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The Times Leader timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE, PA

SPORTS SHOWCASE

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

Social media websites, such as Edmodo, are used by instructors to keep in touch with students in and out of class

Teachers like it A bruised and battered

By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins came up just short of advancing in the Calder Cup playoffs Saturday night following a 3-2 setback to the St. John’s IceCaps. The IceCaps took the best-of-seven Eastern Conference semifinal 4-3 and will now face the Norfolk Admirals in the American Hockey League’s version of the Final Four. 1C

NBA PLAYOFFS

CELTICS 92 76ERS 91

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

IL BASEBALL

Pittston Area High School teacher Sal Carroll shows his psychology class page on Edmodo, a social media site for academic use that mirrors Facebook in many of its functions.

SWB YANKS 3 BULLS 2

Technology becomes a friend of learning

AMERICAN LEAGUE

By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

NATIONAL LEAGUE

PADRES 2 PHILLIES 1

INSIDE A NEWS: Local 3A Nation & World 5A Obituaries 10A, 11A B PEOPLE: 1B Birthdays 6B C SPORTS: 1C Outdoors 12C D BUSINESS: 1D E VIEWS: 1E Editorials 3E F ETC: 1F Puzzles 2F Books 5F G CLASSIFIED: 1G

WEATHER MacKenzie Sheehy Partly sunny. Afternoon rain. High 77, low 55. Details, Page 14C

Psychology teacher Sal Carroll’s classroom extends beyond its four walls inside Pittston Area High School. Carroll regularly uses a social media website called Edmodo, which is designed to look and function like Facebook, to connect with his students in and out of class. Through the site he can post the week’s lesson plan and assignments and to get in touch with students through messages. “I could send messages to kids at the start of the day or at the end of a weekend to give them a reminder about assignments,” he said. “That’s one of the biggest benefits; to get in touch with them when they’re not in front of you in the classroom.” Carroll is hardly alone in harnessing the educational potential of social media, which allows today’s students and teachers to jack into any number of networks from nearly anywhere, nearly any time. Public school officials in Northeastern Pennsylvania and across the nation are struggling to use social media to its

09815 10077

Luzerne County’s unionized detectives fare well in compensation and time off compared to peers in the 11 other similarly sized, thirdclass counties in the state, a review shows. Detective salaries range from $50,300 to $95,532 in Luzerne County. The top end is lower in nine other third-class counties, where salaries max out between $55,000 and $72,983, according to a Times Leader survey. Westmoreland is about the same, with a top pay of $94,779, while Chester County pays up to $108,462, records show. Compensation in like-sized counties is of interest because Luzerne County’s detective contract went to binding arbitration, where comparables may be considered. Third-class counties have populations between 210,000 and See DETECTIVES, Page 14A

COUNTY DETECTIVE BASE PAY RANGES $40

(Thousands) $60 $80

$100

Berks Chester Cumberland Dauphin Erie Lackawanna Lancaster Lehigh Luzerne Northampton Westmoreland York

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Pittston Area teachers Kelly Vincelli and Sal Carroll stand behind a computed displaying Edmodo, an educational social networking site they use in class.

utmost educational potential while navigating the tricky terrain of interacting with students online. Sites like Facebook and Twitter have created a long list of headaches for

school districts to contend with – from cyber-bullying to online disputes turned physical to cheating – but they also See TECHNOLOGY, Page 14A

County Low High Berks $48,828 $69,922 Chester $62,719 $108,462 Cumberland $39,819 $57,895 Dauphin $56,773 $72,983 Erie $37,000 $55,000 Lackawanna $39,445 $52,784 Lancaster $44,240 $64,147 Lehigh $52,208 $72,833 Luzerne $50,330 $95,532 Northampton $47,802 $62,251 Westmoreland $51,033 $94,779 York $46,093 $67,142

Source: Individual counties Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

Gay marriage, abortion are issues again Residents: Pa. health dept. lacks in investigating claims of illness

By DAVID CRARY AP National Writer

6

Survey: County’s detectives fare well

Study compared time off and pay to peers in similar-sized counties in state.

ICECAPS 3, PENS 2

YANKEES 6 MARINERS 2

$1.50

NEW YORK — Abortion and gay marriage. For years, they’ve been lumped together as the paramount wedge issues of U.S. politics — hot-button topics in the vortex of sexuality, personal freedom and public policy. Yet these two divisive issues, prominent as ever this election season and still firing up the liberal and conservative bases of the two major parties, are evolving in intriguingly different ways. Partisans are taking care not to overstate how much the See ISSUES, Page 8A

Inquiry finds several other shortcomings by agency concerning gas drilling.

By KEVIN BEGOS Associated Press

AP FILE PHOTO

Jase Peeples watches President Obama announce his support of same-sex marriage Wednesday on TV at a San Francisco bar.

that health officials have fallen short in responding to their health complaints. The AP also found that the tollfree number the agency gives out for gas drilling complaints doesn’t mention the issue in its automated menu, and the agency’s website doesn’t have a specific place for people to file such complaints. And the AP inquiry showed that the agency didn’t begin keep-

PITTSBURGH — The Pennsylvania Department of Health says it investigates every claim by residents that gas drilling has caused health problems, but several people say the agency’s actions don’t match its words. Two western Pennsylvania residents told The Associated Press See CLAIMS, Page 7A


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SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER

Edvard Munch’s ‘The Scream,’ at nearly $120 million, was the most expensive artwork ever sold at auction

Art frenzy in N.Y. By ULA ILNYTZKY Associated Press

AP PHOTO

U.S. chef Sara Jenkins, right, talks with Cuban chef Hector Higuera, in Havana, Cuba, Friday.

Exchange breaks cultural barriers

Ten NYC chefs team with 10 Havana culinary entrepreneurs in program. By PETER ORSI Associated Press

HAVANA — Foreign art lovers are breaking bread with Cuban waiters, drivers and parking lot attendants this week in a unique experience that forces diners and chefs alike to overcome barriers of culture, language and five-plus decades of animosity between Washington and Havana. Ten prominent New York City chefs are teaming up this week with 10 culinary entrepreneurs from Havana’s budding private restaurant scene, cooking up savory and sweet multi-course meals from an improvised kitchen built in a shipping container. The diners are mostly foreigners in town for a major art exhibition and Cubans who are being randomly invited to participate in the free meals by the visiting chefs who meet them during the course of their stay. Blending contemporary American, Italian, Japanese, even Burmese cuisines with Caribbean Creole classics, it’s a rare culinary treat in a country where many state-run and independent restaurants serve up dull, unimaginative fare. It’s also a performance art spectacle that’s about bridging the gap between estranged neighbors and social classes. “The easiest and most interesting way into understanding another culture is food,” said Sara Jenkins, the project’s chef director and proprietor of West Village eateries Porchetta and Porsena. “And the easiest, most uncomplicated way to make friends is to break bread at the same table.” “Project Paladar,” named after Cuba’s popular independent restaurants, is part of Havana’s 11th Biennial, an irreverent bash attracting 180 artists from 43 countries as well as thousands of art aficionados and collectors. The dining project is fully independent as well, unaffiliated with any Cuban government in-

POLICE BLOTTER WILKES-BARRE – City police reported the following: • Melinda Malinowski of 35 N. Meade St. reported Saturday her pool was slashed. • Nancy Booth of South Franklin Street reported Saturday a 19-inch high definition television with a built-in DVD player was stolen from her residence at 388 E. Northampton St. • Michael Crawford of 435 Horton St. reported a yellow mountain bike was stolen from his residence between 7 p.m. Friday and 11:40 a.m. Saturday. • A manager of the Turkey Hill store on Hazle Avenue Saturday showed police surveillance footage of two women walking about the store putting bottled beverages in

stitute, and is being funded by the donations of American individuals. For 10 days the chefs will take turns pairing off and serving up gourmet meals in the back patio of a cultural center in colonial Old Havana. Guests are greeted with a mojito and escorted to a table for 12 in homage to the maximum number of seats that the government allowed paladars to have when they first opened in the 1990s. With two tables of 12 seats, the organizers plan to feed up to five groups, or as many as 60 people, every evening. At the project’s Friday night launch, an aproned Jenkins sweated over a pan of Burmese coconut-milk curry sauce, preparing it to poach filets of freshly caught red snapper. Accompanying the main dish were tuna tartar and a green mango salad that one could order takeout in New York but particularly tickled the palates of Cuban food professionals. Conversation at the tables was lively as diners introduced themselves, hesitantly tried out second languages and turned to bilingual guests to translate reactions to each course: “Is this basil?” “No, it’s mint!” “I think this is an experience that has never been done in the Biennial, a very interesting sociocultural project,” said Kenia Echenique, a 25-year-old lawyer and actress who fanned her mouth after consuming the curry but said she enjoyed the flavor before the heat kicked in. “I think this can enrich our culture, our paladars, and contribute to exchange between our nations.” “In the kitchen everything’s simple. A sauce is a sauce,” said Hector Higuera Martinez, Jenkins’ cooking partner and the man behind the stylish Le Chansonnier in Havana’s Vedado neighborhood. “These things we have in common, independent of the language barrier. It has been spontaneous.” “Project Paladar” is the brainchild of Craig Shillitto, a New York architect, artist and restaurant designer who was fascinated to read about the explosion of private restaurants in Cuba. one of the women’s purses and leaving without paying for the items. • Gina Miscavage of North Main Street reported Friday her 2006 Hyundai Sonata was spray-painted with images and phrases while parked in a lot at the intersection of State and East Union streets between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. NESCOPECK TWP. – Traffic on Interstate 80 westbound was cut down to a single lane after a tractor trailer struck a guard rail and traveled off the westbound shoulder of the highway near mile marker 250 at approximately 12:45 p.m. Friday, state police said. State police said the driver, Rex McCarty, 55, of Ohio, was not injured. State police closed the right westbound lane for several hours while the truck was towed from the scene.

NEW YORK — The city’s spring art auction season was red hot. The frenzy began with Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” on May 2, when a phone bidder at Sotheby’s plunked down nearly $120 million for the iconic image, earning it the title of most expensive artwork ever sold at auction. Then, Mark Rothko’s “Orange, Red, Yellow” stole the record for any contemporary artwork at auction when it sold for nearly $87 million at Christie’s on Tuesday. But it didn’t stop there. Artist records also were shattered at the two auction houses for works by Yves Klein, Jackson Pollock, Gerhard Richter, Alexander Calder, Roy Lichtenstein, Cy Twombly, Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei and others. The art market remains one of the few flourishing during a difficult economic period. Among the reasons: an expanding global market that includes buyers from Asia, the Middle East and South America, a strong desire by the most knowledgeable collectors to own a top piece by the most recognized artists in the world and the view that art is a sound investment. “People feel very safe about buying art,” said Nicolai Frahm, a partner with the London-based Frahm Ltd. “You have a huge amount of new buyers coming to the market. If you have money, you want to be a part of buying art. People almost are considered imbeciles if they have money and they’re not buying.” Christie’s took in a record $616 million during the two-weeklong auctions of impressionist, modern and contemporary art. Its evening contemporary art sale alone totaled $388.5 million, a record for any auction in that category. Sotheby’s sales total was nearly $704 million. Its Wednesday sale of the Bacon, Lichtenstein, Warhol and other seminal works brought in $330.6 million. All the prices include buyer’s premiums. None of the buyers has been publicly identified, but bidders included collectors from China, Russia, South America, the Middle East, Europe and Australia. Both auction houses offered works from famous collections — Philadelphia philanthropist and art patron David Pincus at Christie’s and New York financier Theodore Forstmann at Sotheby’s — and pieces that had been absent from the market-

By JOE EDWARDS Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Actor George Lindsey was remembered Friday as the grinning Goober who made television viewers laugh for three decades on “The Andy Griffith Show” and “Hee Haw.” A public memorial service drew an estimated 400 people who paid last respects to Lindsey, 83, who died Sunday. He was the beanie-wearing Goober on “The Andy Griffith Show” from 1964 to 1968 and its successor, “Mayberry RFD,” from 1968 to 1971. He played the same jovial character, a mechanic, on “Hee Haw” from 1971 until it went out of production in 1993. Reruns of those shows are still seen on TV. Griffith did not attend, but sent a statement that was read by

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WEEKLY LOTTERY SUMMARY Daily Number, Midday Sunday: 8-0-9 Monday: 1-3-2 Tuesday: 2-3-8 Wednesday: 5-0-6 Thursday: 8-9-2 Friday: 6-9-0 (4-5-4, double draw) Saturday: 3-5-5

Quinto, Midday Sunday: 9-4-0-3-0 Monday: 2-2-5-9-1 Tuesday: 7-5-8-6-7 (8-0-2-2-6, double draw) Wednesday: 9-7-0-3-5 Thursday: 8-2-1-9-9 Friday: 1-7-8-1-1 Saturday: 5-4-3-7-0 Treasure Hunt Sunday: 05-08-11-18-28 Monday: 05-09-11-18-23 Tuesday: 02-10-12-22-23 Wednesday: 03-05-12-15-19 Thursday: 04-12-14-17-29 Friday: 04-14-16-24-29 Saturday: 06-07-11-12-22 Daily Number, 7 p.m. Sunday: 6-8-7 Monday: 6-6-7 Tuesday: 4-6-0 Wednesday: 9-7-9 Thursday: 4-7-5 Friday: 9-0-4 Saturday: 5-8-7

AP FILE PHOTO

’The Scream’ by Norwegian painter Edvard Munch is shown. The work, which dates from 1895 and is one of four versions of the composition, was sold at auction on May 2.

place for decades. “The reason for these recordbreaking sales is, quite simply, the quality of the material,” said Michael Frahm, a contemporary art adviser and Nicolai Frahm’s brother and partner. “The auction houses have managed to find rare pieces by the most renowned artists.” The sales “demonstrated the tremendous growth in demand for high-quality works and how the top end of the market is moving away from the rest to reach new levels, higher than we have ever witnessed before,” he said. They included a silver silkscreen image of Elvis Presley by Warhol that fetched $37 million, Lichtenstein’s comic book-inspired “Sleeping Girl” for $44.8 million and 1 ton of handmade porcelain “Sunflower Seeds” by Weiwei, which brought $782,500. The annual spring auction season was the strongest since the recession hit in 2008. Experts said that mid-range

country music broadcaster Keith Bilbrey at the service at Westminster Presbyterian Church. “George was a better joke teller than me, and I will say here that I ‘borrowed’ jokes from George that he may have ‘borrowed’ from Minnie Pearl,” Griffith confessed. “George told me his fondest memories in show business were the years he spent working on ‘The Andy Griffith Show’ and ‘Mayberry RFD.’ They were for me, too.” Singer Ray Stevens performed “Everything Is Beautiful” during the service. “He warmed a lot of hearts with his brand of humor — wholesome, American humor,” Stevens said before the service. Actor Ernest Borgnine, Lindsey’s close friend, sent a video tribute which was played at an informal gathering before the memorial. In it, Borgnine recalled the pranks they enjoyed playing down through the years. “We loved to outdo each other,” Borgnine said. “It was like therapy.” Also shown at the casual gath-

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Big Four, Midday Sunday: 5-8-7-6 Monday: 5-9-5-6 Tuesday: 7-0-8-5 Wednesday: 8-8-4-4 Thursday: 4-7-7-8 Friday: 1-4-0-1 Saturday: 5-6-1-6

works of art also performed well but that it was artworks at the top end that accounted for the robust market. Tobias Meyer, Sotheby’s worldwide head of contemporary art, said the top of the market performed well because of the global demand for masterpieces. Patricia Berman, chair of the art department at Wellesley College and a director of the Edvard Munch Research Institute in Oslo, Norway, said, “This narrow sector of the art market is robust because of the record number of millionaires and billionaires worldwide, because of the uncertainty of other investment pathways and because of the increasing glamour and cachet of the ownership of contemporary art among newer investors.” Nicolai Frahm called the sale of the Rothko painting for nearly $87 million “amazing” because “that’s not so far away from the most iconic image (’The Scream’) ever created in art.”

Friends remember ‘Goober Pyle’ actor Memorial held for actor George Lindsey, best known for one particular character.

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ering in the church’s fellowship hall were clips from Lindsey on “Hee Haw.” One of them: “Where was Solomon’s temple?” Minnie Pearl asked him. “Right on the side of his head,” Lindsey responded. Kenneth Junkin of Gordo, Ala., drove 300 miles to attend the service. “He brought happiness into my life,” Junkin said. “I had to come.” Several fellow performers from the two shows are dead, including Don Knotts (Barney Fife), Frances Bavier (Aunt Bee), Buck Owens, co-host of “Hee Haw,” and Minnie Pearl. Lindsey is to be buried in Jasper, Ala., in his native state. He was awarded an honorary doctorate in 1992 by the University of North Alabama, and did much charity work for the state. On display at the service was a framed tribute to him placed into the Congressional Record in 2001 and the cover of a Capitol Records album titled “Goober Sings!”

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Quinto, 7 p.m. Sunday: 5-4-4-4-4 Monday: 6-2-8-2-2 Tuesday: 6-2-1-5-5 Wednesday: 2-4-0-1-3 Thursday: 8-8-5-6-2 Friday: 6-2-3-0-5 Saturday: 0-1-8-7-9 Cash 5 Sunday: 02-13-16-35-43 Monday: 11-16-22-24-29 Tuesday: 18-27-28-32-33 Wednesday: 17-18-38-41-43 Thursday: 06-08-11-18-31 Friday: 03-07-17-39-43 Saturday: 03-24-30-31-33 Match 6 Lotto Monday: 22-26-30-37-39-48 Thursday: 01-08-19-27-33-46 Powerball Wednesday: 01-07-11-55-56 powerball: 01 Saturday: 10-24-35-53-58 powerball: 22 Mega Millions Tuesday: 02-06-08-18-51 Megaball: 19 Megaplier: 03 Friday: 03-15-29-35-54 Megaball: 08 Megaplier: 04

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NEWS

IN

BRIEF

HARRISBURG

PUC acts on drill fee law

he Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission this week finalized T provisions of Act 13, the state’s nat-

ural gas drilling impact fee law. The commission voted 5-0 to finalize the procedures the PUC will use to implement, collect and distribute the impact fee as directed by Chapter 23 of Act 13. The commission did not address the provisions of the act that govern local ordinances, claiming uncertainty surrounding pending litigation. PUC Chairman Robert Powelson was one of several state officials sued in March by municipalities, municipal officials and environmental groups over the loss of local zoning authority under Act 13. The PUC is responsible for implementing the section of the law that imposes conditions, requirements or limitations on oil or gas operations. The commission also voted 5-0 to secure outside legal counsel for one year to advise the commission regarding local zoning and municipality law to aid in the implementation of Act 13.

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 3A

LOCAL

Special delivery of food Mail carriers collect items for needy

By JERRY LYNOTT jlynott@timesleader.com

PITTSTON – By late afternoon Saturday, the storeroom of Meals on Wheels of Greater Pittston was filling up with donated food. The nonprofit organization operating out of rented space at 59 S. Main St. served as one of the local drop-off points for the 20th Annual National Association of Letter Carriers’ Food Drive. “They put a lot on our shelves,” said Louise Smith, volunteer coordinator and president of the board of directors of the organization. “It keeps us going for a year.” The cans of vegetables, boxes of cereal, packages of noodles and other non-perishables col-

lected by members of the National Association of Letter Carriers’ Branch 162 in Pittston and unloaded by volunteers helps feed 55 people served two meals five days a week by the organization. The donations allow Meals on Wheels to spend its money on fresh fruits and meats and baked goods. “This is a godsend to us. We count on it and we appreciate it so much,” she said. For nearly 12 years the organization has participated and the most it received was 24 tons of food a few years ago. Last year 10 tons were donated. This year might be a little less and Warren Pollard, treasurer of Meals and Wheels, said it might be because of the still struggling economy.

But organizers of the largest one-day food drive in the country looked to exceed the 70.2 million pounds of food donated last year. Throughout the region the collection looked to be close to last year’s, said Jeffrey Nichols, vice president of the National Association of Letter Carriers Branch 115/Wilkes-Barre. “I think it went well,” he said. Nearly 500 letter carriers in Northeastern Pennsylvania pick up donations left along their routes and donate their time to the drive. “It’s a team effort with the management,” said Nichols. In addition to the Meals on Wheels organization, the drive benefits more than 30 local food banks and pantries.

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

Volunteer Walt Klepaski, AFL-CIO community services liaison, helps rural postal carrier associate Kimberly Drozda unload food outside Meals on Wheels of Greater Pittston Saturday.

Pollard surveyed the nearly full shelves of the Meals on Wheels storeroom and pointed out an abundance of canned green beans. There was too

Senator criticizes gender pay gap

EATON TWP.

Motorcyclist listed critical

A motorcyclist suffered serious injuries Saturday afternoon when he struck the rear of a car while trying to illegally pass vehicles on state Route 92, state police said. Mark Baldwin, 49, of Tunkhannock, was listed in critical condition at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township, to where he was flown by helicopter. State police said Baldwin was riding a 2009 Harley-Davidson motorcycle in the southbound lane of the roadway around 2 p.m. and attempted to illegally pass vehicles when he ran into a 2011 Ford Fiesta turning left onto Jenks Road. The car, driven by Tammy Swingle, 33, of Tunkhannock, went into a grassy field after impact and the motorcycle came to rest on the southbound berm with Baldwin lying in the southbound lane of the roadway, state police said. Baldwin was wearing a helmet, state police said. Swingle and a 10-year-old girl, who was a passenger, were transported by ambulance to Tyler Memorial Hospital for treatment of minor injuries, state police said. The roadway was closed in the southbound direction for approximately 90 minutes. The crash is still under investigation, state police said. DALLAS

MU adds master’s degree

The Misericordia University Health Care Informatics Program has added a Master of Science degree to complement its undergraduate certificate program to meet the need for skilled workers in the expanding field of health care informatics. Classes for the 39-credit Health Informatics Executive Master’s Degree Program begin in the fall. The Pennsylvania Department of Education formally approved the master’s degree in health informatics in April. The university’s HCI program is designed to provide professional and continuing education in health informatics along with research and community outreach services. It teaches how to best use information, information management, and information technology to improve patient care and support the health care business and clinical communities. Health care informatics addresses the information management and technology aspects of clinical and business applications, public health, and biomedical sciences. It includes information support for areas such as clinical and patient care areas like telehealth, teleradiology, online prescribing and electronic health records. It also extends into financial transactions, privacy issues, health care research and Internet-based consumer research. For more information about the Health Care Informatics Program at Misericordia University, please contact the Center for Adult and Continuing Education at 674-1225.

much to use in a year, added Pollard who also cooks the meals. The donations will, in turn, be donated.

Sen. Casey says measures must be taken to even pay between men and women. By STEVE MOCARSKY smocarsky@timesleader.com

DON CAREY PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Gabe Metric of Hanover Township places a flag in a veteran’s grave marker at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Hanover Township Saturday. AMVETS Post 59 in Hanover Township led an effort to place flags for armed services veterans buried in St. Mary’s.

Honoring fallen vets

Volunteers place flags in Hanover Twp. cemetery By MATT HUGHES mhughes@timesleader.com

every one Saturday with an American flag atop each tombstone. Beneath a clear blue sky, about 50 members of the veteran’s organization, auxiliary members and those who just wanted to lend a hand walked each row of graves, removing debris from each veteran’s tombstone and placing a flag on top. “When it’s all done and you go out on St. Mary’s Road or out

HANOVER TOWNSHIP – The oldest grave stones in St. Mary’s Cemetery are so weathered you need to get up close to read them. So the volunteers stooped down. More than 8,000 armed services veterans are buried in the Catholic cemetery, one of the area’s largest, and volunteers from the AMVETS Post 59 in Hanover Township wanted to make sure they paid tribute to See FLAGS, Page 9A

Jack Zelinka of Ashley stoops to place a flag on a veteran’s grave at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Hanover Township, Saturday.

Bowling event strikes a need for hope in fighting cancer Sarah Edwards organizes event in honor of her late mother.

By GERI GIBBONS Times Leader Correspondent

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

Teddi Janosov applauds after picking up spare in bowling fundraiser Saturday.

the community," said Edwards, Forty Fort, a coordinator of the "Hope is D-Leighcious" Bowl for Life event at Chacko’s Family Bowling Center on Saturday evening. She noted her whole family was enthusiastically participating in the event. Barbara Struckus died from gastric cancer, a rare cancer that often goes undiagnosed. Edwards said it is important to disseminate information about all types of cancer to the community because early diagnosis provides the best outcomes. Many of those she worked with at Luzerne County Community College participated in the event and spoke highly of Struckus. LCCC President Thomas Leary said Struckus was a rare person who never said

WILKES-BARRE – Sarah Struckus Edwards was well aware the event was more than a gathering of friends for a night of bowling. It was an opportunity to raise money for the American Cancer Society, an organization which Edwards holds close to her heart. Her mother, Barbara Struckus died three years ago from the disease, and Edwards now considers it a privilege to raise both money and awareness of the cause. "People shouldn’t wait until a disease hits their own family to support such causes; we should all reach out as members of See BOWLING, Page 9A

Even though today is a day to honor mothers, U.S. Sen. Bob Casey notes there are more moms in the workforce than ever, and their salaries lag far behind what men earn. Casey, DScranton, said in a recent conference call with To see the media that additional the pay gap be- photos, tween men and visit www.times women in the leader.com workplace is too large – a disparity of 18.6 percent in Pennsylvania – and measures must be taken to close it. He pointed to a new report by the Joint Economic Committee, which he chairs, titled “Mother’s Day Report: Paycheck Fairness Helps Families, Not Just Women,” which shows that the pay gap harms families and weakens the economy. Nationally, the pay gap is 18 percent, which means women in the United States earn 82 cents for every dollar earned by men. And the gender age gap varies widely between states. For example, in Louisiana, women earn only 69.4 cents for every dollar earned by men. By contrast women in California earn 91.5 cents for every dollar earned by men. Casey said he hasn’t “gotten that far” in research to determine what Louisiana is doing wrong and what California is doing right. Gap has narrowed slightly While the gap has narrowed slightly in recent decades, the repercussions of pay inequity extend far beyond women’s pocketbooks, the report states. “Without paycheck fairness, women have less income to help support their families and fewer dollars to spend in their communities. The economy suffers as a result, the report says. Two-thirds of mothers work outside the home, earning inSee PAY GAP, Page 11A


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SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 5A

Lawmakers in Iraq enjoy perks

U.S.S. Iowa being prepared to become naval museum in Southern California after years of aging in San Francisco Bay

B R I E F

Parliament fails to follow through on promises to cancel free armored cars they approved for themselves. By LARA JAKES Associated Press

AP PHOTO

Hoop, hoop, hurray for students

TRENTON, N.J.

Secret question is nixed

S

tate education officials will no longer use a standardized test question that asked third-graders to reveal a secret and write about why it was difficult to keep. The question appeared on the writing portion of some versions of the New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge given to third-graders this past week. And it drew criticism from some parents, who thought it was inappropriate. Marlboro dentist Richard Goldberg said he was appalled when he asked his twin 9-year-old sons about the standardized tests they were taking and they told him about the question. He said he felt it ventured into topics that would best be kept quiet and it could raise some serious complications. “I got a lot of feedback from parents who also were outraged” about the matter, Goldberg told Neptune’s the Asbury Park Press newspaper. “All of a sudden now you have thousands and thousands of children possibly revealing things that now these people have to report, when the purpose of the exam was to see what the children’s critical reading skills were.”

KABUL, AFGHANISTAN

Imposters kill 2 soldiers

Men wearing Afghan police uniforms shot dead two NATO service members Saturday in southern Afghanistan, authorities said, the latest in a string of attacks on international troops by Afghan security forces or militants disguised as police. Two other coalition service members also died Saturday in Afghanistan, one in an insurgent attack and another of non-battle related injuries. One official of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force familiar with early reports on the incident said the two coalition troops killed in the attack were British soldiers. CARACAS, VENEZUELA

A puzzlement over author

Venezuelan intelligence agents have questioned the author of a newspaper crossword puzzle, and even some supporters of the government are ridiculing allegations the words he chose might be coded calls for a plot to kill the elder brother of President Hugo Chavez. State TV presenter Miguel Perez Pirela raised the accusation, pointing out that Wednesday’s crossword puzzle in the newspaper Ultimas Noticias contained the words “ASESINEN,” or kill, along with the name of Chavez’s brother, “ADAN.” LUXOR, EGYPT

He wasn’t quite dead yet

The funeral of a 28-year-old waiter in southern Egypt turned into a celebration when he woke up after being declared dead. Hospital officials had pronounced dead Hamdi Hafez al-Nubi, who came from the village of Naga al-Simman in the southern province of Luxor, after he suffered a heart attack while working. His family says grieving relatives took him home and, according to Islamic tradition, washed his body and prepared him for burial Friday evening.

AP FILE PHOTO

John Wolfinbarger, 87, of San Martin, Calif., who served on the battleship USS Iowa in the Pacific during World War II watches in April as a crane lifts a 60-foot mast onto the historic ship for reattachment in Richmond, Calif.

Ship is now museum

By ERIC RISBERG Associated Press

RICHMOND, Calif. — Firing its 16-inch guns in the Arabian Sea, the U.S.S. Iowa shuddered. As the sky turned orange, a blast of heat from the massive guns washed over the battleship. This was the Iowa of the late 1980s, at the end of its active duty as it escorted reflagged Kuwaiti oil tankers from the Persian Gulf through the Strait of Hormuz during the Iran-Iraq war. Some 25 years later, following years of aging in the San Francisco Bay area’s “mothball fleet,” the 887foot long ship that once carried President Franklin Roosevelt to a World War II summit to meet with Churchill, Stalin and Chiang Kai Shek is coming to life once again as it is being prepared for what is most likely its final voyage. Not far from where “Rosie the Riveters” built ships in the 1940s at the Port of Richmond, the 58,000-ton battlewagon is undergoing restoration for towing May 20 through the Golden Gate, then several hundred miles south to the Port of Los Angeles in San Pedro. There it is to be transformed into an interactive naval museum. On May 1, ownership of the Iowa was officially transferred from the U.S. Navy to the Pacific Battleship Center, the nonprofit organization that has been restoring the boat for its new mission. “This means everything — it’s going to be saved,” John Wolfinbarger, 87, of San Martin, Calif., who served aboard the USS Iowa for almost two years in the mid-1940s and recently began giving public tours of the old ship during repairs here. “When it gets down to San Pedro, it’s going to be the happiest day of my life, like coming home!” he said, watching the mast being reattached. For the past decade, the lead ship

AP FILE PHOTO

Gun turrets one and two are shown near the bow of the battleship USS Iowa under renovation in Richmond, Calif., in March.

of her battleship class known as “The Big Stick” has sat in the cold and fog, anchored with other mothballed ships in nearby Suisun Bay. This spring, workers began scrubbing and painting the Iowa’s exterior, replacing the teak deck and reattaching the

mast in preparation for the museum commissioning on July 4. Jonathan Williams, executive officer of Pacific Battleship Group, has been overseeing the project, which will exceed $4 million upon completion.

Yemen suspects U.S. behind drone strikes that killed 11 There was no immediate word from U.S. on whether Washington was behind attacks.

By AHMED AL-HAJ Associated Press

SANAA, Yemen — Two suspected U.S. drone strikes killed 11 al-Qaida militants in southern Yemen on Saturday, Yemeni military officials said. The first attack took place near the border of Marib and Shabwa provinces southeast of the capital, Sanaa, killing six militants, including one Egyptian national, the officials said. The second strike hit two cars in Marib, killing five al-Qaida-linked fighters.

Over the past year, parts of Marib, Shabwa and other southern provinces have fallen under the control of al-Qaida militants who have capitalized on the turmoil in Yemen that stems from the popular uprising that toppled longtime leader Ali Abdullah Saleh. There was no immediate word from the U.S. on whether Washington was behind Saturday’s attacks. In the past two weeks, suspected U.S. airstrikes have killed at least three senior al-Qaida operatives in southern Yemen.

Yemeni officials have reported more frequent U.S. drone strikes since Yemen’s new president, Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi, took power in February after Saleh stepped down. Hadi has since ramped up the fight against al-Qaida militants. The Pentagon recently sent American military trainers to Yemen, and Washington has spent hundreds of millions of dollars to assist the impoverished Arab nation fight alQaida and other extremist groups in the country.

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Nine-year-old Marquise Buckner mastered the hula hoop during field day for students of Lee A. Tolbert Community Academy at Macon Park in Kansas City on Friday morning. Four hundred students filled their day with kickball, water balloon toss, hamburgers and hot dogs. The school year ends May 21.

BAGHDAD — Iraq’s lawmakers have hightailed it out of town for a six-week vacation without following through on promises to cancel a pricey perk for free armored cars that they approved for themselves in the annual budget. It is the sort of move that is fueling resentments among the struggling Iraqi public, many of whom accuse the country’s leaders of being corrupt and only in politics for their own profit. For months, parliament has failed to rework the $100 billion budget that came under wide- “They only spread criticism or pass a list of laws to think tackle the country’s about numerous problems. “They have not dis- themselves cussed ways of how to instead of improve the lives of paying atpeople like me,” Ammar Hassan, a college tention to graduate from Karbala people’s who drives a taxi to support himself, said. welfare.’’ “They only think Ammar Hassan about themselves inTaxi driver stead of paying attention to people’s welfare.” The 39-year-old Hassan said he earns an average of about $200 each month — a fraction of the monthly $22,500 salary afforded to each of the 325 lawmakers in parliament. “I’m afraid the day will come when lawmakers pass a law imposing taxes on ordinary people’ salaries and incomes to cover their own living costs,” he said bitterly. Iraq’s government has been rife with corruption going back to the regime of former dictator Saddam Hussein, who hoarded the nation’s oil riches for himself and his cronies amid an impoverished public. Hopes that conditions would dramatically improve as Iraq tried to build a post-Saddam democracy proved overly optimistic, however. A quarter of Iraq’s population of 31 million people live in poverty, and an estimated 15 percent are unemployed, according to U.S. data compiled by the Central Intelligence Agency. Raw sewage runs through the streets in many neighborhoods, polluting tap water, sickening residents and adding to an overall sense of misery. Many Iraqis only have 12 hours of electricity each day. By contrast, Iraqi lawmakers were given a $90,000 stipend for expenses in addition to their monthly salaries when they took office in 2010. And in February, parliament voted to buy $50 million worth of armored cars to protect lawmakers from insurgent attacks that routinely target officials. But far more innocent bystanders than government officials usually are killed in Iraq’s still-frequent bombings. The pricey perk enraged the public, which was only soothed by sheepish promises to redirect the money to the community.


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Group to donate white buffalo bull Buffalo is to replace a rare white buffalo calf that was apparently slaughtered. By LINDA STEWART BALL Associated Press

U.S. students die in crash Three from Boston University were studying in New Zealand when their minivan crashed. By NICK PERRY Associated Press

WELLINGTON, New Zealand — Three Boston University students who were studying in New Zealand were killed Saturday when their minivan crashed. At least five other students from the university were injured in the accident, including one who was in critical condition. The students were traveling in a minivan at about 7:30 a.m. Saturday near the North Island vacation town of Taupo when the vehicle drifted to the side of the road and then rolled when the driver tried to correct course, New Zealand police said. Three of the students died at the scene, police said. Another woman was in critical condition at an area hospital, while at least four other students suffered moderate injuries.

Boston University spokesman Colin Riley said the deceased students were Daniela Lekhno, 20, of Manalapan, N.J.; Roch Jauberty, 21, whose parents live in Paris; and Austin Brashears, 21, of Huntington Beach, Calif. New Zealand police confirmed their identities. Another BU student, Margaret Theriault, was airlifted from the crash site to a hospital in Taupo and was in critical condition, the university said. “This is a horrible tragedy,” Boston University President Robert Brown said in a statement on the website. “Our prayers go out to the students and their families. We will do all we can to provide comfort and assistance to those who have been injured, and to the families and friends of the victims. The university is mobilizing all of our resources to help our students and families deal with this tragedy.” A candlelight vigil was planned for Saturday evening at the university. All of the students except The-

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riault were enrolled in a BU study abroad program in Auckland, the BU website said. Theriault was enrolled in a study abroad program in Sydney, Australia. Sixteen students were traveling in two minivans, on their way to hike the Tongariro Crossing, a famous trek rated as one of the most spectacular in New Zealand. The hike crosses a volcanic crater in the central part of North Island. None of the eight students in the second van was injured. Seven of those eight students were also from Boston University. Kevin Taylor, a police official, said it was not clear why the van drifted to the side of the road. He said some of the students were thrown from the vehicle, indicating they may not have been wearing seat belts.

AP PHOTO

This undated handout photo provided by Cynthia Hart-Button shows Chief Hiawatha, a white buffalo bull.

buffalo calf. As a non-albino white buffalo, Lightning Medicine Cloud was revered by Native Americans. Thousands of people of all races attended a naming ceremony for the unusual calf last year, and Little Soldier called it the “hope of all nations.” Little Soldier said he found the calf dead and skinned, a few feet away from where it was born a year ago. Little Soldier said the calf’s mother, which was found dead and skinned the next day, was poisoned. The calf’s father was struck and killed by lightning in April. The Hunt County Sheriff’s Department and the Texas Rangers are investigating the calf’s death, and Little Soldier said the Bureau of Indian Affairs is also involved. “We’re pushing for this to be a hate crime,” said Little Soldier, who wants lawmakers to offer some kind of protection for the white buffalo. There is also a reward that now exceeds $45,000. Hart-Button said her organization doesn’t open its sanctuary up to the public because of safety concerns. “We’ve been threatened, people have offered me millions of dollars for their heads and hides,”

she said. “I’ve even been offered money for their meat. These are the rarest animals in the world.” The peace organization’s bull may not carry the same spiritual significance, as Little Soldier said it was bred to be a white buffalo. But he said he’s grateful and excited for the gift. “These buffaloes represent world peace, killing something that’s sacred is not what we’re supposed to be walking,” HartButton said. “We’re supposed to be walking towards peace, not going backwards.” Little Soldier said he wants the buffalo’s killers to know they may have destroyed the animal, but not what he stood for. Little Soldier said he has received condolences and concerned calls from as far away as Australia, Europe and Canada. “They’ve opened the doors to him being bigger than ever,” Little Soldier said.

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AP PHOTO

Policemen examine the scene of a minivan crash near Turangi, New Zealand, Saturday. Three Boston University students who were studying in New Zealand were killed Saturday.

DALLAS — An Oregon peacemaker said she’s so upset by the apparent slaughter of a rare white buffalo calf —deemed “the hope of all nations” by a Lakota Sioux rancher last year — that her organization is donating a white buffalo bull from its herd. Arby Little Soldier, who owns the Lakota Ranch near the North Texas town of Greenville, said he had hoped the 3,000-pound gift would arrive during a memorial celebration this weekend that was initially intended to celebrate Lightning Medicine Cloud’s first birthday, which was May 12. The calf was found dead nearly two weeks ago. “We’re trying to surprise everybody,” Little Soldier said Friday, while preparing for opening ceremonies that were later cancelled by rain. A memorial service will be held this morning. Cynthia Hart-Button, the bull’s caretaker and the president of the Sacred World Peace Alliance, is tight-lipped about the animal’s exact arrival time because of transportation and security concerns. The organization claims to have a record 14 white buffalo on its sanctuary in central Oregon. “It’s a sad tragedy,” she said of the calf’s death. “So, instead of them thinking that they lost their hope, we’re bringing their hope back in a different way.” Hart-Button said she hopes the bull, named Chief Hiawatha, will produce another white calf for the Lakota Ranch. The bull will turn 7 on May 16. She said Hiawatha has been like a guard dog, growling when someone comes near who “is not good in spirit.” “I’m sending it down to protect not only the buffalo but to protect him (Arby Little Soldier) and his family,” Hart-Button said. According to Lakota Sioux lore, the goddess of peace once appeared in the form of a white

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The Associated Press

EASTON — Opening statements are scheduled Monday in the capital murder trial of a man accused of having killed a police officer who was trying to fend off the defendant’s dogs last summer. Jury selection for the trial of George Hitcho Jr., 46, wound up Friday with the selection of four men, eight women and three alternates, The (Easton) ExpressTimes reported Saturday. A fourth alternate has already been moved onto the panel because a previously selected juror had a medical issue Authorities say Hitcho killed Freemansburg police officer Robert Lasso with a shotgun on Aug.

CLAIMS Continued from Page 1A

ing track of possible health complaints tied to gas drilling until 2011, several years after a surge of activity in the gas-rich Marcellus Shale. “Everybody kind of just passed the buck,” said Sheri Makepeace, a northwestern Pennsylvania resident who said that starting last year she tried calling the Department of Health and other agencies over fears that nearby drilling created health problems. “I’ve talked to so many different people and have gotten so many different stories.” Christine Cronkright, a spokeswoman for the agency, said the agency stands by earlier statements that it responds to, investigates and issues a formal response to all complaints about gas drilling and public health. Officials are working on how and where to share information on the issue with the public and expect to release details in the near future, she said. The AP also found that previous responses from the Department of Health about the numbers of complaints it has received

11 after the officer responded to a disturbance call at his home. After the shooting, Hitcho said the officer was trespassing. Prosecutors said he was lawfully investigating a complaint. Defense attorneys filed a series of motions Friday on topics ranging from cross-examination of a prison informant to the constitutionality of Pennsylvania’s death penalty. Chief Public Defender Michael Corriere and defense attorney Michael Corcoran asked Northampton County Judge Anthony Beltrami to allow them to question the inmate about his criminal history. They also want jurors barred from seeing autopsy photos of the victim and said they

shouldn’t be told about five guns police found in Hitcho’s home because their client owns them legally and the weapons had no bearing on the shooting. The judge earlier ruled that statements allegedly made by Hitcho after the shooting can be used at his trial. Police allege that Hitcho said “He tried to get in my house” moments after shooting. Investigators have said that the officer was being attacked by Hitcho’s dogs and was moving to use his stun gun when the defendant opened fire. Hitcho’s attorneys have said that they may use a diminished mental capacity defense to spare their client the death penalty if he is convicted.

about drilling and health have been at best confusing and at worst misleading. The agency first told the AP that it had received a total of about 30 complaints, and then modified that to being 30 over the last year. Now, the agency says it didn’t even begin recording such complaints until 2011. Cronkright also told the AP that the agency has no current investigations regarding people who claim gas drilling has impacted their health. That puzzles Janet McIntyre, one of Makepeace’s neighbors. She made a formal complaint by phone in late February and said a health department employee replied that he would get back to her in a few days. McIntyre said she purposefully waited 30 days for a response but none came. “He sounded as if he wanted to get right on it. And that I would have people calling me,” she said. “I was very frustrated. I was getting nowhere. That was disheartening.” The AP started asking the health department about problems in responding to complaints in April, and then in early May McIntyre sent a letter to the agency, outlining her experience.

On Thursday, a health official called her to apologize, she said, adding that “they dropped the ball. But at least they picked it up again.” One public health expert who’s working on gas drilling complaints in Pennsylvania said the health agency is in a difficult position. “I’m not surprised that their protocols are a little difficult to get in place. The response to something like this is really hard,” said David Brown, a former head of environmental epidemiology in Connecticut who is now working with the nonprofit Southwest Pennsylvania Environmental Health Project to examine complaints about gas drilling. Until a few months ago, Pennsylvania health officials had expected to get a share of the revenue being generated by the state’s new Marcellus Shale law, which is projected to provide about $180 million to state and local governments in the first year. But representatives from Republican Gov. Tom Corbett’s office and the state Senate cut the health appropriation to zero during final negotiations, so now the agency is left with a new workload but no funding for the job.

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Mitt urges grads to honor family

At event at Christian college, Romney defends hard work, keeping family commitments. By KASIE HUNT and RACHEL ZOLL Associated Press

LYNCHBURG, Va. — Mitt Romney’s Mormon faith has shaped his life, but he barely mentioned it as he spoke to graduates at an evangelical Christian university Saturday. And he barely touched on hotbutton social issues like abortion and gay marriage, instead offering a broad-based defense of values like family and hard work. “Culture — what you believe, what you value, how you live — matters,” Romney told graduates gathered in the football stadium on Liberty University’s campus in the Virginia mountains. “The American culture promotes personal responsibility, the dignity of work, the value of education, the merit of service, devotion to a purpose greater than self, and at the foundation, the preeminence of the family.” Instead of a red-meat conservative policy speech, Romney discussed his own family and offered a defense of Christianity, saying that “there is no greater force for good in the nation than Christian conscience in action.” Still, he was inclusive: “Men and women of every faith, and good people with none at all, sincerely strive to do right and lead a purpose-driven life,” Romney said. He had one sustained applause line in a 20-minute speech delivered days after President Barack Obama historically embraced gay marriage. “Marriage is a relationship between one man and one woman,” Romney said to a cheering crowd of students who have to follow a strict code of conduct that considers sex out of wedlock and homosexuality to be sins. On Saturday, Obama was not seeking to revisit the issue of gay marriage. In his weekly radio and Internet address, the presi-

AP PHOTO

GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney, center, shakes hands with Jerry Falwell Jr., Liberty University chancellor, before his speech at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va, Saturday.

dent didn’t mention his historymaking endorsement. Instead, he repeated his call for congressional lawmakers to take up a “to-do list” of tax breaks, mortgage relief and other initiatives that he insists will create jobs and help middle-class families struggling in the sluggish economy. Having spent part of the week on the West Coast raising money for his re-election effort, Obama appeared in the Rose Garden of the White House to honor award-winning law enforcement officers. It was Obama’s first joint appearance with Vice President Joe Biden after Biden, according to aides, apologized to the president for pushing gay marriage to the forefront of the presidential campaign and inadvertently pressuring Obama to declare his support for same-sex unions. Obama and Biden walked to the ceremony together. Introducing Obama, Biden credited the president’s commitment to law enforcement.

The late Rev. Jerry Falwell founded Liberty University in 1971 to be for evangelical Christians “what Notre Dame is to young Catholics and Brigham Young is to young Mormons,” as his son, University Chancellor Jerry Falwell Jr., said on commencement day. It’s become a destination for Republican politicians looking to speak to the religious right, and Romney’s campaign team — planning the speech long before gay marriage became a central issue — viewed it as an opportunity to address the kind of socially conservative audience that had been wary of him during the prolonged GOP primary fight. For Romney, the challenge is twofold. His past policy positions, including support for abortion rights, don’t sit well. But his personal faith is also an issue because many evangelicals don’t consider Mormons to be fellow Christians. Evangelicals are a critical segment of the GOP base; many of those voters backed his GOP rivals in the pro-

longed primary. When he locks in the Republican presidential nomination, Romney will make history as the first Mormon nominee from a major party. His faith is central to him and to his family — he spent two years in France as a missionary, a time when he lived in occasionally primitive conditions. When he returned home, he attended Brigham Young University, a Mormon school, and married his wife, Ann, who had converted to Mormonism. As they built a life in Boston, Romney took on a significant leadership role in the church, serving as a lay pastor, fighting to build a temple in town and counseling families in need. But he’s mostly avoided talking about it on the campaign trail, largely avoiding religious forums and events throughout the primary season. And at arguably the most religious venue he’s addressed during the campaign Romney continued to keep his own faith in the background.

ISSUES Continued from Page 1A

issues have in common. Same-sex marriage vaulted into the spotlight when President Barack Obama declared his support this past week, and conservatives restated their opposition. Republicans deny Democrats’ claims that they are waging a “war on women” that encompasses infringement of abortion rights. Polls on same-sex marriage show a huge shift in public opinion in just a decade, from overwhelming opposition to a slight edge in favor. By contrast, attitudes toward abortion have scarcely budged over several decades, with a modest majority of Americans favoring some degree of abortion rights and opposition remaining both stable and vehement. More profound is a moral difference. Americans who are ambivalent about same-sex marriage can decide to accept it with a live-and-let-live philosophy, while the abortion debate inherently involves hard questions about when life begins and whether a fetus has rights. “Everybody knows gay people now — their community left the ghetto a long time ago and is part of everyday life,” said abortionrights supporter Jon O’Brien of Catholics for Choice. “Abortion is very private, often a sad and difficult decision. It’s entirely different.” Another difference: Acceptance of gays is now a given in popular culture, notably in the spate of hit TV shows such as “Glee” and “Modern Family,” with gay and lesbian protagonists. There’s no equivalent embrace of abortion rights in Hollywood’s products; films depicting unintended pregnancies generally opt for a birth. “It’s harder to get out and advocate for abortion,” said Tony Perkins, president of the conservative Family Research Council. “Hollywood and others have been more helpful to the gay and lesbian community in promoting them in their story lines.” Polls reflect divergent trends in how young adults — Holly-

wood’s favorite demographic — view these two issues. According to the Pew Research Center, Americans under 30 tilted slightly against same-sex marriage in 2004, and now favor it by 65 percent to 30 percent — a higher approval rate than for older Americans. “Assuming these trends continue, someone who supports same-sex marriage is probably heartened, because those most opposed are fading from the scene,” said David Masci, a senior researcher with the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life. There’s no equivalent shift or age gap on abortion. Pew’s latest survey on the topic, in April, found that the views of young adults had been more or less stable in recent years and differed little from their elders. While 53 percent of those under 30 supported abortion rights, the approval rate was 55 percent among those aged 50 to 64. One possible consequence: While same-sex marriage might be an issue that Democrats can use to energize youthful voters this year, that may be less likely with abortion rights. “Abortion is an ongoing, protracted war,” said O’Brien of Catholics for Choice. “Gay rights is the new kid on the block, the new thing, and it’s doing particularly well.” Indeed, there’s been concern among abortion-rights activists for a number of years that their cause doesn’t galvanize large numbers of college students and other young adults. Nancy Keenan, president of NARAL Pro-Choice America, cited the need for younger leadership in the movement as she announced Thursday she’d be stepping down at the end of this year. At the University of Wisconsin, political science professor Donald Downs says he’s detected an upsurge of strength for local antiabortion groups. “Even in Madison, I know social liberals who are uncomfortable with abortion,” he said. He also noted that the right to abortion has been established for four decades. “It’s not a huge issue unless it’s taken away,” Downs said. “With gay marriage, they’re trying to establish it. It’s a different psychology.”

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SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 9A

Body of nurse who died while Skyping is home The Associated Press

ROCHESTER, N.Y — The body of a U.S. Army nurse who died suddenly in Afghanistan during a computer video chat with his wife arrived Saturday in western New York, in advance of his planned funeral. More than 100 mourners and admirers assembled at a Rochester airport to pay tribute to Capt. Bruce Kevin Clark. Many carried American flags. The group included veterans of four other U.S. wars, and members of Clark’s family.

FLAGS Continued from Page 3A

on South Main Street and look back at all the cemetery and all the flags out here, it’s pretty neat,” said Dave Brown of Hanover Township, a member of the Sons of the AMVETS auxiliary. The volunteers were preparing the cemetery for Memorial Day – this year on May 28 – the national holiday honoring veterans who died in war. The post will also pay tribute to those veterans with a 21-gun salute at the cemetery flag pole that day. The flags were donated by the Luzerne County Office of Veteran Affairs. For some, Saturday’s effort was a labor of love.

BOWLING Continued from Page 3A

an unkind word about others. “She always found some redeemable quality in everyone,” said Leary. “She was a wonderful person with an ever-present smile, and we are better for having known her.” Leary said the team from LCCC reflected the college’s commitment to its employees and the community it serves. Leigh Robinson and Danielle Shanaberger also coordinated

Clark’s wife, Susan OrellanaClark, was in Texas chatting with him via Skype on April 30 when he collapsed. Her family has said she tried for two hours to get help for her dying husband, before finally seeing military officials enter the room where he lay. Initially, Clark’s family said they believed he had been shot, and that after he fell his wife could see a bullet hole in the closet behind him, but military officials have since said there was no bullet wound on his body. The cause of his death is still being in-

vestigated. Clark’s body arrived in Rochester just before 10 a.m. aboard a Kalitta Air cargo plane. His casket, draped in an American flag, was lowered into a gray hearse while bagpipers played “Amazing Grace.” “It’s important that people never forget the sacrifices that the soldiers and their families make for all of us,” said Susan MacDougall, of Brighton, who was among the mourners. “They give of themselves in ways that we can only imagine.”

“I have my mom that’s buried here; she’s a vet,” said Post 59 Commander Bill Slabinski, tears welling in his eyes. “I’ve got aunts, uncles, grandfathers who are buried here, and it’s very emotional for me.” Some of those buried at St. Mary’s served in wars as far back as the Spanish-American War and the Civil War, but time has not diminished their sacrifice, Slabinski said. They all get flags. There’s also the grave of the woman who died on the Lusitania – the British passenger ship sunk by a German torpedo during World War I – she gets a flag too. For other volunteers, Saturday was an opportunity to teach about the value of service. Brad Fleeger of Sweet Valley walked the cemetery with his grandson

Cameron Fleeger. “It’s just satisfaction to know we did a good thing,” Brad said, adding “and we get hot dogs after.” Others said they were happy just to be there. “I feel it’s an honor to do this,” said Martin A. Smith of Hanover Township, an AMVETS member and Air Force veteran. “These people need the recognition.” “I look forward to it every year,” said Gabe Metric of Hanover Township, another Air Force veteran who has also volunteered for 14 years at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Plains Township. “It’s a feeling you have inside,” he said. “It’s a feeling that nobody can express, it’s just a feeling that you have inside your body.”

the event and expressed delight at the great turnout. Approximately 75 bowlers filled 18 lanes at Chacko’s for the event. “Barbara herself volunteered for the American Cancer Society before her death, and she would have been pleased that her family and friends remained committed to the cause,” said participant Carol Marino, Wilkes-Barre Township, who grew up with Struckus. The event sponsored by Relay for Life cost each bowler $20, which included two hours of bowling, shoes, a T-shirt and refreshments. Many bowlers said

they were happy to be included in an enjoyable activity, while knowing they were supporting a worthy cause. The Relay for Life will take place on June 16 and 17. For further information or to make a contribution, those interested can contact Sarah Edwards at 760-4083. Those interested in obtaining information or support from the American Cancer Society can call 1-800-227-2345. The society always welcomes volunteers for such programs as Road to Recovery, which helps cancer patients to get to medical appointments.

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ISMAEL DIAZ, 77, of WilkesBarre, passed away on Friday at Riverstreet Manor, Wilkes-Barre. He was born in Barranquitas, Puerto Rico, on May 31, 1934. He was the son of the late Valeriano Diaz and Regina Torres. He was preceded in death by his sister, Ernestina Diaz and his brother, Benjamin Diaz. Surviving are his wife of 42 years, the former Petra Rivera Diaz, Wilkes-Barre; daughter, Maria Ramos and her husband, Juan, Ashley; three grandchildren, Juan, Kristina Marie and David Ismael; sisters, Elsa, Felicidad, Irma, Laura, Hilda and Carmen; brothers, Moises, Felix Humberto and Elio; numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held on Monday at 5 p.m. from the George A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley. Private interment will be held in Puerto Rico. Family and friends may call on Monday from 3 to 5 p.m. MIKE WELLES, of WilkesBarre Township, died Saturday afternoon at home, with his family by his side. Funeral arrangements are pending with arrangements by Lehman Family Funeral Service, 689 Hazle Street, Wilkes-Barre. Full obituary will appear in Monday’s edition or by visiting www.lehmanfuneralhome.com. JOAN S. BOOTH, age 82, of Harveys Lake, passed away Saturday, May 12, 2012 at the Meadows Nursing Center, Dallas. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Curtis L. Swanson Funeral Home Inc., corner of Routes 29 & 118, Pikes Creek. WALTER NEBERDOSKY, 67, of Larksville, passed away Friday at Hospice Community Care, Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre. Funeral arrangements are pending from the S.J. Grontkowski Funeral Home, 530 W. Main St., Plymouth.

PATRICIA CONAHAN, 67, of Ross Street, Ashley, died Friday evening at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. Patricia was born in Wilkes-Barre on December 2, 1944. She was the daughter of the late James L. and Carmello (Corsano) Conahan. Patricia was a graduate of St. Leo’s High School, Class of 1963, and was a lifelong resident of Ashley. She was also an Ashley councilwoman for many years. Surviving are brother, James “Jay” Conahan, Jacksonville, Fla.; nieces and nephews. Relatives and friends are invited to attend Patricia’s Mass of Christian Burial with cremated remains on Tuesday at 11 a.m. in St. Leo’s/Holy Rosary Church, Manhattan Street, Ashley. Interment will be held at the convenience of the family. Arrangements are by the George A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105 North Main Street, Ashley. ALBERT S. KARICHNER, 87, a resident of Harding, died Saturday, May 12, 2012, in the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Plains Township. Funeral arrangements have been entrusted to and will be announced by the H. Merritt Hughes Funeral Home Inc., a Golden Rule Funeral Home, 211 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston. RUBY HOLLOWAY, 79, of Mountain Top, passed away Friday evening at the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. The full obituary will appear in Monday’s paper. Kniffen O’Malley Funeral Home Inc., 465 S. Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, is in charge of arrangements. EDWARD C. GRIGLOCK, 36, of Moosic, passed away Friday, May 11, 2012. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Howell-Lussi Funeral Home, 509 Wyoming Avenue, West Pittston.

FUNERALS ARNOLD – Richard, funeral Mass 10:30 a.m. Monday in the Church of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception, 130 S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call at 9:30 a.m. FEDEROWICZ – Matilda, memorial Mass 11 a.m. Saturday, May 19, in All Saints Parish, Plymouth. FRANQUET – Munjia, friends may call 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday in the Gubbiotti Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exeter. JOHNSTON – Stephanie, Mass of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. Tuesday in the Church of the Holy Redeemer (Corpus Christi Parish), Harding. Those attending the funeral Mass are asked to go directly to the church on Tuesday morning as there will be no procession from the funeral home. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. Monday in the funeral home. KOHL – Charles Sr., Mass of Christian Burial 10:30 a.m. Monday in St. Mary Our Lady Hope of Christians Church, Dorrance Corners, Wapwallopen. Friends may call 9:30 a.m. at the church. RUDZKI – Christine, funeral services 10 a.m. Monday in the Lokuta-Zawacki Funeral Home, 200 Wyoming Ave., Dupont. Funeral Mass at 10:30 a.m. in the Holy Mother of Sorrows Church, 212 Wyoming Ave., Dupont. Friends may call 9 to 10 a.m. WESNAK – Robert, Mass of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. Monday in St. Joseph Marello Parish at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church,

In Loving Memory Of

Barbara J. Chronowski

For those I love For those who love me... When I am gone, release me, let me go... I have so many things to see and do You mustn’t tie yourself to me with tears, Be happy that we had so many years. I gave you my love. You can only guess How much you gave me in happiness. I thank you for the love you each have shown, But now it’s time I traveled on alone. So grieve awhile for me, if grieve you must Then let your grief be comforted by trust. It’s only for a while that we must part. So bless the memories that lie within your heart. I won’t be far away, for life goes on. So, if you need me, call and I will come. Though you can’t see me or touch me, I’ll be near. And if you listen with your heart, you’ll hear All of my love around you soft and clear. Sadly Missed By Her Husband, Family and Friends

237 William St., Pittston. Those attending the funeral Mass and interment are asked to go directly to church.

OBITUARY POLICY The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

In Memory Of My Mother

Shirley Kennedy 5/5/56 ~ 7/9/08

You were a precious gift from God above, so much beauty, grace and love. You touched our hearts in so many ways, your smile so bright even on the bad day. You heard God’s whisper calling you home, you didn’t want to go and leave us alone. You loved us so much, you held on tight, til all the strength was gone and you could no longer fight. He called your name a few times before, you knew you couldn’t wait anymore. So you gave your hand to God and slowly drifted away. Knowing that with our love we will be together again some day. Sadly Missing You, Jimmy, Megan and Tyler

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THE TIMES LEADER

Andrew J. Biniek Jr.

Munjia Franquet

May 11, 2012

May 4, 2012

J. Biniek Jr. “Staz,” of A ndrew Plains Township, passed away

Friday morning, May 11, 2012, after a brief illness. Born in Plains Township, he was the son of the late Andrew and Helen Moses Biniek Sr. He was educated in Plains Township schools and was a graduate of Plains Memorial High School, Class of 1951. Andrew spent most of his career in the restaurant industry. He worked as a chef and restaurant manager for Jimeal’s Catering. He also owned and operated Andy’s Bar and Grill, The Golden Palace with his brothers, and most recently was a restaurant manager at Eddie’s Place. Andrew was a member of Ss. Peter and Paul Roman Catholic Church, Plains Township. He was also a member of American Legion Joseph E. Conlon Post 558, Plains Township. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by a daughter, Kimberly Heidig; granddaughter, Megan Evans; brother, William Biniek, who passed away on April 30, 2012, and sister-in-law, Margaret Biniek. Andrew is survived by his wife, the former Joan Clark, with whom he celebrated his 50th wedding anniversary on April 24; daughter Theresa Biniek and fiancé, Rudy Caccia, Plains Township; son, Kevin and his wife, Amy Biniek, Plains Township; son, Andrew III and his wife, Lynese Biniek, Baltimore, Md.; daughter Tracey Biniek, Exeter; grandchildren, William Evans Jr., Kristin and Michael Malenovitch; Kevin Jr. and Nicholas Biniek,

and Jessica Fink; four great-grandchildren; brothers, Joseph Biniek, Edward and his wife, Patricia Biniek, all of Plains Township, brother, Thomas and his wife, Gail Biniek, Plymouth; sister-in-law, Jane Biniek of Plains Township; his favorite sidekick, Eddie Jr., many aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, great-nieces, great-nephews and cousins. Funeral services will be held at 9 a.m. Tuesday from Michael J. Mikelski Funeral Home, 293 S. River St., Plains Township. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m. at Ss. Peter and Paul Church, Plains Township. Interment will be in Ss. Peter and Paul Cemetery, Plains Township. Friends may call from 4 to 8 p.m. Monday at the funeral home. The family would like to extend their deepest gratitude to the nurses and staff at Manor Care Health Services – Kingston, for their exceptional care and compassion for Andrew and his family. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Cancer Society.

Dominick John Liguori May 11, 2012 John Liguori, U.S. ArD ominick my, Spc. 4, 31, of Swoyersville,

passed away on Friday, May 11, 2012, at his home, surrounded by his family, after three years struggle with end stage lung disease, an injury he acquired in Iraq. Born in Kingston on January 18, 1981, he was the son of Andrea and Andrew Kovalik. He was a graduate of West Side Tech in 1999. He worked at Bridon American as a machinist mechanic for two years. Then, he joined the U.S. Army Military and he served two tours of duty, one in Afghanistan and one in Iraq. He was with the 82nd Airborne and Bravo Unit, Specialist in Infantry and Sniper unit. He was an excellent marksman. He also served with the U.S. Army Guard Company C, 111th Army Reserve Infantry, Kutztown. Surviving are his parents. He was the brother of Allyse, Nicholas, Misty and Andy; uncle to Misha, Alexis Brayden, Zanden and Michael; grandson to Sandra and Samuel Liguori and Helen Kovalik; nephew to Deni and Lee Houck, and he had many cousins.

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She was born in Kyoto, Japan, and moved to the United States in 1951. She formerly lived in San Francisco, Calif.; Huntsville, Ala.; Willingboro and Browns Mills, N.J., and in Dallas, Pa. Munjia, better known to her friends as Shino, attended Kyoto schools, where she studied the art of flower arranging and tailoring. She was also associated with her father in his textile manufacturing business, and worked for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Japan. In the U.S., she studied business and worked for Brown Engineering in Huntsville, Ala.; Eaton Corporation in Philadelphia, and for the Eaton Corporation’s Samuel Moore Division in Moorestown, N.J., from where she retired in 1983. Shino was an avid bridge player and attained the rank of Silver Life Master. She also was a Certified Junior Bowling Congress Coach/Instructor and won numerous local and regional tournaments. She was well known for her fine handmade quilts. In addition to her hobbies, Shino devoted many years as a volunteer at John Heinz. Shino was preceded in death by her parents and Carl, her loving husband of 62 years. She is survived by her daughter, Barbara, Alexandria, Va.; her son, Carl, and his wife, Hol-

A service will be conducted on Tuesday at 8 p.m. with military honors at the Hugh B. Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort. Friends may call on Tuesday from 6 to 9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made to Disabled Veterans.

Patsy Jean Kinney 5/9/48 - 5/12/98 In Memoriam, Happy Birthday and Mother’s Day In Heaven

May 11, 2012

L passed away Friday in her home.

Born in Wyoming, she was the daughter of the late Louis and Bertha Bublo Borsos. She was a graduate of Wyoming Memorial High School, class of 1950, and received her Registered Nursing Diploma from the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing in 1953. Leona was employed at Mercy Hospital of WilkesBarre, primarily in the obstetrics department. Since 1971, Leona and her husband, the late Joseph Gober, owned and operated Gober’s Bar and Restaurant, now Gober’s Deco Lounge. She was a member of St. Joseph’s Church of St. Monica’s Parish of Wyoming. Preceding her in death were her husband, Joseph, in 2006; infant brothers, Louis and Edward, and sister Dorothy Esposito. Surviving are children, Elizabeth Gober-Mangan and her husband, James, Exeter; Gerard Gober and his wife, Jane, Phoenixville, Pa.; Joseph Gober and his wife, Anne, Wyoming; Louis Gober and his wife, Liz, Wilson, Pa.; Christopher Gober and his wife, Mary, Nanticoke; nu-

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merous grandchildren and greatgrandchildren; nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held Tuesday at 10 a.m. in St Joseph’s Church of St. Monica’s Parish, 97 East 6th Street, Wyoming. All relatives and friends are asked to go directly to the church the morning of the service. Interment will be in St. Joseph’s Cemetery, West Wyoming. Friends may call Monday 1 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 9 p.m. in Gober’s Deco Lounge, 1248 Wyoming Avenue, Exeter. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Foundation, Lockbox #1352 P.O. Box 8500, Philadelphia, PA 19178-1352 Arrangements are by the Metcalfe and Shaver Funeral Home Inc., 504 Wyoming Avenue, Wyoming. More Obituaries, Page 11A

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ly; her granddaughter Amy, Fairfield, Conn.; her nephew, William Bell, and his wife, Elaine, including their daughters, Erin, Cathleen and Cara, West Pittston, and her family members living in Japan, sisters, Atsuko, and Takako, and brother-in-law, Kimitaka. Shino was devoted to her family, and was a generous friend to all. She will be missed. A viewing will be held at Gubbiotti Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming Avenue, Exeter, on Thursday, the 17th of May 2012, from 5 to 7 p.m. Shino will be interred with her husband, Carl, in Arlington National Cemetery. Donations can be made to the American Cancer Society (www.cancer.org) To send the family an expression of sympathy or an online condolence, please visit www.gubbiottifh.com.

Leona Gober

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unjia Franquet, 86, of EdwardsM ville, passed away peacefully at home on May 4, 2012.

eona Gober, 79, of Exeter,

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The Mom I Remember The mom I remember is intelligent… She was programming computers before most knew what they were. The mom I remember is strong… She stood up for what she believed no matter who disagreed with her, she was a fighter. The mom I remember is determined… She could do absolutely anything she set her mind to! She rewired the house, laid linoleum in the kitchen, hung the drywall, and even rebuilt a carburetor! The mom I remember is creative… She made furniture which included storage space, a lighted box design for Christmas, gun cabinets, kitchen cabinets, all sorts of crafts, custom pin striping on her car. The Mom I remember is talented… She could shoot a bow like no one else, and boy could she dance. The mom I remember is beautiful… She would always look her best whether she was going out or just going to work. The mom I remember is spiritual… She believed in a higher power and had faith that things would work out, everything happens for a reason, this too shall pass The mom I remember is focused… She had to be the best at everything she did. The mom I remember is funny… She could always make people laugh, especially when she tried to trim a tree and cut the branches below her and got stuck! The mom I remember is still inside of You!

I LOVE YOU…

Sadly missed by daughter Lisa Timms, grandson Cody Timms and Theresa’s sisters Joan and Dolores


CMYK

Eleanor A. Swetts May 11, 2012

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leanor A. Swetts, 89, a resident of West Wyoming, passed away peacefully on Friday morning, May 11, 2012, at The Laurels Nursing Center, Kingston, where she had recently been a guest. Her beloved husband was the late John A. Swetts, who passed away on May 22, 2008. Together, John and Eleanor shared 70 beautiful years of marriage. Born in Swoyersville on October 8, 1922, Eleanor was the daughter of the late Leo and Bridget (McGuire) Puchlik. Eleanor was raised in Swoyersville and attended the former Swoyersville High School. A homemaker most of her life, Eleanor took great pride in tending to the daily needs of her home and family. Eleanor was a faithful member of Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church, Swoyersville. A woman of many enjoyments, Eleanor especially enjoyed cooking and baking for her loved ones. She also loved to travel, especially to her favorite destination, Atlantic City. Family was Eleanor’s greatest love in life and she cherished each moment she had with her loved ones. She will always be remembered as a loving and devoted wife, mother, mother-in-law, grandmother, sister, aunt and friend. Her spirit will forever live on in the hearts of those she held dear. In addition to her parents, Leo and Bridget Puchlik and her husband, John, Eleanor was preceded in death by her only son, Richard M. Swetts, who passed away on August 14, 2001; her grandson, Robert Swetts, who passed away on September 14, 2011; her sister, Janice M. Govier. Eleanor is survived by her daughter-in-law, Evelyn Swetts, of Edwardsville; her sister, Romaine Pie-

kanski, of Larksville; her grandchildren, John Swetts and Richard Swetts; her great-grandchildren, Robert, Eric, Noelle, Rob, Kristie, Richie, Christina and Ryan; her two great-great grandchildren; numerous nieces and nephews. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend the funeral, which will be conducted on Tuesday, May 15, 2012 at 9:30 a.m. from the Wroblewski Funeral Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort, followed by a Mass of Christian Burial to be celebrated at 10 a.m. in Holy Trinity Church, 116 Hughes Street, Swoyersville, with the Reverend Joseph J. Pisaneschi, her Pastor, officiating. Interment with the Rite of Committal will follow in Saint Mary’s Cemetery, Swoyersville. Family and friends are invited to call on Monday, May 14, 2012 from 5 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home. For additional information or to send the family of Mrs. Eleanor A. Swetts an online message of condolence, you may visit the funeral home website, www.wroblewskifuneralhome.com. Memorial contributions may be made in Eleanor’s memory to Holy Trinity Church, 116 Hughes Street, Swoyersville, PA 18704.

May 12, 2012

Born in Dallas, on April 22, 1926, Irene was a daughter of the late John and Elizabeth Magda Stofila. She attended College Misericordia. Irene worked for many years in the lab at the former Nesbitt Memorial Hospital, Kingston. A woman of strong faith, Irene was active for many years in St. Therese’s Church, Shavertown. Preceding her in death, in addition to her parents, were her husband, Thomas Krivak; brothers, George and John Stofila; sister, Elizabeth Doskos. Surviving are sons, John, Tho-

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Irene Krivak rene Krivak passed from this life ICenter, Saturday, May 12, 2012 at Mercy Dallas.

mas, Andrew and Matthew Krivak; daughters, Anne Hart, Carla Meister and Michele Kirk; 12 grandchildren; one great-grandson; sister, Rosemary Warren. Funeral services will be private and at the convenience of family. Interment will be made in Sacred Heart Cemetery, Dallas. Irene enjoyed her stay with the Sisters of Mercy; if desired, memorial donations may be made to Mercy Center, 301 Lake Street, Dallas, PA 18612. Arrangements have been entrusted to the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main Street, Shavertown, PA 18708.

come that is crucial to their families’ economic security. Lower-income families are especially dependent on the money earned by working mothers, who provide nearly half of family income,” the report states. Casey said gender discrimination is the most significant factor in the wage disparity between men and women, and legislation he cosponsors – the Paycheck Fairness Act – would help close the gap more quickly in enacted. The legislative proposal: • Prohibits employers from punishing employees for sharing salary information with coworkers. • Makes discrimination cost-

S

ly to employers by making those who bring gender discrimination cases eligible for compensatory and punitive damages as is the case with race and ethnicity discrimination cases. • Develops new training programs for women and girls on how to negotiate compensation packages and recognizes employers who have eliminated pay disparities. Casey thinks training program costs would be “minimal.” No disparity in some jobs Dana Charles Clark, provost/ vice president of academic affairs at Luzerne County Community College, said the disparity between men’s and women’s wages varies by profession and can be non-existent in some. For example, male and female teachers are usually guaranteed equal pay because of the way union contracts are written. The

Joseph ‘Chopper’ Kopinski May 11, 2012 Joe passed away at home, peacefully, surrounded by his wife and children, Friday, May 11, 2012. He was born February 27, 1933, in Wilkes-Barre. He was a son of the late John and Sophie Baranowski Kopinski. He was married to his wife, Dorine Burgit, for 55 years. They would have celebrated their 56th wedding anniversary on June 16. Joe was a 1951 graduate of St. Mary’s High School, Wilkes-Barre, and was employed as assistant manager of McCarthy Tire and Car Wash, Wilkes-Barre, for 48 years. Joe lived a simple life, was known as a kind and caring person and dedicated worker, and he enjoyed traveling and vacationing with his wife, children, and grandchildren. He could be found at the race track or casino on most nights. He loved baseball, especially the Phillies, and watching his grandson and granddaughter playing ball. Just the mention of a Phillies or Giants game could keep him talking all night. He was proud of his children’s

and grandchildren’s accomplishments, and loved wearing any of his grandson’s apparel that carried the state trooper emblem. Joe was known as a great dart league player, obtaining the nickname of “Chopper” from his style of shooting darts, and won many championships on all competitive levels. He is survived by his wife, Dorine; son, Daniel, and his wife, Mary Rose, of Swoyersville; daughters, Cindy Borowicz and her husband, Tom, of Olyphant, and Diane Pawlush and her husband, Larry, of Wilkes-Barre; grandchildren, Amy and her husband, Steve; Amanda and her husband, George; Brian, Danny and Taylor. Funeral services will be held Tuesday at 9 a.m. from the Jendrzejewski Funeral Home, 21 North Meade Street, Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in Our Lady of Hope Parish, 40 Park Avenue, Wilkes-Barre. The Reverend John S. Terry, pastor, will be celebrant. Interment will be in Maple Hill Cemetery, Hanover Township. Friends may call Monday from 4 to 8 p.m. The family would like to thank the nurses at Hospice Community Care and the doctors who cared for Joe for their care and compassion.

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 11A

“I would be very much in favor of any legislation that could help women get equal opportunities in any work situation.’’ Dana Charles Clark Luzerne County Community College

same holds true in entry-level medical careers and in high-demand jobs such as engineering, Clark said. Most pay disparity can be seen in the corporate world, Clarke said, but there are cases in low- to average-paying jobs. She pointed to an ongoing case of women suing Wal-Mart for gender discrimination in California. “I would be very much in favor of any legislation that could help women get equal opportunities in any work situation,” she said. Opposing viewpoint Mary Ellen Petcavage, who retired in February from a local engineering and consulting firm after 30 years in the human relations field, disagrees. “I think we’re being legislated to death, quite honestly. These kinds of burdensome regulations are sometimes more harmful than beneficial,” said Petcavage, of Bear Creek Township. “You had to almost be a lawyer to understand some of the nuances in requirements.” Petcavage has worked with hourly and salaried personnel in the manufacturing, warehouse, large and small retail and engineering fields over her career and said she saw no disparity in wages between men and women in fields in which their skill sets were in high demand. She believes the answer lies in schools providing training to women and girls to better present their skill sets and negotiate salary packages. And families should work to instill the confidence to do so. Casey had said he believes gaps exist in current law, and allowing compensatory and punitive damages for gender discrimination would cut down on the number of suits filed because employers would be less willing to discriminate if they knew it could cost them signif-

icantly in court. Changes come slow Dana Harris, assistant professor in the Division of Business, Management and Technology at Keystone College in La Plume, said she doesn’t disagree that a gap exists between men’s and women’s wages, but she believes closing it will take a significant amount of time even if the legislation is adopted. When the Equal Pay Act of 1963 was enacted, less than 8 percent of women had bachelor’s degrees while more than a third of all women hold them today, Harris noted. “There weren’t as many women in the workforce and they weren’t as educated,” she said. Now, U.S. Census Bureau data shows that 58 percent of adults with advanced degrees are women, which means it’s likely that more women will hold upper management jobs in the future, pushing up the pay scale, Harris said. “What we’d like to see is the gap closed as quickly as possible,” she said. Harris also noted that it wasn’t until 1993 that the Family and Medical Leave Act, which allows individuals to take up to 12 weeks off from work in a year for medical reasons or pregnancy/childbirth and still retain their same position, was enacted. Prior to then, the onus of childcare was entirely on women, she said. But the United States still has a long way to go. Harris said the U.S. is one of only five countries (out of 173) that do not mandate paid maternity leave, making it harder for women to raise a child and keep a good job. The other countries that don’t require it are Lesotho, New Guinea, Liberia and Switzerland. And the U.S., by the way, is not among the 66 countries that offer paid paternity leave.

More Obituaries, Page 10A

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TECHNOLOGY Continued from Page 1A

offer the potential to enhance learning by providing students with a greater array of easily-accessible learning resources, fostering collaborative learning and saving teachers time on mundane tasks. Technology offers options James Kupetz, technology coordinator for the Pittston Area School District, said primary and secondary students today view technology and social media in particular as a more integral part of their lives than their counterparts 10 years earlier did. Schools and teachers who fail to use social media in the classroom are missing opportunities to improve and reinforce their student’s understanding of a lesson while saving themselves time. “Facebook might not be the answer,” he said, but social media designed specifically for educational use that allows social interaction while providing teachers more control over the site’s content offers great potential. While he finds Edmodo useful, Carroll said he wouldn’t be comfortable using Facebook or another non-academic site to communicate with student because he would lack control over what students could post on the site. He does have a personal social media account for keeping in touch with high school and college friends, but said he wouldn’t be comfortable using a non-academic site to connect with students. Carroll said he gets friend requests from former students more often than current ones, but doesn’t accept either. “(Former students) are usually friends with kids who are still in the school,” he said. “I’d email them back telling them because of the connection with school it’s not appropriate at that time. I don’t currently have any former students as friends.” Other local educators expressed similar sentiments. Kelly Vincelli, an English teacher at Pittston Area High School, said she sometimes gets friend requests from students as well, but declines them. “They’ll try, but they kind of get the hint I think,” she said. Northwest Area Superintendent Ronald Grevera said he doesn’t have a Facebook page and advises teachers against having a profile on the site. “There’s always that threat out there that somebody could see something they don’t like on that page,” Grevera said. Facebook issues

DETECTIVES Continued from Page 1A

499,999. Clothing allowance Luzerne County’s $1,050 annual clothing/equipment allowance for detectives stands out because eight other third-class counties don’t provide this benefit. The three remaining counties have annual allowances of $300, $350 and $650. The18 sick days provided to detectives here rank second highest among the 12 counties, surpassed only by neighboring Lackawanna, which grants 20 sick days. York and Cumberland counties provide the least sick days – five – followed by Lehigh with six and Berks with seven. The maximum vacation days here – 30 – is exceeded only in Dauphin County, which provides up to 35. Seven counties have vacation day caps between 20 and 25. Negotiations broke off Luzerne County’s detective negotiations reached an impasse when a Luzerne County Council majority last week rejected the best proposal extracted by the administration. This proposal would have reduced length-of-service bonuses and time off for detectives hired in the future, but not existing ones. Detectives would forgo pay raises this year and receive 2-percent hikes the remaining four years of the contract.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Pittston Area High School teachers Sal Carroll and Kelly Vincelli use Edmodo, an educational social media website that operates like Facebook but offers teachers more control over student postings.

Inappropriate interactions over social media have landed some school district employees in hot water nationally and locally. Last month Lackawanna County authorities arrested Gavin Joseph Creco II of Clarks Summit on a single count of corruption of minors charges for allegedly asking a 12-year-old for her underwear and other clothing via Facebook chat. He is awaiting trial after waiving a preliminary hearing in April. Attention to similar incidents has prompted districts around the nation to draft new social media policies. At least 40 districts nationwide have done so, according to an April Associated Press report. Hazleton Area, Luzerne County’s largest school district, is one of them. Acting Superintendent Francis Antonelli said the district adopted new social media guidelines for teachers in its operations policy in March in response to media reports of inappropriate teacherstudent contact online. “I believe that certainly a policy at this point in time has merit, in that you unfortunately read what’s been happening throughout the country with inappropriate behavior on social media sites between adults and children, and specifically between students and teachers,” Antonelli said. “It was a call to awareness.” Hazleton’s policy prohibits teachers from becoming

COUNTY DETECTIVE NON-VACATION DAYS OFF Personal Holiday

Sick Total

Lackawanna 4

14

20

Erie 4

14

18

Luzerne 5

12

Westmoreland 2

13

38 36

18

35

15*

30

Chester 3

14

12

29

Dauphin 5

9*

15*

Lancaster 4

29

12

12

28

Northampton 5.5 9.5

12

27

Berks 2

12

Cumberland 3

12

7 21 5 20

6 19 5 18 York 13 *Maximum, depends on years of service Lehigh 2

“friends” or otherwise communicating with students via personal accounts on social networks and from posting photographs of students on personal blogs and social networking sites. It mandates that teachers use only school-sponsored email addresses, websites and wikis to communicate with students online. If a student contacts a teacher through the teacher’s personal social media site, the teacher is to respond via district-sponsored channels, the policy states. Hazleton’s policy also emphasizes that the posting of inappropriate photographs and other material on a personal social media page can result in discipline up to and including termination. “As a general guideline, employees should not post anything that they would not want to read in a newspaper or on billboard,” the policy reads. ‘Uncharted territory’ Wyoming Area Superintendent Ray Bernardi said his district doesn’t have a policy addressing social media other than its computer use policy, but expressed interest in drafting one. “That’s uncharted territory but it certainly needs to be addressed, and it’s something that we have to take up with our solicitor to codify it,” Bernardi said. Other districts in the area said they block access to Facebook and other social media sites on school computers, and address social media in their acceptable use of resources and personal

communications device policies, cause anything posted during but have stopped short of making school hours or from a school rules about what teachers and computer could be a serious instudents can say and do online fraction. “When you look at the teaching outside of school hours over First profession, you’re looking at peoAmendment concerns. “Personally I don’t know ple who are professionals and whether that would be a violation should act accordingly,” Suppon of someone’s rights or not,” Grea- said. Dallas Superintendent Frank ter Nanticoke Area Superintendent Tony Perrone said. “…You Galicki said his district blocks socould have a policy, but how cial media websites on school computers and adwould you police it?” dresses the issue in its Those concerns “That’s one of acceptable use of are not without precthe biggest technology policy. edent. The school district Last year Missouri benefits; to get also uses an academic lawmakers barred social media that is teachers from using in touch with under district control, websites that allow them when which eliminates the exclusive access they’re not in need for students and with students. A teachers to communijudge granted an in- front of you in cate via Facebook and junction stopping the classother non-academic the law from taking social media, he said. effect on First room.” District administraAmendment amidst Sal Carroll complaints from Pittston Area teacher tors will also monitor what students post to teachers that it social media sites if a would bar them from school receives word using social media sites like Facebook and Twitter, that threatening or slanderous and the law was later repealed by comments have been made against district employees or stuthe state legislature. Some local officials said their dents, and will take appropriate computer and phone use policies action, Galicki said. Galicki said the district was inoffer adequate guidance and proformed last year that a student tection for the district. Wyoming Valley West Superin- had threatened on Facebook to tendent Chuck Suppon said the bring a concealed weapon to district emphasizes that teachers school and use it on another stushould consider three factors dent. The district notified police when posting anything to social and the student was removed media: time, place and content. from school the following day, The first two are important be- Galicki said.

