bradshaw, NYG ............. 3 2 1 0 18 D. Bryant, DAL ............... 3 0 3 0 18 Kicking PAT FG LG Pts D. Bailey, DAL ...................... 9-9 12-13 48 45 Ja. Hanson, DET .................. 15-15 10-10 51 45 Kasay, NOR .......................... 12-12 9-11 53 39 Henery, PHL ......................... 11-11 8-11 38 35 Akers, SNF ........................... 10-10 8-10 55 34 Crosby, GBY......................... 19-19 5-5 37 34 Gould, CHI ............................ 10-10 8-8 42 34 Mare, CAR ............................ 7-7 8-10 39 31 Barth, TAM............................. 9-9 7-8 49 30 M. Bryant, ATL...................... 9-9 7-7 50 30

S T E E L E R S V S . T I TA N S

Slumping Steelers trying to regroup Decimated by injuries, Pittsburgh faces Mike Munchak’s upstart Titans. By WILL GRAVES AP Sports Writer

AP PHOTO

Buffalo running back Fred Jackson (22) and the Bills will look to run with success against the Eagles this afternoon.

Disappointment vs. surprise Philadelphia is hoping to snap its losing streak, while Buffalo is out to prove its 3-1 start is not a fluke. By JOHN WAWROW AP Sports Writer

ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. — Now that Michael Vick has suggested the “Dream Team” tag no longer applies for the underachieving Eagles, Bills receiver Stevie Johnson believes a change in perception might also be in order in Buffalo. “I can’t say we’re no-names,” Johnson said, preferring instead the curiously coined moniker of “Goon Squad,” which Bills receivers have adopted. “We’re just guys that nobody really wanted.” Until now, of course. This Buffalo team of “Mis-Fitz” — as some also have begun to call them in tribute to quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick — is off to a surprising 3-1 start and will host the Eagles (1-3) today. And the Bills are in no mood to rest on their ac-

complishments one month into the season, particularly after a discouraging 23-20 loss at Cincinnati. “We took a step back,” receiver David Nelson said. “This is an opportunity for us to prove who we say we are.” Who, then, might these Eagles be? All the high-priced, headline-grabbing splashes Philadelphia made this offseason in adding cornerbacks Nnamdi Asomugha and Dominique RodgersCromartie, defensive end Jason Babin and backup quarterback Vince Young have translated into a heap of disappointment. Having blown three consecutive second-half leads, Philadelphia’s off to its worst start and enduring its longest losing streak since 2007. So Vick asked this week to put an end to “Dream Team” references. “That term doesn’t ring true any more,” the quarterback said. “We’re just like any other football team now.” Worse, perhaps. The Eagles haven’t come close to matching their high expectations, while the Bills have so far defied their perennially low ones. This meeting has

the potential to start separating the contenders from pretenders. “It’s one of those games where a lot of questions will be answered,” Bills running back Fred Jackson said. “We know what we’re capable of, but we know we’ve got a tough UP NEXT team coming in here.” EAGLES Troubled as the Eaat BILLS gles might be, they still TV: 1 p.m., have the makings of a WOLF-56 dangerous opponent. OPENING Vick, when healthy LINE: Eagles and even sometimes by 3 LAST MEETwhen not, has led an ofING: Eagles fense averaging nearly beat Bills 17-9, 435 yards and 25 points Dec. 30, 2007 a game. Despite a bruised right hand, he’s coming off a career day with 416 yards passing in a 24-23 loss to San Francisco. And the Eagles have a one-two offensive punch with LeSean McCoy ranking fifth in the NFL with 363 yards rushing.

GIANTS VS. SEAHAWKS

J E T S V S . PAT R I O T S

Last year’s game may Problems aside, long rivalry will be renewed not be a sign of future

By HOWARD ULMAN AP Sports Writer

By TOM CANAVAN AP Sports Writer

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — The Patriots have allowed the most yards in the NFL. The Jets gained their fewest in 14 years in their last game. Both teams have problems — and a chance to correct them against their intense rival when they meet today. A win could provide an extra spark heading into the rest of the season. “It’s a rivalry game,” said New England defensive end Shaun Ellis, who was on the other side of it for the past 11 years. “Regardless of ... what sideline you’re on, you want to go out and play your best in this game. It’s one of the biggest rivalries I’ve been a part of since I’ve been in the league.” LaDainian Tomlinson joined New York last year after nine seasons with San Diego and didn’t need much time to feel the energy. “It’s one of the best rivalries in football,” he said. “You hear about it when you are on the outside looking in, and it’s obviously different and special when you get to be a part of it.” In the next installment, the Patriots (3-1) must shore up their defense without injured star linebacker Jerod Mayo, while the Jets (2-2) hope Mark Sanchez’s terrible performance

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — There seems to be a common feeling among the New York Giants and Seattle Seahawks relating to last year’s meeting between the teams. Just forget it. The Giants went to Seattle and did everything right in posting a 41-7 victory in a game that was over by halftime. Nothing is going to change that, so it’s time to move on. “There are no gimmes in this league,” Giants guard David Diehl said. “Just because last year was lopsided will have no effect on this game and this year. We’re not taking it that way. We know we need to make improvements. We’re going to have to go out there and earn this one.” The Giants (3-1) are coming into today’s game at MetLife Stadium against the Seahawks (1-3), riding a three-game winning streak that has been highlighted by fourth-quarter comeback wins over Philadelphia and Arizona the past two weeks. Seattle is coming off a tough loss to Atlanta and will be playing its final game before a bye. Entering the week with a fourth loss is not the way to go on vacation. “It is really important,” Sea-

NEXT GAME JETS AT PATRIOTS TV: 4:15 p.m., CBS, WYOU-22 OPENING LINE: Patriots by 91⁄2 LAST MEETING: Jets beat Patriots 28-21, Jan. 16, 2011

in a 34-17 loss to Baltimore last Sunday resulted more from the play of one of the NFL’s best defenses than their own struggling offense. Patriots coach Bill Belichick put the focus on preparing for the game, not feeding the hype. “We talk about what we need to do to beat the Jets on Sunday,” he said. “That’s what we’re here for. I mean, what else is there to talk about?” There was plenty of chatter before last season’s playoff game between the teams. Patriots wide receiver Wes Welker made some tongue-incheek remarks referring to footfetish reports involving New York coach Rex Ryan. Welker sat out the Patriots first series, although neither Belichick nor Welker would comment on the reason behind it, and the Jets pulled a 28-21 upset.

NEXT GAME SEAHAWKS AT GIANTS TV: No local coverage. OPENING LINE: Giants by 10 LAST MEETING: Giants beat Seahawks 41-7, Nov. 7, 2010

hawks coach Pete Carroll said of getting a win. “It was important last week and it will continue to be every week. Every game is enormous and every game is a championship game for us. You just have to do everything you can to get that opportunity going your way. With the bye coming up, it would be great to go into the bye with a win and feeling like we are growing. We are such a young team and we need all the confidence builders we can get.” The Giants are going to have to do a lot of studying to prepare for the Seahawks, who have changed roughly half of their starters since last season. Quarterback Matt Hasselbeck signed with Tennessee as a free agent and he has been replaced by the more nimble Tavaris Jackson, the former Viking who posted a 2-1 record as a starter against the Giants.

PITTSBURGH — Don’t even start with the Super Bowl hangover stuff. The Pittsburgh Steelers don’t want to hear it. The defending AFC champions say there are plenty of reasons for their lackluster 2-2 record heading into today’s game against surprising Tennessee. The defense can’t stop the run. The offensive line can’t keep quarterback Ben Roethlisberger upright. The injury list is long and distinguished. No need to throw the Super Bowl in the mix. Yes, the Steelers failed to make the playoffs the U P N E X T next year after winning it all in TITANS AT the 2005 and STEELERS 2008 seasons. TV: 1 p.m., CBS, WYOU-22 Yet there’s a OPENING difference be- LINE: Steelers tween then and by 61⁄2 LAST MEETnow. “We didn’t ING: Steelers win, so it beat Titans 19-11, Sept. 19, 2010 doesn’t even matter,” linebacker James Farrior said. “I was a loser last year. We were just like all the other (30) teams that (didn’t win) and was looking for a new year and a better start.” The Titans (3-1) couldn’t have asked for a faster one under firstyear coach Mike Munchak. The defense is playing lights out and quarterback Matt Hasselbeck is enjoying a rebirth after bolting Seattle. In a Peyton Manningless AFC South, Tennessee doesn’t think the rebuilding process needs to take that long. A road victory over a perennial playoff contender would certainly look good on the resume. The Titans are certainly coming in at the right time. The Steelers will be without All-Pro linebacker James Harrison for several weeks after he needed surgery to repair a fractured orbital bone near his right eye sustained in a 17-10 loss to Houston. Roethlisberger will wear a special shoe to protect his sprained left foot and the offensive line is so decimated the team re-signed veteran Max Starks practically off the street. Everything from health to momentum appears to be tilting toward Tennessee. Munchak isn’t quite ready to play that game. “The media or the public perception is, ‘Man, so-and-so is not playing, that means we win.’ It doesn’t work that way,” he said. Munchak need only point to last year’s meeting between the two teams for proof. The Steelers were without Roethlisberger, serving a fourgame suspension for violating the league’s personal conduct policy, and then lost backup Dennis Dixon to an injury in the first half. No matter. Veteran Charlie Batch came on in relief and led the Steelers to a 19-11 win in a game that may have served as the starting point for longtime coach Jeff Fisher’s departure. Fisher pulled quarterback Vince Young in favor of Kerry Collins, who nearly led Tennessee to a stunning comeback.


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

NHL ROUNDUP

Flyers bedevil New Jersey in opener

Maple Leafs 6, Senators 5 TORONTO — Phil Kessel had three goals and an assist and Toronto held off Ottawa for its second victory in two games this season. Joffrey Lupul had a goal and two assists, Mikhail Grabovski and Colton Orr also scored, and James Reimer made 27 saves for Toronto, which led 5-1 midway through the third period. Daniel Alfredsson scored twice for the Senators, coming off a 5-3 loss in Detroit on Friday night. Colin Greening, Jason Spezza and Stephane Da Costa, with his first in NHL goal, also scored, and Erik Karlsson had three assists. Alex Auld took the loss in relief for Ottawa after allowing two goals in the third period. Craig Anderson started and gave up four goals on 20 shots through two periods.

The Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. — Ilya Bryzgalov made 20 saves and the Philadelphia Flyers spoiled another home opener with a 3-0 win over the New Jersey Devils on Saturday night. The Flyers started the season on Thursday with a 2-1 win over the defending Stanley Cup champion Bruins in Boston. Philadelphia improved to 2-0 with the victory at the Prudential Center. Claude Giroux, Matt Read and Wayne Simmonds provided the goals to support Bryzgalov, the Flyers major offseason signing. It was his 24th career shutout and improved his record against New Jersey to 2-1-0. The Flyers win spoiled Peter DeBoer’s debut as Devils coach. Martin Brodeur made 26 saves for New Jersey. Ducks 2, Rangers 1 STOCKHOLM (AP) — Bobby Ryan scored the only goal in a shootout and the Anaheim Ducks offset New York goalie Henrik Lundqvist’s spectacular play to beat the Rangers 2-1 on Saturday night. Andrew Cogliano opened the scoring for the Ducks midway through the first period, and Brad Richards tied it with 2:15 left in the third period. Lundqvist, from Sweden, kept the Rangers close and rewarded the sellout crowd with an outstanding game in the net, stopping 27 of 28 shots. Jonas Hiller made 14 saves for Anaheim. Both teams opened the season with losses Friday night. Buffalo beat Anaheim 4-1 in Helsinki, and Los Angeles topped New York 3-2 in overtime in Stockholm. Sabres 4, Kings 2 BERLIN — Luke Adam scored twice in a 2:20 span early in the second period to help Buffalo beat Los Angeles in the first NHL game in Germany. Paul Gaustad and Drew Staf-

522

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 110

Lost

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522

Education/ Training

PRACTICAL NURSING INSTRUCTOR

Full-time position to plan, teach and participate in evaluation of practical nursing program curriculum and supervise students in lab/clinical experiences. Refer to www.csiu.org/jobs to view more info & application process. Apply by 10/21/11. EOE.

AP

New Jersey Devils goalie Martin Brodeur (30) closes his eyes as Philadelphia Flyers’ Scott Hartnell (19) and Ian Laperriere (14)

ford also scored, Ryan Miller made 31 saves, and Austrian star Thomas Vanek had two assists for Buffalo. Anze Kopitar scored twice for Los Angeles. He had a goal and an assist Friday night in the Kings’ overtime victory over the New York Rangers in Stockholm. Bruins 4, Lightning 1 BOSTON — Rich Peverley scored twice and Brad Marchand assisted on both to lead Boston over Tampa Bay and give the Stanley Cup champions

Education/ Training

Administration & Finance (AA#04-1-50) Director of Financial Aid, full time, permanent position beginning Fall, 2011. Bachelor’s degree in a related field, 7 to 10 years financial aid experience, 5 years supervisory experience. Demonstrated ability to work with diverse populations preferred. Application deadline for full consideration: October 28, 2011. For a full position description, including applications procedures, visit www. bloomu.edu/jobs AA/EEO Employer

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536

its first win this season. Tim Thomas made 25 saves for the Bruins in the rematch of the Eastern Conference finals. Boston won that series — with Thomas posting a 1-0 shutout in Game 7 — and went on to earn its first NHL title since 1972. Tyler Seguin also had a pair of assists for Boston, which raised its sixth championship banner on Thursday night before losing to the Philadelphia Flyers 2-1. Martin St. Louis scored for the Lightning, and Mathieu Garon stopped 38 shots.

IT/Software Development

DIRECTOR OF IT SERVICES

The Director of IT leads the team to create effective long and short term information architecture as well as plans, organizes, and provides oversight and accountability for the information systems services and activities. We need a strong manager with leadership skills and a proactive, participative management style. Knowledge and experience with network infrastructure, LAN, multiple locations and configurations, as well as CITRIX is required.

Warehouse

Applicants must have a minimum of 6-8 years in a leadership role with direct staff management.

OPEN HOUSE

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573

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SUBMIT RESUME: HR Dept. 703 Rutter Ave. Kingston, PA 18704 Fax: 570-287-2434

538

Janitorial/ Cleaning

FACILITY CLEANERPART TIME

Two openings currently exist in Hanover area. 10pm-2am – Monday-Thursday and Friday 8pm to 2am. Occasional weekends. $9.00 to start. 2nd position is 6am10am- Day porter. $10.00 Must have some light maintenance skills. Positions are part time and are in professional environment. Not on bus route. Experience is required. Apply online at www.sovereigncs. com. EOE and Drug Free Workplace.

538

Wild 4, Blue Jackets 2 ST. PAUL, Minn. — Dany Heatley didn’t take long to make an impact for Minnesota, giving his new team a power-play goal and an assist in a 4-2 seasonopening victory over the Columbus Blue Jackets on Saturday night.

944

Janitorial/ Cleaning

OFFICE - CUSTODIALDOWNTOWN WILKES-BARRE

Part time openings -3:00pm-9:00pm Monday-Friday and 5:00pm-9:30pm. Office cleaning, restrooms and trash. Must have experience in field. $9.00 to start. Apply online at www.sovereigncs. com. EOE and Drug Free Workplace.

542

Capitals 4, Hurricanes 3, OT WASHINGTON — Mike Green scored a power-play goal 2:24 into overtime and Washington won its 10th straight home opener. Green’s drive from the top of the right circle trickled between goaltender Brian Boucher’s legs for the Capitals, who haven’t lost their first regular season game at home since Oct. 6, 2000, against the Los Angeles Kings. Alexander Semin and Jason Chimera scored second-period goals for the Capitals, and Brooks Laich tallied in the third period.

Logistics/ Transportation

DRIVER- NON CDL

Scranton based company seeks recent experienced driver for large body truck. Must be able to lift and unload up to 100 lbs frequently. Local travel all within 120 miles one way. No overnight. Hourly rates starts at $11/hour; Class A license $12.50 to start. Must have clean MVR. Apply online at: www.papaper.com Benefits after 90 days. EOE and Drug Free Workplace.

DRIVERS

800 PETS & ANIMALS 805

Birds

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Cats

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815

Dogs

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542

Logistics/ Transportation

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Continued from Page 1C

waited for Matt Ford to skate into the crease before roofing a shot into the top corner. The goal led to a 3-2 Penguins defeat in a game where they came from behind twice and played relatively sharp for the first game of the season. “Tonight was a step in the right direction and we did a lot of good things,” Penguins head coach John Hynes said. “The difference was managing the game when it’s 2-2 going into the third period.” While the end of the game wasn’t what the Penguins envisioned, neither was the start. Hershey scored two goals on its first four shots, and both tallies came on Penguins’ turnovers. Hershey’s Kyle Greentree struck first when Eric Tangradi had the puck stripped from his stick along the boards in the Penguins end. The puck slid into the slot to Greentree, who put it home for a 1-0 lead. Penguins rookie Brian Gibbons evened things up with a beautiful shorthanded goal that came after he split two Hershey defenders in the offensive zone and placed a shot past Dany Sabourin’s stick. But the momentum was shortlived – 20 seconds in fact, as Hershey’s Matt Ford swiped a Penguins clearing attempt and ripped a shot that went behind Brad Thiessen for a 2-1 lead. “When you play a team that talented and skilled, you can’t make some of the mistakes we did,” Hynes said. Niko Dimitrakos evened things up quickly for the Penguins who began the second period on a power play. Colin McDonald gained control of the puck deep in the Hershey end and dished across to Dimitrakos, who streaked in from the blueline and beat Sabourin to make it 2-2. It was Dimitrakos’ first North American goal in three years after spending the last four seasons in Europe. After that Thiessen displayed the form that won him last season’s AHL Goaltender of the Year

Commercia 542 Logistics/ Properties Transportation

CLASS A CDL DRIVERS Center City WB WE HAVE SPACE Come see us nowyou’ll be surprised! Affordable modern office space available at the Luzerne Bank Building on Public Square. Rents include heat, central air, utilities, trash removal and nightly cleaning all without a sneaky CAM charge. Super fast internet available. Access parking at the new intermodal garage via our covered bridge. 300SF to 5000SF available. We can remodel to suit. Brokers protected. Call Jeff Pyros at 570-822-8577 for details.

950

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PENGUINS

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WILKES-BARRE HEIGHTS

Apartments/ Unfurnished

FORTY FORT

All utilities included. Clean 4 room 2nd floor. Appliances. Covered parking. Non smoking, no pets. Starting at $635/month. 570-714-2017

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We are a national convenience store distribution company seeking full time CLASS A CDL DRIVERS. Generous benefit package to include Medical/ Dental/Vision/STD/ LTD and 401k. $1,500 sign on bonus as well as Attendance/Safety and Performance Bonus programs available. Annual and merit increases. Designed Route Deliveries. Company provided uniform and work boots Guaranteed 40 hours/week. Apply @

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953 Houses for Rent

MOUNTAIN TOP

WALDEN PARK 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, gas heat, 2 car garage, nice living room & kitchen, large deck. $1,250 per month + utilities. No Pets. Proof of income required. Call (570) 6787089

Notes - Cody Wild, Zach Sill (suspension), Jason Williams (injury), Alex Grant, Ryan Schnell, Brian Day (injury) and Keven Veilleux (injury) were scratched for the Penguins.

Hershey................................................... 2 0 1 — 3 Penguins ................................................. 1 1 0 — 2 First Period Scoring – 1, HER, Kyle Greentree 1 (Hanson), 11:27. 2. WBS, Brian Gibbons 1 shorthanded15:27. 3. HER, Matt Ford 1 15:47. Penalties HER, Wellar (roughing) 2:41; WBS, Craig (goaltender interference) 2:50; HER Richmond (highsticking) 5:25; WBS, Tangradi (slashing) 9:06; WBS Dimitrakos (delay of game) 13:32; HER Hanson (slashing) 19:08. Second Period Scoring – 4. WBS, Niko Dimitrakos 1 (McDonald, Tangradi) power play 1:06. Penalties-WBS, DiDiomete (boarding) 11:23; WBS, Chupp (crosschecking), 12:15; HER, Collins (tripping) 14:45. Third Period Scoring – 5. HER, Aucoin 1 (Potulny, McNeill) power play 3:33. Penalties-WBS, Samuelsson (slashing) 2:09; HER, Kane (slashing), 8:02; HER, Bouchard (tripping), 11:10; HER, Brouillette (interference), 16:04; WBS, McDonald (diving), 16:04. Shots on Goal Hershey 6-12-5-23. Penguins 6-11-8-25. Power Play Opportunities Hershey 1 for 6 Penguins 1 for 6 Goalies Hershey, Dany Sabourin 1-0-0 (25 shots-23 saves). Penguins, Brad Thiessen 0-1-0 (23 shots-20 saves). Three Stars – 1. HER, Keith Aucoin (game-winning goal) 2. HER, Matt Ford (goal) 3. WBS, Niko Dimitrakos (goal) Attendance – 7,504. Referees-Jean Hebert (43).Linesmen-Jameel Chaudry (51), Jud Ritter (34).

548 Medical/Health

ACTIVITY DIRECTOR

Full Time, NCCAP certification

RNAC

Full Time

CNA’S & NURSES Per Diem

Competitive Salary & Benefits Package Golden Living Center Summit 50 N. Pennsylvania Avenue Fax 570-825-9423 or pamela.smith2@ goldenliving.com EOE M/F/D/V

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PROGRAM ASSISTANT

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award. He stopped a Chris Bourque blast from in front on a power play and later stuffed Christian Hanson on a breakaway attempt during the period, which also including killing off a Hershey fiveon-three power play. “To be able to kill it like we did with the guys blocking shots and getting in lanes was a big boost for us,” Thiessen said. But not big enough to overcome Aucoin’s third period power play goal, which proved to be the game-winner. “I was waiting for him to pass it,” Thiessen said, expecting Aucoin to pass to a teammate sneaking in the backdoor. “He was looking and looking, and finally I knew he couldn’t make that play so he had to take a shot. He’s a good player and he made a good shot.” Hynes said the fact that Aucoin was left alone on the power play was a miscue, but it wasn’t intentional. The Penguins had an opportunity to get the puck out of the zone and head down the ice with a odd man rush, he said. “We were moving up ice and he was hanging back,” Hynes said. “it works both ways. We don’t get it out and it winds up with a high-end offensive players with the puck.”

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570-823-6865

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Sales/Retail/ Business Development

OUTSIDE SALES

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CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 11C●

LY C O M I N G A T K I N G S

Lycoming’s stifling defense holds King’s in check Monarchs managed just 58 total yards in the first half to top-ranked defense.

By JAY MONAHAN For The Times Leader

WILKES-BARRE TWP. – The way King’s has played as of late, the last thing it needed was a matchup with Lycoming. After being outscored by 110 points in their past two games, the Monarchs hosted the nation’s top defensive unit – a bruising Warriors squad that came in allowing just 168 yards per game. The King’s offense struggled mightily but did manage to gain 196 yards, in a 42-10 loss to the Warriors on Saturday at McCarthy Stadium. “It’s just a good defense,” said King’s head coach Jeff Knarr. “We

knew we had to make plays on third down. I thought we ran the ball consistently but our passing game had to rise up.” Lycoming’s defense posed problems for the Monarchs in the first half. At halftime, the Warriors held a 204-58 advantage in total yards. The top-ranked defense is comprised of three Wyoming Valley Conference starters. GAR graduate Chris Kish posted three tackles, and Lake-Lehman alum Roger Jayne had two tackles, including one for a 4-yard loss. Ray Bierbach, a Northwest product, also chipped in with a tackle from the safety spot. “It’s great to come home and show everyone what we can do,” said Bierbach, who also returned two punts for 24 yards. “We come with our hard hat and our lunch pail every day, and

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LYCOMING

10

KING’S

that’s what we did today,” said Kish. “We just played basic fundamental defense.” Tied at 3-3, Lycoming benefited from a lucky bounce to score its first touchdown of the game. Jake Lehnowsky forced a fumble by Warrior running back Matt Atkinson in front of the goal line. The ball bounced off a Monarch defender’s chest and into the hands of Greg Kovacs for a score to give Lycoming a 9-3 lead. Knarr said that, despite the score, his defense played one of

its best games of the season. The Monarchs forced three field goals in the first half. A 22-yard touchdown by Parker Showers put the game out of reach at 22-3 with 1:12 left in the first half. “I thought our defense played much better,” said Knarr. “They were inspired, physical. We put them in some bad situations as far as field position. “Despite the short field, they didn’t give up touchdowns; they gave up field goals.” King’s failed to achieve any sort of momentum in the passing game with quarterbacks Mike Daly and Joe Kirchon completing a total of 9-of-29 throws for 89 yards. “We knew we had to make plays in the passing game, and we had way too many misfires there. Down 42-3 with 3:08 remaining, the Monarchs connected for

their lone touchdown of the game when Jordan Buford caught a 33-yard pass in the end zone from Daly. Replacement kicker Dan Kempa kicked a 22-yard field goal to tie the game at 3-3 in the first quarter. Kempa also hit an extra point after Buford’s touchdown. King’s had its best opportunity of the game, down 12-3 in the second quarter, when it was stopped twice in Warrior territory with six inches to-go for a first down. Knarr said, “We’re still a young football team that isn’t where it should be in the weight room.” Kyle McGrath rushed for 84 yards on 17 carries for the Monarchs. Lycoming 42, King's 10 Lycoming .............................. 9 13 14 6 — 42 King’s .................................... 3 0 0 7 — 10 First Quarter LYC – Czap 28 field goal, 12:10 KC – Kempa 22 field goal, 3:23

LYC – Kovacs 0 fumble recovery (kick failed), 0:51 Second Quarter LYC – Czap 25 field goal, 8:47 LYC – Czap 29 field goal, 3:45 LYC – Showers 22 run (Czap kick), 1:12 Third Quarter LYC – Campman 49 pass from Klinger (Czap kick), 13:07 LYC – Kovacs 17 pass from Klinger (Czap kick), 2:08 Fourth Quarter LYC – Flail 40 fumble recovery (kick failed), 6:39 KC – Buford 22 pass from Daly (Kempa kick), 3:08 Team Statistics Lycoming King's First downs .......................... 17 15 Rushes-yards...................... 145 107 Passing................................. 193 89 Total Yards .......................... 338 196 Comp-Att-Int ........................ 11-23-0 9-29-1 Sacks-Yards Lost ............... 3-26 3-25 Punts-Avg. ........................... 4-123 5-185 Fumbles-Lost ...................... 1-0 2-1 Penalties-Yards .................. 7-85 4-25 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – LYC: Needhamme 12-79, Showers 11-60, Floyd 4-14, Atkinson 2-7, McGreevy 1-2, Klinger 4-2, Team 2-(minus-3), Jenny 1-(minus-16), Kovacs 0-0; KC: McGrath 17-84, Spencer 13-34, Daly 5-10, Haddock 1-0, Kirchon 3-(minus-21) PASSING – LYC: Klinger 9-20-0-172, Jenny 1-20-4, Atkinson 1-1-0-17; KC: Daly 7-23-0-84, Kirchon 2-6-1-5 RECEIVING – LYC: Campman 4-118, Oliver 227, Atkinson 2-10, Needhamme 1-17, Kovacs 1-17, Saylor 1-4; KC: Ford 3-24, Torres 3-22, Buford 1-33, Greene 1-13, Spencer 1-(minus-3) INTERCEPTIONS – LYC: Fenningham 1-0

D E L AWA R E VA L L E Y AT W I L K E S

AP FILE PHOTO

In this Jan. 9, 1977, file photo, Oakland Raiders coach John Madden, left, talks as owner Al Davis holds the Vince Lombardi Trophy after the Raiders’ 32-14 victory over Minnesota in Super Bowl XI.

DAVIS Continued from Page 1C

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Wilkes University receiver Cory Cesare cuts away from Delaware Valley defenders during their game Saturday at Schmidt Stadium.

Wilkes can’t turn away DelVal The Colonels force four turnovers, but still fall to the No. 10 team in Division III.

tunities,” Colonels coach Frank Sheptock said. “You know you’re going to go through spurts where they’re causing you a lot of issues, but we had chances because there were times we were moving the ball well. We just couldn’t put it in the end zone.” The Aggies (6-0, 4-0 MAC), the three-time defending MAC champions, rattled Colonels sophomore quarterback Alex George early in the game to set the tone. Wilkes’ first drive was advancing into DelVal territory before George was intercepted in the end zone. It was the first time this season the QB was picked off. The Wilkes (2-3, 2-2) defense held the Aggies scoreless after the turnover. But two possessions later, after George coughed up the ball, Delaware Valley needed four plays to take a 7-0 lead. George, who entered the

game with a 64.8 completion percentage, was just 2-for-10 on Saturday. “With all the moving, it was hard to get a gauge on what they were doing in the secondary. They’re pretty experienced there and it’s the first time he’s seen that scheme,” Sheptock said. “But he’ll bounce back. He’s a very resilient young man.” The Aggies opened a 14-0 advantage a few drives later in the second quarter after Wilkes couldn’t capitalize on two more takeaways. Senior defensive back Matt Gunther recovered a fumble, but Tyler Bernsten – who replaced George – was intercepted three plays after that. Delaware Valley’s first play resulted in an interception by Gunther on the Aggies’ 47 and Wilkes got to the 20-yard line on the drive. But penalties pushed the Colonels back to the 37 and they eventually had to punt, which set up DelVal to take a14-0 lead with 4:44 left in the second quarter. Tailback Zach Tivald accounted for Wilkes’ lone score with a 77-yard touchdown run in the third quarter when he busted

through the line, breaking tackles, then sprinted to the end zone. The senior rushed for 148 yards on 25 carries. He became the first back to go for more than 100 yards against Delaware Valley since Lebanon Valley’s Charlie Parker did so in 2008. “Zach, I think he’s as good a back as there is. He’s a hard worker and he’s a complete back,” Sheptock said.

On the first pitch after play resumed, Brandon Inge grounded out. Austin Jackson followed with an RBI double and eventually scored on a wild pitch while Wilson walked three batters to load the bases. Magglio Ordonez had just drawn his walk when heavy rain started falling again, and play was stopped. These were the first rain delays at Rangers Ballpark since May 24. This season was played during one of the hottest and driest summers ever in North Texas, with 100-degree days the

norm. Wilson already had six strikeouts and benefited from two inning-ending double plays. He had thrown 72 pitches before the first break, and 24 more before the second stoppage. Texas took a 2-0 lead in the second on an RBI triple by David Murphy before he scored on Ian Kinsler’s single. Nelson Cruz homered leading off the fourth, ending an 0-for-10 postseason slump. It was his seventh postseason homer, a Rangers record and one more than

Juan Gonzalez had. Verlander had five strikeouts and two walks while throwing 82 pitches over the first four innings. Joaquin Benoit was tossing balls in the bullpen, instead of Verlander, when play resumed in the top of the fifth. Both of Verlander’s walks came in the first, when he also struck out Josh Hamilton and Adrian Beltre to avoid giving up a run even after center fielder Jackson made an error when a flyball by Elvis Andrus hit off the heel of his glove.

14

DEL. VALLEY By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

EDWARDSVILLE – In the last meeting between Wilkes and Delaware Valley, the Colonels forced eight turnovers in a loss. If the same scenario came up for Wilkes this time around, the team was determined to make the Aggies pay. Although Delaware Valley didn’t cough up the ball nearly as much, the team did turn the ball over four times on Saturday at Schmidt Stadium. But once again, Wilkes couldn’t take advantage, while the Aggies did capitalize on a Wilkes turnover in a 14-6 setback to Delaware Valley, which entered ranked 10th in the country in the AFCA Division III Coaches Poll and 16th in the D3football.com Top 25. “We had opportunities throughout the course of the game and unfortunately we didn’t capitalize on those oppor-

ALCS Continued from Page 1C

Welke, certainly about the weather. A few minutes later, after Ramon Santiago led off the fifth with a double and while Brandon Inge was batting with a 1-0 count against C.J. Wilson, the intensity of the rain picked up. Welke then stopped the game for the first time, with Texas up 3-0, and had the field covered.

6

WILKES

Delaware Valley 14, Wilkes 6 Delaware Valley ..................... 7 7 0 0 — 14 Wilkes ...................................... 0 0 6 0 — 6 First Quarter DV – Schuberth 2 run (Sobchak kick) 2:00 Second Quarter DV – Blango 16 pass from Wilmer (Sobchak kick) 4:44 Third Quarter WILKES – Tivald 77 run (kick failed) 9:13 Team Statistics DelVal Wilkes First downs............................. 19 12 Rushes-yards ........................ 52-219 41-171 Passing ................................... 167 71 Total Yards............................. 386 242 Comp-Att-Int .......................... 12-25-1 5-22-3 Sacks-Yards Lost.................. 1-8 1-11 Punts-Avg............................... 4-31.5 7-33.9 Fumbles-Lost......................... 4-3 1-1 Penalties-Yards..................... 5-35 6-50 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING – DV, Schuberth 25-158, Neal 1437, Wilmer 6-30, Hall 3-8, TEAM 4-(minus-14). WILKES, Tivald 25-148, Wogou 7-27, Bernsten 516, George 3-(minus-7), TEAM 1-(minus-13). PASSING – DV, Wilmer 12-24-1-167, Hall 0-10-0. WILKES, George 2-12-1-16, Bernsten 3-10-255 RECEIVING – DV, Vincent 4-70, Hall 3-28, Ferrell 1-26, Bailey 1-17, Blango 1-16, Ruiz 1-10, Devlin 1-0. WILKES, Tivald 2-34, Bousson 1-18, Wogou 1-11, Eagles 1-8 INTERCEPTIONS – DV, Osborne, McCullough, Green. WILKES, Gunther MISSED FIELD GOALS – DV, Sobchak (27 blocked), Sobchak (26, WR)

The cause of death was not immediately disclosed. Davis was one of the most important figures in pro football history from his role in the development of the AFL, the merger with the NFL and the success he built on the field with the Raiders. “Al Davis’s passion for football and his influence on the game were extraordinary,” Commissioner Roger Goodell said. “He defined the Raiders and contributed to pro football at every level. The respect he commanded was evident in the way that people listened carefully every time he spoke. He is a true legend of the game whose impact and legacy will forever be part of the NFL.” Davis was also a litigious gadfly. That was most evident during the 1980s when he went to court — and won — for the right to move his team from Oakland to Los Angeles. Even after he moved the Raiders back to the Bay Area in 1995, he sued for $1.2 billion to establish that he still owned the rights to the L.A. market. Before that, though, he was a pivotal figure in hastening the merger between the AFL — where he served as commissioner — and the more established NFL. Davis was not initially in favor of a merger, but his aggressive pursuit of NFL players for his fledgling league and team helped bring about the eventual 1970 combination of the two leagues into what is now the most popular sport in the country. “Al Davis was a good man, and we were friendly rivals,” Steelers chairman emeritus Dan Rooney said in a statement released by the Steelers. “He was a football man and did a lot for the game of football. I had a lot of respect for him, and he will be missed throughout the entire NFL.” But Davis was hardly an NFL company man. Not in the way he dressed — usually satin running suits, one white, one black, and the occasional black suit, black shirt and silver tie. Not in the way he wore his hair — slicked back with a ’50s duck-tail. Not in the way he talked — Brooklynese with Southern inflection. Not in the way he did business — on his own terms, always on his own terms. “His contributions and expertise were inspiring at every level

— coach, general manager, owner and commissioner,” Dallas owner Jerry Jones said. “There was no element of the game of professional football for which Al did not enjoy a thorough and complete level of knowledge and passion.” Elected in 1992 to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, Davis was a trailblazer during his half-century in professional football. He hired the first black head coach of the modern era — Art Shell in 1988. He hired the first Latino coach, Tom Flores; and the first woman CEO, Amy Trask. And he was infallibly loyal to his players and officials: to be a Raider was to be a Raider for life. “Everybody realizes that sooner or later, you’re going to die. You never expected that from him, because he was so tough,” said former Raiders Hall of Famer cornerback Willie Brown. “The things he’d gone through over the years, of course. He’s meant a lot to this organization, because he’s the leader. It’s hard to replace a great leader and a legend like Al Davis.” Coach Hue Jackson told the team of Davis’ death at a meeting in Houston on Saturday morning. Fans dressed in Raiders jerseys, meanwhile, quickly made their way to team headquarters in Alameda, where a black flag with the team logo flew at half-staff and a makeshift memorial formed at the base of the flag pole. “Definitely shocking news for us,” quarterback Jason Campbell said. “We got here last night and then you wake up this morning and hear we lost our owner, the man who built this team for many, many years, it’s tough to take in as a team. We understand what he meant to this organization. He loved his players, and that didn’t matter if you were here now, or if you played for him 30 years ago. He still loved all his players.” People carrying flowers, flags, silver and black pompoms and even a football-shaped balloon stopped by to pay tribute on a warm, crystal clear fall day in the Bay Area. A tiny candle burned as well. “It’s like losing a grandfather,” said Rob Ybarra of Alameda, who left a bouquet of white flowers shortly after hearing the news of Davis’ passing. “He’s such an icon. The face of the Raiders. It’s hard to put into words how much he meant to everyone.” Davis is survived by his wife, Carol, and son Mark, who Davis had said would run the team after his death.


CMYK PAGE 12C

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

www.timesleader.com

OUTDOORS NOTES State Rep. Gerald Mullery will host a public meeting with the Pennsylvania Game Commission from 7-9 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 13, at Hanover Area High School Auditorium, 1600 Sans Souci Parkway, Hanover Township. "If you have a question or concern about a hunting-related issue, please come out to this meeting," said Mullery, D-Newport Township. "We have a panel of experts lined up." Panelists include: · Pennsylvania Game Commissioner executive director Carl Roe · Pennsylvania Game Commissioner District 7 commissioner Jay Delaney Jr. · State Rep. Edward Staback, Democratic chairman of the House Game and Fisheries Committee The meeting will start with a brief presentation about current issues of interest to the hunting community, followed by a question-and-answer period. Mullery is a member of the House Game and Fisheries Committee The PA Bass Casters will hold two open buddy bass tournaments this month at Harvey’s Lake. The first will be held on Oct. 23, followed by another on Oct. 30. Check-in is at 5:15 a.m., and weigh-in will be at 2 p.m. For more information, call Dan Davis at 762-1469. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Chapter of the Ruffed Grouse Society (RGS) will host its 27th Annual Sportsmen’s Banquet on Wednesday, November 2, at the Inn of the Abingtons, Route 524, Dalton, beginning with a reception hour at 6 p.m. Dinner will be at 7:30 p.m. The event will feature live and silent auctions, games, drawings and door prizes with quality firearms, artwork and collectables. Individual membership and dinner tickets are $50. Family package with two dinners is $90, and additional dinners are $25. Banquet, Conservation and Sustaining sponsorship packages are also available at $275, $500 and $1,000 respectively. As with all RGS fundraisers, proceeds from this event will be used to restore and protect area grouse and woodcock habitat. For more information and/or tickets, contact Clark at 983-9918. The Columbia County Chapter of Trout Unlimited will host a presentation by David Sewalk, TU’s Pennsylvania Marcellus Shale field organizer, on Nov. 17 at 7 p.m. at the Ag Center, 702 Sawmill Road, Bloomsburg. The presentation is entitled “Marcellus Shale, Where We Are and Where Are We Going.” It will focus on TU’s statewide efforts to protect streams from drilling damage. Efforts include the use of GIS mapping to identify potential conflicts and the use of volunteer teams to monitor water quality. For more information, call 672-0111.

Cave bats are facing an epidemic that could wipe out the animals while they hibernate for the winter

TOM VENESKY OUTDOORS

Trapping helps control safety of furbearers

A PENNSYLVANIA GAME COMMISSION

Little brown bats and other cave bats have been hit hard by White-Nose Syndrome

Struggle to survive

like the American chestnut. in the dark, cold and wet environments Five years of following WNS has helped where bats hibernate,” said Greg Turner, wildlife managers identify and better PGC biologist. “Their vulnerability then Cave bats have long been some of understand what Gd is and what potenNorth America’s most successful species. is unparalleled, because their immune tial limitations it may have. The future system is shut down to conserve energy. Then, in 2006, White-Nosed Syndrome for North American bats seems to be Geomyces destrutans has found this (WNS) surfaced in Howe’s Cave near brighter as a result of this important opening. Now it’s up to bats to find a Albany, N.Y., and the future of North work and the track record of other fordefense.” America’s cave bats soon became anyIn Pennsylvania, bats spend six months eign fungi that have invaded our outthing but certain. The disease has since spread north into annually in hibernation, riding out winter doors. It is a perception bolstered by our increased understanding of Gd and the and living off a finite supply of energy Canada, south to North Carolina and west to Oklahoma. This month, bats will generated from consuming massive quan- sometimes surprising resiliency of nature, even when natural order has been be returning to their hibernation quarters tities of flying insects. Gd irritates the disrupted by unnatural events. deep-sleeping bats, forcing in mines and caves and their seasonal them out of their hibernabattle for survival will resume. WNS “If you were pon- Remember how bad things were for bald eagles and tion stupor, which requires strikes bats as they overwinter underAmerican bison? increased energy consump- dering a perfect ground. Field research now seems to tion from a reserve that More than a million cave bats have storm on cave be showing some signs that barely sustains them died from the fungus Geomyces destrucbats, the nasGd also may not be the inestans (Gd) that causes WNS over the past through winter. Death capable epidemiological jugfive years. The pervasive Gd strikes while often follows, regardless of tiest catalysts gernaut it was first expected whether the bat stays put bats are in communal hibernation, often would be orgato be. Ultimately, time and the or flies out over the winter clustered like sardines in a tin to conlandscape looking for food nisms that could bats will sort out whether bats serve energy. When this fungus invades But, the battle that isn’t there. hibernacula, it has been profoundly daexist and strike persevere. North American bats must Although some hibermaging to cave bats, which, in Pennsylvafight with Gd still is likely nacula have been scorched in the dark, cold nia, includes the little brown bat, big closer to its beginning than its by Gd and remain absent brown bat, eastern pipistrelle, Indiana and wet enviend. of all bat life, there have bat, small-footed bat and northern longronments where “As the populations of afbeen some survivors and eared bat. fected bat species decline, the residents at some contam- bats hibernate.” Gd is a cold-loving fungus that thrives distribution of survivors will on the bodies of hibernating bats in caves inated caves and mines in Greg Turner likely shrink to core popPennsylvania and New and mines. Once it appears in these subPGC biologist ulations and habitats, creating terranean areas, it stays. That’s bad news York for several years. It’s a new management challenges for the bats that hibernate in these cham- finding that gives hope; a in identification, protection potential sign of resistance. bers. The very caves and mines that for and potential recovery of survivors and But it’s also early in this fungal invasion, centuries sheltered bats from the elehabitats,” noted Cal Butchkoski, Game so observations are simply that, somements and pestilence now harbor the Commission biologist. “For our bats, world’s preeminent cave bat-killing patho- thing noted, something more to be monsince no treatments are on the horizon, itored. gen. To date, even in New York, Gd has not we must fall back to conservative man“If you were pondering a perfect storm on cave bats, the nastiest catalysts would eliminated cave bats in some their histor- agement. As colonies decline, no number will be too small to protect and manage.” ic hibernacula. Some bats hang on, just be organisms that could exist and strike By JOE KOSACK Pennsylvania Game Commission

OUTDOORS NEWS New CWD regs With Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) nearly 10 miles south of the Pennsylvania-Maryland line, the Pennsylvania Board of Game Commissioners gave final approval last week to a revised set of emergency powers enabling the agency’s executive director to take actions that will mitigate risk factors and determine the prevalence and geographic distribution of CWD. “For more than a decade, the Game Commission has been monitoring our CWD status and striving to prevent CWD from coming to our state,” said Carl G. Roe, PGC executive director. “While I hope that I never have to use these new tools, it is imperative this agency’s executive director be empowered to contain the disease to one area and prevent, or at the very least, slow the spread of this disease.” Under the emergency authority, if the executive direc-

on Gov. Tom Corbett to tighttor concludes the spread of CWD poses a threat within or en Marcellus Shale environmental standards and adjacent to this Commonwealth, he will have the emer- dedicate a portion of fee revenue to conservation. gency authority to: prohibit “Gov. Corbett’s Marcellus the importation of high-risk Shale plan announced yestercervid parts from areas that day is a step in the right diare known to harbor CWD; rection towards improving and define and designate existing environmental stanDisease Management Areas dards related to Marcellus (DMAs) in this CommonShale development, but these wealth. Once a DMA is designated, measures, including the allothe executive director can use cation of funding from an impact fee, must be greatly be his emergency authority to improved to adequately protake several actions, includtect Pennsylvania’s natural ing: allowing the taking of resources,” said Katy Dunlap, cervids without regard to Trout Unlimited’s (TU) Eastestablished seasons and bag ern Water Project Director. limits and methods of take; Echoing the state’s Marcelrequiring mandatory checklus Shale Advisory Commising of hunter-killed cervids; sion recommendation, Gov. prohibiting the removal of Corbett called for extending high-risk cervid parts; prohib- the distance between a gas iting the rehabilitation of well and surface water from cervids; prohibiting the use 100 feet to 300 feet. While an and possession of cervid improvement, the 300-foot urine-based attractants; prodistance must be measured hibiting the feeding of cerfrom the edge of the well vids; and prohibiting any new pad—as opposed to the well permits to possess or transbore—to provide a reasonable port live cervids. buffer between drilling activities and water resources. Regs and fee saught Corbett’s plan did not make this distinction. Additionally, Trout Unlimited is calling

for high quality, exceptional value streams and other important trout waters, TU calls for even greater setbacks from well pads—to be determined on a site-specific basis—to assure that coldwater resources are protected from possible pollution incidents. Corbett’s proposed impact fee ignores the environmental impacts caused by Marcellus Shale development, both the (1) short-term impacts that can be addressed by the agencies inspecting and enforcing Marcellus-related incidents; and (2) long-term impacts that can be addressed by conservation and restoration funding programs. TU strongly urges the Pennsylvania General Assembly and the Corbett administration to ensure that a percentage of any impact fee be directed toward conservation funding programs such as Pennsylvania’s Growing Greener Fund and conservation agencies that have taken on additional inspection and enforcement duties related to Marcellus development, such as the Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commission.

long Interstate 81 South between Moosic and Wilkes-Barre, there’s a gray fox lying dead alongside the road. Struck by a vehicle, no doubt, the fox’s gray pelt splashed with patches of rusty red surely catches the eye of many passing motorists. Like most things in nature, the fox is a thing of beauty – something to be respected. Unfortunately, this one is going to waste. Death by vehicle is a common demise for many of Pennsylvania’s furbearers. Disease ranks up there as well. What makes such incidents even more unfortunate is they can usually be avoided. How? Through trapping. Regulated trapping is the best tool to manage furbearer populations, and keep them in check with the available habitat and food sources. Rather than wind up rotting alongside a road or dying a slow, painful death from disease, trapping not only keeps populations in check but ensures that the furbearer is utilized. Recently, however, an animal welfare group, Born Free USA, went on the attack against trapping. The group released a video with a handful of incidents that they claim involved trappers handling their catch in an inhumane manner. They then went on to use the incidents to paint all of trapping with the same brush. To take it a step further, Born Free USA petitioned the Pennsylvania Game Commission to make a number of changes in regards to trapping. They include prohibiting the use of Conibear, or body-grip, traps, prohibit the use of cable restraints and require trappers to employ an “efficient and less-cruel” method of dispatching their catches. Many false impressions Fortunately, the PGC board didn’t act on the petition – one that is filled with misconceptions. For starters, the petition contains a huge contraction. On one hand, Born Free wants trappers to be required to use efficient and less-cruel dispatching methods, while at the same time the group wants a ban on the very trap capable of dispatching a furbearer instantly and humanely – the body-grip trap. And there’s more. Barry Warner, public relations director for the Pennsylvania Trapper’s Association, believes that many of the cruel incidents contained in Born Free USA’s video are actually staged. A real trapper, he said, doesn’t get their kicks by standing around a set and torturing a captured animal. “No one likes to see that,” said Warner, who is a lifelong trapper. “It’s ludicrous.” It’s a shame that a valuable wildlife management tool such as trapping is the target of a group that uses sensationalism and emotion – not facts -- to back its argument. Ethics are what drive trapping. It’s why we check our traps early every morning, use body-grip traps for mink, muskrat and beaver, and make humanely dispatching our catch top priority. It’s also why almost 5,300 people since 2005 have taken the cable restraint course conducted by the PGC and PTA, in addition to trapper training programs conducted throughout the state. “I know in my heart that trapping is a very valid method to manage wildlife,” Warner said. The only method to prevent the spread of rabies and distemper, keep predator populations in check to protect the eggs of nesting birds and limit conflicts with humans. And, just as important, trapping is the best way to avoid wasting our wildlife resource, such as the gray fox rotting away alongside the interstate.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 13C

GYMNASTICS

American team qualifies for ’12 Games The Associated Press

TOKYO — The American Kiddie Corps looked as if they’d been on the big stage for years Saturday, responding to the loss of Beijing Olympic captain Alicia Sacramone with a commanding performance that topped qualifying at the world gymnastics championships and secured a spot at the 2012 London Games. “They rose to the occasion,” national team coordinator Martha Karolyi said. “This was special, showing how young girls are growing into international gymnasts.” The U.S. was dealt a massive blow Thursday when Sacramone tore her Achilles’ tendon

during training. The Americans were counting on her veteran poise to calm and reassure the youngsters — Jordyn Wieber, McKayla Maroney, Sabrina Vega and Gabby Douglas are all firstyear seniors — not to mention the big scores she puts up on vault, balance beam and floor. And with uneven bars specialist Anna Li sidelined by an abdominal injury, the remaining Americans would have to do every event. It was a tall order for the youngsters — and they handled it like old pros. “These guys are basically on a mission,” U.S. coach John Geddert said. “I’m very, very proud of them. But again, it’s only one step.”

Team finals are Tuesday night. The Americans didn’t have a single fall, and their score of 234.253 points was more than three points better than defending champion Russia and almost four points ahead of Olympic champ China. They posted the highest team score on floor exercise and vault, and were secondbest on uneven bars and balance beam. All five Americans were in the top 12 of the individual standings, with Wieber trailing Russia’s Viktoria Komova by a mere 0.125 points. Aly Raisman was fourth in the all-around and had the highest score of the meet on floor exercise, while Maroney posted the best score on vault.

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CMYK PAGE 14C

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

W

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A

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H

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

NATIONAL FORECAST TODAY Sunny

WEDNESDAY

80° 50°

THURSDAY

Partly sunny, a shower

Sunny

Mostly sunny

78° 54°

75° 54°

FRIDAY

Cloudy, rain showers

69° 54°

TUESDAY

MONDAY

SATURDAY Mostly cloudy, showers

70° 51°

Syracuse 79/54

New York City 84/63 Reading 82/53

Atlantic City 80/54

Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

75/42 64/44 87 in 2007 28 in 1935

Heating Degree Days*

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

6 93 179 177 246

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was below 65 degrees.

Precipitation

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

Sun and Moon

Sunrise 7:08a 7:09a Moonrise Today 5:09p Tomorrow 5:34p

Today Tomorrow

Brandywine Valley

Highs: 79-83. Lows: 50-58. Mostly sunny skies.

Philadelphia 84/59

Temperatures

The Finger Lakes

Highs: 77-81. Lows: 45-57. Sunny and pleasant.

Delmarva/Ocean City

Highs: 74-81. Lows: 50-60. Mostly sunny and dry with light winds expected.

81/53

0.00” 0.66” 0.86” 50.82” 29.73” Sunset 6:33p 6:31p Moonset 4:50a 5:49a

Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg Wilkes-Barre 6.31 -0.90 22.0 Towanda 3.38 -0.48 21.0 Lehigh Bethlehem 2.86 0.54 16.0 Delaware Port Jervis 5.19 -0.38 18.0 Full

Oct. 11

Last

New

Oct. 19 Oct. 26

First

Nov. 2

Forecasts, graphs and data ©2011

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

www.timesleader.com National Weather Service

607-729-1597

74/61

74/51

81/64 87/69 85/78

88/74 48/37

City

Yesterday

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

47/38/.00 79/57/.00 74/46/.00 82/55/.00 77/50/.00 74/48/.00 82/54/.00 80/52/.00 86/71/.00 56/35/1.00 80/53/.00 88/77/.00 89/70/.00 81/56/.00 73/53/.00 71/55/.00 79/71/2.50 81/58/.00 82/71/.00

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

57/46/.00 93/64/.00 70/50/.00 54/43/.14 64/59/.00 64/46/.00 54/43/.21 84/77/.00 86/63/.00 61/50/.00

Today Tomorrow 44/32/pc 74/61/t 81/51/s 82/60/s 77/57/s 75/54/pc 80/59/s 78/59/s 81/64/t 53/39/pc 77/56/s 88/74/pc 87/69/t 83/54/s 78/57/s 78/60/s 85/78/t 73/56/s 78/58/pc

ALMANAC Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.

80/59

78/60

The Jersey Shore

Wilkes-Barre 81/53

84/63

83/60

44/32

Poughkeepsie 82/50

77/56

78/58 53/39

68/56

Highs: 80-84. Lows: 49-53. Sunny and pleasant.

Highs: 73-87. Lows: 54-60. Mostly sunny and dry.

Pottsville 79/50

Harrisburg 80/51

60° 45° The Poconos

Albany 81/54

Towanda 81/48

State College 80/50

63/40

TODAY’S SUMMARY

Binghamton 80/50

Scranton 80/52

60/52

Mostly cloudy, a shower

65° 50°

REGIONAL FORECAST Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

NATIONAL FORECAST: A low pressure system moving across the United States will bring scattered showers and thunderstorms from the northern Plains to the Gulf Coast of Texas. Scattered showers and thunderstorms will extend over the Southeast as well. Meanwhile, high pressure will continue to provide sunny and pleasant weather for the Northeast, Midwest, Ohio Valley and Mississippi River Valley.

45/32/pc 73/59/t 82/57/s 77/56/s 75/56/s 77/58/t 76/59/pc 77/61/s 81/62/t 68/44/s 75/56/pc 87/73/s 89/68/pc 82/57/s 78/60/pc 79/61/s 87/77/t 68/57/pc 76/56/pc

City

Myrtle Beach 77/59/.00 Nashville 79/55/.00 New Orleans 82/71/.00 Norfolk 72/54/.00 Oklahoma City 81/62/.46 Omaha 77/68/.00 Orlando 70/68/4.49 Phoenix 78/58/.00 Pittsburgh 79/47/.00 Portland, Ore. 68/54/.00 St. Louis 82/58/.00 Salt Lake City 55/41/.06 San Antonio 82/73/.05 San Diego 72/56/.00 San Francisco 67/52/.00 Seattle 64/46/.00 Tampa 79/69/.02 Tucson 74/45/.00 Washington, DC 75/53/.00

WORLD CITIES

Today Tomorrow 64/47/r 92/62/s 79/57/s 58/41/pc 67/53/sh 61/55/sh 58/40/pc 86/79/pc 84/66/s 67/60/sh

65/55/r 94/65/s 67/56/sh 62/48/r 74/55/s 56/50/sh 61/47/r 87/78/pc 88/64/s 68/53/sh

Yesterday

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

75/52/.00 75/54/.00 70/54/.00 55/48/.00 88/73/.00 95/66/.00 72/50/.00 87/77/.47 73/63/.00 52/41/.04

Today Tomorrow 78/66/t 80/54/s 84/69/pc 78/56/s 77/62/t 81/61/t 84/72/t 86/61/s 81/50/s 62/51/sh 83/60/s 59/42/pc 80/70/t 73/63/s 69/55/s 60/52/sh 81/71/t 83/54/s 81/53/s

75/65/t 81/55/pc 81/70/t 82/62/s 76/59/t 74/55/sh 88/73/t 93/66/s 80/53/s 57/54/sh 81/60/pc 64/50/pc 85/68/pc 72/63/s 68/56/s 56/54/sh 85/73/t 86/60/s 82/56/s

Today Tomorrow 70/58/t 75/59/s 52/46/sh 66/55/sh 83/71/pc 99/74/s 73/49/s 89/78/t 73/63/pc 52/41/pc

Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snow flurries, i-ice.

71/57/t 73/48/s 48/44/sh 69/58/pc 82/70/t 98/68/s 75/50/s 87/77/t 76/62/pc 53/42/sh

Sunny skies and warm temperatures look like they will stick around for a few more days. Patchy fog will clear out early today with morning lows around 53. We will warm up to 80 with plenty of sunshine. Sunday night will be clear and cool down to 55. Monday and Tuesday will be sunny with temperatures in the mid to upper 70s. On Wednesday, we will start to see temperatures drop into the upper 60s and a chance for showers. - Michelle Rotella


CMYK

BUSINESS timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

CEO pay accelerates nationwide

By PETER WHORISKEY The Washington Post

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. — AstheboardofAmgenconvenedat the company’s headquarters in March, Chief Executive Kevin Sharer seemed an unlikely candidate for a raise. Shareholders at the company, one of the nation’s largest biotech firms, had lost 3 percent on their investment in 2010 and 7 percent over the past five years. The company had been forced to close or shrink plants, trimming the workforce from 20,100 to 17,400. And Sharer, a 63-year-old former Navy engineer, was already earning lots of money — about $15 million in the previous year, plus such perks as two corporate jets. The board decided to give Sharer more. It boosted his compensation to $21 million annually, a 37 percent increase, according to the company reports. Why? The company board agreed to pay Sharer more than most chief executivesintheindustry—witha compensation “value closer to the 75th percentile of the peer group,” according to a 2011 regulatory filing. This is how it’s done in corporate America. At Amgen and at the vast majority of large U.S. companies, boards aim to pay their executives at levels equal to or above the median for executives at similar companies. The idea behind setting executive pay this way, known as “peer benchmarking,” is to keep talented bosses from leaving. But the practice has long been controversial because, as critics have pointed out, if every company tries to keep up with or exceed the median pay for executives, executive compensation will spiral upward, regardless of performance. Few if any corporate boards consider their executive teams to be be-

Paying top executives more

By CANDICE CHOI AP Personal Finance Writer

NEW YORK — Students checking out colleges this fall shouldn’t rule out any options based on price alone. The tuition and fees that schools publish online are often far more than what families end up paying. The problem is that the true cost of attendance — after subtracting federal, state and school grants — isn’t always clear until students receive their financial aid award letters. But starting Oct. 29, colleges will be required to provide “net price calculators” on

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Until the 1980s, median total compensation for top executives increased slowly, but it began to rise quickly in the 1980s.

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their websites. These will give families a better sense of what their actual costs would be for that particular year. This is expected to help students get a more accurate assessment of the range of schools that are within their reach. “The sticker price is what people look at, but it’s not a good indicator of what your cost is going to be,” says Laura Asher, president of the Institute for College Access & Success, which advocates for more affordable education. “Sometimes you’ll end up with a better deal at a school that looks more expensive on the surface.”

At private colleges, which tend to have bigger endowments from which they can provide aid, the average published cost for tuition and fees is $37,000. But that figure drops to $21,000 after factoring in grant aid, according to the College Board, which tracks trends in education pricing. At public schools, the average published total for tuition and fees of $16,000 drops to $10,000 when factoring in grant aid. Students and families don’t have to wait until later this month to start getting a betSee COLLEGE, Page 3D

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Passengers check in Thursday afternoon at the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport. A Times Leader survey found many fares competitive with or lower than those from metropolitan airports. By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

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ITTSTON TWP. — For years, officials of Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport have contended that ticket prices there are competitive with big-city airports in Philadelphia and New York. It turns out they are right for many popular destinations; in some cases flights from the local airport are less expensive, while in others the small difference is more than made up by gas, tollandparkingfeesincurredwithadrive to the larger departure points. A Times Leader analysis of roundtrip coach airfares to destinations including Las Vegas, Orlando, London and Los An-

geles found that the cost of departing from the local airport is often cheaper than or comparable to flying out of Newark or Philadelphia. . There are some exceptions, but anyone with access to the Internet, a few spare minutes and a willingness to compare fares will find the perception that you’ll save money by flying out of larger airports is a myth. “It’s widely thought in Northeastern Pennsylvania that fares are higher here at this airport and people oftentimes don’t even test that,” said Mike Washo, a Lackawanna County Commissioner, member of the airport’s Bi-County Board of Directors and a frequent flyer from the airport

identifiedbytheFederalAviationAdministration as “AVP.” That symbol references the nearby borough of Avoca, even though the majority of the facility lies in Pittston Township. Washo said he’s often found flights out of Avoca to be comparable to those leaving major airports. In many instances, it’s less expensive to fly from Avoca to a major airport for a layover and then on to your final destination than it is to drive to the large airport and fly directly. That’s the case for travelers who want to fly to London on Nov. 4 and return Nov. 11. See FLIGHTS, Page 3D

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Stock up on Halloween candy with prices that won’t scare you to death WHEN IS IT TIME to start stocking up for Halloween? When you see a sale such as this: Rite Aid has two packs of Hershey’s, Reese’s, M&M’s, Kit Kat or Snickers brand fun size candy bags on sale for $2. When you use your Wellness+ card and buy two bags you’ll get a $1 coupon off a future store purchase printed on your receipt. There’s a $1.50 off three bags coupon so pay $4.50 for three bags and get a $1 coupon back. CVS has some candy bags on sale two for $5 and when you spend $10 and use your Extra Care card you’ll get a $3

RON BARTIZEK BUSINESS LOCAL

Flood-damaged businesses need help now

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Median value of total compensation for top executives In millions of 2005 dollars

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ANDREW M. SEDER STEALS & DEALS coupon for a future store purchase on your receipt. Are you of fan of Matt Damon movies? Are you a fan of free? If you answered yes to both, then head to your closest Blockbuster Express movie rental kiosk and rent any Matt Damon movie for free when you use the promo code “DAMON” through Oct. 31. Movies include True Grit, The Adjustment Bureau, The Informant and Invictus, among others. Through Tuesday, as part of its JC

Penney Columbus Day sale, the retailer is offering all outerwear for the family at 50 percent off. All coats are included and select gloves, hats and scarves are, too. Rite Aid also has plenty of fully refundable products through its +Up Rewards program. Use your Wellness+ card when you buy Cepacol 16-18 count sore throat lozenges, Preparation H totables wipes or any of six other products found on pages 5 and 12 of the pharmacy’s circular and get the full purchase price back by way of a printable coupon on your receipt or via check when you participate in the store’s Single Check Rebate program. CVS has a similar deal this week

where you pay $15.99 for a 28-count bottle of pur-Absorb iron supplement and use your CVS Extra Care Card to get a coupon for $15.99 off a future store purchase printed on your receipt. OK, plenty of coupons in this week’s Sunday Times Leader and lots of great ways to use them. Here is one: • Take the $1 off two Minute Rice products coupon to Thomas’ Foodtown where the brand’s ready to serve rice two-packs are on sale three for $5. Get two for $2.34 with the coupon. Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. If you know of any local steals or deals, send them to aseder@timesleader.com.

he worst natural disaster we faced in all the years my wife and I owned The Dallas Post and The Abington Journal was a lightning strike that knocked out our computers for a day. We thought that was terribly inconvenient and resented the unexpected cost of a few hundred dollars, but were back to work long before deadline. That was a minor blip compared to the financial and personal tragedy faced by business owners such as Gino Tighe, whose G T Fabrication Inc. in Pittston suffered $2.5 million in flood damage, more than twice the coverage provided by insurance. Aside from his personal hardship, Tighe had to tell 30 employees they don’t have jobs until he can find a way to recover. The losses at some smaller businesses were a fraction of Tighe’s, but their impact is just as great. Randy Ayers saw his barbecue restaurant in Plains Township devastated by floodwaters that reached the ceiling of his rented space. “Things were just starting to get moving,” for the 3-year-old business, he told reporter Jennifer Learn-Andes. Now the question is how to help these businesses — these employers of dads and moms, teens and seniors — get back on their feet. You would think that at a time such as this politicians and the private sector would quickly agree on a way to finance recovery. Instead, we witnessed a drawn-out fight in Washington over funding for disaster relief — our representatives split on the first vote — while in Harrisburg Gov. Tom Corbett seems more interested in coddling natural gas drillers than in finding money to help local businesses. One simple step could ease the way to recovery for businesses that need money to repair buildings and replace damaged equipment — reducing the interest rate charged on disaster loans. Joe Milazzo, whose Plains Township company makes Qik Joe and other widely distributed products, said the rate was 1 percent after the 1972 Agnes flooding, while today it’s 4-6 percent. That makes no sense, and is destructive rather than helpful, when rates paid to savers are at record lows. Reducing the rate to 1 percent would not be a giveaway, because the return would include the payroll and income taxes paid by workers who would be getting paychecks and not unemployment benefits. And there’s ample precedent; we’ve been giving the huge banks that plunged the economy into recession even sweeter deals for the past three years, allowing them to borrow money virtually for free while many of them shed thousands of workers. For now, local businesses must navigate a hodgepodge of financing options. Luzerne County has 1.5 percent money available, but in limited amounts and with many restrictions. The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber has instituted a recovery fund that is being matched by the Luzerne Foundation, but again, the scope is limited. NEPA Alliance has loans at 3 percent interest and many local banks are promoting special rates for flood recovery. While commendable, all those things together can’t come close to meeting the needs of flooded area businesses. And if we can’t figure out how to help them get back on their feet, this region’s already unacceptable unemployment rate will go higher and a generation of entrepreneurs will see their dreams dashed. Perhaps not every damaged business should be rebuilt, some should move and some may not have the credentials to merit a loan. But many enterprises that represent a lifetime of effort and commitment deserve the chance to make a go of it. Failure to help them will diminish our communities and injure our spirit at a time when we need to bolster both.

Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor, may be reached at rbartizek@timesleader.com or 570-970-7157.


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CORPORATE LADDER JONESKOHANSKI & COMPANY

The accounting firm recently added two new accountants in its Moosic office. John (Eli) Hollock, a native of Mountain Top, holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Wilkes Hollock University. Jessica Herring, Freeland, holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Penn State University.

Herring

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Randy Williams recently joined the Scranton firm as a client specialist. The former station manager for WBRE-TV holds a bachelor’s degree in communications from Williams The University of Scranton and has taught courses in media scriptwriting, broadcast news writing and production.

THE UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON

Eugeniu Grigorescu, Hanover Township, was recently named director of the Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence. He joined the university in 1998 and has served as the center’s associate director since 2007. Grigorescu Grigorescu holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Bloomsburg University and is currently pursing a doctoral degree at The Pennsylvania State University.

MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY

The university and the Conference for Mercy Higher Education recently announced the appointment of chairman and vice chairman of the Board of Trust-

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ees as well as annually to a deserving faculty three new member. members. John C. Metz, Harveys Lake, was appointed Joseph J. Musto, chairman. Metz a long time is chairman resident of and CEO of Metz Kingston, was Metz Culinary recently named Management, Dallas, and has director of been a member of the universibusiness develty’s board for opment at the 25 years. Musto Elkton, Md. Robert Soper, hospital. Shavertown, was appointed vice chairman. Soper is presiJeff Krull recently joined the dent of Mohecertified public accounting and gan Sun at business adSoper Pocono Downs, visory firm as a Plains Township, and has been a partner in its member of the university’s corporate board for five years. governance and Stuart M. Bell, Dallas, is the direcrisk managetor and presiment practice. dent of LuKrull is a certizerne Prodfied public ucts, Inc., Krull accountant in Wilkes-Barre, Maryland and Pennsylvania and and oversees is also a certified information the James E. & systems auditor. Constance L. Bell FoundaBell tion. He also is director, secretary and treasurer Vince M. Kubilus III was recently promoted to financial sales of Jebco, Inc., and a managing assistant. Kubimember of Plainsville Sports, lus has been LLC. Bell will chair the universiwith Fidelity ty’s Investment Committee. since 2008, and Mary Hudack Erwine, Shavertown, holds a bacheis the presilor’s degree in dent of Erwine accounting Home Health from Marywood & Hospice, Inc., University, Kingston. A Kubilus Scranton, former memwhere he is ber of Council working on his master’s degree Misericordia, in finance and accounting. she has helped Erwine Misericordia obtain a number of private gifts and governFrederick Pettit, was recently ment grants in support of the appointed vice president for university’s health science proinstitutional grams. A state-of-the-art teachadvancement. ing lab in John J. Passan Hall Pettit is a bears her name. graduate of Robert C. Friedman, Dallas, is the King’s with a president of Friedman Electric major in politiSupply Co., Wilkes-Barre, and the cal science and River Street a philosophy Jazz Café, minor. He also Wilkes-Barre. holds a law Pettit He previously degree from served on the James E. Beasley School of Council MiserLaw at Temple University, Philaicordia and his delphia. family has established Friedman scholarships to Dominick J. Georgetti, Scranton, support Misericordia students was recently elected partner in and endowed the Pauly and the firm. He has been a member Sidney Friedman Excellence in of the firm since May 2010 and Service Award that is presented

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was named a 201 1 Pennsylvania Super Lawyer under the practice Georgetti area of Personal Injury Defense: Medical Malpractice. Georgetti holds a bachelor’s degree in history from the University of Scranton and a juris doctorate from the University of Dayton School of Law, Ohio.

CENTER FOR AUDIT QUALITY

Philip Santarelli, partner and chief risk officer at ParenteBeard, was recently appointed to the center’s Professional Practice Executive Committee. Santarelli is a member of the Executive Committee of the Private Companies Practice Section of the AICPA and recently completed his term as chair of its Technical Issues Committee. Submit announcements of business promotions, hirings and other events to Corporate Ladder by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250; or by fax to (570) 829-5537. Photos in jpg format may be attached to email.

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

BUSINESS AWARDS

Dallas Township, director of Student Financial Services, was lauded for 25 years with the university. Employees recognized for 20 years of Dr. Leonard J. Boyek, Plymouth, service were: Carl Beecham, Askam, recently received the American OptomeScott Blanchard, Shavertown, Joseph tric Association’s Continuing Optometric Recognition Award for Cipriani, West Wyoming, Charles Edkins, Hunlock Creek, Marie Noel Keller, 2011. Boyek is one of Forty Fort, Cynthia Nardi, Dallas Townonly127 optometrists ship, Pamela Parsnik, Plains Township, nationwide who have Paula Pate-Schloder, Lake Winola, earned this award presented to optome- David Randazza, Wilkes-Barre Township, and Marie Stolarick, Nanticoke. trists who have comHonored for15 years of service were pleted 50 or more credit hours of contin- Darcy Brodmerkel, Shavertown, Denise Boyek uing education in their Miscavage, Lehman Township, Kelley Moran, Harveys Lake, Paul Murphy, field over a one-year period. The ContinLehman Township, and Mark Reboli, uing Optometric Recognition Award can South Abington Township. only be achieved by those optometrists Those recognized for10 years of who have first received the Initial Optomeservice were Allan Austin, Dallas Towntric Recognition award, earned after completing150 hours of continuing educa- ship, Amy Bachman, Northmoreland tion. Boyek is one of only 55 optometrists Township, Helen Bogdon, Lehman nationwide who have received the Contin- Township, William Daniels, Wilkes-Barre, Jennifer Delmar, Shavertown, Eluing Education Award consecutively for izabeth Ann Duffy, Shavertown, Pauli25 or more years. no Gonzalez, Wilkes-Barre, Thomas Mark T. Perry, of The Perry Law Firm, Griffith, Dallas Township, David Kaufwas recently named a Fellow of the Litigaman, Tunkhannock, Diane Madras, tion Counsel of America, a trial lawyer Martin McCarthy, Exeter, Glenn Packhonorary society composed of less than er, Wilkes-Barre, Edward Salijko, Wilkesone-half of1percent of Barre, Christine Somers, Kingston, Roxanne Spears, Trucksville, Barbara American lawyers. Tarence, Noxen, Mark Vitale, Trucksville, Fellowship in the Cosima Wiese, Blakeslee, and Carolyn counsel is based on Yencharis Corcoran, Harveys Lake. effectiveness and Misericordia University recently accomplishment in presented Exemplary Service Awards to litigation, both at the Perry Stephen Cameron, Dallas Borough, trial and appellate levels, as well as superior ethical reputation. facilities maintenance person; Judith Ellis, Kingston, manager, Corporate, Misericordia University recently Government and Foundation Relations; honored staff and faculty for their longBarbara Leggat, Harveys Lake, acting evity at the university. James Calderone director, Center for Adult and Continuing of Kingston, professor of social work, and Ralph Marsh, Forty Fort, a baker for Metz Education; and James Sabulski, WilkesBarre, manager, Print, Duplication and Food Service, were recognized for 30 Mailing Services. years of service and Susan Fronzoni,

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tersenseoftheirexpectedcostseither; many schools have already posted their net price calculators. But they’re far from perfect and aren’t always as straightforward as one might expect. Here’s how to get started: To start, it’s important to understand what exactly the “net price” entails. This is defined as the total cost of attendance — including books, room and board — after the total estimated grantaidaparticularstudentwouldreceive from the school, the state and federal government. Schools are given a lot of leeway in how they arrive at this figure, however. Thismeansthatthecalculatorscanvary significantly in how much financial information they’ll require. The U.S. Department of Education provides a fairly simple template that asks just 10 questions. But schools can use their own or other outside calculators that require more detail information. Even with the more intricate calculators, families shouldn’t have problems answering the questions as long astheyhaveacopyoftheirmostrecent tax forms in hand. Also note that the calculators are designed to give esti-

CEO Continued from Page 1D

low average, so the result has become known as the “Lake Wobegon” effect. It wasn’t until recently, however, that its pervasiveness and impact on executive pay became clear.

Companies have long hid the way they set executive pay, but in late 2006, the Securities and Exchange Commission began compelling companies to disclose the specifics of how they use peer groups to determine executive pay. Since then, researchers have found that about 90 percent of major U.S. companies expressly set their executive pay targets at or

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You would pay $881for a ticket to fly directly out of Philadelphia International on U.S. Airwaysflight728arrivingatLondon’sHeathrow Airport seven hours and15 minutes later. Factor in the price of gas, tolls on the turnpike and parking for the week and you’re likely tacking on a couple of hundred dollars more. Or you can take a 46 minute flight from Wilkes-Barre/Scranton to Philly and catch the same plane to London. For that option you would shell out $845 for the roundtrip, taking the same flight back from London to Philly with the extra flight back to Avoca. The bottom line: Two short extra flights, lower parking, tolls and gas costs and the much quicker, more convenient check in at Avoca, all for $36 less. “Time is huge,” Washo said. “It’s not as hectic here.” Patricia Munley, of Exeter, knows. At the airport last week to pick up her daughter,whowasreturninghomeaftervisiting a friend in Florida, Munley said her family used to fly out of New York-area airports but in recent years the prices at Avoca have come down to the point that they choose to leave Luzerne County to catch a flight fewer than one trip out of four. “Almost always, they’ll be within the difference that we’d pay for gas and parking,” she said.“Sofortheconvenienceofthe20-minute drive here compared to the four-hour round-

above the median of their peer group.Thiscreatesjustthekindsof circumstances that drive pay upward. Moreover, the jump in pay because of peer benchmarking is significant. A chief executive’s pay is more influenced by what his or her “peers” earn than by the company’s recent performance for shareholders, according to two independ-

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 3D trip drive there, I have no problem paying a few extra bucks to fly out of here.” Munley said when the entire family of five flies, however, a difference of $40 per ticket addsupandtheywilloftentakeprice,notconvenience, into consideration. The examples of cheaper flights or those within $40 when leaving from Wilkes-Barre/Scranton rather than Newark or Philadelphia are numerous. Using the departure date of Nov. 4 and return date of Nov.11, the Times Leader review of roundtrip coach ticket costs found: • A U.S. Airways flight from Avoca to Las Vegas, with a layover in Philadelphia heading out and back, is $410. Flying out of Newark, with a layover in Charlotte heading west and Phoenix heading east, will cost $390. • Wilkes-Barre/Scranton to Orlando on U.S. Airways will set you back $382. Drive the two hours to Newark instead and you’ll save only $24. • Heading to the West Coast, why drive east first? Especially since a Delta Airlines roundtrip flight from Avoca to Los Angeles is $340 with a one hour, seven minute layover at the Detroit/Wayne County Airport heading out and a one hour, 20 minute wait at that same airport coming home. Flying from NewarktoLosAngeleswithaonehourlayoverat Cincinnati/NorthernKentuckyAirportheading out and a one hour, 14 minute layover at Memphis International Airport coming back will set you back $374.80, $34.80 more than leaving from Avoca. • A nonstop Delta flight from Avoca to Atlanta’s Jackson-Hartsfield International Airport can be had for $379.40, just $36 more

ent research efforts based on the new disclosures. One was by Michael Faulkender at the University of Maryland and Jun Yang of IndianaUniversity,andanotherwasled by John Bizjak at Texas Christian University. “Peer benchmarking has a significantinfluenceonCEOpay,”Bizjak said. “Basically, you can’t have every CEO paid above average with-

than a nonstop flight out of Philadelphia. Not all cheaper There are plenty of examples of flights not only less expensive from Philadelphia or Newark, but sometimes dramatically cheaper. Mostoftheseareattributabletothefinaldestinations not being served from Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton. In the Times Leader survey, flights to Boston, Dallas and Miami were almost always cheaper when flying out of Newark or Philly, often with prices as little as one-third the cost of departing from Avoca. And there still are flights to cities served directly from Avoca, such as Chicago, that are much more expensive than those from Philadelphia or Newark. Airport Director Barry J. Centini said the airport keeps track of the flight schedules and fares at nearby airports and alerts airlines when they believe there is too great a disparity. To help passengers compare pricing, Centini said the airport has added a “True Cost Calculator” to its flyavp.com website for travelers toseehowmuchaflightoutofPhiladelphiaor NewarkorLehighValleyAirportinAllentown costswhenparking,gasandtollsareincluded. Usingthecalculator,aflightoutofAvocawith aticketpriceof$240withaneedtoparkatthe airport for seven days is cheaper than a flight out of Newark with a ticket price of $50, when parking and fuel costs are factored in. “We’re more convenient, we’re close and our fares are comparable,” Centini said. And people are catching on, he added, noting that flights are up year-to-year and more flights are being added to meet demand.

out pay ratcheting upward over time.” The gap between what workers and top executives make helps explain why income inequality in the United States is reaching levels unseen since the Great Depression. Sincethe1970s,medianpayforexecutives at the nation’s largest companies has more than quadrupled, even after adjusting for inflation, ac-

cording to researchers. Over the sameperiod,payforatypicalnon-supervisory worker has dropped more than10percent,accordingtoBureau of Labor statistics.

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mates; they can’t accurately predict costs to the dollar. It’s also important to note that the aid a school provides in the first year isn’t necessarily guaranteed in following years, even if your financial situation doesn’t change. If the net price calculator isn’t immediately available on the homepage, look underthe“FinancialAid”section,which is usually under an “Admissions” heading.Thecalculatormayalsobelistedunder a different name, such as “financial aid estimator.” Remember that schools aren’t required to post their calculators until later this month. So if you don’t see it right now, check back in a few weeks. Once you’ve located the calculator and entered all your information, you also want to be sure that you’re looking at the right figure. Some schools may also provide a figure called “out-of-pocket cost” or “remaining cost.” Don’t be confused; this is the cost after the school factors in projected income from work and loans. These figures may also combine federal and private loans into one lump sum, even though their interest rates and terms can vary significantly. Even if the calculator spits out a net price that’s slightly out of your reach, don’t be discouraged. The calculator might not have taken into account special circumstances, such as recent unemployment or academic achievements, that could qualify you for more aid.

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TOBYHANNA ARMY DEPOT CAREER DAY: Friday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Hilton Scranton Hotel and Conference Center, 100 Adams Ave., Scranton. Free seminars about federal hiring processes, successful interviewing strategies and networking opportunities, as well as face-to-face time with employers and the opportunity to establish networking contacts. For information or to register, contact Nicole Nelson at 615-8887 or by email at nicole.nelson4@us.army.mil. METROACTION FINANCING YOUR BUSINESS SEMINAR: Oct. 18, 9-1 1 a.m., Hazleton Chamber of Commerce, 20 W. Broad

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OFFICE COACH

BUSINESS AGENDA QUICKBOOKS SEMINAR: Thursday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Wilkes University Small Business Development Center, 7 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. $120 per person. Presented by Tabitha McCormick, C.P.A., C.F.E. and Intuit Certified QuickBooks instructor. Learn how to set up a company file, navigate the program, enter/ pay bills, invoice customers/ receive payment and bank reconciliation. Registration required; call 408-4340.

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St., Hazle Township. $10 per person. Topics include grants, borrowing basics, what lenders look for, credit analysis and available community resources. To register, visit www.MetroAction.org or call 341-0270. NETWORKING MIXER: Oct. 19, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Rodano’s, Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. Free to Wilkes-Barre Chamber members. Reservations required; call Jean Kile at 823-2101 ext. 1 13 or email jeankile@wilkes-barre.org. MAEA DISCOVERY BREAKFAST: Oct. 20, 8-9 a.m., Top of the 80’s restaurant, Hazleton. Free; includes breakfast. Topics include an overview of services that are available to MAEA member companies and testimonials from current members. Registration required; call 622-0992 or email gwhalen@maea.biz. Submit announcements of business meetings, seminars and other events to Business Agenda by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250; or by fax to (570) 8295537. Photos in jpg format may be attached to email.

‘Helicopter parent’ causes friction By MARIE G. MCINTYRE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q: The mother of one of my employees recently called my boss to complain that her daughter, “Angie,� was being overworked. Angie was upset because some required training made it difficult for her to complete her regular duties, so I quickly resolved the problem by changing her training schedule. However, I was completely shocked that Angie had been afraid to talk to me directly and that her mother felt a need to contact my manager. With Angie’s permission, I called her mother, who said she was just worried about her daughter’s health. Apparently, the suggestion to call my boss came from our receptionist, who is a personal friend of Angie’s mother. I don’t understand why the receptionist never told me about this, because we have always had a

great relationship. The fact that all these people have been talking behind my back has me very upset. As Angie’s supervisor, I feel I should have been given more respect. What should I do? A: You need to take a deep breath, calm down, and recognize that this is not some sort of subversive plot. You have simply gotten caught up in a convoluted communication chain. So instead of continuing to fret about recent events, focus on the future and take steps to prevent a recurrence. Regrettably, Angie’s mother appears to be a “helicopter parent� who doesn’t understand that anyone old enough to have finished high school is also old enough to handle her own work issues. To help Angie break the habit of making Mom her mouthpiece, gently explain what she needs to do instead. For example: “Angie, I’m glad we were able to resolve your

one reminder emails about the policy, but this guy is still eating his soup. How do we get him to stop? A: Like many managers, your boss has not yet learned that group warnings never solve individual performance problems. General admonitions are almost always ignored by the actual offenders. To actually enforce the policy, your manager must stop hiding behind “reminder emails� and tell this soup-slurping employee to take his bowl to the Q: My co-worker eats soup in break room. Otherwise, you’ll his cubicle three times a day, de- be hearing that clanking spoon spite the fact that office policy for a long, long time. prohibits eating at your desk. This soup has a very strong, un- Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace pleasant odor, and on top of coach and the author of “Secrets to that, he repeatedly clanks his Winning at Office Politics.� Send in bowl to get every single drop. questions and get free coaching tips Our manager has sent every- at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.

concerns about the training schedule. However, I hope that in the future you’ll come to me directly if you are worried about anything. As your supervisor, my goal is to help you be successful, so we need to discuss any problems you may have.� As for the receptionist, just cut her a little slack. She may have inadvertently stepped on your toes while trying to help a friend, but that’s no reason to ruin a previously great relationship.

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1000 Dunham Drive Dunmore, PA www.nawarhorse.com 570.346.2453 (BIKE) ATV & SxS Demo Ride Rules: These are the rules for Yamaha ATV & SxS demo rides. There are NO EXCEPTIONS and all rules must be followed at all times. 1.) Must have a valid drivers license to drive. 2.) Must fill out entire waiver form. Age Requirements: 1.) ATVs above 250cc rider must be 21 years or older. 2.) Raptor 250 (only 250cc unit available for demo) must be 18 or older to drive by themselves. Can be 16-17 IF parent or guardian is present. 3.) Fill out waiver form and sign Parent/Guardian Permission section of form. 4.) All SxS’s drivers must be 21 or older. Passenger Requirements: 1.) Passengers only allowed in Rhino. 2.) Passengers must be at least 18 years old. 3.) Passengers must be tall eniugh to sit ALL the way back in the seat with both feet FIRMLY on the floor and be able to reach the front passenger hand hold. No exceptions to this rule. 4.) Passengers must fill out their own waiver form. Riding Gear Requirements: 1.) DOT approved Helmet. 2.) Gloves. 3.) Eye Protection (either glasses or goggles) 4.) Long Sleeves. 5.) Long Pants. 6.) Over the Ankle Boots


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 5D

MarketPulse NO MORE PROCRASTINATION Nokia was once a leader in the cell phone industry, but it has been clobbered by innovations from rivals like Apple and Google. Nokia has said it will release its first Windows-based smartphone sometime this quarter. The phone has the best chance at wowing consumers if it's released in time for the start of the November shopping season. But there's a problem: Nokia traditionally doesn't start phone shipments until six months after it has unveiled a new phone. That would mean the earliest the phone could get into customers' hands would be April 2012. Nokia says that's no problem. It's changing its ways and will ship its new phones sooner than it used to.

DRAWING INVESTORS IN The typical investor doesn't know enough about the financial reporting process. At least, that's what the Center for Audit Quality thinks, and has set out to change. The CAQ has developed a three-minute video that's intended to break down how public companies are audited. Perhaps because the subject might be considered less than gripping, the video tells the story through drawings. It features film-noir-style characters with names like Lotta Charts, Indy Pendent, and Johnny Law. At the very least, the trench-coat-draped hero and moody background music inject some glamour into the accounting field.

LESS BAD It's been a bad year for European stocks. Morningstar says all of the developed Europe funds it tracks lost money between the beginning of the year and Sept. 13. But before you pull all of your money from European companies, take a breath: some European stocks rose during that time, like Unilever. The Virtus Greater European Opportunities fund (VGEAX) has more than a third of its assets in Unilever and other consumer companies. That fund has fallen only 3 percent. Unilever sells basics from dried pasta to soap — items people can't do without, even in a downturn. Morningstar says funds that are heavily invested in defensive industries like consumer staples and health care have done better than others. That's true in the U.S. and abroad.

Friday’s close

$5.84

52-week price range $4.82 $11.75 Price-to-earnings ratio: 13

based on past 12 months’ results

Dividend: $1.64 Div. Yield: 7.4% Market value: $20.6b Source: FactSet

Morningstar’s fund picks FAVORITE Mutual European (TEMIX) MORNINGSTAR RATING ONE-YEAR RETURN -10.3% EXPENSE RATIO 1.40% FAVORITE Vanguard European Stock Index (VEUSX) MORNINGSTAR RATING ONE-YEAR RETURN -12.3% EXPENSE RATIO 0.14% Source: Morningstar

Francesca Levy , Kristen Girard • AP

Looking up Matthew Swaim, a portfolio manager at Advisory Research, says stocks may look like even better now than they did in March 2009, when the market hit bottom. Advisory Research has about $6 billion in assets under management, and Swaim helps run its All Cap Value Fund (ADVGX) and its Global Value fund (ADVWX).

InsiderQ&A

Why have stocks struggled lately? Is it because of a potential default in Europe? Europe is the one that has controlled the headlines for the last four or five weeks, Swaim but you can also throw in (fears about a slowdown in) Asian growth and how that develops over the next few years. Not only the growth but the potential overinvestment there: There’s too much capacity, too much inventories in certain areas.

Your global fund keeps about 8.5 percent of the portfolio in Japanese stocks. Those have been either disappointing or overlooked for a few decades now. We just found some good opportunities there from a valuation perspective. There are companies in developed Asia that have access to emerging market growth, whether that be China or other emerging parts of Asia. Japanese companies do have unique assets in Asia, and they’re able to take advantage of that growth. And you’re not paying that (high a price for that). You’re paying a (price-to-earnings) multiple that would suggest they’re only operating in a slower-growth Japan environment. We think we’re getting value prices. Is it frustrating for you to see stocks moving in unison, regardless of their quality? We think that eventually business values will drive the outcome. Ultimately, if the public market won’t value assets properly, management teams will have the ability to monetize the assets at prices that make sense. That means it may play out (through corporate mergers, where acquiring companies will pay a higher price for a company than the stock market will). We’ve been hearing that a big wave of acquisitions is coming, but it hasn’t arrived yet. It has not. We saw a flurry last year. We’ve seen a couple this year, but it’s slowed as banks have pulled back on funding. But you’ve got larger companies that do not see vast (investment) opportunities for their cash. They’re considering returning their capital. One way to do that is to buy assets that have good return potential, and we think that’s (available by buying small and mid-cap companies). Certainly, they have the cash on their balance sheets to execute. Are stocks looking as cheap as they did in March 2009? From a risk-reward standpoint, it’s a better time than March 2009. Balance sheets are healthier. Cost structures are at a place where they’re making good money at even a potentially lower level of sales. So the businesses are lean and mean, and the balance sheets are healthy. If it picks up, as it continues to build off the bottom, these businesses have high return potential, and you don’t have the downside risk of overleveraged balance sheets (like during the recession, when companies were weighed down by more debt) or the liquidation of inventories. In October 2008, you had a lot of retail companies with bloated inventory that were forced to liquidate (and sell their products off at cheap prices). That forced a lot of losses on these companies. But we’re not in that situation now. Inventories are healthy. Balance sheets are healthy. Stocks look pretty cheap.

Mortgage rates fall to record low

Mixed reviews

Why are they selling? Bank of America is swamped by losses from failed mortgages. It’s fighting lawsuits from the government and investors who say the bank should buy back faulty mortgage securities or pay damages. In the first half, the bank paid $12.7 billion to settle such claims. Sellers don’t want to hold the stock because Bank of America doesn’t know how many billions of dollars it ultimately will pay on all the lawsuits. Soros sold 1.2 million Bank of America shares in the second quarter. Paulson and David Tepper of Appaloosa Management each sold half their stock in the same quarter.

The smart money is split on Bank of America. Investors George Soros and John Paulson have sold stock in the nation’s largest bank. Bruce Berkowitz, Thomas Brown and other fund managers are buying. Billionaire investor Warren Buffett has invested $5 billion. The sellers have largely been winning this bet. Bank of America’s stock plunged 44 percent in the third quarter. It’s up 2.6 percent in the fourth but is still at a price not seen since March 2009.

52-WEEK RANGE

15.31

Price-to-earnings ratio: Lost money

based on past 12 months’ results

$64 billion

2010 earnings: -$2.24 b

Change -198%

First half 2010 earnings: $6.31b First half 2011 earnings: -$6.78b

Change -207%

2009 earnings: $2.29 b

PRIME FED Taxable—national avg RATE FUNDS Selected Daily Govt Fund/Cl D FRIDAY 3.25 .13 Tax-exempt—national avg 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 Alpine Municipal MMF/Investor 1 YR AGO 3.25 .13

TICKER

72.26 4

98.01

80.03

3.66

4.8

s

t -12.0 —.18

2

5.9

15

2.9

AWK

23.13 8

31.03

29.37

-0.81

-2.7

s

t 16.1 +27.30

1 17.6a

17

3.1

Amerigas Part LP

APU

36.76 6

51.50

44.42

0.43

1.0

s

t

-9.0 +4.00

2 13.4

28

6.7

Aqua America Inc

WTR

19.28 4

23.79

21.02

-0.55

-2.5

t

t

-6.5 +5.72

2

1.7

21

3.1

Arch Dan Mid

ADM

23.69 2

38.02

25.45

0.64

2.6

t

t -15.4—20.32 4

-5.3

8

2.5

AutoZone Inc

AZO

227.70 9 337.23 324.02

4.83

1.5

s

s 18.9 +39.06

1 24.7

17

...

Bank of America

BAC

-3.6

t

t -55.8—55.37 5 -27.0

...

0.7

Bk of NY Mellon

BK

Bon Ton Store

BONT

CIGNA Corp CVS Caremark Corp

5.13 1

15.31

5.90

-0.22

17.10 1

32.50

17.83

-0.76

-4.1

t

t -41.0—30.95 4

-9.8

8

2.9

3.91 1

17.49

4.75

-0.22

-4.4

t

t -62.5—57.75 5 -30.8

18

4.2

CI

34.33 5

52.95

41.98

0.04

0.1

t

t 14.5 +18.80

1

1.5

7

0.1

CVS

29.45 5

39.50

33.78

0.19

0.6

t

t

2

3.8

14

1.5

CocaCola

KO

58.55 6

71.77

65.90

-1.66

-2.5

t

t

0.2 +13.98

1 10.6

13

2.9

Comcast Corp A

CMCSA 16.91 6

27.16

22.06

1.26

6.1

s

t

0.9 +25.72

1

-1.2

16

2.0

Community Bk Sys

CBU

21.67 2

28.95

23.07

0.38

1.7

s

t -16.9 +3.80

2

3.7

12

4.2

Community Hlth Sys

CYH

14.61 1

42.50

16.49

-0.15

-0.9

t

t -55.9—48.36 5 -14.7

6

...

Entercom Comm

ETM

4.61 1

13.63

5.31

0.06

1.1

s

t -54.1—33.96 4 -21.3

5

...

9

...

Fairchild Semicond

FCS

9.00 3

21.02

12.08

1.28

11.9

s

t -22.6 +30.59

1

-8.1

Frontier Comm

FTR

5.33 2

9.84

5.88

-0.23

-3.8

t

t -39.6—20.79 4

-5.8

Genpact Ltd

G

13.09 4

18.71

14.79

0.40

2.8

t

t

-2.7—17.51 4 22.0a

20

1.2

Harte Hanks Inc

HHS

7.00 2

13.74

7.76

-0.72

-8.5

s

t -39.2—30.39 4 -19.2

11

4.1

Heinz

HNZ

46.99 5

55.00

50.36

-0.12

-0.2

t

t

1.8 +9.00

2

7.0

16

3.8

Hershey Company

HSY

45.67 9

60.96

58.99

-0.25

-0.4

s

s 25.1 +26.03

1

4.1

22

2.3

Kraft Foods

KFT

29.80 7

36.30

33.76

0.18

0.5

t

t

7.1 +11.96

2

2.0

19

3.4

Lowes Cos

LOW

18.07 3

27.45

20.34

1.00

5.2

s

t -18.9 —8.04

3

-5.4

13

2.8

M&T Bank

MTB

66.40 2

91.05

70.82

0.92

1.3

s

t -18.6 —4.23

3

-6.6

10

4.0

McDonalds Corp

MCD

72.14 8

91.22

87.20

-0.62

-0.7

s

s 13.6 +18.17

1 19.4

18

3.2

NBT Bncp

NBTB

17.05 3

24.98

18.89

0.27

1.5

s

t -21.8—10.70 3

-0.9

11

4.2

Nexstar Bdcstg Grp

NXST

4.25 5

10.28

6.81

0.20

3.0

s

t 13.7 +19.26

1

11.2

76

...

PNC Financial

PNC

42.70 3

65.19

47.75

-0.44

-0.9

s

t -21.4 —8.38

3

-5.5

7

2.9

PPL Corp

PPL

24.10 8

29.61

28.10

-0.44

-1.5

s

s

6.8 +6.69

2

1.3

12

5.0

Penn Millers Hldg

PMIC

13.16 0

20.25

20.10

0.01

0.0

t

s 51.9 +38.14

1

...

...

...

Penna REIT

PEI

6.50 1

17.34

7.25

-0.48

-6.2

t

t -50.1—35.87 4 -19.6

...

8.3

PepsiCo

PEP

58.50 2

71.89

61.02

-0.88

-1.4

s

t

-6.6 —4.67

3

1.6

16

3.4

Philip Morris Intl

PM

55.10 6

72.74

65.13

2.75

4.4

t

t

11.3 +20.48

1 17.7a

15

4.7

Procter & Gamble

PG

57.56 7

67.72

63.91

0.73

1.2

s

t

-0.7 +8.43

2

2.8

16

3.3

Prudential Fncl

PRU

42.45 2

67.52

46.02

-0.84

-1.8

t

t -21.6—12.36 3

-8.2

7

2.5

SLM Corp

SLM

10.91 3

17.11

12.56

0.11

0.9

t

t

-0.2 +13.42

1 -23.5

9

3.2

-3.1

37 12.8

SLM Corp flt pfB

SLMpB 38.00 3

60.00

42.45

-1.55

-3.5

t

t

...

0.0

Southn Union Co

SUG

23.60 8

44.65

39.99

-0.58

-1.4

t

t 66.1 +65.81

1 10.0

21

1.5

TJX Cos

TJX

42.55 8

59.72

55.70

0.23

0.4

s

s 25.5 +27.70

1 14.9

17

1.4

UGI Corp

UGI

24.07 3

33.53

26.27

0.00

0.0

t

t -16.8 —6.51

3

4.4

11

4.0

Verizon Comm

VZ

31.60 7

38.95

36.16

-0.14

-0.4

s

t

1.1 +15.77

1

6.3

16

5.5

WalMart Strs

WMT

48.31 6

57.90

53.70

1.80

3.5

s

t

-0.4 -+1.36

2

4.1

12

2.7

Weis Mkts

... 10.9

WMK

36.52 4

42.20

38.40

1.34

3.6

s

t

-4.8 +1.96

2

2.2

15

3.0

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).

Stock Screener

SOURCE: Deutsche Bank; FactSet

FRIDAY YIELD

1WK

0.01 0.16 0.02 0.29 1.08

-0.01 -0.01 -0.03 0.04 0.12

r s t s s

r t t t t

-0.10 -0.05 -0.14 -0.05 -0.05

0.16 0.34 0.20 0.83 2.39

0.07 0.01 0.16 0.78

10-year T-Note 2.07 30-year T-Bond 3.02 Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.

0.15 0.11

s t

t -0.32 t -0.69

3.72 4.77

1.72 2.72

52-WK HIGH LOW

t 0.00 t -0.52 s 0.47 t 0.11 s 2.31 t -0.19

3.29 5.31 4.22 5.95 10.15 2.46

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

FRIDAY NAV

WK CHG

4WK

American Funds BalA m ABALX American Funds BondA m ABNDX American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX BlackRock GlobAlcC m MCLOX BlackRock GlobAlcI d MALOX Dodge & Cox Income DODIX Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX Fidelity Bal FBALX Fidelity Contra FCNTX Fidelity DivrIntl d FDIVX Fidelity Free2020 FFFDX Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX Fidelity Puritan FPURX Fidelity Spartan 500IdxInv x FUSEX FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX Permanent Portfolio PRPFX T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX Vanguard 500Inv VFINX Vanguard GNMA VFIIX Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX Vanguard InflaPro VIPSX Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX Vanguard STCor VFSTX Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX Vanguard TotIntl d VGTSX Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX Vanguard Welltn VWELX Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX

17.22 12.41 47.41 30.91 34.64 32.84 27.28 15.78 25.35 25.31 26.08 17.92 16.70 18.01 13.15 29.38 94.11 17.45 63.35 25.25 12.96 79.69 33.35 16.95 40.92 1.97 1.99 12.79 12.76 51.47 26.04 10.70 10.70 10.70 10.70 45.95 21.17 29.70 53.59 9.60 106.49 106.48 11.10 11.10 14.05 105.78 105.78 13.67 10.62 10.62 11.86 10.94 10.94 13.14 28.69 28.69 28.68 29.54 51.03 23.66

+.25 -.09 +.52 +.61 +.44 +.80 +.61 +.14 +.66 +.43 +.43 +.15 +.14 +.15 -.11 +.59 +2.27 +.16 +.96 +.46 +.12 +1.99 +.55 +.13 +.68 -.01 -.01 +.10 +.11 +1.34 +.42 -.09 -.09 -.09 -.09 +.35 +.47 +.76 +1.41 -.08 +2.31 +2.30 -.06 -.06 +.07 +2.29 +2.29 -.17 -.04 -.04 +.15 -.09 -.09 +.22 +.62 +.61 +.61 +.34 +.61 +.53

-2.6 -1.1 -2.6 -4.4 -7.7 -4.9 -5.4 -2.5 -2.5 -5.5 -2.3 -5.9 -5.9 -5.9 -1.6 -5.7 -4.3 -3.2 -5.1 -8.0 -4.4 -5.1 -4.6 -3.6 -3.4 -3.8 -3.8 -7.0 -7.0 -6.6 -3.8 -2.7 -2.7 -2.6 -2.7 -6.9 -3.3 -5.4 -4.5 -1.1 -3.4 -3.4 -.6 -.6 -.3 -3.4 -3.4 -1.1 -.7 -.7 -3.9 -.5 -.5 -8.0 -4.1 -4.1 -4.2 -1.8 -1.8 -2.9

2.15 3.79 3.36 4.86 6.61 0.96

52-WK HIGH LOW

RETURN/RANK 1YR 5YR +2.9/A +2.4/C -.4/B -9.1/D -13.6/D -1.9/D -2.6/E +1.6/A -2.2/D -5.5/C +4.4/A -3.2/C -3.8/C -2.9/C +2.2/C -13.8/D -3.3/D +2.1/A +1.9/C -11.6/C -.2/B +7.4/A +1.9/A +1.6/A +1.7/A -1.4/E -1.9/E -2.1/E -1.8/E -9.8/B -.1/C -1.1/E -.9/E -.7/E -1.0/E +6.4/A -.9/B +2.3/C +4.0/B +2.3/C +1.8/A +1.7/B +5.6/A +5.7/A +8.3/A +1.8/A +1.8/A +2.2/B +.7/B +.8/B -.2/A +3.9/A +3.9/A -13.1/D +1.5/B +1.4/B +1.3/B +1.3/B +1.4/B +.6/B

+1.9/B +3.5/E +1.3/C -.2/B -.5/A +.1/A -.7/D +1.4/B -1.4/C +1.3/A -.7/A +4.0/B +3.2/B +4.3/A +6.3/B -1.8/A -4.5/D +2.0/B +2.4/A -3.4/C +1.2/B +4.3/A +2.3/A +1.7/B -1.0/B +2.4/C +2.0/D +10.0/A +10.3/A +.8/A +3.8/A +7.2/A +7.4/A +7.7/A +7.4/A +9.2/A -1.5/B +.8/B +4.8/A +6.5/B -.9/B -1.0/B +6.8/A +6.9/A +7.0/B -.9/B -.9/B +4.6/A +4.4/B +4.5/A +1.2/B +6.4/B +6.5/B -2.0/B -.4/B -.4/B -.5/B +3.1/A +3.2/A -2.1/B

Rank: Fund’s letter grade compared with others in the same performance group; an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.

COMPANY

TICKER

CLOSE

BETA VS. EURO

Kohl's WellPoint Intuit Southwest Airlines Time Warner Cable Starbucks CareFusion Kroger Sprint Nextel M&T Bank BB&T Sherwin-Williams Clorox Progress Energy Paychex

KSS WLP INTU LUV TWC SBUX CFN KR S MTB BBT SHW CLX PGN PAYX

49.51 63.95 47.24 7.57 66.38 38.05 24.23 22.14 2.86 70.07 21.00 79.16 65.82 49.53 26.24

0.3 0.2 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.4 0.4 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2

Data through Oct.5

s t s t s s

TICKER

GROUP, FUND

APD

lead to a recession. The concerns have already hurt the value of the euro, which is worth $1.34, down from $1.43 at the end of 2009. The stocks in this screen have also shown little reaction to swings in the euro’s value. That’s measured by what’s known as the stocks’ beta against the euro. A stock with a beta of 1.0 relative to the euro means that the two tend to move together. A stock with a beta of 0.5 relative to the euro tends to fall just 1 percent when the euro falls 2 percent. All of these stocks have a beta of less than 0.5 relative to the euro over the last five years.

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

MutualFunds

Amer Water Works

Europe still looks like a mess, so it may pay to look for U.S. companies that have little to do with the continent. This screen from Deutsche Bank shows companies that get zero sales from Europe. That’s a bigger deal than it used to be: S&P 500 companies made $666.4 million in revenue from Europe last year, up from $516.7 million in 2009. Those sales could be in trouble. Greece has borrowed so much that investors worry that a default is inevitable. That would trigger losses for European banks that own the bonds. It could also

0.09 -0.02 0.16 0.06 0.59 0.10

3-month T-Bill 1-year T-Bill 6-month T-Bill 2-year T-Note 5-year T-Note

Air Products

Avoiding Europe

0.01 0.08 $ 2,500 min (888) 785-5578

2.45 3.99 3.98 4.98 9.87 1.19

TREASURYS

52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN RANK %RTN LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD

-2.8 +7.07

0.01 0.12 $ 10,000 min (800) 243-1575

1WK

Broad market Lehman Triple-A corporate Moody’s Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman Municipal Bond Buyer U.S. high yield Barclays Treasury Barclays

LocalStocks COMPANY

MIN INVEST PHONE

YIELD

FRIDAY YIELD

U.S. BOND INDEXES

Bank of America is the cheapest among large U.S. banks. It’s also selling assets to raise capital to improve its balance sheet. So buyers are speculating it might spin off its profitable Merrill Lynch investment bank. Thomas Brown, CEO of hedge fund Second Curve Capital, is buying after criticizing Bank of America in the past for making big acquisitions like Merrill. “It’s still too big, but getting smaller, which is a good thing,” he says. Buffett paid $5 billion for preferred shares that will earn him an annual dividend of 6 percent. He also has an option to purchase 700 million shares of common stock. Berkowitz of Fairholme Capital Management bought 7 million shares in the second quarter. He now has 99 million and is one of the bank’s 10 largest shareholders. At Thursday’s closing price, his stake is worth $621.7 million.

Thursday’s close: $6.28

Market value:

Money market mutual funds

Why are they buying?

Bank of America (BAC) $5.13

InterestRates

The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage fell to 3.94 percent last week. It’s the first time the rate has been below 4 percent, Freddie Mac says. Mortgage rates often rise and fall with the yield on the 10-year Treasury note, which has been mostly falling this year. But the 10-year yield rose slightly last week after employers added more jobs in September than economists expected.

AVG. BROKER RATING*

P/E RATIO

1.3 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.0 2.0 2.0

13 9 24 12 16 25 19 12 -10 16 18 30 17 18

*1=buy;2=hold;3=sell

p p p p

Dow industrials

+1.7% WEEKLY

Nasdaq

+2.7% WEEKLY

LARGE-CAP

S&P 500

+2.1% WEEKLY

SMALL-CAP

Russell 2000

+1.9% WEEKLY

p q p q p q q q

+1.0%

MO -4.1%

YTD +0.5%

MO -6.5%

YTD +0.1%

MO -8.1%

YTD

-2.6%

MO -16.3%

YTD


CMYK SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

Together, we’ll get through this. We’re working to help our neighbors affected by the recent flooding.

Flood Relief Loan Program

In an effort to speed recovery, Pennstar Bank is offering a special Flood Relief Loan Program. Special rates and flexible terms are available for personal and business installment loans. Additional personal loan options are available including discounts on auto, fixed-rate home equity and mortgage loans.

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866.4STAR.PA

3.00

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Pennstar Bank is a division of NBT Bank, N.A. Member FDIC

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CMYK

THE TIMES LEADER

VIEWS

SECTION

timesleader.com

E

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

KEVIN BLAUM

COMMENTARY

IN THE ARENA

PETER GOLDMARK

Can teams lend new tread to the Motor City?

Stop trying to dismantle government

CHRIS CHRISTIE of New Jersey, not surprisingly, chose to remain in Trenton rather than seek the Republican presidential nomination. A day later Sarah Palin, not surprisingly, was incoherent when stating her intentions. Last week, payroll processor ADP said 91,000 private sector jobs were created in September. And, while the Ford Motor Co., not surprisingly, was announcing a 9 percent increase for U.S. vehicle sales, its hometown Detroit Lions were inexplicably undefeated at 4 and 0. Gov. Christie, former Gov. Palin and September job figures are newsworthy. But Detroit’s Lions have not seen a 4-and-0 start since 1980 when President Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan were racing toward the finish line. The Detroit Lions have energized a city that enjoys a rich history and, like its NFL franchise, might finally be on the rebound after decades of decline. Next year historical remembrances of the United States’ second war with England will stretch from New Orleans to Detroit and into Canada. They will take place in locations including Washington, D.C., where British troops burned the home of Dolly and President Madison; in Baltimore where bombs bursting in air gave proof through the night that England’s assault upon Fort McHenry had failed; and on Lake Erie, where American naval forces on Oct. 9, 1812 initiated the essential retaking of Her Majesty’s Ship “Detroit.” Originally christened the USS Adams, the British renamed her HMS Detroit after the American fort and settlement they also had captured. The encampment Detroit was constructed on a river that along with the St. Clair River forms the indispensable strait connecting Lake Erie and Lake Huron. Its remarkable geographic location, a fortuitous accident of nature, would become a military, trading and economic gold mine. Detroit, the French word for “strait,” was founded in 1701 by Antonine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac. The Great Lakes and navigable rivers were once America’s premiere interstate highway system. Nary a vessel of any consequence could traverse the Great Lakes and reach the Atlantic Ocean or, leaving the Atlantic, reach the Great Lakes without passing through Detroit. Fort, settlement and city, Detroit has been the Motor City, the Paris of the west and Motown. During World War II, President Roosevelt called its industrial might, “the arsenal of democracy.” Today Detroit holds the distinction of being the only U.S. city to have had more than a million residents, but no longer. In the last decade alone it lost an incredible 238,000 residents, 25 percent of its population. With its numbers plummeting to 713,777 Detroit is the 18th largest city in the United States. As the Lions go, so goes Detroit? The Tigers vanquished the New York Yankees on Thursday night, and Dave Bing, 67, the former NBA star of the Detroit Pistons and a self-made steel mogul was recently elected mayor. He is considering various ideas for right-sizing his expansive city of 144 square miles and hundreds of abandoned square blocks. In addition, a recent article in “USA Today” suggests the Sun Belt boom with its money, jobs and corresponding increase in reapportioned congressional districts might be reaching an end. Migration to the South and West has slowed considerably. In the fall of 1956 Detroit was the fifth largest city in the United States. Its population of 1.9 million was booming, and the Detroit Lions under Bobby Layne and Howard “Hopalong” Cassidy were … 5 and 0. Monday night, for the first time in 55 years, the Detroit Lions could again be 5 and 0. They host the visiting Chicago Bears. Oh my. Best of luck, Mayor Bing. Go, Lions!

THERE WAS A moment in one of the Republican debates last month when candidate Ron Paul said: “9/11 came about because there was too much government.” That statement is flat-out delusional — yet not one of the other candidates challenged the Texas congressman’s point. I want to challenge Paul and others who think that way. I want to challenge those politicians who seek to unravel the American system of government. Some of the trademarks of this thinking are: a willingness or eagerness to see the federal government default on its debt obligations or shut down for lack of funding; a belief that all taxation is bad, that the less we have of any kind of taxation, the better off we will be; and a stance that suggests the federal government is the source of everything that is wrong with our country. We forget sometimes what other people and countries around the world admire about the United States. It’s not our military power — there’ve been other empires with huge armies and navies. It’s not our commercial strength that commands respect — there have been and will be other commercial powers as successful as the United States, and as a matter of fact, there is one emerging now — China — that is bidding to surpass us. If the economic geniuses in the tea party succeed in pushing the American economy into a serious depression, China may just be able to do it. What sets us apart, and what others have admired since our founding, is our system of government: its individual liberties, its limited government with checks and balances, its flexibility and capacity for pragmatic innovation, and the rule of law. I’ve talked with people in Europe, Asia, Africa and most recently in the Balkans. Many of them would like — many of them have risked their lives — to live under a system of government like ours. They find it incredible that there’s now a major political group in the United States that wants to unravel our system of government. Proposing or opposing a particular plan, policy, law or aspect of government is legitimate — indeed, that kind of criticism and debate is central to our system and is one of the things that makes it so strong. But trying to take down the system itself — that is extremist and destructive. That’s what the communists, for example, tried to do. The behavior of many who march in the name of the tea party suggests that they want to turn their back on what made us great. Some of them want to abolish the Federal Reserve, which has been admired around the world as the anchor of sensible monetary policy for a century — keeping the banking sector honest and fighting inflation. Others are beginning to question legal as well as illegal immigration, when ours is a country built on the import of tough, innovative talent willing to cast their lot with a young democracy. I don’t mind the rough and tumble of politics, and I don’t even mind a little loud rhetoric and healthy exaggeration. But if you want to undo Social Security, tell everyone they have to get health care totally on their own, abolish the Federal Reserve and think it’s OK for the United States to default on its debts, then I say you are trying to take apart the American government. The line the extreme right spouts is an incantation. Its adherents argue that cutting taxes will create jobs, but they don’t have any research to support that. The biggest advances in America have come when we’ve paid attention to the facts and acted pragmatically and innovatively. We’re in deep trouble now, and magic potions won’t cut it. The presence of a significant movement in our midst that seeks to paralyze or take apart the American government is the single biggest threat today to what we need most: a common effort to adopt practical solutions to the huge economic problems that face us. Before we are done, each of us will have to decide which side we are on.

Kevin Blaum’s column on government, life and politics appears every Sunday. Contact him at kblaum@timesleader.com.

Cathy Wieschhoff, left, and her partner Jessica Bollinger, right, with their 11-year-old son, Lucas Bollinger, photographed at sunrise on their farm in Lexington, Ky.

MCT PHOTOS

Gay couples, advocates fight for recognition By CURTIS TATE

McClatchy Newspapers

ASHINGTON — Now that the U.S. military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy is history, gay rights advocates and their supporters in Congress and the Obama administration are shifting their focus to repealing state and federal laws that define marriage as between one man and one woman. While six states and the District of Columbia allow same-sex marriage and several other states provide varying degrees of legal recognition to same-sex couples, including civil unions and domestic partnerships, the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act prevents the federal government from recognizing legal same-sex marriages from any state. Rep. David Price, D-N.C., a leading co-sponsor of repeal legislation, said the law “will look more and more anachronistic as more states adopt gay marriage.” President Barack Obama, while stopping short of a full endorsement of same-sex marriage, told one of the nation’s leading gay rights organizations last week that he would work to repeal the law. Earlier this year, his Justice Department said it would stop defending it in court. “I believe the law runs counter to the Constitution, and it’s time for it to end once and for all,” Obama said at the Human Rights Campaign’s annual dinner Saturday in Washington. “It should join ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ in the history books.” The U.S. Census Bureau announced last week that it had counted 646,000 same-sex couples across the country in 2010. Though one in five of these couples identified themselves as married, many live in states that offer limited or no legal recognition of their partnerships. That complicates many routine matters for gay couples, from child custody to inheritance to immigration. “The vast majority of gay people identifying themselves as married actually are married or are in a legal relationship,” said Evan Wolfson, the founder of Freedom to Marry, a New Yorkbased gay rights organization. “They’re doing

Jessica Bollinger checks a spelling quiz done by her son, Lucas Bollinger, on their farm in Lexington, Ky.

the best they can under the imperfect law to get legal respect for their committed relationships.” Federal law permits states to define marriage any way they choose, and 37 of the 50 states have defined marriage as between one man and one woman. Same-sex marriage opponents would like to keep it that way. In 2008, they successfully overturned courtordered same-sex marriage in California by taking the issue to voters; Proposition 8 passed with 52 percent of the vote. Last year, a federal district judge struck down the voter-approved law in an ongoing case that likely will end up before the U.S. Supreme Court. “We’re supposed to have a representative form of government where voters ultimately make these decisions, not one where judges make soSee MARRIAGE, Page 6E

Peter Goldmark, a former publisher of the International Herald Tribune, headed the climate program at the Environmental Defense Fund. He wrote this for Newsday.


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➛ S E R V I N G T H E P U B L I C T R U S T S I N C E 18 81

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Editorial

OTHER OPINION: PROTESTS

Occupy Wall St. touches a nerve

T

HE discombobulated tive Jon Shirley, who was hostprotest known as Oc- ing President Obama on a recampaign-fundraising cupy Wall Street in- cent spires more curiosity trip through Seattle and the than solidarity, but it captures West Coast. Shirley expressed a frustration with America’s fi- disappointment with adminisnancial industry that is broad tration reticence on economic reform – especially ensuring and deep. Conversations in communi- that banks never again get ties and households across the “too big to fail.” From Seattle’s spinoff in country simmer with anger over the stunning lack of ac- Westlake Park to Wall Street’s countability to come out of the Zuccotti Park, the complaints are the same: Too little has collapse of the economy. The Great Recession was been done to protect against the behaviors grounded in the that tanked the abuse of lending and Ultimately, economy. accounting practices accountability is Ultimately, acfrom Wall Street to grounded in the countability is Main Street. Such begrounded in the havior enriched secu- ballot box, not ballot box, not rities and mortgage confrontations confrontations brokers and bank ex- with New York with New York ecutives. It sustained City police. City police. Sucthe politicians who cess for Occupy rewrote laws and fended off government over- Wall Street turns on coherent sight, if and when compliant leadership and a focused agenregulators mustered any curi- da to challenge the administration and Congress to reosity. The mostly young people store vigorous financial overwho rallied to Manhattan’s fi- sight. The travesty of the Great nancial district will suffer the consequences of the past dec- Recession and its wretched exade for the rest of their adult cesses is the harm done to the lives as employees and con- ability of ordinary Americans to buy homes, pay for schoolsumers. Homebuyers, credit- and ing and secure their futures. Occupy Wall Street is not a debit-card users, and all forms of consumers are paying bloat- day in the park – or two weeks. ed fees to help fatten banks al- It must be targeted and specifready bailed out by taxpayers. ic. Going after “too big to fail” Seattle Times reporter Jim is a start. The key theme is acBrunner had a revealing chat countability. with former Microsoft execuThe Seattle Times

QUOTE OF THE DAY “This is going to be a tough year …” Kristen Huff The United Way of Wyoming Valley’s vice president of resource development and strategic planning announced the resumption last week of the group’s flood-interrupted annual fundraising campaign. The fund drive in 2010 raised more than $4 million. Donate online at www.unitedwaywb.org or call (570) 829-6711.

OTHER OPINION: THE CHILD-AVERSE

A ban on brats? They’re not kiddin’

A

FTER A Pennsylvania restaurant made headlines this summer by banning children under age 6, the Yahoo! Shine website asked its readers: “Are kid-free restaurants a great idea or flat-out wrong?” Responders skipped right over the real question to list the many other places where children shouldn’t be allowed. Movie theaters. Grocery stores. Airplanes. Disney World. That last one was a joke ... we think. In four days, the site got more than 20,000 comments. The biggest camps by far were the people who are fed up with small people who whine, cry, run around and poop their pants in public and the people whose own children never, ever do any of that. Lost in the din were the normal parents of normal children. All they ask is a little indulgence: Do we have to limit our dining options to Chuck E. Cheese? The no-kids-allowed movement, aka the Brat Ban, is gaining momentum, driven by quiet-seeking adults who want to prohibit children from ev-

erything from concerts to public transportation to Facebook. Demographics tell the story: The United States has more empty-nesters and more childless couples than ever before. One in five women choose not to have children. There is a growing list of options for the child-averse: Adult swim. Theaters that have separate kids and no-kids screenings of the same movie. And yes, kid-free restaurants. Some Whole Foods stores have child-free shopping hours, with activities to keep the kids busy while the grownups forage for cage-free eggs. For a real getaway, there’s leavethembehind.com, a website that specializes in kid-free vacation destinations. But sometimes there’s no escape. On airplanes, for example. Frequent-flying moms have learned to carry big packages of foam earplugs to share with seatmates. There are few things more unnerving than being trapped in a flying tube with a screaming infant. But babies have to go places, too. Chicago Tribune

Our nanny state government feeds the ‘hunger’ hoax TWENTY YEARS ago, hysteria swept through the news media over “hunger in America.” Dan Rather opened a CBS Evening News broadcast in 1991 declaring, “one in eight American children is going hungry tonight.” Newsweek, the Associated Press and the Boston Globe repeated this statistic, and many others joined the chorus, with or without that unsubstantiated statistic. When the Centers for Disease Control and the Department of Agriculture examined people from a variety of income levels, however, they found no evidence of malnutrition among those in the lowest income brackets. Nor was there any significant difference in the intake of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients from one income level to another. That should have been the end of that hysteria. But the same “hunger in America” theme reappeared years later, when Sen. John Edwards was running for vice president. And others have resurrected that same claim, right up to the present day. Ironically, the one demonstrable nutritional difference between the poor and others is that low-income women tend to be overweight more often than others. That might not seem like much to make a political issue, but politicians and the media have created hysteria over less.

COMMENTARY THOMAS SOWELL The political left has turned obesity among low-income individuals into an argument that low-income people cannot afford nutritious food, and so have to resort to burgers and fries, pizzas and the like, which are more fattening and less healthful. But this attempt to salvage something from the “hunger in America” hoax collapses like a house of cards when you stop and think about it. Burgers, pizzas and the like cost more than food that you can buy at a store and cook yourself. If you can afford junk food, you can certainly afford healthier food. An article in the New York Times on Sept. 25 by Mark Bittman showed that you can cook a meal for four at half the cost of a meal from a burger restaurant. So far, so good. But then Bittman says that the problem is “to get people to see cooking as a joy.” For this, he says, “we need action both cultural and political.” In other words, the nanny state to the rescue! Since when are adult human beings supposed to do only those things that are a joy? I don’t find any particular joy in putting on my shoes. But I do it rather than go barefoot. I don’t always find it a joy to drive a

car, especially in bad weather, but I have to get from here to there. An arrogant elite’s condescension toward the people – treating them as children who have to be jollied along – is one of the poisonous problems of our time. It is at the heart of the nanny state and the promotion of a debilitating dependency that wins votes for politicians while weakening a society. Those who see social problems as requiring high-minded people like themselves to come down from their Olympian heights to impose their superior wisdom on the rest of us, down in the valley, are behind such things as the hunger hoax, which is part of the larger poverty hoax. We now have reached the point where the great majority of the people living below the official poverty level have such things as air-conditioning, microwave ovens, either videocassette recorders or DVD players, and own either a car or a truck. Those who believe in an expansive, nanny state government need a large number of people in “poverty” to justify their programs. They also need a large number of people dependent on government to provide the votes needed to keep the big nanny state going. Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. His website is www.tsowell.com.

We may not like it, but sometimes we must pull together ONE OF the many barriers to recovery from a financial crisis is that prudent people end up having to pay for the greed and stupidity of others. It’s not fair. But it’s inevitable. When the federal government launches a big stimulus package, for example, it must sooner or later tax the lucky and the prudent (the only people with money) to pay for it. Similarly, when the Federal Reserve drives interest rates down near zero to keep the economy afloat, savers find that they are earning almost nothing on their nest eggs. It’s as if we imposed a tax on prior thrift, and sent the proceeds to reckless banks and profligate consumers. Of course, some in need of help are victims of misfortune. But often it’s hard to sort the culpable from the blameless. Are homeowners to blame for borrowing too much? What if they didn’t understand the loan? Or got laid off? The prudent feel entitled to be resentful, but perhaps they too are merely lucky in their prudence. Ultimately it makes no difference. There’s just no getting around the need to have some people pay for others at times if we’re to head off a complete economic collapse. As it turns out, that’s especially problematic in America. Indeed, even before the financial crisis, Americans have been less willing than voters in other affluent countries to approve social

COMMENTARY DANIEL AKST safety-net programs. Why? Americans traditionally believe that people’s economic troubles are of their own making. In a famous study titled “Why Doesn’t the United States Have a EuropeanStyle Welfare State?,” the economists Alberto Alesina, Edward Glaeser and Bruce Sacerdote pointed out that in Europe, the poor are overwhelmingly considered unfortunate. In America, they are perceived as lazy. The American notion that we each make our own fate is probably useful in motivating us to work hard. But it’s not so helpful when there is no work. Sadly, our racial and ethnic diversity probably makes us particularly unwilling to bail one another out. Diversity is often seen as an American strength, and there is evidence that it promotes innovation and productivity, which makes all of us richer. But the political scientist Robert Putnam has found that diversity also undermines trust, voluntarism, political engagement and community involvement. Even members of the same ethnic group reported lower trust in more diverse areas. These findings were a source of anguish to Putnam, who struggled to see if they could be

explained by other factors. But they couldn’t, and other studies yield similar results. Greater diversity is linked with lower census response rates, for instance, and lower school funding – both indicators of civic-mindedness. America is growing more ethnically and racially diverse. It is already a lot more diverse than it was a generation ago. And in all likelihood, this plays a role in our reluctance to help one another with a more extensive social safety net. As Alesina and his colleagues put it, “Racial heterogeneity within the United States is one of the most important reasons why the welfare state in America is small.” But why don’t people like to help those who are different? It’s not just racism. Humans probably evolved to make sharp distinctions between those in the clan and those not. Red Sox and Yankees fans do the same, regardless of race. In the long run, intermarriage might turn the American mosaic back into a melting pot. For now, voters are more likely to support the kind of universal programs they perceive as insurance rather than welfare, which is reserved for the neediest. Social Security is an example. We pay for one another. Yet we support it anyway, because we’re all in it together. Daniel Akst, a columnist for Newsday, is the author of “We Have Met the Enemy: Self-Control in an Age of Excess” from Penguin Press.