COMPARING COUNTY DETECTIVE DEPARTMENTS County Luzerne

Full-time detectives 10

Unionized Yes

Cumberland Lancaster

4 9

No Yes

Lackawanna

13

Yes

Northampton

6

Yes

Lehigh Dauphin

17 11

No Yes

Erie York

8 9

Westmoreland

15

Chester

20

Berks

28

Yes Yes except chief/asst chief Yes except chief Yes except chief and operation Lt. Yes except chief

11

Source: Individual counties Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

Length-of-service, or longevity, bonuses have been criticized by Luzerne County officials who argue workers shouldn’t receive special rewards beyond pay, time off and benefits. Cumberland, York and Berks counties don’t pay longevity to detectives. The other nine use a mix of percentage formulas or flat dollar amounts, with Luzerne County detectives receiving one of the most favorable calculations. Luzerne County’s formula multiplies the number of employment years, a half percent and the salary, resulting in bonuses ranging from $498 to $13,530 in 2011. For example, a 32-year detective making $82,000 receives a longevity bonus of $13,120 in Luzerne County. Chester County pays $225 per year of service, which would amount to $7,200 for a 32-year de-

Source: Individual counties

Length of service bonus pay One half percent for each year of service times salary, which was $498-$13,530 in 2011. None $600, 5 yrs; $1,100, 10 yrs; $1,600, 15 yrs; $2,100, 20 yrs $500, 7 yrs; $750, 10 yrs; $1,000, 15 yrs; $1,250, 20 yrs; $1,500, 25 yrs Bonuses after 8 years ranging from 0.25% to 1.5% of salary. $400, 10 years; $800, 15 years. 5%-17.4% of salary, depending on years of service, after 4 years of. employment. Amounts to $3,443$11,980.00 0.25% times years of service None

Vacation 5-30 days

Clothes/equip. allowance $1,050 in 2011

10-20 days 5-25 days

None None

5-25 days

$350 a year

10-25 days

None

10-25 days 9-35 days

None None

6-30 days 10-30 days

$650 a year None

5% of pay, with the percentage increasing 5% every 5 years $225 per year of service

10-25 days

$300 a year

12-24 days

None

None

10-30 days

None

When pressed at a recent council meeting, county Human Resources Director Andrew Check said arbitration tends to favor unions. Three other third-class counties – Westmoreland, Lancaster and Northampton – are faced with expired detective contracts headed for binding arbitration, but officials in those counties are more optimistic. “There’s always a risk with Arbitration concerns binding arbitration, but it’s my beSome Luzerne County Council lief given the economic condimembers are leery of binding ar- tions that we’re facing today that we will more likely get a better rebitration. tective. Lackawanna provides $1,500 for detectives with more than 25 years. Detectives with over 20 years of employment receive $2,100 in Lancaster. Lehigh County would pay $1,000. The formula in Northampton uses a maximum 1.5 percent of the salary for longevity, which means the $82,000 detective would receive $1,230.

Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

sult than we had in the past with binding arbitration,” said Northampton County Human Resources Director Patricia Siemiontkowski. Three other Northampton County unions recently received binding arbitration awards she described as “fair.” “I’m not as fearful of arbitration as I had been in the past,” she said. Westmoreland Human Resources Director Charles Dominick also believes arbitrators are more willing to consider counties’ financial struggles. “I think arbitration has favored

www.timesleader.com

Sample policy needed Part of the reason other local districts haven’t added more comprehensive policies like Hazleton’s may lie in that the Pennsylvania School Boards Association has not drafted a sample policy on the issue. School boards often look to the association for guidance when drafting new policies. Steve Robinson, spokesman for the association, said PSBA hasn’t written a policy because there is no state law to aid the association in doing so. Instead, PSBA suggests school boards consult their solicitors for guidance. “When writing sample policies we refer back to state law,” Robinson said. “There’s no law in place now and there are all kinds of First Amendment issues.” Robinson said PSBA hasn’t recommended districts create new social media policies but added “of course having policies in place for any number of things is always a good idea.” The state Department of Education hasn’t taken a stance either, calling it a local issue. “Each school district sets its own policies regarding social media,” department spokesman Tim Eller said. The Pennsylvania State Education Association, the state teacher’s union, does not make recommendations to districts on their policies but has issued suggestions for its members about their use of social media and runs educational seminars for teachers on the same issue. “Do not accept friend requests from your students or their parents,” the Association recommends. “If a student or parent of a student messages you through a social media site, do not respond.” The association also recommends that teachers avoid posting anything via social media about students, other teachers and administrators or anything else they would not show to their mother, students, superintendent or the editor of The New York Times. Many of those same recommendations have been codified in Hazleton Area’s policy. Union spokesman Paul Shemansky said many districts are still catching up to their students’ use of technology, but that policies are evolving. A few years ago, for example, districts were unsure of how to deal with students who made fake social media profiles about teachers or classmates. “That’s a serious issue if a student does that,” Shemansky said. “…It was relatively new a couple years ago, but now there’s protocols and administrators know what to do if something like that happens.”

unions until recently. We’re getting more arbitration awards I believe are not lopsided or one-sided. I think arbitrators are taking heat,” Dominick said. For the process, the county and union each pick an arbitrator, and those two pick a third from a list of Pennsylvania arbitrators, officials say. Lancaster County Solicitor Crystal Clark also has observed recent arbitration awards that “recognize the economic conditions of a lot of government entities.” More expired detective contracts have headed to binding arbitration in recent years, said Richard Marsh, first vice president of the County Detectives Association of Pennsylvania. Detectives in 10 of the 12 thirdclass counties are unionized, excluding Cumberland and Lehigh counties. “I think the trend the last three years has been for counties not to negotiate. They all want givebacks,” Marsh said. The detectives assist local police departments investigating crimes and deaths. County detectives tend to be among the highest-paid county union employees because they often work off hours investigating crime and specialize in law enforcement techniques, he said. Assertions that arbitration favors unions don’t hold water with him. “I think arbitration absolutely keeps both sides reasonable. If you’re being a pig, you’ll get whacked. If the county is unreasonable, then it will get whacked. It’s a double-edged sword,” Marsh said.


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TOM MOONEY REMEMBER WHEN

Grads: assume nothing, be ready for anything

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By STEVE FONDO Times Leader Correspondent

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ANOVER TWP. — When Michael Calore graduated from Bishop Hoban High School along with his twin brother Mark in 2001, he planned to relax and take some community college courses before making any major decisions. But within a year, Calore would be inspired to make a decision that would alter the course of his life forever. He volunteered for active military service in the U.S. Army at the cusp of the America’s invasion of Iraq in the aftermath of the Sept. 11th terrorist attacks.

You mentioned that being married to your wife, Lori, as being the proudest moment in your life as well as becoming an American Citizen in 2005. It sounds like there are many relatives in the family tree that you are proud of. “My

onored principal, dedicated faculty and hopeful soon-to-be graduates, it’s a privilege to be here before you today at your commencement. I’ll be brief — not because this isn’t 1960, when an hour-long speech was a requirement at high school graduations, but because what I have to say to you is very simple. First off, I want you to notice this big question mark I’m wearing on my academic robe. No, I’m not trying to emulate that TV guy hawking a book on how to get money from the U.S. government. What the question mark means is that you only think you know what’s in store for you. Ever hear the saying “If you want to make God laugh, tell Him your plans”? So you’re going on to college, and maybe grad school, and a solid education will make everything nice and smooth for you? Hah! Economic and political changes even Nostradamus wouldn’t foresee could make your degree and your career plans almost irrelevant four years from now. Look at the experience of engineers in the 1970s, or teachers in the 1980s. “Hot” degrees became albatrosses around people’s necks. There were jokes about Ph.D.s driving cabs. But we adapted, sometimes at great pain, and that’s our lesson to you. Assume nothing, and be ready for anything. So you’re going into the workforce, or maybe the military? Again: Hah! Read up on your field, especially after that first promotion, and get ready for the day when things just don’t work out. The factory could close; the Defense Department could suffer massive budget cuts. So adapt and try again, like Abe Lincoln looking for a general who could win a battle, or like the Wright Brothers who worked for years to get a plane off the ground. Did they throw in the towel or start griping the first time things didn’t go their way? Now does the question mark make sense? Here’s my second point. Look at what I’m holding. It’s a certificate they just gave you that says “Hey, you’re great.” Now watch while I tear it up and toss it on the floor. Want to know why I did that? Almost as soon as you walk out that door at the far end of the auditorium you’ll start meeting other people who have just as many “honors,” or even more. One of the things I distrust about modern graduations is the honors overload. Nearly everybody gets an award, a trophy — something. In 30 minutes most of those honors won’t mean anything. Huge numbers of other young people in other places are also getting them today. Instead, once the party is over, ask yourself some questions. Did I do my job well? Do I realize I still have tons of things to learn? Will I respect the role models and mentors who guide me along the way? Will I be fair to my colleagues and my family, who depend on me? Fulfilling your “yes” and “I’ll try” answers will show if you’re an honorable person. Nobody can tear that up and throw it on the floor. Well, I promised I wouldn’t speak for an hour. By the way, I know you want to get out of here, but I guarantee that in a few decades you’ll be breaking down the doors to get back in and see the old place. Bandleader, strike up the recessional. Two-thousand-and-twelve, here we come!

See MEET, Page 2B

Tom Mooney is a Times Leader columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.

Calore would serve two lengthy at war. “My brother enlisted right out of tours in Iraq as a front-line infantryman. He also left the service suffer- school,” recalled Calore. “At the ing from Post-Traumatic Stress Dis- time, I felt really restless. I lacked direction. order (PTSD), an anxiety “When I saw my brother disorder that can develop BUY IT Mark after he completed baafter exposure to an event sic training, he seemed differthat results in psycholog- Michael R. ent, changed,” continued Calical trauma, especially Calore’s book, "Army Coffee ore. “He had come back a man death or the threat of Sucks," can be and I knew I wanted that for death. purchased in Calore recalled his expe- e-book form for myself. I decided to enlist.” Calore was sent for basic riences in battle and his on- $4.99 on amatraining at Fort Benning, Ga. going struggle to come to zon.com. and then ordered to Fort Reilterms with those experiences in a new collection of short es- ly, Kan., to complete his training as says published in e-book format, en- an Infantryman with the 1st Battalion, 41st Infantry Regimen. titled “Army Coffee Sucks.” His unit spear-headed the U.S iniBenefits him, readers tial invasion into Iraq where they exFor him, writing helps him cope perienced continued resistance from with PTSD. For readers, Calore provides insight into the life of soldiers See CALORE, Page 3B

MEET OMAR HALLSSON

AMANDA HRYCYNA/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER

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mar Hallsson is the owner of the Castle Inn Restaurant on Route 309, the Memorial Highway in Dallas. Hallsson, 64, is originally from Iceland. He attended the Hotel and Restaurant School of Iceland University where he received his Masters degree in 1971 and became a world-renowned chef. Omar is the father of six children. He and his wife, Lori, live in Dallas. You owned restaurants in Iceland from 1978 to 1989. That must have been interesting. Were there any unique experiences running those businesses? “There were very memorable moments. I served the Queen of Denmark and the King of

Sweden at my Naust Restaurant there. I will always remember those occasions.” Now, you are serving residents from Northeast Pennsylvania. When and how did you come to be the owner and what is unique about the restaurant? “I left Iceland and came to the United States in 1989 to pursue a career here. I was a hotel manager in Scranton before I bought the Castle Inn in 1992. We have the finest European cuisine at affordable prices and a very comfortable and cozy setting where people can relax and unwind.” It sounds like you can accommodate a variety of events or occasions here? “As far as events go, we cater to family gatherings and weddings as well as a multitude of other special occasions. We also have a ve-

ry special event at 6 p.m. on Sundays. It is the Murderous Liaisons Production of Murder at the Castle. During the show, the dinner audience participates and attempts to solve a murder mystery. It is a great time for all involved.” You say that kindness and courtesy is paramount in serving your customers. “Every Christmas I join forces with the local Lion’s Club, Kiwanis Club and Rotary Club to host a meal for the homeless.”


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MEET Continued from Page 1B

brother, Hallur, is celebrating the release of his book, Vafugl (The Vulture’s Lair) and my nephew is in the Icelandic band, Leaves. There are others in my family, including my dearly departed father, who has dabbled in acting, among other pursuits. One of my daughters has also tried her hand in the acting field.”

You were a soccer player as well as a chef and restaurant owner. Tell us about that experience. “I played for the Iceland Vikings and was a forward and center for the team. I was a goal scorer. Before that stint I was invited to try out for the Leeds United team at the same time I was getting married. So that never materialized.”

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out the time clock per my opponent’s request. He beat me and that was difficult as I strive to be the best.”

Speaking of being the best, I see the saying above the bar. It reads “ADEINS PAD BESTA ER NOGU GOTT. What is the translation for that saying? “It is a saying I live by. It means, “Only the best You also mentioned that you is good enough.” were once in a chess contest with 300 participants. “I fin- John Gordon writes about area ished in second place after I people for the Meet feature. Reach agreed to play the match with- him at 970-7229.

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Wilkes University honors multicultural awareness The Wilkes University Center for Global Education and Diversity hosted a ceremony honoring members of the Wilkes community who are being recognized for fostering multicultural awareness on campus. The six award recipients are: Jason Benjamin, Tobyhanna, the Wilkes Helping Hands Student Award; Charlotte Hacker, Elkton, Md., and Phat Nguyen, Hanover Township, the Global Scholar and Citizen Award; Andrew Miller, Laflin, the Wilkes Diversity Leader Faculty Award; Elizabeth Swantek, Wilkes-Barre, the Wilkes Diversity Change Agent Staff Award. Mark Allen, Mountain Top, the Wilkes Executive Diversity Award. At the ceremony, from left, first row, Hacker, Swantek and Nguyen. Second row: Miller, Benjamin and Allen. Third row: Felixa Wingen, assistant director, international students; Erica Acosta, associate director, diversity affairs; Kimberly Niezgoda, assistant director, ESL; Georgia Costalas, executive director, diversity affairs.

Iraqi forces as they pushed toward the capital city of Baghdad. “My first tour lasted eight months,” explained Calore. “I came back to the U.S. and hardly had time to breathe when I was redeployed for a second tour which lasted an entire year.” Calore’s second tour was in support of the 10th Mountain Division and First Cavalry where they participated in the US Military’s ongoing effort to quell the insurgent uprising in Sadr City, led by young Islamic cleric Muqtada al Sadr. “One of the things I had to come to terms with and which I describe in the book, was my personal interpretation of good and evil,” Calore said. “Trying to set your own moral compass when you’re surrounded by constant chaos and unrest is vital but extremely difficult. Seeing constant battle and living with the sole thought to protect yourself and your fellow soldiers helps you to survive. It is a singular purpose.”

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“It is impossible to see an 18-year-old die violently before your eyes and easily compartmentalize that feeling. When you witness death and torture at 20 years old, how does someone deal with that?” — Michael Calore

Internal battle chronicled Calore said he started writing letters to family and friends recounting his daily experiences and his internal battle to come to terms with his war-time experiences. “I felt it was important to them as well as myself. I needed an outlet,” he said. The e-book features memoirs and short essays from Calore’s two Iraqi tours as well as stories of his ongoing assimilation and acceptance of those experiences in civilian life.

“It is impossible to see an 18year-old die violently before your eyes and easily compartmentalize that feeling,” Calore said. “When you witness death and torture at 20 years old, how does someone deal with that?” said Calore, now 29 and an English major at Penn State University who plans to teach English. He said he finds a therapeutic release in writing and added that many of his fellow Iraqi War veterans have responded positively to his stories. “It feels good to know that they find common ground with what they’re reading.” Calore said it’s an ongoing struggle to deal with his PTSD and that he still has terrifying nightmares from his battlefield experiences. “It’s impossible for me to assimilate a lot of these experiences in my everyday life,” Calore reflected. “This is something I live with everyday. In my mind, I was able to find some internal understanding of the horrors of war by understanding that for me and in my mind, there will never be a time before war but only a time during war.”

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FIVE GENERATIONS GATHER

Verry, Lisowski Lisowski and Justin Verry were united in marriage Aug. 13, J2011,essica at Saint Ann’s Basilica Scran-

Domiano, Pugh Domiano and Rachel A. L ouie Pugh, Shavertown, together with

their families, are pleased to announce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Thomas and Christine Pugh, Hunlock Creek. Rachel is a 1996 graduate of Northwest Area High School and a 2000 graduate of Penn State University, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in communications with a major in film and video and a minor in theatre arts. She is employed by Impressions Media, Wilkes-Barre, as the director of community relations and general manager of the Weekender. The prospective groom is the son of Louis and Deborah Domiano, Old Forge. He is the grandson of Jean “Gag” Malia, Old Forge. Louie is a 1995 graduate of Scranton Preparatory School and attended the University of Scranton and Northwood University, Michigan. The couple will be united in marriage on Sept. 15, 2012, at the Muhlenburg United Methodist Church in Hunlock Creek. Reception will follow at the bride’s brother’s property, the former Hontz House, Hunlock Creek.

Bason, Bodge Bodge and Brent Bason, B randy together with their parents, an-

nounce their engagement and approaching marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Tina Bodge, Pottstown, and the late William Bodge. She is a 1994 graduate of Pottstown High School. She earned an associate’s degree in business management from Penn State University and an associate’s degree in liberal arts from Montgomery County Community College. She graduated from Temple University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in criminal justice and pre-law in 2005 and is pursuing a Master of Business Administration degree in human resources management and health systems administration at Wilkes University. She is an employee of the federal government. The prospective groom is the son of Larry and Joyce Bason, Conyngham. He is a 1990 graduate of West Hazleton High School. He attended Luzerne County Community College and Bloomsburg University. He is employed by Jacob’s Engineering, Edison, N.J. The couple will exchange vows on Sept. 21 at Lake Wallenpaupack.

Barber, Stuart eanna Barber and Douglas Stuart, together with their D families, announce their upcom-

ing marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Boyd and Linda Barber, Harveys Lake. She is the granddaughter of the late Merle and Vera Conden, Kunkle, and Cora Barber and the late Lee Barber, Tunkhannock. The prospective groom is the son of Henry and Linda Stuart, Shavertown. He is the grandson of the late William and Ruth Hilgert, Harveys Lake, and the late Henry and Esther Stuart, Bunker Hill. Deanna is a 1987 graduate of Lake-Lehman High School. She is the mother of W. Cody Walsh, Kayla Walsh and Kiefer Walsh, Sweet Valley. She is employed as a provider at Caregivers of America. Douglas is a 1982 graduate of Dallas High School. He is employed as a stone mason at Kalinosky Landscaping. The couple will exchange vows June 9, 2012, at a country-style outside wedding in Chase, Pa.

ton, Pa. The ceremony was officiated by the Rev. Philip Altavilla, V.G. The bride is the daughter of Richard and Alicia Lisowski, Taylor. The groom is the son of Donald and Renee Verry, Plymouth. The bride was escorted down the aisle and given in marriage by her father. She chose her sister-in-law, Nicole Kotarski, as her matron of honor and her friend, Amanda Shimko, as her maid of honor. Her bridesmaids were Sarah Ferguson, Jennifer Quinn and Melissa Williams, all cousins of the bride, and her friends Lisa Paden, Bridget O’Connor, Lauren Bieber and Amy Ragni. The bride’s cousin, Laoise Thomas, served as flower girl. The groom chose his friend, A.J. Jump, as his best man. His groomsmen included his brother-in-law, Justin Kotarski, and his friends, Jesse Conyngham, Matthew Bower, William Turner, John Tomkoski, Kevin Blain, William Ostroski and Brendan Moriarity. The groom’s godson and nephew of the couple, Hunter Kotarski, served as ring bearer. Following the ceremony, an evening cocktail hour and reception were held at the Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, Scranton. The bride was honored with a bridal shower by the mothers of the bride and groom and her bridal party at the Tiki Bar at Waldorf Park Social Club, Scranton. The rehearsal dinner was held at the Banshee Irish Pub, Scranton. Jessica is a graduate of Riverside High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration and marketing from King’s College and a master’s degree in special education from Marywood University. She is an autistic support teacher at New Story School, Throop, Pa. Justin is a graduate of Bishop Hoban High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in communications from King’s College. He is a service center manager at FedEx Corporation, Pocono Summit, Pa. The couple honeymooned on the Hawaiian Islands of Maui and Kauai. They reside in Scranton, Pa.

Bray, Horgan obert and Rosemary Bray, Nanticoke, announce the engagement R and approaching marriage of their

daughter, Kimberly, to Brian Michael Horgan, son of John and Mary Lu Horgan, North Wales. The bride-to-be is the granddaughter of Dorothy Bray and the late H. Robert Bray, Nanticoke, and the late Francis and Genevieve Pikul, WilkesBarre Township. She is a 2000 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School and a 2004 graduate of King’s College with a Bachelor of Arts degree in elementary education. She earned a master’s degree in education from Cabrini College in 2012. She is employed as a third-grade teacher at Leidy Elementary, Philadelphia. The prospective groom is the grandson of Loucky and Claire Colavita, Ocean City, N.J., and the late John Francis and Peg Horgan, North Wales. He is a 2000 graduate of Lasalle College High School, Wyndmoor, and a 2005 graduate of King’s College with a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration. He is employed by his family’s construction business, Lansdale. The couple will unite in marriage on June 1, 2012, at Corpus Christi Catholic Church, Lansdale.

The Millers athleen and David Miller, Parsons, Wilkes-Barre, recently celeK brated their 30th wedding anniver-

sary in New Orleans, La. The Millers were married on April 3, 1982, at Our Lady of the Lake Church, Pocono Pines. Kathy is the daughter of the late Betty and George Joseph. David is the son of Helen Miller, Dearborn, Mich., and the late Gerald Miller. The Millers have two sons, Jeremy and his wife, Faith, New Egypt, N.J., and Jared, Trucksville, Pa.

Five generations of the Davis family from Wilkes-Barre recently gathered to celebrate the birth of Lily Weidner. Seated is Betty Davis Toole, great-great-grandmother, holding Lily. Standing: Tiffany Davis, mother; Charles D. Davis III, grandfather; and Charles (Chuck) D. Davis Jr., great-grandfather.

IN BRIEF NANTICOKE: Registration for the full summer session at Luzerne County Community College will be held 9 a.m.-7 p.m. May 21; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. May 2223; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. May 24; 9 a.m-7 p.m. May 29; and 9 a.m.-7 p.m. May 30-31 at the Registrar’s Office. The summer session begins May 30 and ends on Aug. 7. Final exams will be held Aug. 8-9 and Aug. 13-14. For more information call 7400337 or 800-377-LCCC ext. 7337.

Davis, Ellsworth Marie Ellsworth and Pfc. R achel Samuel Davis were united in

marriage on Oct. 7, 2011, in a civil ceremony officiated by District Justice James Tupper. The bride is the daughter of William and Amy Ellsworth, Edwardsville. She is the granddaughter of Lydia Hirner, Bruce Postupak and James and Marie Ellsworth. The groom is the son of Michael and Amy Davis, Forty Fort. He is the grandson of Marlene Davis and the late Arthur Davis and the late Samuel and Dorothy Elias. The bride was given in marriage by her father. She chose her closest friend, Lindsey Widman, as her maid of honor. The groom’s father was the best man. The bride was feted at a bridal shower held at the home of the bride’s parents. A dinner reception was held in the couple’s honor at Cooper’s Seafood Waterfront in Pittston. The bride is a 2007 graduate of E.L. Meyers High School and attended Luzerne County Community College. She is employed as a sales associate. The groom is a 2006 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School. He attended Luzerne County Community College and is proudly serving in the United States Marine Corps at Cherry Point MCAS, N.C. The couple resides in North Carolina.

Articles must be limited to 220 words, and we reserve the right to edit announcements that exceed that word count. Announcements must be typed or submitted via www.timesleader.com. (Click on the "people" tab, then “weddings” and follow the instructions from there.) Submissions must include a daytime contact phone number and must be received within 10 months of the wedding date. We do not run first-year anniversary announcements or announcements of weddings that took place more than a year ago. (Wedding photographers often can supply you with a color proof in advance of other album photographs.) All other social announcements must be typed and include a daytime contact phone number. Announcements of births at local hospitals are submitted by hospitals and published

on Sundays. Out-of-town announcements with local connections also are accepted. Photos are only accepted with baptism, dedication or other religious-ceremony announcements but not birth announcements. Engagement announcements must be submitted at least one month before the wedding date to guarantee publication and must include the wedding date. We cannot publish engagement announcements once the wedding has taken place. Anniversary photographs are published free of charge at the 10th wedding anniversary and subsequent five-year milestones. Other anniversaries will be published, as space allows, without photographs. Drop off articles at the Times Leader or mail to: The Times Leader People Section 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Questions can be directed to Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or e-mailed to people@timesleader.com.

WILKES-BARRE: The Osterhout Free Library’s North Branch Committee will hold a fundraiser 4-7 p.m. Saturday at the Osterhout Free Library North Branch, 28 Oliver St., Parsons, Wilkes-Barre. The event is an all-you-can-eat pasta dinner and a book and bake sale. Takeouts are available after 3 p.m. and walk-ins are welcome. The fundraiser is being coordinated by Jeremy Evanko, a Coughlin High School senior, as part of his Eagle Scout Project. Proceeds will help support the new branch. Cost is $8 for adults and $4 for children 8 and younger. Tickets are available at all Osterhout Library locations. For more information call the North Branch at 822-4660. Donations for the North Branch Library can be sent to the Osterhout Free Library, Attn: North Branch, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701. WILKES-BARRE: Stanton Lanes, 470 Stanton St., WilkesBarre, is hosting a fundraising meeting for organizations interested in learning how to raise money during fundraising week, July 30 through August at 7 p.m. on Tuesday. Snacks and refreshments will be served. To make a reservation, or for more information, call Paul Waliczek or Terri Vesek at 824-4661, or visit TheValleyWithAHeartGoesBowling.com.

SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES The Times Leader allows you to decide how your wedding notice reads, with a few caveats. Wedding announcements run in Sunday’s People section, with color photos, free of charge.

PLAINS TWP.: The Luzerne County Community College Alumni Association and Computer Information Systems (CIS) Department will hold a CIS alumni mixer 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, at Bar Louie at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs. Admission to the mixer is free for LCCC CIS graduates and $20 per person for guests. The event will include door prizes for the first 50 in attendance, raffles and refreshments. The mixer is co-sponsored by Pearson Education and Cengage Publishing. To register, contact Bonnie Brennan Lauer at the LCCC Alumni Office at 740-0734, 800377-LCCC, ext. 7734 or blauer@luzerne.edu.

MEETINGS Polka Party will benefit holiday parties for children The 400 Club, South Prospect Street, Nanticoke, is hosting a polka party to benefit the children’s Christmas, Easter and Halloween parties 7-11 p.m. May 26. Joe Stanky and The Cadets will provide the entertainment. Food and refreshments will be available. Doors open 6:15 p.m. For tickets call Joe Stanky at 7351659 or the 400 Club at 735-1332. Members of the band, from left, are Mike Magdon, John Evanina, Joe Stanky, Bob Smurlo and Nick Nidoh.

Monday HARVEYS LAKE: The Harveys Lake Borough Homecoming Committee, 7 p.m. in the Borough Municipal Building, 4875 Memorial Highway. For more information call Clarence Hogan at 793-5187.


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Youth take part in celebration hosted by LCCC’s Diversity Council Luzerne County Community College Diversity Council and NAACP Student Chapter 29 AC recently hosted the annual Mt. Zion Youth Celebration at the college’s campus. The celebration included an indoor picnic, games and activities, a basketball clinic and a tour of the campus. Some of the participants, from left, first row: Izeyah S. Minix, Thomas Davis, Kameliah Wilson, Essence Dobson, Tyona Dobson, Tesha Todd, Asia Mitchell, Emanuel Haertas and Anyae Carter. Second row: Francis Curry, director, admissions and member of Diversity Council; Erika Merth, Cameron Daughtry, Sanauva-Nique Bilal, Talaysia Taylor, Adonica Grant, Ayanna Warren, Tyheir Williams, Will Johnson, Aria Jae Mason and Judi Myers, coordinator, diversity. Third row: Mary Sullivan, director, student life and athletics and member of Diversity Council; Vincent Todd, Nasir Williams, Taiquan Dobson, Amil Williams, Sean Coperand, Auryanna Scott, Diance McCloe, Khadijah Blagmon, Shealynn Taylor and Cora E. Merth. Fourth row: Teddi Janosov, secretary, student life and athletics; Tytiana Dobson, Denaisia White, Elizsha Streeter, Precious Medley, Nykia Taylor, Dashara Pearay, Shawn Merth, Dajon Rush, Kyle Merth, Stephanie Brewster and Ron Strothers, fitness center/ gymnasium attendant and member of Diversity Council. Fifth row: Nathan Ward, director, college diversity, King’s College; Darren Breese, Amber Johnson, Maria Johnson, Jessie Gibson, Dazonia Gibson, Rianna Daughtry-Smith, Janice Whitaker, Diion Todd, Anthony Butler, Yondel Dudley and Jim Domzalski, director, enrollment management and member of Diversity Council.

Students win ‘My Favorite Teacher’ essay contest Barnes and Noble, Wilkes-Barre, recently held a ‘My Favorite Teacher’ essay contest for students in grades 1-8. Two students from Wyoming Area Catholic School, Exeter, were winners in the contest. Annie Bagnall, grade 4, won first place and Isabel Cherry, grade 6, won second place. Both students wrote an essay on their favorite teacher, James Renfer, English teacher for grades 4-8. They were honored at a reception held at Barnes and Noble on April 18, where they read their essays. From left, first row, are Bagnall and Cherry. Second row: Chris Tigue, principal, and Renfer.

Lucky’s Sporthouse holding celebrity bartending event A celebrity bartender event will be held on May 23 at Lucky’s Sporthouse, 110 Schechter Drive, Wilkes-Barre, to benefit programs and services provided by the Association for the Blind. Serving as celebrity bartenders are, Anna Cervenak and Max Bartikowsky, Mary and Allen Erwine, Dr. Erik Kruger and Abbe Kruger, CeCe McCarthy and Neil Horn, attorney Joseph Prociak and Whitney Pollock and Rachel and Tom Pugh. Sponsored by Lucky’s Sporthouse and Miller Lite, the event will feature music and vocals by Millennium and an auction of celebrity bartenders’ signature drinks with auctioneer Bob ‘Big Daddy’ Stanley. Call 208-3267 to reserve your bar seat or table. For more information contact the Association for the Blind at 693-3555 or toll free 877-693-3555. Some of the participants, from left: Whitney Pollock; Tom Pugh; Rachel Pugh; attorney Joseph Prociak; Max Bartikowsky; Ron Petrilla, executive director, Blind Association; Anna Cervenak; Allen Erwine; Bobbie Steever, Blind Association; Mary Erwine; Kathi Bankes, manager, Lucky’s Sporthouse; Tom Robinson, Blind Association; CeCe McCarthy; and Abbe Kruger.

King’s College students inducted into international honor society Seventeen King’s College students were recently inducted into Psi Chi, an international honor society for students in psychology. Students accepted for admission must be juniors or seniors, be in the top third of their class, have a minimum grade-point-average of 3.4 and have high standards of personal behavior. At the ceremony, from left, first row, are Leah Leikheim, Loretta Bushick, Kristin Ahearn, Megan Yakoski, Alyssa Hill and Shaliyah Jones. Second row: Christis Perillo, Cathleen Traino, Dominic Daley, Timothy Jeter, Konrad Kraszewski, Christina Bartolomei and Lisa LaMaire. Also inducted were Gabrielle Carbone, Carissa Smith, Lauren Williams and Samantha Phelan.

Misericordia University students inducted into biology honor society Nineteen students in the Misericordia University biology program were recently inducted into the Beta Beta Beta (TriBeta) National Biological Honor Society. Students majoring in biology, biochemistry or clinical lab sciences are eligible for the honor society after completing at least three semesters in the program and maintaining a minimum grade point average of 2.75 in the major’s courses for associate members and a 3.0 for regular members. At the induction ceremony, from left, first row, are Chelsea Bonetti, Massapequa, N.Y.; Caitlynn Watkins, Pittston; Shelby Giblin, Honesdale; Amanda Lazzeri, Honesdale; Amanda Lee, Turnersville, N.J., and Anna Konstas, Montrose. Second row: Amelia Poplawski, Wilkes-Barre; Jacqueline Kochmer, Forest City; Moran Romesberg, York; Andrea Carr, Dallas; and Jessica Pavlikowski, Old Forge. Third row: Jonathan Weiss, Minersville; Danielle Yurko, Sweet Valley; Jena Hassinger, Sunbury; Christopher Tiffany, Laceyville; and Bryant Barnhart, Apalachin, N.Y.

HONOR ROLL Dodson Elementary School G. Bartoletti, principal, Dodson Elementary School, recently announced the Honor Roll for the third quarter. Grade 6: Highest Honors: Vanessa Everett, Areli Lopez Flores. High Honors: Khira Cook, Lesly Cruz, Janell Czerpak, Chloe Delp, Wendy Espinoza, Ti’Ahnna Hollis, Michael Hughes, Meghan Moyer, Jaryah Patterson, Isabel Ponce, Kayla Secter, Kaylee Smith, Frankie Sosa, Analy Suarez-Vergara, Ny’Sira Thomas, Tawanna Winstead, Jeffey Yanez. Honors: Equira Ammons, Serenity Bonk, Ariel Boyer, Jawane Buckner, Dominique Cropp, Ariana Dale, Shanie DiFlorio, Oneisha Garallues, Simone Harrold, Chelsea Lezama, Ronald Peguero, Jada Redditt, Tunaja Riley. Grade 5: Highest Honors: Emily Apolinaro, Skylar Elmy, Stephanie Hinz, Juan Rojas, Tyler Yelland. High Honors: Olivia Adolphus, Ashley Amigon, Rafael Amigon, Isaiah Bell, Carl Clemonts, Bryant EspinozaJuarez, Marykay Giza, Elijah Hollis, Maryam Kratz, Samantha

Levy, Casey Mulligan, Latifat Oseni, Kelly Rivera, Mackenzie Shovlin, Deshaun Stone, Michelle Tapia, Destiny Tolbert, Asucena Vergara, Annah Wielgopolski, James Wilde. Honors: Joseph Ammons III, Van Bui, Destiny Englert, Kacie Hogan, Nicole Jarski, Angel Lopez, Jared O’Day, Miguel Olea, Alicia Rodriguez, Tyler Shea, Kasia Stewart, Brandy Vergara, Philip Wydra. Grade 4: Highest Honors: Najeeb Bilal, Trinity Caballero, Zachary Dougalas, Autumn Fenescey, Casey Molina-Vergara, Rachell Reyes Martinez, Rosalinda Sosa, Timothy Wielgopolski. High Honors: Curtis Chandler, Cylee Delp, Kennedy Hoagland, Destiny Hopkins, Destiny Howard, Zuleima Mero, Collin Mosier, Johnny Nunez, Jahmaal Patterson Jr., Jeremy Simon, Kobe Sofa, Yamilet Sosa, Kristian Vasquez. Honors: Edwin Amigon, Keanu Ammons, Heather Campbell, Michael Fox, Skylynn Gonzalez, David Hinz Jr., Leslie Huertero-Sosa, Aishah Khairi, Andrew Koonrad, Courtney Kratz, Melissa Laureano Martinez, Keyana Lopez, Branden McGeever, Holly Raineri, Miracle Ruiz, Ashley Saldivar, Michael Smeraglio, Crystal Tlatenchi.

Grade 3: Highest Honors: Chase Albritton, Selene Amigon, Lei’Ayla Anderson-Combee, Hannah Cook, Kelis Quiller, Michael Robbins, Ada Soriano, Guadalupe Vergara-Perez, Cameron Yelland. High Honors: Xavier Banaszek, Kelsey Bellus, Janelle Coleman, Trey Collins, Amber Douglas, Cindy Espinoza, Thaily Espinoza-Onofre, Dylan Fox, Alexandra Gomez, Angelina Herbert, James Holmes, KyAsya Johnson, Elijah Jordan, Erin Leonard, Peter Lubinski, Autumn Mastropasqua, Kaitlyn Mastropasqua, Alexavier Munoz, Nevaeh Olson, Isabella Painter, Romas Regalado Leonel, Vanessa Reyes Guadarrama, Maleek Robinson, Michelle Secter, Aliviah Seeman, William Urivazo Andrade, Sandra Vasquez, Ashley Ventura-Aguilar. Honors: Konan Desire Dayato, Christopher Englert, Kiana Everett, Johan Guzman, Jazmin Hughes, Carl Johnson, Markel Johnson Soules, Danny Lam, Anyelina Laureano, Jai-Lynn Miller, Ryan Molina, Darnell Moore, Brian Norbert, Savanna Radecki, Arthur Reese III, Onnalee Rolon, Mya Soler, Cristian Sosa Sanchez, Edwin Soto-Santana, Sabreena Tlatenchi, Imaad Toney, Justin Wilson-Holland.

Senator Baker reads to children at Little Meadows Learning Center In celebration of the national Week of the Young Child, Little Meadows Learning Center, managed by Hildebrandt Learning Centers LLC, invited Senator Lisa Baker to be a guest reader to the prekindergarten classes. Senator Baker read the 2012 Pennsylvania One Book, Every Young Child book ‘Stop Snoring Bernard.’ The One Book, Every Young Child program is designed to encourage adults to read daily to children and promote early literacy activities through reading, conversation and quality interactive experiences. Some of the participants, from left: Isabella DeCesaris; Christopher Sholtis; Senator Baker; Noah Moran; Lauren O’Shea, health consultant, HLC; Timothy O’Shea, chief operating officer, HLC; Jacob Bedosky; Jeanette Niebauer, assistant director, Little Meadows; and Rebekah Jia.

Meadows volunteers honored at luncheon Volunteer Appreciation Week at the Meadows Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Dallas, was celebrated to honor the more than 100 community-spirited people who help at the center. They were acknowledged at a luncheon held at Apple Tree Terrace at Newberry Estate to thank them for sharing over 10,650 hours with the residents this year. Certificates of Appreciation and gifts were presented to each volunteer. Special awards were given to volunteers who have given five, 10, 15 and 20 years of service. At the event, from left, first row: Camille Fioti, assistant director of community services; Betty Sorchik, director of community services; Florence Hozempa, 20 years; Irene Meren, five years; Geri Williams, 10 years; and Carle Welter and her pet therapy dog, Opus, five years. Second row: Cristina Tarbox, administrator, Meadows Nursing and Rehabilitation Center; Carl Noto, executive eirector, EEI; Cheryl Newberry, volunteer, 5 years; Gary Kirk, director of finance, Meadows NRC. Also receiving awards were Maria Barbose, Helen Bernick, Diana Ide and Mary Neely, all five years, and Phyllis Sappe, 20 years.


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SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

BIRTHS

Fromel, Julianne and Stanley Knick III, Duryea, a son, April 23.

Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center

Wickham, Lynn and Antonio, Nanticoke, a son, April 24.

Nicolai, Kimberlee and David, Dallas, a son, April 16.

Danko, Samantha and Mark, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, April 24.

Schall, Dayna and Gary Chapin, Edwardsville, a daughter, April 16.

Keller, Holly and Peter Lakkis, Plains Township, a daughter, April 24.

Shay, Amanda and Christopher, Plains Township, a son, April 17.

Baron, Brandy and James Rail III, Meshoppen, a daughter, April 24.

Brogna, Laura and James, Mountain Top, a daughter, April 17.

Robert G. Gregor

Lindsey M. Mieldazis

Robert George Gregor, son of Melissa and Robert Gregor, Jr., Dallas, is celebrating his fourth birthday today, May 13. Robert is a grandson of Janet and Butch Jones and Robert and Diane Gregor, all of Plains Township, and George and Sandra Hrabousky, Margate, Fla. He is a great-grandson of George and Pearl Hrabousky, Wilkes-Barre; Francis Wallace and the late Anna Wallace, Plains Township; the late Peter and Anna Walski; and the late Clayton and Elizabeth Neville.

Lindsey Marie Mieldazis, daughter of Michael and Christina Mieldazis, Warrior Run, is celebrating her seventh birthday today, May 13. Lindsey is a granddaughter of Christine Mieldazis, Warrior Run; the late Michael Mieldazis; Joseph Kus, Sugar Notch; and the late Deborah Kus. She is a great-granddaughter of Len and Marion Croop, Warrior Run; Frank and Janet Kus, Sugar Notch; and the late Theresa Kus. Lindsey has a brother, Michael, 9.

Kowalczk, Krystle and Adam, Wyoming, a daughter, April 17. Nayavich, Amy and David Williams, Wilkes-Barre Township, a son, April 17. Rish, Jonel and Tim Fitzgerald, Blakeslee, a son, April 17.

Pittston Hospital Nurse Alumni plan spring meeting The Pittston Hospital Nurse Alumni will hold its spring dinner meeting May 23 at Leggio’s Italian Ristorante, 64 Center Hill Road, Dallas. A bus ride to the Pauly Friedman Art Gallery at Misericordia University to view the memorabilia from local nursing schools will take place at 5:45 p.m. The Center for Nursing History of Northeastern Pennsylvania will also present ‘The History and Impact of Nursing Education in Luzerne County 1887-2012.’ Dinner will begin at 7 p.m. and includes salad, stromboli, pizza, penna with vodka sauce, gnocchi, potatoes, chicken piccata, flounder Francoise, meatballs, vegetables, coffee, tea, soda and cake for dessert. A cash bar will be available. Cost is $26 and includes tax, gratuity and bus fare. Payment must accompany reservation. For more information contact Mary Ann Rubin at 298-2616. At the gallery, from left, is Rubin and Donna Posatko, gallery curator.

Haydock, Tiffany and Ryan Pucci, Hanover Township, a son, April 17. Perez, Monica and David, WilkesBarre, a son, April 17. Freeman, April and David Harris Jr., Monroe Township, a son, April 18. Chrobak, Rachel and Michael, Dallas, a daughter, April 18. Boyle, Shannon and Kenneth, Hanover Township, a daughter, April 18. Lapinski, Laura and David, Benton, a daughter, April 19. Spry, Jessica and Lamar Radcliffe, Plymouth, a daughter, April 19. Powell, Rebekah and Josh Hughes, Hanover, a daughter, April 20.

Coley L. Comparetta

Greggory Howells Jr.

Coley Leonard Comparetta, son of Robert and Sarah Comparetta, Wilkes-Barre, is celebrating his first birthday today, May 13. Coley is a grandson of Thomas and Alice Comparetta and Mark and Kathy Mamola, Wilkes-Barre. He is a great-grandson of Joseph and Josephine Mamola, Parsons; the late Howard and Margaret Howe, Thomas and Ann Comparetta and Leonard and Alice Yanchik.

Greggory Howells Jr., son of Amy Howells, Luzerne, and Gregg Howells Sr., Falls, is celebrating his 12th birthday today, May 13. Greggory is a grandson of Lois and David Atherton, Sr., Luzerne, and John and Beth Howells, Scranton. He is a greatgrandson of Emma Jean Atherton, Harveys Lake, and the late Glen Atherton, Mervin Lord Sr., Doris Roberts and Marie McLean.

Elizabeth C. Custard Elizabeth Catherine Custard, daughter of Brian and Cherylann Aleo Custard, Stroudsburg, is celebrating her first birthday today, May 13. Elizabeth is a granddaughter of Vincent and Barbara Aleo, Wilkes-Barre, and Bill and Barbara Custard, Melbourne, Fla. She is a great-granddaughter of Anna Bohinski, Wilkes-Barre Township. Elizabeth has two brothers, Joshua, 8, and Ethan, 6.

Frank, Lisa, Kingston, a daughter, April 20. Pond, Jenny and Ronald, Saylorsburg, a son, April 20. Graboske, Mandy and William, Nanticoke, a daughter, April 20. Schwab, Danielle and Jonathan Chuckers, Tunkhannock, a son, April 21. Johnson, Elizabeth and Thomas, Nicholson, a son, April 21.

Guzman, Judymar and Angel Rivera, Plymouth, a son, April 24. Borsuk, Salena and Michael, White Haven, a son, April 25. Sromovski, Kelly and Andrew, Ashley, a son, April 25. Pardi, Amanda and Ashton Schelble, Freeland, a son, April 25. Hontz, Amy and Jasper, Orangeville, a daughter, April 25. Banks, Heather and Richard, Wyoming, a daughter, April 26. Bloom, Clarice and Timothy Vohs, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, April 26. Obuhosky, Margaret and Robert, Hunlock Creek, a daughter, April 26. Kolesar, Shelby and Angelo Sacchatti, Old Forge, a daughter, April 26. White, Alexandra and Curtis, West Pittston, a daughter, April 26. Porzuczek, Alyssa and Carter Frank, Hughestown, a daughter, April 27. Simmons, Ahqueelah and Jevon Moore, Wilkes-Barre, a son, April 27. Hackney, Rebecca and Matthew Drake Graham, Freeland, a daughter, April 27. Kapalka, Laura and Rich, Pittston, a son, April 27. Kelley, Kathleen and Paul Jr., Tobyhanna, a son, April 28. Janosky, Amy and William Jr., Hunlock Creek, a son, April 28. Harvilla, Briana, McAdoo, a son, April 28.

St. Jude teacher, student honored by Barnes & Noble

Lech, Rae Ann and Joseph, Wilkes-Barre, a son, April 21.

Marilyn Baran, an English and science instructor at St. Jude School, Mountain Top, was a winner in the local Barnes & Noble ‘My Favorite Teacher’ essay contest. She was chosen from about 100 entries received from Luzerne County students. Baran was nominated by Jordyn Pavelitz, an eighth-grade student at St. Jude School and the daughter of Stanley and Patricia Pavelitz, Mountain Top. Pavelitz read her winning essay during an awards ceremony at Barnes & Noble. Baran received a Barnes & Noble gift certificate, a set of classic books for her classroom and several Blu-ray discs. Baran and another local winner, James Renfer of Wyoming Area Catholic School in Exeter, advanced to the regional competition with other teachers from Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, Maine and New Hampshire. At the event, from left, are Pavelitz and Baran.

Belusko, Wendi and James, Hazleton, a son, April 22.

Coumes, Sindy and Will Fitz, Albrightsville, a daughter, April 29.

Patton, Keyana and Dennis Meekins, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, April 22.

Ruiz, Maricela and Raul Espinoza, Wilkes-Barre, a son, April 30.

Nordall, Melissa and Matthew Kramer, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, April 22. Smith, Gloria and Mark T., Plains Township, a daughter, April 22. Kelly, Grace and Adam Stark, Tunkhannock, a daughter, April 23.

Nesbitt Women’s and Children’s Center at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital Stefanick, Jennifer and John, Freeland, a daughter, April 13.

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge Photographs and information must be received two full weeks before your child’s birthday. Your information must be typed or computer-generated. Include your name and your

relationship to the child (parent, grandparent or legal guardians only, please), your child’s name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns

of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime contact phone number. Without one, we may be unable to publish a birthday announcement on time.

We cannot guarantee return of birthday or occasions photos and do not return communitynews or publicity photos. Please do not submit precious or original professional photographs

that require return because such photos can become damaged, or occasionally lost, in the production process. Email your birthday announcement to people@timeslead-

Seated left to right residents: Elizabeth Burczyk, Catherine Lachowecz, Dorthea Karchin Standing left to right staff: Suellen Hays Activities, Rebecca Ktytor RN, Anela Mleczynski LPN & Monica Calderon LPN

(570) 735-2973 395 Middle Rd. • Nanticoke, PA

er.com or send it to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250. You also may use the form under the People tab on www.timesleader.com.


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Seena Wehrenberg with her Children (L to R) Amber (9), Colin (5) & Brenna (7)

Cathy Davies with her Son Grayson Davies

Atty. Cheryl Sobeski-Reedy and her son Ryan

In Loving Memory Of Mary Savage (L to R) Cathy Davies & Mary Savage

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Nona’s Happiest & Amazing Memories are with you Tyler. Sunshine Always. Love, Nona

Mandy Prebola with her Son Eddie Prebola, Jr.

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Mrs. Sarah Milewski with her Daughter Maura Elizabeth

Karen Stavish with her Son Jacob Ratuszny

Sarah Potsko

Denise Connors with her Daughter Deena Marie Connors

Amy L. Burke with her Children Chloe L., Torey L. & Eugene J. Burke, Jr.

Molly DeSarro

with her Children Olivia and Benjamin

Desiray Pypiak

with her daughter Kelsey Pypiak

with daughter Elizabeth Love You Mommy!

Lori Shovlin

with her daughter Addison

Happy Mother’s Mother’s Day Melissa Stevenson

of Nanticoke

Leah Kappler of Dallas

with Daughter Carly (9) and Son Charlie (7) You fill my life with happiness and my life with sunshine. I love you!! XO Mommy XO

Nicole MantioneFurcon with her Children Grace (12), Nicholas (10), Julia (7) & Dog Maisy

Anita Budzilek, Dupont

Suzanne Kasteleba, (Mom) Duryea

Suzanne Halko and Andrew Vladimer Halko, Spring Brook Twp.

with her Daughter Calendria Stevenson (2)

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 7B

Sarah Swiderski

Karen Oncay

In Memory Of Helen Keener on Mother’s Day

Happy Mother’s Day In Heaven

with her Children Sophie, Jack & Ava

Sadly Missed by Kathy, Maureen, Bobby, Paul & Entire Family

with her Son Michael Oncay

Anna T. Simerson Love, The Stanislow and Simerson Family XO

Irene Kovaleski with her Son David Edmund (16 mos.)

The Crawfords

(L to R) Cassidy, Hayden, Cooper, (Mom) Jessica & Harper, Hartley & Tucker

Trish Roe Drums

with her Sons Simon (1½) and Caleb (2½)

Nancy Fornett DeMark with her Children Ava (2) & Nico (5)

In Loving Memory Of Anna Seitz Shown with her Great Grandson Cody Dearly Missed By Dolores, Joanie, Lisa and Cody

Kelly Wendolowski

with her Children (left to right) Ryan, Haley Rae, Max (on lap), Kelly Wendolowski, Luke, Matthew and Robby

Franco, (Mom) Mrs. Cindi Ardoline, Matt, Mauri, Kelly, Tyler & Jackie So grateful to work in a field that keep my memories alive! HushaBye & Goodnight - Sweet Dreams - Always Little Ones

Happy Mother’s Day, Mommy! Love, Paul Son of Missy Thomas, Mountain Top


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SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

NAMES AND FACES John Miliauskas, Dallas, was recently inducted into the Pennsylvania Music Educators Association Hall of Fame at the PMEA AnMiliauskas nual In-Service Conference Awards Luncheon at the Lancaster Convention Center in Lancaster. Mary Ann Lugiano, a former student of Miliauskas, nominated him for the award. During his 35-year tenure as band director at Lake-Lehman High School, Miliauskas produced numerous award-winners in parade, concert, field show and indoor guard competitions, including the official Honor Band to Miss America in Atlantic City, 1985; first place in Miss USA Parade, Niagara Falls, N.Y., 1975; first place in Blossom Festival Parade, Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, 1975; and first place in Miss Niagara Pageant Parade in Montreal, Canada, 1977. For 28 years, the Lake-Lehman High School Band took top honors in all categories at the Sherburne Pageant of Bands, New York, and Miliauskas was often named outstanding director. Kylie A. Sheplock, West Pittston, was recently elected as president of the Society of Women Engineers, a not-forprofit national Sheplock educational and service organization. Sheplock, a 2008 graduate of Wyoming Area High School, is a senior majoring in biological engineering at Penn

Daniel Williams, a senior at LakeLehman High School, will receive the Outstanding Senior High School Student Award from the Tatra Club of Luzerne County at the annual installation dinner on May 15. Williams has maintained an academic average grade of 3.7 during his senior year and has been involved in numerous school and community activities. He has participated in Cub and Boy Williams Scouts and is an Eagle Scout. Through scouting, he has been involved in American Red Cross blood drives, food drives and the refurbishing of churches, fire halls and other community facilities. Williams is a member of the soccer team, the track team, the yearbook club and the theater group. He is also a part-time, front-end supervisor at Mountain Fresh Grocery Store. Williams plans to attend Penn State, Wilkes-Barre and then Penn State University, State College, to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree and master’s degree in engineering.

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seventh-grade student at Wyoming Seminary Lower School, has been accepted to Boston Ballet School’s Summer Dance Program 2012. She was chosen from more than 2,400 students who auditioned during a 33-city audition tour that traveled throughout the U.S., Canada, Europe and Asia. Kazimi is a senior company member of Ballet Northeast and a member of the Wyoming Seminary Dance Company. She has appeared in many local ballet productions and will be dancing in Ballet Northeast’s performance of “Paquita” and “Firebird” June 1-3 at the Wilkes University Conservatory. She is the daughter of Karin Kazimi and the granddaughter of Ahmad and Victoria Kazimi, Kingston.

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Sigma Nu, the Jesuit Honor Society. Ashley Ferrari, Conyngham, was inducted into Phi Sigma Iota, the Department of Languages honor society at Lebanon Valley College, Annville. Ferrari is a sophomore political science, international studies and Spanish major. Allyson Earl, Harding, Joshua Miller, Drums, Samantha Clasen, Benton, Allyson Marianelli, Old Forge, and Amanda Miller, Kingston, recently received awards at Honors Convocation at Lycoming College, Williamsport. Earl, a sophomore archeology major, received the Principles of Astronomy Award. Miller, a senior economics and business major, received the John A. Streeter Memorial Award in Economics. Clasen, a January graduate, received the Phil G. Gillette Prize in Modern Foreign Languages. Marianelli, a junior chemistry major, received the Undergraduate Award in Analytical Chemistry. Miller, a senior English major, received the Bishop D. Frederick Wertz Award.

Daniel Davidowitz, a 2010 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School, will have his artwork exhibited in May at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Davidowitz is in his second year at the institute. Joseph O’Hara, Kingston, and Joseph Carr, Plains Township, were recently honored at All Honors Day at Xavier University, Cincinnati, Ohio. O’Hara received the Dean’s Athletic Award given to student-athletes who maintained a cumulative GPA of 3.5. Carr was inducted into Alpha

Natashja Udzella, Kingston, was recently inducted into Chapter 179 of Phi Kappa Phi honor society at Lock Haven University. Udzella is a junior majoring in health science.

LCCC Emergency Medical program receives equipment The Luzerne County Community College Emergency Medical Services program recently received an equipment donation from Plains Ambulance, Medic 2. The department received a heart monitor/defibrillator. The donated equipment, a Medtronic-Physio-Control Monitor, will provide students the opportunity to practice with different technologies utilized in pre-hospital care. At the presentation, from left: Mark Ercolani, paramedic class coordinator, LCCC; Jeff Alu, operations manager, Plains Ambulance; Meg DeRoche, Blakeslee, paramedic student; and Brad Vilcko, Drums, paramedic student.

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State University main campus. She is also involved with Engineering Ambassadors and Women Engineering Program Lead. She has interned with Linde Corporation, Penn State Integrated Design Services, Kellogg Company and Campbell Soup Company. Sheplock is the daughter of Greg and Marie Sheplock, West Pittston, and the granddaughter of Thomas and Ellen Shanahan, Plains Township; the late Thomas and Mary Alice Sheplock, West Pittston; and the late Joan A. Shanahan.

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SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 9B

Garden Art Awards to name recipients at Tunkhannock ceremony

TUNKHANNOCK: The 17th annual Adrienne’s Garden Art Awards ceremony will be held 1-3 p.m. May 20 at the Tunkhannock Area Middle School auditorium. These awards are presented as a memorial to Adrienne P. Maillet. Recipients of the art awards are kindergarten through eighthgrade students who have demonstrated a talent for art during the academic year. Donations are needed for the fulfillment of the endowment to secure the future of these awards. Donations may be sent to Community Foundation of the Endless Mountains, 270 Lake Ave., Montrose, PA 18801. (Write AG

Awards in the check’s memo line.) The award presentation will occur at 2:30 p.m. in the auditorium and the award winning entries will be on display 1-3 p.m. in the lobby of the auditorium. Attendees of the event will be asked to cast a ballot for the People’s Choice Award to be presented to the student whose artwork is chosen as the favorite piece in the show. Winners of this year’s awards are: Makayla Fritsch, Arianna Johnson, Dominic Taylor, Josh Brown, Kylie Hill, Taylar Schultz, Heather Slody, Michael Slowey, Alex Keiser, Alyssa Kovalchick,

Alissa Zamber, Kassidy Shirtz, Dami Colyer, Matthew Prebola, Harmony Mills, Hannah Siedel, Kaitlyn Mikulka, Christian Scotti, Nicole Macko, Austin Southworth, Isaac Flores, Dana Macko, Ashley Darrow, Shane Macko, Josh Butler, Arianna Lizza, John Walsh, Paul DeMarco, Miguel Figueroa, Courtney Yuhas, Gabrielle Roote, Madelyn Russel, David Lawrence, Lauren Kovalchick, Destiny Morales, Abigail Driscole, Alizah Carey, Christian Harvey, Rachel Martin, Katelin Barlow, Zach Zelna, Sofia Mancuso, Seth Jacob, Gerard Mirabelli, Kaelin Whitaker, Jordan Smith and Jacob Peterson.

Students place in science fair

Fourth-grade students at Wilkes-Barre Academy recently participated in the annual Science Fair. Students chose topics in a variety of science and health fields and followed the steps of the scientific method to answer a scientific question. The projects were presented to teachers and classmates and were awarded ribbons by a panel of judges. Winners of the fourth-grade Science Fair, from left: Mia Serkosky, honorable mention; Ashleigh Pyke, second place; Kihana Schicatano, first place; Catrina Havrilla, honorable mention; and Marissa Jason, third place. Jacob Roguskie also received an honorable mention.

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CMYK PAGE 10B

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

HONOR ROLL Holy Redeemer High School Anita Sirak, principal, Holy Redeemer High School, Wilkes-Barre, recently announced that the following students have attained High Honors or Honors for the third quarter. Grade 12: High Honors: Michael Ambrulavage, Stephanie Amendola, Allison Banks, Ashley Bernardi, Lauren Bernardi, Tessa Boyle, Casey Brelsford, Michael Brown, Jeffrey Capaci, Sara Cavanaugh, William Cavanaugh, Matthew Craven, Shaina Dougherty, Brandon Drust, Patrick Duffy, Dalton Ell, Mary Katherine Evans, Zachary Evans, Elizabeth Finnegan, David Gawlas, Nadia Gentilesco, Matthew Geraghty, Arisa Gereda, Kelly Grebeck, Sarina Hall, Ryan Heck, Nathan Janiczek, Eric Jones, Christopher Kabacinski, Courtney Kreidler, Jessica Kreidler, Jared Kukosky, Brianna Ligotski, Michael Martin, Kara McGrane, Daniel McGraw, Amy McLaughlin, Joseph Melf, Shannon Murray, Allison Muth, James Nixon, Jarrod Pavelitz, Devin Phillips, Nicole Phillips, Christina Pino, Eric Ringsdorf, Danielle Rose, Joseph Ruiz, Leah Santucci, Rachel Simon, Matthew Sipsky, Kirby Smith, Raymond Stemrich, Tara Stephens, Emily Suchocki, Sarah Suchoski, Margaret Sullivan, Michael Terninko, Elsbeth Turcan, Michael Vamos, Olivia Vitali, Marissa Warnick, Kimberly Waters, Julia Wignot, Erin Williams, Robert Wingert and Olivia Zurad. Honors: Mario Adajar IV, Robert Arensmeyer III, Michel Banas, Daniel Belsky, Ariana Brennan, Jordan Cadwalader, Angela Costigan, Amber Desiderio, Thomas Doyle, Michelle Druby, Michael Dupre, Ryan English, Megan Ferrell, Ronald Foy III,

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Alexandra Griswold, Francis Hickey, Zachary Janusziewicz, Kurt Jones, Christine Kabacinski, Alexa Kalafut, Brian Kelly, Elizabeth Knaub, Jessica Kupetz, Rebecca Makar, Paige Makowski, Alyssa Miller, Megan Mirra, Thomas Murray, Dylan Myslowski, Elizabeth Nicholas, Dominick Policare, Alexandra Pugh, M. Halie Rexer, Jessica Ruppert, Michael Rychwalski, Vera Sedlak, Alexandra Serra, Stephanie Sullin, Monica Theroux, Christopher Thoma, William Trimblett, Cody Tsevdos, Ian Wagner, Lindsee Waldron, Marissa Walker, Meeghan Walton, Jackson Welch and Andrea Zupko. Grade 1 1: High Honors: Nicholas Ambrulavage, Jeremy Astolfi, Emily Becker, Bethany Chmil, Cornelia Chmil, Matthew Collins, Tyler Dougherty, Marissa Durako, Cassandra Gill, Danielle Gorski, Tricia Harenza, Jeremy Heiser, Dakota Hollock-Sinclair, Louis Jablowski, Cody Januszko, Maria Sara Kupczynski, Michael Kosik, Sydney Kotch, Jacob Kozak, John Kozak, Brendan Leahigh, Patrick Loftus,Thomas Madigan, Morgan Mancini, Andrew Mark, Michael Mocion, Michael Morrison, Jeremy Myslowski, Angeli Nause, Devon Nowicky, Megan Philllips, Victoria Reggie, Kayla Rhiel, Joshua Siecko, Matthew Slavoski, Rachel Sowinski, Christina Springer, Kaitlyn Stochla, Joseph Szczechowicz, Leanne Tabit, Ryan Tabit, Teresa Toomey, Adam Turosky, David Wert and Sarah Williams. Honors: Vito Aiello, Vincent Amarando, Fallyn Boich, James Bond, Krzysztof Bozentka, Nadine Carlo, Rachael Coassolo, Thomas Cosgrove, Kelsey Crossin, Kaitlyn Donnelly, Elizabeth Eaton, Callie Evans, Shane Flannery, Brianne Frascella, Kyle Gainard, Erik Gdovin, Alexandra Gentilesco, Margaret Guarnieri, Robert Jones, Anna Kachmarski, Geetika Khanna, Mary Kolojejchick, Kellie Kopko, Ann Kotch,

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Marnie Kusakavitch, Katelyn Laskowski, Amanda Latoski, Ashley Leighton, JulieAnn Mahle, Alexandria Malacari, Gerald Maloney, Tyler Margalski, Brandon Marx, Nicholas McCarroll , Stephanie McCole, Patrick McHale, Kasey Miller, Louis Murray, Jenna Nitowski, Michael Pahler, Lauren Pikul, Grace Rychwalski, Daniel Seasock, Andrea Siejna, Grace Sipler, Kristen Stepanski, Frazee Sutphen, Sarah Warnagiris, Kelsey Williams and Carleena Wozniak. Grade 10: High Honors: Nathaniel Anderson, Brian Banas, Megan Banks, Caitlin Barat, Michael Boland, Michael Boris, Michael Boutanos, Rachel Callahan, Casey Carty, Erik Cudo, Megan Devaney, Elizabeth DiGiovine, Alec Eustice, Dominique Falzone, Michele Fromel, Carl Gross, Amanda Halchak, Caroline Jones, Kellan Katra, Lucas Klimuszka, Bailey Klocko, Jeffrey Kloeker, Julie Kosik, Tyler Kukosky, Jacqueline Kurovsky, Melanie Kusakavitch, Tram Le, Gary Loughney, Emily Makar, Rachel Makar, Allison Meluskey, Frank Mrozowski, Vinay Murthy, Hailey Noss, Nina Paoloni, Bryce Partlow, Christopher Pawlenok, Alyssa Platko, Michael Prociak, Dominick Rendina, Miranda Robasky, Anneliese Romani, Emily Savidge, Samantha Scalzo, Nikki Scarantino, Christine Scavone, Nicole Slavoski, Sarah Snyder, Donald Stephens, David Tomaszewski, Ana Turosky, Lloyd Wagner, Allison Zablocky and Audrey Zavada. Honors: Elizabeth Arensmeyer, Michael Berbano, James Blewitt, Brandon Bojanowski, Thomas Caffrey, Martin Cirelli, Devon Claherty, Alyssa Clocker, Joseph Devers, Michael Dubinski, Taylor Engel, Alexia Evans, Rachel Finnegan, Jessica Fu(Ting), Brian Geraghty, Patrick Gilhooley, Tyler Guilford, Shawna Hannon, Jason Hauze, Samantha Hilenski, Katherine Jensen, Emily Kabalka, John Kane,

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Margarete Kukosky, Kaila Kurash, Mallory Kusakavitch, Anna Layaou, Eric Ligotski, Chelsea Linden, Chase Makowski, Elizabeth Masi, Mariano Medico, Sara Mirra, Connor Mulvey, Victoria Nealon, Matthew Pawlowski, Yardley Phillips, Lucille Reilly, Natasha Rostova, Patrick Serino, Kelsey Stasko, Nicholas Strellish, Taylor Wheeler, Heather Williams, Krista Williams, Kayleigh Zablock.and Zoe Zarola. Grade 9: High Honors: Kathryn Aldrich, Derek Belsky, Mary Pat Blaskiewicz, Renee Brown, Gaetano Buonsante, Erin Byorick, Jamie Carty, Michael Conlon, Ann Cosgrove, Caitlin Croke, Ryan Crossin, Matthew Dacey, Arielle Djokoto, Robert Dougherty, Eric Flower, Cameron Ford, Michael Gatusky, Katarina Gereda, Cameron Gill, Michael Gorski, Olivia Gregorio, Vanessa Hannagan, Jillian Hayden, Maria Khoudary, Johanna Kultys, Matthew Lyons, Conlan McAndrew, Marlee Mierzwa, Gabrielle Mohutsky, Arvind Murali, Lindsay Musial, Emily Schramm, Briana Scorey, Tyler Scott, Gabriella Soroka Timothy White and Abigail Wolfgang. Honors: Robert Bertram, Elena Bruning-Martin, Ciaran Burke, Nicole Calomino, Thomas Calpin, Ryan Doyle, Ian Dysinger, Greta Ell, Bailey Endler, Breanna Gorski, Hannah Griffiths, Kaitlyn Gushka, Megan Harding, Justin Higgs, Taylor Isaacs, Alex Kotch, Alexis Lewis, Thomas Lewis , Mark Liskowicz, Lauren Manganello, Danielle Marchese, Lucas Mark, Jacob Martin, Madison Mishanski, Connor Murray, Benjamin Nause, Brandon Povilitus, Justin Prenga, Kenneth Rexer, John Rey, Jennifer Ringsdorf, Phoebe Ritsick, Theodosia Seasock, James Slavinski, Abigail Truschel, Terence Vrabec, Matthew Wert, Adriana Wesolowski, Alana Wilson, Alexis Wylam and Adam Zipko.

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HONOR ROLL Good Shepherd Academy Good Shepherd Academy recently announced the Honor Roll for the third quarter. Grade 6: High Honors: Bianca Cantando, Ireland Davies, Emily Evans, Madison Guido, Christa Gumbravich, Lindsey Hoover, Eric Jeffries, Hannah Judge, Marc Kolendowicz, Leah Mullery, Vivian Novitski, Jessica Ornoski, Erica Shay, Scott Williams. Honors: Jake Adonizio, Dayna Belsky, Emily Blaum, Laura Buckman, Adrhianna Centrella, Devin Dougherty, Shane Flaherty, Kandra Innamorati, Francesca Kalie, Logan Korus, Nicholas Kreidler, Morgan Luksic, Alexandra Nockley, Debra Scott, Benton Smith, Colton Smith, Connor Stevens, Kaylen Stone, Sydney Swales, Lauren Wasiakowski, Anthony Zarola. Grade 7: High Honors: Artemisia Ashton, Matthew Blaum, Elizabeth Boos, Kristen Coffay, Emily Easton, Lia Fredericks, Gracyn Giampietro, Anthony Khoudary, Andrew Lacina, Michael Lyons, Charlotte Maria, Katherine Neville, Maria Pino, Jonathan Rokosz, Brian Springer, Eamon Tuttle, Keith Williams. Honors: Joseph Boos, Mackenzie Byers, Ben Donahue, Christopher Draina, Alex Larralde, Joseph Layaou, Ann Lewis, Jeremy Mayerski, Molly McHale, Anthony Molitoris, Nicole Mrugal, John Seasock, Lauren Serafin, Christopher Zim. Grade 8: High Honors: Kaitlyn Ceppa, Colin Ray Craven, Catherine Falzone, Kathryn Jeffries, Kristin Kalish, Courtney Kijek, Macy Klocko, Lydia Lawson, Alexis Ornoski, Kelcie Shovlin, Brianna Stilp, Michael Waugh, Amanda Wozinski. Honors: Caroline Banas, Joshua Betz, Andrea Dogal, Jarrett Gabriel, Madeline Grant, David Iskra, Bailey Janowski, Carrie Ann Kinney, Aidan Lynn, Olivia Mennig, Juliana Pillets, Mark Pointek, Rose Randazza, Lauren Slavoski, Abigail Spencer, Connor Stone, Abigail Stucker, Carissa Wozinski.

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CMYK ➛

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

HONOR ROLL Lake-Lehman Junior-Senior High School Lake-Lehman Junior-Senior High School recently announced the Honor Roll for the third quarter. Grade 7: Distinguished Honor Roll: Nicholas Sergei Albertson, Elizabeth Bartuska, Vincenzo J. Ferrari, Rebecca Lynn Ford, Ashley Herceg, Michael Kenneth James, Emily Marie Johns, Karly Ann Johns, Alyssa Lee Kristeller, Andrew Paul Leahy, Marina Renee Malcolm, Thomas John Manzoni, Kara Pauline Martin. High Honor Roll: Nikolas Jacob Antinnes, Savanah Rae Aton, Emily Ann Carey, Janelle Cawley, Shawn William Deeds, Jr., Jessica Lynn Derhammer, Jay Curtis Foster, Evelyn Elizabeth Hosey, Peter Samuel Hummel, Katherine Ann Kaminski, Carolyn Anne Kerkowski, Justin Lansberry, Devin B. Lindley, Collin G. MacMullen, Matthew Richard Makara, Sarah Kathleen Malak, Maranda Martin, Sean Patrick McMonagle, Kaitlyn Meehan, Matthew Kyle Myers, Sequoia Sioux Saxe, Jake David Selingo, Hailey Joyce Shefler, Katelyn Alexandra Sincavage, Cole Matthew Spencer, Katie Morgan Strohl, David Allen Thomas, Jr. Sierra Lynn Titus, Nicholas James Wnuk, Kaitlyn Marie Young, Lauren Marie Zeisloft. Honor Roll: Alexis Jaye Barker, Cheyanne Brooke Brucher, Jared Michael Campbell, Taylor Lyn Cercone, Samuel Louis Ciravolo, Steven Alexander Coley, Abigail Jean Crawford, Ian Marshall Dawsey, Robert John Derhammer, Ryan James Dourand, Jennifer Lynn Evans, Samantha Lynn Evans, Kortnee Dawn Gocek, Noah Brian Gorski, Andrew Quinn Herrick, Katelynn Rose Hutchins, Glenn Cody Johnson, Devon Karraker, Dakota Jeanne Kittle, Hailey R. Kubiski, Sydney Lynn Lamoreaux, Dyllon Joseph Lee, Jacob Ryan Lotz, Krystal Ann Lowery, Tyler William Manzoni, Caleb Charles Marr, Rachel Marie Martini, Katie Marie McCue, Emily Ann Mieczkowski, Owen James Morgan, Adam Thomas Motovidlak, Chyenne Michelle Nelson, Corrine Lynn Nevel, Jillian Anne O’Brien, Daniel Issac O’Connell, Nathan Thomas Pavlichko, John Benjamin Pelton, Kendra Renee Pudimott, Justin Lawrence Raspen, Megan Ann Rusonis, Sarah Christine Sabaluski, Aubrey Lynn Scavone, Ethan Gray Sensbach, Jacqueline Kay Sharon, Walkker James Shaw, Michael Joseph Sikora, Brianna Marie Smith, Kyle Matthew Spencer, Marcus N. Steele, Marylillian Stepanski, Hannah Rose Stroud, Michael Anthony Stuart, Mackenzie Rose Sutton, Kristopher James Sweitzer, Morgan Lee Thompson, Jakeb Anthony Tomolonis, Jesse Garth Tomolonis, Blake Nathaniel Valyo, Garret Tyler Weston, Kenneth Steele Wickard, Rene Evelyn Wildoner, David Morgan Williams, Tammy Lyne Wingler, Michael Frank Wojciechowski, Luke Angus Yaple, Connor Zekas. Grade 8: Distinguished Honor Roll: Kaley Ann Egan, Julia Therese Hutsko, Rachel Jean Malak, Michael Gary Minsavage, Lindsay Elizabeth Pembleton, Catherine Ann Rose, Clayton Atwood Vasey. High Honor Roll: Jillian Lee Ambrose, Holly Cheyanne Banta, Emily Ann Bauer, Eric Daniel Bordo, Joseph Edward Chaga, Zachary Michael Corey, Lauren Taylor Cunius, Anthony Joseph DeCesaris, Julia Ellen Eneboe, Nicholas Eury, Zachary Michael Field, Dominic George Hockenbury, Perry William Hoover, Marie Rose Johns, Corey Daniel Kinney, Rebecca Ruth Kobal, Kayleigh Elizabeth Konek, Grace Elizabeth Kuschke, Karlie Ann Lobitz, Alaina Marie Nastasiak, Alexis Lynne Soifer, Megan Amelia Spess, Madison Stambaugh, Molly Margaret Storz, Katie Ann Supey, Kaitlin Marie Sutton, John Noah Thomas, Thomas Lee Williams. Honor Roll: Jacob Michael Barber, Elizabeth Jane Bauer, Julia Ann Baur, Zachary W. Brucher, Aubrey Lynn Bullock, Kayla Marie Carrera, Morgan Arielle Coburn, Andrew Steven Cook, Karli Anne Coole, Jacob John Corey, Courtney Elizabeth Eiswerth, Carissa Lee George, Anthony Ralph Greco, Kyra Ann Grzymski, Jared Guth, Alivia Elaine Harrison, Katelynn Marie Harrison, Charles Lawrence Hennebaul, III, Brandon Douglas Hogrebe, Jacob Luke Hummel, Kyle Robert James, Samantha Kanios, Bernard Jakob Karlowicz,

Colby Allen Karnes, Kyle Joseph Katchko, Sabryn Quinn Kurtz, Lisa Michelle LaBar, Rachel Michelle Leskowsky, Rachel Marie Mahoney, Karen Lynn Marchakitus, Andrew McCarroll, Connor James McGovern, Jared Thomas McGrath, Maranda Sue Moosic, Jerome Paul Natishan, III, Dylan James Nayavich, Haley Alexis Nice, Christina Marie Olson, Rebecca Sue Osiecki, Zacharia Ouladelhadjahmed, Miranda Grace Parry, Michael Anthony Peck, Nicholas Scott Perkins, Samantha Marie Rosencrans, Christopher Sabol, Julie Ann Salansky, Sara Rae Schuler, Joseph Francis Sharon, Bailey Marie Stockage, Brandon Michael Tosh, Jessica Ann Ulozas, Blaise Albert Waligun, Corey Weaver, Mikayla Elizabeth Weston, Claire Elizabeth Wilson, Chelsea Lee Witter, Rebecca Lynn Wright, Henry Joseph Zielinski, IV. Grade 9: Principal’s Honor Roll: Katherine Bartuska, Emily Grace Crawford, Noah Thomas Crispell, Hannah Leigh Cross, Zane D. Denmon, Matthew Edkins, Jason Charles Field, Sela Ann Fine, Elana M. Herceg, Philip Samuel Hettes, Shauna Christine Leahy, Nicole Marie Lockard, Megan Ann Mahle, Brittney Paige Mahoney, Matthew Granville Miller, Jasmine Mari Leilani Moku, Jenna Koury Mortenson, Neil Patrick Mras, Alexis Sophia Oplinger, Rachel Helen Pilch, Hannah Rachel Stull, Michael Avery Symeon. High Honor Roll: Alysa Kaitlyn Adams, Natalee Marie Barker, Tyler Eric Burke, Cahil James Carey, Courtney Ann Carey, Matthew Christoph Chabala, Justus James Cole, Kirsten Anne Cope, Morgan Rae Dizbon, Emma Elizabeth Evans, Antonio Ferrari, Monica Anne Fries, Micayla Mary Grey, Caitlyn Taylor Henninger, John Joseph Hospodar, Andrew Richard Hutsko, Jeremy G. Jayne, Connor Adam Jones, Lauren MacMullen, Collin Eric Masters, Ginger Lee Mutzabaugh, Jamie Lynn Niedjaco, Julia Rose Pilch, Amanda Lynn Scavone, Adam Elijah Simmonette, Cayle Rae Spencer, Colleen Mae Spencer, Danae Sutliff, Sara Margaret Tronsue, Frank Matthew Vacante, John Thomas Aloysius VanScoy, Jacob Aaron Yaple, Christian Scott Zeisloft, Ronald Jude Ziomek. Honor Roll: Melissa Lyne Anthony, Crystal Janice Audia, Aleaha Marie Blazick, Jade Amber Butler, Jared Marcus Casaldi, Matthew Jack Cragle, Daniel Xavier Cross, Kenley Maria Cutter, Anna Margaret DeFranco, Derek Mark Dragon, Kaitlyn Evans, Emily Galasso, Jessica Robin Geiger, Morgan Lynne Goodrich, Jessica Elizabeth Harvey, Cory Logan Hoyt, Amy Lynn Ide, Katrina Lee Joyce, Mercedes Keller, Jared Adam Kepner, Shawn Michael Kidd, Kierra Ashlyn Kimble, Brandon James Kozlowski, Hayley Lynn Kozlowski, John Anthony Labatch, James Scott Loefflad, Tiffani Danielle Malinowski, Eric Alan Masters, Natalie Mae McCue, Sade Elizabeth Miller, Marissa Kate Miscavage, Robert James Nayavich, Haley Helen Novitski, Anna Joy O’Connell, Tessa Mary Paul, Benjamin Peter Pilch, Carolyn Price, Thomas Richard Pudimott, Isabel Sanchez, Joshua Robert Sayre, Eliana G. Sicurella, Staci Mae Stine, Bethany Lynne Taylor, John David Tomasura, Korri Rae Wandel. Grade 10: Principal’s Honor Roll: Michelle Ash, Cassia Rose Cole, Nicholas Joseph Egan, Brittany Faux, Christopher Michael Herrick, Kaylee Ann Hillard, Anna Michelle James, Calvin Elliot Karnes, Meghan Elizabeth Maccarone, Emily Mae Malak, Ashley Rose Rood, Megan Elizabeth Sorber, Kelly Ann Sweeney, Alyssa Rae Talacka, Amy Joi Williams, Lindsay Nicole Williams. High Honor Roll: Maria Anna Chinikaylo, Adam Taylor Dizbon, Austin Charles Harry, Alexander Charles Hoyt, Dustin Daily Jones, Olivia Taylor Kojadinovich, Stephanie Nicole Konek, Kahli Kotulski, Jodan S. Lindley, Courtney E. McMonagle, Lacey Raye Miller, Brooke Anne O’Brien, Jason Patrick Patterson, Rene Suzanne Rismondo, Kyle Jacob Romanofski, Alexander Thomas Scott, Symantha Susan Sharon, Tracy Lynn Snyder, Daniel A. Stefanowicz, Vincent Frederick Williamson. Honor Roll: Brittany Marie Acevedo, Douglas Lee Albertson, Emily Mae Anglovich, Rachel Nicole Anthony, Benjamin Michael Attanasio, Emily Joy Barber, Scott Michael Bean, Danielle Rae Belcher, Joshua William Bevan, Tyler R. Bonner, Brady Robert Butler, Grant A. Calkins, R-E-Onna Elizabeth Canfield, Gregg John Ciravolo, Desirae

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Leigh David, Victoria Marie DeCesaris, Robert Brandon Fowler, Peter Henry Groblewski, Adeline Eve Hannigan, Zebulon Harrison, Alexis Elizabeth Harry, Montana Marie Higgins, Shoshana Marie Mahoney, Timothy Vincent Marchakitus, David Allen Oliver, Katelyn Anne Pelton, Dylan Robert Pudimott, Kolbie Renee Rodriguez, Anthony Shaffer, Emily Anne Sutton, Brinley Elizabeth Williams, Joseph John Wojcik, III, Robert William Wright III. Grade 1 1: Principal’s Honor Roll: Joel Austin, Sarah M. Bedford, Thomas D. Boyle, Jason Daron, Megan A. Davis, Christopher N. Edkins, Carly L. Grombel, Katie E. Heindel, Rachel E. Hohol, Ashley D. Jackson, Jared M. James, Amanda L. Mathers, Karli A. O’Brien, Samantha M. Sabol, Molly F. VanScoy, Bethany Joi Williams, Karen P. Yamrick, Kaitlyn Yoniski, Dustin Zeiler. High Honor Roll: Mark M. Bilbow, John Patrick Butler, IV, Cody M. Derhammer, Tristan Ryder Fry, William T. Hillman, Brandon Nathaniel Kelley, Samantha J. Lindley, Emily Maculloch, Samantha A. O’Neill, Sierra S. Pall, Jeremy W. Prater, Cody Christopher Spriggs. Honor Roll: Ryan Christian Akins, Connor Balloun, Ashlee M. Barker, Kayley Bedford, Kenneth Wayne Besecker, Zachary D. Bevan, Emily Blaski, Victoria E. Cadwalader, Jessica L. Campbell, Jeffrey T. Carter, Christie Cawley, Zachary T. Chabala, Michelle Chappell, Piotr Chrzanowski, Jarod J. Ciehoski, Jolisa Raquel Copeman, Miranda Evan Dembowski, Kayla D. Denmon, Karli Ann Doran, Michael Robert Ego, Nicole C. Ford, Michael Cole Hartman, Brent Hizny, Shalynn R. Honeywell, Robert H. Ide, Kassie R. Keiper, Alyssa A. Kobal, Genevieve Konopinski, Colin E. Kovalchek, Shane Christopher Kreller, Michael J. Labatch, Megan M. Lee, Craig Michael Manzoni, Alesha Martin, Kayla Ann Martin, Kevin Charles Masters, Mark Navin, Donald W. Nevel, III, Abraham Caleb O’Connell, Nicole Marie O’Connor, Eric R. Ottaviani, Katrina M. Patla, Rachel Runner, Catherine A. Salaway, Donald J. Scavone, III, Brian P. Sisk, Jr., Sarah N. Stacey, Tyler Stein, Cassandra Marie Stevens, Kendra Nichole Stine, Kieran C. Sutton, Deanna Marie Szabo, Kasey Rebecca Wasylyk. Grade 12: Principal’s Honor Roll: Kristen Dicton Boyle, Bryan P. Carter, Pawel Chrzanowski, Connor Ian Daly, Shelby Jean Foster, Matthew Joseph Gorski, Callie M. Grey, Rachel Holena, Kevin T. Katchko, Jr., Michael Thomas Kiwak, Michelle Lipski, Marissa L. Moosic, Nathan Rinehouse, Raine C. Scott, Nikki Sutliff, Taryn E. Talacka, Alexis P. VanFleet. High Honor Roll: Julia A. Bilbow, Joseph Charles Brandenburg, Hope Dante, Sara Elizabeth Davis, Jay Brendan Dawsey, Kyle J. Fine, Victoria Ann Frederick, Ryan C. Hoyt, Alexandra Samantha Jayne, Jonathan Dennis King, Kayla R. Koziol, Emily Anne Leskowsky, Carol F. Mosier, Jared L. Novitski, Tiffany Celia Oplinger, Mikayla O. Orrson, Amanda Leah RodriguezTeutonico, Rebecca A. Rosser, Brandon Michael Scott, Vincenzo E. Sicurella, Job Thompson Stepanski, Keegan G. Truska, Paige Elizabeth Vacante, Carl D. Whispell, Jr., Julia Catherine Whitesell, Daniel C. Williams, Matthew David Wolman. Honor Roll: Amber Elizabeth Anderson, Eliott James Anderson, Olivia L. Anglovich, Katelyn A. Ashton, Curtis James Barbacci, Lindsey Lee Bennett, Jacob Daniel Bevan, Kevin John Bohan, Sarah Jessica Brooks, John Thomas Butchko, Brittany Lee Carey, Laura L. Casterline, Amy L. Denmon, Tyler P. Denmon, David Dominick Eury, Elizabeth Farrell, Korey Mitchell Fegely, Sean Fertal, Nicole Lauren Fink, Charleen AR Fisher, Bradley Fuller, Christopher Thomas Gerlin, Lewis B. Hackling, Samantha Joe Headley, Scott P. Judson, Samantha Marie Loefflad, Zachary J. Manganella, Tyler James-Charles McGovern, Lianna Milazzo, Briar D. Moore, Hunter L. Murphy, Brent R. Oliver, II, Justin Z. Partington, Sarah M. Perry, Cody A. Poepperling, Justin M. Salvati, Alison L. Sankey, Nicholas Shelley, Troy J. Shurites, Evonne M. Spencer, Kailee Taylor, Jordan Thomas, Zachary David VanLoon, Mackenzie E. Wagner, Ashlyn R. Wilson, David A. Wilson, Eric Wojciechowski, Brittney Rose Wood-Turinski, Merissa R. Wright, Joshua L. Zacharias.

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HONOR ROLL Northwest Area Senior High and Middle School Ryan Miner, principal, and Joseph Rasmus, assistant secondary principal, Northwest Area Senior High and Middle School recently announced the third quarter Honor Roll students. Grade 7: High Honors: Forrest Callahan, Emily Demko, Shayla DiPasquale, Samuel Edwards, Adam Grisham, Brian Hardiman, Emma Herbert, Morgan Kline, Morgan Lancenese, Amanda Learn, Luke Pavill, Skylar Peters, Michael Samulevich, Alijah Zielecki, Sarah Zultevich. Honors: Kaelee Albertson, Brittany Bitto, Kiersten Eddinger, Brittani Jo George, Julia Grattan, Joseph Groff, Ezra Judge, Kennedy Maclean, Mitchell Mazonkey, Noah McGovern, Justis Miller, Katherine Noss, Carlie Pszeniczny, Shelby Spencer, Jesse Tarnowski, Dylan Womelsdorf. Grade 8: High Honors: Ashley Brubaker, Douglas Campbell, Rachel Connolly, Catherine George, Elizabeth Gurzynski, Katie Jones, Tanner Kennedy, Kaylee Kishbaugh, Sarah Kozlowski, Benjamin Krouse, Tanner MacDougall, Vincent Pavill IV, Terasa Pierontoni, Garrett Reese, Alex Schechterly, Jared Sivco, Jeremy Walsh. Honors: Neno Agnello, Andrew Boberick, Carlee Capece, Erin Cerase, Tyde Chamberlain, Emily Clarke, Kelsey Cook, Kira Dempsey, Alan

HONOR ROLL Wyoming Area High School Vito Quaglia, principal, Wyoming Area High School, recently announced the students who qualified for the Honor Roll for the second marking period ending March 23. Grade 7: High Honors: Erin Ainsworth, Grace Angelella, Kathryn Augustine, Madison Beppler, Michael Bonita, Matthew Booth, Victoria Braccini, Lydia Bugelholl, Peter Butera, Robert Butwin, Kara Dooner, Evan Esposito, Lindsey Feeney, Kimberly Ferrara, Stephen Homza, Jessica Hopkins, Dylan Kostak, Aaron Lee, Shari Liddick, Leah Moore, Kara Moscatelli, Madison Mulhern, Kyle Musto, Anthony Nardell, Kristen Nossavage, Makaila O’Reilly, Mackenzie Pegg, Alex Robbins, Laura Sachaczenski, Anthony Saitta, Christina Sakalas, Ryan Shuleski, Eric Speicher, Shelby Stanford, Evan Stravinski, Katrina Stravinski, Evelyn Urban, Emily Uritz, Cassanda Wilson, Katie Wolfgang. Honors: David Alberigi III, Austin Alder, Nikolas Athmann, Joseph Bender, Albert Blannett, III, Julia Bonomo, Adam Buczynski, Morgan Coolbaugh, Dominic Dempsey, Lea Getz, Cailtlyn Gibbons, Emily Goyne, Rachel Johnson, Nina Minnelli, Ariana Pamias, Julia Patts, Grace Pepe, Megan Pitcavage, Joshua Quick, Walker Regis, Albert Scianra, III, Grace Scrobola, Sarah Shemanski, Tristan Sokach-Minnick, Amy Troy, Ashley Vikara, Tiffany Vincavage, Allison Vukovich, Ryan Webb, Ryan Wrubel, Gina Zehner. Grade 8: High Honors: Robert Acacio, Georgia Calimeres, Matthew Carlson, Stephanie Chihorek, Erin Donnelly, Katharyn Dymond, Alexis Harris, Laura Heinzlmeir, Kelsey Kasisky, Hannah Klaproth, Mikayla Klimas, Zachary Lagrue, Ashley Lamoreaux, Cassandra Lockhart, Megan Mattioli, Victoria Mattioli, Michael Murphy, Ryan Murphy, Lauren Perry, Victoria Remley, Samantha Sepko, Anthony Shaver, Jennie Skursky, Stephanie Sokach, Rachael Solano, Jessica Sorick, Krystina Stanczyk, Justin Steinberger, Kelly Sypulski, Morgan Tarnalicki, Anna Thomas, Nico Vasquez, Daniela Vigueras, Claudia Waltz, Nicole Wright, Megan Wysocki. Honors: Bree Bednarski, Mackenzie Bilbow, Joseph Buczynski, Ryan Burton, Rebecca Charney, Kelly Clarke,

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 11B Diltz, Maggie Dow, Eric Evans, Hannah Everett, Haily Gee, Brianna Hardiman, Destiny Higgins, Cheyenne Huffman, Alexis Kennedy, Jillian Kondrosky, Joshua Marr, Abaigael Noss, Brandon Reno, Garrett Roche, Zachary Schwartz, Auston Simonson, Brooke Stavitzski, Danny Truskowski, Joshua Wales. Grade 9: High Honors: Emma Everett, Margaret Murphy, Taylor Pawlik, Emily Snyder, Marissa Sorber, Kelby Truchon. Honors: Anthony Boberick, Samantha Boyer, Matthew Boyes, Zachary Briggs, Shelby Burke, Breauna Decker, Kaitlyn Ford, Emily Gleco, Cody Hart, Hope Hudak, Lindsay Kashnicki, Bryanna Krolick, Stephen Lehner, Emily Lencoski, Morganne Piestrak, Olivia Piestrak, Hailey Povisil, Jacob Ratowski, Faith Rierson, Bailey Taylor, Anthony Trent, Kelsey Yustat, Rachel Zultevicz. Grade 10: High Honors: Kaitlin Agnello, Andrew Antolik, Bethany Ascenzi, Jessica Barchik, Emily Buerger, Hailey Chapin, Alyssa Coutts, Wyatt Cox, Destiny Fisher, Eric Gurzynski, Kylee Hazur, Sara Kashnicki, Tessa Leck, Sierra Macierowski, Charles Margelewicz, Olivia McCorkel, Lillian Owens, Joshua Piestrak, Justin Ratowski, Angel Rollo, Cass Rupert, David Samulevich, Andrew Swiatek, Bruno Walkowiak, Zachary T. White, Ashley Williams. Honors: Janet Bash, Kristin Bomboy, Ricki Carr, Emily Clements, Victoria Daltroff, Natasha Davenport, Trevor Dempsey, Daniel Diltz, Gray Godfrey, Samantha Harden, Austin Hill, Kyleigh Hoover, Joseph Jenkins, Sarah Coolbaugh, Bryan Cumbo, Mitchell DeAngelo, Matthew Dovidas, Blaise Erzar, Taryn Gates, Grace Gober, Lindsey Klinges, Gavin Kross, Cory Lescavage, Maria Marstell, Ryan Marvin, Heather Nametko, Kevin Pish, Mackenzie Toler, Alexandra Traglia, Eric Whyte. Grade 9: High Honors: Amy Alder, Julia Banas, Cecelia Chisdock, Carlane Costello, Joshua Donvito, Emily Endres, Destini Esposito, Chaslyn Facciponti, Dominick Forlenza, Holly Green, Nikolas Gushka, Matthew Harding, Raymond Hopkins, Ryan Kaslavage, Olivia Katulka, Nicole Kolessar, Caitlyn Kraynak, Amber Kuharchik, Anthony Lenkaitis, Justin Palovchak, Victoria Pennington, Mia Perrino, Rachel Polacheck, Carrie Pozaic, Sara Romanowski, Taylor Schechter, Nikki Sellitto, Victoria Sidari, Lauren Sokirka, Haley Stackhouse, Zachary Sypniewski, Brittany Thomas, Francesca Trottini, Peter Urban II, Olivia White, Emily Wolfgang. Honors: Madeleine Ambruso, Mariah Bronsburg, Marcyssa Brown, Danielle Bulger, Nina Cruz, Myiah Custer, Steven Dauber, Juliana DeNardi, Madison Hindmarsh, Tanner Johnson, Zoe Laporte, Geneva Laviska, Zachary Lopatka, Alexa Malloy, Maria Marcum, John Marianacci, Evan Musto, Nina Owen, Jude Polit-Moran, Emma Ramage, Joseph Roach, Julianna Scappaticci, Abigail Schwerdtman, Samantha Williams. Grade 10: High Honors: Drew Bednarski, Emily Bellanco, Mallory Bohan, Tyler Bonita, Cody Colarusso, Nicole Cumbo, Morgan DeAngelo, Jaclyn DeNardi, Jonathan Gamble, Lisa Guido, Audrey Hiedacavage, Sara Justave, Courtney Melvin, Austin Shission, Katherine Sokirka, Danielle Spagnuolo, Gabrielle Spagnuolo, Mari Taggart, Abigail Thornton, Felicia Turner, Gared Zaboski. Honors: Amanda Bialy, Kyle Borton, Stephanie Brown, Brian Buckman, Lindsay Carey, Kevin Carroll, Matthew Hine, Curtis Hosey, Michaela Jurchak, Ariana Keller, Nicholas Leon, Michael Lumley, Brittney Michael, Tah’nee Mitchell, Katelyn Norton, Kaytlin Roach, Leo Skoronski, Carissa Smith, Keegan Thomas, Marissa Urban, Christopher Wall, Brittney Winsock,

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Grade 12: High Honors: Gavin Crosby, Skyler DiPasquale, Deanna Gill, Cody Halchak, Kathryn Kalbach, Brandylynn Macierowski, Joelle Marvin, Karly Mason, Jeffrey Nelson, Matthew Schwiter. Honors: Travis Antoniello, Kayla Buczek, Brandon Butler, Joshua Dunay, Michael Faruolo, Christian Foley, Joshua Hess, Amber Holoman, Heather Hufford, Maranda Koehn, Rachel Linso, Jordan Monick, Andrew Rindos, Nicholas Roche, Sarah Shaffer Dylan Sidoti, Amanda Sivco, Jesse Smith, Alicia Stavitzski, Kyle Stempien, Derek Sutliff, Dalton Tomko, Peter Wolfe. Brian Wisowaty. Grade 1 1: High Honors: John Bankus, Gabrielle Bohan, Valeria Bott, Victoria Brown, Gregory Cajka, Michael Carey, Andrew Coco, April Davis, Serra Degnan, Nicholas Dominick, Nicholas Esposito, Michael Harding, Rebecca Johnson, Casey Kasisky, Ashley Klein, Emily Kneeream, Kaitlyn Kross, Samantha Kudrako, Zachary Lanunziata, Rachel Leandri, Brittany Lemardy, Maria Marianacci, Jessica Martin, Megan Milunic, Zachary Mulhern, Mark O’Hara, Angel Olmstead, Dylan Pegg, Abby Raieski, Angela Raieski, Evan Rider, Brianna Romiski, Stormy Ruiz, Courtney Sadowski, Brittani Shearer, Emily Shemanski, Leslie Shumlas, Joseph Taylor, Katie Tibus, Devaney Wood, Tyler Wrubel, Jordan Zezza. Honors: Gabrielle Alberigi, Kelly Bauman, Mariah Bellanco, Megan Bonomo, Myranda Burgess, Jordan Chiavacci, Bartholomew Chupka, Alexis Coolbaugh, Glynnis Cowley, Nikki Giordano, Paige Hudock, Melissa Kazmerick, Christina Klinges, Alexander Krispin, Cassandra Lescavage, Darion Miller, Nicholas O’Brien, William Romanowski, Jared Saporito, Sarah Schultz, Eric Smith, Stephanie Spudis, Rachael Stark, Hannah Troy, William Weiss. Grade 12: High Honors: Trevor Alder, Alexandra Amico, Christina Argenio, John Barcelon, Stacey Blannett, Amber Bolton, Christopher Bone, David Bonomo, Lisa Chihorek, Angela Coco, Danielle Confletti, Sarah Crake, Mark Dymond, Samantha Evarts, Allison Golden, Kimberly Golden, Jessica Hollister, Keri Irace, Jordan Johnston, Theresa Kelly, Michael Kohut III, Leah Laneski, Emily Lukasavage, Nick Mazzone, Habibah Njiaju, James Pennington, Alicia Pizano, Sara Radzwilka, James Scrobola, Jonathan Scrobola, Hannah Shelley, Samantha Shiner, Jacqueline Stash, Louis Vullo. Honors: Joseph Adonizio, Nicholas Bartoli, Brittany Bender, Morgan Bilbow, Nathanael Brague, Kyle Brogan, Alyssa Crawford, Tyler Gfeller, David Granteed, Kelsey Kovaleski, Sarah Kuharchik, Kyle LaNunziata, Ashley Lombardo, Kaitlin Maguire, Robert Phillips, Shannon Ritts, Adam Romanowski, James Rose, Jr., Brittany Smetana, Catlyn Smith, Kristy Voychuk, Dorianna Williams.

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SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

C A L D E R C U P P L AY O F F S

P E N N S TAT E F O O T B A L L

O’Brien doesn’t lack for swagger Pens finished after Game 7 loss ST. JOHN’S ICECAPS

WBS PENGUINS

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THE END IS HERE

His ‘Hell of a coach’ boast caught the attention of key search committee member.

See O’BRIEN, Page 7C

PAUL SOKOLOSKI OPINION

Nittany Lions now learning about change

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By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

For Russ Rose, it was seven words that sold him on Bill O’Brien. Penn State’s historically successful women’s volleyball coach had listened to dozens of candidates while serving on the school’s search committee for a new football coach. Head coaches, assistant coaches, general managers. College football and pro football. There comes a point where the interviews all start to sound alike. “I’m a So Rose coach. He perked up when, in the made a middle of an instatement terview – in the on one of middle of a sentence, no less – the inter- O’Brien just views that, came out and said it. for me, “I’m a hell of was what I a football coach.” like to “And everysee.” body else probgoes, Russ Rose ably Penn State ‘Geez,’ ” Rose volleyball coach recalled. “And I’m like, ‘Bingo.’ Because I think you want somebody confident. It’s a job that requires you to be confident in what you’re doing and what you know and what your vision for the future is.” Rose should know. With Joe Paterno gone, he is now Penn State’s longest-tenured head coach, as well as the most successful with five national titles, including four straight in the past decade. “I’m a coach,” Rose said plainly. “He made a statement on one of the interviews that, for me, was what I like to see.” In this, his fifth month as head football coach, O’Brien has been touring the Northeast, trying to drum up support from fans and alumni. But before that, he had to sell himself to the university.

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JOE GIBBONS/THE TELEGRAM

Penguins center Cal O’Reilly (26) battles for a loose puck against St. John’s winger Jason King (5) in the first period of Saturday’s Game 7 in Newfoundland. The Penguins got a power-play goal midway through the period but could not complete the rally from a 3-1 deficit in both the game and the series.

Rally falls short in final period Saturday

By ROBIN SHORT For The Times Leader

ST. JOHN’S, Newfoundland — A bruised and battered Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton squad came up just short of advancing in the Calder Cup playoffs on Saturday night, losing 3-2 to St. John’s in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference semifinals. The IceCaps took the best-of-seven series 4-3 and will now face the Norfolk Admirals in the AHL’s version of the Final Four. The Eastern final opens Thursday in Norfolk. In the West, the Toronto Marlies visit Oklahoma City to take on the Barons

in the Western Conference final, which also starts Thursday. It was a gritty effort from the Penguins in the second round, who rallied from a 3-1 series deficit to force a deciding game, including a 4-2 Game 6 win Friday night in St. John’s. “It was a great effort and I’m really proud of the fact we went in and we battled and we went down swinging,” Penguins coach John Hynes said. “I really felt we worked for it and fought until the end. We were one goal worse than them.” Aaron Gagnon’s second goal of the game, 53 seconds into the third period,

proved to be the winner. The Gagnon goal staked St. John’s to a 3-1 lead, one which the Penguins could not overcome. “Funny, but it was the first goal that seemed to take the air out,” Hynes said. “When they scored that third one, we felt like we were still in it, and still able to win.” Ray Sawada also scored for the winners. Replying for the Penguins were Ryan Craig and Colin McDonald. Unlike Friday’s game, when Jason WilSee PENGUINS, Page 7C

NBA

LeBron James laughs during a television interview after having accepted the NBA MVP trophy Saturday in Miami. Calling the honor "overwhelming" but pointing to a "bigger goal," James on Saturday became the eighth player in NBA history to win the MVP award three times.

King James wears 3rd MVP crown, but wants to rule NBA

not the award I want, ultimately. I want that championship. That’s all that matMIAMI — Calling the honor “over- ters to me.” James won the award for the third whelming” but pointing to a “bigger time in four seasons. goal,” LeBron James Only Kareem Abdulon Saturday became “Heat nation, we have a Jabbar, Michael Jorthe eighth player in dan, Bill Russell, Wilt NBA history to win the bigger goal. This is very Chamberlain, Larry MVP award three overwhelming to me as Bird, Magic Johnson times. and Moses Malone James accepted the an individual award. But have won at least that trophy and will get to this is not the award I many MVP trophies. show it off to Miami want, ultimately.” Abdul-Jabbar won Heat fans Sunday afLeBron James six times, Jordan and ternoon when he’s preNBA MVP Russell five times sented with the prize each, Chamberlain again by Commissionfour times. Now, er David Stern before Miami faces Indiana in Game 1 of an they’re the only players with more than James. Eastern Conference semifinal series. “We love you,” Heat President Pat Ri“Heat nation, we have a bigger goal,” James said. “This is very overwhelming to me as an individual award. But this is See JAMES, Page 7C By TIM REYNOLDS AP Sports Writer

AP PHOTO

s a man trying to get in the minds of college kids, Bill O’Brien tries to sharpen his own by simultaneously reading an array of books – most of them about leadership. But the blueprint for directing his new blue and white football team won’t be found on the pages of a book. O’Brien can’t come to Penn State carrying lessons out of the past, trying to turn himself into the next Bo Schembechler or Bear Bryant – or even Joe Paterno of college football coaching lore. O’Brien has to carve out his own style, in his own way. And that means a drastic break from the old way at Penn State. “We’ve changed the way we lift weights. We’ve changed the way we tape ankles. We’ve changed our training room,” O’Brien said. “We’ve made a lot of changes.” Including the way Penn State searches for students who will be athletes on his football team. O’Brien made that clear when Penn State’s Coaches Caravan stopped in Northeastern Pennsylvania this week. Gone is the “Grand Experiment,” a system of producing as much success in the classroom as on the football field that became a mantra of pride under the legendary Penn State coach Joe Paterno before he died. It looks like that vision died with him. “I’m not looking for 100 valedictorians,” O’Brien said. “That’s not going to help me beat Ohio State.” To be fair, he went on to insist he won’t stand for a squad of school boy slackers. As the replacement for Paterno as Penn State’s head football coach, O’Brien said he’ll search for athletes who work as hard in class as on the field. He talked about overseeing Lions teams of integrity and honesty. But truthfully, his reputation and his job aren’t going to be staked on the graduation success rates of his teams. “There’s no gray area in football. You either win or you lose,” O’Brien said. You get the sense the Lions may have lost something in this coaching transition. It starts with O’Brien’s offensive playbook, which comes straight from the New England Patriots – where O’Brien worked as an offensive coordinator last year – and is stacked more than twice as thick as anything Paterno ever put together for the kids. Which presents wonderfully exciting scoring possibilities for Penn State’s football team. And may also make players carrying a full semester of credits choose between studying the gameplan or studying for class. “There’s definitely a thought process that goes along with that,” O’Brien said of the time crunch. “What we’re putting in is the basis of the New England Patriots offense. It’s one I’m most familiar with. Part of June will be our training camp installation meetings, making sure we’re not overloading guys (with information).” But will that work load cut into time for the school load? From the time he was introduced at Penn State in January, O’Brien has been charming and charismatic. “He’s passionate about his team, about the program,” said Penn State women’s basketball coach Coquese Washington, who joined O’Brien during a caravan stop in Hazleton this past week. “He wants everything to be done at a high caliber, a high quality. And those are the hallmarks of winners and leaders.” From his early impressions, the new leader of the Lions looks to have a good read on the whole program at Penn State. You can’t always judge a book by its cover.

Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.


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SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

L O C A L C A L E N D A R TODAY'S EVENTS No Events

MONDAY, MAY 14 H.S. BASEBALL Berwick at Wyoming Area, 4:15 p.m. Coughlin at Hazleton Area, 4:15 p.m. Crestwood at Nanticoke, 4:15 p.m. Dallas at Tunkhannock, 4:15 p.m. Hanover Area at Northwest, 4:15 p.m. Meyers at Wyoming Seminary, 4:15 p.m. Pittston Area at Holy Redeemer, 4:15 p.m. H.S. GIRLS SOCCER Crestwood at Dallas, 4:15 p.m. Holy Redeemer at Berwick, 4:15 p.m. Meyers at MMI Prep, 7 p.m. North Pocono at Honesdale, 4:15 p.m. Wyoming Seminary at Hanover Area, 4:15 p.m. Wyoming Valley West at Nanticoke, 4:15 p.m. Lake-Lehman at Hazleton Area, 6 p.m. Tunkhannock at GAR, 7:30 p.m. at Wilkes-Barre Memorial H.S. SOFTBALL Berwick at Wyoming Area, 4:15 p.m. Coughlin at Hazleton Area, 4:15 p.m. Crestwood at Nanticoke, 4:15 p.m. Dallas at Tunkhannock, 4:15 p.m. GAR at Lake-Lehman, 4:15 p.m. Hanover Area at Northwest, 4:15 p.m. Holy Redeemer at Pittston Area, 4:15 p.m. Lake-Lehman at MMI Prep, 4:15 p.m. Meyers at Wyoming Seminary, 4:15 p.m. H.S. TRACK AND FIELD District 2 Class 3A Meet at Scranton Memorial Stadium, 3 p.m. H.S. BOYS VOLLEYBALL Coughlin at North Pocono Delaware Valley at Hazleton Area Hanover Area at Berwick Wyoming Valley West at Dallas H.S. BOYS LACROSSE District 2 semifinals TBD at Delaware Valley, 4 p.m. Crestwood at Dallas, 4:15 p.m. H.S. GIRLS LACROSSE District 2 semifinals TBD at Wyoming Seminary, 4 p.m. Dallas vs. Delaware Valley at Wyoming Seminary, 6 p.m. COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD Misericordia at Swathmore, 4 p.m.

TUESDAY, MAY 15 H.S. TRACK AND FIELD District 2 Class 2A Meet at Scranton Memorial Stadium, 3 p.m. H.S. BASEBALL Lake-Lehman at MMI Prep, 4:15 p.m. H.S. GIRLS SOCCER Berwick at Dallas, 4:15 p.m. H.S. SOFTBALL Crestwood at Hazleton Area, 4:15 p.m. H.S. BOYS VOLLEYBALL Tunkhannock at Lake-Lehman H.S. BOYS TENNIS PIAA Team Championships First round Wyoming Seminary vs. Moravian/Allentown Central Catholic

W H A T ’ S

O N

T V

AUTO RACING 7:30 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, Spanish Grand Prix, at Barcelona, Spain 1 p.m. SPEED — Rolex Sports Car Series, Global Barter 250, at Millville, N.J.

CYCLING

5 p.m. NBCSN — Tour of California, first stage, at Santa Rosa, Calif.

GOLF

Noon TGC — PGA Tour, THE PLAYERS, final round, at Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. 2 p.m. NBC — PGA Tour, THE PLAYERS, final round, at Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.

HOCKEY

9 a.m. NBCSN — IIHF World Championships, pool play, United States vs. Finland, at Helsinki

NHL

8 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, conference finals, game 1, Los Angeles at Phoenix

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

1 p.m. WPIX — N.Y. Mets at Miami YES – Seattle at N.Y. Yankees 1:30 p.m. WQMY — San Diego at Philadelphia ROOT – Houston at Pittsburgh 2 p.m. TBS — Atlanta at St. Louis WGN — Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee 8 p.m. ESPN — L.A. Angels at Texas

MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE

1 p.m. ESPN — NCAA Division I, playoffs, first round, Princeton at Virginia

MOTORSPORTS

4 p.m. SPEED — FIM World Superbike, at Derby, England (same-day tape) NBA BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ABC — Playoffs, first round, game 7, L.A. Clippers at Memphis 3:30 p.m. ABC — Playoffs, conference semifinals, game 1, Indiana at Miami

NHL HOCKEY

8 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, conference finals, Los Angeles at Phoenix

SOCCER

9:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Queens Park at Manchester City 10 a.m. FX — Premier League, Manchester United at Sunderland SPEED — Premier League, Blackburn at Chelsea 12:15 p.m. ESPN2 — MLS, New York at Philadelphia

T R A N S A C T I O N S BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Acquired LHP Mike Belfiore from Arizona to complete an earlier trade. Assigned Belfiore to Bowie (EL). CLEVELAND INDIANS—Recalled RHP Zach McAllister from Columbus (IL). Placed RHP Josh Tomlin on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 8. Purchased the contract of INF Jose Lopez from Columbus. Optioned INF Jason Donald to Columbus. Designated OF Nick Weglarz for assignment. KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Activated RHP Greg Holland from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Nate Adcock to Omaha (PCL). National League CHICAGO CUBS—Placed RHP Carlos Marmol on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Casey Coleman from Iowa (PCL).

FOOTBALL

National Football League CLEVELAND BROWNS—Signed OL Mitchell Schwartz, DL John Hughes, WR Travis Benjamin, LB James-Michael Johnson, OL Ryan Miller, DL Billy Winn, DB Trevin Wade and FB Brad Smelley.

H O C K E Y National Hockey League Playoff Glance (x-if necessary) CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS Friday, April 27 Phoenix 4, Nashville 3, OT Saturday, April 28 NY Rangers 3, Washington 1 Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 1 Sunday, April 29 Philadelphia 4, New Jersey 3, OT Phoenix 5, Nashville 3 Monday, April 30 Washington 3, NY Rangers 2 Los Angeles 5, St. Louis 2 Tuesday, May 1 New Jersey 4, Philadelphia 1 Wednesday, May 2 NY Rangers 2, Washington 1, 3OT Nashville 2, Phoenix 0 Thursday, May 3 New Jersey 4, Philadelphia 3, OT Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 2 Friday, May 4 Phoenix 1, Nashville 0 Saturday, May 5 Washington 3, NY Rangers 2 Sunday, May 6 Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 1, Los Angeles wins series 4-0 New Jersey 4, Philadelphia 2 Monday, May 7 NY Rangers 3, Washington 2, OT Phoenix 2, Nashville 1, Phoenix wins series 4-1 Tuesday, May 8 New Jersey 3, Philadelphia 1, New Jersey wins series 4-1

Wednesday, May 9 Washington 2, NY Rangers 1, series tied 3-3 Saturday, May 12 Washington at NY Rangers, late Today's Games Los Angeles at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Monday, May 14 New Jersey at NY Rangers OR Washington at New Jersey, 8 p.m. Tuesday, May 15 Los Angeles at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Wednesday, May 16 New Jersey at NY Rangers OR Washington at New Jersey, 8 p.m. NHL Leaders Through May 9 Goal Scoring Name Team .....................................................GP G Danny Briere Philadelphia............................. 11 8 Claude Giroux Philadelphia .......................... 10 8 Dustin Brown Los Angeles ............................ 9 6 Jordan Staal Pittsburgh ................................. 6 6 Ilya Kovalchuk New Jersey ........................... 11 5 Andy McDonald St Louis ............................... 9 5 Alex Ovechkin Washington ........................... 13 5 Brad Richards NY Rangers........................... 13 5 Antoine Vermette Phoenix ............................ 11 5 Travis Zajac New Jersey ............................... 12 5 Jason Chimera Washington.......................... 13 4 Marian Gaborik NY Rangers ......................... 13 4 Zach Parise New Jersey ............................... 12 4 Max Talbot Philadelphia ................................ 11 4 Sean Bergenheim Florida.............................. 7 3 Patrik Berglund St Louis ................................ 9 3 Mikkel Boedker Phoenix................................ 11 3 Gabriel Bourque Nashville ............................ 10 3 Brian Boyle NY Rangers ................................ 10 3 Ryan Callahan NY Rangers .......................... 13 3 Sean Couturier Philadelphia ......................... 11 3 Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh.............................. 6 3 Shane Doan Phoenix ..................................... 11 3 Patrik Elias New Jersey ................................. 12 3 Martin Hanzal Phoenix................................... 8 3 Scott Hartnell Philadelphia............................ 11 3 Tyler Kennedy Pittsburgh.............................. 6 3 Anze Kopitar Los Angeles............................. 9 3 Andrei Kostitsyn Nashville ............................ 8 3 David Legwand Nashville .............................. 10 3 Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh............................... 6 3 Rich Peverley Boston .................................... 7 3 Taylor Pyatt Phoenix ...................................... 11 3 Matt Read Philadelphia.................................. 11 3 Mike Richards Los Angeles .......................... 9 3 Brayden Schenn Philadelphia ...................... 11 3 Alexander Semin Washington ...................... 13 3 Jason Spezza Ottawa .................................... 7 3 Anton Stralman NY Rangers......................... 13 3 Kris Versteeg Florida ..................................... 7 3 Stephen Weiss Florida .................................. 7 3 Dainius Zubrus New Jersey .......................... 12 3 Assists Name Team .....................................................GP A Claude Giroux Philadelphia ........................... 10 9 Jakub Voracek Philadelphia.......................... 11 8 Jaromir Jagr Philadelphia .............................. 11 7 Anze Kopitar Los Angeles ............................. 9 7 Ilya Kovalchuk New Jersey ........................... 11 7 Derek Stepan NY Rangers ............................ 13 7 Keith Yandle Phoenix ..................................... 11 7 Nicklas Backstrom Washington .................... 12 6 David Clarkson New Jersey .......................... 12 6 Dan Girardi NY Rangers ................................ 13 6 Brayden Schenn Philadelphia ....................... 11 6 Danny Briere Philadelphia ............................. 11 5 Dustin Brown Los Angeles ............................ 9 5 Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh .............................. 6 5 Michael Del Zotto NY Rangers...................... 13 5 Drew Doughty Los Angeles........................... 9 5 Marian Gaborik NY Rangers.......................... 13 5 Scott Hartnell Philadelphia ............................ 11 5 Adam Henrique New Jersey.......................... 12 5 Rostislav Klesla Phoenix ............................... 10 5 Daymond Langkow Phoenix.......................... 11 5 Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh ............................... 6 5 Andy McDonald St Louis ............................... 9 5 Dustin Penner Los Angeles........................... 9 5 Alex Pietrangelo St Louis............................... 8 5 Alexander Radulov Nashville ........................ 8 5 Brad Richards NY Rangers ........................... 13 5 Mike Richards Los Angeles........................... 9 5 Mikael Samuelsson Florida ........................... 7 5 Wayne Simmonds Philadelphia .................... 11 5 Justin Williams Los Angeles.......................... 9 5 Travis Zajac New Jersey ............................... 12 5 Marek Zidlicky New Jersey............................ 12 5

American Hockey League Playoff Glance (x-if necessary) CONFERENCE QUARTERFINALS BEST OF 7 EASTERN CONFERENCE Connecticut 3, Bridgeport 0 Thursday, April 19: Connecticut 3, Bridgeport 0 Saturday, April 21: Connecticut 3, Bridgeport 0 Sunday, April 22: Connecticut 4, Bridgeport 3, OT Norfolk 3, Manchester 1 Friday, April 20: Norfolk 3, Manchester 2 Saturday, April 21: Manchester 5, Norfolk 2 Wednesday, April 25: Norfolk 5, Manchester 2 Friday, April 27: Norfolk 4, Manchester 3, OT Penguins 3, Hershey 2 Friday, April 20: Penguins 3, Hershey 1 Saturday, April 21: Penguins 7, Hershey 2 Wednesday, April 25: Hershey 4, Penguins 3, OT Friday, April 27: Hershey 4, Penguins 1 Saturday, April 28: Penguins 2, Hershey 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Toronto 3, Rochester 0 Thursday, April 19: Toronto 4, Rochester 3 Saturday, April 21: Toronto 4, Rochester 3 Monday, April 23: Toronto 3, Rochester 0 EASTERN CONFERENCE St. John's 3, Syracuse 1 Friday, April 20: St. John’s 3, Syracuse 2 Saturday, April 21: Syracuse 4, St. John’s 3 Wednesday, April 25: St. John’s 5, Syracuse 1 Friday, April 27: St. John’s 4, Syracuse 3, OT WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 3, Chicago 2 Thursday, April 19: San Antonio 5, Chicago 4, OT Saturday, April 21: San Antonio 4, Chicago 3 Tuesday, April 24: Chicago 3, San Antonio 2 Wednesday, April 25: Chicago 3, San Antonio 1 Friday, April 27: San Antonio 3, Chicago 2, 2OT Oklahoma City 3, Houston 1 Thursday, April 19: Oklahoma City 5, Houston 0 Friday, April 20: Oklahoma City 4, Houston 1 Sunday, April 22: Houston 1, Oklahoma City 0 Tuesday, April 24: Oklahoma City 5, Houston 2 Abbotsford 3, Milwaukee 0 Friday, April 20: Abbotsford 6, Milwaukee 2 Sunday, April 22: Abbotsford 4, Milwaukee 2 Wednesday, April 25: Abbotsford 4, Milwaukee 2 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS BEST OF 7 EASTERN CONFERENCE Norfolk 4, Connecticut 2 Wednesday, May 2: Connecticut 3, Norfolk 2, OT Friday, May 4: Norfolk 4, Connecticut 1 Sunday, May 6: Norfolk 4, Connecticut 3 Monday, May 7: Connecticut 4, Norfolk 1 Wednesday, May 9: Norfolk 4, Connecticut 0 Friday, May 11: Norfolk 2, Connecticut 1, OT St. John's 4, Penguins 3 Tuesday, May 1: St. John’s 3, Penguins 1 Wednesday, May 2: Penguins 3, St. John’s 1 Saturday, May 5: St. John’s 2, Penguins 1, OT Sunday, May 6: St. John’s 3, Penguins 2, OT Tuesday, May 8: Penguins 3, St. John’s 2, 2OT Friday, May 11: Penguins 4, St. John’s 2 Saturday, May 12: St. John’s 3, Penguins 2 WESTERN CONFERENCE Toronto 4, Abbotsford 1 Tuesday, May 1: Abbotsford 3, Toronto 1 Thursday, May 3: Toronto 5, Abbotsford 1 Saturday, May 5: Toronto 4, Abbotsford 1 Tuesday, May 8: Toronto 3, Abbotsford 1 Wednesday, May 9: Toronto 3, Abbotsford 2, OT Oklahoma City 4, San Antonio 1 Thursday, May 3: San Antonio 6, Oklahoma City 4 Saturday, May 5: Oklahoma City 5, San Antonio 4, OT Monday, May 7: Oklahoma City 2, San Antonio 1, OT Thursday, May 10: Oklahoma City 2, San Antonio 1, OT Friday, May 11: Oklahoma City 4, San Antonio 3 CONFERENCE FINALS BEST OF 7 Oklahoma City vs. Toronto Thursday, May 17: Toronto at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Friday, May 18: Toronto at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Monday, May 21: Oklahoma City at Toronto, 3 p.m. Wednesday, May 23: Oklahoma City at Toronto, 7 p.m. x-Friday, May 25: Oklahoma City at Toronto, 7 p.m. x-Monday, May 28: Toronto at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 30: Toronto at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.

B A S E B A L L Minor League Baseball International League All Times EDT North Division W L Pawtucket (Red Sox) .............. 23 13 Buffalo (Mets)........................... 20 15 Lehigh Valley (Phillies) ........... 19 15 Yankees ................................... 17 16 Syracuse (Nationals)............... 15 21 Rochester (Twins) ................... 14 21 South Division W L Gwinnett (Braves) ................... 22 13 Charlotte (White Sox) ............. 18 17 Norfolk (Orioles) ...................... 15 19 Durham (Rays)......................... 13 23 West Division W L Indianapolis (Pirates)............... 20 14 Toledo (Tigers) ........................ 20 15 Columbus (Indians) ................. 17 17 Louisville (Reds) ...................... 11 25 Saturday's Games Syracuse 11, Rochester 0 Lehigh Valley 5, Louisville 3, 10 innings Pawtucket 7, Rochester 6 Norfolk at Indianapolis, late Toledo at Gwinnett, late Durham at Yankees, late Buffalo at Charlotte, late Today's Games Columbus at Pawtucket, 1:05 p.m. Durham at Yankees, 1:05 p.m.

Pct. GB .639 — .571 21⁄2 .559 3 .515 41⁄2 .417 8 .400 81⁄2 Pct. GB .629 — .514 4 .441 61⁄2 .361 91⁄2 Pct. GB .588 — 1 .571 ⁄2 .500 3 .306 10

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THE TIMES LEADER

BULLETIN BOARD

AMERICA’S LINE

MEETINGS

BY ROXY ROXBOROUGH

Hanover Township Open Golf Tournament Committee will have a meeting Monday at 7:30 p.m. at Wyoming Valley Country Club. Luzerne County Federation of Sportsmen will meet Monday at Post 609 American Legion, corner of Lee Park Avenue and St. Mary’s Road in Hanover Township at 7:30 p.m. Club delegates are urged to attend and interested sportsmen are cordially invited. Plains Yankees Football & Cheerleading Organization will hold its next monthly meeting on Monday at 7:00pm at the PAV in Hudson. All are welcome to attend. Wyoming Valley American Legion Baseball will hold its annual dinner meeting on Saturday, May 19, 6:00 p.m. at Nanticoke Post 350, 23 West Broad St, Nanticoke. Team rosters will be available. Crestwood Football Booster Club will be meeting Wednesday at 7:00PM at Tony’s Pizza.

INJURY REPORT: On the NBA board, Clippers forward Blake Griffin is probable and guard Chris Paul is probable. Follow Eckstein on Twitter at www.twitter.com/vegasvigorish. BOXING REPORT: The WBA/IBF welterweight title fight on May 19 in Las Vegas, Nevada, between Amir Khan and Lamont Peterson has been canceled; in the WBO welterweight title fight on June 9 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Manny Pacquiao is -$400 vs. Timothy Bradley at +$300. BASEBALL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

YANKEES

10

RED SOX

9.0

Indians

Rays

8.5

ORIOLES

Blue Jays

8.0

TWINS

WHITE SOX

8.5

Royals

Tigers

6.5

A’S

RANGERS

Mariners

8.0

Angels

National League REDS

8.5

Nationals

MARLINS

7.0

Mets

PIRATES

7.0

Astros

PHILLIES

7.5

Padres

BREWERS

8.0

Cubs

CARDS

7.0

Braves

D’BACKS

9.0

Giants

DODGERS

7.5

Rockies

NFL Points

Underdog

September 5 GIANTS

9.5

Colts

6.5

BROWNS

JETS

American League

Favorite

BEARS Eagles

3.5

Cowboys

September 9

Norfolk at Indianapolis, 1:15 p.m. Rochester at Syracuse, 2 p.m. Toledo at Gwinnett, 2:05 p.m. Lehigh Valley at Louisville, 2:05 p.m. Buffalo at Charlotte, 2:15 p.m. Monday's Games Norfolk at Indianapolis, 11:05 a.m. Rochester at Syracuse, 12 p.m. Columbus at Pawtucket, 12:05 p.m. Lehigh Valley at Louisville, 6:35 p.m. Toledo at Gwinnett, 7:05 p.m. Durham at Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Buffalo at Charlotte, 7:15 p.m.

B A S K E T B A L L National Basketball Association Playoff Glance (x-if necessary) FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) Sunday, May 6 Philadelphia 89, Chicago 82 New York 89, Miami 87 Boston 101, Atlanta 79 L.A. Lakers 92, Denver 88 Monday, May 7 San Antonio 87, Utah 81, San Antonio wins series 4-0 L.A. Clippers 101, Memphis 97, OT Tuesday, May 8 Indiana 105, Orlando 87, Indiana wins series 4-1 Atlanta 87, Boston 86 Chicago 77, Philadelphia 69 Denver 102, L.A. Lakers 99 Wednesday, May 9 Miami 106, New York 94, Miami wins series 4-1 Memphis 92, L.A. Clippers 80 Thursday, May 10 Philadelphia 79, Chicago 78, Philadelphia wins series 4-2 Boston 83, Atlanta 80, Boston wins series 4-2 Denver 113, L.A. Lakers 96, series tied 3-3 Friday, May 11 Memphis 90, L.A. Clippers 88, series tied 3-3 Saturday, May 12 Denver at L.A. Lakers, late Today's Games L.A. Clippers at Memphis, 1 p.m. CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS Saturday, May 12 Philadelphia at Boston, late Today's Games Indiana at Miami, 3:30 p.m. Monday, May 14 Philadelphia at Boston, 7 p.m Tuesday, May 15 Indiana at Miami, 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 16 Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Thursday, May 17 Miami at Indiana, TBD Friday, May 18 Boston at Philadelphia, TBD Sunday, May 20 Miami at Indiana, 3:30 p.m. Monday, May 21 x-Philadelphia at Boston, TBD Tuesday, May 22 x-Indiana at Miami, TBD Wednesday, May 23 x-Boston at Philadelphia, TBD Thursday, May 24 x-Miami at Indiana, TBD Saturday, May 26 x-Philadelphia at Boston, TBD Saturday, May 26 x-Indiana at Miami, TBD NBA Most Valuable Players 2012 — LeBron James, Miami Heat 2011 — Derrick Rose, Chicago Bulls 2010 — LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers 2009 — LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers 2008 — Kobe Bryant, L.A. Lakers 2007 — Dirk Nowitzki, Dallas Mavericks 2006 — Steve Nash, Phoenix Suns 2005 — Steve Nash, Phoenix Suns 2004 — Kevin Garnett, Minnesota Timberwolves 2003 — Tim Duncan, San Antonio Spurs 2002 — Tim Duncan, San Antonio Spurs 2001 — Allen Iverson, Philadelphia 76ers 2000 — Shaquille O’Neal, Los Angeles Lakers 1999 — Karl Malone, Utah Jazz 1998 — Michael Jordan, Chicago Bulls 1997 — Karl Malone, Utah Jazz 1996 — Michael Jordan, Chicago Bulls 1995 — David Robinson, San Antonio Spurs 1994 — Hakeem Olajuwon, Houston Rockets 1993 — Charles Barkley, Phoenix Suns 1992 — Michael Jordan, Chicago Bulls 1991 — Michael Jordan, Chicago Bulls 1990 — Magic Johnson, Los Angeles Lakers 1989 — Magic Johnson, Los Angeles Lakers 1988 — Michael Jordan, Chicago Bulls 1987 — Magic Johnson, Los Angeles Lakers 1986 — Larry Bird, Boston Celtics 1985 — Larry Bird, Boston Celtics 1984 — Larry Bird, Boston Celtics 1983 — Moses Malone, Philadelphia 76ers 1982 — Moses Malone, Houston Rockets 1981 — Julius Erving, Philadelphia 76ers 1980 — Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Los Angeles Lakers 1979 — Moses Malone, Houston Rockets 1978 — Bill Walton, Portland Trail Blazers 1977 — Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Los Angeles Lakers 1976 — Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Los Angeles Lakers 1975 — Bob McAdoo, Buffalo Braves 1974 — Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Milwaukee Bucks 1973 — Dave Cowens, Boston Celtics 1972 — Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Milwaukee Bucks 1971 — Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Milwaukee Bucks 1970 — Willis Reed, New York Knicks 1969 — Wes Unseld, Baltimore Bullets 1968 — Wilt Chamberlain, Philadelphia 76ers 1967 — Wilt Chamberlain, Philadelphia 76ers 1966 — Wilt Chamberlain, Philadelphia 76ers 1965 — Bill Russell, Boston Celtics 1964 — Oscar Robertson, Cincinnati 1963 — Bill Russell, Boston Celtics 1962 — Bill Russell, Boston Celtics 1961 — Bill Russell, Boston Celtics 1960 — Wilt Chamberlain, Philadelphia Warriors 1959 — Bob Pettit, St. Louis Hawks 1958 — Bill Russell, Boston Celtics 1957 — Bob Cousy, Boston Celtics 1956 — Bob Pettit, St. Louis Hawks

A U T O R A C I N G NASCAR Nationwide-VFW Sport Clips Help a Hero 200 Results Friday At Darlington Raceway Darlington, S.C. Lap length: 1.366 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (5) Joey Logano, Toyota, 151 laps, 126.3 rating, 0 points, $33,825. 2. (2) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 151, 145, 0, $29,700. 3. (13) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 151, 104.8, 0, $18,850. 4. (8) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 151, 106.2, 40, $23,068. 5. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 151, 108.9, 39, $27,843. 6. (1) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 151, 113.8, 39, $25,963. 7. (7) Brian Scott, Toyota, 151, 97.1, 37, $21,753. 8. (4) Kurt Busch, Toyota, 151, 117.4, 0, $12,545.

6

SAINTS

10.5

Bills Redskins

Patriots

6.5

TITANS

VIKINGS

3.5

Jaguars

TEXANS

6

Dolphins

LIONS

9

CHIEFS

Rams

PK

PACKERS

Falcons

6

49ers

Panthers

2.5

BUCS

CARDS

3

Seahawks

BRONCOS

2

Steelers

September 10 RAVENS

7

Bengals

RAIDERS

PK

Chargers

Favorite

Points

NBA GRIZZLIES HEAT

Underdog

8

Clippers

8.5

Pacers

NHL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

Kings

-$120/ even

COYOTES

9. (14) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 151, 91.9, 0, $18,743. 10. (40) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 151, 88.1, 34, $19,668. 11. (16) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 151, 85.7, 33, $18,268. 12. (15) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 151, 81.3, 32, $18,193. 13. (10) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 151, 86.9, 32, $18,143. 14. (22) Michael Annett, Ford, 151, 81.7, 30, $18,093. 15. (12) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 151, 80.9, 29, $19,018. 16. (31) Timmy Hill, Ford, 151, 70.8, 28, $17,918. 17. (25) Travis Pastrana, Toyota, 151, 62.4, 27, $18,068. 18. (9) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 151, 91.5, 0, $11,350. 19. (26) Jeff Green, Toyota, 149, 71.1, 25, $17,768. 20. (36) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, 148, 50.4, 24, $18,368. 21. (32) Jason Bowles, Toyota, 148, 55, 23, $17,643. 22. (37) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 147, 50.7, 22, $11,125. 23. (28) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 144, 50, 21, $17,543. 24. (6) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, accident, 143, 100.4, 21, $17,493. 25. (19) Josh Richards, Ford, 143, 54.3, 19, $11,450. 26. (11) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, accident, 138, 81.4, 0, $17,393. 27. (42) Derrike Cope, Dodge, 138, 40.7, 17, $17,343. 28. (41) Matt Frahm, Ford, engine, 125, 42.1, 16, $10,800. 29. (20) Erik Darnell, Chevrolet, clutch, 91, 66.1, 15, $17,233. 30. (21) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 81, 51.7, 14, $17,493. 31. (30) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, transmission, 60, 62.4, 13, $17,138. 32. (18) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, accident, 44, 56.1, 12, $10,625. 33. (23) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 42, 38.7, 11, $17,073. 34. (35) Blake Koch, Chevrolet, electrical, 29, 42.9, 10, $10,585. 35. (43) Kevin Lepage, Chevrolet, engine, 25, 44.4, 9, $10,540. 36. (34) Tony Raines, Toyota, vibration, 14, 41.8, 0, $10,520. 37. (39) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, brakes, 10, 43.3, 7, $10,500. 38. (38) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, vibration, 7, 42, 0, $10,426. 39. (24) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, electrical, 7, 40.4, 0, $10,315. 40. (27) Casey Roderick, Chevrolet, accident, 3, 38.1, 4, $16,758. 41. (29) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, accident, 2, 36.5, 3, $10,265. 42. (33) Scott Speed, Chevrolet, clutch, 2, 34.9, 0, $10,235. 43. (17) Ryan Blaney, Chevrolet, accident, 1, 33.6, 1, $10,188. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 112.017 mph. Time of Race: 1 hour, 50 minutes, 29 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.255 seconds. Caution Flags: 6 for 32 laps. Lead Changes: 13 among 7 drivers. Lap Leaders: R.Stenhouse Jr. 1-18;D.Hamlin 19-41;J.Logano 42;D.Hamlin 43-50;K.Busch 51-52;D.Hamlin 53-90;K.Busch 91;J.Logano 92;B.Gaughan 93;J.Allgaier 94-101;D.Hamlin 102-128;E.Sadler 129-142;D.Hamlin 143-149;J.Logano 150-151. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): D.Hamlin, 5 times for 103 laps;R.Stenhouse Jr., 1 time for 18 laps;E.Sadler, 1 time for 14 laps;J.Allgaier, 1 time for 8 laps;J.Logano, 3 times for 4 laps;K.Busch, 2 times for 3 laps;B.Gaughan, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Stenhouse Jr., 364;2. E.Sadler, 341;3. A.Dillon, 329;4. S.Hornish Jr., 305;5. C.Whitt, 282;6. M.Annett, 271;7. J.Allgaier, 260;8. M.Bliss, 230;9. J.Nemechek, 222;10. D.Patrick, 219.

G O L F European PGA/Challenge Madeira Islands Open Scores Saturday At Santo da Serra Golf Club Santo da Serra, Madeira Islands Purse: $875,960 Yardage: 6,825;Par: 72 Third Round, Leading Scores Carlos Del Moral, Spain...................69-67-63—199 Joakim Lagergren, Sweden ............66-66-70—202 Oliver Wilson, England.....................66-65-72—203 Magnus Carlsson, Sweden .............66-66-71—203 Mikael Lundberg, Sweden...............69-70-64—203 Ricardo Santos, Portugal.................68-65-68—203 Andreas Harto, Denmark.................67-71-66—204 Richard Bland, England ................... 68-67-69-204 Shirwan Kim, South Korea ..............68-66-70—204 Knut Borsheim, Norway ...................68-69-68—205 Charlie Ford, England ......................67-68-70—205 John Parry, England .........................71-70-65—206 Gary Orr, Scotland............................69-69-68—206 Shiv Kapur, India ..............................70-68-68—206 Matthew Baldwin, England...............67-70-69—206 David Dixon, England.......................68-68-70—206 Julien Guerrier, France ....................70-69-68—207 Chris Paisley, England .....................69-69-69—207 HP Bacher, Austria............................67-69-71—207 Thomas Norret, Denmark................69-68-70—207 Alastair Forsyth, Scotland................69-68-70—207

F O O T B A L L Arena Football League All Times EDT NATIONAL CONFERENCE Central Division ..........................................................WLT Pct PF PA Chicago ........................................... 620.750479435 San Antonio .................................... 530.625407423 Iowa ................................................. 350.375435490 Kansas City..................................... 070.000247379 West Division ..........................................................WLT Pct PF PA San Jose ......................................... 720.778602476 Utah ................................................. 630.667576554 Arizona ............................................ 530.625506411 Spokane .......................................... 440.500458475 AMERICAN CONFERENCE South Division ..........................................................WLT Pct PF PA Georgia............................................ 540.556419451 Tampa Bay ...................................... 540.556492504 Jacksonville .................................... 340.429372385 New Orleans ................................... 350.375440451 Orlando............................................ 170.125298384 Eastern Division ..........................................................WLT Pct PF PA Philadelphia .................................... 620.750577451 Cleveland ........................................ 530.625421380 Milwaukee ....................................... 350.375450465 Pittsburgh........................................ 260.250381446 Friday's Games Cleveland 69, Milwaukee 48 San Jose 70, Utah 59 Spokane 68, New Orleans 62, OT Saturday's Games Georgia 44, Tampa Bay 41 Philadelphia 56, Jacksonville 38 Pittsburgh at San Antonio, late Kansas City at Iowa, late Chicago at Arizona, late

REGISTRATION/TRYOUTS Camp St. Andrew is accepting registrations for its upcoming camps. There will be two weeks of basketball for girls entering grades 5-10. The first week will run from July 8-13, and the second from July 15-20. There will also be two weeks of traditional resident camp for all girls entering grades 3-10 held on the same dates. There will be a father/son weekend for boys ages 6-13 from July 20-22. There will be one week of basketball for boys entering grades 4-9 from July 22-26. For more information or to register, visit www.dioceseofscranton.org or call 226-4606. BWBL Charity Wiffleball Classic will be held May 19 at Coal Street Park. Teams of 3-5 players are guaranteed at least two games. Fee is $10 per player ages 13 and up, with all proceeds benefiting local cancer charities. All materials (bats, balls, etc.) provided. Call 704-8344 to register. Deadline is May 16. Medium pitch format with baserunning, see full rules at www.bwbl.net, or by e-mailing kevin@bwbl.net. Kingston Huskies Football and Cheerleading will have sign ups at the Black Diamond VFW Post 395 near Kost Tire on May 23 from 6-7:30 p.m. downstairs. First time participants must bring a small photo of each child (that will be kept), a copy of the child’s birth certificate, and copies of two proofs of residence. They will be sizing the boys for equipment during sign ups. Board meeting will follow after sign ups. Plains Yankees Football & Cheerleading Organization will hold registration Wednesday, May 16 from 6-8 p.m. at the Plains American Legion, 101 E. Carey Street, Plains. Cost is $60 for one child or $75 per family. Rock Rec Center, 340 Carverton Road, is now accepting registrations for summer camps, which include basketball, soccer, tennis and super sport camp. The camps are open to girls and boys in kindergarten through sixth grade. Camps run from June 18 to Aug. 17. For more information, visit www.rockrec.org or call 696-2769. The Shenandoah Coal Cracker 10K Road Race will be held Saturday, June 9th at 10 a.m. Registration will take place from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. on Thunder Road, North Main Street, Shenandoah, the day of the race. The entry fee is $15 if received by May 31st, $20 after. There will also be a $5 Fun Run for kids 12 and under. For any additional information contact Dan at 462-0389 or by e-mail at dtl73@verizon.net. Stan Waleski Basketball Camp, which runs from July 9-27, will hold registration at the St. Joseph’s Oblates gym in Laflin for boys and girls in grades kindergarten through eighth. The camp stresses fundamentals, skills, competitions, team play and fun, with all players receiving a camp shirt and certificate. Interested players can call Waleski at 4571206 or Coach LoBrutto at 6548030. Players can also email stanwaleski@yahoo.com or visit the camp web site at stanwaleski.com. The Wyoming Valley Catholic Youth Center is currently accepting team registrations for its 2012 Men’s Basketball League. Games will be played on Wednesday and Thursday evening beginning Wednesday, June 6th, 2012. The league will consist of an eight game schedule, with playoffs to follow. PIAA officials will be used for all games. The cost for the league is $200 per team, plus $25 per game for officials. The deadline for registration is Friday, June 1st, 2012. To Register please call Robert Sabola at 570-823-6121 ext. 278 or stop by 36 South Washington Street, Wilkes Barre. Wyoming/West Wyoming/Exeter Panthers Football-Cheerleading Association is holding registration for the 2012 season on the following days and times: May 20th 4 -6 pm, June 4 6-8 p.m., June 9 noon-2 p.m., and June 30 3-5 p.m. The cost will be is $65 per child or $75 per family. You must provide a copy of child’s birth certificate, two proofs of residency (e.g., utility bill), and photo of the child. Registration will be held at the field house on Cedar Street in Exeter. UPCOMING EVENTS Crestwood Football Booster Club Golf Tournament will be held on

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Saturday, July 7 at Sand Springs Country Club.Shotgun start at 9:00AM.The cost is $75 per golfer or $300 per team. Price includes golf, gifts, refreshments, dinner, awards and prizes. There will also be a putting tournament starting at 8:00AM. Hole sponsorships are also available for $50 and $100. Please make out checks to Crestwood Football Booster Club and mail to PO Box 162, Mountain Top, PA 18707. For more information call Ken Givens at 474-0607 or Chris Zero at 262-5273. Dallas Mountaineer Aquatic Club’s Summer League Swim Camp is a nine week competitive swim program that is held from June 4 through August 3, 2012. We provide technical instruction, challenging workouts and a fun atmosphere for swimmers of ages 6 thru college. Our swimmers include novice age group, elite high school and college athletes. You do not have to be a Dallas resident to join the camp. Registration forms due May 19, 2012.For more information on pricing and to download a brochure please visit our website at www.dmacswimming.org or contact Reo Cheshire at 357-8631. Dick McNulty Bowling League will hold its annual summer outing on Sunday, June 3 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Konefal’s Park. Final date for reservations and cancellations is May 27. For more information call Wendy at 824-3086. Dallas football reunion for former players of Ted Jackson will be held from 4-8 p.m. on Sunday, May 27, at Irem Country Club in Dallas. Cost of $45 per person includes open bar and buffet dinner. Tickets for those under age 21 are $20 per person. Children age 4 and under will be admitted free. For more information or to make a reservation, contact Ted Jackson Jr. at 574-0409 or Sandy Jackson at 574-0412. Reservations must be made by Friday, May. 18. GAR Blue-Gray Fund of the Luzerne Foundation will be holding its 6th Annual golf tournament and outing on Saturday July 28 at the Wilkes-Barre Golf Club in Laurel Run. Shot gun start is at 8 a.m. captain and crew. Cost is $85 per golfer and includes golf, prizes, and lunch afterward at the WilkesBarre Twp. Fire Hall on 150 Watson Street. Grace Episcopal Church Kingston is holding its fourth annual charity golf tournament at Sand Springs Country Club on Sunday, June 10. The tournament begins at 2 p.m. with a shotgun start and captain and crew format. A portion of the proceeds will benefit our local community outreach organization, the Women with Children Program at Misericordia University, and Grace Episcopal Church. JCC Milton Brown Memorial Golf Tournament will be held Monday, June 11, at 1 p.m. with a shotgun start. The cost is $125 per golfer and includes greens fees, cart and dinner. Proceeds from this tournament go toward scholarships for children to attend the JCC Day and Autistic Summer Camps. If you would like to play, call Bill Buzza at 824-4646, ext. 232. The seventh annual Lititz Summer Showcase soccer tournament will be held July 28-29. Boys and girls U10-U19 teams are guaranteed three games, and there will be a college showcase for older age groups. Visit lititzsummershowcase.org or contact Mike Logan at loganwhs@verizon.net. The Rampage Wrestling Club will sponsor a wrestling camp June 25-29, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Butler Community Center in Drums. Clinicians include Dylan Alton (three-time PIAA champ), Andrew Alton (two-time PIAA champ), Tom Martucci (NCAA champ), Doug Buckwalter (PIAA Coaches Hall of Fame), Robert Brackup (Blair Academy) and others. Cost is $195 and campers will get a T-shirt. A 20 percent discount for all Little Cougar wrestlers will be given. For more information, contact Andrew Sanko at 215-378-7213 or email andysanko4@gmail.com or chris21@ptd.net. The Relay for Life Golf Tournament will be held at Sand Springs Country Club on Saturday, June 2 at 8 a.m. The tournament will be a captain and crew format. The cost is $90 per person which includes greens and cart fees, lunch and prizes. A hole-in-one contest will be held for a $500 gift card to Price Chopper. All proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society. The tournament is hosted by The Star Survivors and The Forget-Me-Not teams. For more information, call Carol Mariano at 817-4104. Wyoming Seminary Futures Wrestling Camp will be held June 17-21 at the Upper School in Kingston. The camp, for wrestlers ages 10 and up, will feature an appearance by Jeff Blatnick, a member of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame, a 1978 and 1979 NCAA Division II heavyweight wrestling champion and an Olympic gold medalist in 1984. Camp fees are $200 for commuting athletes and $325 for those staying on campus. For more information or to register, visit www.wyomingseminary.org/futureswrestling. Bulletin Board items will not be accepted over the telephone. Items may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.


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SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 3C

YANKEESSUNDAY P A S T W E E K ’ S R E S U LT S

YA N K E E S P R O S P E C T S

PHILLIES PROSPECTS

Mustelier’s torrid start continues By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

Prior to joining the Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre Yankees earlier the month, Ronnier Mustelier was tearing up the Eastern League for the Trenton Thunder, hitting .353 with five home runs and 20 RBI. His hot start resulted in the 27-year-old being named Offensive Player of the Week in the Eastern League for the week ending May 6. The infielder who was signed as a non-drafted free agent after defecting from Cuba just last June is continuing to be successful in Triple-A. In his first seven games for the Yankees, he’s batting .333 with a home run and four RBI. His totals in the minors this season are a .349 average with six longballs and 24 RBI in 32 games. Here are the New York Yankees Top 10 prospects according to MLB.com. 1. Manny Banuelos, LHP, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (TripleA): His longest outing of the season came last week in a onerun, five inning outing against Columbus, but he was hit with the loss. In four starts for Yankees, he’s 0-2 with a 4.50 ERA and 10 Ks in 14 innings. 2. Dellin Betances, RHP, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (TripleA): The 24-year-old picked up his second win last week and saw his earned run average dip to 5.20 in the process. On the season, he’s 2-2 with 28 strikeouts in 36 1⁄3 innings. 3. Gary Sanchez, catcher, Charleston (A): The 19-year-old is tearing up the South Atlantic League for the RiverDogs, hitting .359 in 26 games, good for fourth in the South Atlantic League. He hit his first home run of the season last week and has also stolen seven bases so far this season. He’s riding a nine-game hitting streak hitting .388 (14for-36) in that span. 4. Mason Williams, outfielder, Charleston (A): The fourthround selection in 2010 has been very consistent for the RiverDogs with a .321 batting average this season. The 20-year-old has also hit two home runs, three triples, eight doubles and carries a .367 on base percentage this season. 5. Jose Campos, RHP, Charleston (A): A 19-year-old acquired in the Michael PinedaJesus Montero trade in the offseason was off to a good start before getting roughed up in an outing. Then he was placed on the disabled list last week with elbow inflammation. He’s currently 3-0 with a 4.01 ERA and 26 strikeouts in 24 2⁄3 innings. 6. Slade Heathcott, outfielder, TBA: The 2009 first-round draft pick is currently in extended spring training rehabbing a shoulder injury that sidelined him for the end of the 2011 season. He’s expected to play his first game of 2012 on June 5 with High-A Tampa. 7. Austin Romine, catcher, TBA: A 23-year-old who was expected to be with Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre this season, he is currently on the disabled list with a lower back strain. When he’s healthy, he should join the SWB Yankees. 8. Dante Bichette Jr., third base, Charleston (A): The Yankees first pick in 2011 (51st overall) is batting just .236 for the RiverDogs with four extra-base hits and 11 RBI. He’s starting to get things together, getting a hit in four of his last five games while going 7-for-21. 9. Cito Culver, shortstop, Charleston (A): A first-round pick in 2010 (32 overall), the 19-year-old has picked up the pace after a slow start when his average hovered in the .100’s. He’s broken out by hitting .300 (12-for-30) in his last 10 games as his average has gone up to .227. 10. Adam Warren, RHP, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (Triple-A): In a no-decision last week, he allowed three runs and 11 hits in 4 2/3 innings. For the season, he has a 5.34 ERA with a 2-1 record.

Unbeaten pitcher on Wright track May 6 Pawtucket L, 7-5 at Rochester

May 7 Columbus Ppd. at Rochester

May 8 Columbus L, 1-0 W, 4-3 at Rochester

May 9 Columbus W, 2-1 at Rochester

May 10 Columbus W, 4-3 at Rochester

May 11 Durham L, 8-7 at Rochester

May 12 Durham (n) at Rochester

A new twist on the name game one say “As long as the Yankees are in the area, I will not give any money to that team Earlier this month, Mandaand go see a game at PNC lay Baseball Properties Chief Field.” Executive Officer Art Matin Many of those haters will and New York Yankees Chief still be around for the next 30 Operating Officer Lonn Trost years of the new contract. The were in Moosic for the groundYankee brand reminds us evbreaking ceremony of renoeryday which pro team is affilvations at PNC Field. iated with the Triple-A team. They both spoke about the With a different name, over idea of the team looking for time the dislikers may not care public opinion on whether the as much. Some may even forTriple-A team should keep the get that the Yankees are the Yankees nickname. parent club and may even shell So we are looking for your out some cash for a souvenir. opinion. That might not sound like a First, take these positives lot, but it’s still added revenue and negatives into considto keep the sport flourishing in eration. the area. Let’s go back to just a few There’s no need to change years ago when the Yankees anything else if a name change TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO/PETE G. WILCOX first invaded Northeastern is adopted. A beautiful glass Roger Clemens’ appearance at Pennsylvania in 2007. It was sculpture with the Yankees PNC Field in 2007 was an hard to buy a ticket for fans name slated to perch atop PNC exciting day for NEPA baseball wanting to see minor league Field has no reason to be alfans. baseball. The 8,802 average tered. The Trenton Thunder, attendance at the ballpark that the Yankees’ Double-A affiliate season was the largest in the town on a rehab appearance, remind fans who their parent 23-year history of the Scranthe seats were packed. So club is with a Yankee logo ton/Wilkes-Barre franchise. something is working for the patched on their uniforms. Fans flocked to the park to see nickname. That doesn’t mean the Red up-and-coming players – and But does that also mean it is Barons name needs to be resureven a comeback appearance time for a change? rected, but starting a search for from Roger Clemens – for one Before you say no, take this a fresh name could regenerate of the most prominent names into consideration: even more fan interest, would in all of sports. That alone Sure, the Yankee brand name be fun and prizes may be should have proved the Yanis one of the top sellers and awarded. kees name will sell tickets. most noticeable in the world, However, since that historic even when sports aren’t facRegional Public Campaigns inaugural season the annual tored into the equation. Before the Wilkes-Barre/ attendance has dipped every On the other hand though, Scranton Pioneers arena footyear. And the last two seasons, for every Yankee fan, there are ball team succumbed in the when the numbers didn’t even two Yankee haters. area in 2009, there had to be a average 5,000, consisted of the Take into consideration that birth. two lowest attendances in there are high populations of The conception started in franchise history. There have Phillies, Mets and Red Sox fans 2001 when several team and not been many differences with in NEPA, the three teams’ fans local officials started a commugiveaways and promotions who dislike the Yankees organity operation to name the since then. nization the most. team. Approximately 1,500 Even last year when superI can’t even figure out how suggestions were received star Alex Rodriguez came to many times I’ve heard somebefore the winning nickname By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

DISTRICT 2’S PRESENCE IN THE MINOR LEAGUES

Russ Canzler, Hazleton Area, Columbus (Cleveland, Triple-A): The Hazleton native is mired in a little slump although he has been hitting better of late. To date for Columbus, he’s starting to pick up the pace after a slow start. He’s now hitting .250 with five RBI and a .300 on base percentage. His average was up to .286 before playing Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre, his hometown team that he’s struggled against. Last week, in the four games against the Yankees he went just 1-for-10. His Clippers’ team, which is the two-time reigning Governors’ Cup champion, is in third-place in the IL West but just three game behind division-leading Indianapolis.

Cory Spangenberg, Abington Heights, Lake Elsinore (San Diego, Class A advanced): The No. 10 overall pick last June by the Padres is currently on a roll for the Storm. After beginning the season with a slump, the No. 6 overall prospect in the Padres system according to MLB.com is hitting a lusty .479 in his last 10 games to raise his average above .300 to .303. To date, he also has 12 stolen bases in 15 attempts to go along with three triples and eight doubles.

Ray Black, Coughlin, San Francisco (extended Spring Training): Drafted in the seventh round (237th overall) out of Pittsburgh last June, the right-handed pitcher hasn’t made his professional debut, continuing to work in extended Spring Training. The 21-yearold is currently in Scottsdale, Ariz., for the Giants. Extended spring training is just like regular spring training and consists of workouts and games to keep players fresh in the case he is needed to fill in for an injury. A number of players also stay in EST until June when the shortseason teams open the season. Black is ranked the No. 24 overall prospect in the organization, according to Baseball America and has been known to reach in the high 90s with his fastball. He is also listed as an “Under the Radar” player for the organization, according to MLB.com.

was selected. That led to more fan interest in helping create a logo, colors and even the mascot. The name-the-team winner in 2001 received a Johnny Unitas autographed football and a team-autographed jersey. Drive about an hour south on the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike and you’ll find another booming nickname with the Lehigh Valley IronPigs, which is one of the most recognizable and unique minor league nicknames. Lehigh Valley officials received 3,500 entries for the IronPigs nickname, which is a tribute to that area’s steel workers. The IronPigs’ namewinner received VIP game tickets and team memorabilia. Travel approximately an hour down the turnpike from Allentown and there’s another recipient of a name-the-team contest. Before the Philadelphia Flyers’ existence, a contest was held in 1967. The first prize for the Flyers nickname was a 21-inch color television and second and third prizes awarded were season tickets. Name-our-blog campaign Here at The Times Leader, we have started a brand-new Minor League Baseball blog on our redesigned website. It will be an informative place to get up to date on all of the key happenings around the minors with a strong focus on the New York Yankees’ farm teams. Visit our blog at www.timesleader.com/sports and tell us your suggestion for our namethe-blog campaign and feel free to voice your opinion about whether or not the team nickname should be changed as well.

By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

Rich Thompson, Montrose, Lehigh Valley (Philadelphia, Triple-A): The 33-year-old who is in his fifth season with the Phillies organization is batting .260 for the IronPigs this season and has a hit in seven of his last eight games, going 9-for-25 in that period. Originally drafted in the sixth round by the Blue Jays in 2000 out of James Madison, he has played in the minor leagues for Toronto, Pittsburgh, Boston, Arizona and Kansas City before joining the Phillies in 2008.

Kyle McMyne, Old Forge, Dayton (Cincinnati, Class A): Taken by the Reds in the fourth round (145 overall) of last year’s draft out of Villanova, the righthanded reliever has gotten off to a good start for the Midwest League’s Dragons. He picked up his third win of the season last week pitching 1 2/3 scoreless innings in relief on Friday night. After allowing a run on May 3, he has pitched 4 2/3 scoreless innings. On the season, in 17 1⁄3 innings the 22-year-old has allowed 15 hits, three earned runs and just three walks. He’s averaging more than a strikeout per inning with 18 so far this season to go with a 3-2 record in 12 games.

Monday Durham 7:05 p.m. at Rochester

Tuesday at Toledo 6:30 p.m.

Wednesday at Toledo 10:30 a.m.

Clearwater’s Austin Wright appears to be on the right track to making some noise in the prospect rankings. He’s not currently rated by MLB.com on the Phillies top 20, but may be soon. The 22-year-old left-hander is 4-0 for the Threshers with a 3.34 ERA in six appearances, five of them as a starter. He also has a WHIP under 1.00 allowing 27 hits and 13 walks in 35 innings. His 43 strikeouts are good for third in the Florida State League. Wright was just drafted out of Mississippi last year in the eighth round and in 15 appearances (68 1⁄3 innings) for Williamsport and Lakewood he combined for a 3.03 ERA and 85 strikeouts. Here are Philadelphia’s top 10 prospects according to MLB.com and how they are faring in 2012. 1. Trevor May, RHP, Reading (Double-A): Being named Eastern League Player of the Month, May was hit with his first two losses of the season last week. He’s still on a roll for the Phillies posting a 5-2 record with 45 strikeouts in 41 1⁄3 innings and a 2.83 ERA. 2. Jesse Biddle, LHP, Clearwater (A-Advanced): Coming back after being hit with a line drive cut an outing short, Biddle earned his first win of the season last week. He’s currently 1-2 with a 3.86 ERA for the Threshers this season with 33 strikeouts in 30 1⁄3 innings. After a rough start, he’s given up just three earned runs over his last four starts. 3. Brody Colvin, RHP, Clearwater (A-Advanced): The 21year-old pitched on Thursday and allowed seven runs in 4 1⁄3 innings in his third loss of the season to go with a 5.05 ERA. 4. Larry Greene, first base, TBA: The first-round pick from last June has yet to play in a professional game. The 19-yearold is currently in extended spring training. 5. Phillippe Aumont, RHP, Lehigh Valley (Triple-A): The 6-foot-7, 260-pound 23-year-old reliever hasn’t pitched since May 2 after struggling with command, posting a 6.00 ERA in nine innings, while walking 12 and striking out 15. 6. Sebastian Valle, catcher, Reading (Double-A): He appears to be the heir apparent to Carlos Ruiz in Philadelphia’s future. But he’s struggled of late with Reading, hitting just .200 in his last 10 games to watch his batting average on the season fall from .326 to .240 in the last two weeks. 7. Justin De Fratus, RHP, TBA: He was on a rehab assignment and was shut down after experiencing soreness in his right elbow. He’s expected to begin working out again next month. 8. Freddy Galvis, infielder, Philadelphia: He found a starting spot at second base for the Phillies early, but lately is starting to split time with Pete Orr. He is hitting .214 with one home run and 12 RBI in 33 games. 9. Maikel Franco, third base, Lakewood (Class A): He was hitting over .300 last month, but a slump has his average falling to .218. He’s also belted three home runs and 11 RBI in 30 games. 10. Jonathan Pettibone, RHP, Reading (Double-A): Drafted in the third round in 2008, another starting pitcher with promise for Philadelphia is currently 2-3 with a 3.98 ERA.

On This Date

UPCOMING SCHEDULE

Sunday Durham 1:05 p.m. at Rochester

By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

Thursday at Toledo 6:30 p.m.

Friday at Toledo 7 p.m.

Saturday at Columbus 7:05 p.m.

May 13, 1999 was a big day for the Red Barons and Wendell Magee Jr. The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre outfielder mashed a pair of home runs and drove in eight runs in a 19-0 win over Norfolk. In the process, he also added a pair of doubles. The four extrabase hits in one game are tied for the most in franchise history with two former Red Barons – Kevin Sefcik and Mark Budzinski – and former SWB Yankee Shelley Duncan.


CMYK PAGE 4C

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

During the past 27 years, Mericle has constructed more speculative industrial, ex, and oďŹƒce space than any other developer in Northeastern Pennsylvania. We believe having a mix of quality space available at all times is critically important to the economic success of our area. In fact, more than 12,000 people work in the local buildings we’ve developed. Every time our excavation team digs a foundation, we are investing in the economic future of this region. Every building we construct on speculation helps to create and retain local jobs. Whether you need 1,000 square feet or 1,000,000 square feet, please call Mericle at 570.823.1100. We’ll have a space that works for you.



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B R O K E R AG E D I V I S I O N

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 For Lease â&#x20AC;Ś Dave Daris

 For Lease ... Ron Koslosky

 $25,000/acre ... Steve Barrouk

 For Sale ... Al Guari

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S TA N D I N G S

AP PHOTO

The Mets’ David Wright singles in the ninth inning against the Miami Marlins in a game in Miami on Saturday. Wright homered and singled three times as the Mets won 9-3.

Wright and Dickey lead Mets to win MIAMI — David Wright homered and singled three times in his fourth consecutive multi-hit game Saturday, and R.A. Dickey earned his fifth victory by pitching six innings to help the New York Mets beat the Miami Marlins 9-3. The Marlins lost for only the second time in their past 11 games, while the Mets have won six of seven. Wright singled home a run in the first inning, hit his fourth homer in the third, singled and scored in the sixth, and added an RBI single in the ninth. He finished 4 for 6 and raised his batting average to an NL-best .402. His on-base percentage of .489 leads the majors. Dickey (5-1) gave up two runs and has allowed only seven in his past four starts. The knuckleballer earned a painful RBI when he was hit on his pitching hand in the fifth inning with the bases loaded. He received a visit from a trainer but stayed in the game. Padres 2, Phillies 1

PHILADELPHIA — Edinson Volquez pitched six effective innings, pinch-hitter Jose Guzman drove in the go-ahead run with a sacrifice fly and the San Diego Padres beat the Philadelphia Phillies and ace Roy Halladay for the second time this season.

Volquez (2-2) escaped a few jams early in the game and then again in the fifth inning. The righty won his second straight start. He allowed one run and six hits, walked two and struck out five. Brewers 8, Cubs 2

MILWAUKEE — Shaun Marcum pitched seven strong innings and Edwin Maysonet hit his first career grand slam Saturday to lead the Milwaukee Brewers to a win over the Chicago Cubs. Pirates 5, Astros 2

PITTSBURGH — Andrew McCutchen had a solo home run among his four hits, Jose Tabata also homered and the Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Houston Astros. Nationals 2, Reds 1

CINCINNATI — Jordan Zimmermann extended Washington’s streak of dominant starts, and Danny Espinosa homered for the second straight game, leading the Nationals to a victory over the Cincinnati Reds. Braves 7, Cardinals 2

ST. LOUIS — Brandon Beachy pitched six innings of onerun ball and helped himself with an RBI single, Michael Bourn added a solo homer and the Atlanta Braves beat the St. Louis Cardinals.

AMERICAN LEAGUE ROUNDUP

Hughes pitches into 8th to lead Yankees over M’s The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Phil Hughes won consecutive starts for the first time this season, Raul Ibanez homered against his former team for the second day in a row and the Yankees beat former New York prospect Hector Noesi in a 6-2 win over the Seattle Mariners on Saturday. Jayson Nix hit a two-run shot during a four-run second inning for his first homer with the Yankees, who have won six of eight. Hughes (3-4) allowed six hits and a run in 7 2-3 innings with four strikeouts and a walk. The right-hander’s only blemish was a homer he gave up to Mike Carp in the seventh inning. Boone Logan came in and struck out Ichiro Suzuki with two runners on to end the eighth after allowing a fly ball to Carp that went off the top of the fence in right field. Video review overturned the original call of a home run, leaving Carp with a RBI double. Red Sox 4, Indians 1

BOSTON — Felix Doubront pitched six strong innings and Cody Ross homered to lead Boston to a win over the Cleveland Indians, giving the Red Sox their first winning streak in May. Doubront (3-1) allowed one run on three hits, which was all the Indians would get as relievers Andrew Miller, Vicente Padilla and Alfredo Aceves

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 5C

STANDINGS/STATS

N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P

The Associated Press

L

Baltimore........................................ Tampa Bay..................................... New York ....................................... Toronto........................................... Boston ............................................

W 21 20 19 18 13

Cleveland....................................... Detroit............................................. Chicago.......................................... Kansas City ................................... Minnesota ......................................

W 18 16 16 11 9

Texas ............................................. Oakland.......................................... Los Angeles .................................. Seattle ............................................

W 22 17 15 15

Washington ................................... Atlanta ............................................ New York ....................................... Miami.............................................. Philadelphia...................................

W 20 20 19 17 15

St. Louis ......................................... Cincinnati ....................................... Houston ......................................... Milwaukee...................................... Pittsburgh ...................................... Chicago..........................................

W 20 16 15 15 14 13

Los Angeles ................................. San Francisco .............................. Arizona ......................................... Colorado....................................... San Diego.....................................

AMERICAN LEAGUE Friday's Games N.Y. Yankees 6, Seattle 2 Baltimore 4, Tampa Bay 3 Boston 7, Cleveland 5 Texas 10, L.A. Angels 3 Chicago White Sox 5, Kansas City 0 Minnesota 7, Toronto 6 Oakland 11, Detroit 4 Saturday's Games L.A. Angels 4, Texas 2 N.Y. Yankees 6, Seattle 2 Tampa Bay at Baltimore, (n) Cleveland at Boston, (n) Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, (n) Toronto at Minnesota, (n) Detroit at Oakland, (n) Sunday's Games Seattle (Millwood 0-4) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 0-0), 1:05 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 1-2) at Boston (Bard 2-4), 1:35 p.m. Tampa Bay (Shields 5-1) at Baltimore (Arrieta 2-3), 1:35 p.m. Kansas City (Duffy 2-2) at Chicago White Sox (Humber 1-2), 2:10 p.m. Toronto (R.Romero 4-0) at Minnesota (Diamond 1-0), 2:10 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 3-1) at Oakland (Parker 1-0), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Weaver 5-0) at Texas (Feliz 2-1), 8:05 p.m. Monday's Games N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Seattle at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Kansas City at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Cleveland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.

N AT I O N A L L E A G U E Mets 9, Marlins 3 New York

Miami ab r h bi Reyes ss 5 1 4 0 Infante 2b 3 0 1 0 Gaudin p 0 0 0 0 Kearns ph-lf 2 0 1 0 HRmrz 3b 5 0 1 1 Morrsn lf 4 2 2 0 Webb p 0 0 0 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Stanton rf 4 0 2 1 GSnchz 1b 4 0 2 1 Bonifac cf 3 0 0 0 Hayes c 3 0 0 0 Mattisn ph 1 0 0 0 Nolasco p 1 0 0 0 MDunn p 1 0 0 0 DMrph 2b 2 0 0 0 Totals 41 916 9 Totals 38 313 3 New York ........................... 101 131 011 — 9 Miami .................................. 010 001 100 — 3 E—Hayes (3). DP—New York 1, Miami 1. LOB— New York 13, Miami 9. 2B—Duda (3), Baxter (5), H.Ramirez (7), Stanton (8), G.Sanchez (9). HR— D.Wright (4). SB—Dan.Murphy (2). S—Dickey. IP H R ER BB SO New York Dickey W,5-1 ........... 6 9 2 2 1 0 Acosta ...................... 2⁄3 2 1 1 0 1 Byrdak ...................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Parnell ...................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 D.Carrasco .............. 1 2 0 0 0 1 Miami Nolasco L,4-1 .......... 42⁄3 9 6 6 3 3 3 1 1 0 2 M.Dunn..................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 1 1 Gaudin ...................... 12⁄3 Webb ........................ 1 2 1 1 0 1 Cishek ...................... 1 2 1 1 0 0 HBP—by Nolasco (Nickeas, Dickey). WP—Cishek. Umpires—Home, Tony Randazzo;First, Todd Tichenor;Second, Larry Vanover;Third, Brian Gorman. T—3:28. A—32,128 (37,442). ATorrs cf Niwnhs lf DWrght 3b Duda rf DCrrsc p DnMrp 2b I.Davis 1b Cedeno ss Nickes c Dickey p Vldspn ph Acosta p Byrdak p Parnell p Baxter ph-rf

didn’t allow a baserunner over the final three innings. Angels 4, Rangers 2

ARLINGTON, Texas — Kendrys Morales had a pinchhit, tiebreaking sacrifice fly in the seventh inning to lead the Los Angeles Angels to a victory over the Texas Rangers. Orioles 5, Rays 3

BALTIMORE — The Baltimore Orioles capitalized on five errors by the Tampa Bay Rays and got two hits and two RBIs from Adam Jones in a victory. Royals 5, White Sox 0

CHICAGO — Luke Hochevar allowed three hits in seven shutout innings Saturday night and the Kansas City Royals scored three first-inning runs off Chris Sale to beat the Chicago White Sox 5-0. Blue Jays 2, Twins 1

MINNEAPOLIS — Jose Bautista homered for the third time in two nights and Drew Hutchison threw six strong innings for his second career win and the Toronto Blue Jays beat the Minnesota Twins. Athletics 3, Tigers 1

OAKLAND, Calif. — Brandon McCarthy matched a career high with 10 strikeouts after missing his last start with a sore right shoulder, leading the Oakland Athletics past the Detroit Tigers 3-1 on Saturday night.

W 21 15 15 13 11

All Times EDT AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB 12 .636 — — 13 .606 1 — 14 .576 2 — 15 .545 3 1 51⁄2 19 .406 71⁄2 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB 14 .563 — — 16 .500 2 21⁄2 17 .485 21⁄2 3 7 20 .355 61⁄2 23 .281 9 91⁄2 West Division L Pct GB WCGB 12 .647 — — 16 .515 41⁄2 2 19 .441 7 41⁄2 20 .429 71⁄2 5 NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division L Pct GB WCGB 12 .625 — — 1 ⁄2 — 13 .606 14 .576 11⁄2 — 16 .515 31⁄2 2 18 .455 51⁄2 4 Central Division L Pct GB WCGB 12 .625 — — 15 .516 31⁄2 2 17 .469 5 31⁄2 4 18 .455 51⁄2 18 .438 6 41⁄2 20 .394 71⁄2 6 West Division L Pct GB WCGB 11 .656 — — 17 .469 6 31⁄2 18 .455 61⁄2 4 18 .419 71⁄2 5 22 .333 101⁄2 8

ab 3 5 6 6 0 4 5 5 4 1 1 0 0 0 1

r 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

h bi 1 2 1 1 4 3 3 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Brewers 8, Cubs 2 Chicago

ab 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 2 0 2 1

r 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

h bi 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Milwaukee

ab r h bi Morgan cf-rf 4 1 1 0 Lucroy c 5 1 3 1 Braun lf 4 0 1 0 ArRmr 3b 4 1 1 1 Hart rf 4 1 1 0 Veras p 0 0 0 0 Dillard p 0 0 0 0 Ishikaw 1b 3 2 2 0 Maysnt 2b 3 1 2 4 CIzturs ss 4 1 1 0 Marcm p 3 0 1 0 Aoki cf 0 0 0 1 Totals 31 2 5 1 Totals 34 813 7 Chicago.............................. 100 000 010 — 2 Milwaukee.......................... 100 005 02x — 8 DP—Chicago 1, Milwaukee 1. LOB—Chicago 5, Milwaukee 7. 2B—DeJesus (7), Campana (4), Cardenas (1), Morgan (1), Lucroy (5), Hart (9), Ishikawa 2 (5). HR—Maysonet (1). CS—Braun (2). S—Aoki. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Volstad L,0-5 ........... 6 9 6 6 2 1 C.Coleman............... 2 4 2 2 1 0 Milwaukee Marcum W,2-1 ........ 7 3 1 1 2 6 Veras ........................ 1 2 1 1 0 1 Dillard ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBP—by Volstad (Braun), by Marcum (A.Soriano). Umpires—Home, Fieldin Culbreth;First, Adrian Johnson;Second, Gary Cederstrom;Third, Lance Barksdale. T—2:58. A—42,339 (41,900).