Editorial Board RICHARD L. CONNOR Editor and Publisher JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor

MARK E. JONES Editorial Page Editor PRASHANT SHITUT President/Impressions Media

RICHARD L. CONNOR Editor and Publisher PRASHANT SHITUT President

JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor RICHARD DEHAVEN Vice President/Circulation

ALLISON UHRIN Vice President/ Chief Financial Officer


CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

F

O

Sixty nanoseconds to an altered universe “We don’t allow fasterthan-light neutrinos in here,” says the bartender. A neutrino walks into a

bar. – Joke circulating on the Internet

THE WORLD as we know it is on the brink of disintegration, on the verge of dissolution. No, I’m not talking about the collapse of the euro, of international finance, of the Western economies, of the democratic future, of the unipolar moment, of the American dream, of French banks, of Greece as a going concern, of Europe as an idea, of Pax Americana. I am talking about something far more important. Which is why it probably only made the back pages of your newspaper, if it made it at all. Scientists at CERN (the European highenergy physics consortium) have announced the discovery of a particle that can travel faster than light. Neutrinos fired 454 miles from a supercollider outside Geneva to an underground laboratory in Gran Sasso, Italy, took less time (60 nanoseconds less) than light to get there. Or so the physicists think. Or so they measured. Or so they have concluded after seemingly checking for every possible artifact and experimental error. The implications of such a discovery are so mind boggling, however, that these same scientists immediately requested that other labs around the world try to replicate the experiment. Something must have been wrong to account for a result that, if we know anything about the universe, is impossible. And that’s the problem. It has to be impossible because, if not, everything we know about the universe is wrong. The fundamental axiom of Einstein’s theory of relativity is the absolute prohibition on speed faster than light. Einstein’s predictions about how time slows and mass increases as one approaches the speed of light have been verified by a mountain of experimental evidence. As velocity increases, mass approaches infinity and time slows to zero, making it progressively and, ultimately, infinitely difficult to achieve light speed. Which is why nothing does. And nothing ever has. Until two weeks ago Thursday. That’s when the results were announced. To oversimplify grossly: If the Gran Sasso scien-

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ANOTHER VIEW

A photograph by Don Carey and words by Mark E. Jones

COMMENTARY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER tists had a plate to record the arrival of the neutrinos and a super-powerful telescope to peer (through the Alps!) directly into the lab in Geneva from which they were being fired, the Gran Sasso guys would have “heard” the neutrinos clanging against the plate before they observed the Geneva guys squeeze the trigger on the neutrino gun. Sixty nanoseconds before, to be precise. Wrap your mind around that one. It’s as if someone told you that yesterday at drive time Topeka was released from Earth’s gravity. These things don’t happen. Natural laws don’t just expire between shifts at McDonald’s. Not that there aren’t already mysteries in physics. Neutrinos themselves are ghostly particles that travel through nearly everything unimpeded.But that is simplicity itself compared to quantum mechanics, whose random arbitrariness so offended Einstein that he famously objected that God does not play dice with the universe. Aphorisms don’t trump reality, however. They are but a frail, poignant protest against a Nature that disdains the most cherished human notions of order and elegance, truth and beauty. But if quantum mechanics was a challenge to human sensibilities, this pesky Swiss-Italian neutrino is their undoing. It means that Einstein’s relativity – a theory of uncommon beauty upon which all of physics has been built for 100 years – is wrong. Not just inaccurate. Not just flawed. But deeply, fundamentally, indescribably wrong. It means that the “standard model” of subatomic particles that stands at the center of all modern physics is wrong. Nor does it stop there. This will not just overthrow physics. Astronomy and cosmology measure time and distance in the universe on the assumption of light speed as the cosmic limit. Their foundations will shake as well. But there must be some error. Because otherwise everything changes. We shall need a new physics. A new cosmology. Why? Because you can’t have neutrinos getting kicked out of taverns they have not yet entered. Charles Krauthammer’s email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.

utumn weekends in certain parts of Pennsylvania reverberate not with a A football stadium’s roar but a bull elk’s bugle. Both sites sport eager boys seeking to be the center of attention.

How Amanda Knox became Italy’s scapegoat AMANDA Knox is nothing if not a good story. The pretty young American who headed to Italy for her junior year abroad, fell for an Italian boy and then landed in the dock with him, accused, convicted and then exonerated on charges of murdering another young woman in a sex game gone wild. Knox was never one of the usual suspects. Her roommate, Meredith Kercher, a British exchange student, was found on the night after Halloween 2007, raped, with her throat slit, in the Perugia apartment they shared. When I went to Perugia in 2009, as Knox’s testimony began, to research a book on the case, I didn’t know whether she was guilty as charged, but I was certainly willing to believe it. Either way, it was a textbook example of our never-ending fascination with the supposed femme fatale. Men might batter wives and girlfriends daily, sometimes to death, but their “perp walks” rarely make it onto Nancy Grace’s show, let alone through a second cycle of the local news. “Foxy Knoxy” (as she called herself on her MySpace page), on the other hand, has been a continual headline

COMMENTARY NINA BURLEIGH grabber from the moment of her arrest. After a few weeks in Perugia, I saw that there was something very wrong with the narrative of the murder that the authorities and the news media were presenting. There was almost no material evidence linking Knox or her boyfriend to the murder, and no motive, while there was voluminous evidence – material and circumstantial – implicating a third person, a man, whose name one almost never read in accounts of the case. It became clear that it wasn’t facts but Knox – her femaleness, her Americaness, her beauty – that was driving the case. In person, in prison and in the media, Knox was subjected to all manner of outlandish, misogynistic behavior. A prison “doctor” (he has never stepped forward publicly) tested a sample of Knox’s blood and then informed her she was HIV-positive, prompting Knox to list every man she’d had sex with. Authorities passed the names of seven men to reporters from the British tabloid pack, who printed it. Soon thereafter, Knox was told the doctor was mistaken

and she didn’t have AIDS. Outside prison walls, Italian criminologists were opining in the media and eventually on the witness stand that because the body had been covered with a blanket, the killer was surely female because such an act was evidence of feminine “pieta.” Finally, there were the prosecution’s operatic closing arguments, repeated almost verbatim in the appeal that ended last week. Knox was a “luciferina” – a she-devil – capable of a special, female duplicity. She was “dirty on the inside.” Always, even from the defense lawyers, the closing arguments ended with appeals to God, in a medieval courtroom with a peeling fresco of the Madonna on the wall and a crucifix hanging above the judge. The prosecution’s “angel-faced killer” had arrived in Italy a few months after turning 20, a high school ugly duckling who blossomed into a beauty in college and was still testing her effect on men. She appeared outwardly confident, but, according to people I interviewed, she was deeply averse to conflict. She was also a compulsive diarist, explaining herself in rounded handwriting filling hundreds of journals. She thought of herself as a writer. But that penchant for unfiltered self-expression hastened

her demise. In her “prison diary,” a document police handed to reporters after she’d scribbled in it for a month, Knox was often upbeat, blithe, clearly a devotee of positive thinking. The reporters who read the diary explained it as evidence of a psychopathic mind. Tabloid reporters from Britain concentrated on the few instances where she appeared to have sex on her mind – when she wrote about the fan letters Italian men sent her in jail, for example. They ignored pages she filled with details about being sexually harassed by a prison guard. The young woman who first went to jail at age 20 was a cipher onto whose photogenic, smiling face some Italians could see the archetypal Madonnawhore and, in whose pale eyes, others saw a psychopath. The gaunt, tense woman defending herself on appeal bore barely any resemblance to the fresh, pretty girl photographed kissing her boyfriend outside the murder scene. Only now, having lost the power to bewitch and beguile, has she been revealed as human – and also, apparently, not guilty of murder. Nina Burleigh’s book on the Amanda Knox case, “The Fatal Gift of Beauty,” was published in August. She wrote this for the Los Angeles Times.

LETTERS FROM READERS

Brookside thanks flooding helpers

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n the midst of cleanup from recent flooding, we felt it important to extend a public “thank-you” to all who offered assistance in our Brookside neighborhood, including city, state and federal officials, the American Red Cross and students of Wilkes University. We especially extend thanks to the Salvation Army for setting up a disaster canteen, providing food, cleaning supplies and comfort throughout the ordeal. Its help was offered based on only one criterion: the need. Its care, concern and assistance became a powerful wind beneath our weakened and broken wings. We always will be grateful. Rev. Czeslaw and Donna Kuliczkowski Wilkes-Barre

Caring community offers its support

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e thank all the volunteers who assisted our flood victims at the

MOUNTAIN LAURELS Mountain Laurels is a regular series of letters from readers conveying thanks to individuals or groups for their support, help or kindness.

Wyoming Area Secondary Center’s cafeteria: the members of the American Red Cross, teachers, support staff, cafeteria workers and members of the community. Also, we thank all the volunteers, including Wyoming Area students, who helped our residents in their cleanup efforts. Once again, this demonstrates the tight-knit and caring community in which we live, with people reaching out to others at their most vulnerable time. We are proud and honored to be a part of it. The devastation that the flood caused in our community was a humbling experience. Our hearts go out to the wonderful residents of the Wyoming Area community as you rebuild your lives, homes and businesses. Our sincerest regards and best wishes as you fight back. Nick DeAngelo and Toni Valenti Members, Wyoming Area School Board

Giving thanks for safe haven

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s an American Red Cross disaster volunteer who was assigned as the assistant shelter manager to work with manager Thomas Leskowski at the State Street School in Larksville, I thank, on behalf of Tom and myself and the other Red Cross volunteers, all the wonderful people who volunteered countless hours providing services to the shelter’s residents. I thank the terrific assistance received from the Wyoming Valley West administrative staff, Superintendent Charles Suppon, board member James Fender and Mr. Tribendis, who was present every day and helped to coordinate the showers for the shelter’s residents. The Wyoming Valley West staff provided security, maintenance and assistance in the

kitchen, which provided meals for the 300 evacuees. Also to be thanked are Larksville Mayor Joseph Zawadski, Chief of Police Tony Kopko and his patrol officers, the Luzerne County Sheriff’s Department, Fire Chief Andrew Kachman, Dr. Stanish, the Area Agency on Aging caseworkers and the youth who volunteered. The Salvation Army and Commission on Economic Opportunity provided meals every day, and Olive Garden provided meals for one night – as did many other generous donors who dropped off pizzas, brownies, fruit, etc. We are thankful to have provided a safe haven to everyone who utilized the 14 American Red Cross shelters during the recent Tropical Storm Lee disaster. The Red Cross typically is first to respond to any natural disaster, local or national, and to provide food and shelter during that disaster to anyone affected. Thanks to everyone who helped to provide a safe haven for the residents at the State Street shelter. It was greatly appreciated. Garry Van Scoy Swoyersville

Volunteer hopes he did enough

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n September, Hurricane Irene swept up the East Coast, saturating the land and filling the rivers. A few days later, rain-filled Tropical Storm Lee made landfall in Mississippi and rolled eastward. These two storms’ tracks met just days apart over the Susquehanna River Valley of Pennsylvania and southern New York. Almost all of Lee’s rain drained into the river valley, causing widespread flooding. I wanted to help in some way. I called the Scranton headquarters of the American Red Cross and was asked to volunteer at the Wyoming Valley headquarters, on Sherman Street, Wilkes-Barre. I walked in to introduce myself and soon began handing out supplies to hundreds of cars daily. About 11 days later, I told Bob Haber I wanted to know more about Red Cross operations, as Bob was instrumental in setting up the Red Cross relief effort in Penn-

sylvania. He told me that later that day, Sept. 21, he would be transporting the Wayne County area director to the Hazleton headquarters and that I was welcome to join them. When we arrived in Hazleton, I was amazed at the massive relief effort in progress. Before I walked through the parking lot, I saw license plates from almost every state. Bob introduced us to people from across the United States. Trucks were being loaded and departing in every direction. Bob later told us his part in the ground floor of this effort. I was amazed at how much this man has done for many thousands of people who do not know his name. At some time during our visit, Bob became aware I was not registered as an official volunteer, and he asked me to do so, which I did with great pride! A few questions repeat in my head: Did I contribute enough? How could I have done better? John Paul Harris Jr. Scranton


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LETTERS FROM READERS

Flood response troubles writer

Cooperation key to flood protection

SEND US YOUR OPINION

s I watched the large earth-mover trucks roll down Wyoming Avenue with a state police escort in order to secure the floodrelated problems on the soccer fields in Forty Fort, I was applauding the Army Corps of Engineers, Luzerne County Emergency Management officials and the levee authority officials. I thought that they were prepared for an impending emergency. The colonel from the Baltimore Army Corps of Engineers also was here, advising and supporting the efforts that were under way at every problem location during the September 2011 flood. According to a news conference, this colonel had been involved in 30 levee projects, including the construction of our Wyoming Valley levee. Did he not see flooding problems before, during or after all of these levee projects? It has been reported in the newspapers and on local TV stations that it was Mr. Robert Mericle who saved the day. It was Mr. Mericle who saved my home and business and thousands of other homes and businesses. Thank you, Mr. Mericle. You have been, and continue to be, one of the countless heroes who helped save the Wyoming Valley. You, your colleagues and your employees also have been helping to clean up. One of many questions that needs to be asked is this: Where were the Army Corps of Engineers, EMA officials, levee officials and Luzerne County officials, who apparently were unprepared to handle a potential worst-case scenario? We have had too many flood scares to count. The flood problems that residents near creeks and streams have had to endure have been relent-

Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days. • Email: mailbag@timesleader.com • Fax: 570-829-5537 • Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 1871 1

less. The Valley residents whose homes border the Susquehanna River had been evacuated in 2006, 1996 and 1972. With the known potential threat, why were the warnings to evacuate not more serious this time? If Mr. Mericle did not offer his services, who would have secured the problems that existed at the Midway Shopping Center, the Forty Fort airport, the soccer fields and the Forty Fort Cemetery? Why were those trucks not a part of a convoy for which the Army Corps of Engineers had been prepared? We pay a levee fee to Luzerne County. Isn’t this money being used for protection, maintenance, prevention, repairs and problems that might exist before, during or after a flood? Someone also said to me that government sometimes uses private industry to help in times of need. Mr. Mericle should have been a backup. Who would have been available if Mr. Mericle had not offered his services? I was under the assumption that we can and should count on our government in times of crisis. Jason Smith Forty Fort

Response to 9/11 dishonors victims

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he 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks was surely a day of mourning for those who lost their lives that day, and a day of remembrance and praise for those who showed great courage

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and sacrifice to help save others. Our national media, to its credit, went through great lengths to bring these matters to light. But what the media showed too little of was the entirely dishonorable, disastrous, immoral and destructive U.S. response to the events of that day in 2001. We didn’t see the media citing the fact the U.S. response has caused more than 50,000 fatalities and injuries to U.S. soldiers. (And still, we wonder, for what?) We didn’t see the media citing the fact that the U.S. response has caused the needless deaths of more than 600,000 Iraqis. Nor did we see the media citing the fact that our nation’s invasion of Iraq, as a response to 9/11, has about as much causal relationship as, say, were the United States to attack New Zealand due to global warming. The U.S. military response to 9/11 will rank as one of world history’s most destructive, irrational, cruel and sacrificial acts of war ever undertaken by any nation. We saw too little of that sort of reporting by the U.S. media on the 10th anniversary. But we need to; otherwise, the real sacrifice made by the victims of 9/11 will never come to light, and, again, we’ll have learned nothing as a nation. Martha Pezzino Coordinator Brad Kurlancheek Treasurer Rita Skechus Secretary and Rod Gereda Facilitator Peace and Justice Center Wilkes-Barre

riends from Luzerne County suggested that I comment on the recent flooding challenges of my former home county. They know that I now live in a different portion of the Susquehanna River watershed and that I have operated flood-control systems in the Wyoming Valley. I must commend the emergency officials who handled your recent flooding. If it were not for their high level of competence, any portion of the levee might have failed – leading to significant flooding. I cannot imagine the economic impact. And when we look at those communities that chose to avoid flood mitigation – within your valley and near where I live in upper Northumberland County – we know how devastating the damage can be. I remember how vigilant Kingston was in maintaining the facilities that we managed. But I also know that other communities in the Wyoming Valley at that time were less vigilant, and I always was concerned that the weakest link in the system could lead to devastation. Your current countywide system mirrors a model that proves we can best protect property through cooperation. Many years ago Sunbury took steps to ensure its flood protection. It established a municipal authority and created a fee schedule to fund the costs of the maintenance of the levee system. That was unique statewide, and possibly nationwide, until the Wyoming Valley flood-control officials in cooperation with the county commissioners established a similar fee to accomplish the same objective. In addition, a region-wide, floodcontrol system was initiated that included multiple partners within the Susquehanna

watershed – from WilkesBarre to Sunbury. I have heard that some people who were critical of the flood-control fee in Luzerne County might now be complimentary. Regardless of whether one is in the direct path of flooding or merely impacted economically by flooding, the fee is a reasonable security for our economic viability. Communities and people make choices. We grieve for what has happened in West Pittston and downstream in Bloomsburg, Danville and other river communities. I know from my experience in Milton that some community “leaders” have imprudently objected, in my opinion, to flood protection systems. These choices are very difficult because they impact riverfront properties who some people might view as of historical value. Sometimes property owners experience economic loss or perceived loss from flood-protection takings, but flood protection might be for the greater good. While we cannot protect everything, we can do our best to protect our most valuable assets. By cooperating and understanding the risks we can best meet the challenges of a flooding disaster. Kenneth P. Johnson Former Kingston administrator Milton

Intermodal called unsafe and dirty

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n August 2010, I attended a regular meeting of the Wilkes-Barre Council in regard to the city’s intermodal center. In part, I felt that it needed to be safer and cleaner. I also stated that police are never visible, especially between 4:30 and 5:30 p.m., a very busy time at the center. I also felt that it wasn’t designed correctly, that there should be two crosswalks: one

at each end. At that meeting I was told that “police do patrol the intermodal” and “you can’t add another crosswalk; that would be like crossing the street in the middle of traffic. Just like crosswalk areas are located at specific areas, the same holds true for the intermodal.” More than a year later I could count on one hand how many times I’ve seen a police officer there, and those were only times when they were called due to a problem. What’s worse is someone was recently killed. Had that second crosswalk been built, maybe things would be different today. As time went by, other problems I addressed were never dealt with: Kids still bicycle and skateboard, and areas are overwhelmed with cigarette butts. It’s also far from clean. For starters, check out the elevators that reek of urine. This transportation center now looks like a very old transportation center, kind of like the current Hotel Sterling. If this facility had been built better, maybe there wouldn’t be all these problems. If you check out most bus terminals, especially New York, Philadelphia and the previous Martz Terminal, when you enter or exit buses, you enter a building – no crosswalks, no need to walk behind a bus. What really floors me is that $28 million was spent on this, money that could have been used elsewhere that would have garnered employment. This would have really helped in today’s economy. As any bus commuter can tell you, this was an accident waiting to happen. If these problems aren’t addressed soon, next time we’ll be reading in the paper that someone’s child on a skateboard was hit by a bus. Karen Leonardi Pringle

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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LETTERS FROM READERS

Writer questions Obama cronyism hen Barack Obama ran for president in 2008, he appealed to voters’ sense of disillusionment with Washington. Obama’s campaign theme of “Change we can believe in” assured the American people that he would bring a new kind of leadership to the White House that eschewed the “cynical politics of the past” in which lobbyists, special interest groups and deep-pocketed campaign contributors were given special consideration. The latest scandal involving the Obama administration and its cozy relationship with the now-bankrupt Solyndra Corp. reveals that nothing could be further from the truth. Solyndra was a Californiabased manufacturer of cylindrical solar panels that served as the flagship for President Obama’s “green jobs initiative.” Solyndra’s chief investor was an oil billionaire by the name of George Kaiser, who has been a frequent guest at the Obama White House and had contributed more than $50,000 to Obama’s presidential campaign. Kaiser’s relatively small investment apparently was handsomely rewarded after Obama won the election. In 2009, as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Solyndra was given a very low interest rate government loan guarantee in the amount of $535 million! An investigation by the U.S. Treasury Department is under way, examining why Solyndra, which received only a “B-plus speculative investment” grade from Fitch Rating, received a rock-bottom interest rate of only 1.5 percent when other energy projects have had to pay more than double that rate. There is speculation that Solyndra might have used Enron-style accounting gimmicks in order to hide the true financial condition of the

company from the agency that procured the loan. As Solyndra becomes the third solar company to go belly-up this year, laying off its 1,100 employees and leaving the American taxpayer on the hook for more than half a billion dollars, now might be a good time to ask some important questions: Should the federal government be in the business of picking winners and losers in the marketplace? In other words, should companies whose business model conforms to Obama’s extreme left-wing ideology get preferential treatment over other companies? And as President Obama tours the country trying to sell his second stimulus package, I think it’s also fair to ask this: If the first stimulus package was used to create real jobs rather than give kickbacks and sweetheart deals to Obama administration cronies and campaign contributors, would there even be a need to ask Congress to spend another $400 billion to “jumpstart” the economy? Aaron Perhach Forty Fort

Abortion called form of slavery

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braham Lincoln dealt with slavery as a law that ruled the slave was not a person, and was thus used, abused and sold as property at the whim of the holder. Lincoln knew both the law and the Bible, saying that a person should neither be a slave nor own one. He spoke of a God ever on the side of right, and prayed daily that he and the nation remain on God’s side and thrive under his righteousness. He spoke of destroying his enemies by making them his friends. A peacemaker, he fulfilled the promise of being called “blessed” and a “son of God” as in the Beatitudes revealed by Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount.

Abortion is the new slavery that divides our nation. The issue waits for Congress to bind up this nation’s second wound and declare the fetus a person, who, at once, would enjoy the protection of the 14th Amendment. The husband and wife are not the first causes of their own being; thus, the fetus is not their property in the sense that it conveys a choice or convenience. Like them, from conception, it is a person created in the image and likeness of God. Edziu Antek Silvent West Wyoming

Don’t hold FEMA as political hostage

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he recent destruction of property in our area in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Lee is a stunning reminder of the awesome force of Mother Nature and the need for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Since 1979, FEMA has been a life raft to those people most in need. The organization, as with the majority of its federal counterparts, is far from perfect and certainly needs a form of oversight that Congress provides. Despite its flaws, few would argue that the agency plays a vital role in providing the most needed of resources. For this reason, it is stunning that Congressman Lou Barletta and his Republican caucus used this agency as a political hostage in budget talks that have turned into a shameful orgy of cuts to essential services. I do not argue the need for budget reform, but playing games with affected residents is nothing short of shameful. Congressman Barletta appeared on television, claiming that he is looking for federal aid. But when FEMA was in need of funds following the destruction seen in Joplin, Mo., the congressman said nothing when U.S. Rep. Eric

Cantor stated that additional aid had to be tied to budget cuts. I guess if it’s not in his backyard, Barletta is fine with others’ suffering. When someone has lost a home, he or she cannot wait for Washington to settle its political games; the person needs immediate help. Joseph Cassidy Bloomsburg

Congress blamed for postal woes

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n Sept. 25, the article “Postal service gets stamped out” appeared in The Times Leader. This article attributed the financial condition of the U.S. Postal Service to rises in email, estatements and e-bill payment. While first-class mail volume has undeniably declined in recent years, this is not the true reason for USPS’ financial situation. The real reason is Congress. Congress has been using the quasi-government postal service as a cash cow for years. USPS funds are considered off-budget, so by transferring costs to USPS and making unreasonable demands for cash from USPS, Congress has billions more to work with. Specifically: • The “Postal Civil Service Retirement System Funding Reform Act” of 2003 shifted $27 billion in military pension obligations from the U.S. Treasury to USPS. In other words, USPS is now responsible for the full pension obligation of any USPS employee who ever served in the military – both military and USPS service time – not only their time as a USPS employee. • Overpayments to the Civil Service Retirement System. Two independent studies have returned estimates of $55 billion and $75 billion, respectively. • Overpayments to the Federal Employees Retirement System. The $6.9 billion

figure as of June 2011 is undisputed. In June, USPS stopped paying the employer’s share into FERS, so that overpayment is now down to about $6 billion. • The “Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act” of 2006 requires USPS to pre-fund retiree health care out to the year 2075, and to do so in 10 years. In other words, Congress is forcing USPS to pay retiree health care for employees who have not yet been born. No other federal agency is required to pre-fund, nor do any do so. The total of all the above: Between $130 and $150 billion. It was the 2006 PAEA that drove the nail into the coffin. Absent that one law, USPS would have posted a profit since 2006, would have billions in the bank and be wellpositioned to deal with the drop in first-class mail. But Congress has sucked USPS dry. There’s no more water in the well. HR 1351 was introduced on April 5 by Rep. Stephen Lynch, D-Mass. If enacted, it would correct the above without requiring a single penny of taxpayer dollars. In short, HR 1351 would: 1. Require the Office of Personnel Management within six months to accurately calculate the CSRS overpayment and transfer that amount within 15 days to the USPS retiree health benefits fund. 2. Direct the OPM to use $5.5 billion of the FERS overpayment for the 2011 retiree health care pre-funding requirement (due Sept. 30, which will have passed by the time you read this). Competing proposals to HR 1351 exist. Some will gut the USPS, closing thousands of post offices and processing facilities, and placing hundreds of thousands of employees out of work. This new postal service would offer substantially lower service and substantially higher prices, but Congress would get to

keep the money it has “stolen” from the USPS. The future of the USPS is up to you. Do you want today’s Postal Service that delivers six days a week to every address in the United States and has the world’s lowest postage rates? If so, contact your congressman/congresswoman and request their support of HR 1351. John Stepanik Director, Support Services Pennsylvania Postal Workers Union Dallas

Volunteers lauded for sheltering pets

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he recent flooding and devastation caused by Tropical Storm Lee brought hardship and loss to many Pennsylvania communities. In response to the storm, the Pennsylvania State Animal Response Team, through its network of volunteers in county animal response teams, opened numerous temporary animal shelters, many in conjunction with the American Red Cross. Our county teams are made up of local volunteers who help their communities. Locally, teams in Luzerne, Wyoming and Bradford counties provided care for many animals for up two weeks, while the families with whom they resided dealt with the effects of the storm. On behalf of our board of directors, we recognize and thank our many volunteers who assisted their communities during this emergency situation. We also thank PetSmart Charities and the Wilkes-Barre PetSmart for its significant donation of equipment and supplies, which were helpful to our effort. Joel H. Hersh Executive director Pennsylvania State Animal Response Team Harrisburg

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MARRIAGE Continued from Page 1E

cial judgment calls,” said Andy Pugno, the general counsel for the Proposition 8 Defense Fund and Protect Marriage Coalition, who said he thinks the Supreme Court will uphold the law. Same-sex marriage opponents point out that they’ve won in every state where the issue has been put on the ballot. But polls show that could be changing. In North Carolina, where voters will consider a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage next spring, an Elon University poll shows that 56 percent oppose the ban, while 39 percent support it. Leaders in Washington are changing their minds, too. Last month, Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen of Florida became the first Republican to back the repeal of the federal Defense of Marriage Act. Though she voted for the law in 1996, a decade later she declined to support a federal constitutional amendment to ban same-sex mar-

riage. Rep. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., an openly gay member of Congress who’s running for the U.S. Senate, said while she hoped that Ros-Lehtinen’s support would encourage other Republicans to back the repeal of an “unjust” law, last year’s midterm elections dealt a “significant setback” to that effort. The repeal bill has 125 co-sponsors in the Republican-majority House of Representatives and 29 in the Democratic-led Senate. “It’s a steep hill to climb. That’s not to say we won’t climb it,” Price said. “Repeal is going to be a tough political fight.” Baldwin said her main focus wasn’t on gay issues, but the economy. “This is a tough time for our country,” she said. “My constituents don’t care that I’m gay.” In the meantime, gay and lesbian couples still face a patchwork of state laws. Roughly 50,000 same-sex couples have gotten married in the six states that allow it: New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Iowa, plus the District of Columbia. Other states give same-sex couples the

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benefits of marriage without the name, but many couples won’t be satisfied until they can get married. “Right now it’s basically a second-class citizenship,” said Washington state Rep. Laurie Jinkins, a Democrat and one of six openly gay members in the Washington legislature who are crafting a strategy for the passage of a marriage law, possibly as early as next spring. Washington state’s voters approved a domestic partnership law in 2009. Federal and state marriage laws pose special challenges for samesex couples with children. According to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, 115,000 such couples are raising children.

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In Lexington, Ky., Jessica Bollinger and her partner of 17 years, Cathy Wieschhoff, have an11-yearold adopted son, Lucas. Bollinger, who is the adoptive parent, said that if they lived in a state that recognized same-sex marriage, there would be more security for her son. Bollinger said she and her partner have indicated in their will and spoken with family members to assure that if she died, her partner could take custody of their son and be the legal parent. But the law wouldn’t automatically grant Wieschhoff custody, something that married opposite-

sex couples would take for granted. “She is as much his parent as I am,” Bollinger said. For other couples, the lack of marriage rights reinforces longstanding social stigmas against gay people. Beverly Fletcher of Fort Worth, Texas, who married her partner of 20 years in Connecticut, said her family has struggled at times against barriers and “institutional challenges” in a state that doesn’t recognize their marriage. When her now 12-year-old daughter was in elementary school, another mother protested to the school that Fletcher should not be allowed to accompany the children on field trips, Fletcher said. The mother wanted her banned from the classroom, though the school supported Fletcher. “We have spent our entire adult lives together, my wife and I,” Fletcher said. “It is so discouraging to be married and to not be honored as being married here in

my own community. When we go other places and visit other communities, they really are so surprised at what we still deal with here.” But others said it mattered less how the government defined their families. Paul Wolford and Howard Freedland, both 48, of Davis, Calif., were married in June 2008 during the brief window before Proposition 8 when gay couples in California could legally do so. Wolford, a preschool teacher, and Freedland, an attorney, are parents to an 8-year-old daughter and a 6-year-old son. Wolford believes Americans are generally more accepting of gay couples — and harbor fewer stereotypes about them. While Wolford isn’t happy that his marriage wouldn’t have been permitted after Proposition 8 passed a few months later, he’s decided not to vociferously campaign to repeal the measure. “My greatest activism is just living a normal life,” he said.

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SECTION F SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

AP PHOTO

Julianne Hough arrives at the premiere of ‘Footloose’ in Los Angeles earlier this week.

Right steps lead Hough to success By AMY LONGSDORF For The Times Leader

By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com

one of his shipmates mooned him.” “How could anyone resist mooning him on the moon?” asked Poundstone, who will bring her signature humor and a can of Diet Pepsi to the F.M. Kirby Center in Wilkes-Barre for a show at 8 p.m. Friday. Why does she like that particular beverage so much?

If you’ve heard Paula Poundstone on National Public Radio’s weekly news quiz “Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me,” you know the comedian can weave some wacky stories. Consider the time when she had to create a piece of fiction with an astronaut theme. “I came up with one about the first guy who walked on the moon, that they later found evidence See POUNDSTONE, Page 4F

‘Magic happens,’ beloved bunnies promise By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com

Does your big sister ever dress you up and give you a makeover? Does your little brother barge in and mess up your plans? Do you drive each other crazy but love each other just the same? If any of that is true, you and your sibs are a lot like Max and Ruby – except they’re furry, long-eared, animated rabbits. “Max and Ruby, I think, really offer the reality of siblings. They have that unconditional love for each other, but they don’t always have to agree with each other,” said Patti Caplette, director of “Max and Ruby: Bunny Party.” The family show will come to the F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Based on a Nickelodeon show created

IF YOU GO What: ‘Max & Ruby: Bunny Party’ When: 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Where: F.M. Kirby Center, Public Square, Wilkes-Barre More info: 826-1100

by author Rosemary Wells, the show stars 3-year-old Max and his 7-year-old sister, Ruby. “Ruby is the older sister. She’s in school, and she goes to Bunny Scouts. She’s very smart and thinks she has all the answers,” Caplette said in a telephone interview. “Max is a ‘boy’ boy. He loves mud. He loves getting dirty. He loves to find worms. If Ruby’s playing dolls with her friends, he’ll instinctively come by with a noisy fire truck, just to bug them.” In the “Bunny Party” show, Max and Ru-

by are planning to celebrate the arrival of a “super-duper special guest,” Caplette said. “They take a bus ride to a general store. They look for the most perfect present. They meet all kinds of characters, and all kinds of fun things happen. “Magic happens. Oh, yes, we have magic.” Highlights of the show include Max’s larger-than-life toys, some robots, a giant spider, a ballerina, “four amazing vaudevillian folks who sing and dance” and the scene during which Ruby and her best friend, Louise, treat Max to a “beauty makeover,” complete with curlers and make-up. “It appeals to kids from 2 to 92,” The lovable rabbits Max and Ruby might Caplette said. “But we’ll let you in if remind you of a brother and sister in your own life. you’re 93.”

Since beginning her own pop music group, “2BIG,” when she was 12 years old, Julianne Hough has gone through more changes than David Bowie. She’s earned a living as a “Dancing With The Stars” hoofer and a country-music songbird. With “Footloose,” she can add leading lady to her list of accomplishments. A remake of the 1984 hit musical, the movie about a town where boogie-ing is prohibited gave Hough the chance to strut her stuff as a dancer and an actress. Hough’s work on the flick (due in theaters Friday) so impressed the producers of “Rock of Ages” that she recently nabbed a starring role in the upcoming songfest about a hair-metal howler (Tom Cruise) and a waitress-turned-stripper (Hough). Alec Baldwin, Paul Giamatti, “The show Catherine Zeta-Jones, Mary J. Blige and was a great Bryan Cranston co- stepping star. stone. I mean, “I am having the it did everytime of my life,” says Hough, 23. “It seems thing for my like everything hap- career. It gave pened for a reason. I me this inworked really hard credible expowhen I was growing up. I paid my dues. sure.” Now it feels like the Julianne Hough stars have aligned. I feel like every decision I’ve made has been the right one. I’m kind of freaking out at the moment. It’s crazy.” Dancing, country crooning, pop singing, acting – is there anything Hough can’t do well? “I’m absolutely awful at sports,” she notes. “You’d think being a dancer that I’d have good coordination, but I don’t. I am the worst tennis player you will ever see. I’m so bad, it’s embarrassing.” There’s nothing embarrassing about Hough’s ascent up the show-biz ladder. Fresh off back-to-back “Dancing With The Stars” wins, she’s become a hot property in Hollywood thanks to “Footloose.” The remake, directed by Craig Brewer, recycles the story of a new kid in town named Ren McCormack (Kenny Wormald) who is shocked to discover that a local minister (Dennis Quaid) has outlawed dancing. The ban went into effect after the alcohol-related death of five high-school seniors including the minister’s son. Hough plays the preacher’s daughter Ariel, a spitfire who longs to dance as much as Ren does. It’s only a matter of time before Ariel and Ren are kicking off their Sunday shoes together. The new “Footloose” is more gritty and less cartoony than the original, which starred Kevin Bacon, Lori Singer and John Lithgow. But some film fans wonder why a 1984 movie needs to be remade in the first place. “I was skeptical, too,” says Hough who, coincidentally, grew up near where the original “Footloose” was shot. “When I think of remakes, I think of bad remakes. Why remake something that you love so much? “But I think our movie is very relevant … and, lately, there haven’t been that many teen movies with great messages, like we had in the ’80s. So it was cool to make this movie very honest and real for a new generation.” See HOUGH, Page 6F


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HOROSCOPE

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

10/9/11

BONUS PUZZLE SEAS THE DAY

John Lampkin

DIAGRAMLESS

The Sunday Crossword

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

CRYPTOGRAMS

ARIES (March 21-April 19). At first, you will have a rather straightforward reason for getting to know someone. The more you learn, however, the less the initial purpose seems to matter. You will be, quite simply, curious to find out more. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You take your responsibilities as an earthling seriously. You will show the love and respect you feel for nature by admiring and caring for the various life forms in your environment. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You would normally be inclined to make a prediction as to what you might accomplish and what will likely unfold as a result. Not now. You lead with a sense of wonder. Who knows where the day will flow? Only time. CANCER (June 22-July 22). The dimensions above you seem to invite you to share their lightness of being to whatever degree possible on this earthly plane. You certainly feel freer, as though life is suddenly fresh. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You approach others with your free-flowing conversation. You also have a terrific sense of when to engage and with whom. Knowing when to retreat will be equally useful. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You realize how futile and silly it is to expect people to think and behave just like you do. Your loved ones adore you, in part because they sense that you truly want them to live fully, though not in any particular way. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You see what you create as a part of yourself and therefore bestow a special kind of beauty in all of your work. When you meet with interference, you see it as a fortuitous influence. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Appointments and errands are in store, all in preparation for an upcoming event. While getting everything in order, your mind is abuzz with anticipation. This is going to be fun! SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). You’ll do your own thing, and you won’t care whether anyone notices. You’re making your own rules now, at least socially speaking. And you’ll cause some excitement in the process. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Everyone changes. You cannot predict exactly how, either. To love someone truly and completely means to love him or her through the inevitable changes of life. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Whatever you concentrate on evolves quickly, taking up greater amounts of space and energy. It’s like you can grow things with the power of your thinking. So definitely concentrate on things you actually want to grow. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You can feel someone psychically tugging at you. This person probably just wants to be closer to you, or perhaps he or she needs something so intangible from you that they don’t even know what it is. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Oct. 9). You’ve dared to dream before, but this year there’s something even stronger about the visions you conjure for yourself. You have every intention of bringing them to reality, and you most certainly will. A change in your work lends greater balance to your life. New family additions happen in April. Capricorn and Aquarius people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 2, 18, 24, 36 and 21.

Puzzle Answers on 3F


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UNIVERSAL SUDOKU

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WONDERWORD

By David Ouellet

PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION

For information about WonderWord volumes and Treasuries, call Universal Press Syndicate at 1-800-255-6734.

UNIVERSAL SUDOKU KIDS

WITH OMAR SHARIF & TANNAH HIRSCH

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DEAR ABBY ADVICE

Granddaughter too young to withstand criticism Dear Abby: My mother watches my two children before and after school and during the breaks. She is a caring person, but she is also very critical of my daughter. (She’s fine with my son.) Mom constantly tells my daughter she needs to lose weight or exercise more, or her hair looks stringy, or she isn’t dressed properly. My daughter is only 9. My mother did this to me when I was younger, and it made me feel I could never live up to her standards. How should I approach her about this? I don’t want my daughter to feel inadequate. She’s a beautiful, intelligent little girl. — Frustrated in Missouri

PREVIOUS SUNDAY’S SOLUTION

Dear Frustrated: Deal with this firmly, before your mother erodes your daughter’s self-esteem as she did yours. Tell her how her constant criticism made you feel, that you don’t want the same thing to happen to your little girl, and that anytime she’s tempted to make a negative comment, she should substitute a POSITIVE one instead. Be direct with her, and if she isn’t able to comply, make other arrangements for your daughter.

LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE ANSWERS Bonus Puzzle

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ON THE WEB For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com

MINUTE MAZE

1. In response to customer protests about so many unexplained flight delays, publishers’ light fiction categories expanded to include "airline schedules." 2. A pilot gave this reassuring message to passengers. "Good news is we are safely on the ground. Bad news is we never took off. Suggest you go back to your movies, books and crosswords." 3. When Southwest announced it was kicking up its number of hubs and flights, all the peanut suppliers’ stocks climbed! 4. Ugly airline math law: when there is an empty seat in between you and another passenger, that seat will be occupied by someone who could use two seats. 10/9

JUMBLE

10/9

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Cryptograms

New York Times

HOW TO CONTACT: Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069

10/9 10/9

Dear Abby: My siblings have noticed my distant, odd behavior toward one of my brothers. This sibling and I have a history of incest. He raped me repeatedly for years, and I want nothing to do with him. When the family gathers, one or the other of us declines the invitation if the other one is going to be present. I have told one sibling, “We just don’t get along — old stuff, ya’ know!” and left it at that. I want to keep the reason to myself. I feel I may be pushed for a better answer. Shouldn’t “old stuff” be enough of a reason? Should I tell or not? — Should I Or Shouldn’t I? Dear Should I?: A person who repeatedly rapes someone “for years” is a predator. This wasn’t two kids “experimenting”; it was sexual assault. How do you know he didn’t prey on other siblings or cousins? You should have sought counseling about this years ago, and it’s still not too late. Once you do, I’m sure you’ll find the strength to stand up for yourself and speak out.

To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send a business-sized, selfaddressed envelope, plus check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)

By Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


CMYK ➛

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Continued from Page 1F

Poundstone, 51, has been making people laugh for years – at least since kindergarten.

“I guess it’s the aspartame,” she said with a laugh. “I am so addicted to it. I drink about 16 a day. I get a terrible headache if I don’t.” On a recent vacation, however, she admitted she amused her friends by snacking on water and nectarines. Poundstone, 51, has been making people laugh for years – at least since kindergarten, when the teacher remarked on her frequent comments. She was still at it in seventh grade, when a classmate named Celine wore a pair of sandals to school. “She found that as she bent her foot over and over again it made a kind of ticking sound,” Poundstone said. The ticking sandal sounded like a bomb, and when young Paula remarked, “I wish it would go off,” the long-suffer-

ing teacher apparently sympathized. “She gave me the night off from homework.” Poundstone is still getting along well with teachers, including an instructor with whom she is collaborating on a series of math workbooks. “It started as a way to help my own children (with math),” Poundstone said. “She was totally in charge of the academic rigor and what you should do at which grade level. In the beginning I would throw in a few word problems that were funny. It ended up I wrote a story per page.” For the series, Poundstone invented a character called Leonardo Digit who knocks over a “barrel of decimals” in his father’s store and has many oth-

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er adventures in his quest to become a circus performer. Her own adventurous career path has included jobs as unusual as bicycle courier. “I’m not really that good a bike rider. I’m terribly afraid of going downhill,” she said. Unfortunately, she was a courier in farfrom-flat San Francisco. Her work is less anxiety-producing now, as she meets audiences and sets them chuckling.

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“It’s like going to a cocktail party with friends you haven’t seen in a long time. I have a bunch of stuff I’m dying to share with people,” she said. “On a good night I’m like a toddler learning to walk. I push off from something I’m familiar with.” “I love talking to people. I ask questions like ‘What do you do for a living?’ and little biographies of the crowd unfold.”

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BEST SELLERS HARDCOVER FICTION 1. The Affair. Lee Child. Delacorte, $28 2. 1225 Christmas Tree Lane. Debbie Macomber. Mira, $16.95 3. Feast Day of Fools. James Lee Burke. Simon & Schuster, $26.99 4. Lethal. Sandra Brown. Grand Central, $26.99 5. The Night Circus. Erin Morgenstern. Doubleday, $26.95 6. Aleph. Paulo Coelho. Knopf, $24.95 7. New York to Dallas. J.D. Robb. Putnam, $27.95 8. A Dance with Dragons. George R.R. Martin. Bantam, $35 9. Son of Stone. Stuart Woods. Putnam, $26.95 10. Heat Rises. Richard Castle. Hyperion, $25.99 11. Reamde. Neal Stephenson. Morrow, $35 12. Nightwoods. Charles Frazier. Random House, $26 HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. Killing Lincoln. Bill O’Reilly & Martin Dugard. Holt, $28 2. Jacqueline Kennedy. Caroline Kennedy. Hyperion, $60 3. Every Day a Friday. Joel Osteen. FaithWords, $24.99 4. Unbroken. Laura Hillenbrand. Random House, $27 5. Confidence Men. Ron Suskind. Harper, $29.99 6. EntreLeadership. Dave Ramsey. Howard Books, $26 7. Destiny of the Republic. Candice Millard. Doubleday, $28.95 8. That Used to Be Us. Thomas L. Friedman & Michael Mandelbaum. Farrar, Straus & Giroux,$28 9. A Stolen Life. Jaycee Dugard. Simon & Schuster, $24.99 10. 10 Mindful Minutes. Goldie Hawn with Wendy Holden. Perigee, $24 11. In My Time. Dick Cheney with Liz Cheney. Threshold, $35 12. Rin Tin Tin. Susan Orlean. Simon & Schuster, $26.99 MASS MARKET 1. Cross Fire. James Patterson. Vision, $9.99 2. Miracle Cure. Harlan Coben. Signet, $9.99 3. Full Dark, No Stars. Stephen King. Pocket, $9.99 4. The Darkest Surrender. Gena Showalter. HQN, $7.99 5. Eve. Iris Johansen. St. Martin’s, $7.99 6. Bad Blood. John Sandford. Berkley, $9.99 7. Only His. Susan Mallery. HQN, $7.99 8. In Pursuit of Eliza Cynster. Stephanie Laurens. Avon, $7.99 9. The Unquiet. J.D. Robb, Mary Blayney, Patricia Gaffney, Ruth Ryan Langan, & Mary Kay McComas. Jove, $7.99 10. Sexiest Vampire Alive. Kerrelyn Sparks. Avon, $7.99 11. 1105 Yakima Street . Debbie Macomber. Mira, $7.99 12. Christmas at Timberwoods. Fern Michaels. Zebra, $7.99 TRADE 1. The Help. Kathryn Stockett. Berkley, $16 2. Heaven Is for Real. Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent. Thomas Nelson, $16.99 3. Moneyball. Michael Lewis. Norton, $15.95 4. Sarah’s Key. Tatiana de Rosnay. St. Martin’s Griffin, $13.95 5. The Sixth Man. David Baldacci. Grand Central, $14.99 6. Cutting for Stone. Abraham Verghese. Vintage, $15.95 7. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. Rebecca Skloot. Broadway, $16 8. Don’t Blink. James Patterson & Howard Roughan. Grand Central, $14.99 9. Cleopatra. Stacy Schiff. LB/Back Bay, $16.99 10. Room. Emma Donoghue. LB/Back Bay, $14.99 11. One Day. David Nicholls. Vintage, $14.95 12. Outliers. Malcolm Gladwell. LB/Back Bay, $16.99

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 5F

‘Ghost Hero’ lightens up crime series By AMANDA ST. AMAND “The Dovekeepers” by Alice Hoffman; Scribner (504 pages, $27)

I

faworldofstrongwomenandtheircomplex relationships with one another doesn’t draw you into Alice Hoffman’s brilliant new novel, “The Dovekeepers,” read it for Hoffman’s fine sense of narrative, history and detail as she shares the story of four women who come by various paths to Masada. Masada is the mountain in the desert where 900 Jews held out for months against Roman armies in ancient Israel. Hoffman introduces her four main characters at a leisurely pace, first Yael, whose mother died in childbirth and whosefatherresentsherforit.Revkaisabaker’s wife who saw her husband and daughter slain, and now cares for her daughter’s two sons. Aziza, daughter of a warrior, is raised as a boy and is skilled in fighting. And Shirah is a woman of magic and medicine who keeps her own secrets while helping other women handle theirs. Each woman is broken and hurt in some significant way. Yael seeks the love of a strong man in the face of her father’s rejection. Revka carries failure with her, because she blames herself for the death of her daughter and her grandsons’ fate. Aziza is torn between the world she was born to, and the life of a warrior where she must hide who she really is. Shirah keeps the biggest secret of all — hiding her love for a man she can never publicly have. Hoffman skillfully weaves their lives and stories together as all the women make the arduous journey to Masada. “We came like doves across the desert. In a time when there was nothing but death, we were grateful for anything and most grateful of all when we

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

awoke to another day.” “The Dovekeepers” immerses readers in an ancient world, where nothing is easy — not breathing or walking, not eating or sleeping, no part of daily life happens without chores and challenges associated with that task. Coupled with the difficulty of daily life is the persecution of the Jews. Revka recalls seeing her daughter’s death: “The men fell upon Zara at the fire. I heard her voice the way you hear a bell, it rings and sounds above all other noises. I ran to her and one of the intruders threw me to the side, for to him I was no more than a dried locust ... I charged at them, screaming, but they were four and brutally strong ...While two of them held Zara, tearing at her garments, the other two made quick business of me.” Such a spare description of such a horrid event makes it that much more real. Hoffman’s novels often rely on symbols and magic,mysticismandtotems;“Dovekeepers”is no different. But she weaves these devices so intricately into the lives of Yael, Revka, Aziza and Shirah that readers pay less attention to the mystic elements and more to the events that tie these women to one another. The men in this novel are not given the depth and breadth of the women, in part because the women live in such a misogynistic time and place. Yet there is respect for Revka’s son-in-law, who is nearly unhinged with grief. Josephus, a 1st-century historian, said that two women and five children survived the siege of the Roman armies. So it’s clear that not all four of these remarkable women will live. But each of them will live on in the minds of readers.

By BRUCE DeSILVA For The Associated Press

The on-again, off-again partnership between Lydia Chin and Bill Smith, the private detective-heroes of 11 of S.J. Rozan’s crime novels, is on again. In “Ghost Hero,” a mysterious man hires “Ghost Hero” (Mithem to innotaur Books), by vestigate a S.J. Rozan: rumor that previously unknown paintings by Chau Chun, a Chinese painter killed in the Tiananmen Square uprising, are about to surface in New York. But soon they learn that another P.I. is looking into the same thing and that unscrupulous art dealers, criminal gangs, an academic expert on Chinese painting and even the Chinese government all have a stake in the game. They also learn that their client has been lying to them from the start. Rozan’s heroes, first-generation Chinese-American Chin and middle-American Army brat Smith, allow her an enormous range of voice and tone within this successful series. In last year’s “On the Line,” for example, Chin is abducted and Smith, who narrates the story, races against time to get her back. The mood is grim and the pace intense, giving the book the feel of movies like Liam Neeson’s 2008 kidnapping thriller, “Taken.” But in “Ghost Hero,” narrated by Chin, the mood is light and the story is laced with humor, reminiscent of the 1973 Paul Newman-Robert Redford classic, “The Sting.” Chin and Smith approach their case by running a confidence game designed to deceive everyone, including their client. Some of the book’s funniest moments feature Smith posing as a Russian mobster, complete with a swagger and an accent that is by turns authentic and hilarious. The ethnic differences between Chin and Smith give this series an added dimension. Chin’s mother, who suspects Smith is interested in her daughter for more than business reasons (and he is), calls him “the white baboon.” Rozan uses such tensions to explore issues of diversity and cultural politics without ever getting heavy-handed. Chin and Smith fans will find “Ghost Hero” one of the better books in the series.


CMYK PAGE 6F

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

The dancing in ’Footloose’ was anything but a challenge for Julianne Hough. The ‘Dancing With The Stars’ celeb had to tone down some of her moves so her character, Ariel, would fit in and not look like a professional hoofer.

AP PHOTO

A Lego model of downtown New York greets visitors to Legoland Florida in Winter Haven, Fla. The second Legoland in North America, Legoland Florida is on the site of the old Cypress Gardens. Opening day is Saturday.

ANTICIPATION BUILDS New Legoland park in Florida will keep the kids busy IF YOU GO

W

INTER HAVEN, Fla. — The first thing you’ll do upon entering Legoland Florida is walk up to the nearest oversize Lego model and touch it: Is it really made out of those little plastic bricks that are as much a part of American childhood as skinned knees and ice-cream cones?

The answer is yes. And thankfully, they’re all glued together to withstand abuse from the rambunctious kids and curious parents who will be visiting Florida’s newest theme park, opening Saturday. Situated in little Winter Haven, 45 minutes from Disney and the other Orlando-area attractions, Legoland Florida is aimed at children from 2 to 12. Those in the upper half of that demographic will get the most out it, marveling at the cool Lego models scattered throughout the park and taking full advantage of the opportunities to get their hands on them, visit a castle, shoot lasers and ride four roller coasters that range from mild to mildly wild. (The Legoland folks call them “pink-knuckle” rides.) But there’s a special area for toddlers, too, and parents will certainly linger in the amazing Miniland USA area, which recreates the skylines of New York and other big cities, as well as Florida landmarks, all constructed from Legos. The Miniland is the heart of this and the other four Legoland parks around the world, including one near San Diego. “Every Lego model you see in the park is made with standard Lego pieces,” says Bill Vollbrecht, the self-described “Lego nerd” who designed the park.

“We don’t have special pieces made; they are standard brick sizes, the standard colors that kids can buy in the kits at the store. We don’t modify, change or do anything different. Because we want to show what you can do with them. This is the ultimate toy box.” The new Florida park is the largest of the Legolands, covering 150 acres on the site of the old Cypress Gardens, which was the state’s first theme park when it opened in 1936. Known for its lush gardens and water-ski shows, Cypress Gardens fell into disrepair and financial trouble over the years, changing hands several times and getting battered by a hurricane before it closed for good in 2009. Then Legoland came to town. Legoland planners incorporated the gardens into the new park, as well as the water-ski shows on Lake Eloise and the bleachers and pavilions on its banks. Legoland’s version is a pirate-themed water-ski and stunt show that will be staged several times daily. Sixteen mature live oak trees were moved and replanted as planners tried to maintain the Old Florida feel of the place. A huge, majestic banyan tree, planted in 1939, is in itself worth a stroll through the gardens, thick with lovely native Florida foliage. Also left over

A bust of Albert Einstein, made from Legos, sits outside the entrance to Lego Technic at Legoland Florida.

from Cypress Gardens days were two of the four roller coasters — including the only wooden coaster at a Legoland park anywhere — and “Island in the Sky,” a 100-foot rotating platform ride that offers a bird’s-eye view of the entire park. “We came in there and said, ‘Wow, you can’t buy this from scratch,’ ” says Ian Sarjeant, the senior project director. “The challenge for us was how do we take our standard castle and clusters that we have in every other park and incorporate them into this while keeping some of the existing buildings? We fixed what we could; we tore down what we couldn’t; we added new; we modified old.” Says Vollbrecht: “What first started out as challenges became amazing opportunities.” The park is divided into 10 zones, including Fun Town, where families can get a closer look at how Legos are made; Lego Kingdoms, with a whimsical, interactive ride through the castle; Lego City, where children can drive a car by themselves on

What: Legoland Florida. Where: Winter Haven, Fla., about a 45-minute drive from Orlando When: Opens Saturday. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. most days; check online calendar for occasional closures and longer hours. Tickets: $65 for ages 13 and older and $55 for ages 3 to 12 and 60-plus. More info: www.florida.legoland.com or 877-350-5346

scaled-down streets; and the Imagination Zone, where they can build and mess with more big Lego models. Some of the coolest models outside of the Miniland are the life-size African animals that populate the Safari Trek ride in the Land of Adventure area. Of course, the park conveniently serves as one big commercial for Lego toys, and parents probably won’t get away without plunking down the credit card for souvenirs. To facilitate that, the park has helpfully included one of the largest Lego stores in the world, and other retail opportunities abound throughout. Concessions are available everywhere, including the signature Legoland dessert, “Granny’s Apple Fries.” The first Legoland opened in Billund, Denmark, in 1968. Parks in Windsor, England; Carlsbad, Calif.; and Gunzberg, Germany, followed. A new park in Malaysia is scheduled to open next year.

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license) and driving to the mall,” Hough says. “I didn’t get caught for the longest time, but then someone said to my parents, ‘I didn’t know Julianne had her liContinued from Page 1F cense.’ And, of course, I didn’t.” After her graduation from high The dancing in “Footloose” was anything but a challenge for school, Hough moved alone to Hough. In fact, she says, she had Los Angeles. “I lied to my dad to tone down some of her moves and told him I had $5,000 when I so Ariel would fit in with the oth- only had $2,000 so he’d let me go. er kids and not look like a profes- … I knew he was worried about me.” sional hoofer. Hough’s father didn’t have to Other aspects of the character were a bit more demanding. worry long. A few months after arriving on the “Somebody described Ariel as schiz- “I am having the time West Coast, Hough ophrenic. And I said, of my life. It seems was offered a spot on “Dancing With ‘you mean she’s just a like everything The Stars.” Initialtypical teenager.’ ly, she turned There are a lot of levhappened for a down the show, els to her. The way reason. I worked worried she’d be she deals with these really hard when I typecast as a realtragedies – the death was growing up. ity TV star. of her brother and the Ultimately, she loss of her relationI paid my dues. ship with her Dad – is Now it feels like the relented. “The show was a by acting out sexualstepping ly. She wants atten- stars have aligned. I great feel like every deci- stone. I mean, it tion.” did everything for Hough, who grew sion I’ve made has up a Mormon in the been the right one." my career. It gave me this incredible small town of Sandy, Julianne Hough exposure.” Utah, felt a kinship Hough’s first, with Ariel. self-titled CD was “I could relate to her much more than people real- released by Mercury Nashville in ize,” says the actress, who dates 2007. Tours with Brad Paisley, “American Idol” host Ryan Sea- George Strait and Toby Keith folcrest. “When I was a kid, I was all lowed. “I’ve always loved country muabout the short shorts and too much make-up and high heels. It sic,” she notes. “I sang it and liswas not that appropriate for a 14- tened to it ever since I was a kid. year-old, but I was stubborn. … I have another album that’s done and awaiting release.” That’s the way I acted out.” In the meantime, Hough will The offspring of two ballroom dancers, Hough always loved en- pop up in “Rock of Ages,” the film tertaining family and friends. adaptation of the popular jukeAlong with her four siblings, box musical that uses ’80s songs she’d put on shows, shoot home by Bon Jovi and Night Ranger, movies and choreograph music among others, to tell the story of videos in her parents’ basement. two kids who come to Hollywood “To perform and entertain to make it big in the music busiwere, literally, all I wanted to do ness. Tom Cruise stars as a rocker who puts the moves on Hough afas a kid,” she says. When she was 10, Hough was ter he meets her at a strip club on sent to London with her brother Sunset Boulevard. “It was incredible, insane, and Derek, also a “Dancing With the Stars” veteran, to study with the the music is amazing,” Hough dance coaches Corky and Shirley says. “There were prostitutes and Ballas. After five years overseas, monkeys on the set. It was a crashe returned home, her rebel- zy, crazy movie.” lious spirit intact. “I can remember stealing my parents’ car (before she had her Your Power Equipment


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 135

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Holidays call for deadlines You may email your notices to mpeznowski@ timesleader.com

Best day to play since late June. We are meeting Wooper and going over to The Pelican for clams and beer from Canada... Steelers give the boot to Titans 23 to 20. Boys in Buffalo are in some fine weather... Bills 41. Eagles 14...

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Cylinder engine Auto with slapstick. Navigation system. 57k miles. Black with Camel Leather interior. Heated Seats. Sun Roof, Excellent condition. Satellite Radio, Fully loaded. $18,000. 570-814-2501

ACURA `06 TL

White Diamond 80K original miles,1 owner, garage kept, camel leather interior, 3.2L / 6 cylinder, 5-speed automatic, front/rear & side airbags, ABS Navigation System, 8-speaker surround system DVD/CD/AM /FM/cassette,XM Satellite Radio, power & heated front seats,powerdoor locks & windows, power moonroof, 4 snow tires included!....and much, much more! Car runs and looks beautiful $18,500 Firm See it at Orloski’s Car Wash & Lube 295 Mundy Street (behind Wyoming Valley Mall) or Call 239-8461

AUDI `05 A4 1.8T

Cabriolet Convertible S-Line. 52K miles. Auto. All options. Silver. Leather interior. New tires. Must sell. $17,500 or best offer 570-954-6060

412 Autos for Sale

BMW ‘98 740 IL White with beige

leather interior. New tires, sunroof, heated seats. 5 cd player 106,000 miles .Asking $5,500 OBO 570-451-3259 570-604-0053

Let the Community Know! Place your Classified Ad TODAY! 570-829-7130

Rare, Exclusive Opportunity To Own...

2002 BMW 745i The Flagship of

the Fleet New - $87,000 Midnight Emerald with beige leather interior. 61K miles. Mint condition. Loaded. Garage Kept. Navigation Stunning, Must Sell! $20,000 $18,600

‘26 FORD MODEL T Panel Delivery

100 point Concours quality restoration. Red with black fenders. Never Driven. 0 miles on restoration. RARE! $40,000 $38,000 $36,500

1954 MERCURY MONTEREY WOODY WAGON 100 point restoration. $130,000 invested. 6.0 Vortec engine. 300 miles on restoration. Custom paint by Foose Automotive. Power windows, a/c, and much more! Gorgeous Automobile! $75,000 $71,000 $69,900

From an Exotic, Private Collection

Garage kept. 1 owner. Local driving, very good condition. 53,500 miles. Asking $9,700 (570) 457-6414 leave message

CADILLAC `04 SEVILLE SLS Beige. Fully loaded

Excellent condition. Runs great. New rotors, new brakes. Just serviced. 108,000 miles. Asking $5,000. OR BEST OFFER (570) 709-8492

Line up a place to live in classified!