DeJess rf Campn cf SCastro ss LaHair 1b ASorin lf IStewrt 3b Soto c Barney 2b CColmn p Volstad p Cardns 2b

Padres 2, Phillies 1 San Diego

Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Venale rf 4 0 2 1 Rollins ss 4 0 1 0 Kotsay lf 1 0 0 0 Polanc 3b 4 0 1 0 Darnell lf 3 0 1 0 Victorn cf 4 0 3 0 Cashnr p 0 0 0 0 Pence rf 3 0 0 0 Thayer p 0 0 0 0 Wggntn 1b 4 0 0 0 Headly 3b 3 0 0 0 Ruiz c 4 0 0 0 Alonso 1b 3 0 1 0 Mayrry lf 3 1 1 0 OHudsn 2b 4 0 0 0 Galvis 2b 4 0 1 1 Maybin cf 4 1 1 0 Hallady p 2 0 0 0 JoBakr c 4 0 2 0 Pierre ph 1 0 1 0 Bartlett ss 4 1 1 0 Qualls p 0 0 0 0 Volquez p 2 0 0 0 Orr ph 1 0 0 0 Guzmn ph 0 0 0 1 Papeln p 0 0 0 0 Grgrsn p 0 0 0 0 Denorfi lf 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 2 8 2 Totals 34 1 8 1 San Diego .......................... 001 000 100 — 2 Philadelphia....................... 010 000 000 — 1 E—Gregerson (1), Qualls (1). DP—Philadelphia 1. LOB—San Diego 7, Philadelphia 12. 2B—Venable (6), Maybin (5), Bartlett (5), Victorino (5), Mayberry (4), Galvis (9). SB—Headley (3), Rollins (7), Victorino (10). S—Rollins, Polanco. SF—Guzman. IP H R ER BB SO San Diego Volquez W,2-2 ........ 6 6 1 1 2 5 Gregerson H,5 ........ 1 1 0 0 1 0 Cashner H,4 ............ 1 0 0 0 1 2 Thayer S,3-3............ 1 1 0 0 0 2 Philadelphia Halladay L,3-3 ......... 7 7 2 2 1 10 Qualls ....................... 1 1 0 0 1 1 Papelbon.................. 1 0 0 0 0 0 Umpires—Home, Dan Iassogna;First, Dale Scott;Second, CB Bucknor;Third, Bill Miller. T—2:50. A—45,542 (43,651).

A M E R I C A N L E A G U E L10 7-3 5-5 6-4 6-4 2-8

Str W-1 L-2 W-3 L-1 W-1

Home 10-7 13-3 11-7 8-7 5-11

Away 11-5 7-10 8-7 10-8 8-8

L10 6-4 5-5 4-6 5-5 3-7

Str L-1 L-1 W-3 L-1 W-1

Home 8-10 9-9 6-9 4-13 5-11

Away 10-4 7-7 10-8 7-7 4-12

L10 5-5 6-4 6-4 4-6

Str L-1 W-1 W-1 L-2

Home 9-6 8-9 9-8 7-8

Away 13-6 9-7 6-11 8-12

L10 6-4 6-4 6-4 8-2 4-6

Str W-2 W-1 W-1 L-1 W-1

Home 12-4 8-5 10-6 7-6 6-8

Away 8-8 12-8 9-8 10-10 9-10

L10 6-4 6-4 7-3 4-6 4-6 5-5

Str L-1 L-1 W-1 W-2 L-2 L-2

Home 8-5 8-7 10-8 9-8 8-8 9-10

Away 12-7 8-8 5-9 6-10 6-10 4-10

L10 5-5 3-7 3-7 3-7 4-6

Str W-2 L-2 W-1 L-1 L-2

Home 13-3 8-7 7-10 8-10 9-14

Away 8-8 7-10 8-8 5-8 2-8

NATIONAL LEAGUE Friday's Games Houston 1, Pittsburgh 0 Philadelphia 7, San Diego 3 Miami 6, N.Y. Mets 5 Washington 7, Cincinnati 3 Milwaukee 8, Chicago Cubs 7, 13 innings Atlanta 9, St. Louis 7, 12 innings Arizona 5, San Francisco 1 L.A. Dodgers 7, Colorado 3 Saturday's Games Milwaukee 8, Chicago Cubs 2 N.Y. Mets 9, Miami 3 Houston at Pittsburgh, (n) San Diego at Philadelphia, (n) Washington at Cincinnati, (n) Atlanta at St. Louis, (n) San Francisco at Arizona, (n) Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, (n) Sunday's Games N.Y. Mets (Niese 2-1) at Miami (Zambrano 1-2), 1:10 p.m. Washington (E.Jackson 1-1) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 2-1), 1:10 p.m. Houston (W.Rodriguez 3-3) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 1-2), 1:35 p.m. San Diego (Suppan 2-0) at Philadelphia (Hamels 4-1), 1:35 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 4-1) at Milwaukee (Estrada 0-2), 2:10 p.m. Atlanta (Hanson 3-3) at St. Louis (Lynn 6-0), 2:15 p.m. Colorado (White 0-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 4-0), 4:10 p.m. San Francisco (Zito 1-1) at Arizona (J.Saunders 2-2), 4:10 p.m. Monday's Games Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 7:05 p.m. Houston at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. San Diego at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Colorado at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

Braves 7, Cardinals 2 Atlanta

St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 6 2 3 2 Furcal ss 3 1 2 1 Prado lf 6 1 1 0 Beltran rf 3 0 0 0 Fremn 1b 3 0 0 0 Hollidy lf 3 0 0 0 Uggla 2b 3 2 2 1 Craig 1b 3 0 1 1 McCnn c 4 1 2 2 Freese 3b 3 0 0 0 C.Jones 3b 4 0 1 0 YMolin c 4 0 1 0 Heywrd rf 5 0 0 0 Jay cf 4 0 0 0 Pstrnck ss 4 1 2 1 Greene 2b 3 0 0 0 Beachy p 3 0 1 1 JRomr p 0 0 0 0 JFrncs ph 1 0 0 0 Wnwrg p 1 0 0 0 Medlen p 0 0 0 0 Salas p 1 0 0 0 Diaz ph 1 0 1 0 Descals 2b 1 1 1 0 CMrtnz p 0 0 0 0 Totals 40 713 7 Totals 29 2 5 2 Atlanta ................................ 201 020 011 — 7 St. Louis ............................. 000 001 010 — 2 E—Uggla (6). DP—Atlanta 2. LOB—Atlanta 13, St. Louis 5. 2B—Uggla (7). 3B—Descalso (3). HR— Bourn (1). SF—Craig. IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Beachy W,4-1.......... 6 2 1 1 4 6 Medlen ..................... 2 2 1 1 0 1 C.Martinez ............... 1 1 0 0 0 2 St. Louis Wainwright L,2-4..... 41⁄3 9 5 5 5 5 0 0 0 1 4 Salas......................... 22⁄3 J.Romero ................. 2 4 2 2 1 1 WP—Beachy. Umpires—Home, Wally Bell;First, Brian Knight;Second, Mike Winters;Third, Mike Muchlinski. T—2:55. A—44,157 (43,975).

Pirates 5, Astros 2 Houston

ab 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 0 0 1 0 0

r 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Pittsburgh

ab r h bi Tabata lf-rf 4 2 2 1 Walker 2b 3 0 0 1 AMcCt cf 4 1 4 1 PAlvrz 3b 3 1 1 0 McGeh 1b 2 1 0 0 Navarr rf 2 0 0 0 GJones ph 1 0 0 0 Resop p 0 0 0 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 McLoth ph 1 0 0 0 J.Cruz p 0 0 0 0 Barmes ss 3 0 0 1 McKnr c 3 0 0 0 Morton p 2 0 0 0 Presley T.Buck ph 1 0 0 0 ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Totals 35 2 9 2 Totals 29 5 7 4 Houston.............................. 000 011 000 — 2 Pittsburgh .......................... 101 012 00x — 5 E—P.Alvarez (8). DP—Pittsburgh 2. LOB—Houston 7, Pittsburgh 6. 2B—Schafer (4), C.Snyder (1), P.Alvarez (5). 3B—Tabata (2). HR—Tabata (2), A.McCutchen (3). SB—A.McCutchen (6), McGehee (1). SF—Walker, Barmes. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Happ L,2-3 ............... 5 6 5 5 1 4 R.Cruz ...................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 Abad ......................... 1⁄3 Davi.Carpenter........ 1 1 0 0 1 0 Lyon .......................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Pittsburgh Morton W,2-3 .......... 6 7 2 1 1 0 Resop H,3................ 1⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 Watson H,3 .............. 12⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 J.Cruz S,3-3 ............ 1 1 0 0 0 1 Happ pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. WP—R.Cruz. Umpires—Home, Jim Joyce;First, Jim Reynolds;Second, Mike Estabrook;Third, James Hoye. T—2:59. A—34,187 (38,362). Schafer cf Lowrie ss Altuve 2b Ca.Lee 1b Bogsvc rf Maxwll lf MDwns 3b CSnydr c Happ p R.Cruz p Abad p MGnzlz ph DvCrpn p Lyon p

Nationals 2, Reds 1 Washington

Cincinnati

ab r h bi ab r h bi Dsmnd ss 5 0 1 0 Cozart ss 4 1 1 0 Berndn lf 4 0 1 0 Stubbs cf 4 0 0 0 Zmrmn 3b 3 0 0 0 Votto 1b 2 0 1 0 LaRoch 1b 3 0 1 0 BPhllps 2b 4 0 0 1 Harper rf 4 0 0 0 Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 3 1 2 1 Frazier 3b 4 0 1 0 Ankiel cf 4 0 0 0 Ludwck lf 4 0 1 0 WRams c 2 1 1 1 Hanign c 3 0 1 0 Flores c 1 0 0 0 Latos p 2 0 0 0 Zmrmn p 1 0 0 0 Arrdnd p 0 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0 TMoore ph 1 0 0 0 Cairo ph 1 0 0 0 HRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 Chpmn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 2 6 2 Totals 32 1 5 1 Washington ....................... 000 011 000 — 2 Cincinnati ........................... 100 000 000 — 1 DP—Washington 1, Cincinnati 1. LOB—Washington 8, Cincinnati 6. 2B—Desmond (9). HR—Espinosa (3), W.Ramos (3). SB—Espinosa 2 (3). S— Zimmermann. IP H R ER BB SO Washington Zimmermann W,2-3 7 5 1 1 1 9 Clippard H,8 ............ 1 0 0 0 1 1 H.Rodriguez S,8-10 1 0 0 0 0 3 Cincinnati Latos ......................... 5 3 1 1 5 4 Arredondo L,2-1...... 1 1 1 1 0 3 Ondrusek ................. 1 1 0 0 0 0 Chapman ................. 2 1 0 0 0 4 PB—W.Ramos. Umpires—Home, Eric Cooper;First, Marty Foster;Second, Tim Timmons;Third, Jeff Kellogg. T—3:08. A—42,294 (42,319).

Angels 4, Rangers 2 Los Angeles

Texas ab r h bi ab r h bi Trout lf 4 0 0 1 Kinsler 2b 3 0 0 0 Callasp 3b 4 0 0 0 Andrus ss 3 0 0 0 Pujols dh 3 0 1 0 Hamltn lf-cf 4 1 1 1 TrHntr rf 3 1 0 0 Beltre dh 4 0 1 0 Trumo 1b 2 2 1 2 MYong 3b 4 0 1 0 HKndrc 2b 4 1 1 0 N.Cruz rf 2 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 4 0 1 0 Napoli c 2 1 0 0 Aybar ss 2 0 0 0 BSnydr 1b 4 0 1 0 KMorls ph 0 0 0 1 Gentry cf 2 0 1 1 MIzturs ss 1 0 0 0 DvMrp ph-lf 2 0 0 0 Hester c 4 0 2 0 Totals 31 4 6 4 Totals 30 2 5 2 Los Angeles....................... 000 200 200 — 4 Texas.................................. 000 011 000 — 2 DP—Los Angeles 2. LOB—Los Angeles 6, Texas 7. HR—Trumbo (5), Hamilton (18). SB—Kinsler (3), Gentry (5). SF—Trout, K.Morales. IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles C.Wilson................... 52⁄3 5 2 2 3 4 D.Carpenter W,1-1 . 1⁄3 0 0 0 1 0 Walden H,2.............. 1 0 0 0 0 1 Frieri H,2 .................. 12⁄3 0 0 0 0 3 S.Downs S,3-5 ........ 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Texas M.Harrison L,4-3 ..... 6 4 4 4 2 5 Ogando..................... 2 2 0 0 2 2 R.Ross ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 M.Harrison pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. HBP—by C.Wilson (Napoli), by Frieri (N.Cruz). Umpires—Home, Hunter Wendelstedt;First, Dan Bellino;Second, Jerry Layne;Third, Bob Davidson. T—2:54. A—47,699 (48,194).

Yankees 6, Mariners 2 Seattle

ab 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 3

r 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0

h bi 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0

New York

ab r h bi Jeter dh 4 1 2 0 Grndrs cf 4 0 0 0 AlRdrg 3b 4 0 0 0 Cano 2b 4 0 1 1 Teixeir 1b 4 1 1 0 Swisher rf 3 0 0 0 Ibanez lf 3 2 2 2 Wise lf 0 0 0 0 Martin c 3 1 1 1 J.Nix ss 3 1 1 2 Totals 34 2 8 2 Totals 32 6 8 6 Seattle ................................ 000 000 101 — 2 New York ........................... 040 100 01x — 6 DP—New York 1. LOB—Seattle 6, New York 2. 2B—Carp (2), Teixeira (7), Ibanez (5), Martin (3). HR—Carp (2), Ibanez (7), J.Nix (1). SB—Jeter (2). IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Noesi L,2-4 .............. 7 6 5 5 0 4 Wilhelmsen .............. 1 2 1 1 0 2 New York P.Hughes W,3-4 ..... 72⁄3 6 1 1 1 4 Logan S,1-1 ............. 11⁄3 2 1 1 0 4 Umpires—Home, Chris Conroy;First, Scott Barry;Second, Jerry Meals;Third, Gary Darling. T—2:36. A—43,954 (50,291).

Ackley 2b Jaso c ISuzuki rf JMontr dh Seager 3b Carp lf Smoak 1b MSndrs cf Kawsk ss

Red Sox 4, Indians 1 Cleveland

Boston ab r h bi ab r h bi Brantly cf 4 0 0 0 Sweeny cf 4 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 1 Pedroia 2b 4 1 2 1 ACarer ss 4 0 0 0 Ortiz dh 4 0 1 1 CSantn 1b 4 0 0 0 AdGnzl 1b 4 0 0 0 Hafner dh 3 0 1 0 Mdlrks 3b 4 0 0 0 Choo rf 3 0 0 0 Nava lf 3 1 2 0 Duncan lf 2 0 0 0 C.Ross rf 3 1 1 1 Hannhn 3b 3 0 0 0 Sltlmch c 3 0 1 0 Marson c 2 1 1 0 Aviles ss 2 1 1 1 Totals 29 1 3 1 Totals 31 4 8 4 Cleveland ........................... 000 001 000 — 1 Boston ................................ 002 101 00x — 4 LOB—Cleveland 3, Boston 4. 2B—Marson (2), Pedroia (12), Ortiz (14), Saltalamacchia (7). HR— C.Ross (6). SF—Aviles. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland McAllister L,1-1 ....... 7 8 4 4 0 8 Asencio .................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Boston Doubront W,3-1 ...... 6 3 1 1 2 5 A.Miller H,2 .............. 1 0 0 0 0 0 Padilla H,5 ............... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Aceves S,7-9 ........... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Umpires—Home, Alan Porter;First, Ron Kulpa;Second, Jim Wolf;Third, Derryl Cousins. T—2:30. A—38,048 (37,495).

Athletics 3, Tigers 1 Detroit

Oakland ab r h bi ab r h bi 4 0 1 0 JWeeks 2b 2 1 2 0 Pnngtn Dirks lf 3 0 1 0 ph-ss 2 1 1 1 MiCarr 3b 4 0 0 0 Barton 1b 4 0 1 1 Fielder 1b 4 0 0 0 Reddck rf 4 0 1 0 DYong dh 4 1 1 0 JGoms dh 4 0 1 1 Avila c 3 0 0 1 S.Smith lf 4 0 0 0 Boesch rf 4 0 2 0 Inge 3b 3 0 0 0 RSantg ss 2 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 4 0 1 0 Sogard Worth 2b 2 0 0 0 ss-2b 3 0 1 0 AJcksn ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Cowgill cf 2 1 0 0 Totals 31 1 5 1 Totals 32 3 8 3 Detroit................................. 000 000 001 — 1 Oakland.............................. 100 000 20x — 3 E—Fielder (3). DP—Detroit 1. LOB—Detroit 6, Oakland 7. 2B—D.Young (5). 3B—Pennington (1). SB—Boesch (1). SF—Avila. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Fister L,0-1 .............. 6 5 1 1 2 8 Coke ......................... 2⁄3 3 2 2 0 0 Dotel ......................... 11⁄3 0 0 0 0 3 Oakland McCarthy W,3-3...... 7 4 0 0 0 10 R.Cook H,9 .............. 1 0 0 0 1 1 Fuentes S,2-3.......... 1 1 1 1 0 1 HBP—by McCarthy (R.Santiago). WP—Fuentes. Umpires—Home, Tim Welke;First, Laz Diaz;Second, Mike Everitt;Third, Paul Schrieber. T—2:35. A—20,077 (35,067). Kelly cf-2b

Blue Jays 2, Twins 1

Toronto

ab 4 4 4 4 4

r 0 0 1 0 0

h bi 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0

Minnesota

ab r h bi Span cf 4 0 0 0 Dozier ss 4 1 2 0 Mauer c 4 0 2 0 Wlngh lf 3 0 0 0 Doumit dh 2 0 0 0 Komats RDavis lf 0 0 0 0 pr-dh 0 0 0 0 Plouffe Lawrie 3b 3 0 0 0 3b-1b 3 0 0 1 Rasms cf 3 1 2 0 Parmel 1b 3 0 0 0 ACasill Lind 1b 3 0 1 1 ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Mathis c 3 0 0 0 Mstrnn rf 3 0 0 0 JCarrll 2b 4 0 1 0 Totals 32 2 7 2 Totals 31 1 5 1 Toronto............................... 000 011 000 — 2 Minnesota .......................... 000 100 000 — 1 DP—Toronto 1, Minnesota 2. LOB—Toronto 3, Minnesota 9. 2B—Rasmus (5), Dozier (1), Mauer (6). HR—Bautista (8). IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Hutchison W,2-1 ..... 6 3 1 1 4 4 Cordero H,4 ............. 1 1 0 0 1 1 Frasor H,5................ 2⁄3 1 0 0 1 0 L.Perez H,3.............. 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Janssen S,2-3 ......... 1 0 0 0 0 1 Minnesota Walters L,0-1 ........... 6 6 2 2 0 5 Duensing.................. 2 0 0 0 0 2 Gray .......................... 1 1 0 0 0 2 WP—Cordero. Umpires—Home, D.J. Reyburn;First, Jeff Nelson;Second, Bill Welke;Third, Tim Tschida. T—2:50. A—38,820 (39,500). KJhnsn 2b YEscor ss Bautist rf Encrnc dh Thams lf

Orioles 5, Rays 3 Tampa Bay

Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi Zobrist rf 3 0 0 0 Andino 2b 4 0 1 0 SRdrgz 3b 4 0 1 0 Hardy ss 4 1 1 0 BUpton cf 4 0 1 0 Markks rf 2 0 0 0 Kppngr 1b 4 1 1 0 AdJons cf 4 1 2 2 Guyer lf 3 2 1 1 Wieters dh 3 1 0 0 JMolin c 1 0 0 0 Betemt 1b 3 0 0 0 Scott dh 4 0 1 2 Hall lf 3 1 1 1 EJhnsn ss 3 0 1 0 Flahrty lf 0 0 0 0 C.Pena ph 1 0 0 0 Tollesn 3b 4 0 1 1 Gimenz c 2 0 1 0 Exposit c 3 1 0 0 Joyce ph-lf 2 0 0 0 Rhyms 2b 3 0 0 0 Totals 34 3 7 3 Totals 30 5 6 4 Tampa Bay......................... 010 002 000 — 3 Baltimore ............................ 020 020 01x — 5 E—B.Upton (2), S.Rodriguez (5), Gimenez (3), Guyer (1), M.Moore (1), Betemit (6), Tolleson (2). DP—Baltimore 1. LOB—Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 7. 2B—Andino (4), Tolleson (1). HR—Guyer (1), Hall (1). SB—B.Upton (3). CS—Andino (2). IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay M.Moore L,1-3......... 41⁄3 4 4 1 4 6 W.Davis.................... 12⁄3 0 0 0 1 2 Badenhop................. 1 1 0 0 0 3 Howell....................... 1 1 1 1 0 1 Baltimore Matusz W,2-4 .......... 52⁄3 7 3 2 1 5 Ayala H,3.................. 11⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Strop H,4.................. 1 0 0 0 0 2 Ji.Johnson S,11-11 1 0 0 0 0 0 Umpires—Home, Vic Carapazza;First, Gerry Davis;Second, Phil Cuzzi;Third, Greg Gibson. T—3:01. A—32,862 (45,971).

Royals 5, White Sox 0 Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Dyson cf 4 1 2 0 De Aza cf 4 0 0 0 Giavtll 2b 3 1 0 0 Bckhm 2b 3 0 0 0 Getz 2b 1 0 0 0 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 AGordn lf 5 1 1 0 Konerk 1b 4 0 1 0 Butler dh 5 0 2 1 Przyns c 2 0 0 0 Francr rf 5 0 0 1 Rios rf 4 0 1 0 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 0 AlRmrz ss 3 0 0 0 Falu 3b 4 1 2 0 Viciedo lf 3 0 0 0 AEscor ss 4 1 2 1 Morel 3b 2 0 1 0 Quinter c 4 0 2 1 Totals 39 512 4 Totals 29 0 3 0 Kansas City ....................... 300 000 020 — 5 Chicago.............................. 000 000 000 — 0 E—Beckham (2). DP—Kansas City 1. LOB—Kansas City 9, Chicago 6. 2B—A.Escobar 2 (12). SB— Morel (4). IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Hochevar W,3-3...... 7 3 0 0 1 5 G.Holland ................. 1 0 0 0 1 3 Crow ......................... 1 0 0 0 2 2 Chicago Sale L,3-2 ................ 5 7 3 3 2 3 N.Jones .................... 21⁄3 1 0 0 0 4 1 1 1 0 0 Ohman...................... 1⁄3 Z.Stewart ................. 11⁄3 3 1 1 0 0 Balk—Ohman. Umpires—Home, Rob Drake;First, Joe West;Second, Sam Holbrook;Third, Andy Fletcher. T—2:46. A—20,066 (40,615). Kansas City

F R I D AY ’ S L A T E B O X E S Brewers 8, Cubs 7 Chicago

ab 6 2 4 6 6 6 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 6 5 2 0 3

r 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

h bi 2 0 0 0 2 5 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Milwaukee

ab r h bi Morgan cf 3 1 1 0 Conrad ph 1 0 0 0 Aoki cf 2 0 0 0 RWeks 2b 4 1 0 0 Braun lf 2 1 0 0 ArRmr 3b 5 2 2 1 Hart rf 7 2 4 3 Kottars c 1 1 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 Axford p 0 0 0 0 Dillard p 0 0 0 0 Maysnt ph 1 0 1 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Greink ph 1 0 0 0 Chulk p 0 0 0 0 Green 1b 3 0 1 0 Veras p 0 0 0 0 Loe p 0 0 0 0 Lucroy ph-c 2 0 1 3 CIzturs ss 4 0 1 0 Wolf p 1 0 0 0 Ishikaw ph-1b 2 0 0 0 Totals 51 712 6 Totals 39 811 7 Chicago .............. 000 000 403 000 0 — 7 Milwaukee .......... 100 000 402 000 1 — 8 No outs when winning run scored. E—Camp (1), Ar.Ramirez (4). DP—Chicago 4, Milwaukee 1. LOB—Chicago 13, Milwaukee 15. 2B—Re.Johnson (3), W.Castillo (1), Ar.Ramirez (10), Hart (8), Lucroy (4). 3B—DeJesus (2), Barney (2). HR—DeJesus (1), Hart (7). SB—S.Castro (12). CS—S.Castro (5). S—Wolf, Ishikawa 2. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Garza........................ 5 3 1 1 5 3 Camp ........................ 1 1 0 0 1 1 Marmol H,2 .............. 2⁄3 1 2 2 1 1 Bowden BS,1-1 ....... 1⁄3 2 2 2 1 0 Russell ..................... 1 0 0 0 1 1 Dolis BS,2-5 ............ 2 2 2 2 2 0 K.Wood .................... 2 0 0 0 3 1 L.Castillo L,0-1 ........ 0 2 1 1 0 0 Milwaukee Wolf........................... 6 4 0 0 3 5 Veras H,4 ................. 1⁄3 1 3 3 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 Loe BS,1-1............... 2⁄3 Fr.Rodriguez H,7 .... 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 3 1 0 3 Axford BS,1-7.......... 2⁄3 Dillard ....................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 M.Parra .................... 2 1 0 0 2 3 Chulk W,1-0............. 2 2 0 0 1 2 L.Castillo pitched to 4 batters in the 13th. RJhnsn cf JeBakr rf DeJess ph-rf SCastro ss LaHair 1b-lf ASorin lf LCastill p Mather 3b Marml p Bowden p Campn ph Russell p Cardns ph Dolis p K.Wood p Soto c WCastll c-1b Barney 2b Garza p Camp p IStewrt ph-3b

Braves 9, Cardinals 7

Atlanta

St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 6 1 3 0 Furcal ss 5 1 2 0 Prado lf 5 1 1 0 Jay cf 6 1 2 0 Fremn 1b 4 0 1 1 Hollidy lf 5 1 1 1 Uggla 2b 6 2 2 1 Beltran rf 5 2 4 4 McCnn c 6 1 1 1 Craig 1b 4 1 1 1 C.Jones 3b 4 2 2 1 YMolin c 5 0 1 0 Heywrd rf 6 2 2 2 MCrpnt 3b 4 1 1 1 Pstrnck ss 5 0 1 1 Greene 2b 4 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0 Minor p 2 0 0 0 Freese ph 1 0 0 0 Durbin p 0 0 0 0 McCllln p 0 0 0 0 JFrncs ph 1 0 0 0 Roinsn ph 1 0 0 0 CMrtnz p 0 0 0 0 JGarci p 2 0 0 0 Medlen p 0 0 0 0 VMarte p 0 0 0 0 Hinske ph 1 0 0 0 Rzpczy p 0 0 0 0 Venters p 0 0 0 0 Descals ph 1 0 0 0 OFlhrt p 0 0 0 0 Boggs p 0 0 0 0 Diaz ph 1 0 0 0 Schmkr 2b 3 0 1 0 LHrndz p 0 0 0 0 JWilson ph-ss 1 0 0 0 Totals 48 913 7 Totals 46 713 7 Atlanta ...................... 203 000 110 002 — 9 St. Louis ................... 010 230 010 000 — 7 E—Holliday (1). DP—Atlanta 1. LOB—Atlanta 10, St. Louis 11. 2B—Bourn (8), Prado (9), Uggla (6), McCann (3), Pastornicky (5), Holliday (6), Beltran (2). 3B—Beltran (1). HR—Uggla (5), Heyward (5), Beltran 2 (12), Craig (4), M.Carpenter (2). S—Pastornicky, Furcal, Y.Molina. IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Minor......................... 42⁄3 8 6 6 0 7 Durbin....................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 C.Martinez ............... 1 0 0 0 0 0 Medlen ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 2 Venters BS,1-1........ 1 1 1 1 1 0 O’Flaherty ................ 1 1 0 0 0 0 L.Hernandez W,1-0 2 2 0 0 4 1 Kimbrel S,11-12 ...... 1 1 0 0 0 2 St. Louis J.Garcia.................... 52⁄3 9 5 4 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 V.Marte H,5 ............. 1⁄3 Rzepczynski BS,2-2 ...................... 1 1 1 1 0 0 Boggs ....................... 1 2 1 1 2 2 Motte......................... 2 0 0 0 0 2 McClellan L,0-1 ....... 2 1 2 2 2 0 HBP—by Venters (M.Carpenter). WP—J.Garcia. PB—Y.Molina 2.

Diamondbacks 5, Giants 1

San Francisco Arizona ab r h bi ab r h bi Pagan cf 4 0 1 0 Blmqst ss 5 1 2 1 Arias 3b 4 0 0 0 A.Hill 2b 5 0 0 0 MeCarr rf 4 1 2 1 J.Upton rf 3 0 0 0 Posey 1b 4 0 0 0 MMntr c 3 1 1 1 Pill lf 4 0 0 0 Gldsch 1b 4 1 3 2 HSnchz c 3 0 1 0 RRorts 3b 4 0 0 0 Burriss 2b 3 0 0 0 GParra cf 4 1 1 0 BCrwfr ss 3 0 0 0 Pollock lf 3 1 2 1 Bmgrn p 2 0 0 0 Corbin p 3 0 0 0 Edlefsn p 0 0 0 0 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 A.Huff ph 1 0 1 0 Overay ph 0 0 0 0 Loux p 0 0 0 0 DHrndz p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 1 5 1 Totals 34 5 9 5 San Francisco.................... 100 000 000 — 1 Arizona ............................... 001 031 00x — 5 E—B.Crawford (7), H.Sanchez (2), J.Upton (3). LOB—San Francisco 4, Arizona 9. 2B—Bloomquist (7), M.Montero (4), Pollock (1). HR—Me.Cabrera (2), Goldschmidt (2), Pollock (1). CS—Burriss (2). IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco Bumgarner L,5-2..... 6 7 5 4 2 5 Edlefsen ................... 1 1 0 0 1 2 Loux .......................... 1 1 0 0 0 0 Arizona Corbin W,2-1 ........... 7 3 1 1 0 4 Shaw ......................... 1 1 0 0 0 0 D.Hernandez ........... 1 1 0 0 0 0 Balk—Bumgarner.

Dodgers 7, Rockies 3

Colorado

Los Angeles ab r h bi DGordn ss 5 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 3 2 2 3 Kemp cf 3 0 0 0 Ethier rf 4 2 3 2 Abreu lf 4 0 1 1 Guerra p 0 0 0 0 Elbert p 0 0 0 0 Coffey p 0 0 0 0 Belisari p 0 0 0 0 Uribe 3b 4 1 1 1 Loney 1b 3 0 2 0 Treanr c 4 1 2 0 Capuan p 2 1 0 0 GwynJ lf 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 3 8 3 Totals 33 711 7 Colorado ............................ 000 000 102 — 3 Los Angeles....................... 100 130 11x — 7 DP—Colorado 1. LOB—Colorado 6, Los Angeles 6. 2B—C.Gonzalez (5), M.Ellis (4), Ethier (10). 3B—Fowler (1). HR—Cuddyer (4), M.Ellis (1), Ethier (7), Uribe (1). S—Capuano. SF—Cuddyer. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Moyer L,1-3 ............. 5 7 5 5 1 7 C.Torres ................... 2 2 1 1 2 2 Rogers...................... 1 2 1 1 0 1 Los Angeles Capuano W,5-0 ....... 7 4 1 1 0 3 Guerra ...................... 2⁄3 1 0 0 1 1 Elbert ........................ 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Coffey ....................... 2⁄3 3 2 2 0 1 1 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Belisario ................... Scutaro 2b Pachec 3b CTorrs p Colvin ph Rogers p CGnzlz lf Tlwtzk ss Helton 1b Cuddyr rf RHrndz c Fowler cf Moyer p Nelson ph-3b

ab 3 3 0 1 0 4 4 4 3 4 4 1 3

r 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0

h bi 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

T H I S D A T E I N B A S E B A L L May 13 1911 — Detroit’s Ty Cobb hit his first grand slam. After six innings, the Tigers led the Red Sox, 10-1. Boston came back to win the game 13-11 in 10 innings. 1911 — The New York Giants scored a major league record 10 runs before the St. Louis Cardinals retired the first batter in the first inning. Fred Merkle drove in six of the Giants’ 13 runs in the first en route to a 19-5 rout. Rube Marquard of the Giants entered the

game in the second inning and set a record for relievers with 14 strikeouts in his eight-inning appearance. 1923 — Joe Sewell of the Cleveland Indians struck out twice in one game for the first time in his career. Washington Senator rookie Wally Warmoth was the pitcher. In a 14-year career, Sewell had only one other multiple strikeout game. 1942 — Boston’s Jim Tobin became the only pitcher in modern history to hit three home runs in one

game. Tobin led the Braves to a 6-5 win over the Chicago Cubs. His fourth at-bat was a fly ball caught against the fence in left field. 1952 — In an Appalachian League game, Ron Necciai of the Bristol Twins struck out 27 batters while pitching a 7-0 no-hitter against the Welch Miners. 1955 — Mickey Mantle hit three home runs — two left-handed and one right-handed — as the Yankees beat the Detroit Tigers 5-2.


CMYK PAGE 6C

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

S TA N L E Y C U P P L AYO F F S

Rangers hold off Caps in Game 7

By IRA PODELL AP Sports Writer

AP PHOTO

New York Rangers defenseman Marc Staal (18) defends himself with his gloves as Washington Capitals left wing Alex Ovechkin checks him in the first period of Game 7 on Saturday.

NASCAR

NEW YORK — Brad Richards and Michael Del Zotto scored, Henrik Lundqvist made 22 saves, and the New York Rangers advanced to the Eastern Conference finals with a 2-1 victory in Game 7 over the Washington Capitals on Saturday night. Richards scored less than two minutes in, and Del Zotto doubled the lead in the third period to help the top-seeded Rangers improve to 5-0 in Game 7s at Madison Square Garden. That set up a matchup with the New Jersey Devils, the team the Rangers beat in the 1994 conference finals en route to their first Stanley Cup title in 54 years. That series will open Monday in New York.

2

RANGERS

1

CAPITALS

New York and Washington alternated wins and losses from Game 1 on, and this one didn’t come easy for the Rangers, who missed a chance to eliminate the Capitals in Game 6 on the road. Just 38 seconds after Del Zotto made it 2-0 at 10:05 of the third, Roman Hamrlik sent a shot off of New York forward Derek Stepan that fluttered past Lundqvist for his only blemish of the night.

N B A P L AYO F F S

New York played a very disciplined game, taking only one penalty for delay of game against Ruslan Fedotenko in the third period. The Rangers’ power play did nothing on its two chances, but keeping Washington’s manadvantage unit off the ice helped secure this win. The Capitals tried to pull Holtby for an extra skater with 1:22 left in the game, but he had to scramble back to cover the vacated net before he ever got to the bench. He finally got off the ice, and the Capitals pressured in the Rangers’ end. The puck was stuck in the corner when the final seconds ran out, and Lundqvist thrust both arms in the air as streamers poured down from the ceiling.

COLLEGE BASEBALL

Cougars repeat as Freedom champions

Harvick, Busch still not friendly year later

The Times Leader staff

The Misericordia baseball team is headed back to the NCAA regionals. After a delay of a week because of field conditions in Quakertown, the Cougars beat DeSales 5-3 in the decisive game of the Freedom Conference tournament on Saturday, winning the program’s second straight league title. Senior Jeff Slanovec was named tournament MVP, finishing with an RBI double in the

EDITOR’S NOTE: At press time, the Southern 500 was still in progress. For complete results, go to www.timesleader.com By PETE IACOBELLI AP Sports Writer

DARLINGTON, S.C. — Time has not smoothed things over between Kyle Busch and Kevin Harvick. The two Sprint Cup stars stole the show at the Southern 500 last year with their postrace dustup on the way to the garage after Regan Smith’s victory at the track “Too Tough To Tame.” Harvick was angered with Busch’s tactics late in the race when both were contending for the checkered flag. Busch, Harvick and Clint Bowyer were three-wide on the narrow track during a late restart when all were trying to chase down Smith. Bowyer went sprawling into the interior wall after contact. As cars spun out behind, Busch gathered his machine, then veered down the track and sent Harvick spinning. Smith held on through a green-white-checkered finish for his first Sprint Cup victory. But the real drama was unfolding on pit road as Busch and Harvick drove from the track. Busch was up against Harvick’s back bumper when Harvick jumped out and rushed toward Busch’s window where it looked like he took a swing at Busch. Busch bumped Harvick’s driverless car into the interior wall and headed into the garage. Both were called into the NASCAR hauler and each left composed — although with different versions of what happened. Busch said Harvick engaged in “unacceptable racing.” “I gave him room off of two, I didn’t get the room,” Busch said. Harvick said he was running hard and “things happen. That’s it. What do you do?” Busch and Harvick were both fined $25,000 and placed on probation by NASCAR after the Darlington tussle. The two said they hadn’t talked about what happened last year. “I tend to be able to let things go and forget about things while others tend to keep dwelling and keep bringing them back up,” Busch said. That includes Darlington Raceway leaders, who used the incident as part of its promotional campaign. The track urged fans not to miss round two between “Hitman” Harvick and “Rowdy Busch.” Billboards, radio spots and Internet ads saturated the market with another potential tangle. Harvick understood why the track used the incident to attract fans. He said he hasn’t spent too much time worrying about it. “I don’t talk about Kyle or to Kyle,” Harvick said.

Braden Holtby played well in his second career Game 7, making 29 saves. It was yet another heartbreaker for the Capitals, who were looking to reach the conference finals for the third time. Six of Washington’s seven playoff losses were by one goal, and only one of its 14 games overall were decided by more than one. Both the Rangers and the Capitals reached the second round of this year’s playoffs with Game 7 wins. New York knocked out Ottawa, and Washington eliminated the defending Stanley Cup champion Boston Bruins. But history isn’t all on the Rangers’ side. Since playoff expansion, no club has played 14 games in the first two rounds and went on to capture the Cup.

championship game. Tied 3-3 after six innings, Misericordia got a run in the seventh and eighth innings thanks to a pair of DeSales errors. Matt Karabin picked up the win in relief and Gabe Noyalis sealed the deal, earning the save with a strikeout and the tying run at the plate in the ninth. Andrew Tressa led the Cougars, finishing 3-for-5 with an RBI. Will Minderjahn and Chris Tuttle each had a pair of hits.

LOCAL ROUNDUP AP PHOTO

Boston Celtics forward Paul Pierce drives against Philadelphia 76ers guard Evan Turner during the first quarter of Game 1 in the Eastern Conference semifinasl Saturday in Boston.

Garnett leads Celtics past 76ers

By JIMMY GOLEN AP Sports Writer

BOSTON — Kevin Garnett scored 29 points — his most in the regular- or postseason this year — and added 11 rebounds on Saturday night to give the Boston Celtics a 92-91 victory over the Philadelphia 76ers in the opener of their Eastern Conference semifinal series. Rajon Rondo had 17 assists, 13 points and 12 rebounds for his eighth career playoff tripledouble. He ran the length of the court to receive the inbounds pass and dribble out the final 3.4 seconds of the game. Game 2 is Monday night in Boston before the series shifts to Philadelphia for Games 3 and 4. Andre Iguodala scored 19 points and Evan Turner had 16 points and 10 rebounds for the 76ers, who advanced to the second round for the first time since 2003 by beating East No. 1 seed Chicago. The Sixers led 77-67 with 11 minutes to play before Boston scored 23 of the next 30 points, with Rondo making a jumper to cut it to 80-79, then another with 3:37 left to give Boston the lead. After Spencer Hawes’ basket from the right baseline put the

92

CELTICS

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76ERS

Sixers up 84-83, Rondo drove to the basket and, with his path blocked, turned and handed the ball to Garnett. He banked one in and drew the foul to give Boston a two-point lead, then added another jumper. After misses by Turner and Lou Williams, Paul Pierce hit a fall-away jumper with 78 seconds left to make it a six-point lead — the Celtics’ biggest of the night. Jrue Holliday’s jumper cut it to three points, then Rondo fouled him with 3.4 seconds left and he made both foul shots. Boston inbounded the ball from between the benches, and Rondo sprinted back into the backcourt and outran his defender to the wrong basket as the time expired. Pierce, who had a sprained MCL in his left knee, scored 14 points on 3-for-11 shooting. Rondo was only 6 for 15 from the floor, but he was 3 for 6 in the fourth quarter, adding five

rebounds and four assists. Both teams advanced by winning their first-round series in six games: Boston beat Atlanta, and Philadelphia eliminated the Bulls to become the fifth No. 8 seed to eliminate a No. 1. They got only one day off before beginning the second round in Boston, where the Celtics earned their only victory against the Sixers this year. Philadelphia won the two games at home, including a 32-point victory on March 7. None of the three regular-season meetings between the teams was close. The Sixers scored the first seven points of the game and led by 10 at the end of the first quarter, when Boston shot 30 percent. It was 45-32 when Boston scored 10 of the last 12 points in the half, with Rondo picking up four assists and a steal in the final 3 minutes before the break. A little more than two minutes into the third, Avery Bradley outraced Rondo to a long rebound and took it in, splitting defenders Iguodala and Holiday for the reverse layup that made it 48-47 — Boston’s first lead of the game. Philadelphia quickly retook the lead and extended it to eight points.

Patriots rally for win, tie Coughlin for first The Times Leader staff

HUGHESTOWN — Down by three in the bottom of the seventh, Pittston Area rallied for four runs to beat Nanticoke 5-4 on Saturday in a Wyoming Valley Conference Division I baseball game. The victory moved the Patriots (8-5) into a first-place tie with Coughlin in Division I East with two games left to play. Patrick McGinty came through with the big hit in the seventh and finished with three RBI. Michael Schwab went the distance for the win, striking out seven. Anthony Ioanna hit his league-leading third home run for the Trojans (2-10) and struck out 10 in the loss. Nanticoke

ab r h bi

Yudichak c Jezewski cf Briggs 2b

4 1 1 0 4 1 0 0 3 1 2 0

Ioanna p Decker rf Ivan 1b Mlshfski ph

3 4 3 1

1 0 0 0

1 1 1 0

3 1 0 0

Pittston Area ab r h bi

Houseman 2b MSchwab p Razvillas 1b ASchwab 3b Loftus c Kielbasa lf Carey cf BDelaney dh Mancini pr Hahn rf McGinty ss

3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 2 3 0

1 0 1 0

0 0 2 0

0 0 0 0

Higgs ss 4 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 Maul lf 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 Boyle dh 3 0 1 0 3 2 2 1 Sorber pr 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 3 Myers 3b 3 0 1 0 Totals 22 5 6 5 Totals 32 4 9 4 Nanticoke ................................. 002 000 2 — 4 Pittston Area............................ 001 000 4 — 5 2B – Kielbasa, Hahn, Briggs; HR – Ioanna IP H R ER BB SO Nanticoke Ioanna (L, 2-5).......... 6.1 6 5 5 1 10 Pittston Area MSchwab (W, 2-1) .. 7.0 9 4 2 1 7

Berwick 2, Tunkhannock 1

Clay DeNoia scattered six hits

and struck out six for the win while Ben Bower nailed down the save for the Bulldogs (8-4). Kyle Miller and Jordan Stout had two hits and an RBI apiece. Rich Condeelis and Alex Zaner both finished with two hits with a double for the Tigers (6-6). Tunkhannock

Berwick ab r h bi Morales cf 2 0 0 0 Melito 2b 2 1 1 1 Lashock 3b 3 0 1 0 Miller ss 2 0 2 1 JStout dh 2 1 2 1 Berkes 1b 0 0 0 0 May lf 3 0 1 0 Curtin c 2 0 0 0 Jones ph 1 0 0 0 Fnstrmchr rf 1 0 0 0 Laubach ph 1 0 0 0 DeNoia p 2 0 0 0 Bower p 1 0 0 0 Totals 27 1 7 1 Totals 20 2 7 2 Tunkhannock........................... 000 010 0 — 1 Berwick..................................... 001 010 x — 2 2B – Zaner, Condeelis, Melito IP H R ER BB SO Tunkhannock Saylor (L, 1-1)........... 6.0 7 2 1 1 6 Berwick DeNoia (W, 3-2)....... 5.1 6 1 1 1 6 Bower (S).................. 1.2 1 0 0 0 1

Sherry lf Zaner 2b Custer c Condeelis 1b JMcClain ss Saylor p Lee rf Ash 3b Thompson cf

ab 4 4 2 3 3 3 3 3 2

r 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

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GIRLS LACROSSE

Dallas 11, Mifflinburg 10

Melissa Tucker scored her 5th goal of the day with one second remaining in regulation to edge Mifflinburg in Dallas’ last regular season game. Cara Pricher and Emily Capitano added three goals apiece for the Mountaineers while Madeline Mulhern contributed two assists and Dana Jolley had seven saves in goal. Dallas will take on Delaware Valley Monday evening in the first round of district playoffs.

A half-decade later, Nelson graduates Curtis delivers for Yanks in 10th MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

The Associated Press

IOWA CITY, Iowa — Fifty years ago, Don Nelson left the University of Iowa eight credits and a student-teaching requirement shy of a degree. Nelson took correspondence classes to complete the credits. But it took the most coaching wins in NBA history for the university to decide Nelson didn’t need to be a student teacher to earn a diploma. On Saturday, the former Hawkeyes’ star player returned to re-

ceive his bachelor’s degree in physical education during Iowa’s commencement ceremony at Carver-Hawkeye Arena. “I’ve been waiting for this moment for a long, long time. I wish it would have happened 50 years ago. But it didn’t,” Nelson said, “and I think that the morale to that story is it’s never too late as long as you keep working and keep having dreams. They can come true.” Nelson is known for the 1,355 coaching wins he picked up over 31 seasons as an NBA

coach, a career he wrapped up with Golden State following the 2010-11 season. It’s easy to forget that it all started over five decades ago in the Midwest. Nelson, who turns 72 on May 15, starred for Rock Island High in Illinois, just across the river from Iowa, and joined the Hawkeyes in 1959. Sporting a spiky blond flat top and a versatile game that would serve him well in the pros, Nelson finished his Iowa career as a two-time AllAmerican.

Times Leader staff

ROCHESTER, N.Y. – Colin Curtis delivered a two-out, RBI single in the bottom of the10th inning, driving in Kevin Russo from second base and making the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees 3-2 winners over the Durham Bulls Saturday night. Russo had reached first on a fielder’s choice after Yadil Mujica singled to center field with one out.

Russo then stole second. Curtis’ hit made a winner out of righty Kevin Whelan (1-0). Whelan went 2 innings, allowing just two hits while striking out one. Josh Lueke (0-2) was tagged with the loss. The Yankees got on the board first with a two-run Steve Pearce home run in the third inning. The Bulls answered with two runs of their own in the top of the fourth.


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HS WRESTLING

Key coaching names camping out on the mats By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

The summer months are always a big time for wrestling camps in the area and this year is no different. Several notable coaches will take center stage at the Wyoming Seminary Futures Wrestling Camp and at the Eagles Way Wrestling Clinics at Lake-Lehman High School. One of the top names making an appearance is Jeff Blatnick, a

member of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame, a NCAA Division II champion in 1978 and 1980, and an Olympic Gold Medalist in 1984 who will be at Wyoming Seminary’s clinic. The clinic at Wyoming Seminary will be held June 17-21 for wrestlers age 10-and-up at the Wyoming Seminary Upper School in Kingston. Also slated to appear in Kingston are Troy Letters, past PIAA and NCAA Division I champion

at Lehigh. Letters is also a former assistant at Penn State and is currently the head coach at Clarion University. North Carolina State’s new head coach Pat Popolizio and his assistant Frank Beasley, along with Northern Illinois’ Jeff Breese are also announced to be instructors at the clinic along with Wyoming Seminary’s head coach Scott Green. The cost of the camp is $200 for commuting and $325 for

those staying on campus. All athletes are required to provide a recent physician’s report, including immunization records. For more information or to register online, visit www.wyomingseminary.org/futureswrestling. At Lake-Lehman, a number of prominent coaches are slated to attend the clinics, which are being held Monday and Wednesday evenings from 5:30-7:30 p.m. starting on June 4.

Popolizio, who was named Coach of the Year in the Colonial Athletic Association last year at Binghamton University, is also slated to be one of the featured clinicians at Lake-Lehman. He will be joined by Pat Santoro from Lehigh University, Tim Flynn (Edinboro), Dave Crowell (Nazareth High School), John Stutzman (Bloomsburg), Dan Wirnsberger (Bucknell), Lee Pritts (North Carolina State assistant), Dave

Hoffmann (Bucknell), Josh Moore (Kent State) and Scott Davis, a past Lake-Lehman PIAA Champion. The cost of the Back Mountain clinics, which are being directed by Jack Davis, former Clarion University head coach, is $160 if registered before June 1. A $20 late fee applies after that date. Registration information can be obtained by calling Jack Davis at (814) 538-9034.

NCAA LACROSSE

Penn State women beat Towson The Associated Press

TOWSON, Md. — Haley Ford and Molly Fernandez each scored three goals, and Penn State surprised eighth-seed Towson 15-8 Saturday in the opening round of the NCAA women’s lacrosse tournament. Making their first appearance in the tournament since 2005, the

O’BRIEN Continued from Page 1C

JOE GIBBONS/THE TELEGRAM

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton defenseman Robert Bortuzzo (15) tangles with St. John’s winger Kevin Clark (9) as he goes for a wraparound against goalie Brad Thiessen in Saturday’s Game 7.

PENGUINS Continued from Page 1C

liams got the Penguins on the scoreboard first, it was the IceCaps and Sawada drawing first blood. The big winger took a crossice pass from John Albert and beat Brad Thiessen, who turned in yet another brilliant netminding effort for the Penguins. Craig made it a 1-1 game at 6:43 of the second period, taking a feed from Eric Tangradi and breaking in alone on Eddie Pasquale, beating the St. John’s goalie to the stick side. Gagnon restored the IceCaps’ lead at 11:35 mark of the second with a power-play marker.

“They had the start that they wanted and we didn’t have the start we wanted and that put us back on our heals,” Hynes said. “We kept coming and we were always one goal away, one shot away. “Tonight, if you look at the overall 60 minutes, they were better than we were for longer periods.” Gagnon got the winner just shy of a minute into the final period of play, finding the back of the net from a sharp angle, with perhaps a shot Thiessen should have stopped. McDonald scored on the power play at the 9:36 mark, but the Penguins could not solve Pasquale after that. “It was a real gutsy effort, and that’s the type of team that we have,” Hynes said. “The guys

laid it on the line tonight and we had guys pay a physical price. “We put our hearts out there, we worked as hard as we could, guys sacrificed, but sometimes you don’t get what you worked for.” Game 7, Eastern Conference Semifinals St. John's 3, Penguins 2 (St. John's wins series, 4-3) Penguins .................................................. 0 1 1 — 2 St. John’s ................................................. 1 1 1 — 3 First period—1. St. John’s, Sawada 3 (Albert), 11:52. Penalties, Cormier STJ (roughing), 4:51; Samuelsson WBS (hooking), 18:37. Second period—2. Penguins, Craig 1 (Tangradi), 6:43. 3. St. John’s, Gagnon 4 (Sawada, King), 11:35 (PP). Penalties, Clark STJ (roughing), 7:47; Gibbons WBS (interference), 10:45; Redmond STJ (interference), 12:00. Third period—4. St. John’s, Gagnon 5, 0:53. 5. Penguins, McDonald 6 (Tangradi, Williams), 9:36 (PP). Penalties, Samuelsson WBS (cross-checking), 3:37; Cormier STJ (boarding), 8:16. Shots on goal—Penguins 7-9-12-28; St. John’s 10-11-6-27. Power-play opportunities—Penguins 1for-4; St. John’s 1-for-3. Goalies—Penguins, Thiessen 6-6-0 (27 shots-24 saves). St. John’s, Pasquale 7-4-0 (2826). Referees—Jean Hebert, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen—Jim Vail, Joe Maynard. A—6,287

BOXING

USA will send 9 fighters to London By GREG BEACHAM AP Sports Writer

Six more American boxers have qualified for the Olympics with winning performances at a qualifying tournament in Brazil, allowing USA Boxing to send an impressive nine fighters to the London Games. Including three boxers who qualified last year, the U.S. currently has the second-largest men’s team headed to London. That’s more fighters than any nation except Australia, which will send a boxer in each of the 10 men’s weight classes, and more than traditional amateur powers Cuba and Russia. Light welterweight and American team captain Jamel Herring was among the group that qualified this week at the AIBA Americas Olympic Qualifying Event in Rio de Janeiro. “This performance from the team as a whole should be a message to the world that USA Boxing is still alive and kicking,” Herring told The Associated Press from Rio. “If anything, I say we’re getting stronger and have something to prove.” Herring left Rio with a bronze medal after losing his semifinal bout at the qualifying event, but had already qualified for London along with lightweight Jose Ramirez, light heavyweight Marcus Browne and middleweight Terrell Gausha. Two more U.S. boxers qualified Friday night in

the penultimate day of competition when heavyweight Michael Hunter and super heavyweight Dominic Breazeale won their semifinal bouts. They’ll all travel to London in July with three-time U.S. Olympian flyweight Rau’shee Warren, welterweight Errol Spence and bantamweight Joseph Diaz, who all qualified last year at the world championships. “It’s like a dream,” said Breazeale, a former quarterback at Northern Colorado who only took up boxing about three years ago. “Pinch me, wake me up.” Gausha and Browne won the tournament titles on Saturday, with Gausha beating Dominica’s Junior Castillo 6-2 and Browne trouncing Brazil’s Yamaguchi Falcao Florentino 14-6. While Olympic qualification certainly doesn’t guarantee an improved medal count, the U.S. performance is a boon to a program that has been widely criticized for declining performance in international competition. Americans have won just one gold medal in the past three Olympics — Andre Ward’s victory in Athens in 2004. The U.S. team left Beijing four years ago with only heavyweight Deontay Wilder’s bronze medal in their worst showing ever. USA Boxing made several changes to its program since the disappointing showing in Beijing, allowing fighters to work more closely with their personal

coaches and altering the qualifying process to encourage more competition. The governing body also enlisted celebrated pro trainer Freddie Roach, who has tutored several top American fighters as a special assistant. Hunter’s victory was particularly sweet for the American team. The son of a pro heavyweight failed to qualify for the Beijing Games four years ago, but stayed in the amateur ranks and worked toward London. He finally earned a spot with a 14-8 decision over Ecuador’s Julio Castillo. “It feels good,” Hunter said. “It’s anti-climactic, hasn’t really hit me yet. I’ll probably start crying pretty soon.” Breazeale is another remarkable success story for USA Boxing and All-American Heavyweights, the remarkable training program in Carson, Calif., dedicated to winning amateur titles by turning athletes from other sports into boxers. The 6-foot-6 fighter overcame a third-round deficit to earn his Olympic spot, beating Puerto Rico’s Gerardo Bisbal 15-12. “Going into the third round, I was down by two points, and I had to dig down deep. I was gassed, tired, and I had to dig deep into the heart, knuckle up. I knew I won, but I wasn’t sure if I won by a lot. When I heard that blue corner called, such a relief.”

“All I try to do,” O’Brien explained, “is be myself. Tell people what I think and how thrilled I was to be considered for the job. I knew it was a place that I felt like I was a good fit for. Because I believe in a lot of the same things that Penn Staters believe in. “Now that I’m here, it’s solidified in my mind that it’s a good match.” That’s an idea that he discussed with another coach on campus, Coquese Washington. The two sat down on a few occasions after O’Brien was hired to discuss coaching and life in general. Washington helped provide some important perspective, having come to Penn State in a similar situation. She took over the women’s basketball program from a long-tenured and successful coach who departed the school amid controversy in Rene Portland.

favored Tigers were ousted by a Penn State team led by former Towson coach Missy Doherty. Penn State (12-6) went up 5-1 in the first half, led 6-5 at the break and pulled away by scoring the first five goals of the second half. Dana Cahill had six saves, Theresa Zichelli scored twice

and Maggie McCormick had a goal and three assists for the Nittany Lions, who will next face top-seed Florida, who opened with a 16-4 win over Albany on Saturday. Kelly Custer, Andi Raymond and Ashley Waldron had two goals apiece for Towson (16-4) in the loss.

“I don’t think there’s any magic (guidelines) to coaching at Penn State,” Washington said. “Just being yourself and not feeling a need to be anything other than that. Being authentic to who you are. Believe in the program in an authentic way, a way that speaks to who he is as a man and who he is as a coach. “That’s the only way to do it. If you try to do it any other way, it’s probably not going to work.” So far, Washington said, O’Brien looks to be off to a good start. “He’s passionate. He’s definitely passionate about his team, about the program. And he’s a winner,” she said. “That winner’s mentality comes out in everything he does. He wants the best. He wants everything to be done at a high caliber, a high quality. And those are the hallmarks of strong leaders.” That seemed to carry over to this first spring practice with the Nittany Lions. Quarterback Matt McGloin laughed when he heard Rose’s story about O’Brien. That confidence is what he’s come to ex-

pect from his new coach. What he just discovered this spring, though, was that O’Brien is an effective teacher as well. “He just understands how to get something stuck into your brain,” McGloin said. “He understands how to teach it to you in ways I’ve never really seen before, which makes him special in coaching. “We’re going over reads that we’ve never learned before. The quarterbacks are calling the offense the way we’ve never ever done before. We’re impressed with ourselves, to be honest with you.” As O’Brien himself admits, however, none of that will matter if wins don’t follow on the field. It’s a point he has made sure too get across at each of his first 12 stops on this coaches caravan, which wraps up this week with six more. “He’s doing what you have to do as a young coach,” Rose said. “We’ll see if he gets Joe’s tenure if he’ll be doing the bus tour at 80 years old or not.” O’Brien shook his head and laughed. One season at a time.

JAMES Continued from Page 1C

ley told James during the ceremony. “Not just because of this, but because of what you mean to our organization.” James received 85 of a possible 121 first-place votes from a panel of sports writers and broadcasters who cover the league, as well as one collective fan vote on NBA.com. He finished with 1,074 points, topping Oklahoma City’s Kevin Durant (889 points, 24 first-place votes), the Los Angeles Clippers’ Chris Paul (385, six first-place votes), the Los Angeles Lakers’ Kobe Bryant (352, two first-place votes), and San Antonio’s Tony Parker (331, four first-place votes). James credited several of the league’s best players for being part of his inspiration to play at the highest level. “We do not take LeBron James for granted, not here in this organization,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. And he apparently does not take the organization for granted, either. James’ voice broke a couple of times as he spoke, and he confessed he was more nervous than he anticipated. James relayed a story about his reaction when the news broke publicly Friday night, telling family he was with at the time that “this is crazy.” “I see my two sons, I do what I do and I try to perform at the highest level every night, and a big part of the reason is those guys. I don’t want to let them down,” James said, pausing for a brief moment as he looked at fiancée Savannah Brinson and his sons. “Secondly, my teammates, like I said. The reason I’m up here today is because of those guys. If

AP PHOTO

Miami Heat’s LeBron James, right, chats with his son LeBron James Jr. after having accepted the NBA MVP trophy Saturday in Miami.

those guys don’t sacrifice what they sacrifice every single night ... I wouldn’t be up here.” Moments later, he asked the entire Heat roster to join him on the stage, and they huddled behind him. “These 14 guys right here, they give everything,” James said. “And they give me everything.” James averaged 27.1points, 7.9 rebounds and 6.2 assists — making him only the fourth player with those totals in at least two seasons, according to STATS LLC, joining Oscar Robertson

(five times), John Havlicek (twice) and Bird (twice). Add James’ 53 percent shooting and 1.9 steals per game into the mix, and the club gets even more exclusive. Only Jordan had a season with numbers exceeding what James did this season in those categories — 1988-89, when he averaged 32.5 points, eight rebounds, eight assists and 2.9 steals on 54 percent shooting. “It’s amazing to think about it in that sense — three in four years,” Heat guard Dwyane Wade said.


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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

MMA

Now for the main event, in this corner Cianci By TOM ROBINSON For the Times Leader

James Cianci is excited about reaching main event status for the first time in his Mixed Martial Arts career. Headlining Saturday night’s PA Cage Fight 12 at Genetti Manor in Dickson City, however, is more important in terms of what it could do for Cianci’s future in the sport. “I haven’t really thought too much about being a main event,” the 26-year-old from Clarks Summit said. “It is exciting to know that I’m headlining a fight; that I’ve gotten to that point. “But in terms of preparation and everything like that, I haven’t noticed a difference.” Cianci will take of Joel Roberts for the PA Cage Fight 135-pound championship. The fight will be the first of the year for Cianci, who suffered his first defeat by decision to unbeaten Jordan Parsons in December in Florida. Cianci is 3-1

PA CAGE FIGHT 12 WHEN: Saturday night, 7 p.m. Doors open at 6. WHERE: Genetti Manor, Dickson City PROMOTED BY: Northeast MMA MAIN EVENT: James Cianci vs. Joel Roberts for 135-pound PA Cage Fight championship CARD: 3 professional bouts and up to 11 amateur bouts TICKETS: Priced at $70, $50 and $35. Available at www.pacagefight.com.

with three stoppages as a professional after winning all three of his bouts as an amateur. He appeared – and won – on five of the first seven PA Cage Fight cards promoted by Northeast MMA. Roberts has won four straight bouts by first- or second-round submission to improve to 7-3 as a professional after going 4-1 in his amateur career. He fights for the Rat Pack from Palmerton. The four-bout winning streak, includes victories in Cage Fights

7 and 8 last year and a victory over Brylan Vanartsdalen in Bellator Fighting Championship 49. Roberts holds the PA Cage Fight championship belt from his wins over Scott Heckman and Bret Thomas last year in Scranton. Promoter Jonathan Kernis said Roberts’ earlier Bellator win means the winner of Saturday’s bout has a chance to land appearances on the Bellator series. “Being in a main event goes a long way in saying where I’ve come in terms of my success and the excitement my fights in the past have produced,” Cianci said. “I do think it makes me more marketable, especially down the road when I’m trying to make some moves and get into a bigger organization.” Cianci works part-time as a bartender to keep a steady income, but said his primary focus is on developing his MMA career. “I’m in the gym six days a

week; usually I’m trying to get a practice session in two times a day,” he said. “It’s not as many hours as a full-time job, but it’s as many as my body can physically take.” Cianci has some guidance in his pursuit. His training is done regularly at Northeastern Ju-Jitsu in Swoyersville where he works out with Jimy Hettes, who rose from the early Cage Fights to a 10-0 professional record that includes two victories in the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) series. “We’re a group of guys who are all good and determined,” Cianci said. “We all feed off each other. “Jimy’s definitely the ring leader. He’s the one who runs the practices and helps us out with our technique.” Cianci followed another of Hettes’ approaches in getting additional help from Sean Diggs of World Class Boxing in WilkesBarre.

“My boxing’s been developing basically every day since I became a professional fighter,” Cianci said. “After seeing what Sean did with Jimy’s stand-up, I figured he was the best guy in the area to work with for my striking.” Cianci and his team are part of a strong presence of Lackawanna and Luzerne County fighters on the local card. The other two professional fights have Adam Penberthy and Mike Bannon in action. The Milford fighters are familiar locally from previous appearances. Penberthy also wrestled at King’s College. Penberthy, who won three times as an amateur on Northeast-MMA sponsored cards, is 1-0 as a pro going into his bout against Julian Lane, an Ohio fighter who is 4-0 with a Bellator win to his credit. Bannon also has three prior PA Cage Fight wins, including one as a professional. He puts his

2-0 record on the line against veteran Jay Haas (10-9). The amateur card includes a debut by West Scranton teacher Brad Turi, a former wrestler at the school. Sean Olivieri and Brandon Dolan, a former Pittston Area wrestler, will represent Balance Combat of Old Forge. Scranton’s Paul McDonough is scheduled to go against Kristopher Gratalo, who is from Pittston, but fighting for Team Vicious from Williamsport. Jiovanni Donvito, from Simrell MMA, and Maiguel Machado, from Tattoo Brazillian Ju-Jitsu, are other Scranton fighters. Derek Smith from Olyphant will represent Northeast Karate. Ely Rojas, Keman Jackson, Luis Payano and Jeremiah Wells are part of the Hard Core team from Hazleton. Michael Zola, also from Hazleton, fights out of World Class Boxing. John Ortiz-Rivera is from Team Independent in Freeland.

TENNIS

PRO GOLF

Na takes a 1-shot lead at Players

Na said he is changing his swing and still struggles with balance, making it hard for him PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. to get comfortable over the ball. — Kevin Na didn’t feel comfortHe knows the world is watching, able about anything Saturday and he realizes it makes for except his name atop the leadpainful viewing from living erboard at The Players Chamrooms and behind the ropes. pionship. “I know it’s frustrating,” he Na rolled in a 15-foot birdie said. “It’s frustrating for me. I putt on the 18th hole for one of want to pull the trigger. ... It’s only three rounds without a getting better little by little. bogey on a tough day at the TPC Hopefully, it will go away by the Sawgrass. It gave him a 4-under end of the year.” 68 and a one-shot lead over Matt The first step is getting Kuchar as he goes after the through Sunday. richest prize on the PGA Tour Kuchar, who also challenged — a five-year exemption and a at the Masters, is getting by with spot in all the majors. control of his driver and his For all his practice swings and emotions. Even on a poor tee waggles, even purposely missing shot at the 14th, the worst Kuthe ball so he could start over, char could say was, “Oh, stinkNa pieced together a brilliant er!” What cost him more was a round free of bogeys. He finished ball sinking to the bottom of the with two birdies on the last pond at the 17th, though Kuchar three holes to build a one-shot can’t argue with his position in lead over Matt Kuchar, who hit the last group Sunday. into the water at the islandFowler still sees himself as an green 17th and had to settle for a underdog, even though he broke 69. through last week at Quail HolRickie Fowler, coming off his low to win in a playoff that infirst PGA Tour win last week at AP PHOTO cluded Rory McIlroy. The last Quail Hollow, was dynamic as ever as he shot up the leadKevin Na hits from the 12th tee during the third round of the Play- player to win consecutive weeks on tour was Woods in 2009. erboard. Fowler didn’t make a ers Championship at TPC Sawgrass on Saturday in Ponte Vedra Woods, Tom Kite in 1989 and bogey until the last hole but still Beach, Fla. Raymond Floyd in 1981 are the had the best score of the third only players to make that second pressure,” Na said. “I’ve won round with a 66 and was two hit a couple off line, they were straight win The Players Chambefore. I’ve been in situations shots behind. just hit dead flush. I just got pionship. Fowler figured no one like this. I’ve got to take everyHe is trying to become the nothing out of the round.” gave him much of a chance. thing I’ve learned and do my first player since David Duval in Kuchar went eight consecThat might change now. best.” 1997 to win his first two PGA utive holes without a par — six “I feel like I’m in kind of an He was at 12-under 204. Tour titles in consecutive weeks. birdies and two bogeys — to underdog position — maybe Na is considered among the Texas Open champion Ben seize control on a windy day at overlooked at the start of the Curtis also played bogey-free. Sawgrass. But he slightly missed slowest players in golf, and he was given a bad time on the 16th week, won last week, maybe a He just didn’t have as many on his tee shot at the par-3 17th little tired,” Fowler said. “I’m birdies, missing from inside 10 and never came close to land. He hole for being on the clock and ready to go. Like I said last taking too long to hit his shot. feet on his last two holes for a did well to hit his third shot week, it’s all about giving yourOne more bad time and he 70. He was five shots behind, from the drop area to 5 feet to self chances out here, and I gave would have become the first along with former Masters escape with bogey. myself a chance last week on champion Zach Johnson (73). “It was exciting,” Kuchar said. PGA Tour player in 20 years to Sunday and took advantage of it. be given a one-shot penalty. Tiger Woods never came close “A lot of birdies and a lot more Go out tomorrow, have some He was informed of his bad to getting into contention, bogeys than I normally make. fun, give it our best shot and see time walking to the 17th green though he gave himself plenty of But I knew today was going to and appealed because he said his where that puts us.” chances. The card shows two be a tricky day. I knew there Woods’ chances effectively birdies, two bogeys and a 72 that were going to be a lot of bogeys. caddie’s shadow was in the way. He lost the appeal. Na said he no ended just before the turn. He left him 10 shots out of the lead I knew there were dangers missed a 6-foot birdie on No. 6 longer was on the clock for the going into the final round. It was around every corner.” and three-putted No. 7 from 12 last two holes. On the 18th, he hard for him to digest. Na managed to avoid them, feet. He missed a 7-foot birdie “I played well today and didn’t and now tries to become the first drilled his tee shot into the fairway after only three waggles. putt on the par-3 eighth, and a get anything out of that round,” 54-hole leader to win The Play12-foot birdie putt on the par-5 Then, he backed off only once Woods said. “It was probably the ers Championship since the ninth. And then, he bogeyed the and hit his approach to 15 feet most solid I’ve hit the golf ball tournament moved to May. 10th. for his last birdie. all year, actually. Even though I “I know how to play under By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer

CYC L I N G

Tiralongo wins 7th stage; Hesjedal takes Giro lead The Associated Press

ROCCA DI CAMBIO, Italy — Paolo Tiralongo of Italy won the seventh stage of the Giro d’Italia on Saturday, while Ryder Hesjedal replaced Adriano Malori as the overall leader to become the first Canadian to wear the pink jersey. Tiralongo tussled with defending champion Michele

Scarponi in the final 600 yards of the steep climb to the line before finishing the 125-mile leg from Recanati to Rocca di Cambio in a time of 5 hours, 51 minutes, 3 with a final sprint. AP PHOTO Hesjedal will wear the pink jersey on Sunday after cross- Paolo Tiralongo of Italy celebrates on the podium after he won the ing the line in fifth place, just seventh stage of the Giro d’Italia from Recanati to Rocca di Cambio, Italy, on Saturday. behind Joaquim Rodriguez.

AP PHOTO

Roger Federer lunges to return a ball against Janko Tipsarevic during a Madrid Open tennis tournament semifinal match on Saturday in Madrid, Spain. Federer won in straight sets.

Federer ready for Madrid final Swiss star has a chance to move up in world ranking with win in championship. The Associated Press

MADRID — Roger Federer will play for his third Madrid Open title with a chance to take over the No. 2 spot in the world ranking after cruising past Janko Tipsarevic 6-2, 6-3 in the tournament semifinals on Saturday. The Swiss star and former No. 1 advanced to a finals matchup against Tomas Berdych, who edged Juan Martin del Potro 7-6 (5), 7-6 (6) in the other semifinal. A victory will push Federer ahead of Spain’s Rafael Nadal in the rankings. “It’s going to be a tough match,” said Federer. “Berdych is playing well himself. It’s quick conditions and he can be a big threat in the finals like that.” On the women’s side, Serena Williams will meet top-ranked Victoria Azarenka in the final after each won their semifinal matchups in straight sets. While both Rafael Nadal and top-ranked Novak Djokovic vowed to never again play on Madrid’s new blue-clay court after early exits, Federer’s more technical style has not been overly hampered by a surface many players have criticized as slippery. Federer, who won at Madrid in 2006 and 2009, shook off gusting winds in the late afternoon to hit 25 winners and eight aces en route to the easy victory. While dominating on serve, Federer moved Tipsarevic around the court with an expert mix of shots until breaking for a 3-1 lead with a low slice that the Serb hit into the net. Federer broke again to claim the first set by drawing an error from Tipsarevic with a fore-

hand that clipped the sideline. Tipsarevic, who had upset Djokovic on Friday, fell behind for good at 3-1 in the second set when he could barely graze Federer’s crosscourt return. Federer holds a 10-4 record against Berdych, but the Czech has won three of their last five meetings. “(Berdych) got me in big matches in my career in Wimbledon and at the Olympics. I got him back at the same places,” Federer said. “Still I remember those losses vividly. I think that we match up pretty well against each other because of the shot-making.” Sunday will be the 30-yearold Federer’s 104th final, where he will seek his 74th career title. Earlier, the sixth-seeded Berdych, who hadn’t won a set in his last three matches against Del Potro, scored 15 aces to overcome the Argentine’s skilled baseline game. “It was really just about one or two points that decided for my side,” said Berdych. “It was really close. We fought for every point and I am really happy to have gone through.” Williams beat Lucie Hradecka 7-6 (5), 6-0, while Azarenka ousted fourth-seeded Agnieszka Radwanska 6-2, 6-4. The ninth-seeded Williams will play for her second title of the season. Azarenka has won four tournaments so far. “Victoria has been so consistent in her game this year,” said Williams. “She is so consistent, so amazing and so, just nearly perfect. I am going to the final with nothing to lose.” Williams is 6-1 head-to-head against Azarenka, whose only win came in 2009. This will be the first time they meet on clay. “She’s one of the best players in the world and one of the toughest opponents to play against so we’ll see, but as I said it’s going to be a different story,” Azarenka said.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 9C

AT PLAY

Comet ready for Wilkes football From the Comets to the Colonels Another win for Newport squad

Crestwood’s Vinny Genoble has accepted an invitation to attend Wilkes University and compete on the football team. Pictured are (first row, from left): Karen Genoble (mother), Vinny Genoble. Second row: Christopher Gegaris (high school principal), Greg Myers (head football coach), Bonnie Gregory (assistant principal) and Tony Mozeleski (director of athletics).

Crestwood’s Roger Legg has accepted an invitation to attend Wilkes University and compete on the football team. Pictured are (first row, from left): Sherry Legg (mother), Roger Legg and Boomer Legg (father). Second row: Christopher Gegaris (high school principal), Darren Testa (former head wrestling coach), Greg Myers (head football coach), Bonnie Gregory (assistant principal) and Tony Mozeleski (director of athletics).

Newport sixth grade girls recently won the Wyoming Valley West Middle School Tournament. The girls posted a perfect 4-0 record defeating Valley West 28-21 in the title game. Team members (first row, left to right): Katie Butczynski, Miranda Bohn, Emily Spencer, Taylor Zabrenski and Leah Mullery. Second row: coach Jay Bohn, Morgan Bienkowski, Kasey Radginski, Codi Hornlein, Madelyn Grilz, Elizabeth Moore and coach Joe Batusik.

Golf tournament set to benefit autism awareness St. Jude basketball eighth graders recognized

The 2012 Lexus Autism Golf Classic Planning Committee met recently to recognize National Autism Awareness Month. The Allied Services Integrated Health System’s annual golf tournament will benefit the Pediatric Autism Program and services provided at Allied Services Heinz Rehab, along with funding for the Parents and Professionals collaboration to enhance socialization opportunities for autistic children and their families. The grand raffle prize on June 18 will be a trip for two to the Lexus Champions for Charity Golf threeday event at Pebble Beach, compliments of Lexus MotorWorld. More details at www.alliedservices.org Planning committee members seated left to right: Jim Brogna, Allied Services Foundation; Susan Yelen, representing major sponsor The Yelen Hazzouri Group at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney; Marilyn O’Boyle, representing Huntsville Golf Club and major sponsor The Maslow Family Foundation; Allison Maslow, representing major sponsor The Maslow Family Foundation; and Tina McCarthy, Allied Services and representing feature sponsor McCarthy Family. Standing, from left: Jim Partington, representing major sponsor Lexus MotorWorld; Michael Raymond, PhD, Heinz Rehab Hospital; Alex Rogers, representing feature sponsor Bedwick & Jones; Eric Wassel, Esq., representing feature sponsor O’Malley & Langan; Phil Straub, representing sponsor Hall, Mihalos & Straub; Mark Rowan, DPT, Heinz Rehab Hospital; Tom Bevevino; Jack Simpson, representing major sponsor Morgan Stanley Smith Barney; Leslie Fath, Heinz Rehab Hospital; and Jared Widman, representing major sponsor J.C. Widman Consulting.

St. Jude School recently honored the graduating eighth grade students in its basketball program. This year’s honorees were Patrick Ganter, Kayla Hons and Rachel Rinehimer. Before the start of the final home game of the season, Mrs. Jeanne Rossi, Principal of St. Jude School, announced the honorees and their families to the spectators. Students were presented with gifts to mark the occasion and parents were given flowers as a token of appreciation. A cake was enjoyed at the conclusion of the game. Pictured (first row, from left): Ellen Rinehimer, Rachel Rinehimer, Natasha Ganter, Patrick Ganter, Nicholas Ganter, Kayla Hons, Emily Hons and Lynn Hons. Second row: Bill Rinehimer, Jim Ganter and Brian Hons.

Sisters of Mercy golf tournament set for June

King’s golf tournament supports scholarship fund

The 2012 Swing for Mercy Golf Tournament sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy will take place on June 18 at the Wyoming Valley Country Club in Hanover Township. All funds raised will directly benefit an important ministry of the Sisters of Mercy: the Catherine McAuley Center. Each year, the tournament recognizes a woman who exemplifies the Mercy spirit of compassion and service through her own commitment to the mission of the Sisters of Mercy. The Swing for Mercy Golf Committee takes great pride in announcing Andrea Payne as the 2012 Mercy Woman of the Year. Andrea’s commitment to Mercy is reflected in her long and impressive legacy of service both as a professional and as a community volunteer. As a Mercy Associate and a volunteer at Mercy ministries, Andrea has followed the example of Catherine McAuley, bringing compassion and comfort to those in need. She participated in the organization of the early MOM walks for the benefit of the Catherine McAuley House, and since her retirement, she enjoys helping out at Mercy Center whenever she can. For more information on the 2012 Swing for Mercy Golf Tournament, please contact Jenny Blanchard, Director of Development, at # (570) 674-3218, or by email at jblanchard@mercymidatlantic.org. Pictured are members of the Swing for Mercy King’s College will host the 28th Annual Rev. Paul Farber, C.S.C. Memorial Golf TournaGolf Committee. First row, from left: Andrea Payne, Mercy Woman of the Year, Jenny Blanment on Friday, June 8, at Mill Race Golf and Camping Resort in Benton. All proceeds ben- chard, Director of Development, Sisters of Mercy. Second row: Sr. Therese Marques, Execefit the College’s Farber Memorial Scholarship Fund. The cost per golfer is $150 and inutive Director, Catherine McAuley Center, Jean Brennan, Deborah Mileski, Sr. Kathleen cludes greens fees, carts, refreshments and a post-tournament barbecue and awards cer- Smith, Assistant Director, Catherine McAuley Center; third row: Barbara O’Donnell, Sr. Sara emony. The tournament will begin at 11 a.m. with a shotgun start and will have a captain Sweeney, Mary O’Connor, Judy Ellis. Absent from photo: Mary Cummings, Sr. Jayne Pruitt, and crew format. Hole sponsorships are $100, flag sponsorships cost $250 and major Rosemary Sigmond, Roseann Tedesco. sponsorships begin at $500. Five golfers who are closest to the pin on the par-three holes will be given an opportunity to participate in a “Million Dollar Hole in One Shootout.” The Farber Tournament is the only local tournament to offer this feature. For information or to A T P L A Y P O L I C Y register, please contact Kim Cardone, director of annual giving programs at King’s College, have contact information as well to ensure pubThe Times Leader will accept photos, standat (570) 208-5900, ext. 5677 or email kimberlycardone@kings.edu. Pictured are Farber lication. ings and stories from readers about youth and Memorial Golf Tournament committee members (first row, from left): Mary Rosto; Jim Items will not be accepted over the teleadult recreation activities. We’re also encouragBone; Rose Marie Panzitta, chair of Gift Procurement; Kirk Borchert, Chair; Bill Vinsko, phone. They may be e-mailed to tlsports@timeing anyone in a league – darts, pool, Frisbee, Chair of the Century Club Executive Committee; and Kim Cardone. Second row: Herb God- etc. – to submit standings and results to us. sleader.com with “At Play” in the subject, faxed to 831-7319, dropped off at the Times Leader or E-mailed photos should be sent in a jpeg forfrey, Mary Wood, Tom Landon, Bill Runner, Kathie Daskalakes, Tom Zabresky, Jackie Zamat. Those that are not in a jpeg format might mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N. Main bresky, Brian Vinsko, Jackie Grant, Freddie Pettit and Bill Behm. not be published. All submitted items should

St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.


CMYK PAGE 10C

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

WVW senior heading to Wilkes

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THE TIMES LEADER

Spartan moving on to Albright

Wyoming Valley West football player Kyle Phillips has decided to continue playing at Wilkes University where he will pursue a degree in criminology. Front: Mark Phillips, father; Kyle Phillips and Joan Phillips, mother. Back: Sandy MacKWyoming Valley West football player P.J. Cwalina has deay, athletic director; Erin Keating, principal; Patrick Keating, cided to continue playing at Albright University where he football coach; and Christopher Lazor, assistant principal. will pursue a degree in biology. Front: Mary Jane Cwalina, Missing from photo: Luke and Sara, siblings mother; P.J. Cwalina and Peter Cwalina, father. Back: Sandy MacKay, athletic director; Erin Keating, principal; Patrick Keating, football coach; and Christopher Lazor, assistant principal. Missing from photo: Colleen, sister.

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Two milestones for Crestwood

Two Crestwood volleyball players reached milestones in their careers recently. Nick Banos had his 1,000th career assist and Jake Prohaska spiked his 500th kill. Coach Mike Williams presented each player with a commemorative volleyball to celebrate their achievements.

Travel team wins championship

Valley West athlete off to King’s

Local AAU squad takes second

Wyoming Valley West football player Dylan Flayhart has decided to continue playing at King’s College where he will pursue a degree in criminal justice. Front: Lorraine Flayhart, mother; Brylee Flayhart, sister; Dylan Flayhart and Chris Flayhart, father. Back: Sandy MacKay, athletic director; Erin Keating, principal; Patrick Keating, football coach; and Christopher Lazor, assistant principal. Missing from photo: Savannah Flayhart, sister.

The Wilkes-Barre Pens Midget Independent Travel team took the THL Midget championship recently against the Philly Revolution at Warwick Ice Rink with a 6-2 victory. The first goal of the game was scored by team captain J.J. Sherrill with the following goals from Brian O’Donnell, Jeremy Stach, and O’Donnell before Sherrill and Stach added empty-netters. Assists went to Joe Miscavage, Tom Zdipko, Brian Collins and two for Sherrill. Pictured (kneeling, from left): alternate captain Nick Cholewa, captain J.J. Sherrill, goalie Dale Cunningham, alternate captain Mike Madry, Zach Mangan. Standing: A.J. Popovich, Ryan Kozich, Nick The Northeast Alliance AAU volleyball team finished as Riley, Kyle Gifford, Brian O’Donnell, Tom Zdipko, Jason Krurunners up at the Millersville University AAU volleyball gel, Brian Collins, Jeremy Stach, Mike Wolsieffer, Liam tournament. Pictured are team members (first row, from McClurg and Joe Miscavage. Missing from photo: goalie left): Erin Muldoon, Heather Kramer, Ali Epstein, Sierra Hall. Gary Lukasiewicz, Head Coach John McClurg, assistant Second row: Sydney Spott, Amanda Hall, Sarah Warnagiris, coaches Mark Gifford and Joe Miscavage. Nicole Slavoski, Abby Bessoir and coach Darren Thorpe.

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Nanticoke football player Stephen Valenti will continue his academic and football careers at Ursinus. Pictured (first row, from left): brother Nick Valenti, father Robert Valenti, Stephen Valenti, mother Lynn Valenti. Second Row: head football coach Ron Bruza. Absent is sister Amanda Rhinehammer.