CADILLAC ‘06 STS

AWD, 6 cylinder, Silver, 55,000 miles, sunroof, heated seats, Bose sound system, 6 CD changer, satellite radio, Onstar, parking assist, remote keyless entry, electronic keyless ignition, & more! $16,500 570-881-2775

CHEVROLET `03 IMPALA 97,000 miles, $3,300. 570-592-4522 570-592-4994

CHEVROLET `04 CORVETTE COUPE Torch red with

black and red interior. 9,700 miles, auto, HUD, removable glass roof, polished wheels, memory package, Bose stereo and twilight lighting, factory body moldings, traction control, ABS, Garage kept - Like New. $25,900 (570) 609-5282

CHEVROLET `86 CORVETTE 4x3 manual, 3 overdrive, 350 engine with aluminum heads. LT-1 exhaust system. White with red pearls. Custom flames in flake. New tires & hubs. 1 owner. 61,000 original miles. $8,500 (570) 359-3296 Ask for Les

CHEVROLET `88 MONTE CARLO SS V8, automatic,

Call 570-650-0278

51,267 miles, MUST SELL $3,900 (570) 760-0511

250 General Auction

250 General Auction

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

CHEVROLET ‘06 CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE

ACME AUTO SALES

CROSSROAD MOTORS

343-1959

1009 Penn Ave Scranton 18509 Across from Scranton Prep

Silver beauty, 1 Owner, Museum quality. 4,900 miles, 6 speed. All possible options including Navigation, Power top. New, paid $62,000 Must sell $45,900 570-299-9370

CHEVY `07 AVEO LT Power window/door locks. Keyless entry. Sunroof. A/C. Black with tan leather interior. 22,000 original miles. AM/FM/CD. New tires. $12,000 (570) 287-0815

CHEVY `95 CORVETTE

Yellow, auto, 67,300 miles. New tires & brakes. Removable top, leather. Air power locks & windows, new radio. Good condition. $12,000. 287-1820

CHEVY ‘11 MALIBU LT Moonroof. 7K miles. $18,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

CHEVY`01 MALIBU LS

Shinny midnight blue metallic. Like new with all power options: sunroof, rear spoiler and aluminum wheels. Very well maintained. $4,295. (570) 313-5538

CHRYSLER `04 SEBRING LXI CONVERTIBLE

Low miles - 54,000. V6. Leather interior. Great shape. A/C. Power door locks. $7,500. (570) 760-1005

DODGE `06 STRATUS Only 55K. Brand

new tires, plugs, wires, oil. Excellent Condition. $6,995 (570) 562-1963

LEO’S AUTO SALES 92 Butler St Wilkes-Barre, PA 570-825-8253

DODGE ‘01 DURANGO

4 door, 4WD, Current inspection. Runs good. $1,950 DEALER

250 General Auction

Absolute Real Estate Auction

3 Bedroom Home 521, 523 & 525 Luzerne St., Scranton, PA Thursday Evening October 13, 2011 6:00PM

Auction To Be Held @ Home - 521, 523 & 525 Luzerne Street, Scranton, PA 18504. From I-81: Take Exit 191B To US 11S / Scranton Express To 7th Avenue Exit, Keep Right At Fork To N. 7th Ave. Which Becomes Railroad Ave., To Right On Luzerne Street, To #521. A Nice Home For Family Or Great Rental Property 2-Story, 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath Home With City Utilities, Front & Rear Porch, Rear Fence, Replacement Windows, Nice Kitchen, Etc., Etc.; A Home For Any Size Family; 2 Parcels Selling Together, Plenty Of Parking; Would Make A Nice Home For A Family Or A Great Rental Property. Property Sells Absolutely To The Highest Bidder, Regardless Of Price. Property Sells As-Is, Where–Is, How–Is. Property Sells Subject To NO Contingencies, Be Prepared. If Any Tests Are Wanted Or Needed They Must Be Done Prior To Auction. Announcements Made Day Of Auction Take Precedence Over Printed Material. Brochures Including More Details, Tax Map, Purchase Offer, Etc. Will Be Available On Our Website @ www.manasseauctions.com. Open House: Day Of Auction, 1 ½ Hours Prior To Auction Start Time; Terms & Conditions: A 10% Buyers Premium Will Be Added To The Final Bid Price, And That Total Will Become The Purchase Price. 15% Down Of Total Purchase Price Or $3000, Whichever Is Greater, Due Night Of Auction In Cash Or Good Check With Positive ID. Balance Due At Closing In 30 Days; Property Sells With Special Warranty Deed. Mel & Matt Manasse Auctioneers & Licensed Real Estate Brokers PA Auctioneers License # AU571L & AU3517L; PA Brokers License # SBR000462 & ABR000472 607-692-4540 / 1-800-MANASSE WWW.MANASSEAUCTIONS.COM

800-825-1609

www.acmecarsales.net

11 AUDI S5 QUATTRO CONVERTIBLE Sprint blue/black & tan leather, 7 speed, auto turbo, 330 HP, Navigation, (AWD) 08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX SE

07

blue, auto V6

CHRYSLER 300 LTD AWD silver,

grey leather 06 PONTIAC G6 Silver, 4 door auto 06 DODGE STRATUS SXT RED. 05 CHEVY IMPALA LS Burgundy tan leather, sunroof 05 TOYOTA CAMRY XLE silver, grey leather, sunroof 05 VW NEW JETTA gray, auto, 4 cyl 05 CHEVY MALIBU Maxx White, grey leather, sunroof 04 NISSAN ALTIMA SL 3.5 white, black leather, sun roof 03 CADILLAC SEDAN Pearl white, tan leather, 73k miles 03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO Mid blue/light grey leather, Navigation, (AWD) 02 BUICK PARK AVE Silver, V6 01 SATURN LS 300 Blue 01 VOLVO V70 STATION WAGON, blue/grey, leather, AWD 99 CHRYSLER CONCORDE gold 98 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS black 98 SUBARU LEGACY SW white, auto, 4 cyl. (AWD) 98 HONDA CIVIC EX, 2 dr, auto, silver

SUVS, VANS, TRUCKS, 4 X4’s

08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT silver 5 speed 4x4 08 CADILLAC ESCALADE Blk/Blk leather, 3rd seat, Navgtn, 4x4 07 FORD ESCAPE XLT green/tan lint 4x4 07 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT Blue grey leather, 7 passenger mini van 06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LS V6 4 X 4 06 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR XLS, Blue auto, V6, awd 06 PONTIAC TORRANT Black (AWD) 06 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN ES, red, 4dr, entrtnmt cntr, 7 pass mini van 05 ISUZU RODEO silver, auito 4x4 05 EXPLORER XLT WHITE, AUTO, 4X4 05 FORD F150 XLT SUPER CREW TRUCK Blue & tan, 4 dr. 4x4 05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Silver 4 x4 05 BUICK RANIER CXL gold, tan, leather, sunroof (AWD) 05 GMC SIERRA X-Cab, blk, auto, 4x4 truck 04 CHEVY TAHOE LS grey, 3rd seat 4x4 04 FORD EXPEDITION Eddie Bauer, white & tan, tan leather, 3rd seat, 4x4 04 FORD EXPLORER LTD pearl white, black leather, 3rd seat 4x4 04 CHEVY SUBURBAN LS, pewter silver, 3rd seat, 4x4 03 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER grey, auto, 4x4 03 FORD WINDSTAR LX green 4 door, 7 passenger mini van 02 BUICK RENDEXZVOUS CXL, blue 3rd Seat, FWD 02 BUICK RENDEZVOUS Burgundy AWD 02 CHEVY 2500 HD Reg. Cab. pickup truck, green, auto, 4x4 01 HYUNDAI SANTE FE GLS silver, auto AWD 01 FORD F150 XLT Super Cab 4x4 truck, white & tan 00 CHEVY BLAZER LT Black & brown, brown leather 4x4 00 FORD EXPEDITION XLT, white, 3rd seat, 4x400 00 CHEVY 1500

570-825-7988

700 Sans Souci Highway WE SELL FOR LESS!! ‘09 DODGE CALIBER SXT 2.0 Automatic, 24k Factory Warranty! $12,799 ‘08 HONDA RIDGELINE RTL 32K, Factory Warranty, Leather Sunroof. Wholesale Price........ $23,299 08 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4 34K, Red $15,499 ‘08 SUBARU Special Edition 42k, 5 speed, AWD. Factory warranty. $13,999 ‘08 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE 4 cylinder, 40k $11,999 ‘08 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 4x4, Regular Cab, 63K, Factory Warranty $13,699 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS 4 door, only 37K! 5 Yr. 100K factory warranty $12,299 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS 60k. Factory warranty. $10,399 ‘05 HONDA CRV EX One owner, just traded, 65k $13,599 ‘01 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Executive 74K $5,899 ‘00 CHEVY VENTURE Only 56L $4,499 ‘08 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE Touring. White & Gray. Only 27K. $15,399 TITLE TAGS FULL NOTARY SERVICE 6 M ONTH WARRANTY

MAZDA `97 626 115,000 miles.

Needs some work. $1,000 (570) 817-1524

EAGLE `95 TALON

Only 97,000 Miles. Full custom body kit, dark green metallic with gray interior. Dual exhaust, 4 coil over adjustable struts. All new brakes, air intake kit, strut brakes, custom seats, custom white gauges, 2 pillar gauges, new stereo, alarm, custom side view mirrors. 4 cylinder automatic, runs excellent. $8,500. Call 570-876-1355 or 570-504-8540 (evenings)

FORD `04 MUSTANG Mach I, 40th

ANNIVERSARY EDITION V8, Auto, 1,400 miles, all options, show room condition. Call for info. Asking $24,995 Serious inquiries only. 570-636-3151

FORD `07 MUSTANG

63,000 highway miles, silver, runs great, $11,500. negotiable. 570-479-2482

FORD `07 MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE

34K. V6. 17” wheels. Shaker. 6 disc. Satellite. Mileage computer. New winter tires. Power seat/leather. $17,500. (570) 474-0943

FORD ‘01 TARUS

Only 30K miles. Alloy wheels $7,750

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

FORD ‘02 MUSTANG

GTRedCONVERTIBLE with black

top. 6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $17,500 570-760-5833

VOLKSWAGEN ‘00 BEETLE 2.0 automatic, air 67k miles $6400. 570-466-0999

LAW DIRECTORY Don’t Keep Your Practice a Secret!

Call 829-7130 To Place Your Ad 310

Attorney Services

BANKRUPTCY

FREE CONSULT

Guaranteed Low Fees Payment Plan! Colleen Metroka 570-592-4796 DIVORCE No Fault $295 divorce295.com Atty. Kurlancheek 800-324-9748 W-B

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

310

Attorney Services

Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

FREE CONSULTATION

for all legal matters Attorney Ron Wilson 570-822-2345 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

AUTO SERVICE DIRECTORY

468

Auto Parts

We pick up 822-0995

red, auto, 4 x 4

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

BMW `01 X5

D.P. MOTORS

4.4i. Silver, fully loaded, tan leather interior. 1 owner. 103k miles. $8,999 or best offer. Call 570-814-3666

1451 SHOEMAKER AVE W. WYOMING * 714-4146

BUY * SELL * TRADE 2 2 2 2 2 2

Ford ‘03 F150

BMW `07 328xi

4x2. 60K. $5,995

Black with black interior. Heated seats. Back up & navigation systems. New tires & brakes. Sunroof. Garage kept. Many extras! 46,000 Miles. Asking $20,500. 570-825-8888 or 626-297-0155 Call Anytime!

GMC ‘02 Cargo Van $5,395 Mitsubishi ‘06 Outlander $8,395

Ford ‘05 Escape XLS Standard. 87K. 4 Cylinder. Front Wheel Drive. $7,895

Hyundai ‘04 Santa Fe

CHEVY `96 CAVALIER

78K. 4 Cylinder. Front Wheel Drive. Auto. $7,795

714-4146

472 Auto Services

$ WANTED JUNK $ VEHICLES LISPI TOWING

XCAB TRUCK

3.2 Quattro AT6. Auto tiptronic 6 speed. Black with black leather. Garage kept. Fully loaded, gps, cold weather package. 78K miles. Asking $17,400. Call 570-814-6714

2 door, runs good and looks good. $1,950. Call 570-407-1134

Call Our Auto Credit Hot Line to get Pre-approved for a Car Loan!

412 Autos for Sale

SILVERADO XCAB

To place your ad call...829-7130 NEW!! Full size adult ATV. Strong 4 stroke motor. CVT fully automatic transmission with reverse. Electric start. Front & rear luggage racks. Long travel suspension. Disc brakes. Dual stage head lights. Perfect for hunters & trail riders alike. BRAND NEW & READY TO RIDE. $1,695 takes it away. 386-334-7448 Wilkes-Barre

GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT, NO CREDIT

2wd truck, burgundy & tan 00 GRAND CARAVAN SPORT, dark blue, 4 door, 7 pass mini van 98 FORD EXPLORER Eddie Bauer, white, tan leather, sunropof, 4x4 98 EXPLORER XLT Blue grey leather, sunroof, 4x4 97 DODGE RAM 1500

AUDI `05 A6

375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651 570-779-2288

One coupon per party. In house only.

HONDA`09 RECON TRX 250CC/Electric

CADILLAC `94 SEDAN DEVILLE Fully equipped,

BANKRUPTCY LOST. Cat from Larry O’Malia Greenhouses in Plains. Male, all black, short hair, gold eyes, 8 lbs. no collar, answers to Boo. May have left in customer’s car. REWARD 570-822-3805 570-899-1908

ATVs/Dune Buggies

TOMAHAWK`10

or fax to 570-831-7312

For additional information or questions regarding legal notices you may call Marti Peznowski at 570-970-7371 or 570-829-7130

406

714388

PAGE 2G

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

VITO’S & GINO’S Like New Tires $15 & UP! Like New Batteries $20 & UP! Carry Out Price 288-8995

WANTED

Cars & Full Size Trucks. For prices... Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562

Find homes for your kittens! Place an ad here! 570-829-7130


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 3G

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N

TH E NUM BER 1 NISSAN DEAL ER IN TH E NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGIO N**

S C AN H ERE FO R S ERVIC E S PEC IAL S

AD DUELING U E L I N G N ISSAN S R L 2 0 12 N ISSAN ALTIM A 2 0 11N ISSAN R OG UE O VVS. S. T G I U M E A * * 2 .5 S SED AN

S AW D

STK#N 20528 M O D EL# 13112

M SR P $23,820

4 Cyl, CVT , A/C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

$

B U Y FOR

19,495

*

W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $5 0 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

$

OR

30 AVAIL AB L E

30 AVAIL AB L E

LEAS E FOR :

159

M SR P $23,905

4 Cyl, CVT , A/C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

AT TH IS P R ICE!

AT TH IS P R ICE!

$

P ER M O.

STK#N 20680 M O D EL# 22211

B U Y FOR

20 ,995

*

W / $75 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE

P lu s Ta x.

C IT’S THE O U THE RACE IS ON! N T D 2 1,4 9 5 229 2 6 ,9 9 5 O W N 2 9 ,8 9 5 2 6 ,8 9 5 *$159 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 24 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,435; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $1000 Nis s a n Reb a te & $500 NM AC Ca p tive Ca s h.

OR

STK#N 20827 M O D EL# 16111 M SR P $32,885

STK#N 20905 M O D EL# 15112 M SR P $25,040

12

7 COUP E S

$

M A XIM A S A V A IL A BL E ! S & S V TOO!

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PD L , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts

*

OR

$

C We Will Sell O 75 Altimas and U 75 Rogues N T D 259 O W N P lu s Ta x.

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN MAXIMA MAXIMA 3 3.5S .5S SEDAN SEDAN

2012 2 012 N NISSAN ISSAN A ALTIMA LTIMA 2 2.5S .5S COUPE COUPE

B U Y FO R

199

P ER M O.

*$199 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $13,148; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2150 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . $1000 NM AC L ea s e Ca s h. S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $750 Nis s a n Reb a te.

B IIGG D EEAA L A V A IL A BL E ! 4 CYL & V 6 TOO!

$

LEAS E FOR :

V6, CVT , M o o n ro o f, PW , PD L , Cru is e, T ilt, Po w erS ea t, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

L EAS E FOR

*

$

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE

B U Y FO R

*

OR

W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE

L EAS E FOR

$

*

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

* $229 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14,523; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h d o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d e $1000 N is s a n Reb a te.

* $259 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $17,757; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h d o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . $1000 N M AC L ea s e Ca s h in clu d ed . S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $2500 N is s a n Reb a te.

** 2011 N 2011 NISSAN PATHFINDER ATHFINDER S SV V 4X4 4X4 PER ISSAN P

2011 2 011PER** N NISSAN ISSAN MURANO MURANO S A AWD WD

MO. STK#N 20967 M O D EL# 25211 M SR P $34,930 S A V E OV E R $5000 ON A L L 2011 P A THFIN DE RS IN S TOCK !

$

MO. STK#N 20706 M O D EL# 23211 M SR P $32,130

20 2011 M URA N O’S A V A IL A BL E !

V6, Au to , A/ C, AM / F M / CD, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts !

B U Y FO R

*

OR

$

W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE

L EAS E FOR

329

*

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

$

V6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s !

B U Y FO R

W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE

*

OR

$

L EAS E FOR

299

*

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

* $299 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $15,743; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h d o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . $750 N M AC L ea s e Ca s h In clu d ed . S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d e $2500 N is s a n Reb a te.

* $329 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $15,718; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h d o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . $2345 N M AC L ea s e Ca s h In clu d ed . S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d e $2000 N is s a n Reb a te.

*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils . **As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f Au g 2 0 11.

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229 M U N DY S TRE E T W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .

w w w .ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om

®


PAGE 4G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

JAGUAR `98 XK8

FORD ‘10 FUSION SE

Convertible. 40k miles. Great condition. Silver with black interior. Garage kept. Recently inspected. V8/auto/ AC. AM/FM / 6 disc. $12,000 or best offer. 570-310-1287

Moonroof. Auto. $15,995

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

KIA `08 RONDO Maroon with beige

HONDA `05 ACCORD

EXL. Titanium exterior, grey leather interior. Dual Airbags. ABS. Bucket Seats. CD changer. Cruise. Fog lights. GPS. All power. A/C. 104k. Sunroof / moonroof. $10,900. Please Call 570-814-0949

HONDA `07 ACCORD

V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1 owner with maintenance records. Slate blue with leather interior. Sunroof. Asking $12,500. Call 570-239-2556

HONDAS

‘08 CRV AWD. Extra Clean! $19,999 ‘08 Accords Choose from 3. Low miles. Factory warranty. Starting at $16,495 ‘08 Civic LX Blue. 20 K miles. Factory warranty. $15,800 ‘08 Civic LX Gray. 26K. 1 owner. $14,400 ‘04 Honda Pilot 4x4. Auto. AC. $11,200 ** ** ** ** ** ** ‘05 Lincoln Town Car Extra Sharp! Low Low Miles! $12,995 ‘08 Chevy Trailblazer LT AWD. 15K miles. $19,500 ** ** ** ** ** ** MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

interior. All options. 78,000 miles. Still under warranty. Received 60,000 mile servicing. New tires. KBB Value $8,500. Asking only $7,900. A Must See! (570) 457-0553

LEXUS `98 LS 400

Excellent condition, garage kept, 1 owner. Must see. Low mileage, 90K. Leather interior. All power. GPS navigation, moon roof, cd changer. Loaded. $9,000 or best offer. 570-706-6156

LINCOLN 06

Town Car Limited

Fully loaded. 50,000 miles, Triple coated Pearlized White. Showroom condition. $16,900. (570) 814-4926 (570) 654-2596

WANTED!

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

412 Autos for Sale

`02 FORESTER MERCEDES-BENZ `95 L.SUBARUAWD. Red. $2,850. Hail damSL 500 age. Runs great. Convertible, with removable hard top, dark Blue, camel interior, Summer Driving Only, Garage Kept. Very Good Condition, No Accidents. Classy Car.

New Price!

MX-5 CONVERTIBLE

VITO’S & GINO’S

MERCEDES `92 500 SEL

Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks

White with gray leather interior, 17” custom chrome wheels, 4 new tires, new breaks front & rear. Full tune-up, oil change & filters done. Body and interior are perfect. Car has all the options. 133,850 miles. Original price: $140,000 new. This is the diplomat version. No rust or dings on this car Garage kept. Sell for $9,500. Call: 570-876-1355 or 570-504-8540 Evenings

Highest Prices Paid!!

FREE PICKUP

288-8995

HYUNDAI ‘10 ELANTRA GLS

Only 8,200 miles! 1 Owner. $16,952

MERCURY `95 GRAND MARQUIS 4 door, V8, fully

loaded, moon roof, new tires & brakes. Interior & exterior in excellent shape. 2 owners. Call (570) 822-6334 or (570) 970-9351

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

468

Auto Parts

468

Auto Parts

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES $300 AND UP

$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN, DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!

NOBODY Pays More 570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

SUBARU `98 OUTBACK Wagon. New Tires.

MINI ‘08 COOPER

$3,900. (570) 899-8725

2 door, automatic, leather, sky roof, boost cd, fogs $18,880

Inspection good till July 2012. 155,000 miles.

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

TOYOTA `10

TOYOTA ‘09 COROLLA S

VOLKSWAGEN `04

Camry SE. 56,000 miles. Red, alloy wheels, black cloth interior. Will consider trade. $14,200 (570) 793-9157

MINI COOPER`08 CLUBMAN Ssilver Sparkling

metallic. Roof and mirror caps in black. Black leather interior. Automatic steptronic paddles. Dual moon roof. Cold weather package. Dynamic stability control. Excellent Condition. 33,600 miles. Just Serviced. 30 MPG City. Factory warranty to 50K miles. $19,995 (570) 472-9909 (570) 237-1062

58K miles. 4 cylinder, 6 speed manual. Great condition. All power. A/C. Cruise. $10,500. Call 570-333-4379 after 6:30 pm

35K miles. New, allseason tires. Sirius radio. 2 sets of mats, including cargo mats. $18,400. Call 570-822-3494 or 570-498-0977

NISSAN ‘09 ALTIMA S Auto. CD Player. Cruise. $13,995

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

PONTIAC `04 VIBE White. New manual

transmission & clutch. Front wheel drive. 165k highway miles. Great on gas. Good condition, runs well. $4,500 or best offer 570-331-4777

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

SAAB `06 93 A E R O s p o r t .

Leather interior. Heated seats. Sunroof. Good condition. $8,000. Serious inquiries only. Call 570-760-8264

Beetle - Convertible GREAT ON GAS!

Blue. AM/FM cassette. Air. Automatic. Power roof, windows, locks & doors. Boot cover for top. 22k. Excellent condition. Garage kept. Newly Reduced $14,000 570-479-7664 Leave Message

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

Selling your Camper? Place an ad and find a new owner. 570-829-7130

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CADILLAC `80 COUPE DEVILLE Excellent condition,

CHEVROLET `76 PICKUP Very Good

CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

CHEVROLET `71 MONTE CARLO $2,000 or best offer (570) 650-8687

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

L ow A P R A va ila b le

MSRP $22,945

18,599

SALE Starting $ at PRICE

*

FORD SALEEN ‘04 281 SC Coupe

1,000 miles documented #380 Highly collectable. $28,500 570-472-1854

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

0%

A P R

0 %

A P R

up to 60 m os .

$1000 O N M O ST P lu s CH E VRO LE T TRU CK S .9 OR on 72 m os . A va ila b le

MSRP $27,615

MSRP $31,655

L ow A P R A va ila b le

#11471, Vortec 4.8L V8 S FI, 6 S p d . A u tom a tic, S ta bilitra k , A ir, Lock in g Rea rDifferen tia l, Cu s tom Cloth S ea ts , A M /FM S tereo, Hi-Ba ck Bu ck etS ea ts

SALE Starting $ at PRICE

24,599

MSRP $34,458

MSRP $34,105

*

#11969, 4.8L V8, 4 S p eed A T, A / C, Cru is e, Pos i Rea r, Tin ted G la s s , O n / O ffRoa d Tires

25,999

SALE Starting $ at PRICE

*

2011 CHEVY EXPRESS COMMERCIAL CUTAWAY MSRP $35,865

Bed lin er, Ra il Protector, HD FloorM a ts , M old ed M u d L ow A P R Fla p s , W heel A va ila b le Hou s e Lin er #11136, Vortec 4.8L V8, 4 S p eed A u tom a tic, S ta bilitra k , A ir Con d ition in g , 60/40 Rea rS ea tin g , Keyles s En try, XM S a tellite Ra d io, PW , PDL, O n S ta rw / Tu rn -By-Tu rn Na vig a tion

#11778, Vortec 6.0L V8 S FI, 6 S p eed A u tom a tic, A ir Con d ition in g , Lock in g Rea rDifferen tia l, Cru is e, Chrom e G rille, 17” S teel W heels , A M /FM S tereo, 40/20/40 S ea tin g

2011 CHEVROLET EXPRESS 3500 16’ CUTAWAY w/ATTIC

2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 3500 4WD CREW CAB DURAMAX DIESEL LTZ

*

Kit Car $9,000 (570) 655-4884 hell-of-adeal.com

2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 EXTENDED CAB 4WD

2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2500 4WD REGULAR CAB

28,999

$24,000

MERCEDES ‘29

2011 CHEVROLET EXPRESS 2500 CARGO VAN

2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 CREW CAB 4WD LS

SALE Starting $ at PRICE

MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL

owner. Automatic transmission. Rare tuxedo silver / black vinyl top with black naugahyde interior. Never damaged. $6,000. Call 570-489-6937

L ow A P R A va ila b le #11991, Vortec 4.3L V6 A u tom a tic, A irCon d ition in g , Lock in g Rea rDifferen tia l, 40/20/40 S ea tin g , S ta bilitra k

All original $12,000

CHEVY`75 CAMARO 350 V8. Original

w w w .va lleychevrolet.com

2011 CHEVROLET 1500 REG. CAB 2WD

$49,000

FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD

Condition! Low miles! $7500. FIRM 570-905-7389 Ask for Lee

$3,000 located in Hazleton. 570-454-1945 or 561-573-4114

VALLE Y CH E VRO LE T

L ow A P R A va ila b le

L ow A P R A va ila b le

29,999

SALE Starting $ at PRICE

*

#11939, 6.0L V6, 6 S p eed A u tom a tic, A ir, Lock in g Rea r Differen tia l, Cru is e, Tilt, Fron tVin yl FloorCoverin g , Reclin in g Fron tBu ck etS ea ts

31,589

SALE Starting $ at PRICE

*

2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 3500 4WD REGULAR CAB UTILITY TRUCK MSRP $40,382

MSRP $37,845

L ow A P R A va ila b le

L ow A P R A va ila b le

32,599

SALE Starting $ at PRICE

*

2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 3500 REGULAR CAB 9’ DUMP TRUCK MSRP $43,710

7,000

#11543, Vortec 6.0L V8, 6 S p eed A u tom a tic, A ir Con d ition in g , 18” S teel W heels , PW , PDL, Du a l Hea ted M irrors , Lock in g Rea rDifferen tia l, S ta bilitra k

34,499

SALE Starting $ at PRICE

#11841, Du ra m a x Dies el 6.6L Tu rbo, A llis on 6 S p eed A u tom a tic, Chrom e W heel Trim , M u ch, M u ch M ore!

2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 3500 REGULAR CAB 11’ DUMP TRUCK

2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 3500 HD CREW CAB DUMP TRUCK

MSRP $44,739

MSRP $47,959

L ow A P R A va ila b le

L ow A P R A va ila b le #11482, 6.0L V8, 6 S p eed A T, A /C, S n ow Plow Prep . Pk g ., Lock in g Rea rDifferen tia l, & M ore!

36,999

SALE Starting $ at PRICE

REGULAR AND EXTENDED CABS Available

SAVE OVER

$

L ow A P R A va ila b le

#11451, Vortec 6.0L V8, 6 S p eed A u tom a tic, A C, Cru is e, S u n s ha d e, Lock in g Rea rDifferen tia l, Du a l Rea rW heels

PORSCHE `85 944

Low mileage, 110,000 miles, 5 speed, 2 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, power windows, power mirrors, AM/FM radio, CD changer, leather interior, rear defroster, tinted windows, custom wheels, $8,000. (570) 817-1803

Auto. 4 Cylinder. $16,450

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED!

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

NISSANMint`08condition. XTERRA MAZDA `08 MIATA Grey, Red. Power steering, auto, AC, CD. ONLY 5,500 MILES. $18,000 (570) 883-0143

Auto, air, CD, cassette, cruise, tilt. All power. 174K miles. Mechanical inspection welcomed. Call 570-561-9217

$8,000 or best offer or trade for SUV or other. 570-388-6669

ALL JUNK CARS! CA$H NISSAN `08 SENTRA PAID

570-301-3602

412 Autos for Sale

L ow A P R A va ila b le

#11508, 6.0L V8, 6 S p eed A T, A /C, S n ow Plow Prep . Pk g ., Lock in g Rea rDifferen tia l, & M ore!

*

37,499

SALE Starting $ at PRICE

*

#11392, 6.0L V8, 6 S p eed A T, A /C, Cru is e, PW , PDL, P. M irrors , S n ow Plow Prep . Pk g ., & M ore!

*

40,999

SALE Starting $ at PRICE

*

*All prices plus tax & tags. Prices include rebate & Business Choice Rebate if aaplicable. Low APR in lieu of rebates Must take delivery by 10/31/2011. Select pictures may not represent actual vehicle. Not responsible for typographical errors.

K E N

W A L L A CE ’ S

V A LLE Y CH E V RO L E T

821-2772 •1-800-444-7172

601 K IDDE R S TRE E T, W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A M o n.-Thu rs . 8 :3 0 -8 :0 0 pm ; Fri. 8 :3 0 -7:0 0 pm ; Sa t. 8 :3 0 -5 :0 0 pm

EX IT 170 B O FF I-8 1TO EX IT 1. B EAR R IG HT O N B USIN ESS R O UTE 3 0 9 TO SIX TH LIG HT. JUST B ELOW

PRE-OWNED UNDER $9,999

B1473C 2001 DODGE NEON SE ..........................................................$3,303 T2583B 2001 VOLVO S40 ....................................................................$4,950 T2510B 2004 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS ..............................................$6,252 P4794M 2005 BUICK LACROSSE CX ..................................................$7,565 B1532 2002 BUICK LESABRE CUSTOM .............................................$7,777 B1491A 2005 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER LS ....................................$7,962 T2551C 2004 CHRYSLER PACIFICA BASE ..........................................$7,965 Y2593A 2004 FORD TAURUS SE .........................................................$7,988 T2552A 2005 BUICK TERAZZA CXL ...................................................$8,546 T2584B 2005 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT ................................................. $8,960 T2512B 2005 FORD CROWN VICTORIA STANDARD ...........................$9,295 B1491A 2004 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER LS ....................................$7,962 B1519B 2004 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER EXT LS .............................$8,815 B1473B 2005 CHEVROLET MALIBU LS ..............................................$8,828 T2552A 2005 BUICK TERAZZA CXL ...................................................$8,546 T2512B 2005 FORD CROWN VICTORIA STANDARD ...........................$9,295

W YO M IN G V A LLEY M ALL.

PRE-OWNED VEHICLES T2603A 2006 AUDI A4 2.0T QUATTRO...............................................$12,256 B1513A 2006 VOLVO V50 2.4I............................................................$12,918 B1524A 2006 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS LS .................................$13,637 T2568B 2006 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING ............................................$13,786 B1521B 2005 CHRYSLER 300C BASE ................................................$15,678 B1522A 2009 HYUNDAI SONATA SE...................................................$16,679 T2589A 2007 DODGE NITRO SLT .......................................................$16,760 T2586B 2007 INFINITI M45 SPORT ....................................................$21,947 TT2585A 2010 SUBARU LEGACY 2.5I ................................................$24,471 B1541A 2009 MERCEDES-BENZ CLS-CLASS CLS550 ........................$45,643

TRUCKS T2584B 2005 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT ..................................................$10,951

INCLUDES OIL CHANGES & TIRE ROTATIONS

T2566B 2003 LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER SPORT HSE....................$10,981

T2544B 2005 PONTIAC G6 GT .........................................................$10,477 B1488B 2005 BUICK LACROSSE CXL ..............................................$11,370 P4803A 2006 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT ............................................$11,926 B1535B 2009 CHEVROLET IMPALA LS ............................................$13,760 B1478A 2005 BUICK LACROSSE CXS ..............................................$14,315 B1476A 2008 CHEVROLET IMPALA LS ............................................$14,697 B1538A 2006 BUICK LUCERNE CXL ................................................$15,969 B1527A 2007 BUICK LUCERNE CXL ................................................$16,782 T2492A 2005 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2500HD .............................$16,782 P4804 2008 BUICK LUCERNE CXL ..................................................$17,638 T2543A 2008 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER LT ..................................$18,955 T2500A 2008 CHEVROLET COLORADO LLT .....................................$19,978 B1450A 2008 GMC ACADIA SLT-1.....................................................$27,736 President of Sun Buick, GMC in Moosic

Beyond Percision

BUICK • GMC

“Remember. If you don’t come see me today. I can’t save you any money.”

CREDIT PROBLEMS? NO PROBLEM! WE CAN HELP

Professional Grade

Designed for Action

Mon.-Thur. 10-8; Fri. & Sat. 10-5; Sunday Closed

T2595A 2009 DODGE JOURNEY SXT .................................................$15,829 P4805A 2007 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO ..............................$16,585 T2569A 2008 MERCURY MARINER PREMIER .....................................$17,561 81530A 2008 SAAB 9-7X 4.2I .............................................................$17,921 T2574A 2006 TOYOTA TACOMA BASE ...............................................$22,267 B1499N 2009 JEEP WRANGLER X ......................................................$22,832 T2591A 2010 TOYOTA RAV4 SPORT ..................................................$22,898 B1508A 2007 HONDA ODYSSEY EX-L ................................................$22,907 B1531A 2008 LEXUS RX 350 ..............................................................$25,950

4230 Birney Avenue • Moosic

1-800-523-8757 THE T H E SUN SUN

ADVANTAGE: DVA N TAG E : A

The lowest prices on GM products and service • No hassle financing • Always a great selection of new and used vehicles • Personal service with attention to detail • We offer quality GM Certified vehicles

*All Price Plus Tax & Tags. All rebates & package discount apply.

www.sunbpg.com

MONTAGE AUTO MILE

Birney Ave./Rte 11 • Moosic, PA


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CHEVROLET `81 CORVETTE Very good condi-

PONTIAC 1937 Fully restored near

tion. 350 engine, classic silver with black bottom trim, all original, registered as an antique vehicle, removable mirror tops. 66,000 miles, chrome wheels & tires in very good shape, leather interior, garage kept. Must see to appreciate. Asking $9,000 or willing to trade for a newer Pontoon boat. Call 570-545-6057

Chrysler ‘68 New Yorker

Sedan. 440 Engine. Power Steering & brakes. 34,500 original miles. Always garaged. $6,800 (570) 883-4443

DESOTO CUSTOM ‘49 4 DOOR SEDAN

original. New paint, new interior, new wiring, custom tinted glass, new motor & transmission. Spare motor & trans. 16” wide white walls car in excellent condition in storage for 2 years. $14,000 or best offer. Serious inquiries ONLY. Call 570-574-1923

STUDEBAKER ‘31 Rumble seat, Coupe Good condition. Call for details (570) 881-7545

FORD `52 COUNTRY SEDAN CUSTOM LINE

STATION WAGON V8, automatic, 8 passenger, 3rd seat, good condition, 2nd owner. REDUCED TO $6,500. 570-579-3517 570-455-6589

LINCOLN `66

Continental Convertible

4 door. 67K miles. 1 owner since `69. Good frame. Teal green/white leather. Restorable. $2,500 570-287-5775 570-332-1048

LINCOLN `88 TOWN CAR 61,000 original

miles, garage kept, triple black, leather interior, carriage roof, factory wire wheels, loaded, excellent condition. $5,500. Call Mike 570-237-7660

MERCEDES 1975

Good interior & interior. Runs great! New tires. Many new parts. Moving, Must Sell. $2,300 or best offer 570-693-3263 Ask for Paul

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT DRASTICALLY

REDUCED!! This model only produced in 1967 & 1968. All original 45,000 miles, Color Burgundy, cloth & vinyl interior, 350 rocket engine, 2nd owner. Fender skirts, always garaged. Trophy winner at shows. Serious inquiries only, $7,500. 570-690-0727

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT

Must Sell! Appraised for $9,200 • All original

45,000 miles • 350 Rocket engine • Fender skirts • Always garaged Will sell for $6,000 Serious inquires only 570690-0727

PONTIAC `68 CATALINA 400 engine. 2

barrel carburetor. Yellow with black roof and white wall tires. Black interior. $4,995. Call (570) 696-3513

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 Electra Glide, Ultra Classic, many chrome accessories, 13k miles, Metallic Emerald Green. Garage kept, like new condition. Includes Harley cover. $12,900 570-718-6769 570-709-4937

HARLEY DAVIDSON

Berkshire Green, Originally purchased at Bradley-Lawless in Scranton. Car was last seen in Abington-Scranton area. Finder’s fee paid if car is found and purchased. Call John with any info (570) 760-3440

Boats & Marinas

CABELAS FISH CAT PANTHER 9’. Approximately 5

years old. Retails $699, selling $350. FIRM 570-288-9719

CUSTOM CREST 15’

Fiberglass boat with trailer. Outboard propulsion. Includes: 2 motors Erinmade, “Lark II series”

PRICE REDUCED! $2,400 NEGOTIABLE

570-417-3940

ROW BOAT 12’ & TRAILER new Aluminum,

tires, new wiring on trailer, $699. neg. 570-479-7114

STARCRAFT ‘80 16’ DEEP V ‘90 Evinrude out-

board 70hp with tilt & trim— ‘92 EZ loader trailer. With ‘00 Tracker Series 60lbs foot pedal, 2 downriggers, storages, gallon tanks, 2 fish finders and more. MUST SEE. Make Best Offer. Call 866-320-6368 after 5pm.

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY `04 DUMP TRUCK

36k miles. 9’6” Boss power angle plow. Hydraulic over electric dump box with sides. Rubber coated box & frame. Very good condition. $22,500 firm. Call 570-840-1838

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

439

Motorcycles

‘96 HONDA

American Classic Edition. 1100 cc. 1 owner, under 20,000 miles. Yellow and white, extra chrome, VNH exhaust, bags, lights, MC jack, battery tender, helmets. Asking $3500 570-288-7618

BMW ‘07 K1200 GT Low mileage. Many extras. Clean. $9,000 (570) 646-2645

DAELIM 2006

150 CCs. 4,700 miles. 70 MPG. New battery & tires. $1,500; negotiable. Call 570-288-1246 or 570-328-6897

HARLEY 2011 HERITAGE SOFTTAIL Black. 1,800 miles.

ABS brakes. Security System Package. $16,000 firm. SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY 570-704-6023

HARLEY ‘73

Rat Rod. $3,200 Or Best Offer. (570) 510-7231

HARLEY DAVIDSON `03

100th Anniversary Edition Deuce. Garage kept. 1 owner. 1900 miles. Tons of chrome. $38,000 invested. A must see. Asking $18,000. OBO 570-706-6156

442 RVs & Campers

garage kept! Golden Anniversary - silver/black. New Tires. Extras. 19,000 miles. Must Sell! $10,000. 570-639-2539

Blue pearl, excellent condition, 3,100 miles, factory alarm with extras. $10,500. or best offer. Tony 570-237-1631

HSoft ARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80 riding FLH. King of the Highway! Mint original antique show winner. Factory spot lights, wide white tires, biggest Harley built. Only 28,000 original miles! Never needs inspection, permanent registration. $7,995 570-905-9348

HONDA 2005 SHADOW VLX600, White, 10,000 miles & new back tire. $3,000 (570) 262-3697 or (570) 542-7213

room built on. Set up on permanent site in Wapwallopen. Comes with many extras. $6,500. (570) 829-1419 or (570) 991-2135

EQUIPMENT/BOBCAT TRAILER

KAWASAKI ‘03 KLR 650. Green.

Excellent condition. 6K Miles. $3,000 (570) 287-0563

KAWASAKI ‘05 NINJA 500R. 3300

miles. Orange. Garage kept. His & hers helmets. Must sell. $2400 570-760-3599 570-825-3711

Brand new 2010 tandem axle, 4 wheel electric brakes, 20’ long total, 7 x 16 wood deck, fold up ramps with knees, removable fenders for oversized loads, powder coat paint for rust protection, 2 5/16 hitch coupler, tongue jack, side pockets, brake away switch, battery, 7 pole RV plugs, title & more!! Priced for quick sale. $2,595 386-334-7448 Wilkes-Barre

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC NOW BACK IN PA.

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, , awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986

LAYTON ‘02 TRAVEL TRAILER

30 ft. Sleeps 9 - 3 bunk beds & 1 queen. Full kitchen. Air conditioning/ heat. Tub/shower. $6,900 (570) 696-1969

NEWMAR 36’ MOUNTAIN AIRE

5th wheel, 2 large slides, new condition, loaded with accessories. Ford Dually diesel truck with hitch also available. 570-455-6796

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649

PACE ‘99 ARROW VISION

Kawasaki` 93 ZX11D NINJA LIKE NEW 8900 Original

miles. Original owner. V@H Exhaust and Computer. New tires. $3,800. 570-574-3584

MOTO GUZZI `03

1,100 cc. 1,900 miles. Full dress. Shaft driven. Garage kept. Excellent condition. $6000. Health Problems. Call 570-654-7863

POLARIS ‘00 VICTORY CRUISER 14,000 miles,

92 V-twin, 1507 cc, extras $6000. 570-883-9047

SUZUKI ‘77 GS 750

Needs work. $1,200 or best offer 570-855-9417 570-822-2508

UNITED MOTORS ‘08 MATRIX 2 SCOOTER

150cc. Purple & grey in color. 900 miles. Bought brand new. Paid $2,000. Asking $1,600 or best offer. (570) 814-3328 or (570) 825-5133

YAMAHA ‘11 YZ 450 Brand New! $6,900 (570) 388-2947

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

442 RVs & Campers

CHEROKEE ‘10

Travel trailer. 39 ft., 4 slide outs, 3 bedrooms, 2 bath rooms, microwave, awning, tinted windows, Brand new. Have no pets or smokers. Much more!!!!! $33,000 (cell) 682-888-2880

Ford V10. Excellent condition. 8,700 miles. 1 slide out. 2 awnings. 2 colored TVs, generator, back up camera, 2 air conditioners, microwave/convection oven, side by side refrigerator with ice maker, washer/dryer, queen size bed. $37,900 negotiable (570) 288-4826 (570) 690-1464

SUNLITE CAMPER

22 ft. 3 rear bunks, center bathroom, kitchen, sofa bed. Air, Fully self contained. Sleeps 6. New tires, fridge awning. $4500. 215-322-9845

TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft

Rear queen master bedroom, Walk thru bathroom. Center kitchen + dinette bed. Front extra large living room + sofa bed. Big View windows. Air, awning, sleeps 6, very clean, will deliver. Located in Benton, Pa. $4,900. 215-694-7497

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

BUICK `05 RENDEZVOUS BARGAIN!!

AWD, Fully loaded, 1 owner, 22,000 miles. Small 6 cylinder. New inspection. Like new, inside & out. $13,200. (570) 540-0975

CADILLAC `99 ESCALADE 97k miles. Black with beige leather interior. 22” rims. Runs great. $8,500 Call 570-861-0202

CHEVROLET `06 COLORADO 4X4 REgular cab, 11,000

original miles. Black, 5 speed/5 cylinder, excellent condition! New tires. $14,000 negotiable. Call (570) 299-1538

CHEVROLET `10 SILVERADO 1500 Extended Cab V71

Package 4x4. Bedliner. V-8. 5.3 Liter. Red. Remote start. Garage kept. 6,300 miles $26,000 (570) 639-2539

CHEVROLET `97 SUNLINE SOLARIS `91 SILVERADO travel trailer A/C. HARLEY DAVIDSON `03 25’ with Western plow. Bunk beds. New 4WD, Automatic.

NIGHTTRAIN New rear tire. Very

good condition. 23K miles. $8,500. Call 570-510-1429

fridge & hot water heater. Excellent condition. $3,900. 570-466-4995

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

1500. 4x4. 8’ box. Auto. A/C. 121K miles. $5,995. 570-332-1121

CHEVY `10 SILVERADO

4 Door Crew Cab LTZ. 4 wheel drive. Excellent condition, low mileage. $35,500. Call 570-655-2689

HYOSUNG `04 COMET

250. 157 Miles. Excellent Condition. $1,200. Call 570-256-7760

451

DUTCHMAN 96’ CHEVY `00 SILVERADO 5TH WHEEL with slideout & sun

‘03 Dyna Wide Glide Excellent condition -

WANTED: PONTIAC `78 FIREBIRD HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05 Formula 400 V-ROD VRSCA

421 3 on the tree with fluid drive. This All American Classic Icon runs like a top at 55MPH. Kin to Chrysler, Dodge, Plymouth, Imperial Desoto, built in the American Midwest, after WWII, in a plant that once produced B29 Bombers. In it’s original antiquity condition, with original shop & parts manuals, she’s beautifully detailed and ready for auction in Sin City. Spent her entire life in Arizona and New Mexico, never saw a day of rain or rust. Only $19,995. To test drive, by appointment only, Contact Tony at 570-899-2121 or penntech84th@ gmail.com

439

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 5G

Loaded with options. Bedliner. 55,000 miles. $9,200. Call (570) 868-6503

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

FORD `90 TRUCK

17’ box. Excellent running condition. Very Clean. $4,300. Call 570-287-1246

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘99 F150

Shortbox. 1 owner. New truck trade! $4,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHEVY `99 SILVERADO

Auto. V6 Vortec. Standard cab. 8’ bed with liner. Dark Blue. 98,400 miles. $6,899 or best offer 570-823-8196

CHEVY ‘03 TRAILBLAZER LTZ

4WD, V6, leather, auto, moonroof $9,880

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD 02 F150 Extra Cab. 6

Cylinder, 5 speed. Air. 2WD. $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY 05 TRAILBLAZER LT Leather. Sunroof.

Highway miles. Like Brand New! $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

FREIGHTLINER ’97 MIDROOF 475 CAT & 10 speed transmission. $12,000 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

MAZDA ‘04 TRIBUTE LX Automatic, V6

Sunroof, CD 1 owner Extra Clean! $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHEVY ‘07 HHR LT Moonroof $12,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HONDA `10 ODYSSEY

MERCURY `07 MARINER One owner. Luxury

Leather & Moonroof. $16,995

CHEVY ‘90 CHEYENNE

2500 series. 8 ft box with tool box. Heavy duty ladder rack. 150K miles. Great work truck. $1,500 570-406-5128

CHEVY ‘95 ASTRO

AWD. Good tires. V6. Auto. 149,000 miles. Power everything. Heavy duty tow package. Runs good. Just passed inspection. Kelly Blue Book $2,500. Selling: $1,650 (570) 855-8235

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘98 CHEYENNE 2500 2-wheel drive

1 owner! Local new truck trade! $3,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHRYSLER 02 TOWN & COUNTRY V6. Like new!

$5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

DODGE `00 CARGO VAN 1500

88,500 miles. V6. Automatic. Good Condition. $2,300 (570) 793-6955

Let the Community Know! Place your Classified Ad TODAY! 570-829-7130

DODGE `99 DURANGO SLT 5.9 V8, Kodiak

Green, Just serviced. New brakes. Tow package. AC. Very good condition. Runs & drives 100%. 71,000 miles. ASKING $6,495 (570) 239-8165

FORD `04 EXPLORER

Eddie Bauer Edition 59,000 miles, 4 door, 3 row seats, V6, all power options, moon roof, video screen $12,999. 570-690-3995 or 570-287-0031

FORD `73 F350

Stake body with heavy duty lift gate. Like new. 55K original miles. 1 owner. $3,500 OBO. (570) 823-6829

MAZDA 03 MPV VAN V6. CD Player.

1 owner vehicle!! $3,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

HONDA 06 CRV SE

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HUMMER ‘06 H3 Leather & moonroof $18,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

JEEP `02 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO

Triple black, economical 6 cylinder. 4x4 select drive. CD, remote door opener, power windows & locks, cruise, tilt wheel. 108k highway miles. Garage kept. Super clean inside and out. No rust. Sale price $6,895. Scranton. Trade in’s accepted. 570-466-2771

JEEP `03 Rare. LIBERTY5 SPORT.

speed. 23 MPG. 102K highway miles. Silver with black interior. Immaculate condition, inside and out. Garage kept. No rust, maintenance records included. 4wd, all power. $6,900 or best offer, trades will be considered. Call 570-575-0518

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

JEEPAuto. 04 LIBERTY V6.

4x4. garage kept. Showroom condition, fully loaded, every option 34,000 miles. DRASTICALLY REDUCED $15,500 (570)825-5847

MITSUBISHI `08 RAIDER V

ERY GOOD CONDITION!

29,500 miles. 24X4 drive option, 4 door crew cab, sharp silver color with chrome step runners, premium rims, good tires, bedliner, V-6, 3.7 liter. Purchased at $26,900. Dealer would sell for $18,875. Asking $16,900 (570) 545-6057

MITSUBISHI `11

OUTLANDER SPORT SE AWD, Black interi-

or/exterior, start/ stop engine with keyless entry, heated seats, 18” alloy wheels, many extra features. Only 4,800 miles. 10 year, 100,000 mile warranty. $23,500. Willing to negotiate. Serious inquires only - must sell, going to law school. (570) 793-6844

MITSUBISHI `97 15’ CUBE VAN Cab over, 4 cylinder diesel engine. Rebuilt automatic transmission. Very good rubber. All around good condition inside & out. Well maintained. Ready to work. PRICE REDUCED! $6,195 or best offer Call 570-650-3500 Ask for Carmen

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

NISSAN `10 ROGUE SL AWD. Gray. Sun-

roof. Bose stereo system. Black leather seats. 5,500 miles. $24,000 (570) 696-2777

NISSAN ‘08 ROGUE S AWD. Auto $17,990

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

NISSAN ‘10 FRONTIER SE

6K miles! Automatic. $17,880

Black Beauty! $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

JEEP ‘07 PATRIOT 4WD - Alloys $15,995

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

SUZUKI `03 XL-7

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

LEXUS `96 LX 450

Full time 4WD, Pearl white with like new leather ivory interior. Silver trim. Garage kept. Excellent condition. 84,000 miles, Asking $10,750 570-654-3076 or 570-498-0005

2 storage trailers. 570-814-4790

VOLVO `08 XC90

Fully loaded, moon roof, leather, heated seats, electric locks, excellent condition. New tires, new brakes and rotors. 52,000 miles highway $26,500/ best offer. 570-779-4325 570-417-2010 till 5

457 Wanted to Buy Auto 1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

Auto. 85K. 4x4. Nice, clean interior. Runs good. New battery & brakes. All power. CD. $6,200 570-762-8034 570-696-5444

SUZUKI `07 XL-7 56,000 miles,

automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, all power, CD player, leather interior, tinted windows, custom wheels, $13,000 Call 570-829-8753 Before 5:00 p.m.

712

700 MERCHANDISE 708

Antiques & Collectibles

FREIGHTLINER ’99 CONDO 430 Detroit, Super 10 transmission. Asking $15,000. ‘88 FRUEHAUF 45’ with sides. All aluminum, spread axle. $6,500.

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Special Edition. Maroon, Fully loaded. Leather seats. TV/DVD, navigation, sun roof plus many other extras. 3rd seat . Only 1,900 Miles. Brand New. Asking $37,000 (570) 328-0850

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

TRACTOR TRAILERS

JEEP 08 COMPASS

4 WD. Auto. CD. $14,450

FORD 03 RANGER $9,992

451

ALL JUNK CAR & TRUCKS WANTED Highest Prices Paid In Cash!!! FREE REMOVAL Call V&G Anytime 288-8995

600 FINANCIAL 610

Business Opportunities

BAR/TAVERN

FOR SALE Turn key business. Liquor license & patio license. Air conditioned. Lower level 1 bedroom apt. Reduced to $159,000 Owner Retiring. 570-929-3214

ESTABLISHED BAKERY/SANDWICH ROUTE FOR SALE $40,000.

100+ stops, gross sales $4,000/gross profit $1000 per week. MUST be experienced, energetic, positive & motivated individual. Must have delivery vehicle. 717-271-4323

$ ANTIQUES BUYING $

Old Toys, model kits, Bikes, dolls, guns, Mining Items, trains & Musical Instruments, Hess. 474-9544 COINS. Washington Quarters 1934-P1936-P-1936D1936S-1938P $85. 570-287-4135 COMIC BOOKS Gen 13-1, X-files, Spiderman & many others, $1 each. NEON SIGN - Electric, Camel sign, 30 years old, $150. RECORDS - LP’S, 78’S, 45’S From 40’S, 50’S, 60’S & 70’S. $1 each. 570-829-2411 HUMPHREY BOGART, framed picture in trench coat $50. 570-287-7119

JACKO ANTIQUES

134 Route 11, Larksville (Next to Woody’s Fireplace & Pro-Fix) Oak Icebox. Mahogany Stack Bookcase, Oak Stack Bookcase. Lionel & American Flyer Trains, Coins. We do upholstery, furniture repair, chair caning, re-gluing, cloth & rush seats. We also buy Gold, Silver & Coins. 570-855-7197 or 570-328-3428 PICTURES 15 model sailing ships 6 framed, several ‘lightboxes’ with ship accoutrement several sailor figures, several sea bird figures, 1 battery operated lighthouse with birds moving around it, coffee table shaped like a boat with glass top & oars one free standing boat shaped shelving unit captain wheel captain wheel with barometer 1 ship in a bottle 2 wooden dock ties plus some extras $350. 823-7957

710

Appliances

APPLIANCE PA RT S E T C .

Used appliances. Parts for all brands. 223 George Ave. Wilkes-Barre 570-820-8162 DRYER 3 months old under warranty $300. Caloric gas stove excellent shape $175. 570-574-3120

SWING, Rainforest open-top cradle swing by F.P. $50. Portable pack-nplay by Evenflo. Light blue with blue/yellow plaid, removable bassinet $40. Duoglider double-stroller by Graco, light green with zoo animal print includes 2 canopies & trays with cup holders $40. 570-855-9221

716

Commercial Cleaning Of Northeastern PA

Concerned about your future? BE YOUR OWN BOSS Work Full or Part time. Accounts available NOW throughout Luzerne & Lackawanna counties. We guarantee $5,000 to $200,000 in annual billing. Investment Required. We’re ready – are you? For more info call 570-824-5774 Jan-Pro.com

NE PA TAX & ACCOUNTING PRACTICE

FOR SALE. Serious Inquiries Send Letter Of Interest to Box 2740 C/O Times Leader 15 N Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18711

OPTICAL LAB FOR SALE $60,000

Negotiable 570-825-2456 POPCORN/ CANDY/ICE CREAM SHOP Tunkhannock. Making over 25 flavors of popcorn. Ideal family business. Selling equipment supplies and inventory Turnkey operation. Full training. Unlimited potential $44,900. 570-650-2451

630 Money To Loan “We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

Frigidaire electric range with smooth cooktop, self clean, convection oven, white, brand new $425. 570-788-3485 HESS IN BOXES, 2000 - $25., 1998$40., 2004 - $23. 570-735-1589 MICRO-WAVE, Litton $20. Call 570-825-9744 MICROWAVE for above the range, vent & light, white, excellent condition. $100. Dishwasher white, very good condition. $100. 570-825-3269 MICROWAVE GE sensor oven white $40. 570-474-6028 MICROWAVE OVEN Amana, $25. Sears Kenmore 5.0 cu. ft. chest freezer 2 years old, excellent condition $100. firm. 570-824-7807 or 570-545-7006

Retired Repairman

top loading Whirlpool & Kenmore Washers, Gas & Electric Dryers. 570-833-2965 570-460-0658 WASHER white Kenmore series 70 $75. AIR CONDITIONER 6,000 BTU Goldstar $50. 570-301-8703 Why Spend Hundreds on New or Used Appliances? Most problems with your appliances are usually simple and inexpensive to fix! Save your hard earned money, Let us take a look at it first! 30 years in the business. East Main Appliances 570-735-8271 Nanticoke

712

Baby Items

CLOTHING, Newborn-12 months, girl, $5 each or less. SWING $40. 570-825-0569 HIGH CHAIR, Fisher Price, excellent condition $20. 570-735-5290 PORTABLE CRIB, complete, oak. used once $50. Double stroller, navy & tan plaid, good condition. $40. 824-5589

Building Materials

DOOR: FREE 32” x 80” exterior wood door complete with frame and threshold. Glass on top half, wood panels on bottom half. Call 570-814-9574. SHOWER, 2 piece, 32”, white $75. 570-690-3085

720

Cemetery Plots/Lots

MEMORIAL SHRINE CEMETERY 6 Plots Available

May be Separated Rose Lawn Section $450 each 570-654-1596

MEMORIAL SHRINE

LOTS FOR SALE 6 lots available at Memorial Shrine Cemetery. $2,400. Call 717-774-1520 SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY

724 Cellular Phones CELL phone Uniden EXA 17980, 900 mhz, extended range, built in digital answering machine $99. HTC ozone Verizon wireless global smartphone, charger $75. 570-287-2901

726

Clothing

CLOTHING womens /misses, 15 pieces $30. Girls 14/16 & 16 22 pieces $20. Junior girls sizes 13/14 11 pieces $12. All like new! 570-474-6028 JACKETS 3 leather jackets, black boys size 14, genuine italian stone $25 each. 570-868-6018 WEDDING GOWN size 9 , $50. or best offer 570-825-0569

730

JAN-PRO

Baby Items

BOUNCER 412. Aquarium swing 415. Graco playpen $40. F.P. cradle swing $25. Baby tend walker $15. safety First car bouncer $5. Infant play system $8. F.P. play system with steering wheel $10. Tub $3. Bottle warmer $5. Pink & brown butterfly crib bedding $15. Brown & white nature bedding $15. F.P. Bongos $5. Sesame Street pop open doors $3. Vtech Spin & Learn $5. F.P. storybook rhymes $2. 570-675-4214

Computer Equipment & Software

DESK, computer with top hutch light. Large 2 drawers, $125. Must sell. 674-5624 DESKTIOP: off lease refurbished compaq desktop: 2.4/512/40 /dvd.windows 7, anti virus + more, keyboard + mouse included $100. Off lease refurbished ibm desktop: 1.8/ 512/40 /dvd. windows xp prp, antivirus + more, keyboard + mouse $75. 570-862-2236 PRINTER Lexmark All-in-One USB Ink Jet X6170. Fax, Copy, Scan, Print. Very good condition cable. $25. 570-696-1267.

732

Exercise Equipment

WEIGHT BENCH, large, hardly used, $125. Must sell. 570-674-5624

742

Furnaces & Heaters

BURHAM PROPANE FURNACE

Hot water, 164,000 btu, Series 2 Model B + flue $800. Hot water heater, propane, Bradford & White, 40 gallon 40,000 BTU, $190. 570-752-0881 CARGO CARRIER , Sears Sport $125. Two tier 18” light fixture $15. Corona kerosene 829-4776 FURNACE Gas, American, forced air 150,000 BTU complete with motor & thermostat, runs well, very good condition. $250. 570-696-1847 FURNACE hot water, natural gas, 90,000 btu, pump & controls $250. 570-573-1322 HEATER Corona kerosene portable r $30. 570-824-7807 or 570-545-7006 STOVE vintage coal Frigidaire $299. 570-696-3368

744

Furniture & Accessories

BEDROOM SET, girls twin $175. kitchen set with chairs $125. 570-814-0843 or 570-696-3090


PAGE 6G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Celebrations Area Businesses To Help Make Your Event a Huge Success!

DJ

PARTIES

FLORAL

Johnny Super Star

Your party entertainer! Free magic show for kids of all ages with personal DJ, Now booking Christmas & New Year Eve Events! DON’T DELAY, CALL TODAY! Serving all of Lackawanna & Luzerne County

CLUB 79

Jazmyn Floral

Fresh flowers for any occasion.

PARTIES, WEDDINGS, FUNERALS, PROM & MORE.

516 N. Main St. • W-B Daily Delivery. Mon-Fri 9am-4pm Sat 9am-1pm

FLORAL

Barry’s Floral Shop

176 S. Mountain Blvd. Mountaintop, PA

570-474-9848

www.barrysfloralshop.com

654-8368

• Weddings • Parties • Dances • Karaoke

www.TheLesserEvilDJ.com Check us out on Facebook! (570) 954-1620 Nick (570) 852-1251 Allen

CATERING

BEVERAGES

570-407-2703

DUNDEE BEVERAGE

Banquet facility at West Wyoming Hose Co. #1 or we’ll bring it to you!

570-756-2881

Try our delicious Pumpkin Ice Cream, Pumpkin Rice Pudding, Pumpkin Sundaes, Pumpkin Flurries, Pumpkin Shakes and Pumpkin Whoopie Pies

Twelve Twenty-Four High Energy, full-scale holiday rock orchestra concert! 11/19 @ 7pm - Hazleton Castle Performing Arts Center, 12/9 @ 7pm - Tunkhannock Auditorium 12/4 @ 6pm - Pittston Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Get the full schedule @ www.TwelveTwentyFour.net

TEMPORARILY CLOSED DUE TO FLOODING

• Office • Business • Birthday • School • Fundraisers • Celebrations

We’re Your One Stop Pumpkin Place...

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

Keyco Plaza San Souci Parkway

Catering For All Occasions! We specialize in Italian/American Cuisine

& His Performing Dogs

Ringling, Barnum & Bailey and his All American Canine Friends. Now taking engagements for all fall and winter holiday parties, childrens parties & every where people gather!

WE DO PARTIES

The Lesser Evil DJ

SELECTION AROUND!

TIM THE CLOWN

www.damentis.com

DJ

$12.99

Roman Holiday Sand Bar

Redeem for 15% off any purchase!

www.GrooveTrainband.com

Free Pool Wed & Fri 8-10

Rt. 11 Edwardsville YUENGLING PREMIUM YUENGLING LIGHT BEST CRAFT BEER

PARTIES

REWARD

Now Booking 2011 -2012 dates for • Weddings • Bazaars/Fairs • Parties for Any Occasion

825-8381 • 793-9390

WYO. VALLEY BEVERAGE 24 PACK CANS

NEPA’s premier Dance Band

Bring your own food. Bartender Available.

BEVERAGES

PARTIES

Damenti’s

Banquet room available for Parties! Birthdays, Sweet 16s, Baby Showers & More! $200 for 4 hours.

570-270-5113

(570)-430-3299

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

Delivered to you or At The Shack

The Snack Shack 750 Wilkes-Barre Twp Blvd Wilkes-Barre (570)-270-2929

PARTY HALLOWEEN SPECTACULAR

Featuring The Poets & Frankie and the Corvette’s, Dani-elle & Donna Trusky Genetti Manor, Dickson City

Saturday, October 29 – Doors open at 5pm Deluxe Buffet & Cash Bar. $35 pp

383-0207 or 343-2429 or 457-2808 (evening)

To Advertise Call Tara 570-970-7374

STAYCATIONS

BUS TRIPS, SHOWS, LAST MINUTE DEALS & MORE Save Time & BLACK LAKE, NY Collette’s Shades of Ireland Money in April 22 - May 1, 2012

Advance!

NYC Sightseeing, Broadway Shows & Special Holiday Events:

• Tickets in Advance & “In Hand”! • Great Broadway Seats! • Museum Admissions! • 9/11 Memorial Tickets & Tours • NYC Nutcracker Ballet Tickets! • Radio City Christmas Spectacular • New Year’s Eve Gala Party! • Inside the Statue of Liberty Tours (closes 10/28!)

The NYC Ticket Machine: http://nycsightseeing.nyctrip.com 570-714-4692 www.NYCTrip.com

Fall Wine Tour in the Finger Lakes

October 22, 2011 $99 per person includes: Bus Chateau Lafayette, Penguin Bay, Hazlett, Lunch at Seneca Harbor Station, Fulkerson’s and Glenora Wine Cellars

Radio City Christmas Show

December 8, 2011 $109 per person includes: Bus and show ticket. GREAT SEATS! 601 Market St., Kingston • PA

570-288-9311

Come relax & enjoy great fishing & Tranquility at it’s finest. Housekeeping cottages on the water with all the amenities of home.

Fall Fishing is the best of the year! DON’ T MISS OUT! (315) 375-8962 • www.blacklake4fish.com daveroll@blacklakemarine.com

$50 off Promotion Available Now!

Dublin, Kilkenny, Waterford, Crystal, Blarney Castle, Ring of Kerry, Lierick, Cliffs of Moher, Galway & Castle Stay

Mediterranean

June 10 - June 22, 2012

RCCL’s Serenade of the Seas - Barcelona, Monte Carlo, Florence, Rome, Naples, Venice, Ravenna, Croatia, back to Barcelona

Call for details 570-820-8450

Royal Travel & Tours

239 Spring Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702

15 South Main Street • Wilkes-Barre Free Travel Enrichment Seminars Cruise & Tour Alaska With Holland America Wed., Oct-12, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm Learn about the convenience of a CruiseTour with Holland America. Fundraising for Nonprofit Organizations Wed., Nov-9, 2011 8:00am - 9:30am Bermuda Cruise Group aboard Celebrity Summit 6/17 - 6/24 Includes round-trip motorcoach to the pier. Call or stop in for details All Presentations will be held in the Restaurant, in our basement level. Please call, visit, or email to reserve your seat. 570-823-4141 bostrawilkesbarre@boscovs.com

COOKIES TRAVELERS BROADWAY SHOW BUS TRIPS 570-815-8330

**FOOTBALL** Steelers vs. Titans 10/8 & 10/9 $389 lower; $359 upper Steelers vs. Jaguars 10/15 & 10/16 $389 lower; $359 upper PSU vs. Purdue 10/15 $139 lower Or Bus & Tailgate $50 PSU vs. Illinois 10/29 $129 Or Bus & Tailgate $50 PSU vs. Nebraska 11/12 Bus & Tailgate $50 RADIO CITY CHRISTMAS SPECTACULAR 12/2, 12/4, 12/9, 12/11, 12/16 & 12/17 Call for Pricing!

COOKIESTRAVELERS.COM

JERSEY BOYS Wed. Nov 9 $150 for Front Mezz seating WICKED Wed. Nov. 9 $159 Orchestra Seats **RADIO CITY XMAS SHOW** Mon. Nov. 28th $85 2pm show Wed. Dec. 14th $90 2pm show 2nd Mezz seating

CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247 TO RESERVE YOUR SEATS

Magic Your Way Vacation Package including a

Disney Value Resort and Theme Park tickets, you’ll get the Disney Quick-Service Dining Plan, FREE! From only $73 per person, per day. For a family of 4 save $467. Limited availability. Airfare not included. Call Now!