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Invasive algae Trout Unlimited is issuing an urgent call for a multi-agency, multi-state response to the threat posed by the recent discovery of didymo in the Delaware River. TU is also calling on anglers throughout the region to practice â&#x20AC;&#x153;clean anglingâ&#x20AC;? habits when fishing and boating in the Delaware River system. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disheartening to learn that, despite years of active stewardship and conservation efforts, didymo has managed to rear its head in a 100-mile stretch of the Delaware River,â&#x20AC;? said Roger Olsen, chair of Trout Unlimitedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Leadership Council Delaware River work group. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With this discovery, it is imperative that federal and state agencies promptly address this situation with a multi-state education campaign designed to raise public awareness about the detrimental impact that didymo can have on fish and wildlife, including potential long-term harm to the entire Delaware River ecosystem.â&#x20AC;? Extensive mats of didymo were found in a 100-mile stretch of the Delaware River, from an area near the confluence of the East and West branches of the Delaware River, near Hancock,

NY, downstream to the vicinity of the Dingmans Ferry Bridge, in Pennsylvania. Scientists from the Delaware River Basin Commission have also revealed studies showing that didymo extends much farther downstream. Didymo can grow into large mats of algae that attach to rocks and stream beds where it can alter the life cycle of a river by destroying habitat for aquatic insects (a significant source of food for trout), destroying spawning beds and impacting on oxygen levels in the water. By extension, didymo has the potential to significantly impact angling opportunity and success. Anglers, boaters and other river recreationalists can transmit the invasive algae on boats, waders and other gear. To help prevent the further spread of didymo, anglers need to ensure that this invasive species does not spread further in the Delaware watershed or to other rivers and drainages. TU urges its members and all recreational users of the Delaware River to follow the â&#x20AC;&#x153;inspect, clean, dryâ&#x20AC;? approach: First, before entering any rivers, anglers should inspect all equipment for any rocks, mud, plants, moss or other materials. Then, they should remove any visible material. Next, thoroughly clean equipment with water and a brush to remove any attached

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SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 11C Title 34 (Game and Wildlife Code) and Title 18 (Crimes Code). At least 34 charges were filed on each individual, including; unlawful killing or taking of big game (deer); unlawful devices and methods (use of a vehicle); having a loaded firearm in a vehicle; unlawful use of lights while hunting; shooting on or across highways; shooting within a safety zone; and conspiracy. If the maximum penalty is assessed on all charges, Zimmers and Hinman each face fines, court costs and restitutions in excess of $100,000, as well as 19 years in prison and 99 years of hunting license revocation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thanks to all the concerned citizens who took the extra time and effort to observe, call and get involved, otherwise they may still be out doing this and

getting away with it,â&#x20AC;? WCO Mee said. York County Resident Sentenced To Up To 10 Years In Prison Pennsylvania Game Commission Wildlife Conservation Officer (WCO) Darren David announced that Brian Dale Waugh, 39, of Dover, York County, recently was sentenced to a threeto 10-year prison sentence after being charged with various crimes stemming from a nighttime poaching incident off of Rife Road in Reading Township, Adams County, on Dec. 26. Waugh, who is a convicted felon not allowed to possess any firearm, was involved in shooting a deer from a motor vehicle using a rifle and spotlight, with two juveniles (ages 11 and 15) in See NEWS, Page 13C

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license, so local law enforcement agencies were made aware that the vehicle was wanted by Game Commission WCOs as a Poachers nabbed suspect vehicle in the deer Pennsylvania Game Commis- shootings,â&#x20AC;? said WCO Minnich. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Again, fate was on our side, as sion Wildlife Conservation Offithe suspects got the truck stuck cers (WCOs) Rodney P. Mee the next morning in a local park. and Rob Minnich recently filed The witness was called to identicharges on two Tioga County fy the vehicle and, when he was residents for a weekend poachthere, the suspect walked up to ing spree in which a total of us, thereby providing us with an eight whitetail deer were found opportunity to obtain a positive shot and left lay to rot. Beginning on Friday morning, identification.â&#x20AC;? WCOs Mee and Minnich Feb. 24, through Monday morning, Feb. 27, Zachary Ryan Zim- noted that this case was a waste of the resource, but more unmers, 21, and Michael Wayne Hinman, 24, both of Morris Run, settling was the total lack of concern for safety of others, as were out driving around, spotting and shooting deer and then deer were shot in front of homes, next to homes, across leaving them lay. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fortunately, witnesses called roadways and from the roadways. in descriptions of events and Zimmers and Hinman were vehicle used,â&#x20AC;? said WCO Mee. charged with multiple charges of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deer and evidence were found on scene which helped in locating the violators. The last known deer shot was an eightpoint buck.â&#x20AC;? This was the break the WCOs needed, as a passer-by saw Zimmers and Hinman stopped on the road and thought something was suspicious. The passer-by stopped, got good descriptions of the vehicle, license number and suspects, and saw the deer in the field with a fresh bullet hole in it. The witness then called the Game Commission. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The truck had an out-of-state

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OUTDOOR NEWS

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CMYK PAGE 12C

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

BULLETIN BOARD

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THE TIMES LEADER

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OUTDOORS Don’t touch young wildlife that appears abandoned

THE WESTERN POCONO CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED will hold its Memorial Day picnic on Monday, May 28 at the White Haven Sportsmen’s Club along the Lehigh River. The picnic will run from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and food and drinks will be available. A casting demonstration will be conducted by George Daniel – a certified FFF Fly Casting instructor who has also appeared on ESPN and OLN. Daniel was the head coach of Team USA in the 2011 World Fly Fishing Championship in Italy and eaned a gold medal at the 2008 U.S. National Fly Fishing Championship in Colorado. Autographed copies of his book, “Dynamic Nymphing” will be available for purchase. Fishing will be permitted after the demonstration. Tickets are $18 for adults, $12 for teens 13-17 and children under 12 are free. For more information, call chapter president Paul Raubertas at (570) 768-8409 or email praubert@ptd.net. THE STANLEY COOPER SR. CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED will host the Wyoming Valley Fly Tyers on Tuesday, May 15 at the VFW Anthracite Post 283 in Kingston. The adult fly fishing camp will be held on May 20 at the American Legion in Mountain Top. The cost is $25 for non-TU members and free to members. For more information call Jay Downs at 814-6998. This year’s youth fly fishing camp will be held on June 9 at the Sedesky property. Contact Joe Ackourey at 574-5956. For more information, visit www.sctu.org. THE GREATER WYOMING VALLEY AUDUBON SOCIETY is offering partial scholarships for area students to attend nature camp during the summer of 2012. Partial scholarships will be available at several sites this year. Applicants may choose to attend camp at the Bear Creek Camp Nature Center, Nescopeck State Park, or the Endless Mountains Nature Center. Applications are available by contacting 570-403-2006 or nescopecksp@state.pa.us Application deadline is May 31, 2012. Scholarship recipients will be notified by June 8, 2012. A limited number of scholarships will be awarded to each age level. Recipients will be responsible for their own transportation to and from camp, and for paying the remainder of the camp fee not covered by the scholarship. For more information call 570-4032006. LAKE WALLENPAUPACK is included in this year’s waterways participating in Cabela’s “Wanna Fish for a Millions?” contest. For a second year, the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) is partnering in this contest by tagging fish and selecting Pennsylvania waters where participants can be big winners. Most people have heard the phrase “you have to play to win.” Well, in addition to knowing the contest waters, Pennsylvania anglers need to have a fishing license to play. Your license will be your ticket to fish some of the Commonwealth’s best waters in the hopes of cashing-in on big winnings. While purchasing a fishing license guarantees you a gateway into the contest, PFBC underscores that regardless of the contest, a Pennsylvania fishing license is always a winner. In fact, it affords anglers the opportunity to unlock a year’s worth of fishing opportunities in all the Commonwealth’s fishing waters. Cabela’s started accepting registrations on its website on April 19. The contest began on May 5 and ends July 8. The premise is simple: catch specially tagged fish and win prizes ranging from Cabela’s gift cards to boats to $2 million. All rules and requirements, as well as contest details and registration information, can be found at Cabela’s contest website, www.cabelas.com/ fishformillions. In addition, PFBC will maintain its own contest web page at www.fishandboat.com/fishformillions.htm. Here, Pennsylvania anglers will be able to see the listing of contest waters along with photos of tagged fish. Bulletin Board items will not be accepted over the telephone. Items may be faxed to 831-7319, dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 18711-0250.

www.timesleader.com

TOM VENESKY OUTDOORS

On any waters, there is some life all its own

D

PGC PHOTO

Each spring the Game Commission receives numerous calls regarding fawns that have been abandoned. Sometimes the fawns are picked up by people and taken – an action that often results in a fatal ending for the fawn. PGC officials say fawns that appear abandoned usually are not. The mother is often nearby feeding.

Looks can be deceiving By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

The litter of red fox pups playfully jumped at each other outside of the entrance to their den. While they didn’t have a care in the world, their mother was nowhere to be found. But it didn’t mean the young foxes were abandoned. With a bunch of hungry mouths to feed, the female fox was out hunting prey to feed her litter. She would return. The appearance of young wildlife throughout the area is a certain sign of spring, and it’s also an indicator that the Pennsylvania Game Commission’s Northeast Region Office in Dallas will start to get calls about abandoned fawns, rabbits, birds and other newborn wildlife. But in most cases, the young animals haven’t been abandoned and human interference can sometimes bring about a fatal end. “We’re getting calls everyday,” said William Williams, education and information specialist for the PGC. “We’ll get calls about young wildlife from now until midJune.” Topping the list are fawns, Williams said. Does often leave their fawns while they go off to feed, and people often mistake them for being abandoned when in fact they are waiting for their mother to return. PGC biologist Kevin Wenner said an adult doe with fawns needs to feed often so it can produce milk. Leaving the fawn behind, he said, is a defense mechanism. “If she remained with her fawn it would attract predators,” Wenner said. “While the mother is away, the fawn stays motionless to avoid detection.” Williams said the bulk of the calls for supposed abandoned fawns occur during

Nesting season While the fawning season for deer has yet to peak, turkeys have begun the early stages of nesting, according to Wenner. Data from the PGC’s banded hen study – which allows the agency to track turkey hens with GPS, the nesting season is just beginning. The recent warm weather the area experienced had nothing to do with the timing of when hens nest, Wenner said. “Nesting is typically the result of a change in delight,” he said. “It’s called photoperiodism. The change in daylight initiates the pituitary gland to produce hormones. With hen turkeys that hormone is estrogen, and that prepares their oviduct for egg-laying.”

Who to contact Reach the Pennsylvania Game Commission’s Northeast Region Office at 675-1143.

the Memorial Day weekend. That’s when fawning season is at its peak, he said, and many people are outdoors. “That combination results in more encounters with fawns and more calls to the office,” Williams said. “Some people do try to take the fawn and nurse it, but usually the formula of milk they use isn’t correct and the fawn gets sick. That’s when they call us and by then it’s too late.” Williams strongly advised against handling any fawns. If you do encounter one simply leave it alone, the mother will return he said. In instances when it’s clear that the mother has been killed – such as a fawn standing next to a roadkilled deer, Williams said call the PGC region office. Aside from fawns, PGC Bureau of Wildlife director Cal Dubrock said young rabbits, birds and raccoons are the other species that people commonly encounter in the spring.

While it may appear that they are abandoned, Dubrock said that’s often not the case. In many instances Dubrock said wildlife rely on the “hider strategy,” which Wenner said is employed by does with their fawns. “While it may appear as if the adults are abandoning their young, in reality, this is just the animal using its natural instincts to protect its young,” DuBrock said. “Also, young animals often have camouflaging color patterns to avoid being detected by predators.” Handling young wildlife is a practice that can be dangerous to people as well. Williams said raccoons pose a rabies risk. If young raccoons are picked up and handled, he said, they will have to be euthanized and tested for rabies. “A lot of people don’t realize that, but by handling them they’re exposed to rabies,” Williams said. “We have to start the process for a rabies test, and that upsets them and it’s not something we want to do either. But it can all be avoided by just letting the young animals alone.” Raccoons are considered a high-risk rabies vector species under a working agreement with state health officials, meaning they must be euthanized and tested after human contact. Other species considered high-risk include skunks, foxes, bas, coyotes and groundhogs. Aside from the risks to wildlife and the health hazards posed to humans, there is also a legal element. Under state law, it is illegal to take or possess wildlife from the wild. The penalty for such a violation is a fine of up to $1,500 per animal. “In most cases with young wildlife, people end up doing more harm than good,” Wenner said. “If you find them, don’t touch or handle them and consult the agency.”

Spring is the peak season for newborn wildlife, and it’s also the time of year when people handle and even take home the animals they encounter, thinking they can lend a helping hand.

RICK KOVAL/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

ozens of ducks erupted from the marsh as I crept up to the edge. The area was flooded by a beaver dam two years ago, and the blueberry bushes and tall grass still thrived despite being half-submerged in water. Interspersed among the bushes were pockets of open water, and it was prime habitat for ducks and a multitude of other wildlife. As I knelt at the edge of the marsh and dipped my hand in to check the temperature, I thought about the vital role of water to wildlife. Anywhere there’s water – whether it’s a sprawling lake or a little vernal pool tucked in the forest, there is life. After the ducks quieted down, I gently eased my 10-foot johnboat into the marsh to see what other life this watery world had attracted. There was plenty. With an oar in hand I glided the boat along the calm surface of the water and was soon joined by several American toads, lazily swimming along. It was early April, so the toads were likely males searching for a suitable aquatic lair to begin calling females. The toads were also easy targets. As they kicked and glided across the surface next to the boat, I noticed bunches of small bluegills hovering below. When the toad would kick, the bluegills would dart up and nip at its toes. They would quickly drop back down when the toad floated motionless. It must have made for an annoying day on the water for the toads. With acres of flooded grass and blueberry bushes surrounding me, I decided to maneuver the boat into some of the secluded pockets to see what they held. The ducks – the ones I could identify were woods and mallards, coasted overhead as they returned to the edges where I had flushed them earlier. Hovering above the surface of the open pockets were a few dragonflies. They appeared to be common green darners, but it was impossible to get close enough to tell. The pockets of open water were connected by narrow channels through the thick blueberry bushes. There was just enough water for the little johnboat to glide from one pocket to the next. As I pushed deeper into the marsh I noticed feathers floating on the water. They were from a Canada goose, and as I turned the boat around the corner I came face to face with the source. A few feet away a female goose sprang up from her nest and eyed me suspiciously. I didn’t want to disturb the nest, but the momentum of the boat carried me alongside the goose, who reluctantly hopped in the water and swam a few feet away. The nest was positioned in a large clump of grass just above the water. Three large, white eggs were tucked in the bowl while a fourth – covered in mud, lay along the edge of the water. It had been there for some time, and perhaps the female goose somehow knew the eggs wasn’t any good and rolled it out of her nest. Not wanting to cause any more disturbance for the goose during this critical period, I sunk the oar into the shallow water and pushed the boat back the way I came. As I did, the goose eagerly swam back, stood on the shore and gave me a glaring look before concealing herself back on the nest. Back onto the open water, the wood ducks emitted a few high-pitched whistles from their backwater haunt while the female goose gave a few contented honks now that I had left. I dragged the boat back onto shore and took one last look at the watery world. The ducks had quieted down and life – in all its abundance, returned to normal in the marsh.

Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The Times Leader. Reach him at tvenesky@timesleader.com


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 13C

SOCCER

Red Bulls defender Wilman Conde arrested The Associated Press

FORT LEE, N.J. — New York Red Bulls defender Wilman Conde was arrested early Saturday morning and charged with aggravated assault on a police officer. The 29-year-old Conde was released on his own recognizance pending a hearing in Fort Lee Municipal Court later this month. According to the Fort Lee police report, the police were called to Conde’s apartment at 5:30 a.m. Saturday on a noise complaint. When police arrived, they heard loud music coming from the

NEWS Continued from Page 11C

the vehicle at the time. He also was in possession of marijuana. On April 2, Waugh entered into a plea agreement with the Adams County District Attorney’s office, after being incarcerated, since Jan. 4, at the Adams County Prison following a felony arrest warrant served by Game Commission WCOs.

apartment. As the police officers encountered Conde and the co-owner of the apartment, Fhanor Dominguez-Sanchez, they found the pair to be “very intoxicated and belligerent to the responding officers,” the report read. When one of the officers asked the identity of a female guest, Conde “became loud and got in the way of the officer.” Conde then allegedly pushed the officer repeatedly, causing his arrest. Conde, who joined the Red Bulls in January after gaining a release from Atlas in the Mexican

Premier Division, is a Colombian native who played four seasons with the Chicago Fire of MLS. The Red Bulls issued a statement Saturday: “We are aware of the situation and are in the process of gathering information. We have no further comment at this time.” Dominguez-Sanchez was issued a summons for excessive noise. Conde has played in only two of the Red Bulls’ 10 matches this season, due to a groin injury. He was not expected to play in Sunday’s game against the Philadelphia Union in Chester, Pa.

In the same incident, Todd Edgecomb, 38, of York, York County, was the driver of the vehicle that night, and has been charged jointly by the Game Commission and Reading Township Police Department with corruption of minors; driving under the influence of alcohol; possession of marijuana; unlawful use of lights while hunting; taking big game in closed season; hunting through the use of a motorized vehicle; loaded firearms in a vehicle; and spot-

lighting for wildlife after lawful hours. Edgecomb’s preliminary hearing still is pending. “I hope news of this will send a sobering message to other would-be poachers out there, especially those who would also involve alcohol, drugs, and worst of all – children,” WCO David said. “This type of activity not only represents a significant theft our precious wildlife resources and corruption of youth, but is a serious danger to all involved as well as the public.”

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CMYK PAGE 14C

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

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THE TIMES LEADER

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NATIONAL FORECAST Partly sunny, p.m. rain

WEDNESDAY Partly sunny, late rain

77° 55°

MONDAY Rain and clouds

THURSDAY Partly sunny

73° 52°

70° 55°

67° 54° FRIDAY Partly sunny

75° 50°

75° 50°

Syracuse 73/54

Pottsville 75/55

New York City 81/61 Reading 78/59

Harrisburg 78/58

Atlantic City 73/58

Temperatures

Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

Heating Degree Days*

76/40 69/46 87 in 1953 29 in 1907

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

7 67 4901 6122 6103

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was below 65 degrees.

The Finger Lakes

Highs: 68-76. Lows: 48-54. Chance of showers today. Chance of showers tonight.

Brandywine Valley

Delmarva/Ocean City

Highs: 70-80. Lows: 58-62. Partly cloudy skies today. Skies will become mostly cloudy tonight.

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

0.00” 1.58” 1.28” 9.49” 11.56”

Sun and Moon

Sunrise 5:47a 5:46a Moonrise Today 1:55a Tomorrow 2:23a

Sunset 8:14p 8:15p Moonset 1:29p 2:30p

Today Tomorrow

River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday. Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg Wilkes-Barre 6.42 -1.19 22.0 Towanda 3.80 -0.74 21.0 Lehigh Bethlehem 3.07 0.75 16.0 Delaware Port Jervis 4.15 -0.62 18.0 New

First

Full

Last

May 20 May 28 June 4

Forecasts, graphs and data ©2012

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

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607-729-1597

City

Yesterday

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

44/35/.00 75/63/.03 79/50/.00 79/50/.00 73/49/.00 73/50/.00 69/57/.03 75/48/.00 72/64/.11 54/37/.00 75/55/.00 83/68/.00 83/69/.10 75/54/.00 94/71/.00 65/60/.00 85/78/.00 69/56/.00 69/50/.00

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

54/43/.00 108/75/.00 75/59/.00 57/45/.00 61/41/.00 59/36/.00 59/48/.04 88/79/.00 81/63/.00 59/41/.00

June 11

Today Tomorrow 50/36/sh 74/62/t 79/64/t 78/55/c 68/50/sh 74/60/t 69/49/s 66/49/c 79/60/pc 62/43/t 66/48/pc 83/68/s 83/64/pc 72/54/pc 98/72/s 70/59/s 83/74/t 65/48/s 73/53/s

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75/55/.00 69/59/.02 83/71/.25 78/52/.00 71/59/.13 72/51/.00 85/64/.00 97/70/.00 71/44/.00 81/46/.00 79/59/.00 72/41/.00 81/63/.00 69/60/.00 65/48/.00 75/44/.00 90/70/.00 95/60/.00 78/52/.00

WORLD CITIES

Today Tomorrow 53/41/pc 105/77/s 78/57/s 55/39/pc 62/46/s 53/42/c 59/41/pc 87/80/pc 78/54/s 60/45/pc

63/53/pc 102/71/s 75/61/s 63/44/pc 63/48/pc 55/37/sh 64/44/pc 89/77/c 76/55/pc 61/44/sh

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

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Today Tomorrow 76/54/t 70/56/sh 55/45/c 64/42/s 78/66/sh 107/84/s 73/54/t 85/77/t 70/57/pc 59/33/c

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52/38/sh 77/62/t 73/60/sh 70/56/sh 70/48/sh 74/61/t 75/53/s 69/50/pc 78/61/pc 73/45/pc 74/52/s 84/69/s 83/65/pc 74/54/pc 97/72/s 68/60/s 85/73/t 73/53/s 79/55/s

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ALMANAC Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport

Precipitation

79/63

47/38

Highs: 78-79. Lows: 60-62. Chance of showers late today. Chance of showers tonight.

Philadelphia 81/62

69/49

79/60

85/68

The Jersey Shore

Wilkes-Barre 77/58

81/61

70/59

Highs: 74-80. Lows: 55-58. Chance of showers today, especially this afternoon. Chance of showers tonight.

Poughkeepsie 80/57

66/48

72/52

Highs: 70-78. Lows: 57-60. Increasing clouds late today. Chance of showers tonight.

Towanda 74/54

73/53

62/43

61/51

The Poconos

Binghamton 76/53

State College 75/53

80/45

TODAY’S SUMMARY

Albany 79/58

Scranton 74/58

80/49

75° 50°

REGIONAL FORECAST Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

SATURDAY Partly sunny, showers

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NATIONAL FORECAST: Wet and unsettled weather will be the rule across the eastern part of the country today due to the presence of low pressure systems. Showers will be possible in the Northeast and New England, while showers and thunderstorms will extend from the Mid-Atlantic states and Ohio Valley to the Deep South and Southeast.

TUESDAY Rain and clouds


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SECTION

timesleader.com

THE TIMES LEADER

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SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

New grads to enter harsher world By REBECCA D. O’BRIEN The Record

HACKENSACK, N.J. — Today’s college students will graduate into a labor market reshaped by the recession, in which deferred plans, tight budgets and adjusted expectations are the norm. Graduates — some shouldering tens of thousands of dollars of debt — will compete for jobs for which they feel overqualified and undercompensated, experts say. “You have to go above and beyond to make it in this economy,” said Merideth McGinley, 23, a senior at Ramapo

College of New Jersey who has yet to secure a job. “Yes, the economy is rising, but you have to kind of rise with it and continue to keep on moving. With the way things are now, you have to be flexible.” Flexibility, experts say, is the key; students will have to consider jobs in fields they might not have imagined and will need graduate degrees to pursue many careers. Nevertheless, Carl Van Horn, an employment policy expert at Rutgers University and co-author of a recent study on jobs for college graduates, said he sees reason for optimism.

“I believe what 2012 graduates should expect is better than the last couple of years,” he said. “Many will find it’s a path upward, but not an immediate reward. Eventually, they’re going to do fine, but they’re going to struggle, some of them.” Employers who responded to a National Association of Colleges and Employers survey said they expected to hire 10.2 percent more college graduates this year. Another survey showed a 4.5 percent increase in median salary for the 2012 graduates compared with See GRADS, Page 2D

MCT PHOTO

The Foxconn gym at the Foxconn Longhua campus in Shenzhen, China.

By JOHN BOUDREAU San Jose Mercury News

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Benco Dental district representative Marisa Pitts shows some of the apps she uses to illustrate products and place orders during sales calls. Pitts said her iPad has all but replaced her sales bag.

In touch with

TECHNOLOGY

More businesses, schools are utilizing iPads, mobile devices By MATT HUGHES

mhughes@timesleader.com

E

veryone’s tapping a touchscreen these days, it seems. Apple’s iPhone and other smartphones have become ubiquitous tools in business carried by everyone from executives to secretaries, but what about their supersize cousins? How far have the iPad and other tablet PCs penetrated corporate offices and classrooms in Northeastern Pennsylvania? Darlene J. Robbins, president of the Northeast Pennsylvania Manufacturers and Employers Association, said tablets have infiltrated company boardrooms, but have not yet proven as popular with middle managers. “iPads are being used at the higher management level,” she said. “I feel it’s more of a testing ground for them. If they feel it’s definitely worth the investment then I can see it trickling down throughout the company.”

SUBMITTED PHOTO/GLEN TELLIS

Undergraduate student clinician Marisa Irizarry of Peckville works with a client using an iPad during a speech therapy session at Misericordia University.

ness related work; however, from a corporate perspective, there are pilot programs in some areas to determine if iPads would provide better efficiency for their resources,” Robbins said. But some local companies are finding wider uses for the devices. Benco Dental has embraced the iPad at its Pittston headquarters and national operations as a tool to enhance worker productivity and boost sales. A poll of the company’s roughly 450 salespeople taken two months ago, prior to the release of the newest iteration of the tablet PC, found that 70 percent owned iPads and were using them at work, and the number would climb to 90 percent within six months, after the release of the new iPad, according to Terry Barrett, vice president of information technology

She polled the 37 executives on the group’s board about how they employ tablets in their businesses, and found that some are experimenting with the devices from the top down. “At the local level some have not started utilizing iPads for any busi- See DEVICES, Page 2D

See FOXCONN, Page 2D

Strike up some fun for mom this Mother’s Day HAPPY MOTHER’S Day. Plenty of local establishments are having brunches to fete dear Mom, but once those bellies are full, what can you do to keep the celebration going? Take her to Chacko’s Bowling in Wilkes-Barre where she’ll bowl free all day as long as her family is bowling with her. Need a last-minute gift? Head to Bath and Body Works today to get two free signature collection body care items regularly priced up to $34.50 each when you buy three more of equal or greater price. This offer runs through Thursday. You won’t get this in time for Mom to have in her hands today but if you forgot to get a gift, put a note on her

BUSINESS LOCAL

New thinking needed to draw better jobs

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Workers struggle for better future SHENZHEN, China — Wang Yu Ping, a member of the army of migrant workers who piece together everything from Apple iPhones to Hewlett-Packard laptops at factories spread throughout this country, isn’t happy with the world’s gaze on his life on a Foxconn assembly line. Under pressure from Apple Inc., labor activists and consumer groups, Foxconn recently vowed to improve working conditions at its vast network of factories. The world’s largest electronics manufacturer raised base pay to about $400 a month and slashed overtime work to no more than 18 hours a month. But for the assembly-line worker, that’s a problem. “It’s not good for us,” said Wang, a 30-year-old from central Hubei Province who has assembled iPhones and is now building casings for desktop computers. While the pay increase was welcome, the cut in overtime limits what he can take home each month. “I am working here for the money,” said Wang, his face tense and tired. “If I can’t make more money, I may not choose to work here.” As part of a campaign to highlight the efforts they’ve made to improve working conditions, Foxconn and its largest customer, Apple, invited journalists from the San Jose Mercury News to tour parts of Foxconn City, a sprawling campus for some 200,000 workers, and interview workers chosen by the companies. But the journalists also interviewed a dozen workers outside the factory, with no involvement by Foxconn or Apple. These workers offered a more nuanced view of work there. Most said there had been improvements, but they were still critical of aspects of how they were treated. Others appreciated the work as a path out of poverty and found little cause for complaints. While outsiders may recoil at the grueling work and long hours at Foxconn and similar factories, hundreds of thousands of Chinese like Wang see employment in them as key to their efforts to scramble up the eco-

RON BARTIZEK

for those who bring active duty or veterans ID. Wetzel’s Pretzels, Ben & Jerry’s, Hot Dog Hall of Fame, Johnny Rockets and STEALS & DEALS Betty & Joe’s Bakery & Coffee Maker are offering 10 percent off any purcard that says “gift on the way” and chase and Rustic Kitchen is offering 15 hurry up and order a free 8-by-10 canpercent off any food purchase. vas print (which is a $49.99 value). Everyone is getting on the frozen Shipping will cost $14.95. Go to: canvaspeople.com/canvas-discount to get beverage kick and McDonald’s, the fast food industry leader, is no excepstarted. tion. From Cherry Berry Chiller, FrapGet Mom a free dessert at Friendpé, Real Fruit Smoothie or Frozen ly’s. Print out this coupon good today Strawberry Lemonades, the Golden only to get her a free three-scoop Arch’s McCafe menu keeps expanding, sundae: static.green1020.com/ but so do the prices. Going here will FR/2012/FR_051012_Mothersday/ help: www.mcdonalds.com/us/en/ coupon.gif promotions/cherryberrychiller.html. Saturday is Armed Forces Day and Click on the $1 off get coupon link and to show appreciation for those who print out a coupon good off any size have fought and are now fighting for McCafe items. our country, some eateries at MoheIf you or someone you know uses gan Sun at Pocono Downs in Plains Township have some flag-waving deals Tena pads, this can really help keep

ANDREW M. SEDER

money in your purse. Go here and print a $1 off Tena products coupon and register to get a $7 off Tena pads coupon mailed to you: http://www.tenatwist.com/coupon-index.php I leave you this week with two magical words, one of which isn’t a word in the real world but in coupon universe is well understood: “Coupon tripler.” They can be found in the Price Chopper circular in today’s Times Leader. There are plenty of good coupons to use for this deal. Try starting with the $1 off two Heluva Good dips or cheeses that are on sale two for $4 and you’ll pay $1 for two of them. That’s a heluva good deal. Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. Follow him on Twitter @TLAndrewSeder

here’s good news in a recent Brookings Institution report — the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton region has a higher proportion of manufacturing jobs than most of the other top 100 markets. The bad news? While manufacturing work is seen as a bulwark of a comfortable middle class lifestyle, salaries here are near the bottom, 96th out of 100. The semi-good news in that? At $44,958, the local manufacturing wage is 22 percent above that for all jobs in the market. Many observers believe manufacturing is a foundation stone under a strong economy. The practice of turning raw materials into finished goods adds real value and as workers spend the higher wages justified by that process they support other businesses and their employees. But salaries are dependent on what kind of manufacturing you have, and ours tends to be low-value added and low-wage, according to local economic development types The Times Leader interviewed earlier this week. Hightech manufacturers pay much better and we have few of them; less than half the proportion found in other areas. The reasons for that are obvious. We’re paying the price for decades of reliance on coal mining and other lowwage industries imposed on the populace by companies that exploited an insecure and uneducated work force. They left behind a scarred landscape and communal psyche that still haunt us. Ugly culm banks, tumbledown patch towns and lagging academics are daily reminders to us and discouraging signals to modern employers. But that was then. Fortunately, even the most ruthless of today’s moguls seems mild-mannered by comparison. And even if they aren’t, regulation and public awareness — not to mention a vigilant media — make it hard to imagine the kind of devastation left behind by coal companies. So, how do we attract businesses that run clean operations and pay employees well? Not by continuing to market the region just as a low-cost destination for warehouses and call centers. That pitch may have worked — to some extent — in past years, but it’s unlikely to get a hearing among the technical or specialty business community. “Clean and green” employers, whether in manufacturing or social media, like their surroundings to fit their image, and that means finding a way to integrate them into the landscape. I’m not suggesting industrial zoning at Harveys Lake or an oil refinery in Mountain Top. But a careful review of our suburban and rural communities would turn up many sites suited to 21st Century commercial uses, some of them on land that has been underutilized for decades as farming has declined. Adding jobs to these places also would strengthen their tax bases and support local shops and services that now struggle, if they exist at all. This is easier said than done, of course. A lot of the people who live in suburban and rural communities like things the way they are. And there’s a justified distrust after decades of spot zoning — or no zoning — that plunked businesses too close to residential areas or turned a blind eye to polluters. We don’t want to do that again. So any expansion of business zones must be done carefully and with strict, enforceable protections for the environment and neighbors. But if we learn from our mistakes, and are willing to expand our thinking, we might come up with an approach that fits the times and benefits our communities and people.

Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor, may be reached at rbartizek@timesleader.com or 570-970-7157.


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PRUDENITAL POGGI & JONES, REALTORS Donna M. Czapracki, Wanamie, has joined the Forty Fort team. She is a 1994 graduate of Wyoming Valley West and she received her nursing assistant certification from the American Red Cross in 1997. Czapracki received her real estate license from the Pennsylvania Academy of Real Estate in 2008.

HONORS & AWARDS Kip Tutorow, a facility maintenance manager 1 at the State Correctional Institution at Retreat, received the Department of Corrections’ Outstanding Performance Tutorow Award in recognition for his performance during last September’s flooding. Dollar General, Wilkes-Barre, was named to the Governor’s Achievement Award for Employers Honor Roll for its successful use of the Employment, Advancement and Retention Network program and its Incentive Pantry, which provides goods for underprivileged families in the area. Marilyn A. Derolf, a certified public accountant, received a volunteer service award from the Northeastern Chapter of the Pennsylvania Institute of

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LUZERNE COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE FOUNDATION INC.

The Board of Directors has appointed new members for 2012: Dawn Guadino, owner and pharmacist, Cook’s Pharmacy; Nancy Lavan ‘78, customer service manager, Offset Paperback Manufacturing; Karen Natishan, second vice president/senior investment management

Certified Public Accountants (PICPA). Derolf received the award for outstanding Derolf service and demonstrated contributions to the chapter and the PICPA through active participation in volunteer opportunities. Michael and Kathleen Hirthler will be presented The Mary Bevevino Community Service Award, which Michael Hirthler was established in 2000 and honors a Luzerne County resident who has made a significant, positive impact in the area. It is The Kathleen Foundation’s Hirthler highest trib-

Webb

consultant, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney; and Dr. Philip Webb, chiropractor. The Times Leader publishes announcements of business promotions, hirings and other noteworthy events on Sundays. Photographs may be included as space allows. Submit an announcement by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com, by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711; or by fax to 829-5537.

ute reflecting the unwavering dedication, commitment and spirit of its namesake. Dan Naylor, sales associate with Mericle Commercial Real Estate Services, WilkesBarre, has been awarded the Certified Commercial InvestNaylor ment Member (CCIM) designation by the CCIM Institute. The CCIM designation is awarded to commercial real estate professionals upon successful completion of an advanced analytical curriculum and presentation of a portfolio of qualifying industry experience.

Submit announcements of business honors and awards to Business Awards by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 187110250; or by fax to (570) 829-5537. Photos in jpg format may be attached to email.

OFFICE COACH

Vacation-time strife is overblown By MARIE G. MCINTYRE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

A: While your disappointment is understandable, I do believe you are blowing this out of proportion. Because of the July Fourth holiday, the end of June and beginning of July are extremely popular vacation dates. These weeks are in such demand that some companies rotate their availability. By failing to make your selection within the required time period, you created an opening for someone else to claim a highly desirable slot. When Stacy received the calendar, she had every right to pick any week that was available. Given your previous conversation, she could easily have assumed that you had other plans in mind. Nevertheless, Stacy’s offer to retract her choice is a clear sign that repairing this relationship is more important to her than the vacation schedule. Therefore, the mature response on your part would be to thank her for her generous gesture, then have a nice, friendly chat about who needs this week the most.

Q: I am angry with one of my co-workers because she stole my vacation slot. In our office, employees select vacation dates based on seniority. A calendar is circulated, and everyone marks off the days they want. I get first pick because I’ve been here for 18 years, and I always choose the last week in June. A few weeks ago, “Stacy,” my co-worker, asked when I was planning to take vacation this year. I told her I hadn’t made up my mind, but that my husband seemed to prefer the end of June. When the sign-up sheet came around, we were told to pass it on within two days, but I kept it a little longer because my husband and I were still discussing our options. Before I could make my selection, our supervisor took the sign-up sheet off my desk and gave it to Stacy, who chose the last week in June. I am hurt and upset that Stacy did this behind my back. Now she says she won’t take that week if it’s going Q: You recently printed a letto make me mad. Do you think ter from a woman who resented her manager’s frequent requests I’m overreacting?

FOXCONN Continued from Page 1D

nomic ladder. The workers interviewed last month described an often highly regimented environment in which 10-minute breaks are closely monitored, long tedious lines clocking out are common, and frustrations about not making enough money are mounting. But Foxconn, also known as Hon Hai Precision, offers among the best conditions for employees among electronics manufacturers in China, and its jobs are highly desirable. Some also noted that Apple production lines are safer, and the company’s focus on quality sets its products apart from the others they work on.

Under pressure from Apple Inc., labor activists and consumer groups, Foxconn recently vowed to improve working conditions at its vast network of factories. Work conditions have improved in the past two years, they add. Still, the workers would like to see more improvements, including increased rest breaks, a reduction in the speed at which they must roll products off the line and higher pay. Apple and Foxconn’s commitments to significant changes in assembly-line working conditions — Foxconn em-

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BUSINESS AGENDA

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for information. When faced with a similar situation, I decided that I could use my boss’s desire for data to my own advantage. I began preparing a weekly activity report which summarized the problems encountered by my team and explained how we planned to resolve them. I also gave examples of our going “above and beyond” to keep customers satisfied. To ensure that my manager’s boss was aware of my contributions, I copied him on these emails. During my annual review, I was able to use information from the activity reports to justify my request for a pay increase. Instead of complaining, your letter-writer needs to realize that ongoing communication is just part of “managing your boss.” A: Your weekly activity summaries are a great example of the art of appropriate self-promotion. Thanks for sharing an instructive personal experience. Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace coach and the author of “Secrets to Winning at Office Politics.” Send in questions and get free coaching tips at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.

ploys 1.2 million Chinese — are sure to pressure other Chinese manufacturers to improve life for their workers, said Fan Zhong, a 29-year-old software engineer who left Foxconn in 2010. While some of the Foxconn workers interviewed remain concerned about dangerous work conditions, others said the company provided excellent opportunities, was good to them and even blamed the United States for using the controversy surrounding the treatment of its employees as a way to hold China back. “The Americans want to suppress China” by criticizing Foxconn, said Wang Jin Yan, a 25-year-old quality-control worker for Cisco Systems servers. “We are not a sweatshop. They are looking for an excuse to find China’s faults.”

LABOR & EMPLOYMENT LAW ISSUES: Tuesday, 9-10 a.m., Greater Hazleton Chamber office, 20 W. Broad St., Hazleton. Presented by attorneys from Rosenn Jenkins & Greenwald. Free, refreshments served. Reservations required; call 455-1509 or email jferry@hazletonchamber.org.

a.m., Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce, 20 W. Broad St., Hazleton. Learn how to prospect using today’s technology and other techniques. Chamber members $10, non-members $15, refreshments included. Reservations required; call 455-1509 or email jferry@hazletonchamber.org.

120TH ANNUAL DINNER & BUSINESS EXPO: Thursday, 5-9 p.m., Best Western Genetti Inn & Suites, Route 309, Hazleton. Business exposition includes hors d’ oeuvres and a cash bar. Dinner program will include presentation of the Greater Hazleton Chamber Athena Business Woman of the Year Award and Leadership Hazleton 2012 graduates. $65 per person; reservations required, call 4551509 or email jferry@hazletonchamber.org.

WILKES-BARRE CHAMBER NETWORKING MIXER: May 24, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Cork Restaurant, 463 Madison St., Wilkes-Barre. Free to chamber members and guests. Call 823-2101, ext. 125 for reservations.

PROSPECTING FOR NEW BUSINESS: May 22, 2012, 8:30-10

HAZLETON CHAMBER NETWORKING MIXER: May 30, 5-7 p.m., Capriotti’s Palazzo, One Banks Ave., McAdoo. Featuring a video on the Hazleton Area, “Hazleton a Land of Dreams,” which has been produced by Latino’s Media Group. Free for members, employees and guests. Complimentary hors d’

oeuvres and cash bar. Reservations required; call 455-1509, visit www.hazletonchamber.org or email jferry@hazletonchamber.org. RED CARPET BREAKFAST: May 31, 7:45-9 a.m., Sand Springs Country Club, 10 Club House Dr., Drums. Featuring members of the Luzerne County Council. Hazleton Chamber members $20; non-members $25. Reservations required; call 455-1509, visit www.hazletonchamber.org or email jferry@hazletonchamber.org. Send announcements of upcoming events by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to Business Agenda, Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 or by fax to 829-5537. Include a contact phone number and email address. The submission deadline is Wednesday for publication on Sunday.

GRADS Continued from Page 1D

the class of 2011. College students and experts recited a new educational maxim: An associate’s degree is often just an extension of high school; a bachelor’s degree is the new associate’s degree, and a master’s degree is the new bachelor’s degree. McGinley, a psychology major at Ramapo, said she knows she will have to go back to graduate school to secure a job in her field. “I should have thought it out better,” McGinley said. “I probably shouldn’t have been a psychology major. I love it, but when it comes to finding a job, I have to continue my education to find a job that’s really in the field I want to do.” A 2011Rutgers survey of 571recent college graduates showed that 62 percent felt they would need more education to succeed. Career counselors say students should expect to work many jobs throughout their lives, some in unexpected places. “We are in a new workplace contract,” said Debra Stark, assistant director of career development at Ramapo College. “Globalization and technology have just transformed this hierarchical

DEVICES Continued from Page 1D

MCT PHOTO

Christine Nicholson, a broadcast journalism student at the University of Texas at Arlington, works with professor Julian Rodriguez in the school’s newsroom. She has been preparing for graduation by interning at a local TV station and sending out resumes.

linear ladder.” Some of the growth in job availability is in areas that are not appealing to college students. Sales jobs, in particular, are in abundance. Companies like Sherwin Williams, Enterprise and WB Mason recruit heavily, but college graduates tend to want nothing to do with paint, cars and office supplies. “A lot of students don’t want sales jobs,” said Catherine Love, director of career development at Fairleigh Dickinson in Teaneck.

“I guess they don’t want to be out there selling; they don’t think that’s a worthy job to have. Students need to be more flexible than they were in the past and keep an open mind.” Above all, any job is better than no job. “I think people need to be more aware that having those gaps in a resume will hurt,” said Adrian Ailey, 26, a senior at Ramapo. “Don’t just sit around. It will really hurt you when you go looking for a job.”

“iPads are being used at the higher management level. I feel it’s more of a testing ground for them.”

sively in his speech pathology courses and labs. Misericordia students learn to help clients with a broad array of mental and physical disorders that have affected their speech and work with dozens of patients each week in clinical speech therapy sessions. Tellis’ students use iPads both in the classroom and with patients. An assortment of speech pathology apps has greatly expanded the tools available for use in therapy sessions and in some cases has replaced equipment costing tens of thousands of dollars with software costing less than $10. “Until the advent of the iPad and Android we had no control over it because it was hardware,” Tellis said. “Now because it’s software anybody can design an app and change it to do what they want it to do and that’s really exciting.” Apps can show a visual representation of a person’s speech to someone who has trouble modulating volume, read out loud for patients who have trouble controlling the speed of their speech or stutter, and run flashcard programs for nonverbal clients. But a tablet’s most useful feature is the ability to save data and display analytics on the fly, allowing clinicians to spend less time on paperwork and more time with patients. “On average a person who’s working in a school is seeing about 50 to 60 patients a week; in a hospital it’s eight or 10 a day,” Tellis said. “… now the computers calculate the data for you, so now I can spend a lot more time on my patients because the data collection is being done for me.” Tellis was quick to observe that the iPad and other tablet devices are only as useful as the hand that wields it. “We don’t really let them use the iPads until they’re in the clinical setting so that they know the fundamentals and the theory behind what they’re trying to do with the iPad,” Tellis said. “And if the iPad breaks they can still go back to using a pencil and a paper.”

for Benco. “For us, it’s all about making our sales force more productive,” Darlene J. Robbins Barrett said. “They tend to go out President of the Northeast and visit, in a day, 10 to 15 dental Pennsylvania Manufacturers and offices, so they’re constantly in Employers Association and out of their cars and they need to be able to have access to the information quickly. With a and keep track of their work laptop you’ve got to turn it on and schedule for the day more easily boot up; with the iPad you just than on a pocket-size device. Customers can sign receipts push a button and it’s on.” for orders on the device, and the Fast and easy company may purchase cardBenco has developed several swipe add-ons, allowing instant applications for sales reps and payment by credit card. customers to use, including a virtual store where product orders Useful in schools Portability and the speedy accan be placed during sales presentations. Sales reps also have a cess to information iPads can prolarge repository of product pages vide on the go also appeal to eduin PDF format and videos at their cators at Penn State Cooperative Extension, Luzerne County Exfingertips. Marisa Pitts, territory repre- tension Director Christine Orrsentative for Benco, said she son said. Extension staff spend a lot of bought her iPad about a year ago and it has since “almost totally time in the field hosting commueliminated a laptop and made my nity education classes and events. The university allows sales bag much lighter.” The device saves her time on them to buy tablets with program sales calls, and customers appre- fees if they can enhance programciate the speed and ease it brings ming, and many extensions educators have found ways to use to ordering. “I think that they love it be- them, Orrson said. “You may have somebody out cause I’m a distributor a dental distributor which means I deal in the field, our urban forester with hundreds of manufactur- looking at trees, and he may want ers,” Pitts said. “I can literally tap to access the extension website the app, tap the manufacturer, to identify a particular tree,” Orrtap their library and have a pic- son said. “This is basically taking ture of what they’re looking for in the technology that has been dea moment … So it just saves a lot veloped by Apple and using it to of time on every sales call. I don’t our advantage to help our clients have to write down what they get the best education that we want to order, then find a Panera can give them. “I think what you’re really lookand link into their wireless and send the order with my laptop.” ing at is what they call universal Recognizing the convenience access,” she added. “So that and enhanced productivity the whether you’re in the field or devices offer, Benco is preparing you’re in the office you can proto issue iPads to its 300 service vide people with the best infortechnicians as well, replacing the mation and research that we Blackberry devices those work- have.” The iPad also has exciting poers currently carry. The iPad’s larger screen en- tential for use in classroom and ables the technicians, who travel clinical settings, said Misericorbetween dental offices installing dia University professor Glen Teland repairing equipment, to view lis, who uses the devices exten-


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MarketPulse THAWING SALES Who doesn’t love good weather? Investors in makers of frozen pizza and other packaged foods. Sales for such products were weaker this winter than the year before, and Citi analyst David Driscoll says it’s because the weather was so mild. Record temperatures in the lower 48 states from January through March meant people went out for pizza, rather than heating a packaged one at home. But there’s good news for investors: April temperatures were more moderate, which means that sales for General Mills (GIS), Kellogg (K) and other packaged food makers may be returning to normal.

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STAYING BIG Bigger has been better when it Total returns comes to stock performance this including dividends Large-cap year. The Russell 1000 index of Small-cap large stocks returned 9.5 percent 40% in 2012 through Tuesday, including dividends. That compares with 30 a 7.5 percent return for the Rus20 sell 2000 index of small stocks. One reason is the difference in 10 performance between tech stocks: Large ones have returned 15 per- 0 cent this year, including a 17.5 percent rise for Microsoft. Small -10 tech stocks, meanwhile, have re-20 turned just 4.6 percent. If large stocks can keep it up, it will be the -30 second year in a row that large has been better than small. That hasn’t happened since 1998-99. ’98 ’99 ’00 ’01 ’02 ’03 ’04 ’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10

YET ANOTHER COST How much do you need to save Health care costs have been rising faster than Social Security benefits. to retire? To figure it out, many savers consider how much their housing will cost, or how many vacations they’d like to take a year. But don’t forget about Average annual Average annual increase for increase in retiree health care. A 65-year-old couple Social Security health care costs retiring this year will need an estimated $240,000 to cover mediSource: Fidelity cal costs throughout retirement, according to Fidelity Investments. That’s 4 percent more than last year’s estimate. And it means retiring solely on Social Security will be tough: A couple retiring after earning $75,000 annually should budget for 35 percent of their benefits going to health care.

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Where the yields are real InsiderQ&A

5 events to watch

Investors have grown accustomed to mixed signals from the economy and the stock market’s often quick reaction. The 6-day losing streak of the Dow Jones industrial average may lead investors to wonder what events could influence the direction of their portfoilios. May 23 Informal European summit The European debt crisis has dogged global stock markets for three years. Investor outlook could be swayed as the 27 leaders of the European Union nations meet to talk about economic growth and prepare for a job creation summit in June.

May 16 Housing starts Builders are laying plans to construct more homes in 2012 than at any other point in past 3 1/2 years. More jobs and a better outlook among buyers could also make 2012 the first year since 2008 that construction adds to the U.S. economy.

Steven Huber Who he is: Head of portfolio strategy for T. Rowe Price’s global multi-sector bond and other strategies What he suggests: Consider bonds from emerging markets.

A 10-year Treasury note yields about 1.85 percent. But consumer prices have risen 2.7 percent over the last year, and investors expect inflation to stay above 2 percent. That means investors are losing money on Treasurys after taking inflation into account. Bond experts call this a negative “real yield,” and it’s why Steven Huber suggests looking at bonds from Brazil, Mexico and other emerging markets. They have positive real yields. You think emerging markets offer bond investors the best opportunities? Yes. My timeframe is about a year or longer. In the shorter term, it’s really hard to handicap, given all the uncertainties and not knowing how Europe is going to play out. We’re pretty cautious about the next three to six months, and then that takes us into the “fiscal cliff” (scheduled tax increases and government spending cuts in the U.S. that investors fear could trigger another recession), and who knows what will happen then. But in the long term, high-yield and emerging economies will do better.

Interest rates keep dropping

June 30 End of “Operation Twist” The Federal Reserve is scheduled to wrap up its $400 billion program to lower long-term interest rates. The last time the Fed ended a major program — its second round of quantitative easing in June 2011 — the S&P 500 fell 14 percent in three months, in part on worries about a weakening economy.

InterestRates

Money market mutual funds

PRIME FED Taxable—national avg RATE FUNDS Selected Daily Govt Fund/Cl D FRIDAY 3.25 .13 Tax-exempt—national avg 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 Vanguard OH Tax-Exempt MMF 1 YR AGO 3.25 .13

June 1 Jobs report Hiring was strong during the winter, when employers added an average of 252,300 jobs from December through February. But the job market has since stalled, and payrolls have grown by an average of just 134,500 jobs the last two months. The slowdown echoes 2010 and 2011, raising concern that this recovery may not last.

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-3.6

10

0.1

1 10.2

21

2.6

Cigna Corp

CI

38.79 5

52.95

45.11

-0.15

-0.3

t

s

Why is that? Emerging economies are much better positioned because they went through the pain in the ’80s and ’90s, and they have much lower debt levels and better growth prospects. In the U.S., real rates are negative. In Brazil and Mexico, you have positive real rates of 2 or 3 percent.

CocaCola

KO

63.34 0

77.82

77.47

0.47

0.6

s

s 10.7 +17.93

Comcast Corp A

CMCSA 19.19 9

30.88

29.38

-0.07

-0.2

t

s 23.9 +17.13

1

3.2

18

2.2

Community Bk Sys

CBU

21.67 8

29.47

27.38

-0.14

-0.5

t

t

1

8.6

13

3.8

Community Hlth Sys

CYH

14.61 5

31.55

22.95

-1.10

-4.6

s

s 31.5—22.78 4

-9.3

9

...

Energy Transfer Eqty

ETE

30.78 6

47.34

40.35

-0.24

-0.6

s

t

5.0

23

6.2

Entercom Comm

ETM

4.61 2

10.50

5.36

-0.36

-6.3

t

t -12.8—41.36 4 -23.4

Fairchild Semicond

FCS

10.25 4

20.58

13.41

0.10

0.8

t

t

You like corporate bonds from emerging markets. Isn’t that market very small? It was, but it’s grown. Emerging corporates are now about as large as the global high-yield market, about $1 trillion, if you include both high-yield and investment-grade bonds from emerging markets. We’re seeing pretty strong growth, and we think that’s going to continue. Are most emerging market bonds still issued in U.S. dollars? Most of it is still issued in dollars, but eventually that will change. In emerging markets, the countries that have had a pretty low credit quality and were pretty new to the market started off issuing sovereign debt in dollars. Then as their credit quality increased — and a lot of countries are now investment-grade or close to it like Brazil, Mexico and even Russia — once they graduate to investmentgrade there’s more stability in the economy, and they’re able to issue more corporate bonds and the local markets become more attractive. Most U.S. investors don’t think about in currency valuations can affect their bond portfolios. Isn’t the exchange rate risk a big scary thing? It probably is. It’s always a good idea that when you’re talking about higher risk sectors, of which emerging markets is, that if you have it, have it as part of a diversified strategy. Answers edited for content and clarity. AP

Frontier Comm

FTR

Genpact Ltd

G

Harte Hanks Inc

-1.5 +16.73 -0.6 +4.51

2

11.4—32.58 4

-6.4

7

...

16

...

3.06 1

8.97

3.47

-0.42 -10.8

t

t -32.6—51.89 5 -12.5

20 11.5

13.37 7

18.16

16.47

-0.05

-0.3

s

s 10.2 —4.58

3 17.4a

21

1.1

HHS

7.00 5

10.24

8.47

0.30

3.7

s

t

-6.8 —.17

2 -17.4

12

4.0

Heinz

HNZ

48.17 0

55.00

54.82

1.51

2.8

s

s

1.4 +10.11

2

6.7

18

3.5

Hershey Company

HSY

53.77 0

68.85

68.46

1.57

2.3

s

s 10.8 +24.27

1

7.3

24

2.2

Kraft Foods

KFT

31.88 9

39.99

39.04

-0.21

-0.5

s

s

4.5 +17.30

1

6.6

20

3.0

Lowes Cos

LOW

18.07 9

32.29

29.62

-1.47

-4.7

t

s 16.7 +16.35

1

0.5

21

1.9

M&T Bank

MTB

66.40 8

90.00

84.80

-0.76

-0.9

s

s

11.1

2

-2.5

14

3.3

McDonalds Corp

MCD

79.08 6 102.22

91.90

-3.97

-4.1

t

t

-8.4 +18.88

1 15.2

17

3.0

NBT Bncp

NBTB

17.05 5

24.10

20.42

0.34

1.7

t

t

-7.7 —3.41

3

1.2

12

3.9

Nexstar Bdcstg Grp

NXST

5.53 3

10.28

6.90

0.12

1.8

t

t -12.0—10.97 3 -10.0

...

...

PNC Financial

PNC

42.70 0

67.89

65.48

0.22

0.3

s

s 13.5 +5.50

2

-0.6

12

2.4

PPL Corp

PPL

25.00 5

30.27

27.52

0.17

0.6

s

t

2

-5.6

10

5.2

Penna REIT

PEI

6.50 8

17.34

14.23

-0.21

-1.5

t

s 36.3 —7.20

3 -14.5

...

4.2

PepsiCo

PEP

58.50 7

71.89

66.80

0.90

1.4

s

s

2

2.5

17

3.2

Philip Morris Intl

PM

60.45 9

91.05

86.15

-2.98

-3.3

t

s

1 32.3a

17

3.6

Procter & Gamble

PG

57.56 6

67.95

63.68

-0.60

-0.9

t

t

2

16

3.5

Prudential Fncl

PRU

42.45 4

65.30

51.51

-1.38

-2.6

t

t

2.8—17.04 3 -11.2

6

2.8

SLM Corp

SLM

10.91 5

17.11

13.70

-0.18

-1.3

t

t

2.2—13.77 3 -23.6

13

3.6

SLM Corp flt pfB

SLMBP 39.00 4

60.00

46.01

-0.19

-0.4

t

t 18.0

...

0.0

TJX Cos

TJX

24.60 0

42.76

41.25

-0.37

-0.9

s

s 27.8 +56.29

1 24.9

21

1.1

UGI Corp

UGI

24.07 6

33.12

29.30

0.27

0.9

s

s

-0.3 —5.83

3

3.2

17

3.7

Verizon Comm

VZ

32.28 0

40.84

41.16

0.90

2.2

s

s

2.6 +15.80

1

5.4

44

4.9

WalMart Strs

WMT

48.31 8

62.63

59.42

1.12

1.9

t

t

-0.6 +10.47

2

6.5

13

2.7

Weis Mkts

WMK

36.52 0

45.52

44.99

0.86

1.9

s

s 12.6 +15.84

1

4.1

16

2.7

+.29

-6.5 +4.10 0.7 —1.91 9.8 +30.70 -4.5

-.16

3.4

... 10.1

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).

What’s safe

When markets are shaky, investors tend to run toward government bonds because they’re considered safe investments. But some companies should get consideration as well, financial analysts say. Consider McDonald’s (MCD). Investors see the world’s largest hamburger chain as less of a default risk than several of the largest economies, according to Credit Suisse analysts. They measured that sentiment by looking at credit default swaps, which are essentially forms of Data through May 9

Source: FactSet

FRIDAY YIELD

1WK

0.08 0.19 0.14 0.26 0.75

0.01 -0.01 0.01 0.00 -0.04

r r s t t

t 0.07 s 0.01 s 0.08 t -0.28 t -1.13

0.12 0.25 0.15 0.56 1.89

0.07 0.01 0.16 0.71

10-year T-Note 1.84 30-year T-Bond 3.01 Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.

-0.04 -0.06

t t

t -1.39 t -1.34

3.23 4.40

1.72 2.72

t t t t t t

WK CHG

American Funds BalA m ABALX American Funds BondA m ABNDX American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX Dodge & Cox Income DODIX Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX Fidelity Contra FCNTX Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg FUSVX FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX Permanent Portfolio PRPFX T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX Vanguard 500Inv VFINX Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX Vanguard TotIntl d VGTSX Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX Vanguard Welltn VWELX Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX Vanguard WndsIIAdm VWNAX Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX Wells Fargo AstAlllcA f EAAFX

19.27 12.76 50.98 34.23 37.57 37.85 31.64 17.27 28.98 28.62 29.78 18.85 18.95 13.70 30.47 109.27 74.99 92.08 38.83 48.07 2.14 2.16 19.67 12.88 12.84 56.77 28.49 12.07 10.47 11.25 11.25 11.25 11.25 47.26 24.58 36.43 6.77 57.83 9.79 125.00 124.98 11.05 124.19 124.20 30.67 14.29 10.77 13.00 11.07 11.07 13.65 33.89 33.89 33.88 57.26 32.85 56.73 49.40 27.83 12.27

-.18 -.01 -.27 -.45 -.79 -.41 -.32 -.09 -.31 -.42 -.34 -.23 -.23 -.01 -.72 -1.09 -.83 -1.75 -.51 -.51 -.01 -.01 -.20 -.16 -.16 -1.33 -.13 -.11 -.02 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.76 -.23 -.53 -.02 -.37 -.01 -1.34 -1.35 -.03 -1.33 -1.33 -.29 +.04

-0.80 -1.07 -0.46 -0.97 0.37 -1.04

2.89 5.16 4.03 5.47 10.15 2.07

-.12 -.34 -.32 -.32 -.32 -.22 -.22 -.39 -.62 -.35 -.13

4WK

2.04 3.72 3.25 4.46 6.61 0.93

52-WK HIGH LOW

RETURN/RANK 1YR 5YR

-.1 +.9 +1.0 -.5 -1.7 -.8 -1.1 +.7 -.4 -1.2 +.4 -1.8 -1.7 +.9 -2.5 -.8 -1.9 -3.8 -1.5 -1.0 +1.0 +1.0 -.5 -.5 -.6 -1.6 +.1 +.4 +.5 +1.0 +1.0 +1.0 +1.0 -1.5 -.4 -2.6 +1.8 -.1 +.9 -1.0 -1.0 +.2 -1.0 -1.0 -.8 +1.2 +.4 -.8 +.9 +.9 -2.9 -.8 -.8 -.8 +.8 +.2 +.2 -.6 -.6 -1.2

+4.3/A +6.6/B +1.4/A -7.2/C -12.1/B -1.7/D -1.0/D +2.5/B -.1/C -4.0/B +4.4/A -4.1/C -3.8/C +5.8/D -16.5/C -4.5/D +5.5/A +3.9/B -1.1/A +3.0/A +.3/E -.2/E -11.1/A -1.4/E -1.1/E -9.7/A +.2/C +2.8/ +2.4/ +5.6/ +5.7/ +6.0/ +5.7/ -.2/E -.1/B +6.8/A +4.3/C -1.3/B +6.2/C +3.0/A +2.9/A +6.3/B +3.1/A +3.1/A +2.0/B +9.7/B +2.5/B -.1/A +7.3/A +7.3/A -14.6/C +1.9/B +1.9/B +1.8/B +8.1/A +3.4/A +3.5/A +2.1/A +2.0/A -.7/B

+2.7/B +3.6/E +.4/C -1.3/B -1.8/A +.1/B /D +1.2/C -.7/C +.9/A -.3/A +3.1/B +3.4/A +6.7/B -4.4/A -3.9/D +3.4/A +5.4/A +2.1/B /B +2.2/D +1.8/E -2.2/A +9.1/A +9.4/A -1.2/A +4.0/A +6.1/ +5.5/ +8.3/ +8.5/ +8.8/ +8.4/ +7.8/A -1.1/B +2.4/B +6.9/B +5.0/A +6.7/B +.1/B /B +6.8/A +.1/B +.1/B +.6/A +5.4/B +4.4/B +1.2/A +6.4/B +6.5/B -4.4/B +.6/A +.6/A +.5/A +6.1/A +3.4/A +3.4/A -1.5/B -1.5/B +2.0/B

Rank: Fund’s letter grade compared with others in the same performance group; an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.

52-WEEK LOW HIGH

P/E RATIO DIVIDEND LAST 12 MONTHS YIELD

TICKER

CLOSE

ConocoPhillips

COP

$53.47

$44.71

$61.08

Eli Lilly

LLY

41.30

33.75

42.03

Duke Energy

DUK

21.60

16.87

22.12

4.6

17

Sysco

SYY

27.72

25.09

32.72

3.9

14

COMPANY

52-WK HIGH LOW

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

FRIDAY NAV

StockScreener

insurance on bonds. At the same time, McDonald’s has a relatively high dividend yield of 3 percent. That compares with a 2.1 percent average yield for the S&P 500 index and a 1.9 percent yield on the 10-year Treasury note. This screen from Credit Suisse shows other U.S. stocks where investors see a lower risk of default than for the G7 group of large industrialized nations. These stocks also all have relatively high dividend yields.

t t t t t t

TICKER

GROUP, FUND

APD

-0.19

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

MutualFunds

Stan Choe; J. Paschke • AP

Amer Water Works

7.55

-0.01 -0.06 0.00 -0.04 0.06 -0.02

3-month T-Bill 1-year T-Bill 6-month T-Bill 2-year T-Note 5-year T-Note

Air Products

12.43

0.01 0.11 $ 3,000 min (800) 662-7447

2.06 3.89 3.28 4.46 7.02 1.01

TREASURYS

52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN RANK %RTN LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD

4.92 4

0.01 0.20 $ 10,000 min (800) 243-1575

1WK

Broad market Lehman Triple-A corporate Moody’s Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman Municipal Bond Buyer U.S. high yield Barclays Treasury Barclays

LocalStocks COMPANY

MIN INVEST PHONE

YIELD

FRIDAY YIELD

U.S. BOND INDEXES

November 6 Election Day Unless Congress acts by Dec. 31, a host of tax hikes — including taxes on income, payroll and capital gains — will hit millions of Americans in 2013. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke has said the resulting “fiscal cliff” would be so severe that the Fed wouldn’t be able to offset its effect on the economy.

Sources: FactSet; Federal Reserve

The average rate on the 30-year fixed mortgage fell to a record low again last week, to 3.83 percent from 3.84 percent. It’s the second week in a row the rate has dropped to a record, and the third time since February. Mortgage and other interest rates have followed Treasury yields downward. The yield on the 10-year Treasury is below 1.9 percent, compared with 3.2 percent a year ago.

4.9% 4.7

q

Dow industrials

-1.7% WEEKLY

6 11

Kimberly-Clark

KMB

79.54

61.00

79.93

3.7

19

H.J. Heinz

HNZ

53.94

48.17

55.00

3.5

18

Procter & Gamble

PG

63.67

57.56

67.95

3.5

20

Chevron

CVX

101.78

86.68

112.28

3.5

8

Intel

INTC

27.19

19.16

29.27

3.1

12

McDonald’s

MCD

91.93

79.11

102.22

3.0

17

United Parcel Service

UPS

76.58

60.74

81.79

3.0

19

Marsh & McLennan

MMC

33.36

25.29

34.68

2.6

19

q q q

Nasdaq

-0.8% WEEKLY

LARGE-CAP

S&P 500

-1.2% WEEKLY

SMALL-CAP

Russell 2000

-0.2% WEEKLY

q p q p q p q p

-0.2%

MO +4.9%

YTD -2.6%

MO +12.6%

YTD -1.2%

MO +7.6%

YTD

-0.8%

MO +6.6%

YTD


CMYK PAGE 4D

â&#x17E;&#x203A;

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

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has shrunk the wealth of many INVESTORS 4HE TERM hTECH STOCKSv isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t too meaningful these days. )TS BEST TO SIMPLY EVALUATE EACH company and industry on its own merits. *** 7HEN ) SELL A STOCK WHAT TAX RATE WILL ) PAY Â&#x2C6; N.P., Kansas City, Mo. 2IGHT NOW FOR MOST PEOPLE the capital gains tax rate is 15 percent for stocks held for MORE THAN A YEAR 3HORT TERM gains, from stocks held a year or less, are taxed at your ordinary income tax rate, which can be as HIGH AS  PERCENT 0ATIENCE CAN BE PROFITABLE FOR STOCK INVESTORS .OTE THAT THE RATE CAN CHANGE IN THE FUTURE AND SOME ARE SUG gesting that it should be raised to GENERATE MORE REVENUE

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The Motley Fool

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THE TIMES LEADER

SECTION

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

COMMENTARY

COMMENTARY

LEONARD PITTS JR.

KATHLEEN PARKER

After paying ‘debt to society,’ then what?

U.S. obesity: Eating our way to harm

I PROMISED Russell I would ask you something. We met last week in a medium-security correctional facility. There, I spent a couple hours talking with a group of men who are studying for their GEDs. I stressed to them the need for long-term goals, the criticality of education in an era where good-paying, lowskill jobs are going away and the importance of refusing to allow oneself to be defined by whatever box of race or class society has placed you in. It was toward the end that Russell asked a question whose exact wording I can’t recall, but whose gist was a simple challenge: What are you going to do to help me when I get out? He meant me, personally. And he meant you, personally. Perhaps the question makes you indignant. This would not surprise me. A generation of conservative “reform” on issues of criminal justice has encouraged many of us to believe the only thing we “owe” those who break the law is punishment, followed by punishment, along with punishment and then punishment. It is a seductive line of reasoning. Who among us is not made furious by those men and women who break and enter and steal and damage and violate and maim and kill and thereby rob us of the right to feel secure in our own persons? Small wonder, then, that harsh, endless punishment has come to seem such an absolute good that politicians of both the right and the left stumble all over themselves to prove they are “tough on crime.” And none of them dare speak a word about rehabilitation, for mortal fear of being declared that hated other thing: “soft” on crime. Thus, you get mandatory sentencing guidelines that give a man 25 years for stealing a slice of pizza or kicking down a door. Thus, you get Joe Arpaio, the cartoonish Arizona sheriff, feeding his prisoners moldy bologna and rotten fruit and housing them in tents where the temperature reaches 140 degrees. Thus, you get Troy Davis executed despite substantive doubts about his guilt. Maybe such things leave you feeling righteous and tough. They should actually leave you feeling concerned, if not from moral questions, then from pragmatic ones. America is now the greatest jailer on earth. Prison overcrowding is a growing problem; we literally cannot build facilities fast enough. As CBS News recently reported, the United States has less than 5 percent of the world’s population, but about 25 percent of its prisoners. As CNN recently reported, at 760 prisoners per 100,000 citizens, the U.S. jails its people at a rate seven to 10 times higher than most any other developed nation. Either Americans are much more crime prone than, say, the Japanese or the British or this “reform” is insane. Worse, in a system of punishment followed by punishment, the insanity does not end with locking up our citizens in obscene numbers. No, after we set them “free,” we deny them re-entry into the mainstream of society with laws barring them from jobs, housing, loans, voting, schooling. How can you fix your life – why even try? — if you are denied the reward that should follow, i.e., the dignity of full citizenship? We close doors of advancement and opportunity to exfelons, then wonder why so many end up walking back through the door to prison. Once upon a time, there was an ideal which held that once a person had paid his “debt to society,” he was owed a second chance. That seems to have gone the way of vinyl albums and 69cent gas. But our new ideal — punishment and then punishment — is short-sighted and unsustainable. Maybe you find Russell’s question impertinent. Actually, it could not be more pertinent. What are we going to do to help him when he gets out? It would be good if we had an answer for him. We might not like the answer he finds for himself. Leonard Pitts Jr., winner of the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for commentary, is a columnist for the Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, FL 33132. Readers may write to him via email at lpitts@miamiherald.com.

MONA REEDER/DALLAS MORNING NEWS/MCT PHOTOS

Olga Ausburne, left, is working hard to get on a better path and out of homelessness. She’s taking classes, going to AA meetings, has been living in the dormitory at The Bridge in Dallas, Texas, taking advantage of the programs available. But her husband, Teddy Dean Wise remains content to live the homeless lifestyle. Here, the couple poses for a portrait.

HARD-TO-REACH

HOMELESS

often victims By CHRISTINA ROSALES The Dallas Morning News

D

ALLAS — They live in fields and under highways. They may show up at a shelter or soup kitchen for a hot meal. But offer them a way off the streets, and many of these men and women prefer the independence of homelessness. These people, experts say, are the hardest to reach and need the most help. Almost all of them suffer from severe medical or mental problems, or both. They’re often addicted to drugs and alcohol.

Tommy Robinson is one of these people. He is the vagrant who, police say, stabbed and sexually assaulted a teenage girl on her way to school on April 25 in the Love Field area. While it’s extremely rare for any homeless person to assault someone who is not also homeless, such crimes do happen. But most of the time, according to advocates for the homeless, these hardest-to-reach homeless people — the ones who don’t seek help from government agencies or private social-service organizations — are victimized. “We don’t know any more about what is alleged to have happened, but it is truly horrendous,” said Jay Dunn, president and CEO of The Bridge, a downtown homeless assistance center and shelter. “But this is an example of why it’s important that we, as a community, respond to the problem of homelessness.” Police records state that Robinson, 59, stabbed and raped the 17-year-old as she was walking to her bus stop. Police could find no address for him. By law, shelters cannot divulge information about their clients, but caseworkers say they have no recollection of ever seeing Robinson near The Bridge or downtown soup kitchens. A relative told reporters that Robinson has been homeless for several years and used drugs.

The crime Robinson is accused of is atypical in two respects. First, according to U.S. Justice Department statistics, about 73 percent of sexual assaults are perpetrated by someone the victim knows. Second, a homeless person rarely commits a violent crime against someone who is not also homeless. “People from all walks of life commit crimes,” said Mike Faenza, president and CEO of the Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance. “People believe that there’s something about homeless people that makes them more likely to commit crimes, more likely to be violent.” That’s not the case, according to researchers. The National Coalition for the Homeless has tracked crimes against the homeless since 1999. Its 2012 national report said that between 1999 and 2010, there were 1,184 violent crimes committed by a “housed person” against someone homeless, 312 of which ended in the death of the homeless person. Those numbers are almost surely low. Many homeless victims don’t report the crimes because of fear of authority. “They just want to survive,” said Brian Levin, a See HOMELESS, Page 2E

“We tend to devalue human beings that we don’t understand. They’re not us, and they seem to be second-class citizens, and people believe they deserve their plight. They don’t.” Mike Faenza, president and CEO of the Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance

Olga Ausburne, left, has been living in the dormitory at The Bridge in Dallas, Texas, taking advantage of the programs available. She said she is focused on helping herself instead of continuing to care for her husband, Teddy Dean Wise, right, and several other men who lived in their East Dallas encampment.

E

CLOSE YOUR eyes and picture 110 million obese people waddling around America’s sidewalks. You’ll probably want to keep your eyes closed. Such is the scenario suggested by a new study projecting that 42 percent of American adults will be obese by 2030. That’s 32 million more than today’s 78 million. Of course, they probably won’t be waddling. They’ll be in their cars in the fast-food lane, as they are now. Recall that independent filmmaker Morgan Spurlock (“Super Size Me”) gained 24.5 pounds after one month of eating exclusively at McDonald’s. Something no less than a “major public health intervention” is needed, according to Eric Finkelstein, a health economist with the Duke University Global Health Institute and lead author of the study. What this means is anyone’s guess, but it isn’t far-fetched to infer that a government-mandated health care system eventually would necessitate a government-mandated diet to control costs. In another study, Finkelstein and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that obesity costs about $147 billion per year, accounting for about 9 percent of all medical expenses. An obese person, defined as carrying an extra 30 pounds, costs about $1,400 more in medical expenses per year than a person of healthy weight. No one wants to make overweight people feel worse than they do. Fat is indeed a plague and most of us struggle to varying degrees. There are about 12 renegade pounds out there that love me so much they never want to be far away. If I drop my guard for so much as a month (that is, eat like a normal person), they jump on me like a June tick. At this point, we make the necessary disclaimer that some people are blessed with hummingbird metabolisms (and we hate them), and others are genetically inclined toward fatness. Genetic inclination isn’t a life sentence, however, and personal responsibility can’t be excluded as contributing to most fatty outcomes. These days, responsibility isn’t only about pushing away from the table, but it means educating oneself, reading food labels and going to a little extra trouble. Getting fat has never been easier, of course. Food is plentiful and convenient, and the bad stuff is tasty and cheap. At the end of a long day, it’s easier to buy a Happy Meal than to shop and prepare a balanced dinner. And who wants to hear the little darlings protest when presented with cauliflower over calzone? Out of sheer exhaustion, we fool ourselves into thinking children should have a say in what they eat. And, neverminding all the studies, diets, consultants and excuses, we know that the mystery of non-medical obesity isn’t really so mysterious. In a word, it’s about sugar, including hidden sugars such as high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a liquid sweetener that seems to be in nearly everything. Because it reportedly is much sweeter than cane sugar, HFCS is cheaper to use and also has preservative, as well as fattening, attributes. A 2010 Princeton University study found that rats that drank HFCS gained considerably more weight than rats eating sugar, though their caloric intake was the same. On average, Americans consume about 35 pounds of HFCS per person per year, according to the study. Here’s the simple explanation: Refined or simple sugars and their cousins – high-glycemic carbohydrates (think white bread and potatoes) — cause the pancreas to produce high levels of insulin, which cause the body to store excess sugar not used for energy as fat. The liver in turn is induced to produce cholesterol. We love high-glycemic carbs because they make us feel good by spiking our blood sugar. But what goes up must come down — with a thud. When our blood sugar inevitably plunges, we feel tired, ornery and hungry — and we repeat the cycle. Low-glycemic foods (think apples and collard greens), on the other hand, See PARKER, Page 2E


CMYK ➛

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

HOMELESS Continued from Page 1E

criminologist at California State University in San Bernardino, who has testified before Congress about crimes against the homeless. The coalition’s report “really only relates to what we call hate crimes,” he said. “The victimization of the homeless is far greater,” he said. “They only really give a representative sketch.” No federal agency, such as the FBI, tracks crimes against the homeless. With no residence, and for many of them, no family or close friends, the homeless are easy targets, Faenza said. That’s why many who choose not to permanently get off the streets still use night shelters. But there’s no knowing how many like Robinson, who may not even do that, are out there. Dunn, the Bridge president, estimates that about1,500 homeless people seek services at the downtown Dallas center. As many as 500 of them are described as “service-resistant”: They sleep in shelters or stop by for a shower, but will not take advantage of other services, such as medical or psychiatric treatment. And it’s likely there are many more who refuse any services. Still, that doesn’t mean social workers don’t try. On most days, homeless outreach teams search the streets of Dallas for “roaming clients.” Last week, volunteers from CitySquare, a poverty-fighting agency, looked for Robert Henderson, 52, a homeless man who needs his seizure medicine. They also wanted to catch up with Teddy Dean Wise at The Bridge. CitySquare caseworkers brought him there several months ago, along with his wife, Olga Ausburne. The couple had been living in a field near Interstate 30 and Winslow Avenue, near Samuell Grand Park. Wise and Ausburne both have drug and alcohol problems. But they represent two sides in the spectrum of acceptance of help. Ausburne, 54, has gone through The Bridge’s programs, kept her doctors’ appointments, and is on her way to getting her own apartment. Wise, 50, is not quite there, according to his case managers. “He’s been pretty resistant,” said CitySquare caseworker Chris Oliver. Wise needs help showering and has to be reminded to eat. He’s paralyzed on one side of his body because a drunken man, who was not homeless, beat him, denting his skull. Oliver and others are trying to help Wise into a nursing home. “I’m ready to leave here,” Wise said of The Bridge, while sitting in its courtyard. “It’s just not my

PARKER Continued from Page 1E

release energy at a steady, lessdramatic rate, and our blood sugar stays reasonably level. Less sugar means less insulin means less fat means leaner bodies means better health. Oh sure, eating with such attention to the glycemic index ruins your life. You won’t have any friends. You’ll spend all your time alone weighing four-ounce cuts of fat-free meat, sautéing spinach and picking flaxseed out of your teeth — and your children will hate you — but you’ll be thin. Best of all, you won’t need to go to the doctor as often, or rely on federal food marshals to tell you what to eat.

thing. People are always in your business, and I don’t like the crowds.” Meanwhile, his wife said she’s focused on helping herself instead of continuing to care for Wise and several other men who lived in their East Dallas encampment. “I don’t want anything negative around while I recover,” she said. Dunn said people like Ausburne are the success stories that social workers like to highlight. But they’re not common — not everyone recovers with just a little bit of help. Without constant attention to people like Wise, “the continuity of care can fall apart,” said Daneille Tooker, outreach manager for CitySquare. “It’s not just engaging them, it’s holding their hand: ... ‘You go to the Bridge, show up to this appointment and that appointment.’ The reality is many of them don’t have the functioning skills to make it even to The Bridge.”

V

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

MONA REEDER/DALLAS MORNING NEWS/MCT

Olga Ausburne, left, is a social worker’s success story. She has gone through The Bridge’s programs, kept her doctors’ appointments and is on her way to getting her own apartment. Her husband, Teddy Dean Wise, is not quite there, according to his case managers.

That is what caseworker Ashley Postell is doing for Henderson, the homeless man dependent on his anti-seizure medicine. Without her help, he not only forgets to take his medicine, he also loses

things and skips doctors’ appointments. “I get a little displaced sometimes, said Henderson, who smiled mischievously when Postell told him to stay out of trouble.

He’s been on the streets for five years. Helping him is sometimes frustrating, said Postell, 30. “No matter what, I’m gonna be there for Mr. Henderson,” she said. “I don’t think he’s had that before,” Postell said. Being chronically homeless is a “high-risk endeavor,” said Dunn, the Bridge president. Men and women like Wise and Henderson live a low-quality life. “But there’s also the issue of the public’s safety,” Dunn said. People feel safer with homeless individuals off the streets, especially in the wake of a highly publicized attack like the one Robinson is accused of. Dunn, Faenza and others emphasized that persistent tracking and management of those hardestto-reach homeless reduce overall crime and save taxpayers money. In 2007, the year before The Bridge opened, there were 2,081 nonviolent crimes in the area sur-

rounding it — including the Dallas Farmers Market. In 2011, there were 1,292. And more than 80 percent of the 752 arrests that have occurred at The Bridge since its opening have involved individuals who showed up there intoxicated. According to data gathered by the Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance from hospitals and other agencies, a homeless person who has a mental condition is likely to cost taxpayers three times as much as a housed person with the same condition. That’s mainly because of the police calls and emergency medical care that are inevitable with homeless populations. “I wish we could have a rational response to helping homeless people,” Faenza said. “We tend to devalue human beings that we don’t understand. They’re not us, and they seem to be second-class citizens, and people believe they deserve their plight. They don’t.”

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K ➛ S E R V I N G T H E P U B L I C T R U S T S I N C E 18 81

THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Editorial

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 3E

OUR OPINION: GAY RIGHTS

In America it’s OK to be you

G

AY IS OK. No matter what your parents, your coaches, your classmates, your teachers, your neighbors or even your nation’s future presidents might preach, you can’t – should not – masquerade who you are, how you feel, who you love. Nor should your rights as an American be inferior because of the person to whom you are attracted. Gay youths in Luzerne County have for too long hidden their sexual orientations or faced scorn, harassment and humiliation. As recently as last week, a Hanover Area Junior/ Senior High School student who is gay claimed that teachers have subjected him to ridicule. Also in the news recently, President Barack Obama ended his drawn-out “evolution” on the issue of gay marriage. After pondering whether he believed same-sex couples should be able to exchange vows, and therefore be entitled to the same rights as wedded heterosexuals, he concluded: I do. Polls suggest about half of the nation’s citizens share that belief. It will take more years, maybe decades, for state laws and certain resisters to accept this dramatic social shift and extend gay rights beyond what is currently provided: those non-

FIND SUPPORT • Visit the NEPA Safe Zone program’s website and view the “It Gets Better” videos: www.nepasafezone.org. • Learn about the NEPA Rainbow Alliance at this web address: www.gaynepa.com.

discrimination-in-the-workplace-type rules. Until then, more progress must be made in providing safe, bully-free and tolerant communities and schools. It’s up to compassionate people across our region to send a strong message to youths struggling with their identities. And to the bullies who would prey upon them. It’s OK to be gay in Northeastern Pennsylvania. It’s OK to be gay in South Wilkes-Barre, Scranton and Shickshinny. It’s OK to be gay in Lake-Lehman and the county’s 10 other public school districts. You don’t need to “come out” until comfortable, of course. But you don’t need to deny, pretend or avoid. You don’t need to apologize. You don’t need to agonize. You don’t need to overcompensate. You don’t need to detest yourself, doubt yourself or seek a “cure.” You don’t need to suffer. Gay is OK. And, one day, it’s going to get better.

QUOTE OF THE DAY “I had always hoped that when I ended my career, there would be peace and tranquility in my work environment.” Jeff Namey The superintendent of the Wilkes-Barre Area School District for the past 16 years, who is a 42-year employee of the district, announced last week that he plans to retire as of Aug. 31. Concerns about public corruption’s influence on teacher hiring, a lack of minority teachers, deteriorating school buildings and youth violence continue to nag Luzerne County’s second-largest public school district.

OTHER OPINION: GAY MARRIAGE

Politics, maybe, but a right choice

P

RESIDENT Obama might have been forced to come out sooner than he wanted on gay marriage, but he deserves tremendous credit for taking a risky political stand on one of the more divisive social issues of the day. Obama had long said his position on same-sex relationships was evolving beyond his support for civil unions. There had been signs that Obama would eventually reverse his opposition to gay marriage, the most recent being the decision by the Justice Department not to defend the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act. Obama said his mind was changed after reflecting on the relationships of gay friends and conversations with his wife and two daughters. It had been widely speculated that he might make such an announcement after the presidential election, but recently Obama supporters such as former Gov. Ed Rendell challenged Obama to “man up” and tell the truth about his position. Political opponents say Obama’s changed view, coming six months before the November election, was calculated. But

he has just as much to lose as he does to gain with the historic declaration. Polls show Americans evenly split on the issue, and many gay-rights proponents already were inclined to vote for Obama. That’s because expected Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney not only supports a constitutional amendment banning gay marriage, but he also opposes civil unions. Obama’s decision might galvanize gays and young people, but his new position will likely hurt him among some conservative Democrats and independents. Obama aides say the president has no plans to push for any changes in federal law, and that he believes the issue should be settled by the states. Obama should know by his study of American history that it typically takes uniform, federal action to end discrimination. Like Obama, many Americans have wrestled with the issue of gay marriage. But with the president coming out of the closet with his views, maybe it will be easier for others to follow his lead. The Philadelphia Inquirer

An

company

Editorial Board PRASHANT SHITUT President and CEO/Impressions Media MARK E. JONES JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor Editorial Page Editor

Boomerang-effect hype underrates graduates, families WE PARENTS of college students had better get the basements fixed up. According to none other than Karl Rove and his political action group, chances are better than eight in 10 that the kids will be hauling themselves and their ratty belongings back home after graduation. American Crossroads is out with a political ad that disses President Barack Obama for being “cool.” It shows him dishing with celebrities and quaffing a beer, and notes that “after four years of a celebrity president” half of college graduates can’t find jobs that fit their skills, student debt has topped $1 billion and – OMG! – 85 percent of recent college grads have been forced to move in with their parents. I don’t think this ad will phase college students, who tend to be optimistic about overcoming the obstacles mentioned. But parents, that’s a different story. Eighty-five percent of college grads moving back home? You can see a shudder moving through the land. Parents can stand down, however. PolitiFact, the fact-checking service of the Tampa Bay Times, examined the claim and pronounced it false. It turns out the 85 percent number is kind of a suburban myth, although widely reported on media outlets including Time, CNNMoney and the Huffington Post. PolitiFact found the claim originated with a now-defunct consulting firm, Twentysomething Inc., whose managing director said the number came from a poll done “many years ago” for an undisclosed client. Not a claim on which you’d want to stake your reputation. A much more accurate picture of the so-

COMMENTARY BARBARA SHELLY called boomerang generation is found in a recent report by Pew Research Center, which did extensive polling of families in multigenerational situations, based on 2010 U.S. census data. The Pew survey found that 39 percent of adults 18 to 34 said they either lived with their parents or had moved back in temporarily in recent years. Up to age 30, college graduates were as likely as non-college graduates to be living with the folks. After age 30, only 10 percent of college grads remained tied to their parents’ home, compared with 22 percent of adults ages 30 to 34 without a college degree. The Crossroads group is correct that the number of young adults living with parents is up in the recent economic slump. Pew’s analysis found the highest incidence of multigenerational living since the 1950s. But is that really an indication of a lost generation? Living with the parents after college isn’t exactly a new phenomenon. I did so for a couple of years, to save some money while working an evening reporting shift for a small newspaper. It wasn’t my first choice; that would have been a studio apartment in New York City. But the food was good, and my mom and I developed a mutual addiction to watching “All My Children” before I headed to work. In the Pew report, most of the young people and parents surveyed reported being OK with cohabitation. Everybody pretty much got along and both generations reported financial benefits.

The Pew survey found that 39 percent of adults 18 to 34 said they either lived with their parents or had moved back in temporarily in recent years. That tracks with what Traci Klasing sees in her job as assistant director of the career development center at Park University. Some graduates choose to move back home even if they have other options, she said. “I don’t really see students fleeing from it,” she said. “To me, they’re embracing it.” Remember, these are the families who caravanned together to endless soccer games and band competitions. Studies have shown that the young adults of Generation Y mostly have good relationships with their baby boomer parents. “They’re independent folks, but they really value their parents’ opinions and judgments,” Klasing said. The boomerang effect isn’t just because college graduates want to bond with their parents, of course. Long job searches and low pay for entry-level jobs has a lot to do with it, as does debt. On those points Crossroads America hits a legitimate target, although Obama is making a campaign issue out of reducing student debt. But the specter of moving home with the parents isn’t really scaring anybody. My personal view is that college graduates are better off living on their own. They achieve true independence and might learn how to cook. But I’m keeping my college sophomore’s room intact – just in case. Barbara Shelly is a columnist for the Kansas City Star. Readers may write to her at: Kansas City Star, 1729 Grand Blvd., Kansas City, MO 64108-1413, or by email at bshelly@kcstar.com.

Around we go; who will be VP, does anyone know? QUADRENNIAL EVENTS of a political nature litter the weeks and months of the 2012 calendar. From the first-in-thenation Iowa caucuses on Jan. 3 to the gathering of the Electoral College simultaneously in 50 states and the District of Columbia to choose a president and vice president of the United States “on the first Monday after the second Wednesday in December” (the 17th), they command our attention. Sandwiched between are 49 primaries and caucuses, including those in D.C., the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa and Puerto Rico, until ultimately Utah casts its ballots on June 26. The quadrennial nominating conventions are set for late August and early September. The Republicans meet Aug. 27-30 in Tampa, Fla., followed immediately by the Democratic Convention Sept. 3-6 in Charlotte, N.C. Over in 10 days, they built in just enough intervening hours to resituate the cameras. Dates and locations of the quadrennial three presidential debates and one VP forum were announced last October. After primary victories in North Carolina, Indiana and West Virginia on Tuesday, look for Mitt Romney to book flights to Denver, Hempstead, N.Y., and Boca Raton, Fla., to occupy a podium opposite President Barack Obama on Oct. 3, 16 and 22. (Clear your calendar). But who will be standing opposite Vice President Joe Biden (It will be Biden, won’t

KEVIN BLAUM IN THE ARENA it?) at the veep debate on Oct. 11 inside the Norton Center for the Arts on the campus of Centre College, home of the Colonels, in Danville, Ky.? And when will we know? Intrade, billed as “the world’s leading prediction market,” has 40-year-old Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida (29 electoral votes) atop its online big board derby as the person Romney will most likely tap to be his running mate. Rubio, a Cuban-American, would be the first Hispanic nominated by either party for a spot on a national ticket. But is Rubio ready? Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio (18 electoral votes) runs a close second on the Intrade track. GOP presidential candidates traditionally must win Ohio before entering the White House. Portman is an experienced former trade ambassador. He is bright, qualified and some would say charismatically challenged. Nonetheless he was my 2008 John McCain VP pick. I never thought McCain would stoop to what my instincts already had surmised (see “In the Arena” July 6, 2008). Rounding out Intrade’s current top 10 Romney VP possibilities are Gov. Chris Christie, N.J., (too noisy); Gov. Mitch Daniels, Ind., (too quiet); Gov. Bob McDonnell, Va., (too much); U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan,

Wis., (too soon); former Gov. Tim Pawlenty, Minn., (too timid); U.S. Sen. Kelly Ayotte, N.H., (too NE); U.S. Sen. John Thune, S.D., (too Mitt) and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice of California (too Bush). Who will Romney choose? My guess is he’s not among those I mentioned. What’s your take? I want to know; email your guesses to kblaum@timesleader.com. VP nominees rarely help the cause but they sure can cripple it, and Romney’s choice will undergo intense scrutiny thanks to the Palin disaster of ’08. Romney needs to add heft to the ticket, capture a share of some voting blocs, perhaps the Centre College debate or even a state. Romney needs states. A presidential race is not a single national election but 50 individual state elections, like running for governor in every state simultaneously, and Romney is tied with Obama in North Carolina and Florida while running behind the president in other swing states: Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Iowa, Ohio, New Hampshire and Virginia. The importance of most VP selections tend to fade as we inch closer to Election Day (Nov. 6), but the quadrennial choice of running mates by those nominated to lead America fascinates and commands our attention still. Did I say “he’s” not among those listed? Hmmm. Kevin Blaum’s column on government, life and politics appears every Sunday. Contact him at kblaum@timesleader.com.


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Ah, spring and its rueful, roadside reminder of the cycle of life here EVERY SPRING around Earth Day, my family and I join a group of neighbors on a Saturday morning to perform â&#x20AC;&#x153;roadside cleanupâ&#x20AC;? along a stretch of highway that runs near our community in Mountain Top. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been doing this for roughly 15 years. Because weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re creatures of habit, I suspect that each of us gravitates toward one particular section of road that we call our own. I generally end up policing approximately 200 yards that run along a fairly isolated part of the route. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a spot I suspect that people, knowing that they are unobserved, feel emboldened to toss all manner of garbage out of their vehicles. Over the years Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve noted several patterns involved in littering and dumping that make me somewhat cynical about my fellow man. Some things I guess are just ingrained in you. I cannot imagine throwing anything out of a car window, or

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COMMENTARY DR. HENRY F. SMITH JR. failing to comment negatively if a fellow occupant did. Yet judging from the volume of roadside debris I encounter each year, there are many others who feel no such restraint. The piles of debris along our roadsides are sadly, to me, another indictment of this regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s people and their attitudes, in some ways as damning as those being handed down in our federal courtrooms. Travel, for instance, to State College, the Hershey area or western Pennsylvania and the amount of roadside trash vastly decreases or just disappears. I honestly do not know whether this is because of more vigorous cleanup efforts, but I doubt it. People in those regions, I think, just arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as callous about their surroundings. I have decided there are three main

categories of litter I find on our roadsides. The first group is random objects tossed at the point on the drive when the food or beverage it contained is either consumed or no longer desired. In an unscientific sampling from this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cleanup I would say the most popular item to toss is a coffee cup, followed closely by empty beer cans â&#x20AC;&#x201C; generally brands that are so cheap I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even heard of them (malt liquor cans are very common). You rarely see an empty Stella Artois or a Magic Hat bottle alongside the road. Not to be a snob, but I think this says something sociologically about people who throw out their stuff on our roads. I did find a lot of energy drinks this year, particularly the Monster brand so popular among youths. This does not bode well for the future. A newer item is quarter-full bottles of water and sport drinks. This also discourages me. It suggests that even people intelligent enough to be at least mildly health-conscious still think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OK to toss trash out of their cars. They

are intelligent enough to leave some liquid in the container so that it can be lobbed reliably from their car to the surrounding woodlands. I did find less this year of what was once a common phenomenon: the quart plastic iced tea bottle, filled with what appeared to be urine. This was certainly a welcome development. Then there are the serial litterers. For many years, in one 100-foot stretch of my assigned roadside I would find perhaps 40 of the same size coffee cups, in varying stages of decay, bought at a vendor whose closest store is in Wilkes-Barre. One could easily imagine this thoughtless individual finishing the beverage in roughly the same place every day on his or her way to work, and then adding the empty cup to our local landscape. The last and most egregious group of litterers is the dumpers, who think our roadside is an appropriate place for their unwanted household garbage. I suspect that one reason this problem exists is the lack of municipal dumps, which elsewhere in the country give

people a place, maintained by their taxes, to discard unwanted items. We commonly find plastic bags full of family detritus, along with old tires, furniture and inoperable electronic devices. This year, we found the carcass of someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dog in a plastic bag sentimentally discarded among the McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bags and Powerade bottles. At least some people have the courtesy to save their garbage until after our cleanup, placing their bags next to ours to await pickup. So for several days at least, our stretch of road will be fairly neat and tidy. The white garbage bags will be collected, leaving only the emerging greenery of spring. In about a week, as I drive past, the glint of a fresh beer can (or a fresh case of beer cans) along the road will once again catch my eye. Thus is the cycle of life in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Dr. Henry F. Smith Jr., a Fairview Township resident, practices pulmonary medicine in the Wilkes-Barre area.

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Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great gift to the world: Mom

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n the beginning of time, God set in motion a plan to create the world. One of his masterpieces would be from Adamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rib. God breathed the breath of life into the nostrils of a perfect creature: a woman, Eve, bearing the first entitlement of the name â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mother.â&#x20AC;? Since then, a mother can

make you feel important and really special. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called a hug and a kiss. She can be a â&#x20AC;&#x153;proâ&#x20AC;? at giving free advice. Surely youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve noticed she has a talent for being the best listener. Never forget your mother is your best friend; only she knows your childhood secrets. A child can remember a motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kiss on a boo-boo sticking better than a Band-Aid. As for boo-boos, I remember at age 6 stepping on a nail. It

went straight through the top of my foot. My motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s remedy was soaking it in a bucket of hot water and wood ashes. Magically, it healed. My mom also sold eggs so I could have money for my senior class photos. All six of her daughtersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; dresses she sewed from floral flour sacks. We wore them with pride. A mother, many thousands of years ago, and with the highest esteem, raised her son, Jesus, to be the most

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Unexpected coalition echoes Israel of ’67 IN MAY 1967, in brazen violation of previous truce agreements, Egypt ordered United Nations peacekeepers out of the Sinai, marched 120,000 troops to the Israeli border, blockaded Eilat (Israel’s southern outlet to the world’s oceans), abruptly signed a military pact with Jordan and, together with Syria, pledged war for the final destruction of Israel. May ’67 was Israel’s most fearful, desperate month. The country was surrounded and alone. Previous great-power guarantees proved worthless. A plan to test the blockade with a Western flotilla failed for lack of participants. Time was running out. Forced to protect against invasion by mass mobilization – and with a military consisting overwhelmingly of civilian reservists – life ground to a halt. The country was dying. On June 5, Israel launched a pre-emptive strike on the Egyptian air force, then proceeded to lightning victories on three fronts. The Six-Day War is legend, but less remembered is that on June 1, the nationalist opposition (Menachem Begin’s Likud precursor) was for the first time brought into the government, creating an emergency national-unity coalition. Everyone understood why. You do not undertake a supremely risky pre-emptive war without the full participation of a broad coalition representing a national consensus. Forty-five years later, in the middle of the night of May 7-8, 2012, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shocked his country by bringing the main opposition party, Kadima, into a national unity government. Shocking because just hours earlier, the Knesset was expediting a bill to call early elections in September. Why did the high-flying Netanyahu call off elections he was sure to win? Because for Israelis today, it is May ’67. The dread is not quite as acute: The mood is not despair, just foreboding. Time is running out, but not quite as fast. War is not four days away, but it looms. Israelis today face the greatest threat to their existence – apocalyptic mullahs publicly pledged to Israel’s annihilation acquiring nuclear weapons – since May ’67. The world is again telling Israelis to do nothing as it looks for a way out. But if such a way is not found – as in ’67 – Israelis know they will once again have to defend themselves, by

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ANOTHER VIEW

A photograph by Aimee Dilger and words by Mark E. Jones

COMMENTARY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER themselves. Such a fateful decision demands a national consensus. By creating the largest coalition in nearly three decades, Netanyahu is establishing the political premise for a preemptive strike, should it come to that. The new government commands an astonishing 94 Knesset seats out of 120, described by one Israeli columnist as a “hundred tons of solid concrete.” So much for the recent media hype about some great domestic resistance to Netanyahu’s hard line on Iran. Two notable retired intelligence figures were widely covered here for coming out against him. Little noted was that one had been passed over by Netanyahu to be the head of Mossad, while the other had been fired by Netanyahu as Mossad chief (hence the job opening). To be sure, Netanyahu and Kadima’s Shaul Mofaz offered more prosaic reasons for their merger: national service laws, a new election law and negotiations with the Palestinians. But Netanyahu, the first Likud prime minister to recognize Palestinian statehood, did not need Kadima for him to enter peace talks. For two years he’s been waiting for Mahmoud Abbas to show up at the table. Abbas hasn’t. And won’t. Nothing will change on that front. What does change is Israel’s position vis-a-vis Iran. The wall-to-wall coalition demonstrates Israel’s political readiness to attack, if necessary. (Its military readiness is not in doubt.) Those counseling Israeli submission, resignation or just endless patience can no longer dismiss Israel’s tough stance as the work of irredeemable right-wingers. Not with a government now representing 78 percent of the country. Netanyahu forfeited September elections that would have given him four more years in power. He chose instead to form a national coalition that guarantees 18 months of stability – 18 months during which, if the world does not act to stop Iran, Israel will. And it will not be the work of one man, one party or one ideological faction. As in 1967, it will be the work of a nation. Charles Krauthammer’s email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.

here are people who will window shop for a ‘comfortable’ religion their whole lives, never realizing that none exists. True conviction always carries T a price; you have to step inside and pay for it.

Issue of our time is still civil rights for all IN 1948 a vast majority of Americans thought it was wrong to allow black men to serve with white men in

the military. Yet, in July 1948, President Harry Truman signed an executive order ending segregation in the U.S. military. He didn’t care about the polls. He didn’t put it up for a vote. Our great presidents always showed courage when it came to civil rights. Similarly, if we were to have had a “referendum” on black civil rights in 1964 in Alabama, do you think the general public in that state would have voted to allow black kids to attend school with white kids? Of course not. President John Kennedy had to intervene and force the state university of Alabama to accept federal law and its first black student. Same-sex marriage is the civil rights issue of our time. Gay people are our relatives, friends and fellow citizens and should have the same rights and liberties as any other citizen, even when it comes to the tribulations of love and marriage. If you have religious beliefs against same-sex marriage, that’s fine. Nobody is asking you to

COMMENTARY JOHN WATSON change your religious views. Our common law, however, is not your religion. Gay and lesbian couples should have the same rights as other citizens. Don’t you think? But the real question about last week’s historic news, the first time an American president has personally accepted samesex marriage, is why, when more than 50 percent of Americans agree that same-sex marriage should be legal, can’t we get simple civil rights for our fellow citizens? Well, as they would say on “The Wire,” one of my favorite TV dramas, “it’s in the game.” THE REFERENDUM GAME. Political manipulators use same-sex marriage as a “wedge” issue to influence elections. Most pernicious of the political puppeteers on same-sex marriage is Karl Rove, chief strategist for President George Bush, who encouraged 2004 state referenda throughout the country defining marriage as “between a man and a woman” as a device to mobilize evangelical voters vital to Bush’s reelection. And it worked like a charm.

Bush squeaked out a victory over Democrat John Kerry. The hypocrisy was astounding. Ken Mehlman, who was Bush’s campaign manager in 2004 and Republican National Committee chairman, was among the party’s most active opponents of gay marriage. Today, Mehlman supports gay marriage and acknowledges that he is gay. Men such as Rove, Newt Gingrich, Rush Limbaugh – the loudest windbags for the “sanctity of marriage” and “traditional Christian values” – have been married eight times between them. On Tuesday, predictably, North Carolina became the 28th state to approve a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage. Only Massachusetts, Iowa, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut and New York allow gay nuptials. Maryland, New Jersey and Washington State have passed laws this year approving samesex marriage, but Gov. Chris Christie vetoed New Jersey’s law. In vetoing the law, Christie said that he would rather not accept the decision of the New Jersey legislature because he wants “all of the people of New Jersey to decide.” Ah, Christie, a Republican against our republican form of

government, needs a referendum sandwich. Christie even went so far as to say that the civil rights battles of the 1960s would have been easily resolved if only we had let people vote in state referenda. “People would have been happy with a referendum on civil rights rather than fighting and dying in the streets of the South,” Christie told reporters. Really, Chrispie Cream? Do you think people would have voted for civil rights in the South in 1964? I’m not too sure they would vote for civil rights today. Same-sex marriage has lost 33 state referenda in a row because a majority rarely “gives” rights to a minority. Segregation would not have ended by referendum. The only salvation from the tyranny of the majority is our republican system of government, where, hopefully, we elect people of courage. This week, the “Profiles in Courage” award goes to President Obama and Joe Biden, who finally came into the light of day on same-sex marriage. I have many people in my life whom I love and who are gay. This week, Biden and Obama stood by all of us and the civil liberties of all citizens. John Watson is the former editor of the Sunday Dispatch in Pittston. He lives in Seattle.

Secret to success in education is basic: Working together, adapting IT DOESN’T take much effort to become disheartened about American education. Dismal statistics point to the fact that our children simply don’t know enough. Our top-performing kids can kind of pant along behind the world leaders, but the rest are left in the dust. Children who live in poverty and children of color fare particularly badly, and with both groups growing, the future bodes ill both for them as individuals and for us as a nation. The Council on Foreign Relations warned, “The United States’ failure to educate its students leaves them unprepared to compete and threatens the country’s ability to thrive in a global economy and maintain its leadership role.” Amid all this doomsaying, is there any hope? Yes. The last couple of decades have seen a remarkable growth in the knowledge of practitioners and researchers about how to educate all children. The challenge for us as a country is to make sure that knowledge is understood widely and applied consistently. One key insight: What schools do

make them look at least like middleclass schools; some are at the top of their state. Take, for example, George Hall EleKARIN CHENOWETH mentary School, which serves a poor, isolated neighborhood in Mobile, Ala. matters – a lot. People outside the field All its students qualify for the federal student lunch program, and all are of education might not think much of African-American. In 2004, George Hall that insight, since it seems pretty obviwas once one of the lowest performing ous. Why else would we send our chilschools in the city; today it is among dren to school? But it remains a hotly the top-performing schools in the state, contested idea within the field. Many outperforming many of Alabama’s most have said that schools can do little to help students who come to school from affluent schools. What does George Hall – and the impoverished homes. other schools I have studied – do to be It is certainly true that schools could do even more if their students were not so successful? Each school is exemplary in its own way. Some are small, some anxious about their next meal and large, some rural, some urban, some where they will sleep at night. But suburban, some elementary and some educators around the country are demsecondary, but they all share the same onstrating that they are able to help basic approach. They: even children who live in poverty and • Focus on what students need to isolation reach meaningful standards – know and be able to do in order to be if they do the right things. So the next question is, “What are the ready for college or career training right things?” I have spent almost eight when they leave high school. • Help the faculty collaborate in years trying to answer that question, traveling to high-performing and rapidly order to teach. • Assess frequently to see who has improving schools that enroll significant learned the material and who needs percentages of students of color and students of poverty. Many people would extra help. • Study class, grade and school asexpect these schools to be low-performing, but their student achievement data sessment data to find patterns of in-

COMMENTARY

struction in order to improve. • Deliberately build relationships between students and staff and among staff so that students trust teachers enough to learn from them and teachers trust each other enough to work together. This list seems almost too simple, but it gets at the core of how schools should operate and avoids all the fads and fashions that too often overwhelm the field of education. As simple as this formula is, it represents a very different way of organizing schools. Most schools are organized around individual classroom teachers teaching in isolation. This means that students are highly dependent on which teachers they get. A good teacher means a good year of learning; a not-so-good teacher can mean falling behind. Two or three bad teachers in a row can be a disaster for a student, particularly one whose family is not able to compensate for weak instruction. The schools I have been studying – I call them “It’s Being Done” schools – do not leave teachers to teach in isolation. Their leaders and staff know that no individual teacher can possibly know enough to be able to help every single student and that only by pooling their knowledge and skill can teachers reach

The schools I have been studying – I call them “It’s Being Done” schools – do not leave teachers to teach in isolation. everyone. It turns out, however, that it isn’t so easy to collaborate in these ways. Teachers themselves need teachers to help them work in ways that are best for students. That means that principals are critical to improving schools because, as schools’ head teachers, they are the ones who can focus a school’s efforts to help all children and help teachers learn to work in these new ways. The big picture? We know what is necessary to make schools work for all kids, and at least some people know how to do get the job done. Now we just have to spread that knowledge around. To me, that seems like cause for hope. Karin Chenoweth is writer-in-residence at The Education Trust, a national education advocacy organization, and author of “It’s Being Done: Academic Success in Unexpected Schools.” Readers may send her email at kchenoweth@edtrust.org. She wrote this for The Free Lance-Star in Fredericksburg, Va.


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IT’S EASY TO SEE WHO

THE BIG DOG IS

LATEST AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC) MARCH 2012 FAS FAX CONFIRMS *

DAIL DAILY

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MORE PAID CIRCULATION THAN SUND SUNDAY

45.9%

MORE PAID CIRCULATION THAN * Total average circulation excludes branded editions. Source: ABC FAS FAX six months ending March 31, 2012 as filed with the Audit Bureau of Circulations, subject to audit.

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It’s high time to get in the Active Zones By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com

By LEANNE ITALIE

Associated Press

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EW YORK — The claws and teeth of wild things are a nearnightly affair at bedtime for Gregg Svingen’s 2-year-old, Tessa.Sheraisesatinyindexfingerandissuesaclearandforceful “Be still!” to knock Maurice Sendak’s monsters into shape. “Thisevolvedintotellinganythingscaryorthreateningaconfident ‘No!’, again with an empowered toddler digit,” said Svingen, an American living in Brussels who keeps two copies of “Where the Wild Things Are” on hand. Count Svingen, other grateful parents and their children among those around the world to bid Sendak a fond farewell on Tuesday, when he died in Connecticut at age 83. “Sendak reminds adults about the best parts of childhood: the freedom, the boundless energy, the

possibilities, the security, the fantasies, a time where the rules can bend any way your imagination desires,” said Nicole Forsyth, whose 4-year-old, Audrey, likes “In the Night Kitchen” the best. “But he also reminds us of the pain of childhood: the frustrations, fear, loneliness and confusion, the unfinished mind in its extremes of pure joy and raw, untempered ego,” said Forsyth, in Sacramento, Calif. From the naughty Max of “Wild Things” to the foul-tempered Pierre from Sendak’s bite-size Nutshell Library, parents said Sendak understood the inner world of childhood like few other writers for kids. Sendak

See WILD THINGS, Page 5F

Down below was the “mule team,” seven or eight people wearing helmets and supplying the muscle power. Up above was Donna Cox, harnessed into a rope-and-pulley system and, with every tug the team gave the rope, soaring higher toward the tree branches. “Be careful, Grandma!” called 8-year-old Arielle Cordova, who had just tried The Giant Swing at Bear Creek Nature Camp herself. When Grandma was as high as the rope would reach — a good 30 feet off the ground — she let go of a strap. Yee-haw, suddenly she had an exhilarating, Tarzanin-the-jungle kind of experience, except she was attached to wires instead of clutching a vine. “It was pretty cool,” Cox, 51, of Gouldsboro said after she stopped swinging and climbed down a ladder during a recent Earth Day event at the camp. “When I try something, I really like to go for it.” This spring and summer, hundreds of area residents like Cox and her family will try new things as they “get outside, get exploring, get going” with the 2012 Keystone Active Zone passport program. And don’t worry – you don’t have to be so daring as to try the Bear Creek Nature Camp’s Giant Swing. Walking through parks, riding a bike, paddling a kayak and casting a fishing line are other ways to participate in the Keystone Active Zone program, which includes 30 Luzerne County locations and at least that many possibilities for outdoor fun. Last year, between 500 and 700 people registered for the program, spokeswoman Michele Schasberger said. To get started this year, you can download a Keystone Active Zone passport and visit such places as Frances Slocum State Park, the Mocanaqua Loop Trail, the Lands at Hillside Farms, the Nuangola Bog or the Susquehanna Riverlands. The passport program, which runs through Sept. 30, suggests See KEYSTONE, Page 4F

KEYSTONE ACTIVE ZONES Future Keystone Active Zone activities include: ••• Open house/orienteering at Camp Kresge, Route 437 near White Haven. May 20. 823-2191 ext. 152. ••• A ‘Y Walk Wednesday’ walk on the levee in downtown Wilkes-Barre. Meet at 6 p.m. June 6 at the Wilkes-Barre YMCA. ••• Mocanaqua Loop Trail hike. Meet at 10 a.m. June 2 at trailhead. ••• Back Mountain Bike Ride. 10 miles to the Riverfest. June 23. Meet at 9:30 a.m. at Dallas High School. ••• Opening day at the Hazleton Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 14

RON SWANSON: ‘Gothic Memoirs’ not your average bloodsuckers simply irresistible BOOKSHELF

By MARY MCNAMARA Los Angeles Times

Nick Offerman plays Ron Swanson on NBC’s ’Parks and Recreation.’

ing, of hair, makeup and wardrobe. AndIlovehimwithallmyheart. My love for Ron Swanson is so fairandwildandtruethatithasbecome difficult for me to appreciate even the cockeyed wonder that is Amy Poehler’s Leslie Knope or the comedically perfect pairing of April (Aubrey Plaza) and Andy (Chris Pratt) if Ron is not in the scene. My love for Ron Swanson is so close to devotion that I have begun to measure every man on television (and more than a few in real life) against him. Which shouldn’t surprise me. Though there are plenty of “guys”

LOS ANGELES — There are many reasons to watch NBC’s marvelously funny “Parks and Recreation,” but at this point I only need one: Ron Swanson. Swanson is played by Nick Offerman, an actor blessed with a melodious voice and wickedly expressive eyebrows who has mastered, if not invented, the art of over-the-top understatement. But Swanson is a sum of several parts — an exquisite creation of Offerman’s talent but also of writing and direct- See SWANSON, Page 4F

By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

What:“LuciferRising,”book3in the “Gothic Memoirs” series Author: Rebekah Armusik Publisher: Lady Noir ••• It’s no secret the supernatural has grabbed hold of society lately, with much of the focus falling on vampires. While Rebekah Armusik’s tales are laden with the bloodsuckers, labeling them as strictly “vampire fiction” would not be right. “There’snothingsotriteandbor-

ing and formulaic about it,” Armusik said. “It’s not like anything you’ve ever read before.” The WilkesBarre native, who now resides in Hamburg, is in the midst of a13-book“GothicMemoirs”series. The first two works, “Memoirs of a Gothic Soul” and “Mariposa,” have been out, with “Lucifer Rising” released this month and “Vlkolak King” coming out around Hallo-

ween. The series focuses on Nadija, a college graduate who travels to Prague to research her Slavic ancestors. What she finds is a world of fallen angels, vampires and Guardians, a group of protectors whose bloodline goes back to Adam’s first wife, Lilith. Much to Nadija’s surprise, she’s actually a key component in such a world. The rich story, much of which is based on Slavic folklore and JudeoChristian mysticism, is a major draw for those willing to pay attenSee BOOKSHELF, Page 5F


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HOROSCOPE

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

5/13/12

BONUS PUZZLE The Sunday Crossword

I’LL DRINK TO THAT Pam Amick Klawitter

KENKEN

1. Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 through 4. 2. The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called cages, must combine using the given operation (in any order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners. 3. Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the top-left corner.

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Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

JUMBLE

ARIES (March 21-April 19). An act of loving initiative will open your heart. Show kindness to the one for whom you currently feel only neutrality. The tiniest gesture will liberate a flow of compassion. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You’re not too eager to please these days. You sense your advantage: that others really do need what you contribute. Raise your price. This probably doesn’t have to do with money. There’s a more subtle exchange here. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Your role as a consumer is a powerful one. It may even give you a rush of excitement to make a purchase now, as you realize that your life will be different after the money changes hands. CANCER (June 22-July 22). You’ll expend more than the usual amount of effort chasing after others, trying to get them to take care of themselves and be safe, aware and smart. Tonight, take a break from the nurturing and focus on you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). After each interaction, people are either better off or worse off. You make it your personal responsibility to uplift everyone you meet. It’s as though you’re dusted with good cheer and a little of it rubs off on every person you touch. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You’ll be affected by the Venus/Mars dynamic. Consider what your sign mate H.L. Mencken noted: “A man may be a fool and not know it — but not if he is married.” LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You’ll realize what you did right and give yourself silent props. It’s beneficial to reward yourself in this admiring way. Your sign mate Oscar Wilde said it well, “To love oneself is the beginning of a lifelong romance.” SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Sports, fast vehicles and other high-risk activities have a certain appeal now, and you’ll find yourself slightly more willing to try your hand at the endeavor that is sure to thrill you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Can you make a living doing art? Will people pay for your special talent? The venture in the back of your mind starts to push its way forward. Interesting developments emerge in the weeks to come. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Wishing someone a wonderful life takes only seconds, if that. But it requires a sincere and very focused effort. Your heart and mind work together to shoot arrows of good energy into the core of the world. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). As you think of the one you love, your physiology changes. You may experience a tingling or warming sensation. Loving thoughts unite your physical, emotional and spiritual selves. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You bring effervescence to your scene. People love to be around you because even when you’re not smiling, they can sense the burbling enthusiasm inside you. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (May 13). This year, you’ll choose what you want and go after it. You’ll study and learn from the success and failure of others. June brings financial and emotional security. Utilize your charm and social resources in July. August brings travel. You’ll be charismatic and unconcerned about what others think in September. Proposals are forthcoming. Cancer and Libra people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 30, 1, 33, 25 and 15.

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UNIVERSAL SUDOKU

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PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION

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ADVICE

Adopted daughter is grateful for sacrifice Dear Abby: I hope you will print this on Mother’s Day. This Mother’s Day greeting is for all those incredibly unselfish mothers who chose to place their child up for adoption. I am an adopted child whose life has been a wonderful journey. If I could send a message to my birth mother, it would be one of eternal gratitude for allowing someone else to give me the life she was unable to provide. My adoptive parents love me and instilled a value system and belief in God that have carried me through every challenge life has sent my way. I never felt abandoned, but knew that I was chosen by people who were unable to have children. There is no love like a mother’s love. That is why I want to tell all those mothers out there who gave their children to another parent to love and nurture that their sacrifice and heartache became a miracle for so many of us. God bless all of you on this Mother’s Day. — Thankful Daughter

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Dear Thankful Daughter: I’m pleased to print your Mother’s Day greeting, and I hope it will bring comfort and reassurance to any woman out there for whom today is a reminder of a painful sacrifice. I would also like to wish a happy Mother’s Day to mothers everywhere, be they birth mothers, adoptive and foster mothers, or stepmothers. I applaud you all. Dear Abby: As graduation time approaches, I begin to shudder. Graduation ceremonies have become more like rock concerts than a time to acknowledge student achievements. Families, friends and graduates behave horribly, making it impossible to watch or listen to the proceedings. As both a parent and an educator, may I please offer

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some graduation etiquette advice? 1. Do not yell, blow horns or leap into the air as your special graduate crosses the stage. It’s rude, immature, inappropriate and prevents those around you from hearing the names being called and seeing the next graduates. The noisemaking instruments hurt sensitive ears, so leave them at home. Your special person knows you are there and proud of him or her. 2. Honor ALL of the graduates. Each one deserves the same audience as the first to cross the stage. Do not disrupt by leaving after your grad has had his/ her moment. Stay seated until all of them have received recognition. 3. Small children do not belong at graduations. They get bored, cry, run around, etc., and I don’t blame them. Hire a sitter and let them stay home. 4. The presenters have worked hard to prepare for the ceremony. Listen to them and behave like the mature, thoughtful adults you expect the graduates to become. 5. Have the wild party AFTER the formal ceremony. — Frustrated In Columbus, Ga. Dear Frustrated: I agree that there are certain rules of conduct that should be followed on important occasions — and a graduation ceremony is one of them. I’m printing your very basic rules of behavior in the hope that they will serve as a reminder to those who have forgotten their manners or never learned them in the first place. For everything you need to know about wedding planning, order “How to Have a Lovely Wedding.” Send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby, Wedding Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)

To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send a businesssized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)

Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 5/13


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KEYSTONE Continued from Page 1F

you attend certain events, from Wednesday walks through downtown Wilkes-Barre and Hazleton with a guide who will explain the history or botany of the area to learn-to-canoe and learn-toclimb clinics at the YMCA’s Camp Kresge near White Haven. You’re also encouraged to visit various locations on your own, and in some cases the passport asks you to investigate until you find the answer to a question: What are the names of the two alpacas at Hillside Farms? After you cross the wooden bridge at The Tubs Natural Area, what color markings will you see on the trees? How many bike racks are in Fairview Township Park? Participants can answer the questions and log their visits online, which makes them eligible to win prizes. But the real prize is spending time, preferably active time, outdoors, co-coordinator Carol Hussa said. That’s what dozens of people

Don’t just watch a movie, experience it! All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound

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Lizzy Redmond, 13, of WilkesBarre rides The Giant Swing at the Bear Creek Nature Camp.

did last weekend at Bear Creek Nature Camp, where the “Earth Day” program offered nature hikes, an animal program, lake See KEYSTONE, Page 6F

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*Dark Shadows - PG13 - 120 min (1:00), (1:45), (3:30), (4:15), 7:10, 7:45, 9:40, 10:15 Marvel’s The Avengers - PG13 - 150 min (1:20), (2:15), (4:20), (5:15), 7:20, 8:20, 10:20 ***Marvel’s The Avengers 3D - PG13 150 min (12:45), (1:00), (3:45), (4:00), 7:00, 7:40, 9:00, 10:00 Marvel’s The Avengers in DBOX PG13 - 150 min (1:00), (4:00), 7:00, 10:00 The Five-Year Engagement - R - 135 min (1:15), (4:00), 7:10, 10:00 ***Pirates! Band of Misfits 3D - PG 95 min (1:20), 7:00 *Pirates! Band of Misfits - PG - 95 min (3:30), 9:10 The Raven - R - 120 min (1:45), (4:20), 7:30, 10:10 Chimpanzee - G - 90 min (1:00), (3:00), (5:00), 7:00 The Lucky One - PG13 - 110 min. (1:30), (4:10), 7:40, 10:10 Think Like A Man - PG13 - 130 min. (1:50), (4:30), 7:15, 10:00 The Three Stooges - PG - 100 min. (1:40), (3:50), 7:00, 9:15 The Hunger Games - PG13 - 150 min. (1:00), (4:00), 7:00, 10:00 (Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)

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on television, there are very few men. Ron Swanson is a man. He wears slacks, not skinny jeans or even pants, and his sweaters are collared. He is comfortable with firearms. He can fix things and solve riddles. He is quietly rude and quite often chivalrous. He plays the saxophone. He doesn’t wear vests and drink tea, doesn’t pop Vicodin and sexually harass his staff, doesn’t live with two other goofy guys and a girl, or another man and his child. He isn’t a smart-mouth member of law enforcement; neither does he murder people ritualistically and then blame it all on a traumatic childhood incident. Ron Swanson understands things that other humans of his chromosomal order appear to have forgotten, including: 1. Hair. A man should comb his hair, after which it should appear combed. I could write a sonnet to Ron’s Elvis-wave hair. 2. The mustache. After years of enduring the mixed message of carefully tended scruff — “I’m too busy/ disaffected to shave! But I manage to be unshaven in an even andmeticulouslyshapedway!”— it is a relief to see a man with real facial hair. Sorry, Selleck, there’s a

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new ’stache in town. 3. The bod. Ron Swanson does not look like he weighs less than I do. What with the general waifishness of men on TV, I cannot overstate the aphrodisiac effect this has on a woman. 4. The diet. Steak, bacon and Scotch. Three of the best-tasting, best-smelling things in the world. 5. The attitude. Ron is not apathetic; Ron is Zen. He is a public servantwhohates99percentofthe public, a government official who does not believe in government. He will not suffer fools at all, save the fools he has come to love and those he will protect with his life. Over the years we learned of Ron’s bizarre psychosexual past, of his strange childhood spent learninganachronisticskillsandhisfirm belief that most government is a waste of time and money. Even so, Ron remains a man of mystery. His true feelings are revealed only by his actions. Unlike the multitude of fractured and unforthcoming antiheroes that crowd the screen, Ron is all action and little talk. And whatever his past, he is past desiring help in dealing with it. Ron isn’t nursing some tragic hurt that needs a woman’s love to heal; he doesn’t need to be fixed; he just needs to be accepted. In fact, he doesn’t actually need that, or at least not nearly as much as a Buck knife, a roll of duct tape, a T-bone and a little peace and quiet.

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BOOKS

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SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 5F

‘Bodies’ is a wonderfully devilish sequel By JANICE P. NIMURA

“I

was trying to take the scab off the ’50s, the general idea of it as very comfortable, happy, nostalgic. Mad Men. Oh, please,” Toni Morrison told an interviewer a few weeks ago. The Nobel Prize-winner was referring to her 10th and latest novel, the slender but resonant story of Frank Money, who returns from the Korean War so traumatized that home feels as much like a battleground as the one he just left. Which it is, for a 24-year-old black veteran trying to locate his manhood in 1950s America.

Frank has made it home without his homeboys, the two buddies he grew up with in Lotus, Ga., who died before his eyes in Korea. He is “far too alive” to show himself back in Lotus, and anyway he hates the place: “Nobody in Lotus knew anything or wanted to learn anything.” Discharged in Seattle, he’s found refuge with Lily, whose arm across his chest at night somehow makes it easier to breathe. A letter from Georgia sets him in motion again: “Come fast. She be dead if you tarry.” “She” is his little sister Cee, innocent and abused, in whose sad eyes Frank once saw reflected the “strong good me” he has lost. Leaving his rescuer, Lily, he sets out to rescue Cee.

Morrison, now 81, has always resented critics who call her prose poetic. But no matter how muscular or earthy her vernacular, it is filled with images that lodge and linger. Frank leaves Lily’s and walks straight into a fight that lands him in a mental ward, from which he escapes barefoot and barely clothed. A pastor’s generosity eases his way; the socks he provides lie “folded neatly on the rug like broken feet,” comfort edged with horror. The bewitching flights of imagination that color Morrison’s best-known work are muted here. There are no ghosts except the ones that haunt Frank’s consciousness — though that consciousness itself haunts the story. Italicized passages in Frank’s voice in-

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terrupt and contradict the narrator, correcting and calling out. “I don’t think you know much about love. Or me,” Frank scolds. “You can keep on writing, but I think you ought to know what’s true.” Frank’s odyssey through the dangerous terrains of segregated America and his own battered mind is at the novel’s heart. Cee’s peril, at the hands of a “heavyweight Confederate” doctor who uses her as fodder for his eugenics research, is an odd gothic appendage. Safe back home in Lotus, Cee is healed by “country women who loved mean,” who “handled sickness as though it were an affront, an illegal, invading braggart who needed whipping.” The doctor and his strange household, the wise women of Lotus — these are big characters in a small space, and you wish Morrison had let them expand. Instead, the novel hurtles forward to an improbably happy ending, in which loathed Lotus comes to seem “fresh and ancient, safe and demanding”: no longer an island of indifference, but a fitting home for an odyssey’s end. “Home” is a compressed epic, an uncomfortably tight container for Morrison’s mastery.

“Home” by Toni Morrison; Alfred A. Knopf ($24)

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BOOKSHELF Continued from Page 1F

tion throughout. Not only that, but Armusik presents a character that anyone from Northeastern Pennsylvania could have easily gone to high school with or lived next door to. It makes sense, as Nadija is very much Armusik herself. “I started writing the series when I was in school at King’s College and wanted it to be an autobiographical work about growing up in a Slavic home and the tales my grandmother would tell me,” Armusik said. She soon realized she wanted to put a character into those stories, to actually live them. She not only modeled Nadija after herself but many of thecharactersandsettingsafterthose she experienced in Wilkes-Barre. “The characters are all based on real people, so at one point some of those conversations actually happened. I think that’s why this series resonateswithpeople,becausethey don’t see it as something contrived

or manufactured.” Whether readers are familiar with the area or not, Armusik said the emotion behind the events Armusik draws readers in. “What do I have in common with the housewife, the 18-year-old kid?” she said. “The commonality of my bookisthatit’saboutrealfeelings,real life, real emotions. Human experience is the glue that binds this whole story together. It’s about suffering, love, redemption; someone trying to find themselves in a time where it’s hard to define people at all.” The“GothicMemoirs”serieswill top out with13 books but won’t stop there. Armusik plans to write an additional 13 books, set before the “Memoirs” collection, that will explain the story behind the major players and themes in “Memoirs,” suchasLilithandtheangels.Theseries will conclude with four books that return to the “Memoirs” series, wrapping up with a total of 30 works.

WILD THINGS Continued from Page 1F

Anna Patterson’s journey of mischief-making began15yearsagoinTupelo,Miss.,whenshefirst fell in love with the wild boy Max, who returns home in the end, his supper still warm. “He wasn’t your typical knight in shining armor or dragon-slaying prince,” said Patterson, now a sophomore at the University of Mississippi in Oxford. “It was a different kind of main character, someone with real fears and a real imagination I could relate to. That one book was enough to start a love of reading that’s lasted a lifetime.” Kate Shamon Rushford’s 11-year-old Matthew is an avid reader in Wellesley, Mass., and has loved “Wild Things” since he was 3. “He let kids know that it’s OK to sometimes be a wild thing,” the boy said. “A lot of kids want to escape when they’re in trouble.” Oneofthegreatpleasuresofhavingchildren,said dad William Webb in Memphis, Tenn., is happily losingyourselfinthebooksyoulovedwhilealsodiscoveringnewnuggets,likeSendak’s“Pierre:ACautionary Tale in Five Chapters and a Prologue.” That’s a long title for a tiny book included in Sendak’sNutshellboxsetandpublishedasastandalone as well. No matter what his parents say, sour-faced

Pierre just “doesn’t care,” not even when a lion gobbles him up, then falls ill for his trouble only to spit him out in one piece at the end. “It makes us laugh,” said Webb, who has two boys ages 4 and 2. “That’s my older son’s favorite part, when he comes out of the lion and learns that he really does care after all.” Joshua Steen in Corinth, Miss., has a fan in 2year-old daughter, Lucy. “She especially loves the ‘Wild Things,’ and she’ll growl and howl at the moon. Sendak’s illustrations really have a life of their own. He makes learning to use your imagination so much easier.” Chris McLeod is all grown up at 28 and living in Quincy,Mass.,awayfromhismom,JoanGaylordin Bedford, N.Y. His memories of “Wild Things,” a childhood favorite, are muted now, though his motherhasn’tforgottenheryearsofreadingitaloud. “At this point, I remember only one line: ‘We’ll eat you up — we love you so!’ The funny thing is that, in my mind, the wild things aren’t saying it. My mom is,” McLeod said. David Caughran, 45, has a 7-year-old son who has sadly already moved on from Sendak. He fears that Sendak, a lush illustrator, might already be lost like other picture-book creators to children reading e-books exclusively. “I truly hope that real books don’t get supplanted. There’s something about the experience of holding and reading a true paper book.”

By MARY ANN GWINN The Seattle Times

“Bring Up the Bodies” by Hilary Mantel; Henry Holt ($28)

Readers new to British author Hilary Mantel’s work through her 2009 novel “Wolf Hall” were introduced to a writer who can turn the oldest of stories into a spellbinding tale. What schoolchild doesn’t know the story of King Henry VIII and his six wives? Especially wife number two, the doomed schemer Anne Boleyn? But reading “Wolf Hall,” knowing the outcome didn’t mean a thing — Mantel’s story of Henry’s early reign, told through his righthand man, chief fixer and henchman Thomas Cromwell, lit up the early 16th century in such a way that for this reader, it was a rude shock to pause and realize that the early 21st was right outside the window. Mantel’s portrait of Cromwell was a revelation and won her the Man Booker Prize for literature. For students of the era, Cromwell’s story was familiar — the commoner who rose to advise and control access to the king, the henchman who did the king’s bidding, the closet Protestant who sent the Catholic Sir Thomas More to the executioner for blocking the king’s divorce and remarriage to Anne Boleyn. In her incandescent prose, Mantel showed a different side of Cromwell: a family man, a brilliant businessman and even a philanthropist of sorts, always looking out for those on the bottom rung of the ladder in need of a leg up. But always, a fighter: “He had been fighting since he could walk,” Cromwell thinks of his childhood in Mantel’s new book, “Bring Up the Bodies.” In Mantel’s new novel, the sequel to “Wolf Hall,” death has diminished Cromwell. His wife is dead. His beloved daughters are dead, all wiped out by the plague. As he confronts a member of the king’s chamber about Anne’s alleged infidelities, the man, facing certain death, says he may die of grief. “Bring Up the Bodies” is a grimmer book than its predecessor. Cromwell’s world is narrowing, and his motives are threefold: 1. Survival. 2. Pleasing the king (see number one). 3. Revenge on the scheming aristocrats who brought down his mentor, Cardinal Wolsey. Events are set in motion when Henry tires of Anne Boleyn. He falls in love with Jane Seymour, a quiet, enigmatic girl for whom the phrase “plain Jane” was first coined. In one of many simple and eloquent summations, Mantel writes of Jane: “She is a plain young woman with a silvery pallor, a habit of silence, and a trick of looking at men as if they represent an unpleasant surprise.” Anne was aggressive. The king wants demure. Anne was a schemer. Henry wants simplicity (though the Seymours scheme nearly as well as the Boleyns). Most important, Anne has borne a daughter, and Henry ardently desires a son. Cromwell sets out to do the king’s dirty work. The hardest part for “Wolf Hall” readers to swallow in “Bring Up the Bodies” may be the fact that in the first book, Cromwell was a sympathetic character. In “Bodies,” he is an understandable character, but that understanding requires a considerably darker view of human nature. Cromwell’s job is to help the King dissolve his marriage, and the strategy is to prove that Anne was unfaithful multiple times — even with her brother. As Cromwell interrogates doomed members of the court who may or may not have slept with Anne, he is a wonder and a terror to behold. Cajoling, prevaricating, entrapping, he sets them on the road to the executioner, with actual guilt strictly a side issue. The men who brought Wolsey down are particular targets for Cromwell, and he dispatches them without mercy. Cruel work. But there’s something about these books that makes you feel that we live in a paler time, that something vital has washed out of the world. Anyone can go online and find out what happened to Anne Boleyn and Cromwell, whose fate will almost certainly play out in the third book in this projected trilogy. Nevermind. This wonderful, terrible novel does an awful story full justice. Dare you to tear yourself away.


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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

5 cool places on the North Carolina coast By JOHN BORDSEN McClatchy Newspapers

Continued from Page 4F

kids places without spending a fortune,” Audrey Leon of Scranton said as she walked along a path, pushing her grandson in a stroller. “My kids love the outdoors.” The Keystone Active Zone program began in 2007, sponsored by the Pennsylvania Department of Health and coordinated through Pennsylvania Advocates for Nutrition and Activity. This year’s participating partners include Greater Hazleton Rails to Trails, the Wilkes-Barre Family YMCA’s ACHIEVE project (that stands for Action Communities for Health, Innovation and Environmental Change) and Live Well Luzerne County. By the way, if The Giant Swing at Bear Creek Nature Camp intrigues you, your next chance to use it might be if you sign up for a family camping experience over Memorial Day Weekend (Call 472-3741 for information.) One of four high-ropes activities at the camp, it is most often used by

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kayaking and The Giant Swing. Camp staffer Paulette McDaniels described that last activity as a trust-building experience in which you depend on the “mule team” to lift you only as high as you want to go. As her 7-year-old daughter, Allie, patiently waited for a turn on the swing, Angela Nicoletti of Wilkes-Barre said she’s eager to explore the region’s natural areas with the Keystone Active Zone Passport this summer. “We’ve gone south for vacations, to Florida, Georgia and South Carolina, but we’ve never done much outside around here,” she said. “She loves to fish,” Nicoletti said of her daughter. Down by the camp lake, meanwhile, a pair of teens waded and hunted for minnows while other visitors paddled kayaks or set off on hikes. “This is a great way to take my

($18; $10 for kids) to Shackleford Banks, where humans haven’t lived for a century. The island’s notable residents today are 100-plus wild horses descended (depending on whom you ask) from shipwrecked Spanish steeds or 19thcentury Carolinians. They’re the masters of this 9-mile isle in the National Park Service’s Cape Lookout National Seashore. Approach them slowly, with caution and from downwind.

The wind-and-wave-swept island is great, by the way, for seashells: Bring a bag. Bring a timepiece, too. If you miss the ferry, you’ll be stranded. And carry a water bottle: The only non-saltwater is in horse ponds. Ferry info: 252-728-7555; www.islandferryadventures.com, 252-728-7555. Shackleford info: 252-7282250O; www.nps.gov/calo; 252728-2250.

Portsmouth: Ghost town by the sea Southbound N.C. 12 stops on Ocracoke Island, across the channel from Portsmouth Island. And that’s where the ghost town is. For close to a century, Portsmouth, on Ocracoke Inlet, was on a major trading route to the mainland ports. But in the 1840s, a storm opened up the deeper Hatteraschannel,andthevillage’seconomy gradually wasted away. The

Eunice Remero and Chris Trion walk a trail at the Bear Creek Nature Camp, off Route 115 in Bear Creek Township. Camp trails are open to the public before Memorial Day and after Labor Day, when camp is not in session.

Lifeguard Lauren Remillard stands by a colorful array of boats next to the lake at Bear Creek Nature Camp. Water sports are among the activities you can enjoy with the Keystone Active Zone passport program.

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. — OK, you walked in the ocean and got sand in your picnic snacks. Now what? There’s more than beach to see on the North Carolina coast. Check out these one-of-a-kind attractions for a surfside side trip that’s amazing, fun and inexpensive. Aurora: Pick-your-own fossils The Aurora Fossil Museum owes roughly 90 percent of its collection to the Potash Corp.-Aurora complex nearby. The phosphate mine makes a point of digging up what geologists call the Pungo RiverFormation,agraylayerfoundbeneath 30 to 40 feet of sand and clay. That stratum was a sea floor seven to 23 million years ago. Just as now, the waters were relatively warm and shallow. A variety of primitive creatures lived and died here, and it was a hotbed for tiny animals whose remains decomposed into phosphates — a main ingredient of fertilizer. From time to time, two sandboxsize piles of this prehistoric mine slag are dumped across the street from the museum in a little park. You’re free to go picking through it for fossils. The museum hands out a sheet with little photos that identify 27 of the most common pile finds. The Aurora Fossil Festival is May 25-27. Aurora Fossil Museum admission: free. Details: 252-322-4238; www.aurorafossilmuseum.com Beaufort: Island of wild horses Down at the Beaufort, N.C., waterfront, buy a round-trip ticket

last two residents left in 1971. When Cape Lookout National Seashore was set up five years later, Portsmouth’s 250-acre historic district was put on the National Register of Historic Places. Wander the quiet streets and go into a house that serves as the visitor center; the post office/store, Methodist church, schoolhouse and life-saving station; the other homes are closed. There are a handful of cemeteries. And, in season, squadrons of hungry mosquitoes. To get there, board the state ferry at Ocracoke (www.ncdot.gov/ ferry) for the half-hour ride. Reach Ocracoke via the state ferry from Swan Creek or Cedar Island. The voyage across Pamlico Sound ($15 per car, one way) will take up to 2 ½ hours. Details: 252-728-2250; www.nps.gov/calo. Also: www.friendsofportsmouthisland.org. Carolina Beach: Weird animals, stranger plants Never know what you’ll find in the wild, but at 761-acre Carolina Beach State Park, walk the halfmile Flytrap Trail to spot the rare, meat-eating Venus flytrap, only found naturally within a 75-mile radius of Wilmington. Bugs are drawn to the color and aroma of its leaves; if the insect touches one little hair trigger, nothing happens. But when a second is touched, the leaf halves snap shut on it. It takes three to five days for the plant’sfluidstodecomposeitsprey, then the leaf reopens. The park holds other botanical carnivores, by the way: pitcher

plants, bladderworts, sundews and butterworts. Unusual animal life includes numerous reptiles. You occasionally can spy an alligator at the park marina. And don’t miss the 50-foot Sugarloaf sand dune that has served as a marker for Cape Fear mariners since 1663. Admission: free. Hours: 8 a.m.-8 p.m. daily; longer hours May-August. Details: 910-458-8206; www.ncparks.gov (pick “Carolina Beach” from the “Find a park” menu). Ocracoke: British territory At Ocracoke, you can leave the United States and enter 2,290 square feet of British territory. It’s the British Cemetery, a sad legacy from World War II. In 1942, German subs prowled the East Coast for merchant ships. Inthefirstsixmonthsof1942,close to400shipswerelosttoGermanUboats. Our British allies sent ships over to protect New World commerce. Among them was the Bedfordshire, a fishing trawler converted into an escort ship for convoy duty. The Bedfordshire was sunk by Uboat 558 on May 11. The entire crew of the Bedfordshire was lost, and three days later, a handful of bodies of crewmen began washing up on shore. They were buried in a corner of the Ocracoke cemetery later deeded to the Commonwealth War Grave Commission — so the sailors there can technically be buried in “home” soil. Though the British CemeteryismaintainedbytheU.S. Coast Guard station at Ocracoke, a Union Jack flies over the graves.

FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Liz Masi paddles the waters of the lake at the Bear Creek Nature Camp during an Earth Day celebration last weekend. The event attracted many participants from the Keystone Active Zone passport program.


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 1G

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Legals/ Public Notices

LEGAL NOTICE DEADLINES

FREE

Don’t Keep Your Practice a Secret!

Attorney Services

135

PICKUP

LAW DIRECTORY

310

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Friday 4:00 pm on Thursday Holidays call for deadlines You may email your notices to mpeznowski@ timesleader.com or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to The Times Leader 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 For additional information or questions regarding legal notices you may call Marti Peznowski at 570-970-7371 or 570-829-7130

150 Special Notices ADOPT: Loving, secure, accomplished married couple to adopt newborn. Expenses paid. Please call Ben & Jim 888-690-9890

472

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY 468

Auto Parts

Auto Services

$ WANTED JUNK $ VEHICLES LISPI TOWING We pick up 822-0995

EMISSIONS & SAFETY INSPECTION SPECIAL

$39.95 with this coupon

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

150 Special Notices

Also, Like New, Used Tires & Batteries for $20 & up!

Happy Mothers Day! Hope to see everyone at the Genetti Mother’s Day Buffet for a really special treat for mom! bridezella.net

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H FREE PICKUP

PAYING $500 MINIMUM DRIVEN IN

Full size 4 wheel drive trucks for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm Single white male, age 40, looking for Woman for companionship. Must be drug free. If interested, Call 570-779-5224

WORK WANTED

experienced in home care. I will work in your home taking care of your loved one. Personal care, meal preparation and light housekeeping provided. References, background check also provided. Salary negotiable. 570-836-9726 or 570-594-4165 (m)

574-1275

150 Special Notices

Octagon Family Restaurant

375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651

570-779-2288

W eekend S pecial $13.95 for a Large Plain Pie & a Dozen Wings

Dine in only. Valid Saturday & Sunday. One coupon per party/table. Cannot be combined with any other offers.

Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza

Need a math tutor? Get ready for college math! one on one summer instruction. Affordable rate. experienced instructor. Topics: algebra 1, 2 & 3, plain geometry, trigonometry, pre calculus, & calculus. Call the professor at 570-288-5683

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! Travel

380

Travel

BROADWAY SHOW BUS TRIPS THE LION KING

Wed., June 13 $175. Orchestra JERSEY BOYS Wed., July 18 $150. “Front Mezz”

Call Roseann @ 655-4247

CAMEO HOUSE BUS TOURS IT’S OFFICIAL!!! Kips Bay ShowHouse is at the

Aldyn in NYC Sat., May 19

Coming Attraction

June 24 Coney Island Call Anne 570-655-3420 anne.cameo @verizon.net

DON’T MISS OUT!

New! Special Incredible Last Minute Deals to Cancun and Punta Cana All inclusive packages For Travel

April, May and early June

First Come, First Serviced! Limited Availability, Passports Required Call NOW! 300 Market St., Kingston, Pa 18704 570-288-TRIP (288-8747)

ATVs/Dune Buggies

HAWK `11 125CC

310

Attorney Services

Find the perfect friend. The Classified

section at Looking for that timesleader.com special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

Auto, key start, with reverse & remote control. $700. OBO 570-674-2920

409

409

Autos under $5000

‘00 VOLKSWAGEN GTI

2 door hatchback, 1.8 turbo, 5 speed transmission, AC power steering and windows, moon roof, new brakes, tires, timing belt, water pump and battery. Black on black. 116,000 miles $4,500 570-823-3114

DODGE `93 CARAVAN

SE. Inspection good till 12/12. AM/FM/CD. A/C. All new brakes, muffler, gas tank, radiator, struts. 163k miles. Body & tires good, paint fair. Has had noisy engine for 4 years. $800 or best offer. Call 570-283-9452

Autos under $5000

LEO’S AUTO SALES 92 Butler St Wilkes-Barre, PA 570-825-8253

CHEVY ‘04 MALIBU CLASSIC door, 4 cylinder,

Instruction & Training

EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV Certified. Call 888-2203984. www.CenturaOnline.com

406

Expires 6/30/12 WANTED

360

ALSO PAYING TOP $$$

Vito’s & Gino’s 949 Wyoming Avenue Forty Fort, PA

Cars & Full Size Trucks. For prices... Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562

DAYCARE

In my Kingston home. Licensed. Ages 15 months to 6 years. 570-283-0336

Wed., July 18 $135. Orchestra

570-574-1275

DIRECTORY

Child Care

PHANTOM OF THE OPERA

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

AUTO SERVICE

330

4 auto, good condition. 120k. $2,450.

FORD ‘01 F150 XLT Pickup Triton V8,

auto, 4x4 Super Cab, all power, cruise control, sliding rear window $3,850

412 Autos for Sale

ic. 4 door. $4,800 (570) 709-5677 (570) 819-3140

412 Autos for Sale

ACME AUTO SALES

N V

L IN E U P

W E’VE G O T EM !

2012 NV 2500 V-6 S

$

800-825-1609

www.acmecarsales.net

Sprint blue, black / brown leather int., navigation, 7 spd auto turbo, AWD 09 CADILLAC DTS PERFORMANCE PLATINUM silver, black leather, 42,000 miles 09 CHRYSLER SEBRING 4 door, alloys, seafoam blue. 08 CHEVY AVEO red, auto, 4 cyl 07 BUICK LACROSSE CXL, black, V6 07 CHRYSLER PT Cruiser, white, auto, 4 cyl., 68k miles 07 CHRYSLER PT Cruiser black, auto, 4 cyl 07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL, silver, grey leather 06 LINCOLN ZEPHYR grey, tan leather, sun roof 06 MERCURY MILAN PREMIER, mint green, V6, alloys 05 VW NEW JETTA gray, auto, 4 cyl 04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS silver, auto, sunroof 03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO, mid blue/light grey leather, navigation, AWD 01 VOLVO V70 STATION WAGON, blue/grey, leather, AWD 73 PORSCHE 914 green & black, 5 speed, 62k miles, $12,500

SUVS, VANS, TRUCKS, 4 X4’s

07 CADILLAC SRX silver, 3rd seat, navigation, AWD 06 CHRYSLER PACIFICA TOURING, red, 3rd seat (AWD) 06 FORD EXPLORER XLT, black, 3rd seat, 4x4 06 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD blue, grey leather 4x4 06 NISSAN TITAN KING CAB SE white, auto 50k miles 4x4 truck 06 CHEVY TRAILBLZAER LS, SILVER, 4X4 06 PONTIAC TORRENT black/black leather sunroof, AWD 05 FORD ESCAPE LTD green, tan leather, V6, 4x4 05 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB SPORT, blue, auto, 4x4 truck 04 DODGE DURANGO LTD, gray, gray leather, 3rd seat, 4x4 04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS, silver (AWD) 04 CHEVY AVALANCHE Z71, green, 4 door, 4x4 truck 04 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB SLT SILVER, 4 door, 4x4 truck 04 FORD FREESTAR, blue, 4 door, 7 passenger mini van 04 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE OVERLAND graphite grey, 2 tone leather, sunroof, 4x4 03 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LTZ, blue, two tone leather, V6, 4x4 03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT, silver, 3rd seat, 4x4 03 FORD EXPLORER SPORT TRAC XLT, 4 door, green, tan, leather, 4x4 02 GMC ENVOY SLE, brown, V6, 4x4 02 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE, Sage, sun roof, autop, 4x4 01 FORD F150 XLT Blue/tan, 4 door, 4x4 truck 01 CHEVY BLAZER green, 4 door, 4x4 01 FORD EXPLORER sport silver, grey leather, 3x4 sunroof 00 CHEVY SILVERADO XCAB, 2WD truck, burgundy 89 CHEVY 1500, 4X4 TRUCK

St# N 2 0 76 5 , Sta nd a rd R o o f

M SR P $31,145

2 4 ,2 2 5 ** *

$

0 0

St# N 2 18 9 9 , w / Po w erPk g, Highro o f

2 7,79 8

0 0

**

*

2012 NISSA N NV 2500 V-6 SV LO C KSM ITH P A C KA G E TR U C K

C O M P A NY DEM O

M SR P $33,178

GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT, NO CREDIT

AUDI S5 CONV.

2012 NV 2500 V-8 S

M SR P $27,320

343-1959

11

SELLIN EM !

AN D W E’RE

1009 Penn Ave Scranton 18509 Across from Scranton Prep

Call Our Auto Credit Hot Line to get Pre-approved for a Car Loan!

412 Autos for Sale

Innovation That W orks For A ll.

TH E A LL NEW 2012

speed. 81,000 miles. 4 new tires, Inspected until 3/1/13. $2795 negotiable. 570-417-4731

SUZUKI ‘06 SWIFT RENO 4 cylinder. Automat-

412 Autos for Sale

P O L L O CK

4 auto, good condition 75k. $2,150.

OLDS ‘98 ACHIVEA 2 door, 4 cyl. 5

412 Autos for Sale

Ken

PONTIAC ‘99 GRAND AM door, 6 cylinder,

Current Inspection On All Vehicles DEALER

412 Autos for Sale

$

S AL E P R ICE

27,792

*

2012 NV 1500 V-6 SV M SR P $28,015 St# N 2 0 74 3 , Sta nd a rd R o o f, Po w erLo c k s , W ind o w s , M irro rs

$

2 4 ,8 6 1** * 00

Inc lude s allR e bate s and D is c ounts . N is s an F le e t doe s not apply. D oe s not qualify for $700 additionalc as h re bate or graphic s pac k age .

Au to m a tic , PW , PD L, Tilt, Cru is e

2012 NV 2500 V-8 SV

2012 NV 2500 V8 S

$

M SR P $32,560 St# N 2 14 4 4 , Highro o f, Po w erLo c k s , W ind o w s , M irro rs

2 9 ,14 0

00

**

D on’t M iss This!

M SR P $31,520

St# N 2 172 9 , w / Po w erPk g, Highro o f

*

$

2 8 ,12 2 ** * 00

C hoose O ne O fThe Follow ing O ptions: Stew art B enson NV*PC lus argo M anagem ent P kg or $700 A dditionalC ash R ebate Direct:570-760-8518

C U STO M IZA B LE FO R A PER FEC T FIT

**Tax and tags additional. N ot re s pons ible for ty pographic al e rrors . P hotos for illus tration only .A ll s ale pric e s inc lude $500 c us tom e r c as h in lie u of s pe c ial A P R rate s . S e e de ale r for full de tails .

I’ L L C O M E T O Y O U R

P ER S O N A L IZED A P P O IN TM EN TS !

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

B U S IN ES S !

229M UN DY S T.W IL K E S -BA RRE ,P A .

w w w.ke412n polloc kn is412s a Autos n .c om Autos for Sale for Sale

® 412 Autos for Sale


SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 3G TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N

THA N K YOU!

OF P

FOR A P RIL 2012**

HOW DO W E DO IT? OUR CUS TOM E RS !

2 0 12 N IS S AN

IN STO C K O NLY !

FW D

O V ER 10 0 FW D & AW D TO C H O O S E FR O M ! M O R E A R R IV IN G D A ILY!

LLee a s e FFoo r

PPee r Mo. + Ta x

A va ila b le A t Th is P ric e !

$199 perm onth plustax.39 m onth lease;12,000 m i lesperyear;Resi dual=$11,986.M ustbe approved thru NM AC @ Ti er1;$1999 Cash D ow n orTrade Equi ty (+)plusregi strati on fees; Totaldue atdeli very=$2,202.50.$1000 Ni ssan Lease Rebate i ncluded

20

W ITH $500 NISSAN REBATE & $500 NISSAN CAPTIVE CASH APPLIED.

OR

$ $ 19 19 , 1 9 9 9 5 1 9 9

SSta t a rrtin t in g AAtt OOnn lly: y:

4 Cyl,CVT,AC,AM /FM /CD,PW ,PD L, Crui se,Ti lt,FloorM ats& Splash Guards

M SR P $23,050

Stock# N21596 M odel# 22112 Vin# 274973

CUSTOM ER SATISFACTION IN THE STATE E N N S YL V A N IA R O G U E S

IN NISSAN NEW SALES VOLUM E AND

TH E NU M B ER 1 NISSA N DEA L ER IN TH E NE A ND C ENTR A L P A R EG IO N!

6$ ,0000 00 OOFF FF M SSRP. R P. *

ON EVER Y N EW 20 12 N IS S AN ALTIM A S ED AN IN S TOCK !

®

**B a s ed On N is s a n’s April 2 0 12 Sa les To ta ls And N is s a n April 2 0 12 Cu s to m erSa tis fa c tio n R a tings .

1-8 66-70 4-0 672

w w w .ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om

229 M UN DY S TRE E T W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .

*Ta x a nd Ta g Ad d itio na l. $15 0 0 N is s a n R eb a te. $75 0 N M AC Ca ptive Ca s h Applied . All D ea lerInc entives a nd D is c o u nts Apply. M u s tFina nc eThro u gh N M AC a tTier “ 0 ” o rTier“ 1” . Prio rSa le Ex c lu d ed . W hile Su pplies La s t. In Sto c k Only. N o OvernightCa m ping. OfferEnd s 5 /15 /12 .

Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA

w w w .ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N


PAGE 4G

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

APR PLUS

M O S.

SIDE IMPACT AIR BAGS ANTI-THEFT SYSTEM

AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION SIRIUS SATELLITE RADIO ALUMINUM WHEELS AM/FM/CD POWER WINDOWS POWER LOCKS

KEYLESS ENTRY 1ST & 2ND ROW AIR CURTAINS MESSAGE CENTER TILT WHEEL

MPG MPG 24 Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied

**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

NEW 2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT FWD

NEW 2012 FORD FIESTA SE NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 4 DR Automatic, Air, Pwr. Mirrors, PDL, Advance Trac w/Electronic Stability Control, Side Curtains, AM/FM/CD, Cruise Control, 15” Alum. Wheels, Tilt Wheel, Keyless Entry w/Keypad,

24 Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

A P R

M O S.

Safety Canopy, Side Impact Air Bags, Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Auto., PDL, PW, Fog Lamps, Privacy Glass, Roof Rack, Air, 16” Alum. Wheels, CD, Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Rear Cargo Convenience Pkg.,

24 Mos.

24 Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

NEW

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

Overlooking Mohegan Sun 577 East Main St., Plains

Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

NEW 2011 FORD F-150 4X4 3.7L V6 Engine, XL Plus Pkg., Cruise Control, MyKey Sys., Pwr. Equipment Group, Pwr. Mirrors, 40/20/40 Cloth Seat, XL Decor Group, CD

APR PLUS

M O S.

24 Mos.

FORD EXPLORER

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

NEW

FORD TAURUS SEL AWD

Auto., 3.5L V6, SYNC, Reverse Sensing Sys., CD, Keyless Entry with Keypad, PW, PDL, 18”Alum. Wheels, Anti-Theft Perimeter Alarm, Sirius Satellite Radio,

3.5L Engine, MyFord Display, CD, Auto. Climate Control, PL, Pwr. Mirrors, PW, 17” Steel Wheels, Keyless Entry, MyKey, Cruise Control,

24 Mos.

CALL NOW 823-8888 1-800-817-FORD

M O S.

*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

FORD EDGE NEW

Pwr. Windows, PDL, Air, Advance Trac with Roll Stability Control, Remote Keyless Entry w/Keypad, CD, MyFord, Convenience Group, Auto Headlamps, Reverse Sensing Sys.

APR PLUS

M O S.

PLUS

24 Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

NEW 2012 FORD FUSION SEL NEW 2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X4 Auto., CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Message Center,

APR

Safety Canopy, Side Impact Air Bags, Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Auto., PDL, PW, Fog Lamps, Privacy Glass, Roof Rack, Air, 16” Alum. Wheels, CD, Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Rear Cargo Convenience Pkg.,

Auto., CD, Anti-Theft Sys., Side Curtain Air Bags, 16” Alloy Wheels, Tilt Wheel, AC, Instrument Cluster, Message Center, Fog Lamps, MyKey, Convenience Pkg., Cruise Control, Perimeter Alarm, MyFord, SYNC, Sirius Satellite Radio,

24 Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.

24 Mos. *Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 5G

w w w. M a t t B u r n e H o n d a . c o m

2012 HONDA ACCORD LX

MPG 23 City 34 HWY

$0 DOWN PAYMENT

4 dr, Auto Trans, AC, PW, PL, Cruise, ABS, 6 Air Bags, Tilt, Keyless Entry, AM/FM/CD, Model #CP2F3CEW

219

$

*

$219 Lease Per Mo. For 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment. 1st Payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $13,149.90.

Thank You To Our Customers

0

APR FINANCING .9% NOW AVAILABLE!

2012 HONDA CIVIC LX SEDAN

$0 DOWN PAYMENT

*On select models to qualified buyers for limited term.

2012 HONDA PILOT LX MPG 17 City 24 HWY

MPG 28 City 39 HWY • Model #FB2F5CEW • 140-hp 16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC® • 5-Speed Automatic Transmission • Air Conditioning with Air-Filtration System • Power Windows/Locks/Mirrors • Cruise Control • Remote Entry • 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 4 Speakers • ABS • Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold Front Airbags (SRS) • Front Side Airbags with Passenger-Side Occupant Position Detection System (OPDS) • Side Curtain Airbags ***Lease ease 36 Months through ahfc ahfc. $0 Down Payment Payment.

199

$

* ** Per Mo. L ease Lease

1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $11,952.95

300

• 250-hp 24-Valve SOHC i-VTEC® • 5-Speed Automatic Transmission • 8 Passenger Seating • Variable Torque Management® 4-Wheel Drive System (VTM-4®) • Vehicle Stability AssistTM (VSA®) with Traction Control • Power WIndows/Locks/Mirrors • Front and Rear Air Conditioning with Air-Filtration System • 229-Watt AM/ FM/CD Audio System with 7 Speakers including Subwoofer • Remote Entry • ABS • Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold Front Airbags (SRS) • Front Side Airbags with Passenger-Side Occupant Position Detection ****Lease Lease 36 Months through ahfc ahfc. $0 Down Payment Payment. System (OPDS) 1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $17,388.00

329

$

08 HONDA CRV LX

$15,250

$18,950

2009 HONDA PILOT EX 4WD Mocha, 17K Miles

$28,500 50 TO CHOOSE FROM

08 HONDA ACCORD LXP SDN

$15,950

09 HONDA CIVIC EX SDN

Red, 8K

$16,950

IN STOCK! TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR TRADE!

$17,950

$18,950

08 HONDA ACCORD EXL SDN Silver, 22K

L ease Lease

Black, 37K Miles

09 HONDA ACCORD EX CPE Gray, 33K

* Per ***Mo.

• Model RM4H5CJW • 185-hp • 2.4-Liter, 16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC® 4-Cylinder Engine • Real Time AWD with Intelligent Control System™ • Vehicle Stability Assist™ (VSA®) with Traction Control • Automatic Transmission • Cruise Control • A/C • One-Touch Power Moonroof with Tilt Feature • Remote Entry System • Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink® • Multi-angle rearview camera with guidelines • 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 6 Speakers • Bluetooth® Streaming Audio • Pandora® Internet Radio compatibility • SMS Text Message Function • USB Audio Interface • Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) • Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold Front Airbags (SRS) • Front Side Airbags with Passenger-Side Occupant Position Detection System (OPDS) • Side Curtain Airbags with Rollover Sensor

09 HONDA CIVIC HYBRID SEDAN

TO

Blue, 33K

MPG 22 City 30 HWY

LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY. DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACUTAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE.

A HOND S LE C I ! H M O E R F V CHOOSE

Lt Blue, 63K

2012 HONDA CR-V EX

$0 DOWN PAYMENT

Used Cars

7-Year/100,000-Mile Powertrain Warranty 12 month/12,000-Mile Non Powertrain Warranty 150-Point Mechanical & Appearance Inspection Vehicle History Report

*From the original date of first use when said as a new vehicle *Prior sales excluded. Tax & tags Extra. Expires 05-31-12

Open Monday - Thursday 9-9 Friday & Saturday 9-5

07 HONDA CRV EXL Blue, 39K

$19,350

11 HONDA CROSSTOUR EXL 4WD Green, 18K

$29,950

11 HONDA CRZ EX White, 6K

$19,950

09 HONDA PILOT EX Silver, 33K

$25,950

09 HONDA ACCORD EXL-V6 Silver, 26K

$20,950

1110 Wyoming Ave, Scranton, PA 1-800-NEXT-HONDA 570-341-1400


PAGE 6G

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

A TOP 10 IN THE NATION SUZUKI SALES VOLUME DEALER 2 YEARS RUNNING***

JUST ANNOUNCED

0

%

72

FOR UP TO

** MO.

APR AVAILABLE ON ALL NEW 2012 SUZUKI MODELS! (In Lieu Of Rebates)

NOW WHAT’S STOPPING YOU?

Charles and Holly from Tunkhannock

Margaret from Mountaintop

Rita from Miners Mills

2012 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 4WD

Stk# S1976

0%

2012 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD

NEW

Stk#S1987

$

24,284* 22,499* $

- 1,500* - $ 500*

BUY NOW FOR:

20,499*

NEW Stk#S2100

2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI S FWD

72

3-Mode Intelligent All-Wheel Drive, 8 Standard Airbags, Power Windows, Power Locks, Power Manufacturer Rebate Owner Loyalty Rebate Mirrors, 6 Spd Transmission

$

$

20,463* 18,999* $

2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI S AWD

NEW

14,899*

Stk#S2056

0%

- 1,500* - $ 500*

BUY NOW FOR:

16,999*

Advanced Intelligent All-Wheel Drive, 8 Standard Airbags, Dual Zone Digital Climate Control, Automatic CVT Transmission, TouchFree Smart Key, Power Windows, Power Locks, Molded Mud Flap Package

$

23,669* 21,999* $

$

- 1,500* - $ 500*

Manufacturer Rebate Owner Loyalty Rebate

BUY NOW FOR:

19,999*

BUY NOW FOR:

13,699*

Stk#S2005

2012 SUZUKI EQUATOR CREW CAB SPORT 4X4

0% APR

AVAILABLE UP TO

72

EXIT 175

81 ROUTE 315 ROUTE 315

KEN POLLOCK SUZUKI

MOS.**

4.0L V6 w/ Automatic Transmission, $ MSRP w/ Accessories Dual Stage Airbags, 17” Aluminum $ Wheels, 4-Wheel Anti-Lock Ken Pollock Sale Price Braking System, Six Standard $ Manufacturer Rebate - 2,000* Airbags, Power Windows, $ Owner Loyalty Rebate - 500* Power Locks

29,789* 27,499*

$

BUY NOW FOR:

24,999*

*Tax and tags additional. Buy now for sale price includes Suzuki Manufacturer rebates of $1,000 on 2012 Suzuki SX4 AWD, SX4 Sedan; $1,500 Suzuki Manufacturer Rebates on Suzuki Grand Vitara and Kizashi; $2,000 Manufacturer Rebates on Suzuki Equator. Buy now for sale price includes $500 Suzuki Owner Loyalty on 2012 Suzuki SX4 Sedan, Equator, SX4 Crossover, Kizashi and Grand Vitara. All Ken Pollock Suzuki discounts applied. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. 0% financing in lieu of Suzuki Manufacturers rebates, Owner Loyalty is applicable. Buy now for sale prices valid on IN STOCK vehicles only. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. **O% APR in lieu of Rebates (for “S” tier approvals). $13.89 for every $1000 Financed for 72 Months. Offer is with No Money Down. Offer Ends May 31, 2012. See salesperson for details.***Based on 2010 and 2011 President’s Club Standings.

INTERSTATE

- 1,000* - $ 500*

Manufacturer Rebate Owner Loyalty Rebate

MOS.**

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

16,570* 15,199* $

$

AVAILABLE UP TO

72

MOS.**

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

APR

$

Manufacturer Rebate Owner Loyalty Rebate

1,000* - $ 500*

LE Popular Package, 8 Standard Airbags, 6 Speed Transmission, Power Windows, Power Locks, Power Mirrors, Alloy Wheels

$

MOS.**

MSRP w/ Accessories $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

72

BUY NOW FOR:

AVAILABLE UP TO

8 Standard Airbags, Dual Digital Climate Control, Power Windows, Power Locks, Power Mirrors, AM/FM/CD

18,019* 16,399* $

$

APR

72

APR

AVAILABLE UP TO

MOS.**

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

NEW

0%

0%

AVAILABLE UP TO

$

Manufacturer Rebate Owner Loyalty Rebate

Stk#S2081

2012 SUZUKI SX4 SEDAN

APR

MOS.**

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

NEW

Amanda from Noxen

0%

AVAILABLE UP TO

4 Wheel Drive, Voice Activated Navigation w/ Blue Tooth, Automatic Transmission, Power Windows, Power Locks, Power Mirrors, Electronic Stability Control

THESE PEOPLE DID!

Jerome & Anita from Pittston

Becky from Wilkes-Barre

APR

72

TODAY!

I Love My Suzuki Car Club!

Mark from Mountaintop

The “S” Family from Scranton

NEW

Join The

CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE! WE’RE EASY TO FIND!

JUST OFF EXIT 175 RTE I-81 • PITTSTON

0

%

APR

FINANCING AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED BUYERS*


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 412 Autos for Sale

ACURA `03 3.2 TL-S 4 door, sport sedan,

auto, full power, exceptional condition. Asking $6375. negotiable. Call 570-674-4713

ACURA `08 TL

412 Autos for Sale

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

BUICK ‘98 CENTURY CUSTOM V6, BARGAIN

PRICE! $2,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CADILLAC ‘11 STS 13,000 Miles, Type S, automatic and manual transmission. 53,000 miles. $18,959 570-479-3452 Audi `01 A6 Quattro 123,000 miles, 4.2 liter V8, 300hp, silver with black leather,heated steering wheel, new run flat tires, 17” rims, 22 mpg, German mechanic owned. Reduced $4995. 570-822-6785

BMW `06 650 CI

Black convertible, beige leather, auto transmission, all power. $35,750. 570-283-5090 or 570-779-3534

BMW ‘98 740 IL White with beige

leather interior. New tires, sunroof, heated seats. 5 cd player 106,000 miles. Excellent condition. $4,800. OBO 570-451-3259 570-604-0053

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

BUICK ‘09 ENCLAVE

Showroom condition. $38,800 MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

CHEVROLET `65 CORVAIR 4 speed, 4 door, $2,500. 570-851-4416

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

CHEVROLET `94 CAMARO Z28, LT1, 350 Automatic, tilt, cruise, A/C, power windows, power brakes, power steering. All original. $5000 570-479-4486

CHEVY ‘95 ASTRO

MARK III CONVERSION VAN. Hightop. 93K. 7 passenger. TV/VCP/Stereo. Loaded. Great condition. $3,495 (570) 574-2199

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘04 MONTE CARLO Silver with Black

CXL top of the line. AWD, 50K original miles. 1 owner. Cocoa brown metallic. Dual sunroofs, power memory cooled and heated seats. 3rd row seating. DVD rear screen, navigation system, balance of factory warranty. Bought new over $50,000. Asking $25,900. Trade ins welcome 570-466-2771

CADILLAC ‘00 DTS Tan, satellite

radio, leather, moon roof, loaded excellent condition. 136k miles. $4,995.

570-814-2809

Leather, Sunroof, Very Sharp! $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHRYSLER `04 SEBRING LXI CONVERTIBLE

Low miles - 54,000. V6. FWD. Leather interior. Great shape. A/C. CD. All power. $6,900. Negotiable New inspection & tires. (570) 760-1005

DODGE `00 DURANGO SPORT 4.7 V8, 4WD, 3rd

row seat, runs good, needs body work $1900. 570-902-5623

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 7G

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

CROSSROAD MOTORS

FORD ‘09 ESCAPE LTD

570-825-7988

Only 14k miles, leather moonroof, 1 owner $21,880

700 Sans Souci Highway WE SELL FOR LESS!! ‘11 DODGE DAKOTA CREW 4x4, Bighorn 6 cyl. 14k, Factory Warranty. $21,299 ‘11 Ford Escape XLT, 4x4, 26k, Factory Warranty, 6 Cylinder $20,399 ‘11 Nissan Rogue AWD, 17k, Factory Warranty. $19,299 ‘08 Chrysler Sebring Conv. Touring 6 cyl. 32k $12,899 ‘08 SUBARU Special Edition 42K. 5 speed, Factory warranty. $11,799 ‘05 HONDA CRV EX 4x4 65k, a title. $12,799 ‘06 FORD FREESTAR 62k, Rear air A/C $7999 ‘01 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Executive 74K $5,199 ‘11 Toyota Rav 4 4x4 AT only 8,000 miles, new condition $22,999 TITLE TAGS FULL NOTARY SERVICE 6 M ONTH WARRANTY

DODGE ‘08 AVENGER

R/T AWD 1 owner, only 15k miles, leather, alloys

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649

FORD `94 MUSTANG GT Convertible, candy

apple red. Tan interior & top. 5.0, 5 speed. Totally original, low original miles. $6,800 570-283-8235

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

FORD ‘83 MUSTANG 5.0 GT. FAST!

70,000 original miles. Black with black leather interior. California car, 5 speed, T-tops, Posi rear end, traction bars, power windows, rear defroster, cruise, tilt wheel, all factory. New carburetor and Flow Master. Great Car! $5000, Or best offer. 570-468-2609

HONDA ‘04 CRV

All wheel drive, cruise, CD player, low miles. $11,575

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HONDA ‘08 ACCORD 4 door, 4 cylinder, HONDA ‘08 ACCORD 4 door, EXL with

navigation system. 4 cyl, silver w/ black interior. Satellite radio, 6CD changer, heated leather seats, high, highway miles. Well maintained. Monthly service record available. Call Bob. 570-479-0195

Do you need more space? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way to clean out your closets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

HYUNDAI ‘08 AZZURA

Leather moonroof & much more 1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘02 TAURUS SES LIKE NEW!

$3,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

VITO’S & GINO’S

Wanted:

auto $16,995 WARRANTY MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

$17,575 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

412 Autos for Sale

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995 HYUNDAI ‘08 ELANTRA GLS

only 25,000 miles,

One owner, $14,880 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HYUNDAI ‘08 SANTE FE

1 owner, Alloy, CD player $19,944

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

KT AUTO

www.ktauto.com 430 W. Market St. Scranton, PA 570-346-1133 Chevy ‘11 Impala LT 4 in stock $13,995 Chevy ‘10 Impala LT 2 in stock Fla. cars $12,995 Chevy ‘10 HHR 2 in stock, low miles $12,995 Pontiac ‘08 G-6 6 in stock $10,995 Chevy ‘08 HHR LS $9,995 Saturn ‘08 VUE FWD $12,995

WANTED!

ALL JUNK CARS! CA$H PAID

570-301-3602

JEEP `96 GRAND CHEROKEE V8 Automatic, four

wheel drive, air conditioning, new tires, brakes & transmission. $3,300. 570-972-9685

80,000 miles, excellent condition, all options. Recently serviced. New tires. $8,800. 570-388-6669

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

NISSAN ‘09 ALTIMA SL

SUBARU

Leather moonroof, smartkey, 1 owner

$19,995 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

NISSAN 09 MORANO SL 1 owner, AWD, Alloys, $22,345 560 Pierce St.

MERCEDES-BENZ `91 350 SD Grey metallic with

beige leather interior. Turbo diesel. Auto. All power options. Cruise. Sunroof. New inspection, oil change, front brakes, water pump, injector & clutch fan. 4 new tires. Runs excellent & great MPG’s. Florida car. No rust. Excellent condition. $5,900. Trade welcome. Call 570-817-6000

MERCURY ‘10 MARINER

Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

NISSAN 09 ROGUE S 1 owner, AWD $17,950 560 Pierce St.

Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

SATURN ‘03 VUE

Low miles, leather & alloys. $8,800

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

SUBARU ‘11 IMPREZA PREMIUM. AWD,

1 owner, Low miles, AWD $19,840 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

3,000 miles. Like new, metallic silver, satellite radio, 4 door, 170 hp. $17,500 OBO 570-696-3447 570-574-2799

SUBARU FORESTER’S

NISSAN `99 SENTRA

XE. Runs excellent, great gas mileage. Moving - must sell. Asking $2,800, negotiable. Call 570-852-7323

PONTIAC ‘06 8 G6 GTP door, red with

2 black interior, V6, sunroof, remote start, R-Title, 52,000 miles. Priced to sell at $7200 firm. (570) 283-1756

IMPREZA’S

4

to choose From

starting at $12,400 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

INFINITI ‘03 G35

Sedan. Silver with dark charcoal interior. 105,000 miles. All available options. Looks and runs like new. $8999 Call Rick 762-8165

LEXUS `01 ES 300

$14,990 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

412 Autos for Sale

to choose From

starting at $11,450 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

112K miles. Blue, 5 speed. Air, power windows/locks, CD/cassette, Keyless entry, sunroof, new battery. Car drives and has current PA inspection. Slight rust on corner of passenger door. Clutch slips on hard acceleration. This is why its thousands less than Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO. Make an offer! Call 570-592-1629

TOYOTA ‘09 CAMRY 18,000 Miles,

1 owner, 4 cylinder. $16,900 MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR

VW `87 GOLF

Excellent runner with constant servicing & necessary preventative maintenance. Repair invoices available. Approx 98,131 miles. Good condition, new inspection. $1,500. Call 570-282-2579

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

FORD ‘65 GALAXIE

Convertible, white with red leather interior. 64,000 original miles. Beautiful car. Asking. $10,500 570-371-2151

Boat? Car? Truck? Motorcycle? Airplane? Whatever it is, sell it with a Classified ad. 570-829-7130

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

6 speed, 24’ box with tail gate. 26000 lb. $6995.00 or BO 570-655-2804

Selling your Camper? Place an ad and find a new owner. 570-829-7130

439

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT

Motorcycles

HARLEY ‘07 SCREAMING EAGLE DYNA Assembled by

6 cylinder automatic. 52k original miles. Florida car. $1500. 570-899-1896

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED!