300 Market St., Kingston, PA 18704 288-TRIP (288-8747) info@tentrip.com

CONTACT TARA AT 970-7374 twilliams@timesleader.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 744

Furniture & Accessories

BEDROOM SET golden oak, headboard, footboard, dresser, end table, wrought iron mirror & inserts $325. oak wall table $100. 570-829-3483

BEDROOM SUITE Thomasville pecan, queen headboard, triple oversized dresser, mirror, armoire, 2 end tables. New $2,200, asking $600. Call 570-696-4186

CEDAR CHEST Vintage Rose $200. Girls white bedroom set, double, dresser, chest $150. Kerosene heater, 23dl, brand new $60. Pool ladder, Sharp microwave $10. 570-823-2029 COFFEE TABLE 3 piece walnut, almond lacquer $100. almond lacquer coffee table $50. 655-1508 COFFEE TABLE wood with sliding door $10. 696-3368 CREDENZA glass front, all natural wood, new $100. Full size bed complete $100. 570-328-1370 DINETTE SET heavy duty maple, 2 leafs, 6 chairs, including 2 captains chairs, excellent condition. Original price $1500 several years ago. Good deal @$350. 570-466-5115 DRESSER, long with mirror, headboard, complete, good condition $200. Microwave, stainless steel, for counter $30. 542-4666

To place your ad call...829-7130 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER PA House, 3 piece, honey oak, TV armoire with lighted china cabinet & bookshelves. $800. 570-693-3111

FURNISH FOR LESS

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607 HEADBOARD, oak twin, $50. Oak night stand $50. 570-825-0569

744

Furniture & Accessories

FURNITURE Contents of home

for sale - living room, dining room, bedroom set, chairs, tables, Pennsylvania House entertainment center, Antique desks, Victrola and more! 570-288-4203

FURNITURE SALE

Virginia House Oak Dining Room Set: Includes 1 hutch, 1 buffet, table with 2 leaves, 2 arm chairs, 6 side chairs. Excellent condition, $1,750. La-Z-Boy 3 seat, 2 end reclining sofa: with fabric guard. Light tweed fabric. Excellent condition. $350. 25” GE color tv with remote $100. Queen size bed: $250. King Size Bed: $300. 5 drawer antique dark wood tall bureau: $50. Lexington Recollections Bedroom Set: Solid Oak, off white with brown tops. Includes: 2 twin bunk beds with guard and ladder. 9 drawer vanity dresser with mirror. 4 drawer chest bureau, 5 drawer lingerie chest, 2 drawer night stand, 4 drawer desk with hutch and chair. Twin beds can be set apart. Excellent condition. Asking $1,750 for all. Call 570-262-5028 KITCHEN SET round table, 2 leaves, matching hutch, walnut $250. Blue & white couch $100. Bedroom suite, walnut 6 pieces twin beds $375. 570-784-5075

744

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 7G Furniture & Accessories

RATTAN SUNROOM FURNITURE (NEW) Sofas,

AFFORDABLE

MATTRESS SALE We Beat All Competitors Prices!

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

KINGSTON

NANTICOKE

SCRANTON

chairs, tables, lamps. $600. 570-287-4770

SECTIONAL SOFA tan with matching recliner rocker, both ends of sofa have recliners $150. Weider 4300 system exercise station, 200 lbs in weights. does legs/ arms/ chest $125. 570-829-0588 SHELF. Dark brown for books. 5 shelves, great condition. must sell $75 570-674-5264

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

ASHLEY

26 Ashley St.

Sat., 10/8, 9-3 & Sun. 10/9, 9-1 LOTS OF STUFF Everything Must Go Household, toys, baby, clothes, electronics & more

158 POPLAR ST. 9-2 SUNDAY ONLY Clothing/express/to p brands shoes/ purses household items, furniture, sporting goods, fishtank and much more

MOUNTAIN TOP

13 Park Lane East Sat., Oct. 8th, 9 - 1 Piano, gun cabinet, truck toolbox, day bed, household items, 16”tires, counter top.

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

MOUNTAIN TOP

221 Enterprise St Off Hanover Street Sat. 10/8 & Sun 10/9 @ 8am Hunting, fishing, traps, wireless dog fence, beer taps, signs & trays, good knives, DVDs/CDs, train & railroad collectibles.

PITTSTON TWP.

633 Suscon Rd. Saturday & Sunday October 8th & 9th 8am - 7pm Tools & auto parts, locally made deer attractant, masonry mud boxes, bull float, TV’s, knives, sports cards & memorabilia, Christmas & Halloween items.

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

SWOYERSVILLE RUMMAGE SALE

15 Andover Road (Greenwood Hills Dev.) Sat and Sun Oct. 8 and 9 8am 12pm. Xmas, cabinet and countertop, microwave, toaster oven, resin picnic table, clothes, household,

NANTICOKE

Holy Trinity Church Hughes Street Monday, Oct. 10 9-3pm and 6-8pm Tuesday, Oct. 11 and Wednesday, Oct. 12, 9-3pm W ed. Bag Day Lunch and bake sale daily.

SWOYERSVILLE

314 Tent Ave Saturday & Sunday 9am-6pm Entire contents of 9 rooms home & basement. Antiques, deco, vintage, collectibles and retro furniture. China, crystal, household, cookware, appliances, gaming table, mission bench, lamps, metal ware, pictures, linens, bedding draperies, jewelry, clothing & accessories. Collection of dolls including Barbie, Snoopy, Peanuts gang, Schmid & Walt Disney never out of the box. Signs, autographed baseballs, games, toys, records, movies, tapes, CDs, stereo, speakers, surround sound, electronics, heaters, air conditioners, books, magazines, tons of Christmas items, many tools and power tools, cameras and many more unusual items. Prices right to sell quick! From Main St. in West Scranton turn East onto Luzerne St. 1 block down turn Left onto Tent Avenue.

WEST WYOMING

ROCKER/RECLINER, beige, like new, rarely used. $250 OBO. 570-407-1135

AVAILABLE INSIDE & OUT ACRES OF PARKING OUTSIDE SPACES - $10 INSIDE SPACES $60 AND UP (MONTHLY)

Saturday 10am-2pm Sunday 8am-4pm

WILKES-BARRE

252 S. Sheridan St Off Empire St, Mayflower Section Fri, Sat. & Sun 8am-4pm LARGE YARD SALE Furniture, household, Antiques & much more. New items put out daily.

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

30 Moosic Street Saturday & Sunday 9am-3pm Kids toys, knickknacks, collectibles, books & more. Many new things!

750

Jewelry

ENGAGEMENT RING

137 Penn Avenue Sunday Oct. 9th 8am-12pm Some new items, some slightly used.

220 Phillips Street Sat. & Sun. Oct 8th and 9th, 8am-1pm. Beatle trading cards, beer cans, vintage Christmas items, Pack-n-Play, baby items, lots of attic treasures.

Holy Trinity Church Hughes Street Monday, Oct. 10th, 9-3 and 6-8, Tues. and Wed., Oct. 11 & 12, 9-3 Wed. is Bag Day. Lunch & Bake Sale Daily

243 Madison Street Sunday, Oct-9 9am-? Proceeds of sale go toward funeral costs of a Loved One.

752 Landscaping & Gardening Patrick & Deb’s Lawn Care See our ad under Call An Expert 1162 Landscape & Garden

754

Machinery & Equipment

SAWMILLS: from only $3997, make money & save money with your own bandmill - cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free info & DVD. www.NorwoodSawMills.com/ 300N. Ext 300N 1-800-578-1363

756

Medical Equipment

CHAIR LIFT by Bruno $500. 570-592-4970 POWER CHAIR Jazzy Select, $500. Walker - $25. 570-829-2411

758 Miscellaneous

WYOMING

WILKES-BARRE

EXETER

OPEN SPACE YEAR ROUND

455 W. Sixth St. Saturday & Sunday October 8 and 9 8am - 4 pm chair w/ottoman, 3 pedestal tables, speakers, albums, children’s toys, Christmas, much much more

Mattress Guy

Twin sets: $159 Full sets: $179 Queen sets: $199 All New American Made 570-288-1898

WEST WYOMING

6th Street

DALLAS

99 Franklin St Saturday & Sunday 9am - 4pm Lots of brand name clothes: (Express, GAP, Abercrombie & Fitch). kids items, pet items. Cleaning out the house!

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

FLEA MARKET

TABLE: FREE yellow formica top fifties dinner table, needs new feet caps and has a bit of rust but is sturdy. 428-4482

LAMPS (2) parlor stand up, grey metal & black. $25 each. 570-740-1246 LIVING ROOM SET 7 piece, tweed seating, oak/glass tables $500. Lamps $10-$15. kitchen chairs $10 each. oak hutch $450. 570-902-9274

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

1/2 carat princess cut diamond solitaire set in 14K white gold. List price of $1,495, Purchased from Littman Jewelers for $900, willing to sacrifice at $700. Call 570-814-3383

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275 AQUARIUM 43 gallon Oceanic octoganal, all glass, new condition $100. 570-266-3015 BEDLINER: 89 Chevy S10 truck bedliner, standard 6’ cab $25. Four barrel carb running from running Chevy motor $50. 5 used storm windows 29x53.5” $50. all. Large frameless mirror 36”x42” $50. 570-740-1246 BOOKS 2 boxes hardcover & paperback, King, Grishom etc $25. a box. 570-474-6028

758 Miscellaneous

758 Miscellaneous

CHRISTMAS TREE prelit slim 6’ with gold ornaments $100. 570-693-3111

GARAGE SALE LEFT OVER ITEMS

COSTUME Winnie The Pooh 6-12 months paid $30 asking $5.288-0060 DOG RUN galvanized steel, 8’lx6’ wx6’h, gate. bought $300. sell for $65. 570-474-6351 FOOD PROCESSOR B & D with blender jar, $15. Cooks essential 1 quart stainless steel deep fryer $5. 696-9086 FORD F350 1985 7.3 non turbo diesel, runs good needs work on cab & transmission. $1,000. 256-0962

FREE AD POLICY

The Times Leader will accept ads for used private party merchandise only for items totalling $1,000 or less. All items must be priced and state how many of each item. Your name address, email and phone number must be included. No ads for ticket sales accepted. Pet ads accepted if FREE ad must state FREE. One Submission per month per household. You may place your ad online at timesleader.com, or email to classifieds@ timesleader.com or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to Classified Free Ads: 15 N. Main Street, WilkesBarre, PA. Sorry no phone calls.

All brand new 2 stainless steel double sinks, 2 bathroom vanity faucets $25, each. Utility sink $15. Graco deluxe stroller $65. 2 hand sink NSF $15-$25. Granite under mount sink top, $35. 852-0406

GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER ITEMS

Dress pants, new, 40”x30,$5. Insulation, R13, 3 bags, $40. Golf balls, 5 dozen, $20. Golf bag with tags $10. Paint sprayer, never used, $35. 570-287-9801 GARAGE SALE LEFTOVERS PVC pipes $1 each.Bookcase desk, $10. 2 end tables $20. Sewing machine, peddle, $25.Sewing machine, electric, $10. Ironing board, new, $2. Printer, HP Scanjet, $2. Meat grinder $3. 570-868-6409 HELMET snowmobile $15. Motorcycle helmet $15. Dell computer needs work $25. 570-287-0023 MOTOR mercury outboard 2005 bought new in 2006, 8 hp used 10 times $1,000. 829-1541

PING PONG TABLE $25. Yale safe $50. Heater Tower, electric, portable, $20. 570-825-5847

GRILL. Charcoal, Blackbarrel type. Top lifts, 24x35 grill space. $35 570-333-4827

RANGE: Garland Electric broiler, stain -less steel hood, 4 burners, griddle top. All good condition. $995.570-262-0571

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

570-735-1487

WE PAY THE MOST IN CASH

BUYING 11am to 11pm

CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS 2 large boxes $50. Halloween decorations, box of scarey unique items $125. 570-235-5216 FABRICS - assorted. $15. MUST SELL! 570-313-5213

39 Prospect St • Nanticoke


PAGE 8G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

KEN POLLOCK

CHECK OUT OUR VALUE VEHICLE OUTLET

PRE-OWNED

• 3 Day or 150 Mile Money Back Guarantee** • 30 Day/1000 Mile Limited Warranty** • All Value Vehicle Outlet Cars Pass PA State Inspection**

2004 HYUNDAI SONATA

2005 ACURA MDX AWD

#P14331, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, 4 Cyl, A/C

4,995*

$

8,850

*

$

PLUS:

2003 HONDA ACCORD COUPE

#P14465A, Leather, Sunroof, Auto, Power Windows/Locks

8,997

$

2010 SUZUKI KIZASHI SLS

*

5,697*

$

18,397

$

*

#S1191, Leather, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Dual Climate Control, Automatic

19,977

$

2010 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE #P14408, Leather, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, CD, Nice Car!

14,997*

$

2010 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE #P14408, Leather, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks

14,899

$

*

*

2010 DODGE AVENGER #14403, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, CD

13,887*

$

2009 MAZDA 6

#14413, LT Pkg, Power Windows/Locks, CD, Automatic, Great Gas Mileage

12,997

$

*

#S1737B, PW, PL, Automatic, Sunroof, Great Vehicles!

Automatic, Only 97K Miles, Cheap at

3,999*

$

8,997*

$

2010 CHEVROLET SILVERADO EXT CAB 4X4

SUV’s

2007 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER LS 4X4

15,927

$

*

2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING

13,337*

$

#P14420, SI Pkg, Power Windows/ Locks, CD, Manual Trans, Nice Car!!!

17,777

*

#S1587A, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, CD

17,987

$

*

2004 CHEVROLET TAHOE Z71 4WD

#14366, Touring Pkg, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, CD

$

#S1688A, LS Pkg, Power Windows/Locks, CD, V8, Tow Pkg #S1578A, Tech Pkg, Navigation, Heated Seats, Auto, Alloy Wheels

#P14439A, Leather, Bucket Seats, Rear Barn Doors, PW, PL

14,997*

14,997*

$

2011 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4 Automatic, Chrome Wheels, Power Windows/Locks

19,993*

$

$

2006 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4

2008 HUMMER H3 4X4

#P14462, Power Windows/Locks, CD, A/C, Rare Manual Trans!

#P14483, Sunroof, Alloys, Power Windows/Locks, Auto

10,997*

$

21,997*

$

2007 FORD F150 SUPERCAB 4X4

2009 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4

#P14397, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Bose Stereo, Push Button Start, Auto

2008 HONDA CIVIC SI COUPE

2010 CHEVY COBALT SEDAN

1984 CHEVROLET CORVETTE

TRUCKS/VANS

2011 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD #P14187, Sunroof, Power Seat, Blue Tooth, Dual Climate, Auto

2003 MAZDA TRIBUTE 4WD

2002 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED 4WD

Leather, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, PW, PL, Only 64K Miles!

CARS

2010 SUZUKI KIZASHI GTS

2,625*

9,899*

9,449*

$

1999 CHRYSLER SEBRING COUPE

$

#S1665A, Automatic, A/C, AM/FM/CD, Dual Airbags

#P14389A, Leather, Sunroof, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks

$

#S1686C, Automatic, Leather, Low Miles

2007 CHEVROLET COBALT SEDAN

2004 HONDA ACCORD SEDAN

#P14183A, Chrome Wheel Pkg, Power Windows/Locks, CD

#S1727A, Leather, Sunroof, Auto, PW, PL

WOW!

12,390*

$

2008 SUZUKI FORENZA

JUST TRADED!

#P14440, Custom Wheels, Push Bar, Manual Trans, Soft Top

19,497*

$

22,997*

$

2011 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 4X4

#P14400A, V8, Automatic, Air Conditioning, AM/FM

14,977*

$

2011 SUZUKI EQUATOR CREW CAB 4X4

2011 DODGE DAKOTA QUAD CAB 4X4

2010 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD

#S1675A, Navigation, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks

15,687*

$

#P14444, SLT Pkg, Bedliner, V8, Power Windows/Locks, CD

23,987

$

*

RMZ-4 Pkg, Power Windows/ Locks, Side Steps, Tow Pkg

#P14442, Bedliner, V8, Power WIndows/Locks, CD

25,597*

22,337

$

$

*

2009 HYUNDAI SANTA FE 4WD

2008 DODGE RAM QUAD CAB 2500 4X4

2007 CADILLAC ESCALADE EXT AWD

#S1699A, Sunroof, V6, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, CD

#P14479, 5.7L V8 Hemi, Utility Cap, Power Windows/Locks, Tow Pkg

22” GM Wheels, Navigation, Leather, Sunroof, All The Goodies!

19,747*

$

23,997*

$

33,999*

$

* 2.49% Based on 60 months. Must be approved under program guidelines. Tax & Tags Additional. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. ** See Salesperson for complete details. ***Based on 3 Month District Avg from Suzuki Survey Statistics.

PRE-OWNED

KEN SUPER CENTER POLLOCK 339 HWY 315, PITTSTON, PA AT Ken Pollockk

1-800-223-1111

www.kenpollocksuzuki.com

Hours M-F 9-8pm Sat 9-5pm

CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE WE’RE EASY TO FIND JUST OFF EXIT 175 RTE I-81 • PITTSTON


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 9G


PAGE 10G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

WHO CAN YOU TRUST

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

For Your Next

BUILDING OR REMODELING PROJECT? Members of the Local Building Industry Association of NEPA Are Committed to Providing You With:

• Professional Workmanship • Pennsylvania Licensed Members • Ethical Service

• Competitive Pricing • Quality Materials • Experience • Up to Date Building Codes

PLUS:

Associate Members from Banking, Mortgage Companies, Suppliers, Insurance, Special Products and Services, etc. work hand in hand with our contractors to help guide you through your next project.

For a Complete Listing of the Building Industry Association Members Call Danielle 287-3331 www.BIANEPA.com RS O T C RA T N RS E CO L E OD M E R TES A I C ASSO

WHO IS REPRESENTING YOUR INTEREST? Locally – Statewide – Nationally?

As a Member of the Local Building Industry Association you also become a member of the Pennsylvania Builders Association (PBA) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and are represented on both boards by local members of the Building Industry Association (BIA)

Now – More Than Ever – We Must Work Together For the Building Trades and the Jobs they Create Call Danielle 287-3331 for more info, benefits and an application for membership


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 11G

AM E ER RI C CA A ’S N E EW W

C CA AR AL LTER TER N A ATI TI VE

YO UR SATI FACTI O N HAS ALW AYS BEEN O UR PRI O RI TY AND NO W I T’ S G UARANTEED !

48 HOUR SATISFACTION GUARANTEE

P lu s :

Exclusively atNationw ide CarSales

FR EE W ITH EVER Y VEH ICLE

Ifyou are dissatisfied w ith yourpurchase orchange yourm ind forany reason,bring yourvehicle back w ithin 48 hours or 200 m iles and in the sam e condition and receive a fullrefund.

DOES THAT? N O Q U ESTIO N S A SKED! WWHYHOBUYELSE NEW -BUY NATIONW IDE!

From Your A rrivalTo Your D elivery Your Satisfaction Is O ur Priority. Ou r O ve r FIN AN CIN G CAR S VEH ICL ES Volu m e AS L O W AS TR U CK S S a ve s You IN AL L CON VER TIB L ES % P R ICE $$$ S U V’S VEH ICL ES AP R AVAIL AB L E Eve ryd a y! R AN GES VAN S

20 0

1.9

ere Are A re Just Ju st A Few Few O f O ur u r M oney on ey Savi Sav in g V alu es! H ere ng Val ues! 2 009 K IA RIO’S

M ANAG ER’S SPECIAL! 2 010 H YUNDA ISA NTA FE’S GLS

5 L EFT

N OW

2 011 FORD TA URUS SEL

AC , C D , Au to, Air

$

10 ,998 *

2 010 M A ZDA 6

3 L EFT

N OW

18 ,965

2 011 M ITSUBISHIECLIP LSE SE

Alloys, P W , P L , CD

N OW

$

*

2 L EFT

N OW

2 010 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONV 2 L EFT

14,965 *

2 L EFT

S yn c, Alloys, P W , P L , K eyless, #18322

N OW

$

21,8 65 *

N OW

2 010 M A ZDA 3I

2 L EFT

Au to, P W , P L , C D

$

13,925 *

$

N OW

2 010 FORD EDGE SEL

2 009 M ITSUBISHIOUTLA NDER SE

AW D , P W , P L , C D , Alloys, #18326

S u n roof, Alloys, AW D , K eyless

Au to, P L , C D , Air

14,366 *

2 010 H YUNDA ISONATA GLS

AW D

AW D , Alloys, P W , P L , CD

$

2 010 V W JETTA

N OW

P W R Top , Alloys, CD , K eyless

$

16,933 *

Au to, P W , P L , C D , K eyless

$

18 ,995

*

N OW

$

23,365

*

N OW

$

18 ,8 90

P W , P L , C D , K eyless

*

N OW

2 006 JEEP COM M A NDER

2 008 SUBA RU IM P REZA

2 010 NISSA N V ERSA

4x4, Alloys, P W , P L , 7 P assan ger

AW D , Alloys, P W , P L , CD

Au to, P W , P L , CD

N OW

$

13,68 5 *

CAL L FOR P R ICE

N OW

$

$

14,562 *

2 010 DODGE AV ENGER R/T

2 L EFT

12,38 8 *

N OW

L eather, RearS p oiler, Heated S eats, Alloys

$

15,969 *

O UR VO L LU UM E S SAV AV E ES S Y YO O U M O NE EY Y E EV VE ERYD R YD A AY! Y! V IS IT O U R

2N D

L O C ATIO N

AT 2 M ER ED ITH

H U R R Y, Y, S A L E EENN D S TTHH ISI S W EEK EEK EN EN D ! 290

M U N D Y S TR EET, W

S TR EET, C A R B O N D A L E, P A

C H EC K O U T O U R FU L L IN V EN TO R Y O F B O TH L O C ATIO N S AT

n a tio n w id e c a rs a le s .n e t M o n d a y- Frid a y 9 a m - 8 p m S a tu rd a y 9 a m - 5 p m

IL K ES - B A R R E AT TH E W

YO M IN G VA L L EY M A L L

B U Y N AATIO T I O N W IIDD E A N D S AAVV E TH O U S A N D S ! TH

C A L L 3 0 1- C A R S

PRICES + TAX & TAGS. ARTWORK FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY. OFFERS END 10/31/11.


PAGE 12G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

FREE

DOWNLOAD THE TIMES LEADER APP. GET IT FREE FROM THE APPLE APP STORE OR FROM THE ANDROID MARKET TODAY.

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SAVE NOW!

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 13G

Ken Pollock

DRIVE NOW!

THESE CUSTOMERS DID!

ARE YOU A MEMBER...

2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI S FWD Stk# S1641

2012 SUZUKI SX4 SEDAN Stk#S1732

OFTHE

y m e I lov ki suzu b! u l c r ca

6 Speed Manual, AM/FM/CD, Power Windows/Locks, Keyless Entry

MSRP w/ Add Ons $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

18,289* 16,999* $

$

- 1,000* - 500***

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price Manufacturer Rebate Suzuki Owner Loyalty

SALE PRICE

$

Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty

- 1,000* - $ 500***

15,499*

SALE PRICE

$

15,999*

2012 SUZUKI SX4 PREMIUM CROSSOVER ALL WHEEL DRIVE

2012 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 4WD Stk# S1782

Stk#S1744

Navigation, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, CD $ MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

$

Power Windows/Locks, Keyless Entry, CD

24,154* 22,749* $

$

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

- 750* - 500***

Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty

SALE PRICE

20,443* 17,499* $

$

LE Popular Package, Power Windows/ Locks, Keyless Entry, CD

21,499*

- 500* - 500***

Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty

SALE PRICE

$

18,019* 16,999* $

15,999*

2011 SUZUKI EQUATOR CREW CAB SPORT

Stk#S1642

Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, CD, Bedliner

25,404* 23,499* - 3,000* - 500*** $

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price $ Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty Rebate

$

SALE PRICE

19,999*

* ALL PRICES + TAX & REGISTRATION. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ALL REBATES AND DISCOUNTS INCLUDED. **BASED ON SUZUKI NATIONAL SALES VOLUME REPORTS FOR 2010. THIS IS A COMBINED OFFER. MAKE YOUR BEST DEAL ON A PACKAGE PRICE. ***OWNER LOYALTY REBATE, MUST HAVE OR OWN SUZUKI VEHICLE IN HOUSEHOLD. +2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI JD POWERS HIGHEST RANKD MIDSIZE VEHICLE (APPEAL) STUDY JULY 2011. OFFERS END OCT 31, 2011.

EXIT 175

81 INTERSTATE

ROUTE 315 ROUTE 315

KEN POLLOCK SUZUKI

CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE! WE’RE EASY TO FIND!

JUST OFF EXIT 175 RTE I-81 • PITTSTON


PAGE 14G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 758 Miscellaneous

782

POCKETKNIFE Aerotek 4 3/4 closed linerlock , matte finished, stainless steel blade, abs handle adjustment, tension setting metal thumb stud pocket belt clip $3. 570-332-7933

TICKETS: PENN STATE, Section EHU, cushion seats & yellow parking pass included with tickets. Oct 8: Iowa, 2 tickets, $100 each. Oct 15, 2 tickets, $55 each. Oct 29, Illinois, 2 tickets, $75. Call 570-655-0211

RELIGIOUS ITEMS Hand made Rosaries, $5. Pope John Paul II Memoriblia. 570-829-2411 SLIDE PROJECTOR, carousel, zoom lens, bulk slider loader accessory, screen, a steal at $60. 570-696-1267 STORAGE AUCTION LEFTOVERS baseball, football, basketball, hockey cards mint condition , 2-3 thousand cards $150. Barbie dolls, unopened in boxes, 25 total $150 Disney vhs tapes, plastic cases 95 total $60. Cabbage Patch dolls, some unopened, some used 25 dolls $75. Total for all $435. call 570-650-3450 TIRE & RIM new 15” white wall for 78 Chrysler Lebaron (Fr78-15) $45. firm. 570-824-7807 or 570-545-7006 TIRES 4- 225/70/r16 all season radials, 65% tread left. $100. 1-205/75/r15 light truck tire, 4/32 tread $15. 855-3113 VACUUM BAGS Electrolux generic style C & U .80 each. Swifter wet jet mop $8. 868-6018 WINE BOTTLES 1 gallon, clear,. never reused. $1. each or a dozen for $10. 570-654-2955

762

Musical Instruments

PIANO walnut with bench, recently tuned, good condition $400. 898-1278

764 Musical Lessons/Services TRUMPET student model, good condition $100. 570-655-9594

766

Office Equipment

CHAIRS 3, very good condition swivel manager’s, 2 navy blue, 1 in oatmeal fabric $20. each 3 for $55. 570-696-1267 PRINTERS HP Office Jet 6310, all in one, color printer, fax, scanner, copier, new in box $99. HP Deskjet 3520V portable ink jet color printer with new HP#27 cartridge $75. 570-287-2901

768

Personal Electronics

PHONE CHARGERS 3 Blackberry 1 auto & 2 wall chargers, 1 year old, excellent condition $35. 570824-7807 or 570545-7006

770

Photo Equipment

MINOLTA Maxxum 8000i 35mm film camera, 2 lenses, off camera flash unit very good condition $275. or best offer 570-788-2388

772

Pools & Spas

DIVING BOARD, 12’, wood laminate, commercial grade $125. Sliding board 6’ fiberglass with fittings $250. Both for inground pool and buyer must remove. 388-6837

776 Sporting Goods BIKES. Girls, 15 speed 26” All-terrain, Boys, 18 speed 26” Multi-terrain Stone Mtn. Bike. $85 for both. 570-333-4827 COAT Woolrich down new, large, Woolrich, new wool pants XL (2), Hunting apparel $60. Call 570-287-2073 CROSS BOW LEGEND exercise machine, very good condition, sacrifice $200.570-788-2388 GOLF BAG, Precise professional, black/ navy standup bag, putter tube, ball holder, 6 pockets in excellent condition. $20. 570-696-1267. SKIS-Kllington, k-2, boots size 12, ski poles, all for $100. 570-855-3113 SKIS: USA Super S Volart 72IN Skis with Salomon 900S alum bindings $99. 570-287-2901

780

Televisions/ Accessories

TELEVISION: GE. 28” works good, needs remote $80. 570-740-1246 TV 27” color RCA, remote, barley used $65. 570-457-4433

782

Tickets

PENN STATE TICKETS October 29, 2011 vs. Illinois Section WH-15 yard line - seat backs. (2) at $100 each 570-675-5046 after 6 PM

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 15G

CALL AN EXPERT

Tickets

784

800 PETS & ANIMALS 805

Birds

Tools

RADIAL arm saw 10” $65. Scroll saw 16” $70. 7.5” power saw & blades $25. 7” grinder $25. Floor sander, $25. bench mount vise $25. All are Craftsman. 570-235-5216

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

PINEAPPLE CONURES

Hand fed, hand raised, tame, sold elsewhere for $399. On sale for $199 each. Call 570-472-3914

810

Professional Services Directory

Cats

CAT FREE To good home, female, long hair fully grown. 570-235-7218

1039

CELLAR RESURFACING

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY

RADIAL SAW Craftsman 10” 5 hp, attachments, $160. Heavy duty 1/2 drill, $20. Drill doctor paid $250, $95. Sears scroll saw, $95. Glaster superstar II glass grinder with safeguard, excellent condition, $45. Large aluminum extension ladder, $45. 570-696-9005

CATS (2) male 5 years old , neutered, female tiger and Siamese mix. Free to good homes. 417-2816

RETROFIT LASER guide for most 10” miter saws, works great! $10. call 570-696-1267

KITTEN free to good home, part persian. Playful, needs more pottery training. 570-428-4482

IMMEDIATE INSTALLATION

ROLLING SCAFFOLD, excellent condition 8’ho 6’l x2’w $300. ALL SIZE PIPE & STRAIGHT TAPS, ALL SIZE DRILL BITS $1-10.570-735-5290

KITTENS 4 beautiful grey. free to good homes only. Litter trained. 693-1358

1015

CATS & KITTENS 12 weeks & up.

All shots, neutered, tested,microchipped

VALLEY CAT RESCUE

786 Toys & Games BOARD GAMES: Vintage 1982 Parker Brothers, William Fuld, Ouija $25. Vintage 1975 Selchow & Righter Co., Parcheesi, $25. 570-287-2901

790

Swimming Pools/Hot Tubs

LEISURE BAY HOT TUB with 28 jets and

waterfall. New circuit board, heater & plumbing. Excellent condition! $2000. (570) 690-6855

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise BUYING COINS, gold, silver & all coins, stamps, paper money, entire collections worth $5,000 or more. Travel to your home CASH paid. Marc 1-800-488-4175

NEED CASH? We Buy:

Gold & Gold coins, Silver, Platinum, old bills, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Diamonds, Gold Filled, Sterling Silver Flatware, Scrap Jewelry, Military items, old Tin & Iron Toys, Canadian coins & paper money, most foreign money (paper/coin). Visit our new location @ 134 Rt. 11, Larksville next to WOODY’S FIRE PLACE & PRO FIX.

We make house calls!

Buyer & seller of antiques! We also do upholstering. 570-855-7197 570-328-3428

The Video Game Store 28 S. Main W.B. Open Mon- Sat, 12pm – 6pm 570-822-9929 / 570-941-9908

$$ CASH PAID $$ VIDEO GAMES & SYSTEMS Highest $$ Paid

Guaranteed Buying all video games & systems. PS1 & 2, Xbox, Nintendo, Atari, Coleco, Sega, Mattel, Gameboy, Vectrex etc. DVD’s, VHS & CDs & Pre 90’s toys,

The Video Game Store

1150 S. Main Scranton Mon - Sat, 12pm – 6pm 570-822-9929

VITO’S & GINO’S Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995

1006

824-4172, 9-9 only

815

PAWS TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130 Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

ALASKAN MALAMUTE & SHIBA INU PUPPIES ACA. Shots &

wormed. $475 each 570-477-3398

BOSTON TERRIER / PUG PUPPIES 4 males - $275 3 females - $375 Born 8/1/11 Ready to go! Call 570-825-5659 or 570-793-3905

BOSTON TERRIER DACHSHUND MIX 10 weeks old. First shots. $150/male; $200/females (570) 817-2687

COCKAPOO pups. Black, well socialized. Shots are current. $175 each. 570-765-1846

DOBERMAN PINSCHER

Puppies AKC, red & rust, ears cropped. Only 2 availableCooper’s Dobermans 570-542-5158 Golden Retriever 8 weeks old. AKC. Female. First shots, vet checked. Crate & paper trained. Family raised. $600. 570-925-6794

Birds? Cats? Dogs? Skunks? Snakes? Sell Your Animals with a Classified Ad! 570-829-7130 Morkie pups, Malti-poo pups Health records, love people, toy size maturity. $325 each 570-765-0936

NEWFOUNDLAND/LAB CROSS PUPPIES $350.

CHIHUAHUA PUPS $300.

All shots and vet certified. 570-648-8613

ROTTWEILER PUPS German lines.

2 females. Ready to go. $650. 570-592-5515 570-654-0678 St. Bernard, Poms, Yorkies, Maltese, Husky, Boxer, Doberman, Golden, Dachshund, Poodle, 570-453-6900 570-389-7877

A/C & Refrigeration Services

FURNACES, WATER HEATERS HEAT PUMPS, INSTALLATION & CLEANING Licensed & Insured COMPLETE HEATING SERVICES 570-817-5944

Appliance Service

KIRBY

Dogs

ROUTER $50. MODEL 4 jointer $50. made by Rockwell. $100. for all. 570-822-8957 SAW 10” radial arm saw Craftsman-with legs & locking casters used but not abused $350. 570-287-8265

Chimney Service

VACUUMS WHOLESALE PRICES Sales, service, supplies. Over 30 years experience 570-709-7222

1024

Building & Remodeling

1st. Quality Construction Co.

Roofing, siding, gutters, insulation, decks, additions, windows, doors, masonry & concrete. Insured & Bonded.

Senior Citizens Discount! State Lic. # PA057320

570-299-7241 570-606-8438 ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST 825-4268. Remodel / Repair Kitchen & Baths

ATLANTIC CONSTRUCTION & RESTORATION

Certified Water Damage Restoration: drywall, flooring, minor or major carpentry, painting. Free Estimates. (570) 285-5800

Call the Building Industry Association of NEPA to find a qualified member for your next project. call 287-3331 or go to

www.bianepa.com

General Remodeling Seamless Gutters Energy Audits Insurance Repairs “We take the Fear out of Remodeling”

800-404-3995

www.qualitydesignbuild.com PA HIC055885

NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION

All Types Of Work New or Remodeling Licensed & Insured Free Estimates 570-406-6044

Northeast Contracting Group

Decks, Sunrooms, Additions, Garages, Roofs, Concrete sidewalks & Driveways, etc. Special rates if affected by flood (570) 338-2269

ROOFING, SIDING, DECKS, WINDOWS

For All of Your Remodeling Needs. Will Beat Any Price 25 Yrs. Experience References. Insured Free Estimates 570-899-4713

1039

Chimney Service

A-1 1 ABLE CHIMNEY Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All types of Masonry. Liners Installed, Brick & Block, Roofs & Gutters. Licensed & Insured 570-735-2257

CAVUTO CHIMNEY SERVICE

& Gutter Cleaning Free Estimates Insured 570-709-2479

Find homes for your kittens! Place an ad here! 570-829-7130

Chimney construction, hauling, small demolition, stucco, porches, sidewalks. Insured. Licensed. I Return All Calls! 570-457-5849

CHIMNEY REPAIRS Parging. Stucco.

Stainless Liners. Cleanings. Custom Sheet Metal Shop. 570-383-0644 1-800-943-1515 Call Now! COZY HEARTH CHIMNEY Chimney Cleaning, Rebuilding, Repair, Stainless Steel Lining, Parging, Stucco, Caps, Etc. Free Estimates Licensed & Insured 1-888-680-7990 570-840-0873

1042

Cleaning & Maintainence

AUNT SISSY’S CLEANING

Who has time to clean? I DO! Great rates, friendly service, any size job. From Benton to Scranton and everywhere in between! (570) 925-6520

1045 Clock, Watch Jewelry

BRADFORD CLOCKS

Complete cabinet & movement restoration. Pickup & delivery available. Fast, dependable, quality work. 50+ years in business. Call 1-800-772-0178

1048

Computer Repairs

CB COMPUTER CARE

Virus, Spyware, Malware & Worm Removal. General maintenance. Free Pick up & delivery local area.

570-814-2365

1054

Concrete & Masonry

A+ MASONRY

Affordable Rates Free Estimates Brick, Block, Concrete, Stone, Retaining Walls, Basements, Porches, Patios, Sidewalks & Steps. 20% SENIOR DISCOUNT

No Job Too Small! Lic. & insured. 570-780-8339 570-468-3988

*** AFFORDABLE*** General Masonry & Concrete

NO JOB TOO BIG OR TOO SMALL! Masonry /Concrete Work. Licensed & insured. Free est. John 570-573-0018 Joe 570-579-8109 C&C Masonry and Concrete. Absolutely free estimates. Masonry & concrete work. Specializing in foundations, repairs and rebuilding. Footers floors, driveways. 570-840-9913 570-346-4103

J&J MASONRY INC.

Additions, all remodeling, siding, decks, foundations, concrete driveways, sidewalks, porches, stucco, brick pavers, stone, brick & retaining wall. 570-735-6805 Free Estimates LicPA039027 MC GERARD & SONS

10% OFF All Inside Work! Basement water

proofing, concrete floors, parging foundation walls, foundation repair & rebuild, finish basements. PROMPT SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES QUALITY WORKMANSHIP www.mcgerard.com Licensed & Insured 570-941-9122

Williams & Franks Inc Masonry contractors. Chimney, stucco & concrete. 570-466-2916

1057Construction & Building Bob Brislin Masonry & Construction All phases of construction, basement waterproofing, kitchens & bathroom remodeling. PA 029323 (570) 780-7339

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

1057Construction & Building Bob Brislin Masonry & Construction All phases of construction, basement waterproofing, kitchens & bathroom remodeling. PA 029323 (570) 780-7339

CREATIVE CARPENTRY *No job too small *Quality Guaranteed *Free estimates *Insured & Bonded *Specialist in doors, baseboard, flooring, molding, trim & closets. PA056630

AARON GERLACH 570-807-7465

GARAGE DOOR

Sales, service, installation & repair. FULLY INSURED HIC# 065008 CALL JOE 570-606-7489 570-735-8551

PEI ENTERPRISES, INC.

Residential & Commercial

Building, Remodeling, Maintenance, Management, Landscaping & Preservation. PALic#079784 (570) 496-0277

WWW. PEIENTERPRISESINC . COM

PHILLIPS CONSTRUCTION 33 yrs experience Complete Construction Services

Roofing, siding, windows, additions, decks, etc. Licensed & Insured. 570-788-2283 FREE ESTIMATES

1078

Dry Wall

MARK ANDERSON DRYWALL COMPANY SINCE 1987 Hanging & finishing. Swirreled & Textured ceilings. Water damage & Plaster Repair 570-760-2367

MARK STACK DRYWALL

Hanging & finishing. Textured & swirl ceilings. State licensed & insured. 30 years experience 570-574-7237

MIKE SCIBEK DRYWALL Hanging & finishing,

design ceilings. Free estimates. Licensed & Insured. 570-328-1230

MIRRA DRYWALL Hanging & Finishing Drywall Repair Textured Ceilings Licensed & Insured Free Estimates

(570) 675-3378 1084

Electrical

GRULA ELECTRIC LLC

Licensed, Insured, No job too small.

570-829-4077

SLEBODA ELECTRIC Master electrician Licensed & Insured Service Changes & Replacements. Generator Installs. 868-4469

1093

Excavating

All Types Of Excavating, Demolition & Concrete Work. FLOOD CLEAN UP Large & Small Jobs FREE ESTIMATES (570) 760-1497

GOT A FLOOD MESS? We can help.

Triaxle dump trucks, heavy equipment & demolition services available. Call BONNER’S TRUCKING & EXCAVATING 570-454-1458

1105 Floor Covering Installation

CARPET REPAIR & INSTALLATION

Vinyl & wood. Certified, Insured. 570-283-1341 AT HOME SELECTIONS Carpet, hardwood vinyl. Free carpet removal. Free installation. Zero interest financing. Free Estimates. 570-655-8004

C & S CARPET INSTALLATION

27 YRS EXPERIENCE Professional, Courteous Service Discount To Flood Victims 570-736-6204 or 570-991-3219

Sell your own home! Place an ad HERE 570-829-7130

1105 Floor Covering Installation

90 N. First Street Stroudsburg, PA 800-600-3033

Free shop at home service. HIC PA026831

FALCONE’S CITY CARPET CENTER

35 N. Main St, Pittston

Flood damage– free estimates! All your flooring needs & window treatments 570-498-0977, 570822-3494, or 570592-4060.

1135

Hauling & Trucking

A.S.A.P Hauling Estate Cleanouts, Attics, Cellars, Garages, we’re cheaper than dumpsters!. Free Estimates, Same Day! 570-822-4582 AAA Bob & Ray’s Hauling: Friendly & Courteous. We take anything & everything. Attic to basement. Garage, yard, free estimates. Call 570-655-7458 or 570-905-4820

GUTTER 2 GO, INC.

GUTTER CLEANING Window Cleaning.

Regulars, storms, etc. Pressure washing, decks, docks, houses,Free estimates. Insured. (570) 288-6794

1132

Handyman Services

ALL MAINTENANCE WE FIX IT

Electrical, Plumbing, Handymen, Painting Carpet Repair & Installation All Types Of Repairs DEPENDABLE HANDY MAN Home repairs & improvements. Luzerne Co. 30 Years Experience Dave 570-479-8076

FLOOD VICTIMS Call LICENSED GENERAL CONTRACTOR

Plumbing, heating electrical, painting, roofs, siding, rough & finished carpentry - no job too big or small. Free Estimates. Call anytime. 570-852-9281

POCAHONTAS

Problem Solvers

Power washing, landscaping, tree removal, grass cutting, home repairs, plumbing, drywall, painting, fall clean ups. Insured & Licensed 570-751-6140

RUSSELL’S

Property Maintenance

LICENSED & INSURED Carpentry, drywall, painting, flooring, power washing & more. FREE ESTIMATES 570-406-3339

The Handier Man

We fix everything! Plumbing, Electrical & Carpentry. Retired Mr. Fix It. Emergencies 23/7

299-9142

1135

Hauling & Trucking

AA1AAlways C L E Ahauling, NING

cleaning attics, cellar, garage, one piece or whole Estate, also available 10 & 20 yard dumpsters.655-0695 592-1813or287-8302 AAA CLEANING A1 GENERAL HAULING Cleaning attics, cellars, garages. Demolitions, Roofing & Tree Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or 542-5821; 814-8299

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks Highest Prices Paid!!

288-8995

AFFORDABLE JUNK REMOVAL

Cleanups/Cleanouts Large or Small Jobs FREE ESTIMATES (570) 817-4238

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H FREE

All in a Call

FLOOD CLEAN UP, hardwood floors, tile vct, drywall / finishing, painting, power washing. Free Est. Dependable & Reliable. Package deals available. Call 570-239-4790

VITO’S & GINO’S

FREE PICKUP

1129 Gutter Repair & Cleaning PA#067136- Fully Licensed & Insured. We install custom seamless rain gutters & leaf protection systems. CALL US TODAY ABOUT OUR 10% OFF WHOLE HOUSE DISCOUNT! 570-561-2328

1189 Miscellaneous Service

PICKUP

570-574-1275

1195

Movers

BestDarnMovers Moving Helpers Call for Free Quote. We make moving easy. BDMhelpers.com 570-852-9243

1204

Painting & Wallpaper

“AA+ C LASSICAL”

All phases. Complete int/ext paint & renovations Since 1990 Free Estimates Licensed-Insured 570-283-5714 A & N PAINTING Airplane Quality at Submarine Prices! Interior/Exterior, pressure washing, decks & siding. Commercial/Residential. Over 17 years experience! Free estimates. Licensed & Insured

570-820-7832

ALL KINDS OF HAULING & JUNK REMOVAL

TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL REMOVAL Estate Cleanout Free Estimates 24 HOUR SERVICE SMALL AND LARGE JOBS! 570-823-1811 570-239-0484

CASTAWAY HAULING JUNK REMOVAL

823-3788 / 817-0395

Mike’s $5 & Up

We do cleanups basements, garages, etc. Yard waste removal, small deliveries. Buying Old Wood Furniture Same day service.

793-8057 826-1883

WILL HAUL ANYTHING Clean cellars, attics, yards & metal removal. Call John 570-735-3330

1162 Landscaping/ Garden BRUSH UP TO 4’ HIGH, MOWING, EDGING, TRIMMING SHRUBS, HEDGES, TREES, MULCHING, LAWN CARE, GUTTERS, FALL CLEAN UP. FULLY INSURED. FREE ESTIMATES 570-829-3261 TOLL FREE 1-855-829-3261 Patrick & Deb’s Deb’s Landscaping Landscaping, basic handy man, cleaning, moving & free salvage pick up. AVAILABLE FOR FALL CLEAN UPS! Call 570-793-4773

1183

Masonry

CHOPYAK MASONRY New Chimneys/ Repairs Sidewalks, Steps, Concrete Free Estimates Fully Insured

570-674-7588

STONE MASON

47 Years Experience Creative. All types of masonry. Precast stone, pavers, stucco & general remodeling. Call 570-301-8200

TOM’S CONCRETE & MASONRY

Brick, block, walks, drives, stucco, stone, steps, chimneys porches and repairs. Lic. & insured. 570-283-5254 Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

A.B.C. Professional Painting 36 Yrs Experience We Specialize In New Construction Residential Repaints Comm./Industrial All Insurance Claims Apartments Interior/Exterior Spray,Brush, Rolls WallpaperRemoval Cabinet Refinishing Drywall/Finishing Power Washing Deck Specialist Handy Man FREE ESTIMATES Larry Neer 570-606-9638 DAVID WAYNE PAINTING Scranton to Hazleton

Nobody beats our prices! 570-762-6889

1213

Mountain Top

PAVING & SEAL COATING Patching, Sealing, Residential/Comm Licensed & Insured PA013253 570-868-8375

1228

House in Shambles? We can fix it! Cover All Painting & General Contracting PA068287. Serving Northeast PA & North Jersey since 1989. All phases of interior & exterior repair & rebuilding. Call 570-226-1944 or 570-470-5716 Free Estimates And yes, I am a lead paint removal certified contractor

JASON SIMMS PAINTING Interior/Exterior

Power Washing Free Estimates 21 Yrs. Experience Insured (570) 947-2777

M. PARALIS PAINTING

Int/ Ext. painting, Power washing. Professional work at affordable rates. Free estimates. 570-288-0733

WITKOSKY PAINTING Interior

Exterior, Free estimates, 30 yrs experience 570-826-1719 or 570-288-4311

1213

Paving & Excavating

EDWARD’S ALL COUNTY PAVING & SEAL COATING

Modified stone, laid & compacted. Hot tar and chips, dust and erosion control. Licensed and Insured. Call Today For Your Free Estimate

Plumbing & Heating

VMF -Service Now! We fix Furnaces, Hot Water Heaters, Boilers & handle Plumbing, Heating, Air Conditioning, Refrigeration. 24 Hour Service. Licensed & Insured. 30+ Years Experience. Call 570-343-2035

1234

Pressure Washing

BEE CLEAN

Power Wash & Landscaping Seasonal Services, Rain Gutter Cleaning, Snow Removal & More. (570) 457-1840

Pressure Washing /Painting/Repair Call JJ Murphy 570-714-3637

1249 Remodeling & Repairs

D & D REMODELING From decks and kitchens to roofs, and baths, etc. WE DO IT ALL!!!!!!! CALL US FOR ALL OF YOUR INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR REMODELING NEEDS 570-406-9387 Licensed/Insured YOU’VE TRIED THE REST NOW CALL THE BEST!!! Refinish your bath tub for as low as $299 for jobs scheduled by Oct-14. Includes non skid, SAVE $110!

Call Perma Glaze 1-800-292-6502

REMODELING /RESTORATION from ceilings to

floors, plastering, drywall, painting, carpeting, linoleum, also stucco, dryvit, foundation repairs. Residential/Commercial. 30+ years experience.Insured. Call John 570-235-5185

1252

Flood damage? We can help Paint, drywall, Drywall repair, Power washing 15 yrs. Exp. Fully insured 570-215-0257 EXECUTIVEPAINTING.BIZ

Paving & Excavating

Roofing & Siding

FALL ROOFING Special $1.29 s/f Licensed, insured, fast service 570-735-0846

J.R.V. ROOFING

570-824-6381 Roof Repairs & New Roofs. Shingle, Slate, Hot Built Up, Rubber, Gutters & Chimney Repairs. Year Round. Licensed/Insured ŠFREE EstimatesŠ *24 Hour Emergency Calls*

1294 Tile & Repair

TILE! TILE!TILE!

Tile, Stone & Marble Installations Floors,Walls & Tubs 20 Yrs. Experience Rick 570-864-8595

1297

Tree Care

Tree Removal, Grading, drainage, excavating, lot clearing, snow plowing, stone / soil delivery. No job too small Reasonable Rates 570-574-1862

1327 Waterproofing

`DEFELICE CONSTRUCTION`

Storm Damage, Roofs,Waterproofing. Licensed \ Insured Owner Operated, 20 yrs, senior discount 570-458-6274

1336

Window Cleaning

Professional Window Cleaning & More. Gutters, carpet, pressure washing. Residential/commercial. Ins./bonded. Free est. 570-283-9840

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-474-6329 570-829-7130 Lic.# PA021520


PAGE 16G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

OCTOBER

theGuide

MANAGER’S SPECIAL

It’s Your Entertainment News Source.

2012 SUZUKI SX4 AWD CROSSOVER MSRP $18,019

SPECIAL

$15,995

Stock #300017 The power of engineering.

AMERICA’S #1 WARRANTY 100,000-mile/7-year *

100,000-Mile /7-Year Power train Limited Warrant y. Fully Transferable. No Deductible.

713 N STATE ST., CLARKS SUMMIT, PA • 570-586-6676 • WWW.CHERMAKAUTO.COM M-TH 8-7 • F 8-5 • SAT 8-1 *See dealer for details. Includes $500 rebate and $500 Suzuki Owner Loyalty.

Pre-Owned Cars

2010 Suzuki Kizashi SE AWD

2008 Suzuki SX4 AWD

2011 Chevrolet 2500 Cargo Van

$18,995

$13,995

$21,995

23K Miles

Read it every Friday in The Times Leader.

18K Miles

34K Miles

NUMBER N

2008 Toyota Tacoma 4x4

2007 Honda Accord EX

$CALL$

$17,995

NEWSPAPER NEWS

2006 Chrysler PT Cruiser

44K Miles

60K Miles

ONE AUDITED

IN LUZERNE LUZERN COUNTY

$8,495

815

V isitus 24/ 7 a twww.v a lleyc hev ro let.c o m TO P D O L L FO R TRA DE -I N

A R

S C ars • Trucks • R V’s • M otorcy cles • A TV’s • C om m ercial

2003 CHEVY CAVALIER CO UPE

2009 TO YO TA TACO M A XCAB SR5

2005 CHEVY EQ UINO X

LT AW D SUN RO O F

ONE O W N ER

O N LY 37K M ILES

# 119 5 1A ,2 .2 L D O H C,Tilt,A M/FM/CD , Sport Cloth B u ck et Seats

$

ONE O W N ER

# 12 0 6 2 A ,V6 A u to.,A ir,A M/FM/CD ,Cloth Seats,Sliding Power W indows,Tonneau Cover,Tinted G lass,PW,PD L

7 999*

$

,

25 500* ,

ONE O W N ER

LEATH ER

# 12 0 3 8 A ,V6 ,AT,A /C,Su nroof,Leather, Lu ggage R ack Crossbars,Cru ise,P ower O ptions

$

13 999* ,

2010 CHRYSLER 2006 CHEVY IM PALA LT 2004 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LT 4x4 TO W N & CO UNTRY TO URING Sedan

# Z 2 5 2 6 ,Stow-N-G o Seats, H eated Leather Seats, Front & R ear D VD , My G ig R adio, B ack u p Cam era, P ower Sliding D oors,P wr. Tailgate, Low Miles

$

ONE O W N ER STO W -N -G O

22 500 ,

*

2004 CHEVY AVEO

# 1172 5 A ,V6 A u to.,A /C,R em ote Start System , Cru ise,P ower D river’sSeat,R em ote Sport Mirrors

$

10 900* ,

O N LY 50K M ILES

# Z 2 5 0 1,1.6 L D O H C,P ower Seat,Cloth Seat Trim , Front B u ck et Seats,R ear D efogger

$

7 999*

# 114 0 1A ,5 .3 L V8 ,4 Speed A u to.,A /C, 4 0 /2 0 /4 0 Seating,H D Trailing Equ ipm ent,Cru ise

$

,

2003 CHEVY SUBURBAN

1500 4W D LS

SEDAN

ONE O W N ER

# 119 70 A ,V8 ,AT,A /C,3 rd R ow Seat,P ower O ptions,Trailering P k g.,R ear A u dio Controls

# 12 0 11A ,V6 A u tom atic,w/O D ,Cru ise,A /C, A M/FM CD ,Front Split B ench Seat,Low Miles

12 999* ,

$

6 999* ,

W A L L A CE ’ S

Pet Supplies

Find your next vehicle online.

XLT

timesleaderautos.com ONE O W N ER

16 767* ,

2004 CHEVY CO LO RADO

EXTENDED CAB 4W D O N LY 44K M ILES

# Z 2 4 0 5 ,3 .5 L A u tom atic Trans.,A ir Conditioning, Com fort Convenience G rou p,Fu llVinylFloor Covering

$

14 900* ,

821-2772 • 1-800-444-7172

V A L L E Y 601 K IDDE R S TRE E T, W CH E V RO L E T

845

CAT LITTER BOX with lid + food dishes $6. 696-3368

,

*Prices plus tax & tags. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Select pictures for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors.

K E N

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

13 999*

$

,

2001 CHEVY IM PALA

PLEASE SEE PAGE 32G FOR ADDITIONAL AUTOMOTIVE ADS

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED!

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

# 119 9 2 A ,A u tom atic,A ir Conditioning,A M/FM Stereo w/CD ,B edliner,R u nning B oards

17 999*

ONE O W N ER

$

$

O N LY 45K M ILES

ONE O W N ER

Adorable. Shots. $250. Call 570-467-3434

# 12 0 5 9 A ,ATw/ O D ,A /C,Leather,Two Tone, P ower O ptions,H eated Seats,Low Miles

EXTENDED CAB 4X4

1500 Extended Cab 4x4

YORKIE/SCHNAUZER MIX PUPPIES Non shed.

ONE O W N ER

2005 CHEVY SILVERADO 2007 FO RD RANG ER

5 DO O R

Dogs

IL K E S -BA RRE , P A

Mon.-Thurs. 8:30-8:00pm; Fri. 8:30-7:00pm; Sat. 8:30-5:00pm

EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.

0

$

DOWN*

*For qualified Buyers. Bi-weekly payments greater than 17 1/2 % of monthly net income, additional down-payment may be required. Costs to be paid by Buyer at delivery: registration, taxes, title, doc fee.

W Y O M I N G VA L L E Y 415 Kidder Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 570.822.8870

steve@yourcarbank.com www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 17G

SUNDAY REAL ESTATE

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 09, 2011

THE TIMES LEADER

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.

Smith Hourigan Group

Century21SHGroup.com

Convenient location highlights Kingston Cape Cod Story and photos By Marianne Tucker Puhalla Advertising Projects Writer A great house in a convenient location can be yours for the asking at 357 Ridge St., Kingston. Just one block off Wyoming Ave., this striking Cape Cod is in immaculate condition and features plenty of upgrades, including nearly new kitchen, baths and hardwood flooring, plus necessities such as a newer hot water heater and furnace, and replacement windows. Listed by Pat Busch of Coldwell Banker Busch Real Estate for $154,900, this well-kept home will be open for tours during an Open House today from 1-3 p.m. This home has white vinyl siding, black shutters and a covered front

OPEN HOUSE TODAY, 1-3 P.M.

WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE OR ERA WILL BUY IT! *

porch just right for a rocking chair or two. Set on 35-by-100 corner lot, there is a comfortable fenced-in rear yard and a detached one-car garage to the rear. The front porch leads into the 22by-14 living room. All eyes here are on the beautiful hardwood floors and the white brick fireplace with carved mantle flanked by two elongated windows located on the side wall. This elegant living room has beige walls and two large windows front. An opening to the left leads to the 14by-12 dining room. This room also has two windows front, one window side and more of the stunning hardwood flooring. The eat-in kitchen measures 9-by-18 and includes a breakfast room with a white tile floor and two side windows.

The cooking area offers beige walls, a white tile backsplash, and cherry cabinets with a quartz, solid surface countertop. Appliances include a range, dishwasher and refrigerator. A nearby powder room offers a cherry vanity with white sink, beige walls and a white tile floor. An adjacent door leads to the full, unfinished basement where you find laundry hook-ups and plenty of storage space. A staircase, with a leaded glass window on the landing, leads to the second floor. Here you find three bedrooms and a full bath. The bedrooms range in size from 14by-14 to 8-by-11 all offering hardwood flooring, single closets, and at least one window. There is built-in linen storage Continued

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate, Inc.

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-3:00

17 DONALD CT., WILKESBARRE

Buying? Selling?

DIR: Take Carey Ave to Simpson St., turn right onto Plymouth St., turn left onto Willow St., then turn left onto Donald Ct. MLS#11-2969 $199,900

Discover LF Homefinder.

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 11:00-1:00

Wilkes-Barre: 822.1160 Clarks Summit: 585.0600

Atlas Realty, Inc. :00

-2 829-6200 :00 • www.atlasrealtyinc.com 12

OPEN HOUSES TODAY!

297 SUSQUEHANNOCK 411 JONES ST., DURYEA DR., JENKINS TWP. Beautiful 2 story English Great 2 story, 4 bedTudor with great gardens, room home with 2 car surrounding beautiful in garage, 2 1/2 baths, ground pool with private large semi private yard fenced yard. 3 bedrooms, with deck & retractable 2 1/2 baths. awning, above ground MLS #11-2720 pool. Cul de-sac. MLS #11-2432 $229,900 Call Colleen 237-0415 $259,900 Call Phil 313-1229 Dir: River Rd to Saylor Ave, left onto Susquehannock Dr, follow Dir: Foote Ave. to Pond St., to right on Jones to home on right.

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ONE Mountaintop Office SOURCE 12 N Mountain Blvd. REALTY (570) 403-3000

11-3530 Beautiful 3 bedroom ranch home located in a nice neighborhood. Breath taking view of the Wyoming Valley. Includes a 26’ above ground pool with a nice deck. CALL YVONNE 574-7274 $180,000

Open House! 28 GLENVIEW AVE, DALLAS 11-3287 Newly constructed 3 bedroom home featuring hardwood floors in the living room, kitchen & foyer. Ceramic tile in the baths. Kitchen features birch cabinets, solid surface counter tops and patio door leading to deck and backyard! Move in ready-just relax and enjoy the peace and quiet. CALL MICHAEL 760-4961 $188,900 DIR: Rte 309 to E Franklin (light by McDonald´s, Shavertown) Left onto Goeringer Right onto Glenview.

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lot. MLS#09-4715

This country estate features 30 acres of prime land w/ a pretty home w/ a modern kitchen, 2 full modern baths, bright family room, den with living room and 3 good size bedrooms. The property has open fields & wooded land, a stream, several fieldstone walls & lots of road frontage. Equipment and & rights included. Call Jerry Busch $489,000

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Beautiful one-story home with great views of Shickshinny Lake. Wonderful patio area with hot tub, gardens & electric canopy. Each room has a unique sculptured ceiling, huge closet space. Boat launch within walking distance. Paul Pukatch 696-6559 MLS#11-3686 $325,000

Motivated Seller! Reduced! Well Just starting out or looking to maintained double on a nice downsize? This ranch home can street. Not flooded! Separate work for you! This 3 bedroom utilities; 1 side has 3-4 bedrooms, home has a finished lower level the other side has 2 bedrooms, with coal stove, laundry room, OSP thru alley in rear. DIR: large fenced rear yard, spacious Main St., turn onto Academy kitchen/dining area. (old Turkey Hill), home on R. Worth a look! Karen Altavilla 283-9100 x28 Jill Jones 696-6550 MLS#11-1171 $67,500 MLS 11-1793 $124,900

Move right into this immaculate 2-story situated on 1.7 acres with 4 bedrooms and 2 modern baths. Many nice features include modern kitchen with stainless steel appliances. DIR: Eighth St. to Mt. Zion Rd., to R on Oberdorfer to L on Kitchen. DJWojciechowski283-9100 MLS#11-2067 $229,900

Two Of ces To Serve You Better: 1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100 28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600 Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com

WILKES-BARRE WITH HIGH TRAFFIC LOCATION

This Says Come In! You will feel right at home the moment you step into this quality built home with 3 nice size bedrooms, 2.5 modern baths, This home features a nice modern kitchen, living room, kitchen, 2 full baths, living dining room with hardwood room, dining room, 3 bed- floors, office, laundry, comfortrooms, comfortable gas, able gas heat, cool central air two car garage. You have terrific yard and garage. and to see the patio! MLS#11Better Hurry! 2487 Call Jerry Busch Call Jerry Busch $79,900 $255,000

Victorian Office, excellent condition, 5 zone gas heat, central air with paved off street parking. Beautiful inside and out! Call Pat Busch $299,900

OPEN HOUSES TODAY! 19 KYRA WAY $184,500 PLAINS 3 BR Townhouse W/ 2.5 baths, formal DR & large eat in kitchen. New rugs throughout & all rooms freshly painted. Dir: From the Cross Valley take River St. to R into Rivermist.

73 PERRIN $129,500 SHAVERTOWN GREAT NEW PRICE!! 5 BR home nestled on a large lot of W/ room to grow in! 1 3/4 baths & 1st floor laundry, sunporch, fireplace & det’d 2 car garage! Tucked away on a dead end street. LETS MAKE A DEAL!! Dir: From Kingston take Rt 309 then make L at Burger King onto Roushey & L onto Perrin. Home on R

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244 OVERBROOK ROAD $118,800 DALLAS Nice 3 BR home on a deep lot w/ large eat in kitchen. Dir: 309N to L onto Pioneer Ave. Before Sheetz then L onto Overbrook 81-83 E. BROADWAY $124,900 LARKSVILLE “Good Investment Property” Very well maintained tenant occupied double block has seperate utilities, back yard & 3-car garage. CALL DEB ROCCOGRANDI Dir: From State St. to a Left on Marcy & a right on Broadway

(570) 674-9950 • (570) 824-1499 • (570) 654-4428

11 DIVISION ST , SHAVERTOWN 11-1873 Lead a happy life in this spacious 3 bedroom home on a double lot. Enjoy the tranquility of a quiet neighborhood. Lovely details in this outstanding home include finished walk-out basement with fireplace, hardwood floor in dining room, whirlpool tub,

You We are number 1, because we care.

57 North Main St., Shavertown, PA Time Plaza, Rt. 115, P.O. Box 1051, Blakeslee, PA

Now Hiring New Agents To Help Service Our Growing Inventory Follow Us On:

covered patio and an oversized 2 car garage. CALL CARY 240-3552 $160,000 DIR: From Dallas--Rte 309S to left on E Center Hill (at Burger King), right onto Lehigh to right on Division.

Trucksville

Wapwallopen

CED!

REDU

263490

NEW LISTING HANOVER

Four Star McCabe Realty

46 Kitchen Lane, Harding EN E 9 OPOUS 10/ 30 H N. -3: SU2:00

NEW LISTING LUZERNE

FOR PROMPT REAL ESTATE APPRAISALS, CALL GERALD L. BUSCH APPRAISAL SERVICE 288-2514

TOO GOOD TO LAST TOO LONG! Call us today !

Shickshinny-Great Views! 78-80 Academy St., Plymouth Hanover Twp.-Take a Look!

© 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Af liates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.

Open House! 0012:

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$127,500 Proudly serving our community for 23 years.

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Ranch home on 2.5 acres; large garage, great location. MLS#09-1918

New Listing!

WYOMING COUNTY CENTERMORELAND 30 ACRES

2-4

122 PARNELL ST., 10 NORMAN ST. PITTSTON TWP. PITTSTON TWP. Beautiful home on Great 4 bedroom corner lot with 3 bedbrick home, larger rooms, fenced in yard, than it looks with 1.5 baths, newer roof 4 bedrooms, large and windows, finished family room with lower level. fireplace, rear MLS #11-2749 263 WEST 2AVE., 3380 LAUREL porches, lots of off BEAR street CREEK parking. MLS#11-2887 Call Tom 262-7716 RUN ROAD, $172,900 $189,900 Call Colleen 237-0415. Mountain lake community, cape cod home, Dir: Pittston By-Pass WILKESBARRE to Oak St, right on Ford, left on Parnell. Dir: Pittston By-Pass to Norman St., house on triple left.

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Each Office is Independently Owned And Operated.

WWW.LEWITH-FREEMAN.COM

Make an Offer!! Cozy up in this lovely cape cod. Charming interior, nice size deck, fenced rear yard, shed, rec room in basement, utility room, & workshop. Attic is also partially finished w/pull down & many possibilities to add more space. Paved driveway & parking for 6 cars, this is not just a driveby, Call Stacey Lauer 262-1158 for an appointment today!! MLS#11-1363 $102,900

S! ACRE 10.98

Room to roam on 10.98 acres with outbuildings, woodsy settings and cleared acreage. Sweet single story home with deck, new windows and hardwood floors. Additional acreage available. Won’t last long at $110,000. Call Tracy 332-8764. MLS# 11-3299

Harveys Lake

1.84

Hanover Twp.

S

ACRE

Lovely older home of gracious architectural layout features high ceilings, stained glass, new kitchen and bath, replacement windows, roof and fencing. Beautiful old fashioned charms fills every nook and cranny. All on 1.84 acres. MLS# 11-2347 Call Tracy 696-2468. $144,900

UR AL TO VIRTU

Immaculate 3 bedroom 1.5 bathroom, modern kitchen has a Dining/ LivingRoom combo w/ H/W floors. 2 ductless a/c units w/ heat pumps. This home is a must see has a 3 season sun porch overlooking a nice wooded view w/ above ground pool and gorgeous fenced in yard...Neat Move in condition in a great neighborhood. Call Georgette 817-6536 MLS#11-2945 $153,900

715780

ERA1.com

12-

Jerry Busch, Jr. Is Ready To Work For “You!” Call Jerry Today 709-7798

GERALD L. BUSCH REAL ESTATE, INC. Pat Is Ready To Work For “You!” 288-2514 Call Pat Today 885-4165 EMAIL: JERRYBUSCHJR@AOL.COM

11 AM -1 PM

78 HICKORY ST., WILKESBARRE

DIR: Wilkes-Barre Blvd to Lehigh St right onto Hickory home on left. Jenn Davison 793-1033 MLS#11-3458 $48,900

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One of a kind! Custom built log home on quiet street near College Misericordia. Great Room with traditional fireplace. Master bedroom opens to deck. Spacious kitchen/dining room with many windows and skylights. Loft for easy third bedroom. Built in 2 car garage and basement access. MLS#11-3026 $275,000

Shavertown: 696.3801 Mountain Top: 474.9801

11 AM -1 PM

Kingston: 288.9371 Hazleton: 788.1999

DALLAS


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Kingston

Continued from front page

in the hall. Also renovated within the last few years, the full bath is picture pretty with blue tiled walls and a white tiled floor. A modern white vanity has a white cultured marble sink. This bath has its own linen closet and a tiled tub and shower surround. There is a single window facing the side. This home has gas hot water baseboard heat, and public water and sewer systems. A one-car detached garage is set to the rear of the property and provides off-street parking. To get to today’s Open House from Wyoming Ave. (Route 11) in Kingston, turn onto Chester St., and continue one block. The home is on the corner of Chester St. and Ridge Ave. For more information or to make an appointment to see this comfortable home, contact Pat Busch, Coldwell Banker Busch Real Estate, (570) 288-2514; Box6754@aol.com SPECIFICATIONS: Cape Cod 1,576 square feet BEDROOMS: 3 BATHS: 1 full, 1 half PRICE: $154,900 LOCATION: 357 Ridge Ave., Kingston AGENT: Pat Busch REALTOR: Coldwell Banker Busch Real Estate, (570) 885-4165; Box6754@aol.com

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

BACK MOUNTAIN

BACK MOUNTAIN

BEAR CREEK VILLAGE

DALLAS

DALLAS

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 906 Homes for Sale Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

Beautiful 5 bedroom, 2.2 baths & FANTASTIC “Great Room” with built in bar, private brick patio, hot tub & grills! 4 car garage with loft + attached 2 car garage. Situated on over 6 acres of privacy overlooking Francis Slocum with a great view of the lake! Lots of extras & the kitchen is out of this world! MLS#11-3131 $625,000 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

LINEUP LINE UP ASUCCESSFULSALE A GREAT DEAL... INCLASSIFIED! IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

ASHLEY

19 Davis St. Very affordable single family, 3 bedroom, 2 bath starter home in a good location. MLS #10-4026 $29,900 Call Jay Crossin Ext. 23 Crossin Real Estate 570-288-0770

AVOCA

314 Packer St. Remodeled 3 bedroom with 2 baths, master bedroom and laundry on 1st floor. New siding and shingles. New kitchen. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3174 $99,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

133 Frangorma Dr Bright & open floor plan. 5 year old 2 story. 9' ceiling 1st floor. Custom kitchen with stainless steel appliances. Family room with 14' ceiling & fireplace. Convenient location. MLS# 11-2572 $359,000 Call Geri 570-696-0888

470 Lewis Drive Great house in great condition! Unique 1 1/2 story with 4 bedrooms & 2 1/2 baths on 2 acre wooded lot. Fireplaces in living room, dining room & family room. Modern kitchen with stainless appliances & breakfast bar. Hardwood floors. Flexible floor plan. MLS#11-2408 $349,9000 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

BEAR CREEK BERWICK

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

BACK MOUNTAIN

NEW LISTING Wonderful Back Mountain find in Elmcrest development. Big enough to raise four daughters with 3 bedroms, 3 baths, woodburning fireplace, hot tub, replacement windows and hardwood floors under new carpeting, all on a large lot with fieldstone walls. MLS#11-3279 $247,500 McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

The Attorney To Call When Buying A Home • Complete Real Estate Legal Services

475 East Ave. Top to bottom re-do for this beautiful 3 bedroom, 1.75 bath, 2 story home located in the Meadow Run Lake community of Bear Creek. Tranquil setting, modern interior all re-done, granite countertops in the kitchen, exterior with new landscaping and stone patio with lake frontage to name a few! MLS 11-1643 $329,900 Call Jay A. Crossin 570-288-0770 Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

BEAR CREEK

6650 Bear Creek Blvd

Well maintained custom built 2 story nestled on 2 private acres with circular driveway - Large kitchen with center island, master bedroom with 2 walk-in closets, family room with fireplace, custom built wine cellar - A Must See property! $299,900 MLS# 10-4312 Call Geri 570-696-0888

319 East 10th St Remodeled 4 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, large lot (No Flood Zone) Columbia County. Low Taxes! $105,000, 570-204-6550 c-investments.com

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

BERWICK

FOR SALE BY OWNER 50% below Market Value. Fixer upper. Not in flood zone. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Corner lot. $46,500. (570) 394-9537 BERWICK

H1145 ANDYPERSON SPECIAL 6th Avenue

Lots of potential! $36,500 Can see online c-investments.com 570-204-6550

BLAKESLEE Quiet Country Living

Impressive, wellcared for, 4 Bed Colonial on a beautiful 2 Acre home site, just 20 minutes to W-B. Lots of storage with a huge basement and 3 Car Garage. Enjoy country living at it’s best. Call Betty 570-643-4842

570-643-2100

DALLAS

• Title Insurance • Rapid Title Search & Closing • Evening & Weekend Appointments

Angelo C. Terrana Jr. Suite 117 Park Building, 400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA (570) 283-9500

714078

ATTORNEY AT LAW

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Proposed new construction “Ranch Condo” in Green Briar with a 1 car garage, community pool & tennis in a great adult community. $229,900 MLS# 10-1105 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Fantastic home with a large family room with fireplace. You will love the kitchen and get ready for “Summer Fun” in the private in ground pool. MLS# 11-1141 $257,500 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

DALLAS

210 42nd St. E Beautiful 3300 sq.ft. custom built Tudor home on 3.7 +/acres with stream, pond & gorgeous landscaping in a great country like setting. A home you'll be proud to own. MLS#10-4516 $ 399,900 Call Barbara Metcalf 570-696-0883

DALLAS

20 Fox Hollow Drive Well maintained two story with fully finished lower level awaits its new family. 4-6 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 2 fireplaces. One year home warranty included. Wonderful neighborhood. $270,000 MLS #11-3504 Call Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

Call a mortgage or appraisal specialist today to assist you in buying or selling your property!

Over 60 Years of Appraisal Experience

Joseph J. Mantione Broker PA Certified Residential Appraiser

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Pat McHale Associate Broker PA Certified Residential Appraiser

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211 Hillside One Enjoy the comforts & amenities of living in a beautifully maintained townhouse, 3/4 Bedrooms, family room with fireplace out to deck. Bright & airy kitchen, finished lower level, Tennis, Golf & Swimming are yours to enjoy & relax. Maintenance free living. PRICE REDUCED! $210,000 MLS# 10-1221 Call Geri 570-696-0888

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

TAX APPEAL • ESTATE • HOME EQUITY BANKRUPTCY • DIVORCE • REFINANCE

197 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming, PA 18644 •

(570) 613-9080

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

DALLAS

DALLAS

DALLAS

DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT

3 Crestview Dr. Well-constructed and maintained sprawling multilevel with 5,428 square feet of living space. Living room & dining room with hardwood floors & gas fireplace; eat-in kitchen with island; florida room. 5 bedrooms, 4 baths; 2 half-baths. Lower level rec room with wet bar & fireplace. leads to heated in-ground pool. Beautifully landscaped 2 acre lot. $575,000 MLS# 11-1798 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

314 Loyalville Road Very Nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath doublewide on 2 acres with detached 2 car garage and well maintained yard. Home has Anderson Thermopane windows, wood burning fireplace in TV room, walk-in closet, wall heater in full basement, 16x23.6 & 9.6x8.4 rear deck, 9.6x8.4 front deck, glass sliding door in kitchen, central air, black walnut trees, peach tree, paved driveway etc. MLS# 11-2679 REDUCED!!! $165,000 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

NEWBERRY ESTATES $109,000 2 bedroom, 2 bath unit in move in condition. Lease purchase available. $1,400/month with $4,800 assist at closing. Call Nancy Eckert 570-696-0882 or Terry Eckert 570-696-0843

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

Line up a place to live in classified!

DALLAS

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

DALLAS

DALLAS

20 OAK DRIVE WOW! This home offers replacement windows, newer hot water heater, gas fireplace, hardwood floors, sun porch, large fenced rear yard, flagstone patio, heated inground pool, finished lower level, located in the Lehman School District. Just minutes from Harveys Lake, why not join the Beach Club this summer! It is a MUST SEE HOME! MLS#11-1258 $154,900 Bob Cook 696-6555 Jill Jones 696-6550

Brian Walker Sales Associate PA Certified Residential Appraiser

CALL US WITH YOUR APPRAISAL NEEDS!!

DALLAS Nice 3 bedroom home on a deep lot with large eat in kitchen. MLS#11-3387 $118,800 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Mortgage & Appraisal Services

We Need Your Help!

Open floor plan, raised ranch. Newly rebuilt in 2009. Located in nice neighborhood close to everything! MLS# 11-2928 $109,500 Call Christine Kutz Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

DALLAS NEW CONSTRUCTION

Anonymous Tip Line 1-888-796-5519 Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office

2,400 sq feet $329,000 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAYS, 11-1

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Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

PRICE REDUCED! Clean & neat 3-4 bedroom cape cod. 2 car garage. Deck & porches. Gas heat. 85’ x 115’ lot. $110,000. Call Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

DALLAS

REDUCED PRICE! Secluded on a hill but part of High Point Acres. 2 story Colonial, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Large family room with fireplace and sliding door to screened porch. Community Swimming Pool. 2 car garage. Central AC. Wooded lot. $265,000. 11-1077 Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

100% Financing Wooded and private Bi-Level in Dallas School District. This home features 1 Car Garage, 3 Bedrooms, 1 3/4 Bath and nice updates. Plenty of room on your private 2 acre lot.100% USDA Financing Eligible. Call for details.

REDUCED PRICE $166,000 Call Cindy King 570-690-2689

www.cindykingre.com

570-675-4400

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

DALLAS

SHORT SALE! Charming 3 Bedroom Cape Cod with 1 Car Garage in great neighborhood. Close to Park/Rec Center. Dallas School District. Priced as Short Sale, subject to bank approval. $92,000 Call Cindy 570-690-2689 www.cindykingre.com

570-675-4400

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 19G

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate, Inc. Discover Buyers Top Choice for Homes Searches

www.lewith-freeman.com LF Homefinder – Search and save your favorite homes right on our website

Did you Know? More sellers choose L&F to display their homes for sale. Lewith & Freeman homes appear on all major real estate websites, 600 & Growing...

Call the experts!

Kingston 570.288.9371 Shavertown 570.696.3801

Mountain Top 570.474.9801 Hazleton/Drums 570.788.1999

Wilkes-Barre 570.822.1160 Clarks Summit 570.585.0600 OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 10/9 • 1-3PM

SHAVERTOWN Spacious home. Wonderful flr plan & elegant detail throughout. Fantastic 2 story great rm w/gas FP, great kitchen, MSTR on 1st flr, 5BRs, 5 baths & great finished LL w/ custom cabinetry. MLS# 11-3697 MARGY 696-0891 $445,000

HARVEY’S LAKE PRICE REDUCED - BREATHTAKING BEAUTY: 88 feet of lake frontage. 5BR home w/new Master Suite & gourmet kitchen, exceptional boathouse w/dream view. MLS# 11-605 VIRGINIA ROSE 714-9253 $950,000

1000 LAUREL RUN RD., BEAR CREEK TWP. New Construction! Quality abounds in custom designed 4BR, 3.5 bath home. Open floor plan, gourmet kitchen, lg LR, HW floors 1st floor, Master Suite w/tile shower & Jacuzzi. Minutes to Golf Course! MLS# 11-1361 CLYDETTE 696-0897 $495,000 Dir: Rt.115S - Turn R on Laurel Run Rd to L on Golf Course Rd - Property on L (corner)

OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 10/9 • 12:30-2PM

MOUNTAINTOP Gorgeous Lakefront property. Master Suite on lower level w/FP, HW, vaulted ceilings, finished lower level w/ movie theatre. MLS# 11-2848 JOAN 696-0887 $875,000

SHAVERTOWN Wonderful home in convenient location features spacious formal rms, beautiful HW flrs, & grand stone FP. Kit opens to bright sunroom/brkfst area. 4 lg BRs, office & 2 baths on 2nd flr. Charming wrap around porch offers views of lg property w/mature oak & pines. MLS#11-528 RHEA 696-6677 $599,000

125 FRANGORMA DR., TRUCKSVILLE PRICE REDUCED! Happy days in this beautiful 3BR, 3 bath, Traditional in one of Back Mtn’s quietest downhome subdivisions. MLS# 113235 DEANNA 696-0894 $259,500 Dir: Rt 309 to Carverton Rd to W Hillside to R on Frangorma.

10 DAKOTA DR., DALLAS DAKOTA WOODS - Carefree Condo -Bright & spacious w/3 BR’s, 1st flr master, study/library, kit w/granite & upscale app’ls, 2 car gar. MLS#11-3208 RHEA 696-6677 $379,000 Dir: Route 309 N - Dakota Wood on Right.

MOUNTAINTOP 3BR, 2.5 bath home in quiet development. Large eat-in kitchen, DR, LR, FR w/FP & finished LL. Heated sunroom & 2 car garage. Lot 90x200. MLS# 11-696 ANDY 714-9225 $259,900

HARDING Top of the line everything in this gorgeous 4BR home. Great pool area w/huge deck. Over 4000SF. Stone & vinyl. A must see! MLS# 11-3672 TERRY E. 696-0843 $549,000

KINGSTON Old World Charm at its best! Beautiful 5BR, 2.5 bath home w/mod kit. HW flrs, 2 mantels & 1 wood burning FP, 2.5 car gar, library w/built-ins & FP, DR w/ beam ceiling & stain glass windows. Great landscaping! Could make wonderful bed & breakfast! Agent owned. MLS# 11-2878 MATT 714-9229 $264,900

KINGSTON Move-in condition Duplex. Each unit approximately 1400SF w/2BRs, large LR, formal DR, eat-in kitchen, gas heat & C/A. Detached 2 car garage & nice yard. MLS# 112866 TERRY NELSON 714-9248 $159,000

FORTY FORT NEW PRICE! This 3BR, 2 bath home includes LR, DR, den ,kitchen & sunroom on the 1st flr. New, neutral carpeting, gas heat/ CA, 3 car gar & nice yard. MLS#10-1762 RHEA 696-6677 $136,500

OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 10/9 • 1-2:30PM

LAFLIN Beautiful Tudor home in excellent condition. 4BRs, 3 baths, newly updated with HW flrs, new appliances - Corian, new roof, decks, driveway, 2 car garage. MLS# 10-4093 SHIRLEY 714-9281 $212,000

MOUNTAINTOP Woodberry Manor - A gorgeous Quality New Construction w/4-5BRs, 4 baths, superb Kit w/Island & huge pantry. Choose your granite, cabinets, tile & carpet. Lots of extras include upgraded molding package, paved driveway, composite decking, sidewalk & curbs. MLS#11-3589 TERRY D. 715-9317 $419,900

SHAVERTOWN NEW CONSTRUCTION! Elegant stone & succo exterior - all finest appointments, 9’ ceiling, HW floors, crown moldings. Select your cabinetry. MLS# 11-1987 GERI 696-0888 $499,000

BEAR CREEK VILLAGE Delightful cedar sided ranch w/deluxe MSTR Ste, A/C, 3FPs, modern Kit, Lg rec rm, heated in-grnd pool, lake access. MLS#11-3144 Ann Lewis 714-9245 $299,000

HAZLE TWP. Stop searching your dream home awaits. 4BRs, 3.5 baths, custom built Colonial. Open & spacious Kit w/granite, SS appls, imported tile flr. Beautiful HW flrs, gas FP, finished walk-out LL, professional landscaping. MLS# 113234 PAT G. 788-7514 $297,900

PINE RIDGE ESTATES Close to work & shopping!! Almost new traditional home in a gorgeous neigborhood. All mod conveniences, 2 stry foyer, granite Kit w/ss appls, open flr plan, gas FP w/stone hearth & 2nd flr lndry. Lg MSTR Ste w/sitting area, whirlpool tub w/ shower. MLS#11-138 JOAN 696-0887 $265,000

PLAINS Beautiful 3BR Ranch larger than it appears on a quiet street. Lower level almost finished. A must see! MLS# 11-3077 MARY M. 714-9274 $249,000

SWOYERSVILLE Steeplechase - End luxurious Townhouse. Cathedral ceilings, 3BRs, 2.5 baths, HW floors, gas heat, C/A, fenced yard, 1 car garage. MLS# 11-3533 NANCY PALUMBO 714-9240 $209,900

FORTY FORT Completely remodeled 4BR, 2 bath home. New electric, plumbing, windows, furnace, etc. A must see! MLS# 11-3379 TINA 714-9251 $174,900

PARSONS Great corner property in Parson’s section. Includes residence & commercial space totaling 4607SF. MLS# 11-459 LISA 715-933 $169,000

TWINS AT WOODBERRY MANOR

WEST PITTSTON Well cared for & nicely kept. A place to call home! Complete w/2 car oversized garage, C/A, 1st fl laundry, eat-in kitchen. Convenient to shopping, West Pittston pool & ball fields. MLS# 11-583 JUDY 714-9230 $134,500

Spectacular 3br 2 1/2 bath twin on great lot offers beautiful hardwood floors on 1st flr and stunning kitchen with granite counter tops and stainless steel appl. Large master suite with wonderful bath & closet. All modern amenities, stately entry and staircase, composite deck, central air, gas heat, 1 car garage. MLS# 11-2000 WEST PITTSTON Nicely maintained 3BR home. Remodeled bath w/whirlpool tub, DR w/patio doors leading to yard. MLS# 11-3058 CHRISTINA 714-9235 $119,000

Prices Start at $219,900

Call Lisa Joseph at 715-9335 or Virginia Rose at 714-9253 for more information.


PAGE 20G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

906 Homes for Sale

DRUMS

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

906 Homes for Sale

DURYEA

BEECH MOUNTAIN LAKES

134 Beaver Slide Dr.

$179,000 MLS# 11-21844 Barbara Young Call 570-466-6940

COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE 570-474-2340 Ext. 55Sunday October 9 1pm-3pm $179,000 MLS#11-21844

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

1140 SPRING ST. Large 3 bedroom home with new roof, replacement windows, hardwood floors. Great location! For more information and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com. MLS 11-2636 $119,900. Call Tom 570-262-7716

Great home. First floor Master Bedroom, Huge walk-in closet, Master bathroom suite with sunken tub and tile shower. Two Family rooms, both overlooking the patio, valley and river. Breathtaking views from the gourmet kitchen. VERY HIGH AND VERY DRY !!!! Pick your lot now…$350,000

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

DURYEA

DUPONT

167 Center St. 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath 2 story home with garage and driveway. Newer kitchen and bath. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3561 $69,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

We Need Your Help!

1219 SOUTH ST. Renovated 1/2 double with 3 bedrooms in nice neighborhood. Own for what it takes to rent. All new windows. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-2523 $54,900 Call Phil 570-313-1229

Anonymous Tip Line 1-888-796-5519

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office

COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE

100 Years of Exceptional Real Estate Services

Visit

40 N. Mountain Blvd., Mountaintop

Open House Sunday, October 9th

Coldwellbankerrundlerealestate.com e-mail: rundlerealestate@coldwellbanker.com Hablamos Espanol

30 M 1: 30P 3:

Call Stan Pearlman (570) 474-2340 • Stanley.Pearlman@ColdwellBanker.com

716385

6010 BEAR CREEK BLVD., RTE 115, BEAR CREEK VILLAGE Own a piece of history! Beautiful Bear Creek estate. Granite countertops, AGA Four Oven gas stove, Miele dishwasher.Two master bedrooms with fireplaces, Wood-burning fireplace in Living Room, gas fireplace in Library, spacious porch, Mud room. Absolute privacy, stunning perennial flower gardens, large kitchen garden, dog run, invisible dog fence. MLS#10-2602 $400,000 WEBSITE: www.6010bearcreekboulevard.com DIR: South from Wilkes-Barre on Route 115. Driveway on right just past White Haven Road, #6010 on white post.

Great buys ………VERY HIGH AND VERY DRY !!!! The Views at Eagle View in Jenkins Township are outstanding. You’ll never find a better time to buy your lot. Put a deposit on any lot and build when you are ready. We are a custom builder and will build to your plan or modify one of ours to be your “Dream Home”. Trade your flood property for one of our lots/home packages. We have started our landscaping at Eagle View…. making these spectacular lots even more outstanding.

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

DURYEA

DURYEA REDUCED

302 Cherry St. Don’t miss out on this charming 2 story which boasts Pride of Ownership. Move in condition with many updates. Modern eat in kitchen, dining room is open to living room, 2 bedrooms, 1 3/4 baths. As a bonus enjoy the view from your large upper floor living area with gas fireplace and sliding doors that lead to a spacious balcony. Beautiful manicured corner lot. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3512 $129,900 Call Terry 570-885-3041 Angie 570-885-4896

Open House - Sunday, Oct. 9 • 1-3pm th

1305 Oak Drive, Shavertown

Lovely 3 bedroom 2400 sq. ft. Cape Cod with modern eat-in kitchen, large sunroom and family room. Master bedroom with master bath. Central air, gas heat and 2 car garage. Very well landscaped with beautiful paver sidewalks. Quiet neighborhood. $229,000 Dir: Rt. 309 to Hillside Rd., L on Chase, L on Huntsville, R on Oak

38 Huckleberry Lane Blueberry Hills 4 BEDROOMS, 2.5 baths, family room with fireplace, 2 car garage, large yard. Master bath with separate jetted tub, kitchen with stainless steel appliances and island, lighted deck. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-3071 $329,000 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

DURYEA

OUT OF FLOOD AREA 2000 Sq. Ft., meticulous Custom Brick Ranch; 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 2-car garage, gas heat, central air, 4 season Florida Room, covered outside patio, closets and much more… MLS#11-1836 $257,900 Call Donna 613-9080

LAND FOR SALE

W. 8th Street, West Wyoming - 7 Acres - Approved for 15 Residential lots, public water, public sewer. $199,000 Call Joe 613-9080

ELEGANT HOMES, LLC. 51 Sterling Avenue, Dallas PA 18612

(570) 675 • 9880

www.eleganthomesinc.net

Open House Sunday • 1:00-3:00PM

Luxurious Twins in Kingston

* Approx 2100 Sq. Ft. * 2 Car Garage with Storage Area * 2 Story Great Room * Cherry Kitchen with Granite * Fenced in Yard with Patio * Gas Heat/AC

Introductory Price $198,900

New Construction!

Directions: From Wyoming Ave. take Pringle St. to the End, take left on Grove St. Twins on left - 267 Grove St. Kingston

805-807 Main St. Multi-Family. Large side by side double with separate utilities. 3 bedrooms each side with newer carpet, replacement windows and newer roof. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-3054 $89,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

DURYEA

NOT IN FLOOD ZONE 5 rooms. For sale by owner. 2 bedrooms and bath upstairs, 3 rooms and 1/2 bath downstairs, corner lot with small yard. $56,000 570-885-4913 570-885-3367

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

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Smith Hourigan Group Smarter. Bolder. Faster.

Mountaintop 570-474-6307

726 Ice House Drive, Mountaintop

The Ice Lakes - Better than new! Beautifully finished 6 month old 3540 sq.ft. home with extensive trim and upgrades. 4 or 5 bedrooms, 4 full baths. Hardwood throughout 1st floor and 2nd floor foyer. Pretty entry with grand stairway. French doors with transoms into LR. Custom kitchen. Gorgeous master bedroom & bath. Expandable areas on 2nd floor. Easily finished daylight basement. Custom painted. Move right in!

CALL DAVE HOURIGAN @ 570-474-6307 or 570-715-7750

SUNDAY OCT. 9 1PM - 3PM PRICE REDUCED! 314 Bennett Street Refashioned 3 or 4 bedroom, two full modern baths. Two story, 2300sf, with level yard with lovely new landscaping and 1 car garage. New EVERYTHING in this charming must see property. Custom blinds throughout the home. Great neighborhood with Park beyond the backyard. MLS# 11-3776 $174,900 Call Patti 570-328-1752 Liberty Realty & Appraisal Services LLC

Smith Hourigan Group Smarter. Bolder. Faster. Shavertown 570-696-1195

9 Williams St. Large 4 bedroom home with nice rear deck, replacement windows, off street parking. Possible apartment in separate entrance. Loads of potential. For more info and pictures visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2091 $69,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmore space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to cleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Kevin Smith Kev

Open House - Sunday, October 9 • 1-3pm th

138 White Birch Lane, Dallas

ELMCREST - Charming two story on nice lot features LR & DR with hardwood floors, modern oak Kitchen, 1st floor Family Room, 4 large Bedrooms, 2 full and 2 half Baths. Master with whirlpool tub, oak vanity and WIC. Lower level family room with gas fireplace and stone wet bar. Deck overlooks level rear yard. 2 car garage. Gas heat and central air. $329,000 Dir: Rt. 415 to Dallas Center, R on Lake St., L into Elmcrest, R on White Birch to end, R on White Birch. Home on L. Call Kevin Smith 570-696-1195 • 570-696-5420

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

EDWARDSVILLE

Donna Mantione Sales Associate

101 BOSTON AVENUE, WEST PITTSTON

Place an ad with us and it’s easy for buyers to find their way to you. Because directions to your Garage Sale appear online and on our mobile app. For only $15, you get a free sales kit, plus an opportunity for a blowout sale!

$512,000

DURYEA

Call Ruth K. Smith 570-696-1195 / 570-696-5411 197 Wyoming Avenue Wyoming, PA 18644 Office (570) 613-9080 www.jjmaginc.com

OUR APP PUTS YOUR GARAGE SALE ON THE MAP!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Smarter. Bolder. Faster.

Ruth K. Smith

RIVER SHORES… We still have two great properties in West Pittston’s River Shores….. we have a spec with 3400 square feet of living space with huge home theater and loft, high ceilings and two Fps. We also have a building lot for a custom home of any size.

DURYEA

Smith Hourigan Group Shavertown 570-696-1195

411 JONES ST. Beautiful 2 story English Tudor with exquisite gardens, surrounding beautiful in ground pool, private fenced yard with a home with too many amenities to list. Enjoy the summer here! Screened in porch and foyer that just adds to the great living space of the home For more info and photos: visit:www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-2720 $229,900 Call Phil 570-313-1229

BEAUTIFUL HOMES ANY SIZE in the Pittston area….. with rooms overlooking the valley and river below, large Great Rooms with fireplace and a keeping room off the kitchen opening to the outstanding rear yard. WE WILL CUSTOM DESIGN YOUR OWN DUPLEX RANCH HOME FOR $299,900. Larger homes with 4 or 5 bedrooms priced below $400,000. These lots are outstanding with rear yards that will be the envy of your friends. VERY HIGH AND VERY DRY !!!!

696-3801

REAL ESTATE

696-0878 Leslie Bullock 357 Apache Drive, Shickshinny 3 bedroom 2 bath newly renovated lakefront dream on large, private lot. Plenty of room for family, friends & boats. This is not a drive-by. MLS#11-2512 $325,000

DeRemer Realty

Phone: 22 DeRemer Drive, Sweet Valley (570) 675-0520 or (570) 477-1149 Hunlock Creek P.O. PA 18621 E-MAIL: A L: m mderemer@icontech.com dere de r me o te c .c .com o om E-M MAI er@ @ic con ech

Open House • Sunday, October 9th • 1:00-3:00PM

110 Oxford St., Hanover Township (Lee Park Section) Beautiful up-dated Bi level with 4 bedrooms, large family room, two full large baths & modern kitchen. Finished lower level, deck. Plenty of off street parking with garage, driveway & back yard access from alley if needed. Ready to move in with new wall to wall & painting etc. MLS #11-280

Reduced to $99,900

Anxious seller, make reasonable offer! Dir: Oxford St. is at crossroads by Carey Ave. & San Souci Hwy

Please call Bob DeRemer for all your appraisal needs. Certified, reasonable rates


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 21G

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

EDWARDSVILLE

EXETER

FORTY FORT

HANOVER TWP.

HARVEYS LAKE

HUGHESTOWN

JENKINS TWP.

OPEN HOUSE

JUST REDUCED! Great starter home! Three bedroom 2 story with living room & dining room. Nice sized kitchen. Lower level recreation room, 3 season porch, detached 1 car garage. Nice yard. Reduced to $75,000. MLS#11-2863 Call Ruthie (570) 714-6110

5 Raymond Drive Practically new 8 year old Bi-level with 4 bedrooms, 1 and 3/4 baths, garage, fenced yard, private dead end street. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-3422 $179,000 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

143B GROVE ST., Like to entertain? This floor plan lends itself to that with a large kitchen, formal dining and living rooms. A car enthusiast? This garage will hold 4 cars comfortable. Enjoy a hot tub, this workout room has one and French doors opening to the rear yard. Spacious bedrooms, wood burning fireplace. The list goes on and on! Did I mention you are just ¼ of a mile from the lake?! MLS#11-1994 $249,900 Jill Jones 696-6550

189 Rock St. Spacious home with 4 bedrooms and large rooms. Nice old woodwork, staircase, etc. Extra lot for parking off Kenley St. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3404 $109,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

New Listing! 122-124 SHORT ST.,

OUT OF THE FLOOD ZONE! Very nice double-block on a quiet street. Good income property for an investor or live in one side and rent the other to help with a mortgage. #122 has living room, dining room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms and a full bath. #124 has living room, dining room, kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths and a family room with free-standing fireplace. Off-street parking on one side. Taxes are currently $1516 on Assessed value of $68,700. Motivated Seller! Call today for an appointment. MLS#11-3694 $62,000 Mary Ellen & Walter Belchick 570-696-6566

Sunday 12pm-5pm

362 Susquehanna Ave

Completely remodeled, spectacular, 2 story Victorian home, with 3 bedrooms and 1.5 baths, new rear deck, full front porch, tiled baths and kitchen, granite countertops, all Cherry hardwood floors throughout, all new stainless steel appliances and lighting, new oil furnace, washer dryer in first floor bath. Great neighborhood, nice yard. $174,900 (30 year loan, $8,750 down, $887/month, 30 years @ 4.5%) 100% Owner Financing Available 570-654-1490

EXETER REDUCED

EXETER

105 Cedar Street Price Reduced! $50,000

Great starter home in a great neighborhood, off street parking, upgraded electric, newer roof, replacement windows & 2nd floor laundry. MLS 10-4130 Call Arlene Warunek 570-650-4169

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

EXETER

128 JEAN ST. Nice bi-level home on quiet street. Updated exterior. Large family room, extra deep lot. 2 car garage, enclosed rear porch and covered patio. For more information and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-2850 $184,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

EXETER TWP.

Vinyl sided 4 bedroom spacious home with a great eat in kitchen, 1 3/4 baths & much more. Near the local schools. PRICE REDUCED $119,900 MLS# 11-1144 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

EXETER

311 Lockville Rd Stately brick 2 story, with inground pool, covered patio, finished basement, fireplace and wood stove 3 car attached garage 5 car detached garage with apartment above. MLS#11-1242 $739,000 Call Joe or Donna, 613-9080

FORTY FORT Nice size 4 bedroom home with some hardwood floors, large eat in kitchen with breakfast bar. 2 car garage & partially fenced yard. Close to everything! $92,900 MLS# 11-1977 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

EXETER

NEW LISTING 3 bedroom Townhouse has 1st floor laundry and recently added sunroom. Move in ready. MLS#11-2965 $119,000 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

EXETER

908 Primrose Court Move right into this newer 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Townhome with many upgrades including hardwood floors throughout and tiled bathrooms. Lovely oak cabinets in the kitchen, central air, fenced in yard, nice quiet neighborhood. MLS 11-2446 $123,000 Call Don Crossin 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-287-0770

Wanna make your car go fast? Place an ad in Classified! 570-829-7130.

Smith Hourigan Group 570-287-1196

FORTY FORT REDUCED!

FORTY FORT 4 Sunset Court

Located in a private cul-de-sac. Large enclosed front porch, 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage. $149,000 MLS 11-2824

HANOVER TWP.

1301 Murray St. Very nice duplex, fully rented with good return in great neighborhood. For more information and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2149 $124,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

FORTY-FORT

167 Slocum St Handyman special. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 bath, two story. Nice lot/neighborhood. Being sold as is. $45,000 570-954-8825 or email gckar1@yahoo.com

8 Diamond Ave. Loads of space in this modernized traditional home. 3rd floor is a large bedroom with walk-in closet. Modern kitchen, family room addition, deck overlooking large corner lot. Not just a starter home but a home to stay in and grow! For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #11-622 $119,000 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

HANOVER TWP.

FORY FORT

Great Walnut street location. 8 rooms, 4 bedrooms. wall to wall carpet. Gas heat. 2 car garage. Deck & enclosed porch. MLS 11-2833 $111,000 Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

GLEN LYON

You’ll look long & hard to ever find a beautiful Double like this one! Huge 120x130 lot with detached 2 car garage & loft , modern kitchens, 1.5 baths , pocket doors & so much more! $118,500 MLS# 11-1167 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

22 DEXTER STREET GREAT GREAT BUY FIRE SALE! $6,000. Won’t last long. Call 570-780-3009

HANOVER

Diamond in the rough! This 3 bedroom, 1 bath home is looking for a new owner to restore its beauty! Living room and Dining room features hardwood floors, original woodwork and beautiful French Doors. Large kitchen with pantry in need of some updating. 1 car Garage and private driveway. Call Jesicca Skoloda 570-237-0463 JesiccaSkoloda Realtor@gmail.com MLS# 11-2741 $44,500 570-696-2468

94 Ferry Road Nice vinyl sided 2 story situated on a great corner fenced lot in Hanover Twp. 2 bedrooms, 2 modern baths, additional finished space in basement for 2 more bedrooms or office/playrooms. Attached 2 car garage connected by a 9x20 breezeway which could be a great entertaining area! Above ground pool, gas fireplace, gas heat, newer roof and “All Dri” system installed in basement. MLS #11-626 $119,900 Mark R. Mason 570-331-0982 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

HANOVER TWP.

2 story in good condition with 3 bedrooms, 1 full bath, eat-in kitchen, 2 car garage, fenced yard & new gas heat. MLS # 10-4324 Reduced to $44,000 Call Ruth at 570-696-1195 or 570-696-5411

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

HUGHESTOWN

HANOVER TOWNSHIP 710 Church Street

Exceptionally well care for home in move in condition. Everything is new, roof, siding, windows, porches, kitchen and baths. MLS 11-2309 $119,000 Jay A. Crossin CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 ext. 23

Pole 131 Lakeside Drive Lake front home with 2-story livable boathouse! Year round home offers fireplace, cathedral ceiling, cedar paneling. Boat house has a patio for grilling, open dock space as well as enclosed area for your boat. 2nd floor is a studio style kitchenette/ living room, full bath plus a deck. Take a look! MLS#11-1379 PRICE REDUCED! $384,900 Bob Cook 262-2665 Jill Jones 696-6550

HARVEYS LAKE

6 Hemlock Gardens Great neighborhood only ¼ mile to Warden Place at Harvey Lake, access to Harveys Lake through the Beach Club at Warden Place. 8 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, garage, 18 x 36 inground heated pool, 12x27 screened porch, landscaped, workshop, office in lower level, 100x150 lot neat and clean ready to move-in. MLS#11-2357 $146,000 Bob Cook 570-696-6555

HARVEYS LAKE

POLE 265 LAKESIDE DRIVE 44’ of lakefront! This home offers recently remodeled kitchen with Cherry cabinetry, granite counters. Hardwood floors through the kitchen and dining area. Stone fireplace, enclosed porch to enjoy the lake view! The boathouse has a second level patio, storage area, plus dock space. A must see! MLS#11-2018 $369,900 Bob Cook 570-262-2665

SUNDAY, SEPT- 25 1:00pm-2:30pm 97 Center Street Looking for a sold home with off street parking & detached garage? Look at this one. Great neighborhood and tremendous potential. $64,900 MLS #09-4385 Call Pat McHale 570-613-9080

JENKINS TWP.

12 Oaklawn Ave. Out Of Flood Zone! Pristine 3 story home with garage, full basement, beautiful woodwork. Carpeted & painted throughout. Newer Roof, including all appliances, gas heat, rooms with many features. Great Neighbors. No work for you, move right in! $120,000. Call 570-823-8710

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

HAZLE TOWNSHIP

738 Pardeesville Rd.

HARDING

SERENITY

Enjoy the serenity of country living in this beautiful two story home on 2.23 acres. Great for entertaining inside and out. 3 car attached garage with full walk up attic PLUS another 2 car detached garage. WOW! A MUST SEE! For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS#11-831 $267,000 Call Nancy 570-237-0752 Melissa 570-237-6384

Homeowners Warranty Included Pardeesville,Beautiful 6 Year Old, 2 Story Colonial 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, Modern Eat In kitchen, Formal Dining Room, Divided Living Room, French doors between kitchen & Dining Room. Lighted Stairway. Great location for someone working at Humboldt or Valmont industrial parks that does not want to live in the city. Basement has superior wall system and is plumbed for another Bath room. MLS 11-3175 $220,000 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

475 S. Main St. 3 bedroom, 1 bath, 2 story home with vinyl replacement windows, vinyl siding, large yard and off street parking. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3545 $79,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

JENKINS TWP. BACK ON THE MARKET

HUNLOCK CREEK

12 Oakdale Drive Completely remodeled 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home with detached garage & carport on approx 1.5 acres in a nice private setting. MLS# 11-1776 $129,900 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

129 S. Dawes Ave. 4 bedroom, 1 bath, large enclosed porch with brick fireplace. Full concrete basement with 9ft ceiling. Lots of storage, 2 car garage on double lot in a very desirable neighborhood. Close to schools and park and recreation. Walking distance to downtown WilkesBarre. Great family neighborhood. Carpet allowance will be considered. For mor info and photos visit: www.atlas realty.inc.com $129,900 MLS #11-1434 Call Tom 570-262-7716

P E N D I N G

23 Mead St. Newly remodeled 2 story on a corner lot with fenced in yard and 2 car garage. 4 bedrooms, 1 bath, 1,660 sq. ft. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com $84,900 MLS 10-3684 Call Bill 570-362-4158

JENKINS TWP. (Eagle View)

Very attractive home with a 2 car garage, new family room & stainless steel appliances. Ample off street parking. NEW PRICE $142,600 MLS# 10-4452 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

KINGSTON

Home/Lot Package Beautiful custom built home with a stunning river view overlooking the Susquehanna River and surrounding area. Custom built with many amenities included. A few of the amenities may include central A/C, master bedroom with master bath, ultramodern kitchen, hardwood floors, cathedral ceiling, and a 2 car garage. There are are many other floor plans to choose from or bring your own! For more details & photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2642 $375,000 Call Kim 570-466-3338

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

KINGSTON

621 Gibson Avenue BY OWNER. Brick Cape Cod with hardwood floors. 3 bedroom, family room, 2 bath, living room with fireplace, two car garage with loads of storage, partially finished basement. Price Reduced! $179,900 Call (570) 333-5212 No Brokers Please.

KINGSTON

663 Westmoreland Avenue

322 N Sprague Ave Spacious 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home with three season porch, nice yard & private driveway. MLS# 11-965 $61,900 Call Barbara at 570-466-6940

COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE 570-474-2340 Ext 55

KINGSTON This remodeled home sits in a quiet neighborhood on a corner lot. Enjoy an open layout with new carpet, beautiful tile, and fresh paint in neutral tones. A Large yard and a park across the street is another highlight! 6 month home warranty. Call Jesicca Skoloda 570-237-0463 JesiccaSkoloda Realtor@gmail.com MLS# 11-2741 $89,999 570-696-2468

29 Landon Ave N Striking curb appeal with charm to spare! Hardwood floors throughout the first floor, beautiful arched doorways, gas fireplace, lots of closet space, modern kitchen and a large updated main bath. MLS#11-3075 $144,900 Call Mary Price 570-696-5418 570-472-1395

582 Gibson Ave FOR SALE BY OWNER Tastefully remodeled traditional in one of Kingston's finest and convenient neighborhoods. Features include: hardwoods and tile throughout, 5 bedrooms, 2 Full baths, 2 half baths, modern kitchen, finished basement/entertainment room, finished attic, office with fireplace, huge deck, inground pool, 8 person hot tub, 2 car garage. If you want Kingston, you need to see this property. Asking price $282,500 (570) 899-0236

KINGSTON

JENKINS TOWNSHIP

HANOVER TWP. SALE BY OWNER

310 Lockville Rd. call Kathie 570-288-6654

HARVEYS LAKE

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

906 Homes for Sale

KINGSTON

KINGSTON

KINGSTON

HANOVER

GREAT REDUCED PRICE! Charming home with hardwood floors, fireplace & Built in's, formal dining room, 2 car garage, sunporch & neat as a pin throughout! Nice location on a tree lined street away from the hustle & bustle! $114,900 MLS# 10-4472 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Need to rent that Vacation property? Place an ad and get started! 570-829-7130

297 Susquehannock Drive Settle into summer with this great 2 story home on quiet cul-de-sac with private back yard and above ground pool. Deck with awning overlooking yard! 4 bedrooms, 2.5 bath home in Pittston Area School District with family room, eat in kitchen, central a/c and garage. Full unfinished basement MLS 11-2432 $259,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

906 Homes for Sale

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

KINGSTON

549 Charles Ave. A quality home in a superior location! Features: large living room; formal dining room with parquet flooring; oak kitchen with breakfast area; 1st floor master bedroom & bath suite; bedroom/ sitting room; knotty pine den; half-bath. 2nd floor: 2 bedrooms & bath. Finished room in lower level with new carpeting & wetbar. Central air. 2-car garage. Inground concrete pool with jacuzzi. $324,900 MLS# 10-1633 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

Seller Wants To Deal!

Stately home on a corner lot with a lot of nooks, crannies & built-ins. Lower level living quarters that would be a Teens dream! Formal dining room, fireplace, formal entry & more! $199,500 MLS# 11-1452 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

KINGSTON

125 3rd Ave

Well kept 2 story with 3 bedrooms and 1.5 baths situated on a nice street in Kingston. Newer roof, furnace, water heater, electric service. Replacement windows throughout. Basement has high ceilings, ideal for re-finishing or workshop! MLS 11-2167 $144,000 Jay A. Crossin CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

91

%

of Times Leader readers read the Classified section.

Charming 2-1/2 story with 3 bedrooms on 2nd + a 4th (12x24) on 3rd, full bath upstairs, half bath with laundry on 1st floor, lots of closet space, finished walk-out basement and much more! MLS 11-2340 $189,000 Jay A. Crossin CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 ext. 23

KINGSTON

76 N. Dawes Ave. Very well maintained 2 bedroom home with updated kitchen with granite counter. Large sunroom over looking private back yard. Attached garage, large unfinished basement. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2278 $129,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

KINGSTON

806 Nandy Drive Unique 3 bedroom home perfect for entertaining! Living room with fireplace and skylights. Dining room with builtin china cabinets. Lower level family room with fireplace and wetbar. Private rear yard withinground pool and multiple decks. MLS#11-3064 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

KINGSTON 83 E. Vaughn St

*2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today? Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NL ONE NLY N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

Yes, it’s really true, $120,000. From the Room size entrance foyer to every room in the house, you find PERFECTION. Living Room, Dining Room/Family Room, Large Kitchen, Butler-style work area, 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bath, lovely enclosed screenedin porch. Off street parking. Choice location. 11-2155 $120,000 Joan Evans Real Estate 570-824-5763

906 Homes for Sale

KINGSTON

NEW LISTING

Beautiful modern 3 bedroom and 1.5 bath home on large lot. 1 car garage. Hardwood floors, family room on first floor and basement. New gas heat, windows, electrical security, fireplace, walk up attic. Must See. Call for details MLS 11-2415 $210,000 Nancy Answini 570237-5999 JOSEPH P. GILROY REAL ESTATE 570-288-1444

KINGSTON

OPEN HOUSE

Sunday 12pm-5pm 46 Zerby Ave Lease with option to buy, completely remodeled, mint, turn key condition, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, large closets, with hardwoods, carpet & tile floors, new kitchen and baths, gas heat, shed, large yard. 100% Owner Financing Available $134,900 (30 year loan @ 4.5% with 5% down; $6,750 down, $684/month) WALSH REAL ESTATE 570-654-1490

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

KINGSTON REDUCED

167 N. Dawes Ave. Move in condition 2 story home. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, hardwood floors, ceramic throughout. Finished lower level, security system For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-1673 $154,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

KINGSTON REDUCED!!

177 Third Ave. Neat as a pin! 3 bedroom, 2.5 baths, end unit townhome with nice fenced yard. Bright Spacious kitchen, main level family room, deck w/ retractable awning. Gas heat/central air, pull down attic for storage and 1 car garage. Very affordable townhome in great central location! MLS 11-1282 $134,500 Mark R. Mason 570-331-0982 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

KINGSTON

Sunday, Oct. 9th 1PM-3PM 111 Church St. Large 3 bedroom completely updated. Big family room. Detached garage. Home warranty included. Walk-up attic. Replacement windows. $149,900 MLS #11-3598 Call Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

Find Your Ideal Employee! Place an ad and end the search! 570-829-7130 ask for an employment specialist


PAGE 22G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

KINGSTON

3 Main Street

LAFLIN

LAFLIN

LARKSVILLE

LILY LAKE

Historic 120+ year old home, many original details, new roof, updated electrical and a huge garage. Currently a gift shop. Corner lot, newly paved parking area. $170,000 MLS 11-2115. Call Betty at Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 570-287-1196 ext 3559 or 570-714-6127

Lovely brick ranch home in great development. 2 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. All hardwood floors, brand new roof. 2 family rooms suitable for mini apartment. 1st floor laundry, sunroom, central air, alarm system, 1 car garage and electric chair lift to lower level. Very good condition. MLS 11-2437 $210,000 Call Nancy Answini 570-237-5999 JOSEPH P. GILROY REAL ESTATE 570-288-1444

111 Falcon Drive Brand new since 2004, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, central air, 2 car garage, shed, 6 car driveway. Roof, kitchen, furnace, a/c unit and master bath all replaced. Modern kitchen with granite island, tile floors, maple cabinets. Fireplace in family room, large closets, modern baths. Stamped concrete patio. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #11-1166 $279,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

375 Warren Ave. Motivated Sellers! Selling below appraised value!!! 2-story home with 3 bedrooms, full bath and all appliances included. Tons of closet space including cedar closet and a basement ready to be finished. Nice size yard with a private driveway located near Wyoming Valley West elementary and middle schools. Call for an appointment today! MLS#11-1969 $94,500 Karen Altavilla 570-283-9100 x28

LAFLIN

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

33 Market St. Commercial/residential property featuring Ranch home with 3 bedrooms, newly remodeled bathroom, in good condition. Commercial opportunity for office in attached building. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3450 $169,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

LAFLIN

Spacious ranch with 4 bedrooms, 1 3/4 baths, 18x22 Family room with fireplace on a 102x150 lot. Fantastic view from the rear deck! MLS# 11-2609 $147,500 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

LAFLIN

Job Seekers are looking here! Where's your ad? 570-829-7130 and ask for an employment specialist

LAFLIN

LARKSVILLE TOWNHOUSE 3 bedroom. 1.5 bath. Finished basement. Central air. All appliances included. $105,900. This property will be reduced $1,000 every 2nd day until sold. MLS 11-608 Call Bernie 888-244-2714

ROTHSTEIN REALTORS 570-288-7594

LARKSVILLE

LAFLIN

210 Beechwood Dr Rare brick & vinyl tri-level featuring 8 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, family room with fireplace, rear patio, sprinkler system, alarm system & central air. $204,900 CALL DONNA 570-613-9080

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

5 Fairfield Drive Motivated seller! Move right in just in time to entertain for the holidays in this 3 bedroom 2.5 bath home in a private setting. Prepare for the festivities in this spacious gourmet kitchen with stainless steel appliances and Subzero refrigerator. Your guests can enjoy the spectacular view of the West mountains. Must see to appreciate all of the amenities this home has to offer. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-1686 $314,900 Call Keri 570-885-5082

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

Very well maintained double-block has 4 bedrooms on one side & 2 bedrooms on the other. Live in 1 side & rent the other, or keep as investment. Very good rents coming in on both sides. Includes 3-car garage & off street parking. MLS# 11-2964 $124,900 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

MOUNTAIN RD. Contemporary home on approx. 1 acre with “valley views”. Raised gardens, fish pond and manicured setting. Home is multi-level featuring 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, galley kitchen, great room with fireplace. MLS#11-1079 Reduced to $249,000 Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565

LAUREL RUN

Pine Run Road Lovely Ranch home on 1 acre, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths with enclosed sun porch. Updated kitchen with ceramic tile floor, updated bath. Hardwood floors. Newer carpeting in bedrooms, finished basement with gas fireplace, bar area, TV room, laundry & 4th bedroom/office. Detached 2 car garage with adjacent covered concrete patio. Large landscaped yard. Serious inquiries only. $185,000 FIRM Call 826-0023 Leave Message

Patrick Deats Contractor Back Mountain Lots Now Available! Integrity • Quality • Value

Open House Sundays • 11AM-1PM

Custom Home Builder with over 25 years experience in Luzerne and Lackawanna Counties

570-696-1041

Year-round beauty featuring cedar and stone siding, central aid conditioning, hardwood floors. Modern kitchen with granite island, 4 bedrooms, fireplace in master, 2 baths. Sunroom with glass walls for great lake views. Low taxes. MLS#11-1753 Reduced to $299,000 or rent for $1,250/mos Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Heritage Homes Promise: Competitive Pricing No Hidden Costs N ppggrades Noo H Hidden Upgrades

LUZERNE

330 Charles St. Very nice 2 bedroom home in move in condition with updated kitchen and baths. Nice yard with shed and potential off street parking. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3525 $59,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

The Somerville - 2,210 sq. ft. Starting at $211,900

The Brentwood - 2,131 sq. ft. Starting at $177,800

LUZERNE

807 North St

Lovely modern large ranch with 4 or 5 br including a master suite with walkin closet. Full finished basement with a separate room presently used as a functioning beauty shop and 1/2 bath. Beautiful back yard with 2 covered patios one with hot tub. Gas heat, all hw floors on first level, professional landscaping, neutral decor, oversized 1 car garage, lots of closets and storage & much more. MLS 11-3139 $172,000 Call Nancy Answini 570-237-5999 JOSEPH P. GILROY REAL ESTATE 570-288-1444

The Mayfield - 2,202 sq. ft. Starting at $196,300

The Bedford C - 2,098 sq. ft. Starting at $176,800

Northeastern Pennsylvania’s builder for over four decades Scan to visit our website!

Featuring:

2808 Scranton/Carbondale Highway Blakely, PA 18447 570-383-2981 • www.heritagehomesltd.com

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

w New Construction For Sale www.patrickdeats.com Lot/Home Packages or Custom Homes on Your Lot Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

Town & Country Properties

586.9636

Call Us Today!

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842.9531

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 12:00-1:30PM

19 REAR ELM ST, WEST PITTSTON Very cute starter home with nice carport, deck and in-ground pool. Don’t miss out on this one! Winter and summer pool covers, pool vacuum included. MLS#11-2931 $89,500 Directions: From Exeter Ave, Elm St, right at white wall (side of second warehouse), left at yellow pole, sign

Call Lori Pepson 815-6626

THE TIME TO BUILD IS NOW Call 1-866-823-8880 For An Appointment Anytime!

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SUSQUEHANNA

MODULAR HOMES Building a Modular Home Provides Many Benefits Over Stick Built... • Less than half the time to complete project • Built to the strictest BOCA codes • Will work with insurance companies to assist flood victims • Customized floor plans to suit your budget • Complete packages starting at $89,900* • Take advantage of low interest rates

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906 Homes for Sale

LUZERNE

807 North Street NEW LISTING Lovely modern large ranch with 4 or 5 bedrooms including a master suite with walk in closet.Full finished basement with a separate room presently used as a functioning beauty shop and 1/2 bath. Beautiful back yard with 2 covered patios, one with hot tub. Gas heat, all hardwood floors on first level, professional landscaping, neutral decor, oversized 1 car garage, lots of closets and storage & much more. MLS#11-3139 $172,000 (570) 237-1032 (570) 288-1444

It's that time again! Rent out your apartment with the Classifieds 570-829-7130

714547

www.ColdwellBankerNEPA.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY,OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 23G

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

LUZERNE

MOUNTAIN TOP PRICE REDUCED

NANTICOKE

PITTSTON

Union St. FOR SALE OR RENT Commercial-Large Quonset building; 4536SF of floor space plus 4 separate rental units. 2 rented, 2 available. Potential to build another building on the property. Close to Luzerne exit of the Cross Valley Expressway exit 6. Owner says sell! MLS#10-320 Reduced to $210,000 Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565

MESHOPPEN

Novak Road

66 Patriot Circle This 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath TOWN HOUSE is in excellent move in condition in a very quiet subdivision close to town. It is being offered fully furnished, decorated and appointed. This TOWN HOUSE is in the desirable Crestwood School District and is close to shopping, restaurants, fitness centers and more! Preview this home

Rear 395 E. Washington St. 2 family home with 2 bedrooms each side, separate utilities, great income earning potential. One side occupied, one available for rent. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2425 $59,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

www.66patriotcircle.com or call for details. (267) 253-9754

Lovely, nearly completed, renovated Victorian farmhouse sits high on 7.81 acres featuring panoramic pastoral views, high ceilings, original woodwork, gutted, rewired, insulated and sheetrocked, newer roof, vinyl siding, kitchen and baths. Gas rights negotiable. Lots of potential with TLC. Elk Lake School District. $165,000 MLS# 11-525 Call 570-696-2468

MOOSIC Furnished home.

Greenwood Section 3 Bedroom ranch, well maintained. Furniture and appliances included. Beautiful neighborhood & yard. $145,000 negotiable Call 570-430-7017

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

MOUNTAIN TOP

257 Main Road S 2 bedroom Ranch. Large rear yard. Hardwood floors! Large eat-in kitchen. Large living room with hardwood and family room with carpet. New roof in 2011! Ideal starter home. MLS#11-1966 $119,000 Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

MOUNTAIN TOP

MOUNTAINTOP 129 Timberwood Dr.

PITTSTON 4-5 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. 4,500 above ground sq. ft. Whirlpool tub, master suite (approx 650 sq. ft.) 2 story grand foyer with oak staircase, hardwood floors, formal dining room. Great room has cathedral ceiling and fireplace. Library, deck, 3 car garage, security system. $595,000 More info at: forsalebyowner.com List # 20712604 570-474-2993

MOUNTAINTOP

72 Fieldstone Way Stunning 4 bedroom 2 story! 2 story family room fireplace. Granite kitchen, stainless steel appliances, new sprinkler system, dining room and living room hardwood, 2.5 bath. Nice yard. MLS#11-492 $348,000 Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

9 Anne Street Modern bi-level, 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, tile kitchen and bath floor. New appliances, gas hot water furnace and architectural roof. Family room, 3-season room and deck. 2 car garage, large yard. Move-in condition. Convenient location. Reduced to $219,000 OBO. Call (570) 403-6252 or (570) 823-7540.

VERY CUTE HOME 2 bedrooms, 1

bath room, offstreet parking, well maintained, natural woodwork, hardwood floors, new carpet, kitchen floor, drop in stove, large deck, new heating system. $33,000. 570-902-5244

NANTICOKE

Two story single with 7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, new windows, modern kitchen, some appliances included, electric service, some carpeting and hardwood floors. Call Rita for details $68,900 570-954-6699 Walsh Real Estate 570-654-1490

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

PITTSTON

PITTSTON TWP. STAUFFER POINT 42 Grandview

PLAINS

PLYMOUTH

SHAVERTOWN

78-80 Academy St. Well maintained double block with separate utilities on a nice street in Plymouth. This double block has a fencedin yard and offstreet parking through the rear alley access. Oneunit has 7 rooms with ¾ bedrooms, (great for owner occupied) and the other has 4 rooms with 2 bedrooms. Make an appointment today! MLS#11-1171 $67,500 Karen Altavilla 570-283-9100 x28

12 Windy Drive New construction in the exclusive Slocum Estates. Stone & Stucco exterior. All the finest appointments: office or 5th bedroom, hardwood floors, crown moldings, 9' ceilings 1st & 2nd floor. Buy now select cabinetry & flooring. MLS #11-1987 $499,000 Call Geri 570-696-0888

Handy Man Special

Double Block on Cornelia Street. BEING SOLD AS IS NOT IN FLOOD ZONE. 6 rooms per side. Newer furnances & roof. Large lot & nice neighborhood. $35,000 ALL SERIOUS OFFERS CONSIDERED 570-655-9731

PITTSTON REDUCED!

PITTSTON

51 Plank St. 4 bedroom Victorian home completely remodeled with new kitchen & baths. New Berber carpet, modern stainless steel appliances in kitchen. Private yard, wrap around porch, corner lot with off street parking. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-2864 $99,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

95 William St. 1/2 double home with more square footage than most single family homes. 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, ultra modern kitchen and remodeled baths. Super clean. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc. com MLS 11-2120 $59,000 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

PITTSTON TWP.

Drive NEW PRICE

P E N D I N G

better than new end unit condo, with 1st floor master bedroom and bath, Living room with gas fireplace, hardwood floors in living, dining room & kitchen, granite countertops and crown molding in kitchen, with separate eating area, lst floor laundry, heated sunroom with spectacular view, 2 additional bedrooms, full bath and loft on the 2nd floor, 2 car garage, gas heat and central air, priced to sell $274,500 MLS 11-2324 call Lu-Ann 602-9280

additional photos and information can be found on our web site, www. atlasrealtyinc.co m

PLAINS

PITTSTON

82 Parsonage St

MOVE-IN CONDITION! Good starter home. 2 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths. Replacement windows. Newer roof. Freshly painted. New carpet. Basement with two levels. Parking in front of home. Priced to sell! MLS 11-2508 $39,900 Joan Evans Real Estate 570-824-5763

PITTSTON

85 La Grange St

10 Norman St. Brick 2 story home with 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, large family room with fireplace. Lower level rec room, large driveway for plenty of parking. Just off the by-pass with easy access to all major highways. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com. MLS 11-2887 $172,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

PITTSTON TWP.

PITTSTON

NANTICOKE

ENORMOUS 4+ bay garage!! Plus 1 more garage for gadgets! Pretty 4 bedroom Cape with a supplemental coal unit and a beautiful view from the back yard. NEW PRICE!!