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

FREIGHTLINER ‘96 FL70 5.9L CUMMINS,

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. Reduced price to $26,000. Call 570-825-6272

Custom Vehicle Operations. Very Unique, Fast Bike. 1800cc. 10,000 miles. Performance Rinehart pipes, comfortable Mustang seat with back rest and detachable rack , Kuryakyn pegs and grips, color matched frame, SE heavy breather air filter comes with HD dust cover and gold CVO owners key. Excellent condition. Silver Rush/ Midnight Black. Asking $12,500 Call Ron @ 570- 868-3330

HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON SPORTSTER CUSTOM Loud pipes.

VOLVO 850 ‘95 WAGON Runs good,

needs some work. Will take offer. 347-693-4156

427

Must Sell! Appraised for $9,200 • All original

45,000 miles • 350 Rocket engine • Fender skirts • Always garaged Will sell for $6,000 Serious inquires only 570690-0727

421

Near Mint 174 miles - yes, One hundred and seventy four miles on the clock, original owner. $8000. 570-876-2816

HARLEY DAVIDSON `07

Road King Classic FLHRC. Burgundy / Cream. 6 speed. Cruise control. Back rests, grips, battery tender, cover. Willie G accessories. 19,000 miles. $13,250. Williamsport, PA 262-993-4228

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 Electra Glide, Ultra

Boats & Marinas

Classic, many chrome accessories, 13k miles, Metallic Emerald Green. Garage kept, like new condition. Includes Harley cover. $12,900 570-718-6769 570-709-4937

GRUMMAN ‘95 DEEPV 16’ 48hp Evinrude 50 lb thrust electric motor. All tackle and life vests included. Live well, fish finder. $4,000 570-579-3975

SILVERCRAFT

Heavy duty 14’ aluminum boat with trailer, great shape. $1,250. 570-822-8704 or cell 570-498-5327

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘03 DYNA WIDE GLIDE

Golden Anniversary. Silver/Black. New Tires. Extras. Excellent Condition. 19,000 miles $10,000. 570-639-2539

T’APP INTO IT. GET THE FREE TIMES LEADER APP ADDED TO YOUR IPAD NOW!

3 EASY WAYS Search and install The Times Leader app from the iPad store. OR

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PAGE 8G

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 439

412 Autos for Sale

VULLO MOTORS, INC.

OVER

RATES STARTING @ 2.19%

65

YEARS

(570)-344-1600

100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL

VVisit isit UUss @ vullomotors.com

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘09 V-ROD MUSCLE

412 Autos for Sale

Sprin g Specia l

S A V E 10% P a in tle s s De n t Re m ova l

R evolutionary Process to R em ove Sm allD ents - D ings Even H ailD am age.

288-6459 A uthoriz e d Bos c h S e rvic e De a le r

VRSCF. 1250 cc. Brilliant silver, 7,988 miles. Excellent condition. ABS, Brembo triple disc brakes, factory security, + extras. Original owner, garage kept. $12,000. 570-762-6893

412 Autos for Sale

S

439

Motorcycles

HSoft ARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80 riding FLH. King of the Highway! Mint original antique show winner. Factory spot lights, wide white tires, biggest Harley built. Only 28,000 original miles! Never needs inspection, permanent registration. $7,995 OBO 570-905-9348

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

412 Autos for Sale

AVE

TH OUS AN D S CL E AN R E L I ABL E L OW M I L E CAR S

SP EC IA L O F TH E W EEK

2010 C H EVR O LET C O B A LT 50K M iles, 1 O w ner, N ew Tires, S irius R adio

V IEW M O R E A T P ETIL L O M O TO R S.C O M G O O D C R ED IT G ETS L O W IN TER EST R A TES!

P E TTILIL L O M OOTOR TO R S • 5570-457-5441 7 0 -4 5 7 -5 4 4 1

• Bankruptcy .........“WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT” • Divorce .............“WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT” • Fixed Income ......“WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT” • First Time Buyer...“WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT” • Repo ................“WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT” • Foreclosure ........“WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT” • Unemployment ....“WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT”

412 Autos for Sale

P E TTILIL L O M OTOR O TO R S • 570-457-5441 5 7 0 -4 5 7 -5 4 4 1

412 Autos for Sale

Motorcycles

439

Motorcycles

MATTIE AUTOMOTIVE 220 Bennett Street, Luzerne Motorcycle State Inspection, Tire Sales & Maintenance 570-283-1098

SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800 GL INTRUDER Garage kept, no rust, lots of chrome, black with teal green flake. Includes storage jack & 2 helmets. $3600 570-410-1026

RARE CAR!

1 of 500 ted Edition Limi

#12598A, 2007 Indy 500 Pace 400HP 6-Speed Paddle Shift Automatic Transmission, Car Replica, PACE CAR GRAPHICS, 6.0L Atomic Orange Metallic Tintcoat, 3LT Preferred Equipment Indy Seat Embroidery, Z06 Style Group, AM/FM/CD, DVD Navigation, Memory Package, Sport Atomic Orange Spoiler, Interior Suspension, Heated Seats, Power Telescoping & Manual Tilt Steering Wheel, Heads-Up display, Bose Premium Stereo, Trim & Door Handles Adjustable Sport Bucket Seats with Perforated Leather Inserts, *

www.valleychevrolet.com

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC NOW BACK IN PA.

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, , awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

412 Autos for Sale

ONLY 19K MILES

$39 999* ,

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

DODGE ‘05 CARAVAN

SXT Special Edition. Stow and go, beautiful van. Leather heated seats with sunroof, tinted windows, luggage rack. Brandy color, 85K miles. $11,875 negotiable 570-301-4929

FORD ‘02 EXPLORER Red, XLT, Original

non-smoking owner, garaged, synthetic oil since new, excellent in and out. New tires and battery. 90,000 miles. $7,500 (570) 403-3016

MOTORHOME COACHMAN 2005 ENCORE 380DS 15,500 miles Cat engine, Allison Auto trans, New Tires, New Aluminum Wheels, new Brakes Satellite antenna. Has R-TITLE repaired in 2008. perfect condition.$74,500. Any Questions call 570-655-2804

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

CHEVY ‘03 IMPALA

One owner, only 42k miles. $8,550

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘02 F150 Extra Cab. 6

Cylinder, 5 speed. Air. 2WD. $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘06 ESCAPE XLT

4x4. Sunroof. Like new. $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘00 EXPLORER XLT

eXTRA cLEAN! 4X4. $3,995. 570-696-4377

Compass Driving Mirror, Home Remote Steering Wheel Radio Controls, Power Convertible Top, Electronic Instramentation Performance, Performance Tuned Tires

451

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORDV6.‘04Clean, EXPLORER

Clean SUV! 4WD $5995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

SUZUKI 2006 BOULEVARD 4,000 miles, garage kept, excellent condition. $3,000 570-970-3962

2007 CHEVROLET CORVETTE INDY 500 PACE CAR CONVERTIBLE

442 RVs & Campers

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘05 SILVERADO X CAB

2 WHEEL DRIVE $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

412 Autos for Sale

NISSAN `04 PATHFINDER ARMADA Excellent condition.

Too many options to list. Runs & looks excellent. $10,995 570-655-6132 or 570-466-8824

412 Autos for Sale

FORD ‘04 RANGER

Super Cab One Owner, 4x4, 5 Speed, Highway miles. Sharp Truck! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

GMC ‘05 ENVOY SLE moonroof, many extras. $10,850 560 Pierce St.

Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HYANDAI ‘11 SANTA FE

1 owner, only 7k miles. $22,900 560 Pierce Street

Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

MERCURY `03 MOUNTAINEER

AWD. Third row seating. Economical 6 cylinder automatic. Fully loaded with all available options. 93k pampered miles. Garage kept. Safety / emissions inspected and ready to go. Sale priced at $7595. Trade-ins accepted. Tag & title processing available with purchase. Call Fran for an appointment to see this outstanding SUV. 570-466-2771 Scranton

MITSUBISHI `11

OUTLANDER SPORT SE AWD, Black interi-

or/exterior, start/ stop engine with keyless entry, heated seats, 18” alloy wheels, many extra features. Only Low Miles. 10 year, 100,000 mile warranty. $22,500. Willing to negotiate. Serious inquires only - must sell, going to law school. (570) 793-6844

NISSAN ‘97 PICKUP XE 4WD, alloys, 5 speed. $6,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

SUZUKI `07 XL-7 56,000 miles,

automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, all power, CD player, leather interior, tinted windows, custom wheels, $13,000 Call 570-829-8753 Before 5:00 p.m.

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

VITO’S & GINO’S

Wanted:

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 9G

AM E ER RI C CA A’ S

NE EW W

C CA AR

AL LTER TER N A ATI TI V E

H A PPY M OTH E R S D AY ! FR O M O U R FA M ILY A T NA TIO NW IDE C A R SA LES W H ER E

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#18581A, L eather, M oon roof, Chrom e W heels, O n ly 65K M iles, F resh Trad e

$

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$

#18686, Alloys, RearS p oiler, S trip e P ackage

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#18650A, L ow M iles, P W , P L , 4x4, Alloys

$

*

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$

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#18655A, Alloys, CD , K eyless En try

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#18698, L eather, S u n roof, Backu p Cam era, AW D

S a le P ric e

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1.99

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19 ,5 6 9 *

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#18652, P W , P L , CD , Au to, K eyless

CH ECK OU T OU R FU L L IN VEN TOR Y AT

n a tion w id e c a rs a le s .n e t M on d a y-Frid a y 9a m -8 p m S a tu rd a y 9a m -5p m

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BUY N AATIO T I O N W IIDD E A N D S AAVE AN VE TTHH O U S AANN D S !

CAL L 3 0 1- CAR S

*PRICES + TAX & TAGS. ARTWORK FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. OFFERS END 5/31/12. **UP TO 63 MONTHS WITH BANK APPROVAL.

$

S a le P ric e

15 ,9 3 2 *

C A R S,TR U C KS C O NVER TIB LES SU V’S,VA NS


PAGE 10G

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

2008 DODGE RAM 3500 REG CAB DUALLY 4X4

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 11G

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

USED CARS 2003 CHEVY CORVETTE Only 5K Miles, 6-Speed, As-New Condition

Only 54K Miles, Auto, Diesel Engine

26,995

2010 TOYOTA TUNDRA DOUBLE CAB 4X4

Low Miles, Local New Car Trade

“Rock Warrior Edition”, TRD Pkg, Only 13K Miles

28,995

$

2002 CADILLAC DEVILLE

$

$

30,995

2003 FORD F-150 SUPER CREW

2009 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS

2008 CHEVY IMPALA LT

FX4 Pkg, Local New Car Trade

Ultimate Pkg, Only 52K Miles

Just 21K Pampered One Owner Miles

8,995

$

AS TRADED

8,995

13,995

$

$

$

2010 HYUNDAI TUCSON GLS

2007 GMC YUKON DENALI XL

2011 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL

2011 DODGE CHALLENGER SE

2011 GMC ACADIA SLT

2011 BUICK LUCERNE CXL

Just 18K Miles, Local One Owner

Just Traded, Navigation, Rear Entertainment

All Wheel Drive, 19K Miles, 7- Passenger

Choose From 2, Miles As Low As 15K

Leather Seating, 18K Miles, 7-Passenger

Leather Seating, Choose From 2

17,995

22,995

$

$

2011 KIA RIO LX

2010 DODGE CHARGER SXT

Auto, Air, Balance of Factory Warranty

FROM

Power Galore, Balance of Factory Warranty

11,200

$

FROM

2011 MAZDA CX-7

22,800

33,300

FROM

15,200

$

FROM

FROM

15,800

$

$

21,300

$

FROM

2011 CHEVY CAMARO LT CPE

19,900

FROM

$

32,300

FROM

2011 DODGE DAKOTA CREW CAB 4X4’S

Power Galore, Extra Sharp!

All Wheel Drive, Silver Beauty, 12K Miles

Auto, Power Group, Alloy Wheels

$

$

2011 NISSAN ROGUE SV

2011 VW JETTA SE

All Wheel Drive, Black Beauty, 17K Miles

FROM

FROM

22,500

FROM

$

All Wheel Drive, 18K Miles, Tons of Warranty

20,500

$

FROM

11,600

$

2011 CHRYSLER 200 LX

2012 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ

2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT GLS SDN’S

All Wheel Drive, Power Throughout, 16K Miles

New Body Style, Preferred Equipment

Leather, Moonroof, From 13K Miles

Choose From 5, Nice Colors

19,900

$

FROM

FROM

15,100

$

22,000

$

FROM

2010 NISSAN ALTIMA S

2010 VW BEETLE COUPE

2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING SEDAN

Choose From 3, Miles As Low As 12K

Choose From 2, Balance Of Factory Warranty

Preferred Equipment Pkg, Extra Sharp!

Black Beauty, 35K Miles, Power Equipped

Limited, Touring, Tons of Factory Warranty

20,600

FROM

18,600

$

2010 & 2011 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT

2011 FORD FUSION SE

All Wheel Drive, Low Miles

V6 Engine, Choose From 2

FROM

25,600

$

FROM

15,900

$

FROM

2011 CHEVY IMPALA LT One Owner, Balance of Warranty

16,600

$

11,900

$

FROM

2011 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS

2011 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4

$

2011 CHEVY HHR WAGON’S LS & LT Pkg, Choose From 5

2012 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4

FROM

23,500

$

FROM

Choose From 4, Low Miles

21,400

15,995

2011 GMC TERRAIN SLE-2

2011 CHEVY AVEO LT SDN’S

Big Horn Edition, Miles As Low As 14K

$

412 Autos for Sale

FROM

FROM

14,500

$

2011 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ

14,900

FROM

Power Galore, Balance of Warranty

13,700

2010 DODGE CALIBER SXT

One Owner, Balance of Warranty

17,800

Choose From 2, Tons of Warranty

14,700

$

14,200

$

FROM

2011 NISSAN SENTRA S

White Beauty, Power Galore

$

2010 DODGE AVENGER SXT

$

FROM

11,995

$

FROM

$

13,995

$

FROM

1-888-307-7077

*In stock vehicles only. Prices plus tax & tags. All rebates applied. See Salesperson for Details. Financing must be approve thru ally bank. See dealer for details.

HOURS: Monday Thru Thursday 8:00am - 7:00pm Friday & Saturday 8:00am - 5:00pm

of Scranton - NEPA

2012 Cadillac SRX

2012 Cadillac CTS

MSRP $43,085 39 MONTHS

MSRP $40,360 39 MONTHS

Luxury Edition

LEASE IT!

429

$

$

0

SECURITY DEPOSIT

Per Month + Tax*

All Wheel Drive

LEASE IT!

279

$

$

0

SECURITY DEPOSIT

Per Month + Tax*

Lease price based on a 2012 CTS Sdn with All Wheel Drive $40,360 MSRP. $279 per month plus 9% PA sales tax total $306 per month. 39 Month lease 10,000 miles per year. 39 Monthly payments total $11,934 $.25/mile penalty over 32,500 miles. $2000 down payment plus $279 first payment plus tax and tags due at delivery. Total due at delivery $2539 plus tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LEASE. Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by 5/31/2012. Requires ALLY Bank Tier S credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details. Example payment per thousand 16.67 per month. Example down payment 29%.

Lease price based on a 2012 SRX AWD Luxury Edition $43,085 MSRP. $429 per month plus 9% PA sales tax total $467 per month. 39 Month lease 10,000 miles per year. 39 Monthly payments total $18,213 $.25/mile penalty over 32,500 miles. $2000 down payment plus $429 first payment plus tax and tags due at delivery. Total due at delivery $2650 plus tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LEASE. Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by 5/31/2012. Requires ALLY Bank Tier S credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details. Example payment per thousand 16.67 per month. Example down payment 29%.

2012 Cadillac SRX Front Wheel Drive MSRP $36,075

LEASE IT!

24 MONTHS

329

$

0

$

SECURITY DEPOSIT

Per Month + Tax*

Lease price based on a 2012 SRX FWD Luxury Edition $36,075 MSRP. $329 per month plus 9% PA sales tax total $358 per month. 24 Month lease 10,000 miles per year. 24 Monthly payments total $8,616 $.25/mile penalty over 20,000 miles. $2000 down payment plus $329 first payment plus tax and tags due at delivery. Total due at delivery $2550 plus tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LEASE. Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by 5/31/2012. Requires ALLY Bank Tier S credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details. Example payment per thousand 16.67 per month. Example down payment 29%.

Premium Select Pre-Owned Cars Sunroof, Onstar, XM, 22K Miles

Dark Blue, Cashmere, Leather, Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, XM, Onstar, One Owner Low Mileage

25,998

$

18,997

$

2008 Cadillac DTS Premium White Diamond/Cashmere Leather, Navigation, Heated/Cooled Seats, 18” Performance Wheels, Sunroof

28,998

$

2011 Cadillac SRX AWD

2006 Cadillac DTS

Ultra View Sunroof, All Wheel Drive, Heated & Memory Seats

Memory Settings, Chrome Wheels, Dark Blue, 26,762 Miles

36,991

$

18,996

$

2010 Cadillac Escalade

#12533, Black/Black Leather, Navigation, 22” Chromes, Sunroof, Rear Entertainment, Only 22,506 Miles

R.J. BURNE 1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton

(570) 342-0107 • 1-888-880-6537 www.rjburne.com Mon-Thurs 9-8 • Sat 9-4

51,990

$

2006 Cadillac CTS White Diamond w/ Cashmere Interior, Special Edition, Sports Package

16,996

$

1205 Wyoming Ave. RJ Burne Cadillac

WYOMING AVE.

From Wilkes-Barre to Scranton Expressway 8 Blocks on Wyoming Avenue *TAX & TAGS EXTRA NC + Non-Certified

81

2007 Cadillac STS AWD

EXPWAY

2008 Cadillac CTS


PAGE 12G

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 708

468

Auto Parts

468

Auto Parts 468

AS ALWAYS ***HIGHEST PRICES*** PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED VEHICLES!!!

DRIVE IN PRICES

Call for Details (570) 459-9901 Vehicles must be COMPLETE!! PLUS ENTER TO WIN $500 CASH!! DRAWING TO BE HELD LAST DAY OF EACH MONTH

www.wegotused.com 412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

Auto Parts

468

Auto Parts

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES $300 AND UP

$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN, DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!

NOBODY Pays More

600 FINANCIAL 610

Business Opportunities

TURN KEY OPERATION

Located at Wyoming Valley Mall must sell. $125,000 negotiable. Ask for Rob 570-693-3323

570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

700 MERCHANDISE 702

Quality Cars

UseGAS your tax refund buy. FREE when you financeto a vehicle FREE GASup when you months finance a vehicle to 36 36 months (Seeup salesto representative for details) (See sales representative for details)

W Y O M I N G VA L L E Y

Air Conditioners

LG&AIRHeat CONDITIONER Pump

18,000.4 SEER R410 Refrigerant Wall mounted, ductless. 220 volt. One indoor, one outdoor unit with remote control. Call 570-288-0735

Line up a place to live in classified! 706

Arts/Crafts/ Hobbies

Counted cross stitch, books, Aida cloth, hoops, frames, kits. reasonably priced 288-5555 Victorian picture $35.00 Large botanical garden picture $40.00. 3 pottery vases $35.00 498-0977

708

Antiques & Collectibles

415 Kidder Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702

570.822.8870 steve@yourcarbank.com www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com

Antiques & Collectibles

Larry - Mt. Top 474-9202

412 Autos for Sale

Appliances

Football mini helmet autographed LaVar Arrington w/coa former Penn State player $40. Penn State Playerson professional teams, 200 count. $15. Cards, Philadelphia Eagles from 19781988, 30 count. $10. Phillies cards. 114 assorted 1978-1987 $10. 313-5214 or 313-3859 Hess trucks, new in boxes. 2000-2008 $50-$100 675-4383 RECORD COLLECTION, 207 records 78RPM and 70 records 45RPM, various artists, all for $10. Call 570-735-6638 SEWING MACHINE, Antique Singer pedal factory sewing machine with original table converted to electric. Works great! Model # 31-15. Serial #AA-90760. New belt, plus extra bobbins and needles. Asking $175 OBO Call 570-947-6531.

710

Appliances

Why Spend Hundreds on New or Used Appliances? Most problems with your appliances are usually simple and inexpensive to fix! Save your hard earned money, Let us take a look at it first! 30 years in the business. East Main Appliances 570-735-8271 Nanticoke

GENE’S RECONDITIONED APPLIANCES 60 Day Warranty Monday-Friday 8:00PM-5:00PM Saturday 8:00AM-11:00AM Gateway Shopping Center Kingston, PA

(570) 819-1966 DRYER white, electric Bosch vented, Axxis model WTA 3510, several years old & perfect operating condition. $125. 570-825-2961 REFRIGERATORAmana 17.9 cu. ft., bisque, very good condition. $90. Pick up after 6/13/12. 570-639-5066 STOVE coal burning stove Old fashioned antique white Dickson kitchen stove with warming closet has 6 lids. $550. 570-735-2081 WASHER/DRYER COMBO UNIT: Whirpool Washer/ electric dryer 24” combo unit. White, excellent condition $800. Call 570-814-7207

712

Baby Items

BABY ITEMS, Graco infant car seat with base $20, Kidsline farmyard themed nursery set with lamp and many accessories $20, Shermag glider and ottoman combo, oak wood with tan upholstery $50. All originally purchased at Babies’R’Us and in excellent condition. 570-902-9822

Food saver $125. call 570-562-1801

CAR SEATS. 2 infant/toddler 5 point harness car seats. 1 blue & grey, 1 black & grey. Both in good condition $20 each. 570-793-6040

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

Used appliances. Parts for all brands. 223 George Ave. Wilkes-Barre 570-820-8162

712

Baby Items

Crib, wooden. asking $100. Changing table, for baby $50. Car seats, (2) $20. each. & baby swing $20. 826-0451 or 479-0181

Floor Safe, antique, National Safe And Lock, inside drawers & locking compartment, measures 2’ 6.5 across $400. 570-592-7247

APPLIANCE PA RT S E T C .

ANTIQUE TOYS WANTED

710

STROLLER. New 3 wheel jogger still in box, never used. Paid $249, asking $125 & a new cradle baby swing with canopy. Paid $160, asking $100, or $225 for all items. Call 570-771-6081

716

Building Materials

BATHROOM matching sink set. Gerber white porcelain with mirror & medicine cabinet $80. 570-331-8183 TILE, approximately 300 available, can by smaller quantities. $2.00 per tile. 570-288-3947

726

Clothing

COAT

KENNETH COLE Beige, size 6, hardly worn. $75. 570-855-5385 COAT ladies black leather fully lined, size large, knee length wrap style, excellent condition f$80. Ladies size 10 tan suede calf hi boots with beige fur trim, never worn $15. 484-632-8072 DRESS. Mother of the Bride. Grey/silver, size 8, strapless top with flowers, beading & silver threading with sheer bolero jacket. Original price $1,200 asking $400 for all. 570-262-9483 Lamb coat, ladies, black persian, with white fur collar, size large, hardly worn. $50. 313-5214 or 313-3859

730

Computer Equipment & Software

COMPUTER. Complete set up includes office size desk & chair. Emachines CPU with XP Home. Craig flat screen monitor, Lexmark color printer. Excellent. All $300 570-489-2675

732

Exercise Equipment

Fitness Stepper, Wagen Tech. An effective cardiovascular workout. Fits in 12”x16” floor space. AAA battery, only $35. 287-8498

744

Furniture & Accessories

BEDROOM SET: Girl’s 5 piece bedroom set. Includes headboard, dresser with mirror, chest of drawers and more. $350. Call 570-868-6254

744

Furniture & Accessories

PITTSTON TWP. Mattress Queen Plush-Top Set New in Plastic Must Sell ASAP $150 Call Steve @ 570-280-9628

MATTRESS SALE

We Beat All Competitors Prices!

Mattress Guy

Twin sets: $139 Full sets: $159 Queen sets: $199 All New American Made 570-288-1898 ROCKER, wood/tapestry, $75. RECLINER, Burgundy velour cloth, $125. SOFA, CHAIR, OTTOMAN, 3 TABLES, great for den. Wood and cloth, all in excellent condition. $450. Call after 6 PM 570-675-5046 SOFA & LOVE SEAT. Green with matching pillows & removeable wooden legs. Great condition. Asking $300 for set. 570-793-6040 SOFA, LOVESEAT, CHAIR. Brown. Fair condition. FREE 570-3882388 Swing set, Wooden. $300. 826-0451 or 479-0181 TV armoire with 27 inch Zeneth television,$200.00 High bedroom dresser $50.00, triple dresser with mirror 50.00 Total Price For All Items: $500.00 570-606-1624 Twin bed, girls white headboard, also footboard mattress $75.00 262-2410 Wicker-glass table $25.00 570-498-0977

end

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

747 Church St Saturday 8am -4pm Sunday 8am - Noon Way too many items to mention! Rain or shine - covered sale. New and old items.

CHILDREN’S FURNITURE, Dark red chest, 3 drawers, solid wood $100. Dresser with mirror, 6 drawers, matching nightstand, chestnut wood $250. L.L.Bean Rangeley platform twin bed, walnut finish $100. All very good condition. Call 570-675-4795

HARDING

903 Appletree Rd

Saturday & Sunday May 12 & May 13 8am - 2pm Plenty of items for sale: clothing, indoor / outdoor furniture, hand and power tools, kitchen items & much more! Basically anything you’d find in someone’s home, garage or barn - come see! MOUNTAINTOP

Clock, Grandfatherruns perfect $350. Fireplace, oak with log heater $150. 570-740-7446 Coffee table, Maple, 20x48 inches, excellent condition. $50. 675-4383 COMPUTER DESK: Very good condition. Black with slide keyboard shelf. $45. 570-740-1412 or 570-498-0439 DINING ROOM TABLE SET: Oak. 60”x40” with 2 leaves (12” each). $600. Call 570-735-8346 Entertainment center with glass stereo cabinet. Very good condition. Asking $75. 570-239-6011 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, Solid Oak, with 31 inch opening for TV. Lots of room below for storage. Side storage area with glass door. Unit is 54 in w x 21.5 in d x 52 in h. $400. 27 inch JVC TV. Great for gaming. $50. Call 570-868-5749.

100 Lakeview Drive Laurel Lakes Development. (off exit 159 Nuangola) Saturday, 8am-? and Sunday 5/13 from 8am-?

12 Ridge Street Across from entrance to Laurel Lakes May 11th to the 13th 8am-4pm daily. Household, tools, crafts. & more!

PITTSTON

408 S. Sherman St. Fri., Sat., Sun., 8-2 Electronics, clothes, housewares, toys, books, etc.

WYOMING

14 Dolores Road Sat. & Sun. May 12 & 13th, 8am - noon. Sunrise Estates, off Carverton Rd. Antiques, clothing, toys, knick knacks

750

Jewelry

CAROL IS BUYING PAYING TOP

DOLLAR for your gold, silver, co ins, scrap jewelry, rings, diamonds, necklaces,bracelets, old antique costume jewelry. Guaranteed to be paid top dollar. WE MAKE HOUSE CALLS! 570-855 7197 570-328-3428 NECKLACE 16” pearl with 67 5-5.5 white pearls & 14kt gold clasp.From Wisnosky jewelers. Paid $1,600 asking $900 OBO. 570-301-8749

752 Landscaping & Gardening LAWNMOWER. Craftsman 21” with bag $95. Runs well. 570-881-7116

Machinery & Equipment

GENERATOR: Robot. 3,300 Watts. 110 volt / 12 volt. Brand new. Used 2 hours. $275 or best offer. Call 570-283-9452 SAWMILLS from only $3997-MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmillCut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www.Nor woodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

756

Medical Equipment

Lift chair, mauve, battery back up, very good condition $300 OBO. 570-287-6967 leave message. Potty Chair, new Invacare, folding walker with front wheels, folding walker. Excellent condition. All for $20. 570-735-6638 WHEEL CHAIR. Manual with foot pedals, like new. $75. 2 pair aluminum crutches. $120 for all. 570-592-7247

758 Miscellaneous

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275 38 Johnson Street Sat. & Sun. May 12th & 13th, 9-3. Furniture, housewares, collectibles, decorations & more!

PITTSTON TOWNSHIP

HUTCH, Lighted Oak Dining Room. 2 pieces, bottom is combination of doors & drawers. 570-313-9763 LIVING ROOM SET: matching sofa, loveseat, & recliner. Blue. In like new condition. $500. Call 570-735-0189

WILKES-BARRE

NUANGOLA

FURNISH FOR LESS

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607

633 Suscon Rd. Friday,Saturday & Sunday 8am-7pm 10” table saw, 10” radial arm saw, large drill press, precious moments, sports collectibles, Nascar 1:24 cars, records, comics & more!

754 Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

BUNK BEDS. Very good condition. $80 570-262-2410 CHAIR. Queen Anne wing back chenille, gold, wood leg trim. Excellent condition. $50. 570-639-5066

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

1 W. Chapman St. May 12 & 13, 9-3 Furniture,tools,Hon -da mower, storage /file cabinet, desk.

Backpack, Academy Broadway, almost new. Navy, nylon & leather. $40. Maple trees, red. 5-10 years old, 3-5 feet tall $25$70 675-4383 Car Rims. Honda, 4 pair 15” will fit any model Accord, Civic, and Del-Sol cars. Brand new. asking $175 570-239-6011. Hats, Girls victorian, with hat boxes. $25 570-498-0977 Sink for bathroom $20. call 826-0451 or 479-0181


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 758 Miscellaneous CANES & walking sticks, new batch. Over 40 available, made from slippery maple trees. $4-$5 each. Over 200 Christmas & household items. Includes, Christmas trees, lights, cups, flowers, vases, wreaths, ornaments & more! all for $55. Electric sewing machine, enclosed cabinet, 2 drawers $55. 570-735-2081 Drain pipe, black 12’ $5. Splash block, 36”, concrete, $5. Rain lamp-lights, needs motor, $5. Sheet rock, 4’ x 8’, also smaller pieces, $5. Ax, single edge, long handle $10. Cro wbar, heavy, 64”, $10. Bow saw, 36’ $5. Bowl, lead crystal, $20. 570-675-0920 Exhaust hood, Kitchen commercial stainless steel, comes complete with filters, lights, rand rooftop stainless steel fan system. 9 feet, 10 inches long, 30 1/2 inches wide. never over grease fryers. $999.00. 831-5728

FREE AD POLICY

The Times Leader will accept ads for used private party merchandise only for items totaling $1,000 or less. All items must be priced and state how many of each item. Your name address, email and phone number must be included. No ads for ticket sales accepted. Pet ads accepted if FREE ad must state FREE. You may place your ad online at timesleader.com, or email to classifieds@ timesleader.com or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to Classified Free Ads: 15 N. Main Street, WilkesBarre, PA. Sorry no phone calls.

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR BEST PRICES IN THE AREA

CA$H

ON THE

$POT,

Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

LEFTOVER GARAGE SALE ITEMS: 165 Soy Candles $895, Futon - black $85, Heavy Duty Wheel Barrel - $65, Motorized racing set $115, 40’ Aluminum extension ladder $350, Sofa Love Seat $65, 40 five gallon buckets of dirt $110. Call 570-288-1077

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130 LONGABERGER BASKETS: Mothers day basket, maple leaf basket, sweet pea basket, darning basket, large peg basket. Each has protective plastic liner and some have ceramic tie on tag. Never used. $18 each. Call 570-826-0830 5 5 5 5 5 5 Red hat, size large, $20. Hooded black cape, $40. Cut glass dinner & serving pieces & a large vase, $25 for all. Corner shelves 60” metal & wood, $50 for both. Nautical decor, $18. 5 beautiful ceramic ducks, $20. One 29” Rooster & one 19” duck with babies, $30 for both. 570-267-2600 5 5 5 5 5 5 Scooter, Razor “Brand New” $100.00 Bike, girls, $30. 826-0451 or 479-0181 Sewing machine, Singer. Heavy duty head with formica table. $100. 570-740-7446 Trees, potted dwarf, red maple $5.00 and up. 655-4815 Yard sale leftovers, household items, decorations, wooden shelf, etc.Asking $200 for everything, call 570-239-6011

762

Musical Instruments

Amps-Traynor YCV custom valve 40 watt tube combo with Celestion speaker $345. Marshall JCM600 60 watt Tube Head $425. Pedals-Proco Turbo Rat guitar effect pedal, $65. Pedal, Jimi Hendrix style Octave, $99. Pedal, Fender Starcaster chorus $29. call 570-283-2552 LUDWIG DRUMSET, Almost new, very little signs of usage! Includes bass drum (23”), snare, hi-hats (14”), Avanti crash symbol (18”) with additional stand, two toms (12, 14”), floor tom (16”), & foot petal. Burgundy color finish. Only missing throne. $350 firm. A STEAL in this condition! Call or text 570-855-3382

768

Personal Electronics

Computer monitor $35. Call 498-0977

774

Restaurant Equipment

LIGHT, Neon, CocaCola. $50, firm. 570-313-9763

776 Sporting Goods BICYCLES. Mongoose $30, Schwinn $30, Golf Bag, black Nike. Very good condition, $20. 570-690-3840 after 1:00 pm. Golf carts $40. Practice golf balls 5.00 dozen. Bmw tan mates $35.00. Exterra mates $35.00. 498-0977 MOUNTAIN BIKE, 15 speed Shogun TrailbreakerNeon GreenExcellent ConditionBike hardly used and garage kept. 29 inch frame $60. Call Bill 570-954-2029 SPORTS COLLECTIBLES: Hawthorne Village Collection - Eagles 2 Dome cars, offensive engine, locomotive & tracks, $250; NFL Licensed football Pennants, 11 teams, all for $50; NFL Coors Metal Beer Sign displaying all teams - $50; ICG Autographed Baseball cards, 1970, various teams and athletes, all for $300; Topps baseball scratch-off scoreboard, ball strike indicator, from 1981 Topps Chewing Gum, Inc. 2 sets. $150 each. Call 570-430-2311 Tent- Hillary Camping, sleeps 6. $45 Camping Cots, 2 metal framed, both $20. Metal Hammock Frame $12.00. BikeMurray 18 speed, 20 inches, Herculite micro alloy. $45. 824-0591 Travel bag, golf. Bennington cover. New. $50. 6754383

780

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 13G

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

VITO’S & GINO’S

Wanted:

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

784

Tools

Saw, Craftsmen Radial 10” 5 HP, many attachments $85. Drill bit sharpener, $45. Scroll Saw, Sears $80. Glass Grinder Glasco Star 2, $25. Ladder, Aluminum extension $50. And many miscellaneous tools. 696-9005

786 Toys & Games TRAX. Girl’s, kid’s, 18 months + up. New in box, battery & charger included. Asking $50. 570-328-4927

788

(570)48GOLD8 (570)484-6538

Highest Cash PayOuts Guaranteed Mon-Sat 10am -6pm Closed Sundays

1092 Highway 315 Blvd (Plaza 315) 315N .3 miles after Motorworld

We Pay At Least 80% of the London Fix Market Price for All Gold Jewelry

London PM Gold Price

TV 20 inches, $35. call 498-0977

792

Video Equipment

CAMCORDER Magnavox VHS older style but works perfectly. Comes with sturdy black leather case, adaptors & battery included. Will provide heavy duty tripod if purchased for “hands free” movie making. $75. 484-632-8072

794

WE PAY MORE FOR YOUR

GOLD, SILVER JEWELRY, COINS SCRAP JEWELRY, Bring it on down for a great price. Anything old in good condition, trains, toys etc. 570-328-3428 570-855-7197

800 PETS & ANIMALS 810

Video Game Systems/Games

GAME CONSOLE REPAIR

I offer the lowest prices locally. Broken Xbox 360’s, PS3’s, Wii’s, disc read errors, etc. Call Chris or visit the Video Game Store 28 S. Main St, W-B 570-814-0824

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

CAT. FREE. 4 year old black & white neutered male. Shots & tested. Friendly. Needs a loving home. 570-690-8442

CATS & KITTENS 12 weeks & up.

All shots, neutered, tested,microchipped

VALLEY CAT RESCUE

824-4172, 9-9 only KITTENS, FREE - 3 male and 2 female, black, gray and mixed, very healthy and cute. (Duryea) (570) 457-3983 KITTENS: free to good home. Ready in 2 weeks. Call 570-779-3705

815

Dogs

Bikes, dolls, guns, Mining Items, trains & Musical Instruments, Hess. 474-9544

9 weeks old, 2 males $225. Very playful 371-3441

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES Pure-Bred. Black & Brown. $500. Call 570-840-4243

German Shepherd Purebred puppies. $550 less cash discount. Please call 570-836-8044 Miniature Schnauzer free to good home. 3 years old. Grey and black. Very friendly. Good with older children. Call 570-443-2449

815

Dogs

POMERANIAN

AKC, 10 weeks, 1 male. Chocolate & White. 1st & 2nd Shots & wormed. Vet checked. Home Raised. $500. 570-864-2643

SHIH-TZU PUPPIES Shots current.

$500 570-250-9690

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130 Poms, Yorkies, Maltese, Husky, Rotties, Golden, Dachshund, Poodle, Chihuahua, Labs & Shitzus. 570-453-6900 570-389-7877

845

Pet Supplies

We Need Your Help!

AQUARIUM. 30 gallon with all accessories, stand, fish food. $125, firm. 570-288-5555

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Anonymous Tip Line 1-888-796-5519 Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office

CALL AN EXPERT 1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY 1006

A/C & Refrigeration Services

STRISH A/C Ductless / Central

Air Conditioning Free Estimates Licensed & Insured 570-332-0715

1024

Building & Remodeling

1st. Quality Construction Co.

Roofing, siding, gutters, insulation, decks, additions, windows, doors, masonry & concrete. Insured & Bonded.

Senior Citizens Discount! State Lic. # PA057320

570-606-8438 ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST 825-4268. Remodel / repair, Porches, decks & steps DAVE JOHNSON Expert Bathroom & Room Remodeling, Carpentry & Whole House Renovations. Licensed &Insured

570-819-0681

HUGHES Construction

NEED A NEW KITCHEN OR BATH???? Seasonal Rooms

Roofing, Home Renovating. Garages, Kitchens, Baths, Siding and More! Licensed and Insured. FREE ESTIMATES!! 570-388-0149 PA040387

NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION

All Types Of Work New or Remodeling Licensed & Insured Free Estimates 570-406-6044

ROOFING, SIDING, DECKS, WINDOWS

PAWS TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130 Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

BRAZILIAN MASTIFF PUPPIES 3 males, 1 female,

$ ANTIQUES BUYING $ Old Toys, model kits,

CHIHUAHUA FOX TERRIER

Cats

Stereo/TV/ Electronics

Sewing Machine $50.00 Digital picture frame $30.00. 570-498-0977

genders available. $700 to $1,300 www.willowspring cavaliers.com 215-538-2179

WILKESBARREGOLD

Tickets

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

HAVANESE PUPPIES All colors and both

Dogs

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES Call 570-379-3729

1039

Visit us at WilkesBarreGold.com Or email us at wilkesbarregold@ yahoo.com

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

able, health certified. $700 to $1,500.

815

Professional Services Directory

TV. 60” HD Projection TV. Good condition. $200, OBO. 570-313-9763

Plains” Bus Trip to Plains, Georgia June 7-10, 2012 Trip arranged by Larry & Diane Cook Transportation by Stucker Tours Profits benefit the Plains, Georgia Better Hometown Program. Call Larry or Diane, 570-270-9239 for further details or reservations!

CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIEL PUPPIES Registration avail-

WANTED JEWELRY

May 11th: $1,583.00

MEET PRESIDENT JIMMY CARTER &“Plains ROSALYNNHelping CARTER

Dogs

288-8995

Televisions/ Accessories

782

815

$600 males $650 females. Dewormed. Ready to go. Great mothers day present! 570-328-2569

For All of Your Remodeling Needs. Will Beat Any Price 25 Yrs. Experience Ref. Ins. Free Est. 570-332-7023 Or 570-855-2506

Shedlarski Construction

HOME IMPROVEMENT SPECIALIST Licensed, insured & PA registered. Kitchens, baths, vinyl siding & railings, replacement windows & doors, additions, garages, all phases of home renovations. Free Estimates 570-287-4067

SPRING BUILDING/ REMODELING?

Call the Building Industry Association for a list of qualified members

call 287-3331 or go to

www.bianepa.com

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

Chimney Service

A-1 1 ABLE CHIMNEY Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All types of Masonry. Liners Installed, Brick & Block, Roofs & Gutters. Licensed & Insured 570-735-2257

CAVUTO CHIMNEY SERVICE

& Gutter Cleaning Free Estimates Insured 570-709-2479

CHIMNEY REPAIRS Parging. Stucco.

Stainless Liners. Cleanings. Custom Sheet Metal Shop. 570-383-0644 1-800-943-1515 Call Now!

COZY HEARTH CHIMNEY

ALL CHIMNEY REPAIR Chimney Cleaning, Rebuilding, Repair, Stainless Steel Lining, Parging, Stucco, Caps, Etc. Free Estimates Licensed & Insured 1-888-680-7990 570-840-0873

1042

Cleaning & Maintainence

HOUSE CLEANING

We would love to clean your home. We clean around your schedule. We clean weekly, bi-weekly, and monthly. We also do one time cleaning. Call Eddie 570-677-0344 or online at www. empresacleaning. com

1057Construction & Building

1129 Gutter Repair & Cleaning

FATHER & SON CONSTRUCTION Interior & Exterior Remodeling Jobs of All Sizes 570-814-4578 570-709-8826

Window Cleaning Pressure washing Insured 570-288-6794

FS CONSTRUCTION Specializing in all

types of home improvements, complete remodeling from start to finish, additions, roofing, siding, electrical and plumbing, all types of excavation & demolition, sidewalks and concrete work, new home construction, with new model on display. Free estimates, licensed, insured. Call Frank at 570-479-1203

GARAGE DOOR

Sales, service, installation & repair. FULLY INSURED HIC# 065008 CALL JOE 570-735-8551 Cell 606-7489

H-D Contracting Flooring, siding, decks & more. Any size job. Call Salvatore 570-881-2191 Russ Keener Construction Windows, doors, siding, porches, decks, kitchen, baths, garages, & more. All home maintenance. Free estimates, Fully Insured PA079549 570-336-6958

1078

Dry Wall

1135

Hauling & Trucking

GUTTER CLEANING

1132

Handyman Services

#1 FOR ALL YOUR CONSTRUCTION NEEDS Interior & exterior painting. All types of remodeling. Front and back porches repaired & replaced Call 570-991-5301

DOPainting, IT ALL HANDYMAN drywall,

plumbing & all types of interior & exterior home repairs. 570-829-5318

Mark’s Handyman Service

Give us a call

We do it all! Licensed &Insured

570-578-8599

The Handier Man

We fix everything! Plumbing, Electrical & Carpentry. Retired Mr. Fix It. Emergencies 23/7

299-9142

1135

Hauling & Trucking

AA CLEANING

ALWAYS READY HAULING Moving, Deliveries, Property & Estate Cleanups, Attics, Cellars, Yards, Garages, Construction Sites, Flood Damage & More. CHEAPER THAN A DUMPSTER!! SAME DAY SERVICE Free Estimates 570-301-3754

CASTAWAY HAULING JUNK REMOVAL

823-3788 / 817-0395 S & S HAULING & GARBAGE REMOVAL

Free estimates. Clean out attics, basements, estates & more. 570-472-2392

1156

Insurance

NEPA LONG TERM CARE AGENCY Long Term/Short Term Care Products Life Insurance Tax Deferred Annuities Medicare Supplement Plans Dental/Vision Estate Planning Ideas 570-580-0797 FREE CONSULT

MIRRA DRYWALL

A1 Always hauling, cleaning attics, cellar, garage, one piece or whole Estate, also available 10 & 20 yard dumpsters.655-0695 592-1813or287-8302

570-675-3378

Licensed, Insured, No job too small.

AAA CLEANING A1 GENERAL HAULING Cleaning attics, cellars, garages. Demolitions, Roofing & Tree Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or 542-5821; 814-8299

DempskiMasonry.com

570-829-4077

B.P. Home Repairs 570-825-4268 Brick, Block, Concrete, Sidewalks, Chimneys, Stucco. New Installation & Repairs

SLEBODA ELECTRIC Master electrician Licensed & Insured Service Changes & Replacements. Generator Installs. 868-4469

A.S.A.P Hauling Estate Cleanouts, Attics, Cellars, Garages, we’re cheaper than dumpsters!. Free Estimates, Same Day! 570-822-4582

ARE YOU TIRED OF BEING RAKED? Specializing In Trimming and Shaping of Bushes, Shrubs, Trees. Also, Bed Cleanup, Edging, Mulch and Stone. Call Joe. 570-823-8465 Meticulous and Affordable. F ree E stimates

AFFORDABLE

BITTO LANDSCAPING & LAWN SERVICE 26 years experience, landscape designs, retaining walls, pavers, patios, decks, walkways, ponds, lighting, seeding, mulch, etc Free Estimates. 570-288-5177

1054

Concrete & Masonry

DEMPSKI MASONRY & CONCRETE

All Phases Licensed & Insured No job too small. Free Estimates.

570-824-0130

C&C MASONRY & CONCRETE Absolutely free

estimates. Masonry & concrete work. Specializing in foundations, repairs and rebuilding. Footers floors, driveways. 570-766-1114 570-346-4103 PA084504 COVERT & SONS CONCRETE CO. Give us a call, we’ll beat them all! 570-696-3488 or 570-239-2780

D. Pugh Concrete

All phases of masonry & concrete. Small jobs welcome. Senior discount. Free estimates. Licensed & Insured 288-1701/655-3505

Williams & Franks Inc

Masonry - Concrete Brick-Stonework. Chimneys-Stucco” “NO JOB TOO SMALL” “Damage repair specialist” 570-466-2916 WYOMING VALLEY MASONRY Concrete, stucco, foundations,pavers, retaining wall systems, dryvit, flagstone, brick work. Senior Citizen Discount.570-287-4144 or 570-760-0551

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Hanging & Finishing Textured Ceilings Licensed & Insured Free Estimates

1084

Electrical

GRULA ELECTRIC LLC

1093

Excavating

EXCAVATING/MODULAR HOMES

Custom excavating, foundations, land clearing, driveways, storm drainage, blacktop repair, etc. 570-332-0077 Skidster/Backhoe With Operator I can help make your spring projects a little easier. Fully Insured. Reasonably Priced. Free Estimates. Stan 570-328-4110

1099

Fencing & Decks

DECK BUILDERS

Of Northeast Contracting Group. we build any type, size and design, staining & powerwashing. If the deck of your choice is not completed within 5 days, your deck is free! 570-338-2269

1105 Floor Covering Installation

ETERNITY FLOORING

*Hardwood *Laminate *Ceramic *Porcelain Installations 570-820-0233 Free Estimates PA 089377

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

Junk removal cleanups, cleanouts, Large or small jobs. Fast free estimates. (570) 814-4631

ALL KINDS OF HAULING & JUNK REMOVAL SPRING CLEAN UP!

TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL REMOVAL DEMOLITION Estate Cleanout Free Estimates 24 HOUR SERVICE SMALL AND LARGE JOBS! 570-823-1811 570-239-0484

Find Your Ideal Employee! Place an ad and end the search! 570-829-7130 ask for an employment specialist

www nepalong termcare.com 1162 Landscaping/ Garden

JAY’S LAWN SERVICE

Spring clean-ups, mowing, mulching and more! Free Estimates 570-574-3406 O’NEIL’S Landscaping, Lawn Maintenance,Cleanups, shrub trimming, 20 years experience. Fully Insured 570-885-1918 TOUGH BRUSH, mowing, edging, mulching, shrubs, and hedge trimming, tree pruning, garden tilling, Spring clean up. Accepting new customers this season. Weekly & bi-weekly lawn care. Fully Insured. Free Estimates 570-829-3261 TREE REMOVAL Stump grinding, Hazard tree removal, Grading, Drainage, Lot clearing, Stone/ Soil delivery. Insured. Reasonable Rates 570-574-1862

1165

Lawn Care

GRASS CUTTING

Affordable, reliable, meticulous. Rates as low as $20. Emerald Green 570-825-4963

1165

Lawn Care

YARD CLEAN UP Attics & Basements Complete clean ups Garden tilling Call for quotes 570-954-7699 or 570-926-9029

1183

Masonry

H O S CONSTRUCTION

Licensed - Insured Certified - Masonry Concrete - Roofing Quality Craftsmanship Guaranteed Unbeatable Prices Senior Citizen Discounts Free Estimates 570-574-4618 or 570-709-3577

1189 Miscellaneous Service

VITO’S & GINO’S

Wanted:

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS Highest Prices Paid!!

1213

Keystone Paving & Seal Coating Services Free Quotes. Residential / Commercial. Parking lots / driveways•drainage •landscaping •hot tar • asphalt paving • seal coating. 10% off for spring! 570-906-5239

Mountain Top

PAVING & SEAL COATING Patching, Sealing, Residential/Comm Licensed & Insured PA013253 570-868-8375

1228

1195

Movers

BestDarnMovers Moving Helpers Call for Free Quote. We make moving easy. BestDarnMovers.com 570-852-9243 BestDarnMovers Moving Helpers Call for Free Quote. We make moving easy. BestDarnMovers.com 570-852-9243

1204

Painting & Wallpaper

AMERICA PAINTING

Interior/Exterior. 20 years experience. Insured. Senior Discount 570-855-0387 JACOBOSKY PAINTING Interior, & Exterior Painting, $50.00 off with this ad. Call 570-328-5083

M. PARALIS PAINTING

Int/ Ext. painting, Power washing. Professional work at affordable rates. Free estimates. 570-288-0733

Plumbing & Heating

CARL KRASAVAGE & SON Heating, Plumbing, & Air Conditioning. No job too big or small. Let our experience & knowledge work for you. Free Estimates. Call 570-288-8149 D.M. PLUMBING & HEATING Specializing in boilers, furnaces & water heaters. 10% senior discount. Licensed,Insured &24 hour service 570-793-1930

1234

FREE PICKUP

288-8995

Paving & Excavating

Pressure Washing

PRESSURE WASHING

Decks, siding, roof / gutter cleaning & patios. Serving the Lackawanna & Luzerne County areas. Call 570-883-1495

1252

Roofing & Siding

ABSOLUTELY FREE ESTIMATES E-STERN CO. 30 year architec tural shingles. Do Rip off & over the top. Fully Insured PA014370 570-760-7725 or 570-341-7411 EVERHART CONSTRUCTION Roofing, siding, gutters, chimney repairs & more. Free Estimates, Lowest Prices 570-855-5738

J.R.V. ROOFING

570-824-6381 Roof Repairs & New Roofs. Shingle, Slate, Hot Built Up, Rubber, Gutters & Chimney Repairs. Year Round. Licensed/Insured ŠFREE EstimatesŠ *24 Hour Emergency Calls*

Jim Harden

570-288-6709

Serra Painting Book Now For Spring & Save. All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction. 30 Yrs. Experience Powerwash & Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco Aluminum. Free Estimates You Can’t Lose! 570-822-3943

WITKOSKY PAINTING Interior

Exterior, Free estimates, 30 yrs experience 570-826-1719, 570-288-4311 & 570-704-8530

1213

Paving & Excavating

DRIVEWAYS PARKING LOTS ROADWAYS HOT TAR & CHIPS SEALCOATING Licensed and Insured. Call Today For Your Free Estimate

570-474-6329 Lic.# PA021520

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

New Roofs & Repairs, Shingles, Rubber, Slate, Gutters, Chimney Repairs. Credit Cards accepted FREE ESTIMATES! Licensed-Insured EMERGENCIES

SPRING ROOFING

McManus Construction Licensed, Insured. Everyday Low Prices. 3,000 satisfied customers. 570-735-0846

1297

Tree Care

GASHI AND SONS TREE SERVICE AND STUMP REMOVAL. Fully Insured. 570-693-1875

Tree Removal & DAVID WAYNE PAINTING Interior/Exterior QUALITY WORK AT A FAIR PRICE 570-762-6889

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!


PAGE 14G

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

V isitus 24/ 7 a twww.v a lleyc hev ro let.c o m

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2006 FO RD FO CUS O N LY 48K M ILES

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2009 CHEVY M ALIBU SEDAN

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2001 CHEVY SILVERADO EXTENDED CAB LT 4X4

13 999* ,

2007 SUZUKI XL7 AW D O N LY 37K M ILES

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15 999* ,

2007 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LT 4X4

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16 972

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2010 SUBARU FO RESTER 2.5X LIM ITED AW D

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21 888* ,

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$

O N LY 6K M ILES

28 999* ,

2010 CHEVRO LET SUBURBAN LT 4W D

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23 999* ,

2011 CHEVRO LET SILVERADO 2500HD EXTENDED CAB LT 4X4

#12401A , 6.0LV8 A utom atic, A ir, PW , PD L, O nstar, C D , RoofM arker Lam ps, Snow Plow Prep Pkg, H D Trailering Equipm ent, Rem ote Start, X M Satellite Radio, 21K M iles

$

29 999* ,

2010 CHEVY AVALANCHE LTZ

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ONE O W N ER

O N LY 18K M ILES

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31 999* ,

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TIMES LEADER LEADER www.timesleader.com www.timesleader.com TIMES

SUNDAY, SUNDAY, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY MARCH MAY 13, 19, 4, 2012 PAGE PAGE 15G 15G

SUNDAY REAL ESTATE

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

THE TIMES LEADER

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER. Smith Hourigan Group

Visit Our Website

Century21SHGroup.com

Stately elegance abounds in Ice Lakes Story and photos by Marianne Tucker Puhalla Advertising Projects Writer

It is Mother’s Day and you can make the mother in your life happy with the chance to call this magnificent property in Ice Ponds section of Mountain Top her own. Grand and gracious, this four-bedroom, four-bath home at 60 Ice Lake Drive offers over 4,400 square feet of space, with amazing attention to detail. Listed by Pat Sciandra of Lewith and Freeman Real Estate for $629,900, the 6.5acre property is conveniently located just a mile and a half from the Nuangola exit of Interstate 81. Highlights include a beautifully landscaped yard with in-ground pool, hot tub, screened porch and elevated deck, outside, and amenities inside including a dramatic twostory foyer and granite kitchen of this 2004 construction. Offering a red brick and tan vinyl exterior that is accented by black shutters, this home has also has an attached three-car garage.

The front door leads into a dramatic twostory foyer with hardwood flooring and an atrium window overhead. To the right, two single windows facing front with half round tops accent the 14-by-15 living room. This elegant space has khaki walls accented by a white chair rail and white crown molding. To the left off the foyer, the 13-by-14 dining room provides a splash of color with Colonial red walls, a white chair rail for contrast, and more of the elegant hardwood flooring. A bay of three oversized windows brings in plenty of natural light from the front. French doors open to the rear to the breakfast room and kitchen. The picture-perfect kitchen has maple cabinets topped by black speckled granite with a white ceramic tile backsplash. A large, granitetopped island has a breakfast bar and book shelves tucked into the ends for cookbooks and collectibles. Storage is plentiful thanks to a large, two-door pantry cabinet and additional cabinets that help form a desk or buffet

serving area on the interior wall. Appliances include a refrigerator, stove, microwave, and a wood covered dishwasher that matches the cabinets. The open breakfast room has sliding doors that lead rear to a screened-in porch that overlooks the pool and the deck. To the left, the 21-by-22 vaulted family room has a dramatic beamed ceiling and a striking red brick fireplace, with raised brick hearth. This room, along with the kitchen, also has khaki walls and its own set of sliding doors that open rear to the deck. To the right of the kitchen, a study measures 10-by-11 and provides the perfect place to curl up with a book in front of a bay of windows that overlook the pool and yard. Nearby you find a powder room with maple vanity with cream Corian countertop and marble tile floor in shades of gold and tan, a large coat closet and a door leading to the attached three-car garage. Upstairs, the large, open second floor

Continued

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate, Inc.

WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE OR ERA WILL BUY IT!*

Open House Next Sunday 1:00-3:00

Waypoint In Luzerne

Home...

It’s where the Happiest Mother’s Day Memories are Made! Watch this Community come to life by becoming a Bell Weather Resident. There has never been a better time to join us…

Prices Starting in the $140’s

Find us in our convenient Location: Wyoming Avenue to Union Street. Turn onto Mill Hollow in Luzerne.

Contact one of our Luzerne County Real Estate Professionals at 570.403.3000

Two-story New Construction Townhomes

• 1st floor master • Formal Dining Room • Eat-in Kitchen • Loft • Valuted Ceilings • Front Porch • Garage • Garden Area

Shavertown: 696.3801 Mountain Top: 474.9801

Wilkes-Barre: 822.1160 Clarks Summit: 585.0600

www.lewith-freeman.com

Atlas Realty, Inc. :00

-2 829-6200 :00 • www.atlasrealtyinc.com 12

0 1:3 12-

OPEN HOUSES TODAY! 0-4 2:3

:00 0-2 0 : 12

2-4

ERA1.com

ONE Mountaintop Office SOURCE 12 N Mountain Blvd. REALTY (570) 403-3000

29 VALLEY VIEW DR., MOUNTAINTOP

Spectacular home on a gorgeous corner lot, spacious 2 car garage, finished lower level, modern kitchen & baths. Great spaces. MLS #11-2500. Call3380 Julio LAUREL 592-3966.RUN ROAD, WILKESBARRE $174,900 Dir: 81 outh to PA 165large to 309 S. Left great on Kirby, Ranch home on 309, 2.5 Exit acres; garage, left on Valley View Dr.

location. MLS#09-1918 $189,900

76 N. DAWES AVE. KINGSTON

Great home with 2 large bedrooms, modern kitchen, built in garage with driveway, private yard and enclosed sun porch. MLS #12-41. 263 WEST AVE., BEAR CREEK Call Colleenlake 237-0415. $115,000 Mountain community, cape cod home, triple Dir: Pierce St. to right on N. Dawes, home on left.

lot. MLS#09-4715 $127,500

We Sell Happiness!

WWW.LEWITH-FREEMAN.COM

GERALD L. BUSCH REAL ESTATE, INC. 288-2514

Open House-Price Reduced! 0pm -1:3 0 0 : 12

405 SUTTON CREEK RD, EXETER TWP 12-33 Enjoy the quiet setting on almost 1 acre yet close to town. Home features an indoor in-ground pool, master bedroom with whirlpool tub, large 2 car detached garage with finished loft area and so much more!

CALL JACK 878-6225 NEW PRICE $125,000 DIR: Rte 92N make left onto Sutton Creek Rd, 2nd house on right.

New Listing! 577 MEADOWLAND n KINGSTON 12-1544 sto g n This delightful home Ki has it all!LocationSpace-Upgrades.So many upgrades. Very well maintaned with central air,wonderful familyroom with wood fireplace and wet bar,4 BR’s,3 bths,den or office,3 season porch...wicker set remaining,new roof and the list goes on! CALL LYNNE 574-7093 $230,000

s k Estate paupac n e l a Lake W

New Listing!

129 PICKERAL LANE GREENTOWN 12-1411 Exquisite 3 BR 2 Bath Cape Cod in Lake Wallenpaupack Est. Development. The superior condition home features hardwood flooring, ceramic tile flooring, freshly painted interior, soft-toned decor. Communiity Clubhouse and Pool! CALL MICHAEL 760-4961 $150,000

263490

Se Habla ~ Espanol

Wilkes-Barre 570-825-2468 • Shavertown 570-696-2010 info@mksre.com

WILKES-BARRE Landmark home / office located on a corner lot in a high visibility location in Wilkes-Barre’s Historic District. With over 4,800 sq ft this property offers many options for your home or professional office space. 2 full baths, 2 half $325,000

baths. Off street parking for 6 cars. Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468

Darren G. Snyder Broker/President

WILKES-BARRE 5 Unit property for sale on the campus of Wilkes University with a Cap Rate of 8.14%. Annual Net Operating Income of $32,169. 100% occupancy over the last 5 years. $395,000 Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468

SALESPERSONS WANTED!

WILKES-BARRE Very spacious 5 bedroom, Join a GROWING FIRM servicing the Greater Wyoming Valley 1 1/2 bath home in very with offices strategically located in SHAVERTOWN & W-B. good move-in condition Enjoy a challenging career with EXCELLENT INCOME with with a modern kitchen, 3 car garage and fenced POTENTIAL for intelligent, industrious, motivated individuals. We have professional office space available and WILL TRAIN yard and many updates. QUALIFIED PEOPLE. If you have a license or have always $89,500 wanted to obtain one call for a confidential interview. Learn Call Darren Snyder how you can become a part of our 570-825-2468 EXCELLENT ORGANIZATION!

Jerry Busch, Jr. Is Ready Each Office is Independently Owned And Operated. To Work For “You!” Call Jerry Today 709-7798 EMAIL: JERRYBUSCHJR@AOL.COM

PLAINS NEW PRICE!

PLAINS HUDSON GARDENS

KINGSTON UNCOMPROMISING ELEGANCE!

LARKSVILLE NEW PRICE!

Excellent condition, 8 rooms, 3 Bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, 3 season porch, comfortable gas heat and lots of closet space. MLS#11-4448 Call Pat Busch $79,900

Come Relax in the Gardens! 9 spacious rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, finished basement, generous room sizes, garage and beautiful lot. MLS#12-307 Call Pat Busch 885-4165 $149,900

Genuine character is expressed throughout every inch of this classic home situated on a lovely residential street. It features 9 rooms, 5 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, modern kitchen with granite counter tops and stainless steel appliances, lots of woodwork huge newel post. Wrap around porch, screened porch, deck and a two car garage. And Yes.... It does have a Tur$249,900 ret! MLS#11-2343 Call Pat Busch 885-4165

Great Opportunity! This home has 5 rooms, 2 bedrooms, newer furnace, a great yard and good sized concrete block garage. Hurry! Call Jerry Busch Jr ! MLS#12-1083 $49,900

FOR PROMPT REAL ESTATE APPRAISALS, CALL GERALD L. BUSCH APPRAISAL SERVICE 288-2514

Celebrate Mom’s Special Day! Happy Mother’s Day! !

Bear Creek-Country Living!

Shavertown-Versatile!

Mountain Top-Beautiful!

Luzerne-7 Acre Property!

Enjoy! Enjoy! Country living! All brick 3 bedroom ranch home in Bear Creek. Remodeled kit. with oak cabinets and island. Finished basement with a bonus room and large family room. Hardwood floors throughout, cleared lot, private driveway. Paul Pukatch 696-6559 12-1698 $159,000

Versatile 2-story home incls. professional office space, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 family rooms, eat-in kitchen, dining room, living room and rec. room & office space with private entrance & waiting/office area, exam room/file area. Craig Yarrish 696-6554 12-1509 $245,900

Beautifully appointed home in a magnificent setting. Hardwood floors, crown molding, beamed ceiling, 3-season porch with mahogany flooring, in-ground heated pool, exquisite landscaping, studio above garage could be 4th bedroom. Maribeth Jones 696-6565 12-1647 $535,000

Much more than meets the eye with this 7 acre property consisting of 2 dwellings and 8 vacant land parcels with 1200’ of road frontage, situated at the top of Bennett St. in Luzerne, the views are amazing! Many possibilities! DJ Wojciechowski 283-9100 12-1659 $375,000

Two Of ces To Serve You Better: 1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100 28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600 Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com © 2012 BRER Af liates Inc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Af liates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other af liation with Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.

Pat Is Ready To Work For “You!” Call Pat Today 885-4165

View Our Listings on Realtor.com

837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston

288-1401

15 BERGH STREET, PLAINS A lot of house for the money, this 9 room - 3 full bath home is conveniently located. 1st floor laundry. 2-car garage. Nice 100’ x 150’x yard. MLS#11-4388 JOE MOORE

For Instant Pricing & More Info TEXT: ML30 TO: 88000

138 ORCHARD EAST, DALLAS 2 bedroom - 2 bath condo in very nice condition. Tiled baths. 2 balconies. Nearby 1-car garage. New vinyl exterior... Assessment paid by seller/owner. New roof 2005. New electrical system. MLS#11-4031 JOE MOORE $109,000

For Instant Pricing & More Info TEXT: ML26 TO: 88000

78 LACKAWANNA AVENUE, SWOYERSVILLE, PA 18704 2-bedroom & bath cape cod with enclosed 3-season porch. Finished room in basement. Great 2-car detached garage (20’ x 26’)with concrete driveway. Fenced rear yard. MLS#11-3566 JOE MOORE $99,500

744678

Pure Indulgence... Luxury Condominiums nestled in a quiet corner of Northeast Pennsylvania

Kingston: 288.9371 Hazleton: 788.1999

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PAGE 16G

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Ice Lakes

Continued from front page

hallway overlooks the foyer and shares in the light of the large atrium window. To the left, the master bedroom is a comfortable 14-by-17 and has taupe walls, white carpeting, and a ceiling fan that offers ambient light that shines upward onto the ceiling. There are two single windows front. The adjacent master bath features a cherry vanity with striking black granite countertop, two sinks and an inviting oval jetted tub set into a white tile surround with black trim. There are matching black accent tiles set into the white tile floor. This bedroom suite features two large walk-in closets, each with its own window. A nearby second floor laundry room offers plenty of maple cabinets for storage, a double closet and a single window rear. A second full bath on this level has a white vanity with a white Corian sink, khaki walls, and a khaki and tan ceramic tile floor with white ceramic tile tub and shower surround. Bedrooms two, three and four range in size from 14-by-11 to 15-by-20, each with a large closet and plentiful windows. There is pull-down access to attic storage from the hall. The full, finished basement has nine-foot ceilings and its own zone for heat and air conditioning. It offers three separate rooms for recreation that could as easily be used as an apartment. A 13-by-22 family room incldues recessed lighting, built-in display shelves and tan carpeting over special sub-flooring. A 13-by-20 recreation room is decorated with matching latte walls and carpeting and features its own wet bar and space for a game table. A third room, featuring a beautiful bamboo floor, is perfect as a gym or workout room. This room has three full-sized windows facing rear. A nearby full bath provides a maple vanity with white cultured stone sink, and a one-piece tub and shower surround, with Federal blue and white décor. A separate, unfinished storage area has 10-foot ceilings and two ground-level windows. This home has four-zone propane forced air heat and central air conditioning. There is a private well and connections to the public sewer system. To make an appointment to see this lovely home, contact Pat Sciandra at Lewith & Freeman Real Estate at (570) 7159337; or cbagent@yahoo.com. SPECIFICATIONS: Traditional 4,450 square feet BEDROOMS: 4 BATHS: 4 PRICE: $629,900 LOCATION: 60 Ice Lake Drive, Mountain Top AGENT: Pat Sciandra REALTOR: Lewith & Freeman Real Estate, (570) 715-9337; cbagent@yahoo.com

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

AVOCA

BACK MOUNTAIN

BEECH MOUNTAIN LAKES

DALLAS

DALLAS Huge Reduction

DALLAS Newberry Estates

DURYEA

DURYEA

906 Homes for Sale EXETER

548 ADAMS ST. Charming, well maintained 3 bedroom, 1 bath home located on a quiet street near Blueberry Hills development. Features modern kitchen with breakfast bar, formal dining room, family room with gas stove, hardwood floors in bedrooms, deck, fenced yard and shed. MLS#11-2947 $107,500 Karen Ryan 283-9100 x14

REDUCED 619 Foote Ave. Fabulous Ranch home with 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, ultra modern kitchen with granite counters, heated tile floor and stainless appliances. Dining room has Brazilian cherry floors, huge yard, garage and large yard. Partially finished lower level. Built for handicap accessibility with exterior ramp, interior hallways and doorways. If you’re looking for a Ranch, don’t miss this one. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-4079 $149,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

530 Cherry Drive Spacious 2 bedroom townhome with hardwood floor, gas heat, central air, end unit with one garage. All appliances, move in condition. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 12-712 $169,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

WEBUY HOMES! Any Situation 570-956-2385 ASHLEY Exclusive Listing REDUCED TO $28,500

127 DONATO DRIVE Large mobile home, excellent condition on double lot, located in Ashley Park. Carport, above ground pool with deck, 2 sheds, fenced in yard, modern kitchen, dining room, family room with wood burning fireplace, 2 bedrooms, master bedroom has whirlpool tub, laundry room with appliances, foyer, large en-closed heated porch. New hardwood floors thruout, vinyl siding, central air, skylights, private driveway, appliances. Listed exclusively by Capitol Real Estate Shown by appointment Qualified buyers only! Call John Today 570-823-4290 570-735-1810

P E N D I N G

1215 South St. SpaPcious 4 bedroom home with in law suite with separate entrance. Large lot, large room sizes. Split system A/C in family room. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-963 $89,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

AVOCA BACK MOUNTAIN

214 Gedding St. Cozy Cape Cod home with 2 bedrooms, 1st floor laundry, nice yard with deck. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-668 $59,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130

AVOCA

901 Main St. Stately 4 bedroom home with beautiful woodwork, extra large rooms with gas heat and nice yard. MLS 12-884 $79,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Back Mountain

www.capitol-realestate.com for additional photos

Great Dallas Location. Close to town & library. 4 bedroom ranch with lower level family room, replacement windows, 16x32 deck, garage, 100 x 150 lot. 12-1528 $180,000 Besecker Realty 570-675-3611

LAKE VIEW custom built Chalet with 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths & 2,600 sq. ft. Features hardwood floors thruout 1st & 2nd floors & bamboo flooring in the finished lower level. 2 fireplaces & central air. Motivated Seller. Take a virtual tour at www.PaHouseHunt ers.com or TEXT 2308 to 85377 for additional info & pictures. MLS #12-564 $249,900 Cindy Perlick

Smith Hourigan Group Mountain Top 570-715-7753

20 Fox Hollow Drive OPEN HOUSE SUN. APRIL 29TH 12 NOON-1:30PM If you have seen it before, TAKE ANOTHER LOOK! Freshly painted, new tile. Open floor plan & so much room!Well maintained home on wooded lot in desirable neighborhood. 4-6 Bedrooms, 3.5 baths, tile kitchen, hardwoods in family room, new carpet. Finished walk-out lower level with two additional bedrooms and 3/4 bath. Two fireplaces. ONE YEAR HOME TRUST WARRANTY included. $270,000 MLS #11-3504 Call Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

DALLAS

DALLAS

Dakota Woods Enjoy maintenance free living at Dakota Woods Development in the Back Mountain. This 3+ bedroom condo features an open floor plan, first floor master suite, hardwood floors, stunning granite kitchen, gas fireplace & 2 car garages. Large loft area provides multiuse space. MLS# 11-3212 $299,000 Call Rhea 570-696-6677

143 Nevel Hollow Road Great country living in this 3 bedroom, 2 & 1/2 bath home with 1 car attached garage, large entertainment room lower level. Plus a 30'x30' detached garage with open 2nd floor ready to finish & mechanics pit in one stall. MLS 11-4124 $195,000 570-675-4400

DALLAS

211 Hillside One "Newberry Estate" OPEN HOUSE MAY 6TH 1PM-2:30PM Enjoy comforts and amenities of living in a beautifully maintained townhouse. 3000 square feet., 4 bedrooms, 3 l/2 baths, hardwood floors, Bright & Airy kitchen, Tennis,golf and swimming are yours to enjoy. PRICE REDUCED! $179,000 MLS# 11-2608 Call Geri 570-696-0888

BEAR CREEK

CAPITOL REAL ESTATE

DALLAS

Immaculate 4 bedroom 3 bath brick front home in Northwoods. Many amenities include hardwood floors in the living room & dining room, cherry kitchen with breakfast area that opens to deck overlooking a large yard and gazebo. Family room with gas fireplace, moldings, gas heat, central air & attached 2 car garage. MLS#111193 $369,000 Call Rhea 570-696-6677

6650 Bear Creek Blvd Well maintained custom built 2 story nestled on 2 private acres with circular driveway - Large kitchen with center island, master bedroom with 2 walk-in closets, family room with fireplace, custom built wine cellar. A MUST SEE! MLS#11-4136 $299,900 Call Geri 570-696-0888

2 Story Immaculate Home located in a desirable neighborhood! Charming wrap around porch welcomes you & your friends to a beautiful inviting home. MLS# 12-1630 $430,000 Call Donna Klug 570-690-2579

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5406

FAIRMOUNT TWP. Newberry Estate Three story freshly painted unit at Hillside. 2 bedrooms & loft, 3 bath, modern kitchen, fireplace in living room, central air & gas heat. Convenience of living at Newberry Enjoy golf, tennis & swimming. MLS#11-4435 $132,900 Call Rhea 570-696-6677

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New Homes From $275,000$595,000 570-474-5574

3 Bedroom, 2 bath Doublewide with 2 car detached garage in good condition sitting in the country. $119,900 MLS#11-4501 Call Kenneth Williams 570-542-2141 Five Mountains Realty

It's that time again! Rent out your apartment with the Classifieds 570-829-7130 DALLAS

248 Overbrook Rd. Lovely 4 bedroom cape cod situated in a private setting on a large lot. Vaulted ceiling in dining room, large walk in closet in 1 bedroom on 2nd floor. Some replacement windows. Call Today! MLS 11-2733 $114,900 Jay A. Crossin Extension 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770 DALLAS

MANY POSSIBILITIES! 4,000+ sq.ft. well maintained home with 4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, 2 kitchens and 2 story unfinished addition, garage, on 2 lots. Can be finished for 3 unit rental income or country store. $153,000. Jeannie Brady ERA BRADY ASSOCIATES 570-836-3848 DALLAS

NEWBERRY ESTATE ORCHARD EAST Two bedroom condo, 2nd floor. Living/dining room combination. 1,200 square feet of easy living. Tiled bath, new vinyl exterior, Two balconies,new roof, 2005. New electrical system. one car garage nearby. Security system, cedar closet, use of in-ground pool. $109,000 MLS#11-4031 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

DRUMS 4 bedroom Colonial with hardwood floors in formal dining & living room. Modern eat in kitchen, finished basement with 24” x 30” recreation room. Deck, hot tub and ceiling fans. MLS#11-4504 $199,000 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

LivingInQuailHill.com

New Homes From $275,000$595,000 570-474-5574

61 Acer Lane Great value, great location on a fabulous lot. From your hot tub you can enjoy the view of the almost full acre lot. Year round sun room, plus you have a Lower Level that adds more space to this great home. Don’t miss out on this incredible buy!! Schedule your showing today. MLS 12-808 $139,900 Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 Trademark Realtor Group 570-613-9090

Condos with architect designed interior on 3 floors. Large, well equipped tiled kitchen with separate breakfast room, den with fireplace-brick & granite hearth. Open floor plan in living/dining area. 3 or 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths. Lower level has den or 4th bedroom with family room & bath. Recently sided; attached 2-car garage, walk-out lower level, decks on 1st & 2nd floor; pets accepted (must be approved by condo association). Country Club amenities included & private pool for Meadows residents. MLS 12-203 $250,000 Maribeth Jones 570-696-6565

DUPONT

140 Bear Creek Boulevard Beautiful family home on over 1/2 acre with 3 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms and finished lower level. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 12-918 $159,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

S O L D

DURYEA

$159,900 Good visibility commercial location. Room for up to 3 businesses! Also has 2 apartments., off-street parking for 8 w/ possibility. of much more in rear. Great for Beauty/Nail Salon, Fitness Studio, Shop, and Garage type businesses. Call CHRISTINE KUTZ for more information. 570-332-8832

570-283-9100

DURYEA

97 Chittenden St. Flood damaged home with new furnace, electric box, water heater, outlets and switches. 1st floor gutted but already insulated and ready for sheetrock. 2nd floor has 4 bedrooms and bath with double sinks. Large yard. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-1225 $69,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

DURYEA NEW PRICE!!!!!

621 Donnelly St. Great starter home, already furnished, newer roof and vinyl windows. Move right into this 2 bedroom, 1/2 double home. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc. com MLS 12-1042 $29,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

DURYEA REDUCED!

38 Huckleberry Ln Blueberry Hills 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, family room with fireplace, 2 car garage, large yard. Master bath with separate jetted tub, kitchen with stainless steel appliances and island, lighted deck. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 11-3071 $309,860 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

TRUCKSVILLE

130 Harris Hill Rd For Sale or Lease Remodeled doublewide mobile home on solid foundation. Featuring 3 bedrooms, new kitchen, new carpet, fresh paint & nice yard with deck. Only $49,000. Call 570-466-6334

P E N D I N G

EXETER

908 Primrose Court Move right into this newer 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Townhome with many upgrades including hardwood floors throughout and tiled bathrooms. Lovely oak cabinets in the kitchen, central air, fenced in yard, nice quiet neighborhood. MLS 11-2446 $117,900 Call Don Crossin 570-288-0770 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-287-0770

Job Seekers are looking here! Where's your ad? 570-829-7130 and ask for an employment specialist EXETER

Nice size 4 bedroom home with some hardwood floors, large eat in kitchen with breakfast bar. 2 car garage & partially fenced yard. Close to everything! $89,000 Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

The Attorney To Call When Buying A Home • Complete Real Estate Legal Services • Title Insurance • Rapid Title Search & Closing • Evening & Weekend Appointments

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

3 bedrooms, 2 baths, finished basement, screened patio, new paint & carpet. Move in condition. $139,900. Call 570-301-9590

Angelo C. Terrana Jr. ATTORNEY AT LAW Suite 117 Park Building, 400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA (570) 283-9500

754272

906 Homes for Sale


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 17G

More than 5,000 Northeastern Pa. Families Served First Time Buyer Programs  FHA & VA Loan Experts  Refinance – Low Fixed Rates for Home Improvements,  Consolidate Debt or Cash Out! Fast, Free Pre-approval – Online, By Phone or In Person  USDA/Rural Housing Loans – Low Fixed Rates with No Money Down and No PMI  Construction Loans – Low Fixed Rates & Low Down Payment Options Available  Evening/Weekend Appointments  Friendly, Local Processing/Closing Staff! 

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EXETER

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OVER 880 SALES IN 2011*

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Steve Farrell Owner/Broker

KINGSTON OFFICE (570) 718-4959 OR (570) 675-6700

Ruth K. Smith

New Listing

New Listing

DU

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HO ME WA R

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39 Butler Street, Kingston

New Listing

RE

Nice size 4 bedroom home with some hardwood floors, large eat in kitchen with breakfast bar. 2 car garage & partially fenced yard. Close to everything! $89,000 Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

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570-718-4959

MOCANAQUA

PLAINS

WILKESBARRE

3BR/1BA RIVERFRONT LOG HOME w/open floor plan, spacious 1st floor BR, 2 lots. MLS#12-1601

Nice Bright Traditional w/modern ceramic eat-in kitchen & tiled bath, built-in garage & deep yard. MLS#12-1512

2BR/1BA Two Story on a corner lot. Great starter w/new roof, replacement windows, newer bathroom. MLS#12-1546

Call Eddie 570-814-6129

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EXETER

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OPEN HOUSE Sunday 12pm-5pm

362 Susquehanna Ave Completely remodeled, spectacular, 2 story Victorian home, with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, new rear deck, full front porch, tiled baths and kitchen, granite countertops, all Cherry hardwood floors throughout, all new stainless steel appliances and lighting, new oil furnace, washer dryer in first floor bath. Great neighborhood, nice yard. $174,900 (30 year loan, $8,750 down, $887/month, 30 years @ 4.5%) 100% OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Call Bob at 570-654-1490

Restored 4219 sq. ft. Century home with all original woodwork on a large double lot in Kingston. 5 bedrooms, 3 ½ baths. Formal dining room, family room & sunroom. Fireplace in master bedroom. 3rd floor studio with bookshelves. The architecture and size of the lot are what set it apart from the other homes. New cedar fence, 90% Pella new architectural windows. Replaced heating system to gas hot water radiators. 3 zoned PEX tubing throughout heating systems. New hot water heater.

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HANOVER

Great multi-family home. Fully rented double block offers large updated rooms, 3 bedrooms each side. Nice location. MLS 114390 $129,900 Call/text for Details. Donna Cain 570-947-3824

Each office is Independently Owned and Operated

KINGSTON

570-407-2314 or cshedlock@classicproperties.com

$79,900

Call Whitney 570-338-7537

CLARKS SUMMIT

NORTH POCONO

TUNKHANNOCK

POCONO MOUNTAINS

Heritage He eritage H Homes omes P Promise: romise:

EXETER REDUCED

128 JEAN ST. Nice bi-level home on quiet street. Updated exterior. Large family room, extra deep lot. 2 car garage, enclosed rear porch and covered patio. For more information and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.co m MLS 11-2850 $179,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

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SIGNATURE PROPERTIES Kimberly J. Reilly, MBA REALTOR® 230 Ferguson Avenue Shavertown, PA Office: 570.675.5100 Cell: 570.466.3338 kimberly.reilly@century21.com www.c21signature.com

Contact Carol Shedlock Today for a confidential interview:

906 Homes for Sale

D

To place your ad call...829-7130

Call Carol 570-407-2314

NANTICOKE

Traditional 3BR/1.2BA Two Story, large open LR/DR combo, huge eat- in kitchen & yard w/patio area. MLS#12-961

*CLOSED SALES BASED ON COMPANY WIDE SALES FOR NORTHEASTERN PA FROM 1/1/2011 to 12/31/2011 *Ranking as of Jan. 2012

Call Ruth K. Smith 570-696-1195 / 570-696-5411 906 Homes for Sale

Classes taught by: Whitney Lopuhovsky Certified Corporate Trainer Multi-Million $ Club

MOUNTAINTOP

3BR/2.5BA BEAUTIFUL LAKEFRONT COLONIAL! Sit on your tiered deck & feel how relaxing the calm water can be! MLS#12-40

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

WILKES-BARRE

5 bedrooms, 2.5 bath, hardwood floors, large kitchen, Driveway. asking $80,000 Call 570-829-4027

titiv ivee Pr Pric iccin ng • No No H idd id den Co den de C Cost ost sts ts • No N H id idde dde d n Up Competitive Pricing Hidden Costs Hidden Upgrades

New Model!

2898 Scranton/Carbondale Highway Blakely, PA 18447 570-383-2981 • www.heritagehomesltd.com HERITAGE HOMES INCLUDE: • Gas Warm Air Heat • Site Work Package • Central Air Conditioning • Concrete Front Porch • Andersen Windows • 1st Floor Laundry • Master Bath Whirlpool • Two Story Foyer • 2 1/2 Tile Baths • Front Stone Accent •˙Hardwood, Kitchen, Foyer • Poured Concrete Foundation Featuring:

The Arlington - 2,820 sq. ft. You’ve Got Dreams. We’ve Got Plans. MODEL HOURS Weekdays 12-7 Sat & Sun 12-5 Closed Fridays

Scan Code and Visit Our Website:


PAGE 18G

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

From This Grilling Porch!

This View!

Attached to this one floor ranch!

ALL FOR AROUND $300,000 Our pricing isn’t filled with hidden extras.... we give you a great home for a great price ! And we make it fun to build. We only have a few lots, so don’t put it off and be sorry later.

OPEN HOUSE

With us, what you see is what you get........ Come and veiw what comes with our homes..... at 15 River Shores Court, West Pittston ( Erie St & Susquehanna Ave) from 11am until 3pm - Sunday 906 Homes for Sale EXETER TWP.

NEW PRICE $699,000 311 Lockville Rd Stately brick 2 story, with in-ground pool, covered patio, finished basement, fireplace, wood stove, 3 car attached garage, 5 car detached garage with apartment above. MLS#11-1242 Call Joe or Donna, 613-9080

906 Homes for Sale

Find your next vehicle online.

timesleaderautos.com

Line up a place to live in classified!