NANTICOKE

W. Green St. Nice 2 bedroom Ranch syle home, gas heat, finished basement, vinyl siding, deck. Move in Condition. Affordable @

$89,500 Call Jim

Towne & Country Real Estate Co. 570-735-8932 or 570-542-5708

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

Country living on 1 acre outside of Noxen. 3 Bedroom mobile home excellent condition separate garage, 2 covered porches. Newer roof. Owner says SELL! REDUCED! $80,000 Shari Philmeck ERA BRADY ASSOCIATES 570-836-3848

NANTICOKE

PENN LAKE

111 E. Grand St. One half double block. 3 bedrooms, plaster walls, aluminum siding & nice yard. Affordable @

Towne & Country Real Estate Co. 570-735-8932 or 570-542-5708

NANTICOKE

414 E. Grove Street 3 bedroom, 1 bath, 2 story with off street parking, backyard, new oil furnace, windows, wiring, kitchen, bath, flooring & paint. Excellent condition. $88,500. Sellers pays 1st year property tax. Call Bill Remey @ 570-714-6123

175 Oak Street 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, 1st floor laundry room, 3 season porch, fenced yard and off street parking. MLS#11-1974 PRICE REDUCED! $89,000 Call Patti 570-328-1752 Liberty Realty & Appraisal Services LLC

HOME FOR SALE

Crestwood School District. Stunning Cape Cod (architecturally designed). Three bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths 2 car garage on one acre. Features include: large front porch, deck, beautiful kitchen with corian countertops, breakfast nook & island. Stainless steel appliances; hardfloors, formal dining room with wainscoting. Two story vaulted family room with fireplace; first floor master bedroom/ bath with jacuzzi, walk in shower & vanity dressing area built in; abundant closets, den on first floor plus laundry; second story has 2 additional bedrooms & bath. Full basement. Please call or email for details. $349,900 Dee Fields, Associate Broker 570-788-7511

deefieldsabroker@gmail.com

Good investment property. All units are rented. All utilities paid by tenants. MLS 11-1497 $83,900 Gloria Jean Malarae 570-814-5814 CLASSIC PROPERTIES 570-718-4959 ext. 1366

PITTSTON 89 Lambert St

Large 4 bedroom, 1 bath home on extra deep lot with frontage on 2 streets. Multi family unit (MLS #11-2244) next door also for sale. Possible commercial use with rezoning. $93,500 MLS# 11-2228 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

PLAINS

214 Elizabeth St. 3 bedroom, Victorian, semi modern kitchen, 1 full - 2 1/2 baths. 1st floor laundry, gas heat, finished lower level with walk out, large shed. A must see at this price. For additional info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-1677 $79,900 Call Lu-Ann 570-602-9280

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

This pleasant brick 3 bedroom on a wide lot, sits nicely back from the street. Recently remodeled. MLS 11-1080 $88,000. Call Betty at Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 570-287-1196 ext 3559 or 570-714-6127

PITTSTON

92 Tompkins Street Totally remodeled 2-story; 7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2-car garage, deck, rear fence. MLS# 11-2770 $108,000 CALL JOE OR DONNA 570-613-9080

PITTSTON

3 unit income property on extra deep lot with frontage on 2 streets. Single family home next door (MLS#11-2228) also for sale. Possible commercial use with rezoning. $78,000 MLS#11-2244 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

PITTSTON TWP.

993 Sunrise Dr. Horizon Estates Fabulous end unit townhome provides luxurious, carefree living. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths with 1st floor master suite. Ultra kitchen with granite and stainless appliances. Dining room with built in cabinet. 2 story living room with gas fireplace and hardwood. 2 car garage, maintenance free deck, nice yard that can be fenced. Low HOA fee for snow removal and grass cutting. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3488 $289,900 Call Terry 570-885-3041 Angie 570-885-4896

PITTSTON TWP. REDUCED

PITTSTON

31 Tedrick St. Very nice 3 bedroom with 1 bath. This house was loved and you can tell. Come see for yourself, super clean home with nice curb appeal. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3544 $89,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

38 Frothingham St. Four square home with loads of potential and needs updating but is priced to reflect its condition. Nice neighborhood. Check it out. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-3403 $69,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

PLAINS

PITTSTON

NOXEN

This very nice family home, as it has been for many years, with a detached garage, 1 3/4 baths, 4 bedrooms & so much more is waiting for your private tour. MLS #11-2654 $78,600 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

$34,900

Bow Creek Manor 316 Cedar Manor Dr Meticulously maintained 4 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath two story on almost 1 acre. Master bedroom suite. 2 family rooms. 2 fireplaces. Office/den. Large deck overlooking a private wooded yard. 3 car garage. $349,900, or rent for $1,800 / month with the option to buy. MLS 11-3286 Please Call Bob Kopec Humford Realty 570-822-5126

NANTICOKE

906 Homes for Sale

HEIGHTS SECTION

Call Jim Krushka

MOUNTAIN TOP

Privacy abounds this beauty on almost 3 acres of “Pure Privacy” tucked away from the hustle & bustle of everyday stress. 4 bedrooms, 1 3/4 baths with a 2 car detached garage & workshop. This 19x30 master bedroom will knock your socks off! MLS #11-2705 $252,000 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Beautiful, cozy home. Upstairs laundry, lots of closet space.Tastefully renovations. extra large driveway.low maintenance.thermostats in each room. all measurements approximate. MLS 11-2210 $89,900 David Krolikowski CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

PITTSTON

$85,900

MOUNTAIN TOP

REDUCED! Motivated Seller! $116,900. 619 S. Hanover St Nicely appointed brick 2-family. 2nd unit on 2nd and 3rd floors has 3 bedrooms, 2 baths currently at $400/mos below market value of at least $600/mos. Most windows replaced throughout. Heated 2-car detached garage, rear covered patio, fenced-in side yard. MLS#11-2538 Call Steve Shemo (570) 288-1401 (570) 793-9449

PITTSTON

44 Lambert St

12 George Street

MLS# 11-2088 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950 35 Patriot Circle Interior unit with oak laminate on 1st floor. Rear deck faces the woods! MLS#11-1986 $106,000 Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

NANTICOKE

10 Garfield St. Looking for a Ranch??? Check out this double wide with attached 2 car garage on a permanent foundation. Large master bedroom suite with large living room, family room with fireplace, 2 full baths, laundry room, formal dining room, vaulted ceilings throughout and MORE! For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 10-2463 $89,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

906 Homes for Sale

99 1/2 Pine St. The owner of this house took pride in its upkeep. It is meticulous. Home has 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, eat in kitchen, living room and dining room. Walkout basement with paneled walls and heat. Large yard with newer one car detached garage, accessed from rear alley. MLS 11-3555 $48,000 Call Terry 570-885-3041 Angie 570-885-4896

122 PARNELL ST. Beautiful bi-level home on corner lot. 7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, newer roof and windows. Fenced in yardFor more info and phtos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.om MLS 11-2749 $189,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

Stunning ranch home in lovely neighborhood. Built in 2003. Beautifully landscaped yard. Screen porch, deck with awning off master bedroom, tons of storage. Oversize 2 car garage. Attention to detail throughout. MLS 11-3004 $189,900 Call Christine Kutz Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

17 N. Beech Road (N. on Main St., Plains, turn right in Birchwood Hills and onto Beech Rd, House on right) Lovely updated Ranch home with 3 bedrooms, 1 bath. 1 car garage in the very desirable Birchwood Hills development. Electric heat, newer roof, great curb appeal. Huge fenced in back yard with new shed, plenty of closets and storage. www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3003 $139,900 Call Keri Best 570-885-5082

P E N D I N G

PLAINS 18 ABBOTT ST two story, single

family, 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, offstreet parking, eatin kitchen, dining room, office/study, living room, utility room, electric heat, Quiet neighborhood, not in the flood area, near school and cross valley. New roof, replacement windows, tile floor in the kitchen, hardwood floors in the bedrooms. Ceiling fans and Air units. Full basement. Large lot with driveway, covered patio with attached carport. Price includes appliances and some window treatments. $80,000 Call 570-592-2837

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmore space? Ayardorgaragesale in classified is thebestway to cleanoutyourclosets! You’rein bussiness withclassified!

350 Union St. Cute as a doll house. 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with off street parking. Priced right with nice layout, replacement windows, newer roof, enclosed rear porch. MLS 11-3569 $67,500 Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

PRINGLE

SHAVERTOWN

91 GATES ROAD, Great 3 bedroom ranch home on over 2 acres of land! This home offers an oversized garage with carport in rear. A large tiled sunroom to enjoy year round. Master bedroom with ¾ bath. First floor laundry. Schedule your appointment today! MLS#11-1911 $152,900 Jill Jones 696-6550

PLAINS

KEYSTONE SECTION 9 Ridgewood Road

SHAVERTOWN

TOTAL BEAUTY 1 ACRE- PRIVACY Beautiful ranch 2

bedrooms, 1 bath, attic for storage, washer, dryer & 2 air conditioners included. New Roof & Furnace Furnished or unfurnished. Low Taxes! New price $118,500

570-885-1512

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

PLAINS TOWNHOME

Completely remodeled In quiet plains neighborhood. 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath. with finished basement/3rd bedroom. Hardwood floors, central air, electric heat, new roof & appliances. $118,000 Motivated Seller! (570) 592-4356

PLAINS

Updated 2-story, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home has 1 car garage & carport, fenced rear yard with tiered deck and more. MLS#11-3655 $152,000 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

PLYMOUTH

PLAINS

NEW LISTING 3 bedroom Townhouse in “Rivermist” with 2.5 bath, 1 car garage & all new carpeting & painted interior throughout! MLS#11-3153 $184,500 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

PRINGLE

SHAVERTOWN

58 Longdale Ave New Construction 1,980 SF. 2 story, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, large kitchen, laundry room, living room, family room, dining room, 2 car garage, front porch & rear deck. Large 70’x225’ flat lot. $245,000 Call (570) 674-5173

Sunday, Oct-2 12:30pm-2:00pm Broad Street

HIGH & DRY

Solid, meticulous, 1500 S.F., brick ranch, containing 6 rooms, 3 bedrooms and 1 full bath on the main level and full bath in basement, situated on 1.03 Acres. NEW kitchen with granite counter tops, wood cabinetry, new stove, dishwasher, microwave, tiled floors. Bath has new tile floor and tub surround, double vanity and mirrors. Lower level has summer kitchen, full bath and large, drywalled area. Oversize, 2 car garage/ workshop and shed. Property has been subdivided into 4 lots. Call Pat for the details. $249,900. Pat McHale (570) 613-9080

SHAVERTOWN

570-288-6654

Needtorentthat Vacationproperty? Placeanadand getstarted! 570-829-7130

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

SHAVERTOWN

NEW PRICE! 855 Park Ave Huge home ready for your family to move right in! 5 bedrooms including huge master suite, 3.5 baths, hardwood floors, stainless appliances, fireplace, huge lot with fenced area. MLS #11-2540 $185,000 Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

Let’s Make A Deal! 5 bedrooms, 1 & 3/4 baths, 2 car garage, family room plus den or office. On a dead end street.

New Price!! $129,500

Don’t miss this spacious 2 story, with a 17 x 11 Living room, formal dining room, eat in kitchen plus ½ bath on the first floor & 2 bedrooms & bath on 2nd floor. Extras include an enclosed patio and a detached garage. Reasonably priced at REDUCED! $34,900. MLS 11-2653 Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

Lovely 3 bedroom 2400 sf Cape Cod with modern eat-in kitchen, large sunroom & family room. Master bedroom with master bath. Central air, gas heat & 2 car garage. Very well landscaped with beautiful paver sidewalks. Quiet neighborhood. $229,000 Call Ruth Smith 570-696-1195 or 570-696-5411

MLS# 11-960 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

SHAVERTOWN

1195 Sutton Road Attractive, wellmaintained saltbox on 2 private acres boasts fireplaces in living room, family room & master bedroom. Formal dining room. Large Florida room with skylights & wet bar. Oak kitchen opens to family room. 4 bedrooms & 3 1/2 baths. Finished lower level. Carriage barn $449,000 MLS# 10-3394 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

SHAVERTOWN

380 Lantern Hill Rd Stunning describes this impressive 2 story with views from every room. Architectural design which features gourmet kitchen with granite tops. Office with built-ins. Finished lower level with 2nd kitchen. Family room with French doors out to rear yard. 4 car garage. $ 775,000 MLS# 11-1241 Call Geri 570-696-0888

Land for sale? Place an ad and SELL 570-829-7130

GET THE W with a Clas 570-82


T

PAGE 24G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

OLD FORGE Beautiful Ranch home with 3BRs, eat-in kitchen, large LR & finished lower level that walkouts to a covered patio. MLS# 11-3627 PEG 714-9247 $145,000

SWOYERSVILLE Large than it looks! Fabulous lower level FR w/summer kitchen & 3/4 bath. Fenced yard w/shed. Handicap accessible. 3BRs. MLS# 11-3618 NOEL 696-0721 $159,000

HARDING

FORTY FORT

HARDING Great condition and very spacious. New carpet throughout. Pretty kitchen w/new counters, breakfast bar & lighting. New deck & large backyard. Not a drive-by! MLS# 11-1893 PAT S. 715-9337 $192,000

FORTY FORT Completely remodeled 4BR, 2 bath home. New electric, plumbing, windows, furnace, etc. A must see! MLS# 11-3379 TINA 714-9251 $174,900

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-3:00 PM Lot 1 Woodberry Dr., Mountaintop

Preview this 4BR, 3bath 2 story model w/ lots of HW & tile. Granite counters in kit, MSTR Suite w/2 walk-in closets & tiled bath w/ dbl vanities, shower & whirlpool. Home/lot packages available. TERRY D. 715-9317 Dir: 309S. to Right on S Main, Right on Nuangola, RIght on Fairwood Blvd. to end. Straight into Woodberry Manor. Right on Woodberry Dr.

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-2:30 PM

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 25G

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-2:30 PM

138 Orchard East

5 Noble Lane

DALLAS Enjoy carefree living in the Villas at Masonic Village. Located at Irem Temple Country Club, this entrance fee community offers interior & exterior home maintenance. Call for details on this unique community. MLS# 10-3841 RHEA 696-6677 Dir: 309N to L on Country Club Road - L onto Wedgewood Way. Follow into Masonic Village.

DALLAS Newberry Estates! Easy living in updated 2BR Condo w/large LR/DR, oak kitchen, 1 3/4 baths, garage. MLS# 10-402 NANCY E. 696-0882 $109,000 Dir: Pioneer Ave. to Newberry Estate - R at Appletree Terrace - L into Orchard East - 1st R to #138.

DALLAS DAKOTA WOODS- Carefree Condo - Bright & spacious w/ 3 BR’s, 1st flr master, study/library, kit w/ granite & upscale appl’s, 2 car gar. MLS# 11-3208 RHEA 696-6677 $379,000 Dir: Rt 309N to R into Dakota Woods

KINGSTON

SHAVERTOWN

FRANKLIN TWP.

SHAVERTOWN Elegant home w/wonderful floor plan-5BRs, 6baths & huge kitchen w/Garland range & bright breakfast area. Great finished lower walks out to patio & stunning Sylvan pool! MLS# 11-37 MARGY 696-0891 $750,000

FRANKLIN TWP. PRICE REDUCED! Lovely 4BR, 4 bath home set on 2.68acres. 4 car garage attached & 2 car detached garage. Only 3 yrs young! MBR St alone is 1080SF, French doors open to lg deck for entertaining w/gorgeous views! Brazilian cherry HW flrs in some rms. Zoned A-1. A MUST SEE!!! MLS# 11-1252 SHIRLEY 714-9272 $499,900

KINGSTON Airy & elegant define the interior of this 3 story 5BR, 4 bath home. The elegant entry opens to the formal LR & den, both w/FPs. Kit w/breakfast area is bright & inviting. A formal DR w/beamed ceiling & built-in cabinets. An added feature to this splendid home is a lg indoor - in-ground swimming pool w/ adjacent 3 season room. MLS# 11-2791 RHEA 696-6677 $495,000

Matt Hodorowski 570.714.9229 or Marcie Petrucelli 570-714-9267

Smith Hourigan Group 358 South Memorial Highway, Shavertown

(570)696-1195 Visit Us @ century21SHGroup.com Open House Today • 1:00-3:00PM

$139,900

Drums Drums Hazleton

• Outdoors: Golfing, Lakes, Hiking, Fishing, Hunting, Boating, Swimming, Skiing, Casino • Historic Landmarks, Architecture

• 1st floor master • Formal Dining Room • Eat-in Kitchen • Loft Watch this Community come to life by becoming a Bell Weather Resident. There has never been a better time to join us… • Valuted Ceilings • Front Porch Prices Starting in the $170s • Garage Find us in our convenient Location: Wyoming Avenue to Union Street. • Garden Area

Nancy Judd, Assoc. Broker...............287-8276 Steve Shemo.......................................793-9449

BUY NOW BEFORE IT’S“TOO LATE”

837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 3:30-5:00PM

(570) 474-9801

W NE

W NE

Amazing townhouse for sale! This is a must see! Featuring a cultured stone exterior. Pella windows, hardwood floors and gorgeous tile, granite countertops, large room sizes with great closet space and very high ceilings. Luxurious 1st floor master suite. Spacious second floor with 2 bedrooms, large bath and spacious loft overlooking Great Room. Beautiful home! MLS#11-3678 $329,000

MOUNTAIN TOP

Enjoy this quiet community in Crestwood school district. Quality materials like Douglas Fir timber, Anderson Windows & Superior Walls. Features include modern kitchen & baths w/ tile, HW floors, 2 zone heat and central A/C, concrete patio. Spacious floor plan offers Formal LR, DR & FR. MLS#11-2546 $269,000

WILKESBARRE

Gorgeous Condo in Downtown Wilkes-Barre. This 2 bedroom Condo has it all! Open floor plan with ultra modern kitchen and baths. Beautiful wood floors, high ceilings, balcony and a community rooftop deck. Quiet, worry free, city living in the heart of downtown. MLS#11-428 $249,500

LAFLIN

This newly updated ranch offers 4 bedrooms,2 bathrooms,french doors in dining room open up to a family sized deck.Fully finished lower level with a Sauna & fireplace. MLS#11-3557 $159,000

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-2:30PM

1:0

Lovely modern large ranch with 4 or 5BR including a master suite w/ walkin closet. Full finished basement with a separate room presently used as a functioning beauty ship and 1/2 bath. Beautiful backyard with 2 covered patios one with hot tub. Gas heat, all hw floors on first level, professional landscaping, neutral decor, oversized 1 car garage, lots of closets and storage & much more. MLS#11-3139

$172,000

DIR: From Kingston turn on to W. Bennett St. Go through Luzerne to left on Kelly then right on North St.

CALL NANCY ANSWINI (570) 237-5999

PM 3:0

: 0-4

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$334,900

Stunning 4BR, 2 story w/ 3975SF, finished lower level walks out to pool! Granite kitchen, 3-zoned heat & nice room sizes! MLS# 11-2270 $398,500

Pretty 4BR Bi-level! LR, DR, 3BRs, HW, finished lower level FR w/ FP, 3 full baths, 2 car garage. 2120SF. Nice lot! MLS# 11-2282 $204,900

2BR Ranch w/ large rear yard, HW floors, large eat-in kitchen, LR w/ HW, FR w/ carpet. New roof in 2011. Ideal starter home! MLS# 11-1966 $119,000

If you are buying or selling anywhere in the county, I can help you! Only if you call! Direct Line - Jim (570) 715-9323

Plains Modern 2BR, 2nd floor, great location. No pets, no smoking. $550/mo. plus utilities

Forty Fort Modern 2BR, AC, parking, garbage & water included. Great location. No Pets, No Smoking. $575/mo. plus utilities

…………Is Developing Nicely! See our spec home and lots today!

DURYEA

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

New Listing - Hanover Twp.

DALLAS TOWNSHIP Spectacular wooded and rolling topography provides backdrop for one of the Back Mountains most successful new neighborhoods. Created by Halbing-Amato Developers, you can work with Summit Pointe Builders to design your dream home or choose your own builder. Offers public, water, sewer, gas, electric, phone and cable.

Priced from $52,900 to $89,900.

Call Kevin Smith (570) 696-5420 Kevin.Smith@Century21.com

Directions: From Kingston. Route 309 to a right on Center Street. Left at the “T” onto Ondish Road. Follow 3/4 mile to Saddle Ridge Entrance on the Right.

1046 N. Memorial Hwy., Dallas Across From Agway

email: gilroyre@yahoo.com

807 NORTH ST., LUZERNE

30

RENTALS

ING IL ST

Spacious two-story home featuring 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. Long list of upgrades and improvements..newer carpet, roof, windows, fenced in yard, above ground pool, electrical systems, stone patio, insulation and features great cosmetic upkeep. This property is a must see! MLS#11-3681 $139,000

: 0-2

401 Upper Demunds Rd., Dallas

$154,900 DIR: Rt 309N, R on Hildebrandt, DIR: E. Center Hill Road, L on immediate L on Upper Demunds Road, Burndale, home on R. home on R.

$74,900

230 Wyoming Ave., Suite 5 Kingston, PA 18704

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 2:00-3:30PM

OPEN HOUSES TODAY

21 Burndale Road, Dallas

RE D

288-1444

rae@lewith-freeman.com

Terrific 4BR, 2.2 bath 3900SF home. 3-4BR Cape Cod. Modern kitchen w/all 1.7acre; HW; eat-in cherry Kitchen; 1st appliances. HW, carport, 2 driveways, floor FP; 2 story foyer; MBR Suite; Rec heated pool, sunroom. Handicap room w/wet bar; A/C; 2 garages. accessible.

Jim Graham Associate Broker

JENKINS TWP.

Rae Dziak 714-9234

MOUNTAINTOP

Turn onto Mill Hollow in Luzerne.

ING IL ST

WWW.LEWITH-FREEMAN.COM

226 Poland Street, Swoyersville

Two-story Townhomes

1898-2011

CLARKS SUMMIT Beautifully appointed home set high off the road w/6+acres for more privacy yet you are only mins from downtown C.S. Granite cntrtps,cherry HW flrs, cath ceilings, gourmet Kit, wonderful MSTR Ste & a backyard to die for! Built-in grill, refrig, etc under a covered patio & in-ground pool! MLS# 11-2396 DEB 714-5802 or PEG 714-9247 $790,000

(570) 288-9371

Pure Indulgence... Luxury Condominiums nestled in a quiet corner of Northeast Pennsylvania

Area Amenities:

• Accredited Primary/Secondary Education • Sporting / Entertainment Complex, Venues

15 AMHERST STREET., WILKES-BARRE Nicely maintained 4 bedroom traditional in great neighborhood. 2nd bath handicap accessible with open ceramic shower, modern kitchen with breakfast bar, 1st floor laundry room and lower level family room. 1 car detached garage. Close to schools and bus routes. MLS#11-3276 $87,500 STEVE SHEMO DIR: South on S. River St. to a right onto W.River St., 1st right onto Riverside Drive, left onto Old River Rd., right onto Marlborough, right on Locust to a right onto Amherst.

Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop Mountaintop

1305 Oak Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 11 Shaver Ave. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 19 Woodcliff Dr. 1:30-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 223 Davenport St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 2 Oval Dr. 3-4PM Lewith & Freeman 5 Noble Lane 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 102 Ide Rd. 2:30-4PM Lewith & Freeman 829 Homestead Dr. 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman 30 W. Fallbrook Ave. 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman 125 Frangorma Dr. 12:30-2PM Lewith & Freeman 10 Dakota Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman 138 Orchard East 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman 275 Ferguson Ave. 3-4PM Lewith & Freeman MOUNTAINTOP & SURROUNDS 25 Harley Dr. 1:30-3:30PM Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 45 Waterman Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 432 Ice Harvest Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 5 Forest Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 4 Mystic Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman Lot 1 Woodberry Dr. 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman HAZLETON & SURROUNDS 134 Beaver Slide Dr. 1-3PM Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 12 Sand Hollow Dr. 12-2PM Eileen R. Melone Real Estate 908 McKinley St. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman

Contact one of our Luzerne County Real Estate Professionals at 570.403.3000

I’m Sue Barre. I sell houses, and I can sell yours. (570) 696-5417

Joseph Moore, CRB, Broker/Owner

Shavertown Shavertown Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas Trucksville Dallas Dallas Shavertown

WILKES-BARRE Terrific 4-5BR 6000SF home on 1.68acres; LR & DR; eat-in cherry Kit w/all appls; 1st flr FR w/FP; MBR Ste; 1st flr office; A/C; Rec rm; Pool; 3 garages. MLS#11-3196 RAE 714-9234 $459,000

WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE OR ERA WILL BUY IT!

Move in condition on this 3BR, 1.5 Ba Ranch on the end of a quite street. Mod kit & LR w/ wood flooring, LL offers a TV or game room, pool table & accessories stay, built in bar & stools in rec room. ALl new windows but one, new roof, AC upstairs, ductless air & gas heater in LL. Big deck... partially covered, with large fenced yard for the kids or pets. Dallas Schools. Directions: Starting at Dallas Hardw ware, go up long hill on Huntsville, look ffo o Davenport on L at top. House on R for aat end of street.

CELEBRATING 113 YEARS OF SERVICE

234 Union St. 1:30-3:30PM Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 80 E. 4th St. 12-1:30PM McDermott & McDermott Real Estate 37 Luzerne Ave 12-2PM Realty World Tom Hart Realty 510 Gibson St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 22 Sondra Dr. 11AM-1PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 11 Michael Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 39 Cambria St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 1455 Wyoming Ave. 12-1:30PM Prudential Poggi & Jones 78-80 Academy St. 12-2PM Prudential Poggi & Jones 316 Simpson St. 12-2PM Prudential Poggi & Jones 51 Charles St. 1:30-3PM Lewith & Freeman 111 Church St. 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman 29 N. Landon Ave. 2-4PM Lewith & Freeman 267 Grove St. 1-3PM Elegant Homes BACK MOUNTAIN & SURROUNDS Dallas 244 Overbrook Rd. 11AM-1PM Four Star McCabe Realty Shavertown 73 Perrin 1:15-3PM Four Star McCabe Realty Dallas 123 E. Orchard 1-3PM Jack Crossin Real Estate Dallas 28 Glenview Ave. 12-1:30PM Century 21 Signature Properties Shavertown 11 Division St. 12-2PM Century 21 Signature Properties Trucksville 274 Mathers Dr. 1-3PM Classic Properties Back Mountain 96 Saddle Ridge Dr.12:30-2:30PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Dallas 138 White Birch Lane 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Shavertown 1351 Huntsville Rd. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group

Pringle Larksville Larksville Kingston Larksville Larksville Plymouth Forty Fort Plymouth Swoyersville Larksville Kingston Kingston Kingston

SHAVERTOWN Picture perfect Ranch w/ finished basement w/ wet bar, HW floors, C/A, charming fenced yard w/ deck. MLS# 11-1663 MARK 696-0724 $148,000 Dir: 309N - L on Ferguson

UC ED

223 Davenport, Dallas

West Pittston Rear 19 Elm St. 12-1:30PM Coldwell Banker Town & Country Prop. Wyoming 22 Tenth St. 2-4PM McDermott & McDermott Real Estate Exeter 180 E. 1st St. 11AM-12:30PM JJ Mantione Appraisal & Realty Group Exeter 164 E. 1st St. 12:30-2PM JJ Mantione Appraisal & Realty Group Exeter 1984 State Route 29 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Exeter 213 Susquehanna Ave.1:30-3PMCentury 21 Smith Hourigan Group Pittston 178 Chapel St 1:30-2:30PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group West Pittston 140 Ann St 2:30-4PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Harding 46 Kitchen Lane 2-3:30PM Prudential Poggi & Jones Harding 131 Theodore St. 12-1:30PM Prudential Poggi & Jones Laflin 215 Haverford Dr. 2-4PM Lewith & Freeman Pittston 29 Fulton St. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman Jenkins Twp. Insignia Point Courtyards 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman HANOVER/ASHLEY/NANTICOKE & SURROUNDS Hanover Twp. 19 Garrahan St. 1-3PM M.E. Moore & Son Newport Twp. 565 Old Newport St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Hanover Twp. 7 Kings Rd. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Hanover Twp. 120 E. St. Mary’s Rd. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group Hanover Twp. 110 Oxford St. 1-3PM DeRemer Realty KINGSTON/WEST SIDE & SURROUNDS Kingston 167 N. Dawes Ave. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Luzerne 807 North St 2-3:30PM Joseph P. Gilroy Real Estate Larksville 81-83 E. Broadway 11AM-1PM Four Star McCabe Realty Luzerne Waypoint Townhomes 1-3PM ERA One Source Realty

275 Ferguson Avenue

LAFLIN

OPEN HOUSES - SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9TH, 2011

WILKES-BARRE & SURROUNDS Wilkes-Barre 362 Stucker Ave. 12-2PM Jane Kopp Realtor Plains 19 Kyra Way 11AM-1PM Four Star McCabe Realty Wilkes-Barre 15 Amherst St. 3:30-5PM M.E. Moore & Son Wilkes-Barre 17 Donald Court 1-3PM ERA One Source Realty Wilkes-Barre 78 Hickory St. 11AM-1PM ERA One Source Realty Wilkes-Barre 53 Ketchum St. 11AM-1PM McDermott & McDermott Real Estate Wilkes-Barre 1007 Morgan Dr. 2:30-4PM Prudential Poggi & Jones Plains 433 N. Main St. 1:30-3:30PM Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate Plains 100 Helen St. 12-2PM Realty World Rubbico Real Estate Plains 661 N. Main St. 12-2PM Realty World Rubbico Real Estate Wilkes-Barre Twp. 803 E. Northampton St. 1-2PM Lewith & Freeman Bear Creek Twp. 1000 Laurel Run Rd. 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman Plains 16 Briar Creek Rd. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman PITTSTON/NORTH & SURROUNDS Jenkins Twp. 297 Susquhannock Dr.12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Duryea 623 Hooven St. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Pittston Twp. 10 Norman St. 2:30-4PM Atlas Realty Pittston 116 Johnson St. 2:30-4PM Atlas Realty Duryea 411 Jones St. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Pittston Twp. 122 Parnell St. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Wyoming 1702 W. 8th St. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty Avoca 314 Packer St. 2:30-4PM Atlas Realty Duryea 620 Hooven St. 1-2:30PM ERA One Source Realty

CLARKS SUMMIT

OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 3:00-4:00 PM

10 Dakota Drive

P ON END E IN W G EE IN K!

SWOYERSVILLE

M

714045

OLD FORGE

I

WILKESBARRE

Start off your Summer the right way !!! Move right into this big beautiful 6 bedroom 2 bathroom home. Features window seat, pocket doors, hardwood flrs, decorative fp with oak mantle, beamed ceilings, huge yard & off street parking for 3 cars. MLS#11-3457 $79,900

WHITE HAVEN

I am a well kept ranch nestled up in the most private of settings. My charming features include a wrap around porch and a beautiful fireplace. I offer breathtaking wooded views often visited by wildlife as well as a stunning landscape highlighted by wild flowers. 200 Amp service, Low taxes, No HOA, 8x16 shed, 12x24 garage with storage loft MLS#11-3486 $49,900

Mountaintop (570) 403-3000

ONE SOURCE REALTY

Clarks Summit Peckville Moscow Lake Ariel

620 HOOVEN ST., DURYEA

DIR: Main Street through Pittston, R onto Parsonage Street which turns into Foote Ave, Left onto Hooven @ Town Tavern. Home on Left. MLS#11-1457 $85,600

ERA1.com Toll Free 877-587-SELL

(570) 587-9999 (570) 489-8080 (570) 842-2300 (570) 698-0700

Mt Top Scranton Stroudsburg Lehighton

AVOCA

Great home in a great neighborhood. This home offers a large eat-in kitchen, living room with new laminate flooring, 4 bedrooms and a modern bath. Vinyl siding and a newer roof. Off street parking in the alley behind the home. Home is located on a dead end street. MLS#11-3486 $49,900

(570) 403-3000 (570) 343-9999 (570) 424-0404 (610) 377-6066

(570) 675-4400

NANTICOKE

Beautiful 2 story on a quiet street waiting for a new owner. Close to schools, highway, shopping, and dining. Large lot with fenced in backyard and off street parking (car port). Well built home, very energy efficient & structurally sound. Good roof, dry basement, cold a/c on both floors. Convert main living area into a 1st floor bedroom. Move-in condition. MLS#11-1830 $33,000

Accredited Buyer Representative Certified Residential Broker, E-Pro Graduate Realtors Institute Seniors Real Estate Specialist

Sunita Arora Broker/Owner

Conditions and limitations apply; including but not limited to: seller and house must meet specific qualifications, and purchase price will be determined solely by ERA Franchise Systems LLC, C b based ased d upo upon a d discount isc of the home’s appraised value value. Additionally, a second home must be purchased through a broker designated by ERA Franchise Systems LLC. ) ©2008 ERA Franchise Systems LLC. All Rights Reserved. ERA® and Always There For You® are registered trademarks licensed to ERA Franchise Systems LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

www.gordonlong.com If you’re a fan of city lights, enjoy them from the custom built deck of this stunning two-story contemporary home in a great neighborhood. Picture Perfect Condition - Nothing to do but move in! MLS#11-3663 Priced at $275,000

!

W G NETIN S LI

RT 239 CAMBRA

Wonderful Views from this well Built Ranch Home on 2 ACRES, Full Finished Basement. Two Car Heated Garage.

Asking $159,900

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate

(570) 696-3801 • (570) 696-0883 Direct metcalf@epix.net Barbara F. Metcalf Associate Broker

69 N. MEMORIAL HIGHWAY, SHAVERTOWN, PA 18708

Call Richard Anytime for appointment 570.406.2438 Listing#11-3414


PAGE 26G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

SHICKSHINNY

SWOYERSVILLE

WEST PITTSTON

WEST PITTSTON

WILKES-BARRE

Great New Construction on 2 Acres with 1 year Builders Warranty! 2 Story home with 4 bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, Living Room, Dining Room, Kitchen, Breakfast Room & Laundry Room. Dining Room has tray ceiling, gas fireplace in living room & whirlpool tub in Master Bath. Plus 2 car attached garage, open front porch & rear deck. MLS 11-2453 $275,000 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

NEW LISTING Two-story home with updated roof, double lot, two car garage. Large kitchen, 3 bedrooms, living room, formal dining room. MLS#11-3400 $112,000 MaryEllen Belchick 570-696-6566

TRUCKSVILLE

SUGAR NOTCH

Woodland Road Attractive 3 bedroom ranch, central AC, attached two car garage. 9 years young, large lot. Call Jim for details. Affordable at

$169,500 Towne & Country Real Estate Co. 570-542-5708 or 570-735-8932

Well maintained 3 bedroom, 2 bath double wide in nice neighborhood. Many updates. Landscaped & fenced yard with pool, large deck & koi pond! $99,700 MLS#11-2253 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

TRUCKSVILLE

172 Spring Garden St

SUGARLOAF

Smith Hourigan Group 570-474-6307

SWEET VALLEY REDUCED!

4 Oliver Road Located in the back part of Oliver Road in a very private part of North Lake in Sweet Valley. Yearning to be restored, lake front cape cod in a very tranquil setting was formerly used as a summer home. MLS 11-2113 $99,000 Jay Crossin CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 ext. 23

SWOYERSVILLE

2 Unit Duplex & Double Block with a 4 Bay Garage. Family owned for many years. BIG REDUCTION $100,000 MLS# 09-1643 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

SWOYERSVILLE

Enjoy this charming 2 bedroom home with recently updated tile kitchen and bath, laminate floors in bedrooms, large yard, deck and storage shed. MLS #11-3231 $92,500 Call Matt 570-714-9229 or Darlene 570-696-6678

WEST PITTSTON

2 FAMILY HOME 3 bedroom, bath, kitchen, living, dining room each side. Recently remodeled. Quiet neighborhood. Did not receive any water damage at all. No Realtors, please. $87,500 570-945-7423 Leave A Message

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WEST PITTSTON

6 Acre Horse Farm

New Price! $215,000 Private ranch on 6 acres. Hardwood floors in Living Room, halls & Bedrooms. Great kitchen. Dining area, sliding doors to huge composite deck overlooking pool and fenced yard. 24x40 3 bay stable / garage. The perfect dog lover's paradise easily converted for dog breeders or hobbyists with plenty of room for exercise yard and agility course. Plenty of room for horses or just to enjoy! Directions: Take Rt. 93 in Conyngham to Rock Glen Rd. Proceed 6 miles to Right on Cedar Head Rd. Go. 8 miles to stop sign. Go straight over 2 wooden bridges. Take Right on Hilltop Dr. House 1/2 mile on left. 11-2539 $215,000 Call Michael Pinko (570) 899-3865

Spacious 3 unit in very nice condition & has been owner occupied for over 40 years. 3 bedrooms each unit, vinyl sided and most all replacement windows, 2 furnaces, ample parking & a lot of old charm! Nice location on tree lined street. MLS#11-3253 $142,500 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Make an Offer! Cozy up in this lovely cape cod. Charming interior, nice size deck, fenced rear yard, shed, rec room in basement, utility room, & workshop. Attic is also partially finished with pull down & many possibilities to add more space. Paved driveway & parking for 6 cars, this is not just a drive-by, call for an appointment today! $102,900 Call Stacey Lauer at 570-696-2468

TUNKHANNOCK

Enjoy the spectacular view of all seasons from this lovely “Colonial“ situated on over 4 acres of pure country living PLUS privacy, yet only 15 minutes from Dallas. Great kitchen, 2.5 baths & attached 2 car garage. NEW PRICE! $279,900 MLS# 11-1238 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

321 Franklin St. Great 2 bedroom starter home in the “Garden Village”. Brand new flooring throughout, fresh paint, vinyl siding and replacement windows. Newer electric service, eat in kitchen w/breakfast bar. 1st floor laundry room and off street parking. MLS 11-2302 $89,500 Mark R. Mason 570-331-0982 CROSSING REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

WEST PITTSTON 322 SALEM ST. REDUCED

Great 1/2 double located in nice West Pittston location. 3 bedrooms, new carpet. Vertical blinds with all appliances. Screened in porch and yard. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS#10-1535 $49,900 Charlie VM 101

WEST PITTSTON

WANAMIE

987 Center St. Country setting surrounds this 4 year old home featuring a large modern kitchen and breakfast area with tile flooring. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, living room, family room, 2 car garage, front porch and rear deck/ MLS 11-690 $154,900 Call Patty Lunski 570-735-7494 EXT 304 ANTONIK & ASSOC. 570-735-7494

WAPWALLOPEN

NEW LISTING! Enjoy country living in this well maintained 3 bedroom ranch. Modern kitchen with 1st floor laundry & lots of closet space. MLS#11-2885 $134,900 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

NEW LISTING 101 Boston Ave. Quality home in great location w/custom features throughout. Won’t last long. $257,900. Call Joe or Donna, 613-9080

WEST PITTSTON

OPEN HOUSE SAT. & SUN. 12-5 232 North Street Completely remodeled two story home with, 2 bedroom & 1.5 baths. New kitchen, bath, carpet, tile, hardwoods, all appliances, including washer & dryer in upstairs bath. This is an awesome home with lots of extra amenities, large closet space, driveway, nice yard and neighborhood. $139,900 with $5,000 down, financing at 4.5% 30 yrs, monthly payment of $875. 100% Owner Financing Available. Call Bob at 570-654-1490

Well cared for and nicely kept. A place to call home! Complete with 2 car oversized garage, central air, first floor laundry, eat in kitchen. Convenient to shopping, West Pittston pool and ball fields. PRICE REDUCED! $134,500 MLS 11-583 Call Judy Rice 570-714-9230

WEST WYOMING

292 W. 3rd St. Charming Ranch in great location with 7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, finished basement, sunroom, central air. Newer roof and windows, hardwood floors. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2946 REDUCED $119,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

P E N D I N G

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

WEST WYOMING 438 Tripp St

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

WILKES-BARRE

Beautifully maintained double block on large landscaped lot (5 lots). Many updates, hardwood under carpet, ceiling fans, plaster walls and off street parking for 9! Must See! MLS # 11-2651 $110,000 Call Christine Kutz for details. Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

WILKES-BARRE

NEW LISTING Great 2-story with newer roof, flooring, windows & central air. Large driveway, fenced rear yard with patio & shed. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths & 1st floor laundry. MLS# 11-3256 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

Sunday 12pm-5pm Completely remodeled home with everything new. New kitchen, baths, bedrooms, tile floors, hardwoods, granite countertops, all new stainless steel appliances, refrigerator, stove, microwave, dishwasher, free standing shower, tub for two, huge deck, large yard, excellent neighborhood 100% Owner Financing Available $154,900 (30 year loan @ 4.5% with 5% down; $7,750 down, $785/month) 570-654-1490

WHITE HAVEN

123 Fern Ridge Rd.

PRICE REDUCED! In Community of

White-Haven Pocono's. Nice 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Ranch. Great Vacation Home or Year round Home. Community Lake & other amenities. Close to Hunting, Fishing, Golf and Skiing. Close to Rt 80. All offers contingent to bank short sale approval. REDUCED! $70,900 MLS# 11-765 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

WHITE HAVEN

28 Woodhaven Dr S

Exquisite Inside! 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, formal dining room, family room, modern eat-in kitchen, Master bedroom and bath, front and side porches, rear deck, 2 car attached garage. Property is being sold in “as is” condition. MLS 11-1253 Huge Reduction! $169,000 Jean Malarae 570-814-5814 CLASSIC PROPERTIES 570-718-4959 ext. 1366

Very affordable for what this 3 bedroom, 1.5 home has to offer! Good room sizes, convenient location and “THE PRICE IS RIGHT!” MLS#11-3346 $49,900 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE 54 PENN ST. SALE BY OWNER

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE REDUCED

608 Wyoming Ave

185 West River St

Spacious, quality home, brick - two story with 6 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bath, two fireplaces, den, heated sunroom off living room, screened porch off formal dining room, modern eat-in kitchen, garage. Many extras... Sacrifice, owner relocating out of state $125,000. MLS 11-2474 JANE KOPP REAL ESTATE 570-288-7481

WILKES-BARRE

221 Brown Street

Great first home or down size. Nice clean move in ready no lawn work here. 2 car detached garage and best of all the Mortgage is probably lower than your rent payment. $52,500 MLS# 11-871 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

WILKES-BARRE

241 Dana Street

Spacious 3 bedroom, 1.5 baths with textured ceilings, updated kitchen, all appliances including dishwasher, tiled bath with whirlpool tub, 2nd floor laundry room. Replacement windows. MLS# 11-88 Call Arlene Warunek 570-650-4169

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

35 Hillard Street

Great neighborhood surrounds this updated 2 story home with original woodwork. 3 bedroom, 1 bath, 1,500sf oak eat-in kitchen, hardwood floors, stained glass windows, large rooms, fenced yard, deck. Zoned R1 Single Family Zone. New Price $79,900 MLS #11-599 Call Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

WILKES-BARRE 1400 N. Washington St Nice 2 story in need of some TLC with low taxes, near the casino. Roof is 5 yrs young. Newer water heater (installed '09), replacement windows throughout, 100 AMP electric, tiled bath, wallto-wall carpeting entire 1st floor. MLS 11-2383 $58,900 Donald Crossin CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

WILKES-BARRE

164 Madison Street

Spotless 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home with hardwood floors, stained glass, and modern kitchen in move-in condition. 11-2831 $79,900 Marilyn K Snyder Real Estate 570-825-2468

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Remodeled 2-3 bedroom with eat-in kitchen & oak cabinets; large dining room with oak flooring; laundry room on first floor with 1/2 bath; ceramic tile master bath with granite vanity and walk in linen closet; extra large master bedroom; wrap porch; partially fenced; concrete basement; ceiling fans; stained glass windows; gas heat; wood floor attic; shed; close to mall; quiet, safe neighborhood. Nice view. Move in condition, no repairs needed. Low real estate taxes. $87,500. 570-970-8065, or email aleta59@msn.com

WILKES-BARRE

60 Kulp St. 3-4 bedroom, 2 story home with well kept hardwood floors throughout. Private driveway with parking for 2 cards and nearly all replacement windows. MLS 11-2897 $65,000 Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

WILKES-BARRE

60 Saint Clair St

Drastic Reduction $60,000

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

122 Oak Street Very nice oak kitchen with tile floor! Fenced in yard. 3 nice size bedrooms. Large living room and large dining room + 2 modern baths with tile & pedestal sink! Nice neighborhood! Built-in window seats in middle bedroom. Rear shed - 4 window air conditioners. MLS#11-2481 $119,500 Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

NEW CONCRETE DRIVEWAY NO FLOODING HERE

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE 100 Darling St

Nice tow bedroom single, gas heat, enclosed porch, fenced yard. Close to downtown & colleges. Affordable at $42,500. Call Town & Country Real Estate Co. 570-735-8932 570-542-5708

906 Homes for Sale

WILKES-BARRE

OPEN HOUSE

WEATHERLY SALE BY OWNER

Fully furnished. 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths, eat-in kitchen, fireplace. Includes all furniture. Maytag washer/dryer, dishwasher, freezer & screened in porch. Double car garage. $75,000 Or best offer. For Appointment Call 570-427-8116

3 unit commercial building with 2 apartments & a store front operation plus a detached 2 car garage. $75,000 MLS# 11-1724 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

906 Homes for Sale

39 W. Chestnut St. Lots of room in this single with 3 floors of living space. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath with hardwood floors throughout, natural woodwork, all windows have been replaced, laundry/pantry off of kitchen. 4x10 entry foyer, space for 2 additional bedrooms on the 3rd floor. Roof is new. MLS 11-325 $69,900 Jay A. Crossin 570-288-0770 Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

Great 4 bedroom home with new kitchen, furnace and bath. Laundry room off kitchen. Newer windows and roof. Hardwood on first floor. Off street parking. Older one car garage. Walk up attic. MLS 11-1478 $69,000 Call Nancy Answini 570-237-5999 JOSEPH P. GILROY REAL ESTATE 570-288-1444

89 Simpson St., This well kept 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home offers an open living room/ dining room floor plan. Master bedroom with its own office area. Plenty of closets in addition to the walk-up attic for storage! Off-street parking, large deck overlooking the fenced rear yard. Just move right in! $79,900 Jill Jones 696-6550

WILKES-BARRE NOW REDUCED!

191 Andover St. Lovely single family 3 bedroom home with lots of space. Finished 3rd floor, balcony porch off of 2nd floor bedroom, gas hot air heat, central air and much more. Must see! MLS 11-59 $66,000 Jay A. Crossin 570-288-0770 Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

WILKES-BARRE

Parsons Manor PRICE REDUCED!

184 Brader Drive Large, fenced in corner lot surrounds this 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath ranch. Off Dining Room, enjoy a covered deck. All electric home. AC wall unit. Full basement with 2 finished rooms. Attached garage. Shed. Owner Re-locating out of area. MLS 11-2473 REDUCED!!! $138,000 JANE KOPP REAL ESTATE 570-288-7481

G IN D EN P

WILKES-BARRE PARSONS

74 Empire ST N Do you have an older child that wants his or her own space? Here it is, the lower level is finished & has its own private entrance & small kitchenette. 3 bedroom, 1 3/4 baths home in very good condition & ready for a new owner. Enclosed upper & lower porches. Laundry area off kitchen. MLS#11-3459 $84,000 Lou Pellegrino 570-417-3427

COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE 570-474-2340 x22

Motorcycle forsale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Rolling Mill Hill Section

231 Poplar St. Well-Maintained 3 bedroom home in Move-in condition. Hardwood floors, upgraded appliances & great storage space. Private driveway and nice yard. MLS# 10-4456 $75,000 Barbara Young Call 570-466-6940

COLDWELL BANKER, RUNDLE REAL ESTATE

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

WYOMING

For Sale by Owner. Double Block, easily convertible to single. Kitchen, living room, 3 bedrooms & bath each side. New 2 car garage. 66’x100’ lot. Asking $160,000. Call 570-693-2408

WYOMING

570-474-2340 Ext. 55

WILKES-BARRE

To settle Estate

314 Horton Street Wonderful Family Home, 6 rooms (3 bedrooms), 1 1/2 baths, two-story, Living room with built-in Bookcase, formal Dining Room with entrance to delightful porch. Eat-in kitchen. Private lot, detached garage. A must see home. MLS 11-2721 Asking $75,000 GO TO THE TOP... CALL

JANE KOPP REAL ESTATE

570-288-7481

WILKES-BARRE

SUMMIT PLACE Townhome. Pay less mortgage than rent! See this three bedroom, 2 bath home today. MLS#11-2594 $74,999 MaryEllen Belchick 570-696-6566

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE

Location, Location, location! Either you are looking to raise your family or just work from home this amazing brick ranch style property has it all. Zoned commercial, 3 very large bedrooms and 3 1/2 baths, full finished basement, library room, oversized living room, formal dining room and so much more. You have to see it to appreciate. Call today for a private tour of the property. 1 year Home Warranty. MLS 11-1870 REDUCED!!! MOTIVATED SELLERS MAKE OFFER! $325,000 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

MOTIVATED SELLER!! Nicely maintained 2-story traditional in great neighborhood. Modern oak kitchen, open layout in family room/den with new floors, above ground pool in fenced rear yard. 1-car detached garage with workshop area, all on a nice wide lot. MLS#11-2428 REDUCED TO $139,900 Call Steve Shemo (570) 288-1401 (570) 793-9449

YATESVILLE PRICE REDUCED

REASONABLE OFFERS ACCEPTED

67 Courtright St

PRICE REDUCED!! Three bedroom,one bath home located within walking distance to General Hospital. Amenities include front porch, eat-in kitchen. All appliances inc. washer and dryer included. Being sold “As Is”, no warranties expressed or implied. Permit parking available. MLS 11-760 $39,900 Call Stan Pearlman 570-868-2478 COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE 570-474-2340 ext. 49

29 Amber Lane Remodeled 2 bedroom Ranch home with new carpeting, large sun porch, new roof. Move right in! For more info and photos please visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-749 $79,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

WYOMING

262 Stucker Ave & Lot-10 Virginia Drive SUNDAY, OCT 9 12 NOON TO 2PM (Scott St. to Stucker, third street after baseball field) 7 room (3 bedrooms), 1 1/2 baths. Lower Level has family room and 1 car attached garage. To settle Estate. $84,900. 10-2472 Call Joe Bruno 570-824-4560 JANE KOPP REAL ESTATE 570-288-7481

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

WILKES-BARRE

Price Reduced! Why pay rent move right in to this well maintained 2 bedroom home with nice yard, privacy fence and garage. MLS# 11-2875 $57,500 Call Andrea 570-714-9244 or Darlene 570-696-6678

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Let the Community Know! Place your Classified Ad TODAY! 570-829-7130

WILKES-BARRE MINERS MILLS

NEW LISTING! Charming two-story home with hardwood and pine floors, modern kitchen and baths, formal living room and dining room, 3 bedrooms, gas heat, separate 330SF of office space. Detached garage and carport, updated windows, roof and furnace. Zoned business commercial. MLS#11-1010 $99,900 Call Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565

WILKES-BARRE

1007 Morgan Drive Beautiful two-story traditional home located high & dry in Pine Ridge Estates, one of WilkesBarre’s newest developments. Features 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, master suite with walk-in closet, 9’ ceilings and hardwoods on 1st floor, family room with gas fireplace, two-car garage and deck. MLS#11-3479 $239,900 Karen Ryan 570-283-9100 x14

12 Reid st. Spacious Bi-level home in semi-private location with private back yard. 3 season room. Gas fireplace in lower level family room. 4 bedrooms, garage. For more informtion and photos visit wwww.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 10-4740 $149,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

YATESVILLE REDUCED!

61 Pittston Ave. Stately brick Ranch in private location. Large room sizes, fireplace, central A/C. Includes extra lot. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #10-3512 PRICE REDUCED $189,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 27G

Scenic Hilltop Location

• 1.5 - 2 Acres • Custom Built Homes • Restricted Covenants

Wyoming Area School District

• On Cul-de-sac No Thru Traffic • Road Access Completed By Winter

Pride Builders Exclusive Builder

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

• Exeter Township within

SOLD SOLD

Hurry! Only 4 Lots Left

a mile of Applewood Golf Course • Located in a beautiful area not effected by recent flooding

Buy Now For Spring Building Wyoming Area School District

Located in a beautiful area not effected by recent flooding.

Call for an appointment

(570) 283-0327


PAGE 28G 909

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

Income & Commercial Properties

909

AVOCA

25 St. Mary’s St. 3,443 sq. ft. masonry commercial building with warehouse/office and 2 apartments with separate electric and heat. Perfect for contractors or anyone with storage needs. For more information and photos log onto www.atlas realtyinc.com. Reduced to $89,000 MLS #10-3872 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

DUPONT INVESTMENT

OPPORTUNITY

Income & Commercial Properties

909

EDWARDSVILLE

Lawrence St. Nice 3 unit property. Lots of off street parking and bonus 2 car garage. All units are rented. Great income with low maintenance $139,900 MLS# 10-2675 Call Karen

Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

FORTY FORT

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Income & Commercial Properties

KINGSTON REDUCED!!

47 N. Thomas St. Well maintained duplex in a nice area of Kingston. 2nd floor unit is occupied. New roof, new heating system, brand new in ground pool recently installed. Laundry hook-up for both units in basement. Newer roof and exterior recently painted. MLS 11-1199 $139,500 Jay A. Crossin 570-288-0770 Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Commercial Property with approx. 5000 sq. ft. with an office, storage & a 2nd floor apt in a high traffic area.

Single family home with a separate building containing a 1 bedroom apartment and 5 car garage all on 1 lot. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2828 Priced to sell at $85,000 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

DURYEA REDUCED!!!!

HANOVER TOWNSHIP 22 W. Germania St

This 6,600 sq. ft. concrete block building has multiple uses. 5 offices & kitchenette. Over 5,800 sq. ft.. warehouse space (high ceilings). 2 overhead doors. $86,500 MLS 10-1326 Bob Kopec HUMFORD REALTY 570-822-5126

Sell your own home! Place an ad HERE 570-829-7130

921 Main St. Over 2000 sq. ft. commercial space currently used for local business, two 2 bedroom apartments with 1 rented, garage, off street parking. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #11-1965 Price negotiable, please make an offer $167,000 Call Tom 570-282-7716

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

JENKINS TWP.

www.cindykingre.com

570-675-4400 Main St. 1 story, 2,600 sq. ft. commercial building, masonry construction with offices and warehousing. Central air, alarm system and parking. Great for contractors or anyone with office/storage needs. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-3156 $84,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

EDWARDSVILLE

173-175 Zerby Ave. Great income property with additional garage space (34x38) room for 3 cars to rent! Live in one half and have your mortgage paid by the other! $12,000+ potential income! MLS # 11-1111 REDUCED! $59,900 Call John Shelley 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

WISTERIA

KINGSTON 7 Hoyt St

462 W. State St. Lower End Pizza! Established profitable business for sale. Restaurant, bar, game room, separate dining room. Parking for 35 cars. Turnkey operation. Additional parking lot included. For lease or sale $175,000 Call Jay Crossin Ext. 23 Crossin Real Estate 570-288-0770

LUZERNE

941

High Traffic - Good visibility. This 6,000 sq. ft. masonry building is clear span. Multiple uses - professional commercial, etc. 18 storage/warehouse units included. MLS#11-2787 $325,000 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

NANTICOKE 39 W. CHURCH ST.

Formerly used as a Personal Care Home with 10 bedrooms and 4 baths. Nice kitchen, 2nd kitchen/laundry area. MLS 11-864 $190,000 Call Barb Strong 570-762-7561 ANTONIK & ASSOCIATES 570-735-7494

Apartments 941 Unfurnishe

SKYLINE

Apartments Unfurnishe

Nice duplex zoned commercial, can be used for offices as well as residential. All separate utilities. Keep apt. space or convert to commercial office space. Adjacent lot for sale by same owner. MLS 11-2176 $85,900 Jay A. Crossen CROSSEN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 ext. 23

COMMONS

• All Utilities included in rent • • Convenient Location • • Handicap Accessible Units • • Free Internet Access • • 1 Bedroom rent from $500 to $545/Month • • 2 Bedrooms rent $650/Month • Continuing to accept applications at Housing Authority Main Office THE HOUSING AUTHORITY OF MONROE COUNTY 1055 West Main Street Stroudsburg, PA 18360 Phone: (570) 421-7770 TDD: (570) 421-6968

Bear Creek Township Rooms starting at Daily $39.99 + tax Weekly $179.99 + tax WiFi HBO Available Upon Request: Microwave & Refrigerator

(570) 823-8027

www.casinocountrysideinn.com info@casinocountrysideinn.com

Countryside Inn

Room

Casino

Room 962

909

Income & Commercial Properties

NANTICOKE Hanover & West

Ridge St MANY POSSIBILITIES WITH THIS PROPERTY! Has been used in the past as student housing, but could also be used as private home, offices or commercial property. Many new updates - well taken care of. Off street parking. $100,000 570-956-4883

NANTICOKE NEW PRICE!!

423 E. Church St. Great 2 family in move in condition on both sides, Separate utilities, 6 rooms each. 3 car detached garage in super neighborhood. Walking distance to college. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-1608 $123,000 Call Tom 570-262-7716

PITTSTON

35 High St. Nice duplex in great location, fully occupied with leases. Good investment property. Separate utilities, newer furnaces, gas and oil. Notice needed to show. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3222 $89,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

PITTSTON

HEIGHTS

Brand New Two and Three Bedroom Townhouses For Rent in Barrett Township, Monroe County for income qualified households age 62 or older

• Washer/Dryer & Central Air Unit in all Units • • Geo-Thermal Heat • • Handicap Accessible Units • • Section 8 Welcome • • 2 Bedrooms rent from $650 to $800/Month • • 3 Bedrooms rent from $769 to $915/Month •

Duplex. Aluminum siding, oil heat, semi - modern kitchens, long term tenant. On a spacious 50’ x 150’ lot. Motivated Seller. REDUCED. $39,900 Anne Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

Continuing to accept applications at Housing Authority Main Office or On-Site Wednesdays from 9-4 103 Plateau Drive, East Stroudsburg

THE HOUSING AUTHORITY OF MONROE COUNTY 1055 West Main Street Stroudsburg, PA 18360 Phone: (570) 421-7770 TDD: (570) 421-6968

Brand New One and Two Bedroom Townhouses For Rent in Barrett Township, Monroe County for income qualified households age 62 or older

962

Wellness Center / professional offices. Lease Space Available. Brick and stucco facade offered on building exterior while interior features built-in offices with natural woodwork and glass. Modern style lofts allow for bonus interior space and warehouse space is offered as Built to Suit. --SPACES AVAILABLE: 1200 SF, 1400 SF, 4300 SF (Warehouse space, also offered as built to suit) --Custom Leases from $8.00-$12.00/ square feet based on terms. --Price/ square foot negotiable depending on options. (ASK ABOUT OUR FREE RENT) --Property ideal for a medical, business, or professional offices. --100+ Parking Spaces. Call Cindy 570-690-2689

Income & Commercial Properties

LARKSVILLE HUGE REDUCTION!

KINGSTON

Owner will hold some of the financing for qualified buyer. $196,000 MLS# 11-945 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

909

941

Apartments 941 Unfurnishe

Apartments Unfurnishe

EAST MOUNTAIN APARTMENTS The good life... close at hand

Regions Best Address

• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.

• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.

822-4444

www.EastMountainApt.com

288-6300

www.GatewayManorApt.com

SAINT JOHN Apartments 419 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre

• Secured Senior Building for 62 & older. • 1 bedroom apartments currently available for $501. per month INCLUDES ALL UTILITIES. • YOU regulate heat & air conditioning • Laundry Room Access • Community Room/Fully equipped kitchen for special events • Exercise Equipment • 24 Hour Emergency Maintenance • Garage & off street parking • Computer / Library area • Curbside public transportation

570-970-6694

Equal Housing Opportunity

570-288-6654

941

Apartments Unfurnishe

W IL K E SW O O D A PAR TM E NTS

1 B edroom Sta rting a t $675.00 • Includes gas heat, w ater,sew er & trash • C onvenient to allm ajor highw ays & public transportation • Fitness center & pool • P atio/B alconies • P et friendly* • O nline rentalpaym ents • Flexible lease term s M ond a y - Frid a y 9 -5 Sa turd a y 1 0-2

822-27 1 1

w w w .liv ea tw ilk esw ood .com * Restrictions Ap p ly

CEDAR VILLAGE

Apartment Homes

Ask About Our Summer Specials!

909

Income & Commercial Properties

PITTSTON Township Blvd.

MAKE AN OFFER! Ideal location between WilkesBarre & Scranton. Ample parking with room for additional spaces. Perfect for medical or professional offices. Contact agent to show. Asking $945,000 Contact Judy Rice 570-714-9230 MLS# 10-1110

PLAINS COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

15 South River St. Not in Flood Zone For Sale By Owner 4,536 sq. ft., high traffic area, across from Rite-Aid, gas heat. For more info, call 570-820-5953

PLYMOUTH

Spacious 1791 sq. ft. 1/2 double with wrap around porch, shed & garage. Semi modern kitchen & bath. 3 bedrooms with gas heat and plenty of storage. $24,900 Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

Immediate Occupancy!!

MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS

61 E. Northampton St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 • Affordable Senior Apartments • Income Eligibility Required • Utilities Included! • Low cable rates; • New appliances; • Laundry on site; • Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation

Please call 570-825-8594 D/TTY 800-654-5984

WYOMING 14 West Sixth St.

Former upholestry shop. 1st floor in need of a lot of TLC. 2nd floor apartment in good condition & rented with no lease. Storage area. Off street parking available.

PRICE$65,000 REDUCED!

Contact Judy Rice 714-9230 MLS# 11-572

WYOMING PRICE REDUCED!

285 Wyoming Ave. First floor currently used as a shop, could be offices, etc. Prime location, corner lot, full basement. 2nd floor is 3 bedroom apartment plus 3 car garage and parking for 6 cars. For more information and photos go to www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #10-4339 $169,900 Call Charlie VM 101

912 Lots & Acreage

570-288-6654

SCRANTON

Live in one and rent the others to pay for your mortgage! This Multi-Unit features gorgeous hardwood floors in the 1st level apartment. Second Level apartment has 4 bedrooms! Lower Level apartment has cozy efficiency. Plenty of parking and a 2 car carport is another highlight. Call Jesicca Skoloda 570-237-0463 JesiccaSkoloda Realtor@gmail.com MLS# 11-2741 $124,999 570-696-2468

WEST PITTSTON

Great Investment Opportunity. 2 Storefronts & attached 3 bedroom home all rented out with separate utilities. $125,000 MLS# 11-2185 Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

WILKES-BARRE

101 Old River Road

BUILDING LOT for sale in the beautiful mountains at Eagle Rock Resort, a gated community. 1/4 acre totally wooded with small stream in back yard. 2 free rounds of golf monthly. Free access to public pool, tennis courts and more. Public water and sewer available. Must sell to support son’s college tuition. Please make reasonable offer. Call 610-562-9204.

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

DALLAS

$135,000 SPECTACULAR WATER VIEW! 2 acres overlooking Huntsville Reservoir. Building site cleared but much of woodlands preserved. Perc & site prep done. MLS # 11-2550. Call Christine Kutz for details. Four Star McCabe Realty 570-674-9950

DALLAS

New Goss Manor lots. Prices ranging from $59,900 to $69,900. Public water, sewer, gas & electric available. Call Kevin Smith 570-696-1195 or 570-696-5420

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

Duplex - “Today’s Buy, Tomorrow’s Security” Do you appreciate the gentle formality of beamed ceilings, French style doors with beveled glass & beautiful woodwork? Each unit: 2 bedrooms, bath, living room, dining room, gas heat. Spacious rooms. Separate utilities. 2 car detached garage. 10-0920 $89,900. Joan Evans Real Estate 570-824-5763

DRUMS

Lot 7 Maple Dr. Private yet convenient location just minutes from interstates. You can fish in your own back yard in the Nescopeck Creek or use the nearby state game lands. Perfect for your vacation cabin or possible year round home! MLS#11-1492 $14,900 Jill Jones 696-6550

WILKES-BARRE

Washer & Dryer Central Air Fitness Center Swimming Pool Easy Access to I-81 Mon – Fri. 9 –5 44 Eagle Court Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706 (Off Route 309)

570-823-8400 cedarvillage@ affiliatedmgmt.com

EXETER

NEWPORT TOWNSHIP 1 mile south of

Ida Acres, Wyoming Area School District. 6 lots remain, starting at $38,000. Private setting. Underground utilities. 570-947-4819

Out of flood area. 100x125ft. All utilities in place. Building moratorium does not apply to this lot. $45,000 reduced to $42,000 Call 570-655-0530

HARDING

Mt. Zion Road One acre lot just before Oberdorfer Road. Great place to build your dream home MLS 11-3521 $29,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

HARVEYS LAKE

SELLER SAYS SELL! Land with Lake View 90' x 125' Lot with View of the Lake. Sewer Permit Required. $19,000 MLS# 10-2523 Call Cindy 570-690-2689

www.cindykingre.com

570-675-4400

JENKINS TWP.

L.C.C.C. 2 lots available. 100’ frontage x 228’ deep. Modular home with basement accepted. Each lot $17,000. Call 570-714-1296

PLAINS TWP.

14 + ACRES

in an approved subdivision. Easy access to Rt 81 & PA Tpke. 1/2 mile from Mohegan Sun Casino. $275,000. 772-260-0901

BACK MOUNTAIN

Huntsville Dam Area

BUILDING LOT 17.96 acres. Beautiful, slopping, wooded, lot, with privacy & great views. Last lot in development with public sewer, gas & underground utilities. 8 minutes to Kingston on Hillside Rd. $47,500 570-283-0547

915 Manufactured Homes Hospital St. Eagle View Great residential lot overlooking the Susquehanna River for a stunning view of the river and surrounding area. Build your dream home on this lot with the best river and valley views in Luzerne County. Gas, telephone, electric and water utility connections are available. For more details & photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-2640 $125,000 Call Kim 570-466-3338

KINGSTON TWP.

VACANT LAND Large barn and 28+/- acres close to town. MLS#09-3699 Reduced to $299,000 Maribeth Jones 696-6565

LAFLIN Lot#9 Pinewood Dr

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME

on one of the last available lots in desirable Laflin. Convenient location near highways, airport, casino & shopping. DIRECTIONS Rt 315 to laflin Rd; make left off Laflin Rd onto Pinewood Dr. Lot is on corner of Pinewood Dr. and Hickorywood Dr. MLS 11-3411 $34,900 atlas realtyinc.com Call Keri Best 570-885-5082

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

MOUNTAIN TOP

Crestwood Schools! 126 Acres for Sale! Mostly wooded with approx. 970 ft on Rt. 437 in Dennison Twp. $459,000 Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

MOUNTAIN TOP

Several building lots ready to build on! ALL public utilities! Priced from $32,000 to $48,000! Use your own Builder! Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

HUNLOCK CREEK

Quiet country setting. Lots available. $295 per month. Includes water, sewer & trash. Call Bud 570-477-2845

LAUREL RUN ESTATES

We have mobile home sites for new and used single & double wides. LARGE WOODED LOTS

overlooking Wilkes-Barre Call 570-923-8499 CELL 570-241-1854

SPRINGBROOK

2 bedroom. Clean. Needs no work. Remodeled throughout. Owner financing. $14,000. 570-851-6128 or 610-767-9456

918 Miscellaneous for Sale

Veteran’s Bring your VA Entitlement Certificate

And If You Qualify, I Can Help You Find And Purchase A Home In Luzerne County! Right now there are hundreds of homes listed in our MLS in this county that may qualify for 100% VA financing. Let’s sit down and talk, make a plan, and help you get ‘moving” into a home. Dee Fields, Associate Broker 570-788-7511

deefieldsabroker@gmail.com

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified! 924

Out of State Properties

FLORIDA SOUTH WEST COAST 3 bedroom, 2 bath Only $139,900. Similar unit sold for $325k. Stainless, granite, storage, covered parking, close to golf, 5 minutes downtown & Gulf. Special final weekend special for incentives. Call now 877-888-7601 NY STATE land liquidation sale ends this month. Large Acreage - Waterfront - Lots with Camps. Top Hunting Lands. Over 150 tracts. ALL BARGAINS 800-2297843 www. landandcamps.com VIRGINIA eastern shore, waterfront lots. Call Bill 757824-0808 visitomp.com

930 Wanted to Buy Real Estate

Stately brick building in Historic district. Wonderful 1st block S Franklin. Formerly Lane's. 5700sq ft + full basement for storage. Great professional space. Well maintained. Private parking & garden. MLS#11-345 $495,000 570-696-3801 Call Margy 570-696-0891

Industrial Site. Rail served with all utilities. KOZ approved. For more information and photos visit www.atlas realtyinc.com $2,395,000 MLS#10-669 Call Charlie

EARTH CONSERVANCY LAND FOR SALE *61 +/- Acres Nuangola $99,000 *46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp., $79,000 *Highway Commercial KOZ Hanover Twp. 3 +/- Acres 11 +/- Acres *Wilkes-Barre Twp. 32 +/- Acres Zoned R-3 See additional Land for Sale at www.earth conservancy.org 570-823-3445

938

Apartments/ Furnished

PITTSTON

19 Ziegler Road Picture a sunrise over the mountain. Ready to build, residential lot. Secluded entrance road from Route 502. Priced to sell! Underground telephone and electric service in place. Make this the site of your future home. MLS#11-486 $55,000 Ron Skrzysowski (570) 696-6551

NEW PRICING!!!

1 bedroom starting @ $690

‹ ‹ ‹ ‹ ‹

912 Lots & Acreage

44.59 ACRES

Deposit With Good Credit.

Featuring:

912 Lots & Acreage

DURYEA

& $250 Off Security

Efficiencies available @30% of income

Income & Commercial Properties

EXETER

$250 Off 1st Months Rent,

IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE

909

DALLAS WANTED TO BUY

5 or more acres in the Dallas School District. Not to be divided - to build our dream home. 570-510-5226 570-675-9340

WE BUY HOMES 570-956-2385 Any Situation

PLYMOUTH FURNISHED APARTMENT FOR RENT

utilities all paid Call 570-881-0636 WILKES-BARRE

FULLY FURNISHED 1 BEDROOM APT.

ŠShort or long term ŠExcellent Neighborhood ŠPriv. Tenant Parking Š$595 includes all utilities. No pets. (570) 822-9697

WYOMING

1 bedroom, 2nd floor. No pets. Drug free. Non smoking. Proof of employment & background check. Heat & hot water provided. $600/month + 1 month security. Call (570) 693-2415 Leave message.

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

ASHLEY

Quiet 2nd floor, 2 bedroom. Laundry, off street parking w/ carport. Large yard. Includes water, sewer & garbage. References, 1st, last + security required. $550/ month 570-735-8730 570-332-8080

DALLAS

2 bedroom, 1st floor, off-street parking. Call 570-407-0365

DALLAS

2 bedroom. 2 story. 1.5 bath. Fridge & stove. Laundry hook up. Private entrance. Deck. Off street parking for 2 cars. No pets. 1 year lease. Credit check & references required. $660/month. 570-696-0842 Leave message.

DALLAS

Newberry Estates Furnished 3 bedroom, 2 bath completely redone condominium. Rent includes maintenance fee and country club fee. $1500 per mo. NO PETS. Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565

DALLAS TWP

CONDO FOR LEASE:

$1,800. 2 bedroom/ 2 Bath. Call Us to discuss our great Amenity & Maintenance program! Call 570-674-5278

DALLAS

Š Large 3 bedroom 2nd floor. Š Remodeled 1st floor, 1.5 bedrooms. Off street parking. Call Joe 570-881-2517 Dallas, Pa. MEADOWS APARTMENTS 220 Lake St. Housing for the elderly & mobility impaired; all utilities included. Federally subsidized program. Extremely low income persons encouraged to apply. Income less than $12,250. 570-675-6936, 8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

DUPONT

Beautiful, totally renovated multi floor 6 room apartment. Large bedroom plus 2 smaller bedrooms, new appliances, partially furnished. Window treatments included. Off street parking, easy access to 1-81 airport & casino. Tranquil neighborhood. No smoking. $700 month plus utilities PLUS security. 570-762-8265

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

FORTY FORT

103 River St 2nd floor, 1 bedroom, living room, appliances. Parking. $550, heat & water included. Tenant pays electric. Pet Friendly. Call 570-814-9700

FORTY FORT

All utilities included. Clean 4 room 2nd floor. Appliances. Covered parking. Non smoking, no pets. Starting at $635/month. 570-714-2017


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

FORTY FORT

AMERICA REALTY RENTALS “OVER 2 GENERATIONS OF MANAGED SERVICE” Soon to be available remodeled 1 bedroom, appliances, laundry. Starting @ $500 + utilities. EMPLOYMENT VERIFICATION, NO SMOKING OR PETS. 2 YEAR SAME RENT/LEASES 288-1422

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

FORTY FORT Large, modern

2 bedroom, 2nd floor apartment. Eat in kitchen with all appliances. Spacious living room, bath, a/c units, laundry, off street parking. Great location. No pets or smoking. $575 + utilities. Call 570-714-9234

FORTY FORT Newly renovated,

great neighborhood. 2nd floor. Non smoking. Oak floors, new carpet in master bedroom. new windows, 4 paddle fans, bath with shower. Stove & fridge, dishwasher. Off street parking, coin- op laundry. $600 + gas, electric & water. References required, no pets 570-779-4609 or 570-407-3991

FORTY FORT

Winterset Estates Studio Apartment New & charming. $600 per month + security & references required. Absolutely no pets. Call 570-814-1316

FORTY-FORT

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

KINGSTON

2 Apartments Available

2 bedrooms. Private parking. Quiet neighborhood, near colleges. $600 & $625/month + utilities, 1 month rent & security. AVAILABLE NOW! 570-656-7125

KINGSTON

2 bedroom, 1 bath. $600. Water included. New tile, carpet, dishwasher, garbage disposal, Washer/Dryer hookup - Large yard Double Security Facebook us at BOVO Rentals 570-328-9984

KINGSTON

2nd floor large studio apartment. All utilities paid by landlord. Free use of washer/dryer. No smoking. No pets. 1st months rent, security & 1 year lease. $525/month. Section 8 approved. 570-331-7016 Days or 288-6764 Night

KINGSTON

3rd floor - living room, eat in kitchen. Heat included. One bedroom & spare room. Close to town & Kingston Corners. $575/month 631-821-8600 x103

KINGSTON

795 Rutter Ave Screened porch, kitchen downstairs, upstairs living room, bedroom & bathroom. $575/month + utilities. No pets. 570-417-6729

KINGSTON

Beautiful 1st floor in great neighborhood. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, newly remodeled. W/d hookup, stove, dishwasher, microwave included. All hardwood flooring except tile in kitchen and bathroom. NO PETS. $695/mo + utilities & security deposit Call Scott at 714-2431 ext. 137

KINGSTON

Newly remodeled, 2nd & 3rd floor, 2 bedroom, appliances included, central air, off street parking. $525 + utilities. No pets. Call 570-287-9631 or 570-696-3936

MURRAY ST. Large, ultra modern 1 bedroom. Extra room for office. A/C, hardwood floors throughout. Washer / dryer. Private off street parking. Fully equipped kitchen & designer bathroom. No pets. $700 570-881-4993

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

GLEN LYON

Nice first floor apartment. 2 bedroom. Stove, fridge, washer & dryer. Lots of storage space. $650. Heat included. Call 570-333-4567

1st floor, 4 room, renovated apartment. Gas or electric heat. Washer/ dryer hook up. Off street parking. Application process required. $375 per month + utilities & security. 570-714-1296

HANOVER TWP. Out of flood zone.

Beautiful 2nd floor, 3 bedroom. Wall to wall carpet, large living room & kitchen, 2nd floor porch with spectacular views, washer/ dryer hookup. Garbage & sewer included. $650/ month + utilities & security. 570-592-4133

HARVEYS LAKE

1 bedroom, LAKE FRONT apartments. Wall to wall, appliances, lake rights, off street parking. No Pets. Lease, security & references. 570-639-5920

JENKINS TOWNSHIP W ! ELL INSULATED LOW COST UTILITIES!

Nice, 2nd floor, 5 rooms. Includes: gas range, ceiling fans, knotty pine enclosed porch, OSP. $400 + utilities (gas heat), security & references. Non smoking. 655-1907 or 570-814-2297

JENKINS TWP. 3rd floor, 1 bed-

room. All utilities included. Refrigerator & stove. No pets. Available end of September $600 month. call 570-655-0539

KINGSTON

1 bedroom. Available now. $450 + security & electric. Call (570) 829-0847

KINGSTON 131 S. Maple Ave.

4 room apartment 2nd floor. Heat & hot water included. Coin Laundry. Off street parking. No pets/smoking. $645 570-288-5600 or 570-479-0486

Find Your Ideal Employee! Place an ad and end the search! 570-829-7130 ask for an employment specialist

KINGSTON

KINGSTON

Rear 23 E Vaughn 2 bedroom, off street parking, $450 per month + utilities. Security deposit required. NO PETS. AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 570-690-0564 or 570-823-7564

KINGSTON

Remodeled 2 bedroom, dining & living room, off street parking. All new appliances. $600/ month + utilities, security & references. Water & sewer included. Absolutely No Pets. Call 570-239-7770

941

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 29G Apartments/ Unfurnished

HOUSING

Available Immediately ASK ABOUT OUR DISCOUNT PROGRAM...

2222

KINGSTON

1 BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM 3 BEDROOM

WILKES-BARRE

2 BEDROOMS 1st & 2nd floor

WILKES-BARRE

2 BEDROOM Modern, near Mohegan Sun All Apartments Include: APPLIANCES MAINTENANCE SEWER FEES

Ask about our good credit discount!

570-899-3407 Tina Randazzo Property Mgr

LARKSVILLE

3 bedroom, 1 bath. $775. With discount. All new hardwood floors and tile. New cabinets / bathroom. Dishwasher, garbage disposal. Washer/dryer hookup. Off street parking. Facebook us at BOVO Rentals 570-328-9984

LARKSVILLE

Spacious 2nd floor, 3 bedroom. Laundry hook-up. Backyard. $495/month + utilities & security. Call (570) 282-0127

KINGSTON

SDK GREEN ACRES HOMES 11 Holiday Drive

Kingston “A Place To Call Home” Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts 3 Bedroom Townhomes Gas heat included

FREE

24hr on-site Gym Community Room Swimming Pool Maintenance FREE Controlled Access Patio/Balcony and much more... Call Today or stop by for a tour! 570-288-9019

KINGSTON

Spacious 3rd floor, 2 bedrooms, porch, off street parking. Heat & water included. New fridge & stove. $550 + security.Call 570-287-5282

KINGSTON West Bennett St

1st floor 1 bedroom. Kitchen, living room, bath. Water & sewer included. $450 + utilities, security & lease. 570-675-4938

KINGSTON

Wyoming Avenue 2nd floor, 1 bedroom, appliances, laundry room. $460 + electric. Security & references. 570-696-1600

Apartments/ Unfurnished

NANTICOKE

1st floor, 1 bedroom. Heat, water, garbage & sewage included. Off street parking. All appliances included. $530 + security. Call 570-406-5221

NANTICOKE

2 bedroom, 1st floor. Large eat in kitchen, fridge, electric stove, large living room, w/w carpeting, master bedroom with custom built in furniture. Ample closet space. Front/back porches, off street parking, laundry room available. No dogs, smoking, water, sewer, garbage paid. $575/mo + gas, electric, security, lease, credit, background check. Call (570)696-3596 NANTICOKE 2nd Floor apartment for a tenant who wants the best. Bedroom, living room, kitchen & bath. Brand new. Washer/dryer hookup, air conditioned. No smoking or pets. 2 year lease, all utilities by tenant. Sewer & garbage included. Security, first & last month’s rent required. $440.00 570-735-5185

NANTICOKE

347 Hanover St. 1 bedroom, 1st floor, wall to wall carpet, eat-in kitchen with appliances, washer /dryer hook up, porch & shared yard. $400 + utilities & security. Call 570-814-1356

NANTICOKE

LARKSVILLE

Very clean, 1st floor 3 Bedroom with modern bath and kitchen. New flooring, large closets. Off Street Parking, fenced yard. Water & garbage included. Tenant pays electric & gas service. $575/month. No pets. One year lease. 570-301-7723

LUZERNE

1 bedroom, wall to wall, off-street parking, coin laundry, water, sewer & garbage included. $495/ month + security & lease. HUD accepted. Call 570-687-6216 or 570-954-0727

LUZERNE 41 Mill Street

1st floor, 2 bedroom, large bath with shower, stove, refrigerator and dishwasher, washer/dryer hookup, 1 car attached garage. Fieldstone working fireplace. Non Smoking. Too many extras to mention, call for more details. $700 + utilities. 570-288-3438 Midtowne Apartments 100 E. 6th Street, Wyoming PA 18644

Housing for

Extremely Low & Very Low Income

Elderly, Handicapped & disabled. 570-693-4256 ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED Rents based on income. Managed by EEI

KINGSTON

S. Thomas Ave. 2 bedroom, 2nd floor. Nice area. Stove & fridge. $575 per month + utilities. No pets. Call (570) 760-8684

941

MOOSIC

4 rooms, 2nd floor, heat, water, sewer included. $695. Security /references 570-457-7854

MOUNTAIN TOP 1 Bedroom apart-

ments for elderly, disabled. Rents based on 30% of ADJ gross income. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. TTY711 or 570-474-5010 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer.

Mountain Top

1st floor. 1 or 2 bedrooms. Laundry, facilities, porch. No pets. $600/month + utilities, security, lease & credit check. (570) 868-6503

MOUNTAIN TOP WOODBRYN 1 & 2 Bedroom.

No pets. Rents based on income start at $405 & $440. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. 570-474-5010 TTY711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Immediate Opennings!

NANTICOKE

1, 2, OR 3 BEDROOMS AVAILABLE 1st month deposit and rent a must. 516-216-3539 Leave message.

603 Hanover St 2nd floor, 1 bedroom. No pets. $550 + security, utilities & lease. Photos available. Call 570-542-5330

NANTICOKE APT FOR immediRENT Available

ately, 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, all appliances provided, washer/dryer on premises, off-street parking, Pets Negotiable. Garbage included. Tenant responsible for all other utilities. Quiet neighborhood, enclosed porch with mountain view. Wall-to_wall carpet, freshly painted. 1 Year lease, background/credit check + references. $550/ mo 1st month plus security., Call (718) 510-7059 after 9:00 a.m.

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

NANTICOKE

FRONT STREET 2 bedroom, 1st floor unit $550/month. Owner pays gas, water, sewer, garbage. Tenant pays electric. Security deposit, application, credit check required. No pets. Agent, Wendy 570-336-6162

KILLIAN REAL ESTATE 570-752-1300

NANTICOKE

Spacious 2 bedroom apartment. Living room, kitchen, pantry, washer/ dryer. No pets. Sewer & trash included. $485/mos. 570-262-5399

OLD FORGE

Get out of the flood zone! 4 rooms with basement. All appliances. Off street parking. Fresh paint & new carpet. $575 per month includes heat, water & sewage. No pets. No smoking. DAYTIME

570-760-9144 EVENING

570-457-8983

PITTSTON bedroom.

1 Off street parking for 1 vehicle. Washer dryer hookup. Fridge & stove. Non smoking. $425 + utilities, security & references. Call 570-430-3804

PITTSTON

Š2 bedroom, 1st & 2nd floor, $475. Š2 bedroom, 2nd floor, $550. Š3 bedroom, 1st & 2nd floor, $650. Š3 bedroom, 2nd floor, $575. Call Bernie 888-244-2714

ROTHSTEIN REALTORS 570-288-7594

PITTSTON

Modern 2 bedroom, 2nd floor. Includes appliances. Laundry hookup. Heated garage, off street parking. Heat, sewer, water & garbage included. $695/mos. + security & lease. No smoking/pets. 570-430-0123

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

PITTSTON

Out Of Flood. 4 room apt. Laundry room, enclosed porch, off street parking, newly painted. Heat, water & hot water included. $650/month. Security required. Call 570-954-7849

PITTSTON TWP.

Large 3 bedroom in great location. No pets. Non smoking. Off-street parking. Includes water & sewer. $800 + electric, security & last month. 570-237-6000

PITTSTONHUGHESTOWN Completely remod-

eled, modern 2 bedroom apt. Lots of closet space, with new tile floor and carpets. Includes stove, refrigerator, washer, dryer, gas heat, nice yard and neighborhood, no pets. $600/month $1000 deposit. 570-479-6722

PLAINS TOWNSHIP This Tudor Bi-Level

offers 3 bedrooms and tile bath with rear deck and storage shed plus a finished basement with family room ,fireplace, ¾ bath & den or 4th bedroom and one car garage in lower level. Out of Flood with great back yard. Lease, security, no pets, references $ 875.00 plus utilities. Call 570-760-6769 or 570-287-8151

PLYMOUTH

49 Center Ave. rear 1st floor, Combination kitchen, living room, bedroom, bath. Fridge, range, washer dryer hookup. Off street parking. Heat, hot water & sewage paid. $520 + security & References. Call 570-779-2257

SCRANTON

GREEN RIDGE SECTION Large 1 bedroom. Heat included. Bathroom, eat in kitchen, living room. Off street parking. $650/month (631) 821-8600 x103

SWOYERSVILLE

Modern 1 bedroom, 1st floor. Quiet area. Appliances, coin-op laundry, off street parking. Gas heat, no pets. $430, water/sewer included. Security & references. Call 570-239-7770

WARRIOR RUN

1 bedroom, water & sewer included, stove, fridge, $400 plus security & reference. Call 570-301-8200

WEST PITTSTON 1st floor, 1 bedroom.

Laundry room with washer & dryer. All appliances. Call 570-430-3095

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

WEST PITTSTON

1st floor, 1 bedroom. Stove, refrigerator, microwave included. Washer/dryer hook up. Off street parking. $550 per month + security & references. No pets Call (570) 388-4242

WEST PITTSTON

2 Apartments Available

1st floor. 1 bedroom. Carport. $525/mos + security. Available November 1 2nd floor. 1 bedroom. $490/mos + security. Available immediately. No pets, heat & water included for both. Not in flood zone. Call after 6pm. 570-333-5499

WEST PITTSTON

Gorgeous pet friendly 2 bedroom apartment. $700 + first / last, utilities & security. Call 570-430-3100

WEST PITTSTON

Spacious 1 bedroom apartment, 2nd floor. Recently renovated. Gas heat - new, efficient furnace. Sewer & appliances included. Off street parking. Security. No pets. $500 + utilities. 570-586-0417 West Pittston, Pa. GARDEN VILLAGE APARTMENTS 221 Fremont St. Housing for the elderly & mobility impaired; all utilities included. Federally subsidized program. Extremely low income persons encouraged to apply. Income less than $12,250. 570-655-6555, 8 am-4 pm, Monday-Friday. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

WEST WYOMING

934 SHOEMAKER AVE

3 bedrooms, wall to wall carpet, gas heat, laundry hookup, private driveway. No Pets. $525 + utilities. Security & references. 570-693-4226

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WHITE HAVEN LARGE 1 BEDROOM WITH DEN ON 1/2 ACRE View specifics on Craig’s List under “Poconos-apts housing” $700/mo. belle50212006 @yahoo.com

WILKES-BARRE

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms - Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!! www.mayflower crossing.com Certain Restrictions Apply*

WILKES-BARRE / KINGSTON Efficiency 1 & 2

bedrooms. Includes all utilities, parking, laundry. No pets. From $390. Lease, security & references. 570-970-0847

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

WILKES-BARRE

1 bedroom. Heat & hot water included, $550 month + Security required 570-237-5397

WILKES-BARRE

123 GEORGE AVE 2nd floor, 2 bedroom. Stove, dishwasher, washer/ dryer hook up. $550 per month + utilities & security. No pets, lease, credit check, references. 570-472-9494

WILKES-BARRE

2 & 3 bedroom, 1 bath apartments near General Hospital $525 & $575 + utilities, first, last & security. No pets. 570-821-0463 570-417-3427

WILKES-BARRE 2nd floor, 1 bed-

room, refrigerator & stove included. Off street parking. $485 month + security, references & utilities.

Call 570-822-8671

WILKES-BARRE 3 bedroom, 1/2

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE NORTH 723 N. Main St.

2nd floor, 2 bedroom, w/w carpet, , water included. Tenant pays electric No pets. $450 plus security. Call 570-814-1356

WILKES-BARRE NORTH

807 N. Washington 2 bedrooms, 2nd floor. Wall to wall carpeting. Eat in kitchen with appliances. Off street parking - 2 cars. Coin op laundry. All utilities included. $650 / month + security. No pets. 570-814-1356

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH 2nd floor, 2

bedroom, big living room, off-street parking, washer /dryer hook-up. $500 + utilities & security deposit. 570-690-7721

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH SECURE BUILDINGS 1 & 2 bedroom

apartments. Starting at $440 and up. References required. Section 8 ok. 570-332-5723 WILKES-BARRE Š1 bedroom water included Š2 bedroom water included Š1 bedroom efficiency water included Š2 bedroom single family Š3 bedroom single family HANOVER Š4 bedroom large affordable Š2 bedroom NANTICOKE Š2 bedroom large, water included PITTSTON ŠLarge 1 bedroom water included PLAINS Š1 bedroom water included KINGSTON Š3 Bedroom Half Double McDermott & McDermott Real Estate Inc. Property Management 570-821-1650 (direct line) Mon-Fri. 8-7pm Sat. 8-noon

WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH

Must see! 1 bedroom, study, off street parking, laundry. Includes heat and hot water, hardwood floors, appliances, Trash removal. $575/mo Call (570)821-5599

3 bedroom townhouse style. Washer/dryer hook up. Full basement. Tenant pays utilities. $475/month + security. Fenced backyard. 570-824-4266

WILKES-BARRE

WYOMING

HEIGHTS Townhouse type apartments. 2 bedrooms, Stove , Fridge, washer/ dryer hookup. Offstreet parking. Utilities by tenant. No Pets. $495/month 570-825-8355 6 to 8 pm ONLY

1 bedroom apartment. Wall to wall carpet. Appliances furnished. Coin op laundry. Heat, water & sewer included. $550/month. Call 570-687-6216 or 570-954-0727

WILKES-BARRE

1 bedroom, 2nd floor. All utilities incl. $595/mo + security. No Pets. (570) 762-7522

LAFAYETTE GARDENS

SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR! 113 Edison St. Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom apartments available for immediate occupancy. Heat & hot water included. $625 Call Aileen at 570-822-7944

WILKES-BARRE LODGE Formerly The Travel Lodge 497 Kidder St., Wilkes-Barre Rooms Starting at: Daily $44.99 + tax Weekly $189.99 + tax Microwave, Refrigerator, WiFi, HBO 570-823-8881 www.Wilkes BarreLodge.com

WILKES-BARRE

Mayflower area, 2nd Floor, 1 bedroom with appliances. Nice apartment in attractive home. Sunny windows & decorative accents. Off street parking. No pets, no smoking. Includes hot water. $400 + utilities. 570-824-4743

Commercial Properties

WILKES-BARRE

Mayflower Section Rent with Option to buy 1 bedroom apartment available. Nice Area. Duplex (1 unit ready now). Easily convertible into a 6 room, 2 bath single when purchased. Carpeting, Hardwood, & some appliances included. 570-823-7587

double, 1.5 bath, gas heat, off-street parking, fenced in yard, excellent condition. $600/ month + utilities, references & security. No pets. Call 570-654-7992

WILKES-BARRE 447 S. Franklin St.

944

WYOMING

WYOMING

TOWNHOUSE

Carpet, tile bath, appliances, washer / dryer hookup, sewer, parking by front door. $600 + Utilities, Security & Lease. No smoking, no pets. 570-693-0695

Center City WB WE HAVE SPACE Come see us nowyou’ll be surprised! Affordable modern office space available at the Luzerne Bank Building on Public Square. Rents include heat, central air, utilities, trash removal and nightly cleaning - all without a sneaky CAM charge. Super fast internet available. Access parking at the new intermodal garage via our covered bridge. 300SF to 5000SF available. We can remodel to suit. Brokers protected. Call Jeff Pyros at 570-8228577 for details.

COMMERCIAL RETAIL SPACE

800 to 2400 sql. ft. available starting at $750/month

OFFICE SPACE

Bennett St. Luzerne 1100 to 1600 sq ft, 1st floor, off street parking. Call 570-283-3184

OFFICE SPACE

973-879-4730

DOLPHIN PLAZA

PITTSTON

Established Wilkes-Barred Shopping Center

Rte. 315 1,700 - 2,000 SF Office / Retail 4,500 SF Office Showroom, Warehouse Loading Dock Call 570-829-1206

FORTY FORT

1188 Wyoming Ave This unique 2,800 Sq Ft. interior (Circa 1879), features 10’ ceilings, large distinctive chandeliers as well as two fireplaces. Three french door entrances contribute to the interior’s light, bright atmosphere. Other features include: Š40 car, lighted parking area ŠHandicapped accessible entrance ŠCentral A/C ŠHardwood floors ŠA large carpeted open floor space. This building’s curb appeal is second to none. The signage is perfectly positioned on the 179 ft. front Over 15,000 vehicles pass daily 570-706-5308

FORTY FORT

Free standing building. Would be great for any commercial use. 1900 sq. ft. on the ground floor with an additional 800 sq. ft in finished lower level. Excellent location, only 1 block from North Cross Valley Expressway and one block from Wyoming Ave (route 11) Take advantage of this prime location for just $995 per month! 570-262-1131

OFFICE OR STORE NANTICOKE

1280 sq ft. 3 phase power, central air conditioning. Handicap accessible rest room. All utilities by tenant. Garbage included. $900 per month for a 5 year lease. 570-735-5064.

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

OFFICE SPACE 18 Pierce St

Kingston, PA Available Immediately, Off street parking. Security required. 2 room Suite $200/month,, 4 room Suite $500/month, includes utilities. 570-690-0564 570-823-7564

Find Your Ideal Employee! Place an ad and end the search! 570-829-7130 ask for an employment specialist 944

Commercia Propertie

HI--N’--DRI! FORTY FORT...PRIME

FEATURES: • High Traffic, C1 Zoned. • Commercial or Professional • PLENTY OF PARKING

328 Kennedy Blvd. Modern medical space, labor & industry approved, ADA throughout, 2 doctor offices plus 4 exam rooms, xray and reception and breakrooms. Could be used for any business purpose. Will remodel to suit. For lease $2,200/MO. Also available for sale MLS #11-751 Call Charlie VM 101

PITTSTON COOPERS CO-OP

Lease Space Available, Light manufacturing, warehouse, office, includes all utilities with free parking. I will save you money!

RETAIL SPACE FORTY FORT

Sublet in high traffic West Side area. 2,000SF +/$1,000/month includes all utilities. Great retail location! Please call The Flower Warehouse at 570-714-2570

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130 RETAIL SPACE

Ideal for Upholstering & Furniture Repair

1,600sf space. Next to Jacko’s Antiques, Rt. 11, Larksville. Private entrance. All utilities paid by occupant. Nice locations, lots of traffic. 570-855-7197 570-328-3428

315 PLAZA

900 & 2400 SF Dental Office direct visibility to Route 315 between Leggios & Pic-ADeli. 750 & 1750 SF also available. Near 81 & Cross Valley. 570-829-1206

WAREHOUSE / COMMERCIAL 2,275 Sq. Ft. Build-

ing in Wilkes-Barre. Formerly used as a commissary. Loading dock, plenty of parking. Call 570-814-8106

(STUCCO LOOK)

• CENTRAL AIR (optional)

Call (570) 288-2195

Commercial Properties

WILKES-BARRE

Lease this freestanding building for an AFFORDABLE monthly rent. Totally renovated & ready to occupy. Offices, conference room, work stations, kit and more. Ample parking and handicap access. $1,750/ month. MLS 11-419 Call Judy Rice 5701-714-9230

947

Garages

HANOVER TWP.

LARGE HIGH TRAFFIC AUTO GARAGE Power lift, detail bay, lots of space. Recently renovated! $1,200 per month + first & last. 570-332-8922

950

Half Doubles

GLEN LYON

Renovated apartment. Washer/dryer hook up. Off street parking. New furnace. Available November 1st. application process required. $500 per month + utilities & security. Call 570-714-1296

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

HANOVER TWP.

Completely remodeled 2 bedroom, 1 bath, wall to wall carpet. Stove, washer/dryer hook up. Off street parking. $750/month + first, last & security. Includes water, sewer & trash. No pets. No smoking. References & credit check. 570-824-3223 269-519-2634 Leave Message

KINGSTON

Half Double- 5 bedroom, 1 Bath $875 with discount. All new carpet, dishwasher, garbage disposal, appliances, Large Kitchen, new cabinets, Washer/dryer hookup, Double Security. Facebook us @ BOVO Rentals 570-328-9984

3 bedroom, 1 bath half double, Freshly cleaned & painted. Tenant pays all utilities including sewer. $550 plus security. Call (570) 332-5723

LARKSVILLE

3 bedrooms, wall to wall carpeting, washer/ dryer hookup, stove, dishwasher, finished basement, garage, sewer & garbage included. $700 + utilities & security. No pets. 570-7442789 or 256-3256

PLYMOUTH

Half double. Living room, dining room, kitchen. 2 bedrooms, wall to wall carpeting, washer/ dryer hookup. Off street parking. $475 / month + utilities, 1 month security & references. Call Call 570-287-5782 or 570-709-2192

W. PITTSTON/ JENKINS TWP 2 bedroom 1/2 dou-

ble. Tile kitchen & bath. Off street parking. $600 + utilities. 570-237-2076

WILKES-BARRE

46 Waller St. 3 bedrooms, newly renovated,Yard carpet, appliances, NO PETS! Security, , lease, $675 + utilities 570-592-1328 570-332-1216

WILKES-BARRE 549 S. Main St.

3 bedrooms, kitchen,

room, dining WAREHOUSE/LIGHT living room, basement. month. No pets. Call 570-824-4899 MANUFACTURING $500 or 570-239-4340 OFFICE SPACE WILKES-BARRE HEIGHTS 173 Almond Lane 3 Bedrooms, new PITTSTON carpet & paint. Main St.

12,000 sq. ft. building in downtown location. Warehouse with light manufacturing. Building with some office space. Entire building for lease or will sub-divide. MLS #10-1074 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

STONE/DRIVET, 2-TONE

• NEW ROOF:

944

LARKSVILLE

• NEW EXTERIOR: CULTERED

MARCH THIS YEAR

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Hazleton St. Modern office for lease only. Visible from Rt309 & I-81 with easy access to both. Adaptable to many uses. Tenant pays utilities. $5,000/month Contact Judy Rice 714-9230 MLS# 11-851

EXETER LOCATION Newly remodeled partially furnished. 200 sf. All utilities included, except phone. $300/month Lease. Call 570-602-1550

• 2 Modern offices; 1 new ‘09

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP

Commercial Properties

OFFICE SPACE ASHLEY

ZION GROVE

Newer log home in gated community. Cathedral ceiling in living room & kitchen. Propane free standing stove. Master suite with loft. Guest suite with separate entrance. Large rec room over 2 car garage. 3 bedrooms/3 baths. 5 miles from Humboldt Ind. Park. 1 year lease required. $1,400/mo. Call Debbie 570-474-6307 or 570-715-7746

944

Find Your Ideal Employee! Place an ad and end the search! 570-829-7130 ask for an employment specialist

Shared yard. Front porch. Full basement. Eat-in kitchen with appliances. No pets. $595 + utilities & security. Call 570-814-1356

WILKES-BARRE

HEIGHTS 2.5 bedrooms, new stove, carpeted, hook ups, gas heat, no pets. $525 per month + utilities & $350 security. 570-824-8786

Boat? Car? Truck? Motorcycle? Airplane? Whatever it is, sell it with a Classified ad. 570-829-7130


PAGE 30G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

15,000 SF Commercial Bldg w/variety of uses. 4.6 acre lot w/plenty of pkg. MLS#10-1110 JUDY 714-9230

Prime location former Convention Hall. Wonderful opportunity for professional offices. Pkg for 100+ cars. Zoned Hwy Business. MLS#11-3654 MARGY SIMMS 6960891

3.895 Acres on W-B Blvd- 700 front feet provides excellent exposure. Utilities, access road, possible KOZ opportunity. MLS#111346 VIRGINIA ROSE 2889371

Creative business investment opportunity. 10,000 SF bldg on 3 acres. MLS#11-3121 SUSAN LONGO 714-9264

Outstanding brick bldg! Parking for 7-10 cars. MLS#08-2790 PEG 714-9247

5700 SF in Prime downtown location. Suitable for office/residence. Full basement, private parking, Zoned C3. MLS#11-345 MARGY 696-0891

Completely redone 3 story building w/finished LL. Zoned Commercial. MLS#11-1172 JIM 715-9323

Great investment - Turn key gas station w/convenient mart. Prime location. MLS#11-1810 GERI 696-0888

6 residential units, 3 commercial retail spaces & a garage. Plenty of parking! MLS#10-3569 JILL 696-0875

Wonderful opportunity for commercial bldg w/ice cream stand, storefront & apt. Also storage bldg. MLS#11-554 CORINE 715-9321 or MATT 714-9229

Multi-purpose bldg w/2 Great location on busy Rte Commercial Bdg located on OSP, storefront w/warehouse & busy Rte 309. 4000 SF of space. Off 309! Office Bldg w/1500 SF of space apts, garages. MLS#11-2238 & 2270 SF warehouse. MLS#11-2094 ANDY 714-9225 or JUDY 714-9230 street pkg. MLS#11-2096 ANITA REBER 788-7501 ANITA REBER 788-7501

2-Story Masonry bldg. Ideal for loft apts or sm mfg business. Pkg for 36. MLS#11-741 MIKE J 970-1100

3 BR, Ranch w/gar+ Unique Building attached bldg. Zoned HWY COMM. Ideal May be converted to suit your needs for office or sm business. MLS#10-4367 w/zoning approval. MLS#11-302 RAE 714-9234

DAVID 970-1117

Multi-Purpose Bldg Great investment! 2 bldgs zoned commercial. Convenient location on State St - Adjacent lot 1 consists of retail space & apts, the Gas/Service Station w/3 bays & office. available. MLS#10-4590 MLS#10-467 other is a 2-story home. MLS#10-4056 MARGY 696-0891 or MIKE J 970-1100 Donna Santoroski 788-7504 MIKE JOHNSON

Move-in ready. Use the entire bldg or rent space out. Ten offices, 3 baths, off street pkg. MLS#11-995 TRACEY 696-0723 or JUDY 714-9230

High traffic Route 11 Established turn-key w/6000 SF Showroom/Garage, & restaurant w/2 apts. Business & building priced to sell! MLS#11-130 Apt above. MLS#11-2106 ANITA REBER 788-7501 ANDY 714-9225

Prime Commercial location - 123x120 lot zoned B-3 Hwy. High traffic area. MLS#11-1029 RAE 714-9234

4 Sty brick office bldg, more Prime location - 8000 SF multi-use bldg. 1st flr office/commercial than half rented. High traffic area. 2 lots included for pkg. MLS#11-1045 space & 2 apts on 2nd flr. MLS#11-508 ANDY 714-9225 or MARGY 696-0891 RHEA SIMMS 696-6677

Prime location ZONED HWY COMMERCIAL- 4 BR Cape Cod on 100x556 lot. MLS#11-229 RAE 714-9234

Great corner property. Auto repair & body Ranch style home includes 2990SF shop w/state certified paint booth. Commercial space. MLS#11-459 2nd flr storage. MLS#11-2842 LISA 715-9335 ANDY 714-9225

900 SF Commercial space on Great Professional Building 1st flr. 900 SF 2 BR apt on 2nd flr. for your business. Zoned Commercial, Billboard also available to rent on bldg. Move-in condition. MLS#11-2313 MLS#10-4309 DEE FIELDS 788-7511 TINA 714-9251

Affordable bldg waiting for your business. 2 BR apt on 2nd flr. OSP. MLS#11-572 JUDY 714-9230

Join the other Professionals at 2800 SF Office bldg w/3 bay Lease this building Prime location on Prime Location 32,000SF, garage. Plenty of pkg. Visible from Rt w/nice offices, conference room & Kit. Memorial Hwy. Unique space-many 1900SF - 12 pkg spaces. MLS#09- this Class A Office Bldg w/Atrium. 4000SF 30+ parking, including trailer spaces available. Can be divided. MLS#11-2162 309 & 81. MLS#11-851 Ample parking. MLS#11-419 possibilities. Zoning B-2. MLS#11-669 3085 MLS#08-1305 JUDY RICE 714-9230 JUDY 714-9230 JUDY 714-9230 MARK 696-0724 MARGY 696-0891 VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371

DALLAS

Lovely 4 bedroom home nestled on 2 acres of land in a quiet, private setting. 2 story deck, above ground pool, large yard, private drive. Oil heat. Washer and dryer included. $1050 + security, utilities & references. Water and Sewer included. Call 570-675-7529

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified! DALLAS

NEWBERRY ESTATES

Carriage House fully furnished, 1 bedroom washer, dryer. Country club amenities included. No pets, no smokers. $945/month. 570-807-8669

953 Houses for Rent

DRUMS

SAND SPRINGS Golf Community 2400 sq. ft. Townhouse. Modern kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, 2 stall garage. 3 minutes to interstates 81 & 80. $1350 + utilities. Call 570-582-4575

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

953 Houses for Rent

EDWARDSVILLE

Very nice 4 room, vinyl sided half double. All new wall to wall carcarpeting. All win dows thermal pane -90% are brand new. new. Large spacious updated kitchen. Bath updated. All win dows have new mini blinds & new curtain rods. Steel insulated front & rear doors with dead bolts + storm doors. Economical gas heat. Your Your own driveway. driveway. Short distance to bus stop & shopshopping. Lease. $550/month + utiliutilities. 570-650-3803

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

953 Houses for Rent

HARVEY’S LAKE

Cute Cape Cod style, in beautiful setting, 2 miles off Harvey’s Lake. Sits on 9 acres with beautiful yard. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, w/d. $650 plus electric. Call Ron 570-881-8493

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

HARVEYS LAKE

WARDEN PLACE Smaller 2 bedroom house with lake rights. Stone fireplace with gas heat insert, knotty pine & carpets throughout. $750/month + some utilities & security. References a must. Call 570-639-5293

953 Houses for Rent

HUNLOCK CREEK

Exceptional 2 story 18 acre wooded private setting. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 2 car attached garage, large deck, full basement. Pets considered. Utilities by tenant. Showing by appointment. $1,500/month Call Dale for details 570-256-3343 Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141

KINGSTON

361 Reynolds Street 3 bedrooms. $750 per month + utilities. Security deposit required. NO PETS. AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 570-690-0564 or 570-823-7564

KINGSTON 54 Krych St.

Single: 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, gas heat, wall to wall, kitchen with stove & refrigerator. Quiet street. No pets. Not Section 8 approved. $675/mo. 570-288-6009

953 Houses for Rent

MOUNTAIN TOP

Rent to Own - Lease Option Purchase 5 bedroom 2 bath 3 story older home. Completely remodeled in + out! $1500 month with $500 month applied toward purchase. $245K up to 5 yrs. tj2isok@gmail.com

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

MOUNTAIN TOP WALDEN PARK

4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, gas heat, 2 car garage, nice living room & kitchen, large deck. $1,250 per month + utilities. No Pets. Proof of income required. Call (570) 678-7089

MOUNTAINTOP 3 bedrooms, 2

KINGSTON

Executive Home well maintained.

Newly remodeled. Front porch, foyer entrance, hardwood floors, living room, dining room, 4 bedrooms, 2 fireplaces, 2.5 baths, granite kitchen, sun room, basement with plenty of storage, no pets, no smoking. $1,600/month

570-472-1110 Nice Area

OFFICENTERS - Pierce St., Kingston

Professional Office Rentals

Full Service Leases • Custom Design • Renovations • Various Size Suites Available Medical, Legal, Commercial • Utilities • Parking • Janitorial Full Time Maintenance Staff Available

For Rental Information Call:

1-570-287-1161

LONG POND 2 STORY

FARMHOUSE 3 bedrooms, 1.5 bath. $600/month + utilities. No pets. Credit check & references. Seasonal campground swimming pool use. Lease, first & last month + security deposit required. Call (570) 646-2300 9am-5pm, M thru F

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

baths, large eat in kitchen. Garage. Huge deck overlooks woods. Washer/dryer, dishwasher, fridge, sewer & water included. Credit check. $1,200 + security, No pets, no smoking. Proof of income required. Call (570) 709-1288

NANTICOKE

Desirable Lexington Village Nanticoke, PA Many ranch style homes. 2 bedrooms 2 Free Months With A 2 Year Lease $795 + electric

SQUARE FOOT RE MANAGEMENT 866-873-0478

NANTICOKE

Single family home for rent. Three bedrooms, one bath, kitchen with all appliances including dishwasher, laundry room with washer and dryer included. Off street parking with Single Car / garage. $650 month + security deposit. Utilities by tenant. Call Monica Lessard

570-287-1196 Ext. 3182

953 Houses for Rent

POCONOS

Beautiful Chalet. 1,500 sq. ft., 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Easy access. Appliances included. Washer/ Dryer. Stone fireplace. Great school district. Hardwood floors. Available now. $1,250. Call 831-206-5758

Land for sale? Place an ad and SELL 570-829-7130

SHAVERTOWN Near Burger King

3 bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, 3 season room, hardwood floors, off street parking & gas heat. 1 year Lease for $900/month + 1 month security. Garbage, sewer, refrigerator, stove, washer/dryer & gas fireplace included. (570) 905-5647

THORNHURST

3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, appliances, attached garage. Full basement on 2 acres. No pets or smoking. $850/mo plus security 570-842-8786

WEST PITTSTON

Completely remodeled 2 story, 2 bedroom home with new kitchen, 1.5 bath rooms, all new stainless steel appliances, including refrigerator, stove, dishwasher, washer and dryer, new carpet tile and hardwood, paved driveway, electric heat, nice yard and neighborhood. No pets $1200. month $2000 security. 570-479-6722

953 Houses for Rent

953 Houses for Rent

959 Mobile Homes

WILKES-BARRE

DO YOU OWN A HOME THAT YOU'D LIKE TO RENT TO A QUALIFIED RENTER?

Pocono Raceway Campground

2 houses available #1. 3 bedroom, nice bathroom $650. #2. 4 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath. $700 Both have large kitchens, hardwood floors, Full basements, enclosed yards. All plus utilities, references & security. No pets. 570-766-1881

WILKES-BARRE

Clean, 2 bedroom, duplex. Stove, hookups, parking, yard. No pets/no smoking. $495 + utilities. Call 570-868-4444

I have immediate qualified renters looking for Homes or Townhomes to lease. Please contact me asap for details and areas, including Drums, Conyngham or Mountaintop areas. Dee Fields, Associate Broker 570-788-7511

deefieldsabroker@gmail.com

Looking to buy a

Looking for the right deal home? on an automobile? Place an ad here and let the Turn to classified. sellers know! It’s a showroom in print! 570-829-7130 Classified’s got the directions! 956 Miscellaneous

WILKES-BARRE/NORTH

Near General hospital. Single 3 bedrooms, appliances, gas heat, $540 + utilities. Call (570) 824-1431

PITTSTON

WYOMING

Beautiful 2 bedroom, 1 bath. A/C. All appliances included. New wall to wall carpet. Attached garage, off street parking, large yard with patio, in school zone. No pets. No smoking. Quiet Neighborhood. $1,100 + security & utilities. Call 570-237-5632

Find Your Ideal Employee! Place an ad and end the search! 570-829-7130 ask for an employment specialist

1.25 acres of land for lease. $3,500 per month with 300’ frontage on Route 315. Call Rhea Simms at 570-696-6677 for details

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! CELEBRATING 113 YEARS OF SERVICE Joseph Moore, CRB, Broker/Owner

LONG POND

2 MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT. 3 bedrooms. $500/month for each mobile home + utilities. No pets. Credit check & references. Seasonal campground swimming pool use. Lease, first & last month + security deposit required. Call (570) 646-2300 9am-5pm, M thru F

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified! 962

Rooms

KINGSTON HOUSE Nice, clean furnished room, starting at $315. Efficiency at $435 month furnished with all utilities included. Off street parking. 570-718-0331

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

SEDONA, AZ

7 night vacation at beautiful Los Abrigados Resort & Spa. Any week through January 31. $750 570-417-1212

Need to rent that Vacation property? Place an ad and get started! 570-829-7130 1898-2011

Nancy Judd, Assoc. Broker...............287-8276 Steve Shemo.......................................793-9449

BUY NOW BEFORE IT’S“TOO LATE”

134 PAGE AVENUE, KINGSTON Light industrial complex consisting of main building (8,417 s.f.) with offices & shop areas; clear-span warehouse (38’ x 144’); and pole building (38’ x 80’) on 1.16 acres. MLS#11-1320 JOE MOORE $299,000

837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston

33-37 TENER STREET, LUZERNE High Traffic - Good visibility. This 6,000 sq. ft. masonry building is clear span. Multiple uses - professional - commercial, etc. 18 storage/ warehouse units included. MLS#11-2787 JOE MOORE $325,000

716092

953 Houses for Rent


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 PAGE 31G

Leveraging the Power of the Internet!

How would you like to receive a weekly report showing who’s been searching for your home online? With Online Sellers Advantage you can! • OSA automatically keeps you up-to-date on both your house and local market conditions. •It’s an exclusive tool that distinguishes your property from competing listings. • OSA maximizes your homes exposure. • Only one real estate company has it, Prudential Poggi & Jones, REALTORS. Take the guesswork out of listing your home! Finding your dream home has F never been easier with Online Buyer Advantage! • OBA cconnects internet buyers with millions of listings. • You have access to local multiple multi-list services. • You can save favorites, receive regular updates, email alerts and much more. Just one more reason to choose Prudential Poggi & Jones, REALTORS!

TE A T S E L A AL RE I T N E D U PR ARE S G N I T LIS RE!

R E H W Y R EVE

Edmund H. Poggi, III President/Owner

CANADA

DREAM

NAL TERNATIO HOMES IN

COMMER

TM

C IA L

HG TV ’s

ese sites

Many of th

. PLUS! ther sites multiple o h it w s g n listi on: the Pru ID share our

Real rudential arch for P ate st le a You can se e /r l.com prudentia o .c te m lrealesta prudentia s.com ie rt e p lpro prudentia m PruRE.co om c y. lt erea

ng

perties usi

Estate pro

nchisees of Inc, operated fra owned and tial Financial, independently vices marks of Pruden through the registered ser are offered are es vic bol ser sym tate brokerage tial logo and the Rock Es al Re tial den tial, the Pru ities. Pruden its related ent ancial company. Pruden ial, Inc. and Fin dential Financ tes, Inc., a Prudential using Opportunity. © 2011 Pru Equal Ho l Estate Affilia

1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort, PA 18704 Phone: 570-283-9100 Fax: 570-283-9101 28 Carverton Road, Shavertown, PA 18708 Phone: 570-696-2600 Fax: 570-696-0677

Visit Our Website: www.poggi-jones.com

Prudential Financial, its related An iindependently Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential © 2011 P d ti l Fi i l IInc. and d it l t d entities. titi A d d tl owned and operated broker member of Prudential Need a Roommate? and Financial company. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc.Place andanitsadrelated entities, registered in many find one here! jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity. 570-829-7130


PAGE 32G

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

0.9% for24-36 m on ths a n d 1.9% for37 to 60 m on ths on a ll n e w A c c ord , CR-V , Fit, Od ys s e y, P ilot, a n d 2012 Civic m od e ls (e xc lud e s Hyb rid s ) G AS M ILEAG E 28 CITY/39 HW Y

$0 DO W N

2011 H on d a

2012 Hon d a

CIV IC E X

• M odel#FB2F8C J W • 140-hp,SO H C i-V TEC ® 4-c y linder engine • 5-s peed autom atic trans m is s ion • Bluetooth® † H ands FreeLink ® • Intelligent M ulti-Inform ation D is play (i-M ID ) • 160-w att A M /FM /C D audio s y s tem • U SB A udio Interfac e • O ne-Touc h Pow er M oonroof w ith Tilt Feature • R em ote Entry • Pow er W indow s /Loc k s /M irrors • M P3/ W indow s M edio® II A udio (W M A ) play bac k c apability • Ec o A s s is tTM s y s tem • A nti-loc k brak ing s y s tem (A BS) • D ual-s tage,m ultiplethres hold front airbags (SR S) • Front s ide airbags w ith pas s enger-s ide O c c upant Pos ition D etec tion Sy s tem (O PSD ) • Side c urtain airbags

A CCO RD L X

INI N S TOCK TO C K !

G AS M ILEAG E 16 CITY/22 HW Y

• M odel#C P2F3BEW • A uto • A ir • A M /FM /C D • 6 A ir Bags • PW • PL • C ruise

P IL O T L X

$

• M odel#Y F4H 2BEW • 250-hp, 3.5-Liter, 24-V alv e SO H C i-V TEC ® • V -6 Engine V ariable Torque M anagem ent® • 4 W heelD riv e Sy s tem (V TM -4® ) • A nti-Loc k Brak ing Sy s tem (A BS) • V ehic le Stability A s s is tTM (V SA ® ) w ith Trac tion C ontrol• Front and R ear A ir C onditioning • A M /FM /C D A udio Sy s tem w ith 7 Speak ers Inc luding Subw oofer 60/40 Split • Flat-Folding, Sliding and R ec lining 2nd-R ow Benc h Seat • 60/40 Split Flat-Folding 3rd-R ow Benc h Seat • D ual-Stage M ultiple-Thres hold Front A irbags (SR S) • Front Side A irbags w ith Pas s enger-Side O c c upant Pos ition D etec tion Sy s tem (O PD S), Three-R ow Side C urtain A irbags w ith R ollov er Sens or • Pow er W indow s /Loc k s /M irrors • R em ote Entry Sy s tem

225/ 225/M OO.**.**

**LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS , 3 6K THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $12,852.00

$0 DO W N

G AS M ILEAG E 21 C ITY/ 27 H W Y

$0 DO W N

2011 H on d a

$

305/ 305/M O.**** O . ****

2011 Hon d a

CR-V L X

• M odel#RE4H3B32 • 180-hp,DO HC i-V TEC ® 4-cylinder engine • 5-speed autom atic transm ission • RealTim eTM 4W D system • V ehicle Stability A ssistTM (V SA ® ) w ith traction control• A nti-lock braking system (A BS) • Dual-stage, m ultiple-threshold front airbags (SR5) • Front side airbags w ith passengerside O ccupant Position Detection System (O PDS) • Side curtain airbags w ith rollover sensor • C D Player • Pow er W indow s/Locks/M irrors • A /C

****LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS , 3 6K THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $16,901.50

$

239/ 239/M OO.*.*

*LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS , 3 6K THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $14,852.10

*BAS E D ON 2008-2009 E PA M IL E AGE E S T IM AT E S , RE F L E CT ING NE W E PA F UE L E CONOM Y M E T HODS BE GINNING W IT H 2008-2009 M ODE L S . US E F OR COM PARIS ON PURPOS E S ONL Y . DO NOT COM PARE T O M ODE L S BE F ORE 2008. Y OUR ACT UAL M IL E AGE W IL L VARY DE PE NDING ON HOW Y OU DRIVE AND M AINT AIN Y OUR VE HICL E . AL L OF F E RS E XPIRE 10/ 31/ 2011.

M A AT TT BU R N E H O N D A 1110 WYOMING AVE. • SCRANTON • 1-800-NEXT-HONDA w w w. M a t t B u r n e H o n d a . c o m

M A AT TT T B U UR RN N EE

H O ON N DD A A PR R EE - O W W N N EE DD

C EE N NT T EE R R

W e’ve E a rned o u r R epu ta tio n!

1) 2) 3) 4) 5)

E a ch Vehicle S erviced F irs t! ( If it do es n’t m eet o u r s ta nda rds ... It’s go ne!) H o nda C ertifica tio n... A s k... Its the bes t! A ll Vehicles F a irly, C o m petitively P riced! M u ltiple F ina ncing S o u rces fo r yo u r bes t ra te! B u rne F a m ily O w ned D ea lers hip fo r 83 Yea rs ! H o nda s ince 1977! C CAL AL LL :1-800-N :1-800-NEE X XTH TH O ON NDD A A SH SH OO PP AT AT WW WW WW ..MM ATTB ATTBUURRNNEE HH OONNDD AA. .CCOOMM 00 BUIC K C ENTURY SDN

$6,750

05 C H EV Y M A LIBU LS SD N B eige,61K M iles

N ow

$10,500

02 SUBA RU IM PREZA O /B 4W D S ilver,54K M iles

N ow

$11,500

03 DO DG E DA KO TA Q UA D C A B 4W D G ray,V 8,56K,W as $12,750

N ow

$12,750

06 C HEV Y TRA ILBLA ZER 4W D

S ilver,61K,W as $13,750

N ow

$13,750

09 SUBA RU IM PREZA A W D B lue,46K M iles

N ow

$15,950

08 NISSA N A LTIM A “S” SDN

W hite,13K M iles,W as $18,950 N ow

$17,750

04 SA A B 93 SEDA N

B lack,61K M iles

N avy,68K M iles

N ow

H O N D A ’S

99 H O N D A C IV IC C PE

B lue,77K M iles

$7,250

N ow

02 TO Y O TA HIG HLA NDER 4W D

N ow

IN S IGHT HYBRID

10 IN SIG H T EX B lue,21K M iles...........................N O W $18,950 10 IN SIG H T EX G ray,22K...................................N O W $18,950 10 IN SIG H T EX N A V I S ilver,9K......................N O W $19,950

CROS S TOUR 4W D

11 C RO SSTO UR EXL G ray,31K....................NO W $33,500

N avy,102K M iles

$10,500

N ow

03 HO NDA A C C O RD EXL V 6 SDN

07 ELEM 08 ELEM 08 ELEM 09 ELEM

EL EM EN T 4W D

EN T EX R ed,67K M iles.........................N O W EN T LX R ed,68K M iles.........................N O W EN T LX S ilver,56K...............................N O W EN T EX R ed,11K M iles.........................N O W

$15,750 $16,500 $16,950 $21,500

B lack,41K M iles,W as $13,950 N ow

$12,750

07 JEEP C O M PA SS LTD A W D Khaki,60K M iles

N ow

$13,950

07 FO RD EXPLO RER BA UER 4W D B row n

N ow

$16,950

10 TO Y O TA C A M RY LE SDN G old,28K M iles

N ow

$17,950

W hite,72K,W as $14,500

PIL OT 4W D

08 C IV IC 08 C IV IC 09 C IV IC 09 C IV IC 10 C IV IC 10 C IV IC

1.9%

36 m os

CIV IC

LX SD N G ray,36K................................N O W EX SD N W hite,41K,5 S peed...................N O W LX SD N G ray,25K................................N O W LX SD N R ed,21K................................N O W LX SD N S ilver,17K.............................N O W LXS SD N S ilver,16K...........................N O W

ACCORDS

06 A C C O RD LX SDN G old,37K.................................NO W 07 A C C O RD EX SDN G ray,51K..................................NO W 08 A C C O RD LXS C PE R ed,48K.......................................NO W 08 A C C O RD LXP SDN N avy,24K.............................NO W 08 A C C O RD LXS C PE B lack,33K,....................................NO W 07 A C C O RD EXL SDN B lack,35K.............................NO W 10 A C C O RD LX SDN S ilver,28K................................NO W 09 A C C O RD EX SDN S ilver,35K................................NO W 09 A C C O RD EX SDN S ilver,42K................................NO W 10 A C C O RD LX SDN W hite,19K................................NO W 09 A C C O RD EX SDN G reen,21K...............................NO W (2) 09 A C C O RD EX SDN B lack,19K.......................NO W 08 A C C O RD EXL SDN G ray,19K..............................NO W 09 A C C O RD EXL SDN B lack,21K.............................NO W 09 A C C O RD EXL SDN R ed,21K...............................NO W 10 A C C O RD EXL SDN W hite,25K............................NO W

$14,950 $15,950 $16,500 $16,750 $17,500 $17,750

N ow

10 PILO T LX S ilver,31K........................................NO W $24,500 09 PILO T EX W hite,46K.......................................NO W $24,750 09 PILO T EX B lack,34K........................................NO W $24,950

60 m os

$13,950 $16,750 $16,950 $17,500 $17,750 $18,500 $18,950 $18,950 $18,950 $19,500 $20,500 $20,500 $20,500 $21,500 $21,500 $22,500

$12,500

G ray,83K M iles,W as $11,950 N ow

S ilver,45K M iles

N ow

09 RIDG ELINE RTL B lack,25K........................NO W $27,950

06 C RV 06 C RV 07 C RV 09 C RV 08 C RV 08 C RV

CRV 4W D

EX S ilver,56K.............................................NO W EX M oss,31K............................................NO W EXL G old,78K...........................................NO W LX G reen,34K............................................NO W EXL R ed,63K............................................NO W EXLR ed,40K.............................................NO W

$13,250

W hite,56K M iles

N ow

B lack,56K M iles

07 DO DG E RA M 1500 Q UA D SLT 4X4

$16,750 $16,950 $17,950 $19,750 $20,950 $21,500

D isclosure:1.9% - 36 m os,2.9% - 60 m os thru A .H .F.C .W -A -C on C ertified A ccords.C ertified H onda’s have 1yr - 12k B asic W arranty.B alance of 7yr - 100K P ow ertrain W arranty from in-service date.

N ow

S ilver,61K,W as $17,950

N ow

$17,500

07 M A ZDA C X-7 TO URING A W D B lack,58K M iles

N ow

$17,950

$13,250

05 HO NDA C RV EX 4W D G ray,55K M iles

B row n,40K M iles

$14,950

$12,500

05 V O LV O S40I SDN

09 HY UNDA I SO NA TA G LS SDN N ow

$11,250

06 H Y U N D A I TU SC O N 4W D

08 HY UNDA I ELA NTRA G LS SDN N ow

$9,950

03 JEEP LIBERTY 4W D

B lue,42K M iles

RID GEL IN E 4W D

2.9%

$10,750

05 FO RD EXPLO RER BA UER 4X4

$11,950

08 PO NTIA C G 6 SDN

H O N D A C R V 4W D 02 EX,S ilver,98K $10,750

04 LX,G old,95K

G old,73K M iles,W as $13,500 N ow

$9,750

03 TO Y O TA C A M RY XLE SDN

N ow

$15,950

07 SUBA RU IM PREZA A W D

S ilver,39K,W as $17,950

N ow

$17,500

08 TO Y O TA TA C O M A C LUB C A B TRD 4X4

N avy,46K M iles,W as $26,500 N ow

$25,500

( (5 -1 -8 -8 -2 34 (5 57 70 0) )3 411 -11 4 40 00 0 • • 11 -8 80 00 0-8 82 22 2-2 211 11 0 0

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I N G A V E . • S C R A N T O N , PA

1 8509

w w w .m a ttb u rn e h o n d a .co m

on d a y - T

h u rs d a y 9 -8 : :0 0 0 • F rid i d a y 9 -5 &

S a tu rd a y 9 -3 :3 :3 0

Times Leader 10-09-2011  

The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 10-09

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