EILEEN R. MELONE Real Estate 821-7022

EILEEN MELONE, Broker 821-7022

Visit us on the web at: www.NEPAHOMESETC.com OR www.realtor.com/wilkes-barre

COUNTRYWOOD

FORTY FORT

CHEAPER THAN RENT! 38 Oak Street. Spacious 1/2 double block. Living room / dining room combo. 3 bedrooms on second floor, 3 on the third. 1 1/2 baths. lst floor laundry. 3 porches. Large yard with loads of parking. Aluminum siding. Concrete driveway. Many extras! MLS # 12-711. Conventional financing. ($2,995 down, $325, month. 4 1/4% interest, 30 years. $59,900. Bob Kopec HUMFORD REALTY 570-822-5126

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

HANOVER TWP

ESTATES

Level Building Lots .40 – 1.50 Acres All Underground / Public Utilities Gas, Sewer, Water, Phone, Electric, Cable, Street Lighting, Sidewalks Rental / Lease Options Available Convenient Location / Hanover Township / Close to Hanover Industrial Park NEPA’s Leader in Energy Efficient Construction Alternative Energy Solutions Additional Warranty and Maintenance Services available

EVERY NEW HOME CONTRACT INCLUDES HEATING AND COOLING BILLS FOR

10 YEARS

LOT PRICES STARTING AT $40,000 $40 000 LOTS READY FOR IMMEDIATE CONSTRUCTION For Specifics Call Connie Yanoshak 829-0184

Very well maintained 2-story home with 6 rooms, 3 bedrooms, large eat-in kitchen and 1.5 baths. This home also has a first floor laundry room, ductless air conditioner, gas steam heat and a fenced in yard with a shed. This home is in move-in condition just waiting for you to move into. Make an appointment today! #11-4433 $79,900 Karen Altavilla 283-9100 x28 Prudential: 696-2600

Find A New Friend In The Times Leader Classified

To place an ad call 829-7130

New Residential Construction Custom Remodeling Kitchen and Baths

HANOVER TWP. 10 Lyndwood Ave

Office: 570-655-2374 Direct: 570-237-1444

rank F arey C Construction, Inc. Where High Quality Is The Standard

w w w. f r a n k c a r e y c o n s t r u c t i o n . c o m

3 Bedroom 1.5 bath ranch with new windows hardwood floors finished basement 2 car garage and a finished basement. MLS 11-3610 $139,900 Call Pat Guesto 570-793-4055 CENTURY 21 SIGNATURE PROPERTIES 570-675-5100

754024

Land Development


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 19G

From $199,900!

NEWN! PL A

th

1i0versary!

Ann

Single Story “No Steps”

• 3 BR • 2 Bath • 2 Car Garage • Granite Counters • Spa Style Bath • Hardwood Floors

Sand Springs Active Adult Community

• 1 Story Single Family Patio Homes • Live a maintenance free lifestyle • Golf Course; Clubhouse activities! Open Daily 12 to 5 Fri. & Sat. 11 to 5

Relocating? Home Sold?

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HEMLOCK - 3BR, 2.5 Bath $244,900 SAUCON - 4BR, 2.5 Bath $264,900 BRECKENRIDGE - 4BR, 2.5 Bath, Over 3,000 Sq. Ft $339,900

Call 570.708.3042

SandSpringsGolf.com

Sand Springs Real Estate Corp. 570.708.3042


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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


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SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

HANOVER TWP.

HANOVER TWP.

HANOVER

19 Lee Park Ave. Well kept 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath single with eat in kitchen, 1st floor laundry area, w/w, ceiling fans, full concrete basement. Gas heat. Home sits on large lot with 2 car detached garage and off street parking. MLS 12-541 $79,900 ANTONIK & ASSOCIATES, INC. 570-735-7494 Ext 304 Patricia Lunski 570-814-6671

Extraordinary Quality Built 4000+ Square Foot Home – the rear yard with stone patio backs up to the 8th Fairway of the Wyoming Valley Country Club! There’s a custom cherry eat-in kitchen with island, formal living and dining rooms with hardwood floors, 1st Floor Family Room with Vermont Stone fireplace and wet bar, 1st floor Master Suite with His & Her Dressing and Powder Rooms opening to a tiled master bath with jetted tub and separate tiled shower; Second floor has 3 additional Bedrooms with walk in closets, 2 full baths and large attic for storage; Gigantic Lower Level Family Room has a stone fireplace, seated bar area with sink & mirrored backsplash, workout area, & powder room. Stunning landscaping surrounds this beautiful home with an indoor and outdoor speaker system, oversized 2 car garage & underground sprinkler system. MLS #11-994 $385,000. Call Pat today @

Multi-family. large 3 unit building, beautifully updated apartments. Two 3 bedroom apartments & one efficiency apartment. Great location also offers street parking. This is a must see. $139,900. MLS 114389. Call/text for Details Donna Cain 570-947-3824

HANOVER TWP.

20 Dexter St., Nice starter home with shed M OVE -I N R EADY ! 3 bedroom. Fenced yard. Security system. Roof 2006. Hanover Area Schools. This home would be eligible for the LUZERNE COUNTY GROWING HOMEOWNERS INITIATIVE. Seller will help with closing cost expenses. MONTHLY PAYMENT $191 ON A 30 YEAR MORTGAGE- HOW CAN YOU BEAT THAT? MLS #11-3023 Reduced $35,000 Call Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

HANOVER TWP.

476 Wyoming St. Nice 3 bedroom single home. Gas heat. Convenient location. To settle estate. Reduced to $34,900 Call Jim for details

Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group 570-287-1196

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

HANOVER TWP.

Towne & Country Real Estate Co. 570-735-8932 or 570-542-5708

HANOVER TWP.

78 Luzerne St. Not a drive-by. Move right into this sparkling clean, bright and cheery 1/2 double. All new floor coverings and freshly painted interior. 2 zone gas hot water baseboard heat. W/d hookups in basement which has a concrete floor. All measurements are approximate. MLS 12-1129 $45,000 Call Michelle T. Boice 570-639-5393 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130

NEW LISTING Two-story brick home originally built in the 1860’s…warm and fuzzy is the feeling as you enter this gracious home…The living room is now a “pool room”. Den with Pergo flooring and stunning fireplace with built-in bookshelves. Dining room with hardwood floors, eat-in kitchen, second floor has 3 spacious bedrooms, gas heat, large fenced yard. #12-1426 $197,600 Maribeth Jones 696-6565 Prudential: 696-2600

HANOVER TWP. REDUCED

HANOVER TWP.

95 Pulaski St. Large home on nice sized lot. Newer windows, walk up attic. 3 bedrooms, nice room sizes, walk out basement. Great price you could move right in. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-4554 $39,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

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5 Raymond Drive Practically new 8 year old Bi-level with 4 bedrooms, 1 and 3/4 baths, garage, fenced yard, private dead end street. For more info and photos visit: www. atlasrealtyinc.com MLS 11-3422 $175,000 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

D

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

HANOVER TWP.

SOLD

285 Lyndwood Ave. Brick 3 bedroom Ranch with full finished basement. Home features large modern kitchen, 3 nice size bedrooms, all with closets, hall coat closet, w/w, modern bath, ceiling fans, fenced yard. Private driveway, newer furnace. Assessed value and taxes recently reduced! MLS 12-222 $86,000 Patricia Lunski 570-814-6671 Antonik & Associates, Inc. 570-735-7494

Find Your Ideal Employee! Place an ad and end the search! 570-829-7130 ask for an employment specialist

906 Homes for Sale HARVEYS LAKE

Dallas School District. Wooded and private Bi-Level. This home features 1 car garage, 3 bedrooms, 1 3/4 bath & nice updates. plenty of room on your private 2 acre lot. Call for details. $166,000 Call Cindy King 570-690-2689 www.cindykingre.com

HANOVER TWP. 570-675-4400

906 Homes for Sale

JENKINS TWP.

297 Susquehannock Drive Traditional 4 bedroom home with 2.5 baths, 2 car garage, private yard with above ground pool. Large deck with retractable awning. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-945 $254,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

HARVEYS LAKE Ridge Ave ATTENTION CAR BUFFS! 4-car garage and house. Garage has updated roof, house has beautiful woodwork, spacious room sizes, 3 bedrooms, possible 4th on third floor. Windows are leaded and stained glass. Pay your mortgage with garage rental or store your collectibles. #11-4133 $75,000 Maribeth Jones 696-6565 Prudential: 696-2600

HARDING

2032 ROUTE 92 Great Ranch home surrounded by nature with view of the river and extra lot on the river. Large living room and kitchen remodeled and ready to move in. Full unfinished basement, off street parking. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-79 $78,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

HARVEY’S LAKE

4 bedroom Cape Cod, 3 car garage, pool, with 64 feet. of lakefront.MLS# 12-1636 $599,900. call Stephen @ 814-4183 JJ Mantione Appraisal & Realty Group Inc.

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

KINGSTON

LUZERNE

MOUNTAINTOP

38 W. Walnut St. Charming 4/5 bedroom with 1.5 baths. Beautifully appointed kitchen w/granite counter tops, cherry cabinets and hardwood floors. Gas fireplace in living room, leaded glass windows in living room and dining room. Nice back deck, 2 car garage and 4 season front porch. MLS 11-4103 $179,900 Jay A. Crossin EXT. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

459 Bennett St. Very nice 5 bedroom, 2 story home in nice area of Luzerne. Off street parking for 4 cars. 1st floor master bedroom & laundry. Replacement windows on 2nd floor. 5 year young full bath. Modern kitchen w/breakfast bar, oak cabinets. Basement always DRY! All measurements approximate MLS11-3745 $122,900 Debbie McGuire 570-332-4413 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Beautiful and great condition, spacious 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath traditional 2 story home situated on a large level nicely landscaped lot. Newer kitchen. Crestwood Schools. Features large cedar walled 3 season room with skylight and doors to large deck, Family room with fireplace, formal dining and living rooms, 1st floor laundry, & gas HWBB heat. MLS# 12-1065 $238,000. Call Pat. Direct line 715-9337. Lewith & Freeman Real Estate 570-474-9801

KINGSTON

LUZERNE

JENKINS TWP.

Modern 2 story home on 1+ acre. Duplex. Excellent starter home, retirement home, or investment property public sewer,deep well. asking $109,900 570-287-5775 or 570-332-1048 HARVEYS LAKE

WELL MAINTAINED 2 STORY - 4 Bedroom, eat-in kitchen, spacious Living Room, family room with original woodwork, remodeled baths and nice front porch on 1.58 partially wooded acres near Harveys Lake. $117,800 Jeannie Brady ERA BRADY ASSOCIATES 570-836-3848 HARVEYS LAKE

Nice country home with almost a full acre of land. 1 mile from Harveys Lake. Home offers some new windows, new copper piping and updated electric circuits. Come relax in the nice screen porch. MLS 12-476 $148,000 Call Tony 570-855-2424

HUGHESTOWN REDUCED

4 Orchard St. 3 bedroom starter home with 1 bath on quiet street. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-254 $69,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

P E N D I N G

JENKINS TWP.

4 Widener Drive A must see home! You absolutely must see the interior of this home. Start by looking at the photos on line. Fantastic kitchen with hickory cabinets, granite counters, stainless steel appliances and tile floor. Fabulous master bathroom with champagne tub and glass shower, walk in closet. 4 car garage, upper garage is partially finished. The list goes on and on. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com. MLS 12-210 $389,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

431 Chestnut Ave. Charming 2 story single family home with upgrades, including new kitchen cabinets, furnace, hot water heater, 200 amp electric, 2 car detached garage. Walk up attic for additional storage space. MLS 11-4106 $129,900 Jay A. Crossin EXT 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

KINGSTON MOTIVATED SELLER REDUCED!

76 N. Dawes Ave. Use your income tax rebate for a downpayment on this great home with modern kitchen with granite counters, 2 large bedrooms, attached garage, full basement could be finished, sun porch overlooks great semi private yard. A great house in a great location! Come see it! . For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-41 $115,000 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

KINGSTON TWP

Large, spacious home, ultra modern kitchen, new windows, carpet & bath. Off-street parking, gas heat & hardwood floors. Large open floor plan. Must See! MLS #12-958 $105,000 Call Lynda Rowinski

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5418 MOUNTAIN TOP

Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 3/4 bath, with hardwood floors under carpet & 2nd kitchen in lower level for entertaining. screened porch, landscaped yard, heated workshop & much more! $179,900 Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

Affordable 3 bedroom ranch with full basement and large deck located on 1.5 acres only 1 mile from the beach and boat launch. $148,500 Jeannie Brady ERA BRADY ASSOCIATES 570-836-3848

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! HARVEYS AREA

LAKE

P E N D I N G

JENKINS TWP

1252 Main St.

3 Bedrooms 1 Bath Finished Walk-Out Basement Corner Lot Single Car Garage

$57,900

SPRINGS ARTISTRY Nestled on 3.86 acres. Will be yours to enjoy in this 4 bedroom, with 1st floor master suite, with a jacuzzi type tub. Separate shower, 2 walk-in closets, opens to deck and in-ground pool, 2 story family room, warmed by a gas fireplace, & 2 sets of french doors to deck. Appealing granite kitchen, and natural wood cabinets, bright breakfast nook. Country charm, halfway to heaven! $269,000. Call Tracy McDermott 570-332-8764 570-696-2468

Call Vince 570-332-8792

Highland Hills 8 Patrick Road Magnificent custom built tudor home with quality throughout. Spacious 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 2 story living room with fireplace and library loft. Dining room, family room and 3 season sunroom which overlooks professionally landscaped grounds with gazebo and tennis/basketball court. Lower level includes recreation room, exercise room and 3/4 bath. Enjoy this serene acre in a beautiful setting in Highland Hills Development. Too many amenities to mention. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-723 $399,900 Call Terry 570-885-3041 Angie 570-885-4896

KINGSTON 171 Third Ave

JENKINS TWP.

2 W. Sunrise Drive PRICED TO SELL! This 4 bedroom has 2 car garage with extra driveway, central air, veranda over garage, recreation room with fireplace and wet bar. Sunroom For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-296 $199,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

So close to so much, traditionally appointed 3 bedroom, 3 bath townhome with warm tones & wall to wall cleanliness. Modern kitchen with lots of cabinets & plenty of closet space thruout, enjoy the privacy of deck & patio with fenced yard. MLS 11-2841 $123,000 Call Arlene Warunek 570-650-4169

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

MOUNTAINTOP

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 12:00 - 1:30PM

573 Carverton Rd Privacy & serenity! This 40 acre estate features living room with fireplace & hardwood floor; family room with vaulted ceiling & fireplace; 1st floor master bedroom & bath with jetted tub & stall shower; panelled den; dining room with stone floor & skylight; 3 additional bedrooms & 2 baths. Central Air, 3 outbuildings. REDUCED $695,000 MLS 11-4056 Call Nancy Judd Joe Moore 570-288-1401

LAFLIN

13 Fordham Road Totally remodeled custom brick ranch in Oakwood Park. This home features an open floor plan with hardwood floors, 2 fireplaces, kitchen, formal living & dining rooms, family room, 4 bedrooms, 4 baths, office with private entrance, laundry room on first floor, tons of closets and storage areas, walk-up attic, great finished basement with fireplace, builtin grill, in-ground pool, cabana with half bath, an oversized 2-car garage & a security system. Renovations include new: windows, gas furnace, central air, electrical service, hardwood floors, Berber carpeting, freshly painted, updated bathrooms & much, much, more. Laflin Road to Fordham Road, on right. $399,700 Call Donna 570-613-9080

NANTICOKE $49,900

136 East Ridge St. A great home features 3 bedrooms, plenty of closet space, modern eat in kitchen with great appliances, living room with wood pellet stove, large family room, 1 1/2 modern bathrooms, washer/ dryer hook-up, second floor has all new replacement windows, exterior has aluminum siding, stain glass window on new front porch, new above ground pool, fenced in level yard, Plenty of off street parking, A+ today. Never worry about parking, its always there. Great location, best price home in today's market, Shown by appointment only, to qualified buyers. Call John Vacendak CAPITOL REAL ESTATE 570-735-1810 www.capitolrealestate.com for additional photos

Greystone Manor. Ten year old home with attached apartment. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Kitchen, living room, dining room & den. Apartment has 1 bedroom, bath, living room, dining room, private entrance. 3 car garage, front porch, large decks. Total 2,840 square feet. On cul-de-sac. Call BOB RUNDLE for appointment.

MOUNTAIN TOP

Spacious 3 bedroom, 1 3/4 bath split level on a beautifully landscaped 1 acre lot. Large sunroom & recreation room with fireplace and wet bar. $205,000 Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

MOUNTAINTOP

9 Anne Street Modern bi-level, 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, tile kitchen and bath floor. New appliances, new gas hot water furnace and architectural roof. Family room, 3-season room and deck. 2 car garage, large yard. Move-in condition. Convenient location. Reduced to $199,900 OBO 570-823-4282 or 570-823-7540

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

906 Homes for Sale NANTICOKE

415 Jones Street Adorable home with charm & character. 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, eat-in kitchen, formal dining room, family room with gas fireplace. 3 season room, fenced in yard with rear deck & shed. $119,000 MLS#12-498 Michael Nocera 570-357-4300

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5412

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130! NANTICOKE

NANTICOKE

1/2 DOUBLE Great starter home in nice area. Close to schools and recreation. Large 3 season porch with cabinetry, great for entertaining. New plumbing, lots of light & huge walk up attic for storage or rec room. $35,000 Call CHRISTINE KUTZ 570-332-8832

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

Get ready for your outdoor entertaining!! Fenced & beautifully landscaped lot with huge rear Trex decks and newer above ground pool. Plenty of off-street parking & detached 2-car oversized garage. 2 Story has 3 bedrooms, formal dining room & modern kitchen with corian counters & oak cabinets. MLS# 12-457 $117,900 Call Deb Roccograndi at 570-696-6671

NANTICOKE

NANTICOKE

MOUNTAIN TOP

570-474-2340, Ext. 11

189 Rock St. Spacious home with 4 bedrooms and large rooms. Nice old woodwork, staircase, etc. Extra lot for parking off Kenley St. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3404 $89,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Move right into this beautiful 4 bedroom home in desirable Rockledge development. Many upgrades & features including modern kitchen with granite countertops, 22x20 great room, 2 fireplaces, new paint, carpet, gorgeous 2 tier deck & much more. $245,000. For more information or to schedule a viewing please Call 570-242-5381

29 Valley View Dr. MOTIVATED SELLER Modern kitchen and bath. Tile floors. Corner lot with deck overlooking spacious yard. Great neighborhood. Conveniently located. Easy to show. Call for an appointment today MLS#11-2500 $174,900 Julio Caprari: 570-592-3966

MOUNTAINTOP

COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE

JENKINS TWP.

HARVEYS LAKE

MOUNTAINTOP

906 Homes for Sale

143 W. Broad St. Nice 2 story home with 3 bedrooms 1.5 baths, fenced yard, newer furnace with 3 zones and newer 200 amp electrical service. This home has an attached Mother in Law suite with a separate entrance. This can easily be converted to a 1st floor master bedroom with a master bath. MOS 12-1401 $69,900 John W. Polifka Five Mountains Realty 570-542-2141 570-704-6846

Motivated seller! Affordable 3 bedroom 2 story home. Features a study on 1st floor, or could be a 4th bedroom. Semi modern kitchen, includes appliances "as is", gas heat, full basement. MLS#12-1107 Asking $52,000. Call Pat at 715-9337. Lewith & Freeman Real Estate 570-474-9801

NEWPORT TWP.

NANTICOKE VACANT LAND 333 OAKMONT LANE 1.15 acre, level lot, #254, on cul-de-sac, in Laurel Lakes. Underground electric, phone & cable. Ready for your new home in 2012! MLS# 11-4465 $35,500 Call Christina Kane 570-714-9235

MOUNTAIN TOP

182 Robert Street Nice single or duplex. Gas heat. Detached garage. This home is “high and dry”, and available for immediate occupancy. Call Jim for details. Affordable @ $104,900 TOWNE & COUNTRY R.E. 570-735-8932 570-542-5708

5 bedroom Contemporary has a vaulted ceiling in living room with fireplace. Hardwood floors in dining & living rooms. 1st floor master bedroom with walk in closet. Lower level family room. Deck, garage, separate laundry. $257,500 MLS#12-170 Call Joe Moore 570-288-1401

NORTH LAKE

NANTICOKE

LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION! Beautiful home in Alberdeen Acres, hole 7 of Blue Ridge Golf Course. 1.84 acres of serenity. Large 4 bedroom home with great deck to relax on and enjoy your surroundings. Come make this your private retreat today. $259,900. MLS 121627. For more information or to schedule a showing call or text Donna 570-947-3824 or Tony 570-855-2424

214 West Ridge St Great 2 story home, freshly painted and carpeted, large rooms. Don't miss out on this great buy and to own a home of your own. 12-1302 $69,900 Call Karen Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340 NANTICOKE 294-296 EAST STATE ST

Inviting home with 90’ of lakefront & wonderful enclosed dock. The huge great room features a vaulted ceiling, hard wood floors, handsome stone fireplace, built-in cabinets & long window seat with offering lake view. Modern kitchen with large pantry for entertaining, Master suite opens to 3 season room, also lakefront. 2nd floor guest rooms are oversized. MLS# 11-2954 $328,500 Call Rhea 570-696-6677

NANITCOKE

3 bedroom, 1 bath. Nice opportunity for a starter home or investment property. Original columns, moldings, and leaded glass windows are intact. Reduced $40,000 CALL CHRISTINE KUTZ 570-332-8832

Beautiful woodwork highlights the Victorian influenced 3 bedroom home featuring hardwood floors, pocket & transoms doors, shuttered windows, crown molding & large bay window. Plus a 2+ bedroom unit with newer kitchen to help pay mortgage. MLS 12-674 $89,000 Call Arlene Warunek 570-650-4169

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

NOXEN

PRICED TO SELL Brick ranch with large living room, 3 bedrooms, sun room, deck, full basement, sheds and garage on 0.54 acres in Noxen. $135,000. Jeannie Brady ERA BRADY ASSOCIATES 570-836-3848


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OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-3:00 PM Lot 1 Woodberry Dr., Mountaintop

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WYOMING Great home for summer entertaining! Large rooms, inground pool, private fenced yard, large deck, new baths, OSP. MLS# 12-1682 MARY M. 714-9274 $215,000

WILKES-BARRE Beautiful 5BR, 2.5 bath home on large lot. Meticulously maintained. Large room sizes. Modern kitchen & baths, in-ground pool. MLS# 12-1729 JILL 696-0875 $229,900

SHAVERTOWN

PLYMOUTH

W NE

G TIN LIS

SHAVERTOWN 5BR home w/gas heat, C/A, finished basement on a quiet street. Move-in condition! MLS# 12-1703 MARK 696-0724 $200,000

PLYMOUTH Completely remodeled 2story 3BR home. Great view. Tile radiant floors, modern maple Kit w/ stainless steel appliances, 1st floor bath & laundry, deck, wet bar & hot tub provides great entertainment for family & friends. MLS# 12-444 ANDREA 714-9244 $105,900

Preview this 4BR, 3bath 2 story model w/ lots of HW & tile. Granite counters in kit, MSTR Suite w/2 walk-in closets & tiled bath w/ dbl vanities, shower & whirlpool. Home/lot packages available. TERRY D. 715-9317 Dir: 309S. to Right on S Main, Right on Nuangola, RIght on Fairwood Blvd. to end. Straight into Woodberry Manor. Right on Woodberry Dr.

DALLAS Exceptional 3BR Condo w/spacious rooms & elegant custom paint & built-ins throughout. Beautiful kitchen, wonderful views. 1st floor Master Suite has office, large WIC & stunning bath. Walk-out LL has handsome FR, BRs, office & great organized storage. MLS# 12-1680 RHEA 696-6677 $495,000

MOUNTAINTOP Great offering! Spectacular Lakefront 2 story w/4BRs, 2.5 baths & finished lower level. 1yr home warranty PLUS 2% Seller’s Assist! MLS# 12-1669 CORINE 715-9331 $299,900

FRANKLIN TWP. Surround yourself in the beauty of nature while enjoying brilliant sun rises from the front porch & stunning sunsets from your rear deck. Imagine yourself coming home to this picture-perfect 4BR, 4 bath home set on 2.68acres. A must see! MLS# 12-1516 SHIRLEY 714-9272 $469,900

MOUNTAINTOP Move-in condition to this beautiful 4BR, 4 bath home on 1+acres. HW floors, lower level with 3/4 bath, new refrigerator, gas oven & dishwasher. MLS# 12-1710 SHARON 970-1106 $349,900

DALLAS

SWEET VALLEY

KINGSTON

GLENMAURA

W NE

G TIN LIS

W NE

DALLAS Unique Lincoln log home. Outstanding LR w/FP, large deck w/lots of light & privacy, 2BRs & loft. MLS# 12-1711 SUSAN 696-0876 $269,000

G TIN LIS

W NE

SWEET VALLEY Beautiful 4BR, 4 bath Country home on 4+acres. Finished lower level w/ fireplace. Rear deck overlooking pool w/ Cabana & changing room. Just 10 minutes to everything! Country living at its best! MLS# 12-1723 SHIRLEY 714-9272 $260,000

G TIN LIS

W NE

KINGSTON Huge 5BR in the heart of Kingston. Updated kitchen with granite. Big beautiful rooms. MLS# 12-1724 JOAN 696-0887 $320,000

E IC PR

MOOSIC GREAT PRICE REDUCTION! A Glenmaura Masterpiece! Every detail in this custom 4BR Ranch was well planned & designed. Brazilian cherry HW, custom cabinetry, gourmet kit, wall to wall windows overlooking the 5th Fairway & an incredible LL for entertaining. VIRTUAL TOUR! MLS# 11-4182 MARIE 881-0103 $849,000

SHAVERTOWN Elegant 7yr, 2 story w/premium finishes throughout. Open 2 story foyer, custom kitchen w/granite tops, walk-out finished LL, private 1.16acre lot. MLS# 12-1617 GERI 696-0888 $432,000

OPEN HOUSES - SUNDAY, MAY 13TH, 2012

Pittston Exeter Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre

Only 1 Remains!

Kingston Kingston Kingston Mountaintop Mountaintop Harveys Lake

Rae Dziak 714-9234

(570) 288-9371

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.

(570) 696-1195

Century21SHGroup.com

PITTSTON/NORTH & SURROUNDS 48 Lewis St. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty 118 Trayor St. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty WILKES-BARRE & SURROUNDS 15 Haldeman St. 12-2PM Realty World Rubbico Real Estate 93 N. Cleveland St. 12-2PM Realty World Rubbico Real Estate 320 Kidder St. 12-2PM Realty World Rubbico Real Estate KINGSTON/WEST SIDE & SURROUNDS 76 N. Dawes Ave. 2:30-4PM Atlas Realty 139 Lathrop Court 1:30-3:30PM Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 267 Grove St. 1-3PM Elegant Homes MOUNTAINTOP & SURROUNDS 29 Valley View Dr. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty 3 Sikorski Court 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman BACK MOUNTAIN & SURROUNDS Pole 205 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman

24 Meadow Lane, Hunlock Creek $289,900

56 Amherst St., Wilkes-Barre $118,000

NEW LISTING 122 Buck Ridge Drive, Drums $139,900

NEW LI NEW LISTING STIN ING G IST 199 Clearview Ave., Trucksville $119,900

Looking to Sell...

HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY

Smith Hourigan Group

rae@lewith-freeman.com

Mothers hold their children’s hands for a short while... but their hearts forever

More Advertising More Open Houses Excellent Service...

(570) 474-9801 MOUNTAINTOP

DRUMS

MULTIFAMILY

!

!

W NE PRICED TO SELL

!

W NE

!

!

W NE

W NE

W NE

With Rae, Service = Sales (Consistent Top Producer)

PRICED TO SELL

I’m Sue Barre and I sell houses, and I can SELL YOURS! (570) 696-5417

ELEGANT HOMES, LLC.

PITTSTON

DURYEA

10 room, 3,748 SF, 5-zone heat sprawling ranch, 12 acre park-like parcel, pool, newer roof

Bi-Level Blueberry Hill Estates with ample storage, finished LL situated on a double lot

$589,000 MLS#12-1707

$235,000 MLS#12-1696

FORTY FORT

Cape Cod offers 4BR, hardwood floors throughout home, central air, garage and more!

$99,900 MLS#12-1618

DURYEA

Income potential! well maintained, updated kitchens and baths, yard, garage + OSP.

$95,900 MLS#12-1661

TRUCKSVILLE

4BR, 2 story on 24acres w/ granite kitchen, large FR, DR, large LR, C/A, large barn, 2 decks & security system. Very nice! MLS#12-1483 $459,000

3BR, 2BA mobile on a full foundation on a double lot. Dallas School District

$75,000 MLS#12-1639

51 Sterling Avenue, Dallas PA 18612

(570) 675 • 9880

www.eleganthomesinc.net

Open House Sundays • 1:00-3:00PM

Luxurious Twins in Kingston

$198,900

New Construction!

* Approx 2100 Sq. Ft. * 2 Car Garage with Storage Area * 2 Story Great Room * Cherry Kitchen with Granite * Fenced in Yard with Patio * Gas Heat/AC Directions: From Wyoming Ave. take Pringle St. to the End, take left on Grove St. Twins on left 267 Grove St. Kingston

DURYEA

Blueberry Hills! Granite kitchen, master suite, family room with gas fireplace, views

$319,900 MLS#11-3974

SUGARLOAF

Petite Farmette, 3BR split-level, wood stove, new roof, attached garage + 3 car w/ workshop

$239,900 MLS#11-3966

MOUNTAINTOP

Ranch on corner lot, eat-in kitchen, hardwood floors, in-ground pool, finished LL

$149,900 MLS#12-389

LAFLIN

Updated ranch, 4BR, French doors to large deck, finished LL with a Sauna & fireplace

$149,500 MLS#11-3557

Jim Graham Associate Broker

PLYMOUTH

3BR, 2BA completely renovated eat-in kitchen, new appliances, new master suite, OSP

$120,000 MLS#12-1282

MULTIFAMILY

a

New 4BR 2-Story w/MBR on 1st floor! Granite kit w/ss appliances, DR w/hdwd, lg FR w/FP, public sewer, all on 2.8 acre lot! MLS#12-1233 $319,900

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate

(570) 696-3801 • (570) 696-0883 Direct metcalf@epix.net Barbara B bara F. Metcalf Bar Metc t alf A ociate Brokerr Ass Associate

$114,900

100 Years of Exceptional Real Estate Services

COLDWELL BANKER RUNDLE REAL ESTATE 40 N. Mountain Blvd., Mountaintop

Sweet Valley

139 LATHROP COURT, KINGSTON

Lovely, well-maintained 2 bdrm townhome in very nice condition. Enjoy low maintainance living close to grocery, shopping, and recreation! Two parking spaces included, no HOA fees. Very nice location. MLS#12-404 Directions: Wyoming Ave. (Rt 11) S to left on E. Dorrance Ave, then left onto Rutter Ave. Turn right into Lathrop Court, just before Eyecare Specialists..

Visit

Coldwellbankerrundlerealestate.com e-mail: rundlerealestate@coldwellbanker.com Hablamos Espanol

Call Stan Pearlman (570) 474-2340 • Stanley.Pearlman@ColdwellBanker.com

See our spec home and lots today!

If you are buying or selling anywhere in the county, I can help you! Only if you call! Direct Line - Jim (570) 715-9323

69 N. MEMORIAL HIGHWAY, SHAVERTOWN, PA 18708

OPEN SUNDAY, MAY 13TH 1:30-3:30PM

…………Is Developing Nicely!

Smith Hourigan Group (570) 696-1195

DALLAS TOWNSHIP Spectacular wooded and rolling topography provides backdrop for one of the Back Mountains most successful new neighborhoods. Created by Halbing-Amato Developers, you can work with Summit Pointe Builders to design your dream home or choose your own builder. Offers public, water, sewer, gas, electric, phone and cable.

Priced from $52,900 to $89,900.

Call Kevin Smith (570) 696-5420 Kevin.Smith@Century21.com

Directions: From Kingston. Route 309 to a right on Center Street. Left at the “T” onto Ondish Road. Follow 3/4 mile to Saddle Ridge Entrance on the Right.

Dallas

3138 Memorial Hwy., Dallas Across From Agway

(570) 675-4400

DRUMS

Remodeled 4BR Cape Cod on ½ acre, master bath, fireplace, country like setting

$99,900 MLS#11-4335

PLAINS

Double block, BR and 2BR units, garage, large eat-in kitchen, nice sized back yard.

$94,000 MLS#11-2398

Mountaintop (570) 403-3000

ONE SOURCE REALTY

Clarks Summit Peckville Moscow Lake Ariel

DURYEA

Adorable, affordable remodeled ranch. Finished LL, new paint in and out. Move right in!

$83,900 MLS#11-1457

ERA1.com Toll Free 877-587-SELL

(570) 587-9999 (570) 489-8080 (570) 842-2300 (570) 698-0700

Mt Top Scranton Stroudsburg Lehighton

EDWARDSVILLE

3BR doll house in nice section of town. Wood floors, formal dining room, eat-in kitchen

$59,900 MLS#12-828SCR

(570) 403-3000 (570) 343-9999 (570) 424-0404 (610) 377-6066

WILKESBARRE

6BR, modern baths & eat-in kitchen, finished attic, large yard, extra lot

$59,000 MLS#12-247

www.gordonlong.com If walls could talk! Nestled on an attractive 1.72-acre lot, you’ll find this 4 BR, 2.5 BTH historic home built in the early 1800’s. Throughout the years, the owners have maintained it’s charm, integrity & If you crave privacy, consider this stunning 3BR, 2.5 bath 2 story traditional cradled on a 2 acre lot. Ultra modern kitchen w/breakfastt character. Offers formal LR w/FP, DR, library/den, lower level rec room and workshop. 3-car detached garage has large loft w/1-horse area, great room w/cathedral ceiling & FP, formal DR & bonus stall stable. MLS#11-3104 $249,500 room over $299,000 roo ove verr 2 car c garage. g ge. gara g MLS#12-679 Onlyy $299,00 ge 9,00 , 0 ,00

Shickshinny Lake Dallas ll

Accredited Buyer Representative Certified Residential Broker, E-Pro Graduate Realtors Institute Seniors Real Estate Specialist

Sunita Arora Broker/Owner

*Conditions and limitations apply; including but not limited to: seller and house must meet specific qualifications, and purchase price will be determined solely by ERA Franchise Systems LLC, C b based ased d upo upon a d discount isc of the home’s appraised value value. Additionally, a second home must be purchased through a broker designated by ERA Franchise Systems LLC. ©2008 ERA Franchise Systems LLC. All Rights Reserved. ERA® and Always There For You® are registered trademarks licensed to ERA Franchise Systems LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

The best of both worlds. If you crave privacy, consider this 4BR, 3BTH raised ranch on a 4.96 acre wooded lot. A tree lined driveway leads to this spacious 3,300 sq. ft. home. MLS#12-1409 $199,999 Adjoining 1+ acre lot w/deeded lake front available for $50,000

Stunning craftsman-style home cradled on 11+ acres complete w/ pond, stream & rolling meadows in pristine condition. Great room w/stone FP & warm wood walls is one of the focal points of this home. Offers modern kitchen, formal DR & FR. Wrap-around porch overlooks property, recently built 3-car garage w/guest quarters above, invisible dog fence, and HOME WARRANTY on property. MLS#11-1741 $499,000

EW G N TIN S LI

10 FA AC RM RE

BLOOMINGDALE ROSS TOWNSHIP 10 Acre Farm field with Country Views from this Immaculate Ranch Home, Ultra Modern Kitchen, Oversized Garage Listing #12-1067 All for $274,900 Call Cherub for details 570-762-4641


PAGE 26G

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

2-Story masonry bldg on Former automotive/gas station (tanks removed). 1500 SF bldg w/2 bay 96x180 lot w/pkg for 36 cars. Ideal for apts garage & pkg for 30 cars. MLS#12-1713 or small mfg business. MLS#12-1758 MIKE 970-1100 or MARGY 696-0891 CLYDETTE 696-0897

1600 SF building - ideal for professional offices. Includes office furniture. Zoned Commercial. MLS#121422 MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Great location for multi-use Opportunity to own your own commercial business. Ample pkg, office & restaurant/pizza business. Includes equipment & liquor license. MLS#12-1658 workspace. MLS#12-685 PAT G 788-7514 or BEN T 788-7516 JUDY RICE 714-9230

Former Tavern w/2 apts. No liquor license. Needs work. Add’l lot for OSP. MLS#12-421 JULIO 714-9252 or ANDY 714-9225

900 SF Commercial space on Great business opportunity. 1st flr has 2 BR, Apt. Freshly painted exterior. Zoned 1st flr. 900 SF 2 BR apt on 2nd flr. Billboard also available to rent on bldg. Community Business. MLS#11-4416 MLS#10-4309 MATT 714-9229 TINA 714-9251

Nicely maintained offices & garage. 2400 SF w/overhead door. Great for many uses. Near highways. MLS#114561 JUDY RICE 714-9230

Prime commercial storefront + 3 spacious Apts. Parking lot in rear. MLS#12-687 DONNA S 788-7504

6000+ SF former furniture store, plus apt. & lots more space. High traffic area. Combined w/12 Davenport. MLS#11-3865 RAE DZIAK 714-9234

Unique bldg currently used 2 bldgs zoned commercial. as single residence. May be converted to 1 consists of retail space & apts, the suit your needs (w/zoning approval). other is a 2-story home. MLS#10-4056 MLS#12-844 MIKE JOHNSON

Established turn-key Auto repair & body restaurant w/2 apts. Business & shop w/state certified paint booth. building priced to sell! MLS#11-130 2nd flr storage. MLS#11-2842 ANDY 714-9225 ANDY 714-9225

Currently business on 1st flr, 3 BR apt. on 2nd flr. Lg garage in rear w/storage. Owner financing or lease purchase available. MLS#11-4015 ANDY 714-9225

High traffic Route 11 w/6000 SF Showroom/Garage, & Apt above. MLS#11-2106 ANITA REBER 788-7501

Brick & block prime office bldg. Great location on busy Rte Includes professional office space + 309! Office Bldg w/1500 SF of space restaurant. MLS#12-366 & 2270 SF warehouse. MLS#11-2094 GERALD PALERMO 788-7509 ANITA REBER 788-7501

Wonderful opportunity for commercial bldg w/ice cream stand, storefront & apt. Also storage bldg. MLS#12-370 CORINE 715-9321

4 Sty brick office bldg, more Former landmark restaurant. 3235 SF Warehouse. than half rented. High traffic area. 2 lots Perfect for landscaper, contractor, etc. offers 3500 SF on the 1st level plus basement. Parking for 40 cars. MLS#12-89 included for pkg. MLS#11-1045 Zoned Industrial. MLS#12-1376 ANDY 714-9225 or MARGY 696-0891 GERALD PALERMO 788-7509 ANDY CISNEY 714-9225

Well built 2 story - 8000 SF bldg. Prime location/high traffic area. Add’l pkg available. 1st flr office/commercial space & 2 apts on 2nd flr. MLS#11-508 RHEA SIMMS 696-6677

Retail, Office, Medical Whatever your need - This 4000 SF Bldg can accommadate it! Parking for 10. MLS#12276 JUDY RICE 714-9230

Lg Commercial warehouse & office space w/over 3.5 acres. Owner financing or lease purchase available. MLS#11-4014 ANDY 714-9225

Prime location - former Convention Hall. Wonderful opportunity for professional offices. Pkg for 100+ cars. Zoned Hwy Business. MLS#11-3654 MARGY SIMMS 696-0891

Large 8000 SF building looking for a new lease on life! Zoned Commercial. MLS#11-4058 SANDY 970-1110 or DAVID 970-1117

High traffic location. 2900 SF professional office space w/basement storage. Pkg for at least 12 cars. MLS#12416 RHEA SIMMS 696-6677

Ideal bldg for retail sales or prof offices. High traffic location on Route 309S. Zoned Commercial. MLS#121534 MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100

DAVID 970-1117

Great location for professional 3 BR, Ranch w/gar+ Prime location office. Private drive in rear. Zoned C-3. attached bldg. Zoned HWY COMM. Ideal ZONED HWY COMMERCIAL- 4 BR Cape Property being sold "as is". MLS#10-4362 for office or sm business. MLS#10-4367 Cod on 100x556 lot. MLS#11-229 TINA 714-9251 RAE 714-9234 RAE 714-9234

Commercial - Vacant Land Perfect downtown corner location near Coal Street Exit. Ideal for many uses. MLS#12181 MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100

Commercial opportunity awaits your business.1st flr 10,000 SF w/offices. 2nd flr storage. Plenty of pkg on 4.62 acres. MLS#10-1110 JUDY 714-9230

6700 SF building on the San Highly visible commercial Attractive office space 32,000SF, Prime Location Prime location on 30+ parking, including trailer spaces Souci Parkway. Modern office space available. in excellent condition. Good visibility. 1900SF - 12 pkg spaces. MLS#09- space on busy blvd, across from Wegman’s & Memorial Hwy. Unique space-many Parking for 30+ cars. MLS#12-1342 Price Chopper. Plenty of pkg. MLS#12-1709 For "rent" only. MLS#10-4503 MLS#08-1305 3085 possibilities. Zoning B-2. MLS#11-669 MATT HODOROWSKI 714-9229 TERRY ECKERT 696-0843 BARBARA M 696-0883 VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371 MARGY 696-0891 MARK 696-0724

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

WILKES-BARRE 74 Frederick St

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE NOW REDUCED!

WYOMING

YATESVILLE PRICE REDUCED

909

Income & Commercial Properties

909

DUPONT

BEAR CREEK This very nice 2 story, 3 bedroom, 1 bath home has a large eat in kitchen for family gatherings. A great walk up attic for storage and the home is in move-in condition. MLS 11-1612 $63,900 Call Karen Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130 WILKES-BARRE

Just on the market this 2 story offers a modern kitchen, formal dining room, 1st floor laundry plus 2/3 bedrooms On 2nd floor. Affordably priced at $ 27,900 MLS 12-50 Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

570-288-6654

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130 WILKES-BARRE

77 Schuler St. Newly renovated with new windows, door flooring, etc. “Goose Island” gem. Large home with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, screened in porch overlooking fenced in yard, driveway, laminate floors throughout. Fresh paint, move in condition. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-845 $99,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

WILKES-BARRE

89 Conwell Street Well maintained 2 story home with a finished lower level and a gas fireplace. New carpets and a walk-up attic, great for storage. $60,000 MLS# 11-4529 Call Michael Nocera

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP 570-696-5412

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

Nice 3 bedroom, 1 bath home, with 3 season porch and detached 1 car garage. Good starter home in well established neighborhood. Family owned for many years. $65,000 CALL CHRISTINE KUTZ 570-332-8832

WILKES-BARRE NOW REDUCED

298 Lehigh Street Lovely 2 story with new roof, furnace, water heater, new cabinets and appliances. Whole house newly insulated. Nice deck and fenced-in yard. Call Chris at 570-8850900 for additional info or to tour. MLS 11-4505 $75,000 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Find homes for your kittens! Place an ad here! 570-829-7130

191 Andover St. Lovely single family 3 bedroom home with lots of space. Finished 3rd floor, balcony porch off of 2nd floor bedroom, gas hot air heat, central air and much more. Must see! MLS 11-59 $66,000 Jay A. Crossin 570-288-0770 Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Job Seekers are looking here! Where's your ad? 570-829-7130 and ask for an employment specialist WILKES-BARRE PRICE REDUCED

115 Noble Lane 3 bedroom, 2 bath end unit townhome with finished lower level. Natural gas fireplace, 3 tiered deck, newer roof, cul de sac. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-1006 $59,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

WILKES-BARRE To Settle Estate $56,900 REDUCED! Offer Needed!

314 Horton Street Wonderful home, 6 rooms. 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, twostory, living room with built-in bookcase, formal dining room with entrance to delightful porch. Eat-in kitchen. Private lot, detached garage. A must see home. MLS 11-2721 New Price $56,900 GO TO THE TOP... CALL

JANE KOPP REAL ESTATE

570-288-7481

527 Dennison St. Charming brick Tudor home in wonderful neighborhood. Hardwood floors, cherry cabinets, solid wood doors only begin to describe this delightful home. Motivated Seller! MLS#12-1227 $225,000 Jolyn Bartoli

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5425

WYOMING

DOUBLE BLOCK

Easily converts to single home. New roof, electric, windows & 2 car garage. Remodeled. 66 x 100 feet, fenced lot, $120,000. 570-693-2408

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WYOMING

12 Reid st. Spacious Bi-level home in semi-private location with private back yard. 3 season room. Gas fireplace in lower level family room. 4 bedrooms, garage. For more informtion and photos visit wwww.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 10-4740 $149,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

909

Income & Commercial Properties

ASHLEY

TO SETTLE ESTATE 92/94 CAREY STREET Live on one side, and rent the other, call for details. Call 570-735-8763

AVOCA Fall in love with this gorgeous brick home just a few minutes from town. spacious rooms, a view of the countryside, a fenced inground pool, gazebo with electric, spacious recreation room with wet bar, curved oak staircase, beautiful French doors and a fireplace in the kitchen are just some of the features that make this home easy to love. MLS# 12-443 $600,000 Jolyn Bartoli

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5425

1255 Laurel Run Rd. Bear Creek Twp., large commercial garage/warehouse on 1.214 acres with additional 2 acre parcel. 2 water wells. 2 newer underground fuel tanks. May require zoning approval. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-208 $179,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Income & Commercial Properties

100 Lincoln St. MULTI FAMILY 3 bedroom home with attached apartment and beauty shop. Apartment is rented. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-941 $82,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

Shopping for a Looking for the right deal new apartment? on an automobile? Classified lets Turn to classified. you compare costs It’s a showroom in print! without hassle Classified’s got or worry! Get moving the directions! 941

with classified!

Apartments Unfurnishe 941

Wilkeswood Apartments 1 & 2 BR Apts

2 & 3 BR Townhomes

570-822-2711

www.liveatwilkeswood.com

25 St. Mary’s St. 3,443 sq. ft. masonry commercial building with warehouse/office and 2 apartments with separate electric and heat. Perfect for contractors or anyone with storage needs. For more information and photos log onto www.atlas realtyinc.com. Reduced to $89,000 MLS #10-3872 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

SDK GREEN ACRES HOMES 11 Holiday Drive

Kingston “A Place To Call Home” Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts 3 Bedroom Townhomes Gas heat included

FREE

24hr on-site Gym Community Room Swimming Pool Maintenance FREE Controlled Access Patio/Balcony and much more... Call Today for Move In Specials. 570-288-9019

Income & Commercial Properties

EDWARDSVILLE

Lawrence St. Nice 3 unit property. Lots of off street parking and bonus 2 car garage. All units are rented. Great income with low maintenance. $139,900 MLS# 10-2675 Call Karen Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

Income & Commercial Properties

FORTY FORT

1012 Wyoming Ave. SUPER LOCATION Needs work. Priced to sell. Great for your small business or offices. Very high traffic count. Property is being sold IN AS IS CONDITION. Inspections for buyers information only. Property needs rehab. MLS 11-4267 $84,900 Roger Nenni 570-288-0770 Ext. 32 Crossin Real Estate 570-288-0770

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness Looking for that special place with classified!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! Apartments Unfurnishe

called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

HANOVER TOWNSHIP Crossroads area. commercial building lot, in a high traffic area. 25,000 square foot lot. Owner financing available. Please Call 1-800-696-3050 HUGHESTOWN

EAST MOUNTAIN APARTMENTS The good life... close at hand

Regions Best Address

• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.

• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.

822-4444

288-6300

941

909

909

Income & Commercial Properties

KINGSTON

Apartments 941 Unfurnishe

www.EastMountainApt.com KINGSTON

909

www.GatewayManorApt.com

Apartments 941 Unfurnishe

Apartments Unfurnishe

IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE

Immediate Occupancy!!

Efficiencies available @30% of income

MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS

61 E. Northampton St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 • Affordable Senior Apartments • Income Eligibility Required • Utilities Included! • Low cable rates; • New appliances; • Laundry on site; • Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation

Please call 570-825-8594 D/TTY 800-654-5984

115 New St. Offie building with over 2600 sq. ft. can be divided for up to 3 tenants with own central air and utilities and entrances. New roof. 20-25 parking spots in excellent condition. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-607 $249,900 Call Tom

S

O L

D

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

366 Pierce Street (corner lot). 1,300 sq. ft. concrete block commercial building on a 90 x 145 lot. Central air conditioning. Paved parking for 25 cars. Presently a pizza business, but land can be used for multiple uses (bank building, offices, etc.). MLS 12-1279. $350,000 Bob Kopec HUMFORD REALTY 570-822-5126

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! KINGSTON

64-66 Dorrance St. 3 units, off street parking with some updated Carpets and paint. $1500/ month income from long time tenants. W/d hookups on site. MLS 11-3517 $99,900 Call Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 909

Income & Commercial Properties

LAFLIN

33 Market St. Commercial/residential property featuring Ranch home with 3 bedrooms, newly remodeled bathroom, in good condition. Commercial opportunity for office in attached building. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 11-3450 Reduced $149,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

909

Income & Commercial Properties

WILKES-BARRE

57 Carey Ave. Good investment property. 4 apartments needing a little TLC. Two 1 bedroom apartments. One 2 bedroom and one 3 bedroom. Separate water and electric. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-1026 $79,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

912 Lots & Acreage Earth Conservancy Land For Sale 61 +/- Acres Nuangola - $99,000 46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp. $79,000 Highway Commercial KOZ Hanover Twp. 3+/- Acres 11 +/- Acres Wilkes-Barre Twp. 32 +/- Acres Zoned R-3 See additional land for sale at: www.earth conservancy.org 570-823-3445 HARDING Mt. Zion Road One acre lot just before Oberdorfer Road. Great place to build your dream home MLS 11-3521 $29,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 25G 912 Lots & Acreage

PITTSTON TWP.

Beautiful lot in Pocono Ridge Estate. 1.14 acres with a view! MLS 12-1313 $48,500 Call Kevin Sobilo 570-817-0706

PITTSTON TWP. Beautiful lot in

Pocono Ridge Estate. 1.14 acres with a view! MLS 12-1313 $48,500 Call Kevin Sobilo 570-817-0706

SHICKSHINNY

WYOMING

Kingston Wellness Center / professional offices. -Modern Decor and Loft Style Offices -Four Lane Street Frontage -100+ Parking -Established Professional & Wellness Businesses On-Site -Custom Leases Available -Triple Net Spaces Available: 600SF, 1400SF, 2610SF, and 4300SF. 4300SF Warehouse Space available Built to Suit. Call Cindy 570-690-2689

171 Susquehanna Avenue Well kept home on beautiful street in a desirable neighborhood. Very large rooms, hardwood floors, fenced yard, 1 car garage. All measurements approximate. MLS# 12-1079 $65,000 Call Tracy Zarola 570-696-0723

WYOMING PRICE REDUCED!

www.cindykingre.com

fer Heights. Ready for your dream home just in time for Spring! MLS 12-549 $32,500 Call Kevin Sobilo 570-817-0706

LAND FOR SALE: Upstate NY Land Sale “Sportsman Bargain” 3 acres w/ cozy cabin, Close access to Oneida Lake -$17,995. “Large River” -over 900 ft. 18 acres along fishing/swimming river -$49,995. “Timberland Investment” -90 acres deer sanctuary, beautiful timber studs, small creek $99,995. Over 100 new properties. Call 800-229-7843 Or visit landandcamps.com

MOOSIC BUILDING LOT

570-675-4400 Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

MOUNTAINTOP 110 North

Mountain Blvd. OFFICE OR RETAIL SPACE Great Location! Total 3,000 square feet on two levels. High visibility, plenty of parking, garage in rear. $295,000. 570-474-2993 NANTICOKE

285 Wyoming Ave. First floor currently used as a shop, could be offices, etc. Prime location, corner lot, full basement. 2nd floor is 3 bedroom apartment plus 3 car garage and parking for 6 cars. For more information and photos go to www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS #10-4339 $159,900 Call Charlie VM 101

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Corner of Drake St. & Catherine, Moosic. 80x111 building lot with sewer & water available, in great area with newer homes. Corner lot. For more details visit www.atlasrealtyinc.com. MLS #12-1148. Call Charlie

MOUNTAIN TOP Beautiful 2.66 Acre building lot/lake view. Public sewer & natural gas. Use any builder! Call Jim for private showing. $126,500.00 570-715-9323.

912 Lots & Acreage BEAR CREEK

REDUCED 414 Front St. Move right into this modern office building featuring 4 offices, receptionist office, large conference room, modern kitchen, storage room, full basement, central air, handicap access. 2 car garage and 5 additional off street parking spaces. This property is also available for lease. Lease price is $675/mo + $675 security deposit. Tenant pays all utilities. Sells for $85,900 Call John Polifka 570-704-6846 5 Mountains Realty 42 N. Main St. Shickshinny, PA 570-542-2141 INCOME/ COMMERCIAL PROPERTY NANTICOKE

39 Wedgewood Dr. Laurelbrook Estates Lot featuring 3.22 acres with great privacy on cul-desac. Has been perc tested and has underground utilities. 4 miles to PA Turnpike entrance. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-114 $64,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

570-283-9100

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE IN CLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

MOUNTAIN TOP Several building lots ready to build on! ALL public utilities! Priced from $32,000 to $48,000! Use your own Builder! Call Jim Graham at 570-715-9323

Newport Township

Wanna make your car go fast? Place an ad in Classified! 570-829-7130. 912 Lots & Acreage

Unique investment opportunity. Vacant storefront which can be used for office, retail, etc. with a 3-room, 1 bedroom apartment above. Other side of the building is a 6room, 3 bedroom home. Perfect for owner occupied business with additional rental income from apartment. Newer roof & furnace, hardwood floors, off-street parking, corner lot. Close to LCCC. MLS#12-780 $44,900 Karen Ryan 283-9100 x14

MOUNTAIN TOP Beautiful 2.66 Acre building lot/lake view. Public sewer & natural gas. Use any builder! Call Jim for private showing. $126,500.00 570-715-9323.

DALLAS

LOTS - LOTS - LOTS 1 mile south of L.C.C.C.

210’ frontage x 158’ deep. All underground utilities, natural gas. GREAT VIEW!! $37,500 2 LOTS AVAILABLE 100’ frontage x 228’ deep. Modular home with basement accepted. Each lot $17,500. Call 570-714-1296

912 Lots & Acreage

$129,900 SPECTACULAR WATER VIEW! 2 acres overlooking Huntsville Reservoir. Building site cleared but much of woodlands preserved. Perc & site prep done. Call Christine Kutz 570-332-8832

DALLAS AREA 3 lots. 70 x 125.

LivingInQuailHill.com

New Homes From $275,000$595,000 570-474-5574

Land for sale? Place an ad and SELL 570-829-7130

Level *7.5 acres* building lot with a mountain view. Great for horses or organic farming. MLS 12-306 $59,000 570-675-4400

DURYEA 196 Foote Avenue

Corner lot, bordering Foote Ave and McAlpine St. Commercial zoning. $10,000 or best offer. Please Call 610-675-9132

WILKES-BARRE Furnished 1 bed-

room executive apartment. All brand new. Spacious eat in kitchen. 2 TV’s provided, leather sofas. Too many amenities to list. $700. No pets. 570-899-3123

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

Apartments/ Unfurnished

AVOCA

Modern & spacious 1st floor, wall to wall carpet. Appliances, washer & dryer hookup. Off street parking. Security, no pets. $450 month. 570-655-1606

DALLAS

SWEET VALLEY Grassy Pond Road 6.69 wooded acres. Great building site and/or ideal hunting property. No utilities. $70,000. Call Pat Doty 570-394-6901 McDermott Real Estate 570-696-2468

Dallas, Pa. MEADOWS APARTMENTS 220 Lake St. Housing for the elderly & mobility impaired; all utilities included. Federally subsidized program. Extremely low income persons encouraged to apply. Income less than $12,400. 570-675-6936, 8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

4 acres. Perk Tested & Surveyed. Well above flood level. Mountain View. Clear land. $45,000. Bill 570-665-9054

DUPONT

WYOMING

FIRST ST. 4 building lots each measuring 68x102 with public utilities. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-439 $39,900 EACH Call Charlie 570-829-6200

915 Manufactured Homes

EAST MOUNTAIN RIDGE

(Formerly Pocono Park) and San Souci Park. Like new, several to choose from, Financing &Warranty, MobileOneSales.net Call (570)250-2890

927

Vacation Locations

VIRGINIA SEASIDE LOTS: Spectacular 3+ acre estate lots in exclusive development on the seaside (the mainland) overlooking Chincoteague Bay, islands and ocean beyond. Gated entrance, caretaker, private paved roads, community pier, pool and club house which includes 2-bedroom guest suites for property owners. Great climate, fishing, clamming and National Seashore beaches nearby. Just 30 miles south of Ocean City, Md. Absolute buy of a lifetime, recent bank sale makes these lots available at 1/3 original price! Priced at only $49,000 to $65,000. For info call (757)824-5284 Email: oceanlandtrust@yahoo.co m, pictures on website: www.corbinhall.com

Collect Cash. Not Dust. Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

PITTSTON

Prime Location on Route 315 – Great visibility, 1.25 acres with 300’ of road frontage. LAND LEASE Call for details MLS 113571 Rhea Simms 570-696-6677

Apartments/ Furnished

1 bedroom, 1st floor 1 bedroom. $650/month all inclusive. W/w carpeting. Security, No Pets. 570-690-1591

City water and sewer, gas available. $36,500 per lot. 570-675-5873

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649

938

Job Seekers are looking here! Where's your ad? 570-829-7130 and ask for an employment specialist

TUNKHANNOCK Approximately

219 Main Street Very nice 1st floor, 1 bedroom with new bathroom, modern kitchen, hardwood floors, fresh paint, off street parking. Call Darren 570-825-2468 DUPONT Completely remodeled, modern 2 bedroom townhouse style apartment. Lots of closet space, with new carpets and completely repainted. Includes stove, refrigerator, washer, dryer hook up. Nice yard & neighborhood, no pets. $595 + security. Call 570-479-6722

DURYEA

2nd Floor, 2 bedroom, kitchen, living room, refrigerator and stove provided, washer/dryer hookup, 3 rooms, wall to wall carpeting, sewer included. Quiet neighborhood, No pets. $485 per month, lease, 1st, and security deposit, and references required. Call 570498-0949

EDWARDSVILLE 21 Pugh Street.

Quiet, one way street, half double, cleaned and freshly painted, 2.5 bedrooms, living room, dining room, kitchen, with washer/dryer hookup. Gas heat. Small yard, small pets considered with additional rent. $530.00 per month + security & last months rent. Call 570-793-6566

EXETER

2 bedrooms, 1 bath, refrigerator & stove, washer/dryer hook-up, no pets, no smokers. $575/month, plus utilities, security & background check. Call 570-655-3809

FORTY FORT A 1B EDROOM

ONLY ONL NL LY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com

Nice, quiet neighborhood. First floor, spacious living room with working fireplace, bedroom with 2 closets. New kitchen with stove, fridge & lazy Susan. Laundry room off kitchen with washer / dryer, bath / shower. Off street, lighted parking. Lease, security, references. Gas heat & all utilities by tenant. Absolutely no pets. $600. Call 570-714-5588

FORTY FORT

Ransom Street, 1st floor, 1 bedroom, dining room, oak hardwood floors, central air, range & fridge included. Off street parking. $585/month utilities by tenant. Security, references, lease, pets maybe? Handicapped accessible 570-287-5775 or 570-332-1048.

HANOVER TWP.

3 bedrooms, 1.5 bath, no pets. $725 + utilities, 1st months security deposit. Call 570-417-3427

KINGSTON 2 bedroom. $675/

month. Includes gas heat. Security & references required No pets. Call 570-288-4200 KINGSTON

3 bedroom 1 bath. $700/month. Separate utilities, laundry hookups, stove and refrigerator included. Small pets negotiable. Call Scott Zoepke Trademark Realty 570-814-0875

KINGSTON

399 -401 Elm Ave. Newly remodeled apartments. 1st floor, 3 bedroom, $850 + utilities. 2nd floor, (2) 2 bedroom $600 + utilities. NO PETS, No section 8 housing. References and security required. 570-301-2785

KINGSTON

Beautiful, oversized executive style apartment in large historic home. Two bedrooms, one bath, granite kitchen, hardwood floors, dining room, living room, basement storage, beautiful front porch, washer/ dryer. $1,200 monthly plus utilities. No pets. No smoking. Call 570-472-1110

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

PT

Very nice, clean, great neighborhood, hardwood floors, a/c, washer /dryer with newer appliances, storage, 1st/last/security with one year lease. References required. $650 + utilities. Water/sewer by owner, no pets, non-smoking. Call 202-997-9185 for appointment

FORTY FORT 2nd floor, 4 rooms,

Call 829-7130 to place an ad.

Apartments/ Unfurnished

FORTY FORT

941

HUGHESTOWN Cleared lot in Stauf-

LEASE SPACE

941

wall to wall carpet, heat, public water, sewer & recycling fees included. Tile bathroom with shower. Attic & yard. Stove & fridge furnished. Washer / dryer hookup. Good location, off street parking, No pets. 1 year lease & security, $650. Call 570-655-0530

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

KINGSTON

Freshly painted, 2 bedrooms, refrigerator & stove, washer/dryer & water provided, off-street parking, no pets, $525/month + heat, electric & security deposit. Call (570)417-2919 KINGSTON Modern, spacious, 2nd floor, 2 bedroom with off street parking. Gas heat, A/C laundry in unit, no pets, no smoking. Screened porch $750 + utilities Call 570-714-9234

KINGSTON

Nice area. Modern, clean, 1 bedroom, 2nd floor. Recently painted. Refrigerator & stove, washer/ dryer hook up, off-street parking, no dogs. $550/ month & security, includes heat, water & sewer. 570-545-6057

KINGSTON

Recently renovated 2 bedroom. Living room & dining room. Convenient off street parking. All new appliances. Gas. Water & sewer included. $550 + utilities, security & references. No pets, no smoking. Call 570-239-7770

KINGSTON/PRINGLE

Totally remodeled, clean, 1 ½ bedroom half double (apartment size). All new stainless appliances. Backyard, large driveway. No pets. $625 + utilities & security. Call Fadwa, 570-574-1818

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

LARKSVILLE

178 Nesbitt Street Newly remodeled, 2 bedroom, washer/dryer/stove & fridge included. $450/ month+ security. No pets. Utilities by tenant. Must be seen! Call after 9:00 am 570-574-1909

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

LARKSVILLE

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY Cute and clean 2 bedroom, off street parking, w/d hookup, eat in kitchen. Immaculate. $435 + utilities. 1 mo. security. NO DOGS 845-386-1011

LUZERNE

1 bedroom, wall to wall, off-street parking, coin laundry, water, sewer & garbage included. $495/ month + security & lease. HUD accepted. Call 570-687-6216 or 570-954-0727

LUZERNE

378 Miller St. Recently remodeled, 1st floor. 1 bedroom, living room, large modern kitchen with stove. New bath, clean basement, laundry hookups. Enclosed porch, parking. No pets/smoking. $500/mo. includes heat and water. 570-288-9843

LUZERNE 4 room apartment,

1 bedroom, 1 bath, refrigerator and stove provided, washer/dryer hookup, carpeting off-street parking, no pets. $500/ month, plus utilities, 1 month security 570-406-2789 MINERS MILLS 2 bedroom apartment. First floor. Includes water, sewer & trash. $500 + security. Call Bernie 888-244-2714

MOUNTAIN TOP

1 Bedroom apartments for elderly, disabled. Rents based on 30% of ADJ gross income. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. TTY711 or 570-474-5010 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer.

MOUNTAIN TOP WOODBRYN 1 & 2 Bedroom.

No pets. Rents based on income start at $405 & $440. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. 570-474-5010 TTY711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Immediate Openings! NANTICOKE

1st floor. 1 bedroom. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED! Off street parking. Fresh paint. NO PETS $525 + security 570-477-6018 leave message

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

NANTICOKE

314 Prospect St. Convenient 1st floor, 1 bedroom, nonsmoker, large closets. Freshly painted & new carpeting. New ceiling fans, new modern kitchen & tile bath. New windows. Heat & hot water included. Washer/dryer hook up, stove & refrigerator provided. No pets. $595. 570-287-4700

Need to rent that Vacation property? Place an ad and get started! 570-829-7130

NANTICOKE Spacious 2 bed-

room, full kitchen, No pets, no smoking. $475 + electric. Call 570-262-5399

30+ DAY

BEING REMODELED

NORTH WILKES-BARRE FIRST FLOOR Spacious 1 bedroom with aesthetic fireplaces, new kitchens, wallto-wall, built in appliances & MORE. APPLICATION/EMPLO YMENT VERIFICATION “being considered” NO PETS/SMOKING 2 YEARS @ $625+ UTILITIES. MANAGED!

America Realty 288-1422

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

PITTSTON

1 or 2 bedroom, wall to wall carpeting. Off street parking. Stove, fridge, porch, sewer, garbage. $450/ month. No Pets (570) 947-5113

PITTSTON

144 Carol St. 2nd floor, 4 rooms, stove, washer dryer hook up. $425/month, tenant pays utilities, 570-498-2665

PITTSTON

2 bedroom, 1 bath. Nice neighborhood. Off street parking Own basement. $500/month + utilities + 1 mo. security 347-668-6568

PITTSTON 2 bedrooms, 1st

floor. Stove, fridge, w/d hookup provided. $550/mo., includes sewer & refuse. Utilities by tenant. NO PETS Call Charlie 570-829-1578

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

PITTSTON

2 or 3 bedroom, 1st floor, full kitchen. Heat included, no pets. $650 + 1 month security. Call 570-451-1038

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

PITTSTON

2nd floor, 2 bedrooms, living room, eat in kitchen. Stove, garbage disposal, fridge, washer & dryer included. Carpeted & newly painted, A/C. Trash & sewer paid. Off street parking for 1 car. No smoking. No pets. $575 + utilities, security & 1st month. 570-696-1485 Leave Message

PITTSTON

3 rooms, 1 large bedroom, completely renovated, corian counters, off street parking. $550/per month. Utilities by tenant. Call 570-654-5387

SUGAR NOTCH

Spacious, completely remodeled, 1st floor, 2 bedroom apartment. Large kitchen, appliances included. Tenant is responsible for own utilities. $475/month 570-235-4718

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

SWOYERSVILLE

All new, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath. stove, dishwasher microwave, washer/dryer hookup. Off-street parking, no pets. $560/ month, + utilities, references, lease & security. (570) 301-7723

SWOYERSVILLE

Newly remodeled 1 bedroom studio apartment with large living room, kitchen & bath. Wall to wall carpet. Off street parking. All utilities paid except electric. $595 + security. Call 570-287-3646

WEST PITTSTON

203 Delaware Ave. 1st floor. 4 rooms, no pets, no smoking, off street parking. Includes heat, water, sewer, fridge, stove, w/d. High security bldg. 570-655-9711

WEST PITTSTON

Large 2 bedroom, 2nd floor . Hardwood floors, balcony, heat & hot water included. $775/month + security. No smoking. 570-947-9340 West Pittston, Pa. GARDEN VILLAGE APARTMENTS 221 Fremont St. Housing for the elderly & mobility impaired; all utilities included. Federally subsidized program. Extremely low income persons encouraged to apply. Income less than $12,400. 570-655-6555, 8 am-4 pm, Monday-Friday. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

Looking for that special place called home? Classified wil address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms - Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!! www.mayflower crossing.com Certain Restrictions Apply*

WILKES-BARRE / KINGSTON Efficiency 1 & 2

bedrooms. Includes all utilities, parking, laundry. No pets. From $390 to $675. Lease, security & references. 570-970-0847

WILKES-BARRE

1 bedroom, and also a 3 bedroom apartment for rent, newly remodeled, with stove, fridge, washer & dryer hookup. $425 and $625 plus utilities and security. Call 570-301-8200

WILKES-BARRE

1 bedroom, refrigerator & stove, offstreet parking, no pets.$370/per month, security, references & lease. 570-825-5945 before 9:00 p.m.

WILKES-BARRE 155 W. River St.

1 bedroom, some appliances included, all utilities included except electric, hardwood floors, Pet friendly. $600. 570-969-9268

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

WILKES-BARRE

1st floor 3 bedroom, 2 bath apartment. Off street parking. First / Last & security required. Leave message. Call 570-817-0601

WILKES-BARRE

2 bedrooms, 1 bath, big kitchen,6x8 porch, available June 1st, landlord pays heat and water. No hookups, no pets. $625 per month, 1st month and security required. Call Manny 718-946-8738 or 917-295-6254

WILKES-BARRE APARTMENTS FOR RENT!

425 S. FRANKLIN ST. For lease. Available immediately, washer/dryer on premises, no pets. We have studio & 1 bedroom apartments. On site parking. Fridge & stove provided. 24/7 security camera presence and all doors electronically locked. Studio - $450. 1 bedroom - $550. Water & sewer paid. One month security de-posit. Call 570-793-6377 or 570-208-9301 after 9:00 a.m. to schedule an appointment. Or email shlomo_voola @yahoo.com wilkesliving.com WILKES-BARRE COUNTRY LIVING IN THE CITY 2 bedrooms, modern, well insulated, Stove, fridge, washer, dryer, parking, deck. No dogs Near Cross Valley. $485 + utilities. 570-417-5441

WILKES-BARRE

King’s College Campus 3 Large Bedrooms, living room, wall to wall, large kitchen & bath with tile floors. Stove, fridge, heat, water & off street parking included. Shared yard. $900 + security. That’s only $300 per person. 570-823-0589 WILKES-BARRE

LAFAYETTE GARDENS

SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR! 113 Edison St. Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom apartments available for immediate occupancy. Heat & hot water included. $625 Call Aileen at 570-822-7944

WILKES-BARRE

1 bedroom apartment, 2nd floor. Stove, fridge, heat & hot water included. Attic Storage. Carpeted. No pets. Nice, safe area. Call 570-823-7587

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE Nice, 3 bedroom, 1st floor apartment. Close to Wilkes-University and downtown Wilkes-Barre. Modern eat in kitchen, basement laundry + large storage area. $725 + gas and electric. Call 570-793-9449

WILKES-BARRE

NORTH, 777 N. Washington St. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, 2nd floor. Offstreet parking. Garbage removal included. $450 /month, + utilities. Call 570-288-3438

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH

Nice neighborhood. 1st floor, 2 bedroom. Wall to wall carpet. Off street parking. Washer/dryer. $575 + 1 month security, references & credit check. No pets. (570) 574-2249

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH SECURE BUILDINGS

1 & 2 bedroom apartments. Starting at $440 and up. References required. Section 8 OK 570-357-0712

WILKES-BARRE

Wilkes-University Campus Studio, 1 & 2 bedroom. Starting at $400. All utilities included. No pets. 570-826-1934

WILKES-BARRE

VICTORIAN CHARM 34 W. Ross St. 1 bedroom, 2nd floor. Most utilities included. Historic building is non smoking/no pets. Base rent $700/mo. Security, references required. View at houpthouse.com. 570-762-1453

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130 941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE Š1 bedroom water included Š2 bedroom water included Š2 bedroom single family Š5 bedroom large Š2 bedroom, heat & water included Š 2 bedroom, totally remodeled Š 3 bedroom, half double, immaculate condition NANTICOKE Š2 bedroom large, water included PITTSTON ŠLarge 1 bedroom water included McDermott & McDermott Real Estate Inc. Property Management 570-821-1650 (direct line) Mon-Fri. 8-7pm Sat. 8-noon

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

WYOMING

1 bedroom 2nd floor at $595/month. Off street parking. Non smoking. No pets. Bonus walk up attic with tons of storage. Heat, water, garbage, sewer included. 1 month security, credit check & references. 1 year lease. Please call Donna 570-613-9080

WYOMING

1 bedroom 2nd floor at $595/month. Off street parking. Non smoking. No pets. Bonus walk up attic with tons of storage. Heat, water, garbage, sewer included. 1 month security, credit check & references. 1 year lease. Please call Donna 570-613-9080

WYOMING

Available immediately 2nd floor. Bright & cheery. One bedroom. Quiet building & neighborhood. Includes stove, refrigerator, heat, water, sewer & trash. No smoking. No pets. Security, references $595/month Call (570) 609-5133

WYOMING

Updated 1 bedroom. New wall to wall carpet. Appliances furnished. Coin op laundry. $550. Heat, water & sewer included. Call 570-687-6216 or 570-954-0727


PAGE 26G

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

2-Story masonry bldg on Former automotive/gas station (tanks removed). 1500 SF bldg w/2 bay 96x180 lot w/pkg for 36 cars. Ideal for apts garage & pkg for 30 cars. MLS#12-1713 or small mfg business. MLS#12-1758 MIKE 970-1100 or MARGY 696-0891 CLYDETTE 696-0897

1600 SF building - ideal for professional offices. Includes office furniture. Zoned Commercial. MLS#121422 MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

Great location for multi-use Opportunity to own your own commercial business. Ample pkg, office & restaurant/pizza business. Includes equipment & liquor license. MLS#12-1658 workspace. MLS#12-685 PAT G 788-7514 or BEN T 788-7516 JUDY RICE 714-9230

Former Tavern w/2 apts. No liquor license. Needs work. Add’l lot for OSP. MLS#12-421 JULIO 714-9252 or ANDY 714-9225

900 SF Commercial space on Great business opportunity. 1st flr has 2 BR, Apt. Freshly painted exterior. Zoned 1st flr. 900 SF 2 BR apt on 2nd flr. Billboard also available to rent on bldg. Community Business. MLS#11-4416 MLS#10-4309 MATT 714-9229 TINA 714-9251

Nicely maintained offices & garage. 2400 SF w/overhead door. Great for many uses. Near highways. MLS#114561 JUDY RICE 714-9230

Prime commercial storefront + 3 spacious Apts. Parking lot in rear. MLS#12-687 DONNA S 788-7504

6000+ SF former furniture store, plus apt. & lots more space. High traffic area. Combined w/12 Davenport. MLS#11-3865 RAE DZIAK 714-9234

Unique bldg currently used 2 bldgs zoned commercial. as single residence. May be converted to 1 consists of retail space & apts, the suit your needs (w/zoning approval). other is a 2-story home. MLS#10-4056 MLS#12-844 MIKE JOHNSON

Established turn-key Auto repair & body restaurant w/2 apts. Business & shop w/state certified paint booth. building priced to sell! MLS#11-130 2nd flr storage. MLS#11-2842 ANDY 714-9225 ANDY 714-9225

Currently business on 1st flr, 3 BR apt. on 2nd flr. Lg garage in rear w/storage. Owner financing or lease purchase available. MLS#11-4015 ANDY 714-9225

High traffic Route 11 w/6000 SF Showroom/Garage, & Apt above. MLS#11-2106 ANITA REBER 788-7501

Brick & block prime office bldg. Great location on busy Rte Includes professional office space + 309! Office Bldg w/1500 SF of space restaurant. MLS#12-366 & 2270 SF warehouse. MLS#11-2094 GERALD PALERMO 788-7509 ANITA REBER 788-7501

Wonderful opportunity for commercial bldg w/ice cream stand, storefront & apt. Also storage bldg. MLS#12-370 CORINE 715-9321

4 Sty brick office bldg, more Former landmark restaurant. 3235 SF Warehouse. than half rented. High traffic area. 2 lots Perfect for landscaper, contractor, etc. offers 3500 SF on the 1st level plus basement. Parking for 40 cars. MLS#12-89 included for pkg. MLS#11-1045 Zoned Industrial. MLS#12-1376 ANDY 714-9225 or MARGY 696-0891 GERALD PALERMO 788-7509 ANDY CISNEY 714-9225

Well built 2 story - 8000 SF bldg. Prime location/high traffic area. Add’l pkg available. 1st flr office/commercial space & 2 apts on 2nd flr. MLS#11-508 RHEA SIMMS 696-6677

Retail, Office, Medical Whatever your need - This 4000 SF Bldg can accommadate it! Parking for 10. MLS#12276 JUDY RICE 714-9230

Lg Commercial warehouse & office space w/over 3.5 acres. Owner financing or lease purchase available. MLS#11-4014 ANDY 714-9225

Prime location - former Convention Hall. Wonderful opportunity for professional offices. Pkg for 100+ cars. Zoned Hwy Business. MLS#11-3654 MARGY SIMMS 696-0891

Large 8000 SF building looking for a new lease on life! Zoned Commercial. MLS#11-4058 SANDY 970-1110 or DAVID 970-1117

High traffic location. 2900 SF professional office space w/basement storage. Pkg for at least 12 cars. MLS#12416 RHEA SIMMS 696-6677

Ideal bldg for retail sales or prof offices. High traffic location on Route 309S. Zoned Commercial. MLS#121534 MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100

DAVID 970-1117

Great location for professional 3 BR, Ranch w/gar+ Prime location office. Private drive in rear. Zoned C-3. attached bldg. Zoned HWY COMM. Ideal ZONED HWY COMMERCIAL- 4 BR Cape Property being sold "as is". MLS#10-4362 for office or sm business. MLS#10-4367 Cod on 100x556 lot. MLS#11-229 TINA 714-9251 RAE 714-9234 RAE 714-9234

Commercial - Vacant Land Perfect downtown corner location near Coal Street Exit. Ideal for many uses. MLS#12181 MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100

Commercial opportunity awaits your business.1st flr 10,000 SF w/offices. 2nd flr storage. Plenty of pkg on 4.62 acres. MLS#10-1110 JUDY 714-9230

6700 SF building on the San Highly visible commercial Attractive office space 32,000SF, Prime Location Prime location on 30+ parking, including trailer spaces Souci Parkway. Modern office space available. in excellent condition. Good visibility. 1900SF - 12 pkg spaces. MLS#09- space on busy blvd, across from Wegman’s & Memorial Hwy. Unique space-many Parking for 30+ cars. MLS#12-1342 Price Chopper. Plenty of pkg. MLS#12-1709 For "rent" only. MLS#10-4503 MLS#08-1305 3085 possibilities. Zoning B-2. MLS#11-669 MATT HODOROWSKI 714-9229 TERRY ECKERT 696-0843 BARBARA M 696-0883 VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371 MARGY 696-0891 MARK 696-0724

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

WILKES-BARRE 74 Frederick St

WILKES-BARRE

WILKES-BARRE NOW REDUCED!

WYOMING

YATESVILLE PRICE REDUCED

909

Income & Commercial Properties

909

DUPONT

BEAR CREEK This very nice 2 story, 3 bedroom, 1 bath home has a large eat in kitchen for family gatherings. A great walk up attic for storage and the home is in move-in condition. MLS 11-1612 $63,900 Call Karen Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130 WILKES-BARRE

Just on the market this 2 story offers a modern kitchen, formal dining room, 1st floor laundry plus 2/3 bedrooms On 2nd floor. Affordably priced at $ 27,900 MLS 12-50 Ann Marie Chopick 570-760-6769

570-288-6654

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130 WILKES-BARRE

77 Schuler St. Newly renovated with new windows, door flooring, etc. “Goose Island” gem. Large home with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, screened in porch overlooking fenced in yard, driveway, laminate floors throughout. Fresh paint, move in condition. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-845 $99,900 Call Colleen 570-237-0415

WILKES-BARRE

89 Conwell Street Well maintained 2 story home with a finished lower level and a gas fireplace. New carpets and a walk-up attic, great for storage. $60,000 MLS# 11-4529 Call Michael Nocera

SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP 570-696-5412

Purebred Animals? Sell them here with a classified ad! 570-829-7130

Nice 3 bedroom, 1 bath home, with 3 season porch and detached 1 car garage. Good starter home in well established neighborhood. Family owned for many years. $65,000 CALL CHRISTINE KUTZ 570-332-8832

WILKES-BARRE NOW REDUCED

298 Lehigh Street Lovely 2 story with new roof, furnace, water heater, new cabinets and appliances. Whole house newly insulated. Nice deck and fenced-in yard. Call Chris at 570-8850900 for additional info or to tour. MLS 11-4505 $75,000 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Find homes for your kittens! Place an ad here! 570-829-7130

191 Andover St. Lovely single family 3 bedroom home with lots of space. Finished 3rd floor, balcony porch off of 2nd floor bedroom, gas hot air heat, central air and much more. Must see! MLS 11-59 $66,000 Jay A. Crossin 570-288-0770 Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Job Seekers are looking here! Where's your ad? 570-829-7130 and ask for an employment specialist WILKES-BARRE PRICE REDUCED

115 Noble Lane 3 bedroom, 2 bath end unit townhome with finished lower level. Natural gas fireplace, 3 tiered deck, newer roof, cul de sac. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-1006 $59,900 Call Tom 570-262-7716

WILKES-BARRE To Settle Estate $56,900 REDUCED! Offer Needed!

314 Horton Street Wonderful home, 6 rooms. 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, twostory, living room with built-in bookcase, formal dining room with entrance to delightful porch. Eat-in kitchen. Private lot, detached garage. A must see home. MLS 11-2721 New Price $56,900 GO TO THE TOP... CALL

JANE KOPP REAL ESTATE

570-288-7481

527 Dennison St. Charming brick Tudor home in wonderful neighborhood. Hardwood floors, cherry cabinets, solid wood doors only begin to describe this delightful home. Motivated Seller! MLS#12-1227 $225,000 Jolyn Bartoli

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5425

WYOMING

DOUBLE BLOCK

Easily converts to single home. New roof, electric, windows & 2 car garage. Remodeled. 66 x 100 feet, fenced lot, $120,000. 570-693-2408

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

WYOMING

12 Reid st. Spacious Bi-level home in semi-private location with private back yard. 3 season room. Gas fireplace in lower level family room. 4 bedrooms, garage. For more informtion and photos visit wwww.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 10-4740 $149,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

909

Income & Commercial Properties

ASHLEY

TO SETTLE ESTATE 92/94 CAREY STREET Live on one side, and rent the other, call for details. Call 570-735-8763

AVOCA Fall in love with this gorgeous brick home just a few minutes from town. spacious rooms, a view of the countryside, a fenced inground pool, gazebo with electric, spacious recreation room with wet bar, curved oak staircase, beautiful French doors and a fireplace in the kitchen are just some of the features that make this home easy to love. MLS# 12-443 $600,000 Jolyn Bartoli

Smith Hourigan Group 570-696-5425

1255 Laurel Run Rd. Bear Creek Twp., large commercial garage/warehouse on 1.214 acres with additional 2 acre parcel. 2 water wells. 2 newer underground fuel tanks. May require zoning approval. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-208 $179,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Income & Commercial Properties

100 Lincoln St. MULTI FAMILY 3 bedroom home with attached apartment and beauty shop. Apartment is rented. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-941 $82,900 Call Charlie 570-829-6200

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

Shopping for a Looking for the right deal new apartment? on an automobile? Classified lets Turn to classified. you compare costs It’s a showroom in print! without hassle Classified’s got or worry! Get moving the directions! 941

with classified!

Apartments Unfurnishe 941

Wilkeswood Apartments 1 & 2 BR Apts

2 & 3 BR Townhomes

570-822-2711

www.liveatwilkeswood.com

25 St. Mary’s St. 3,443 sq. ft. masonry commercial building with warehouse/office and 2 apartments with separate electric and heat. Perfect for contractors or anyone with storage needs. For more information and photos log onto www.atlas realtyinc.com. Reduced to $89,000 MLS #10-3872 Call Charlie 570-829-6200 VM 101

SDK GREEN ACRES HOMES 11 Holiday Drive

Kingston “A Place To Call Home” Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts 3 Bedroom Townhomes Gas heat included

FREE

24hr on-site Gym Community Room Swimming Pool Maintenance FREE Controlled Access Patio/Balcony and much more... Call Today for Move In Specials. 570-288-9019

Income & Commercial Properties

EDWARDSVILLE

Lawrence St. Nice 3 unit property. Lots of off street parking and bonus 2 car garage. All units are rented. Great income with low maintenance. $139,900 MLS# 10-2675 Call Karen Coldwell Banker Rundle Real Estate 570-474-2340

Income & Commercial Properties

FORTY FORT

1012 Wyoming Ave. SUPER LOCATION Needs work. Priced to sell. Great for your small business or offices. Very high traffic count. Property is being sold IN AS IS CONDITION. Inspections for buyers information only. Property needs rehab. MLS 11-4267 $84,900 Roger Nenni 570-288-0770 Ext. 32 Crossin Real Estate 570-288-0770

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness Looking for that special place with classified!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! Apartments Unfurnishe

called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

HANOVER TOWNSHIP Crossroads area. commercial building lot, in a high traffic area. 25,000 square foot lot. Owner financing available. Please Call 1-800-696-3050 HUGHESTOWN

EAST MOUNTAIN APARTMENTS The good life... close at hand

Regions Best Address

• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.

• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.

822-4444

288-6300

941

909

909

Income & Commercial Properties

KINGSTON

Apartments 941 Unfurnishe

www.EastMountainApt.com KINGSTON

909

www.GatewayManorApt.com

Apartments 941 Unfurnishe

Apartments Unfurnishe

IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE

Immediate Occupancy!!

Efficiencies available @30% of income

MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS

61 E. Northampton St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 • Affordable Senior Apartments • Income Eligibility Required • Utilities Included! • Low cable rates; • New appliances; • Laundry on site; • Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation

Please call 570-825-8594 D/TTY 800-654-5984

115 New St. Offie building with over 2600 sq. ft. can be divided for up to 3 tenants with own central air and utilities and entrances. New roof. 20-25 parking spots in excellent condition. For more info and photos visit: www.atlas realtyinc.com MLS 12-607 $249,900 Call Tom

S

O L

D

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

366 Pierce Street (corner lot). 1,300 sq. ft. concrete block commercial building on a 90 x 145 lot. Central air conditioning. Paved parking for 25 cars. Presently a pizza business, but land can be used for multiple uses (bank building, offices, etc.). MLS 12-1279. $350,000 Bob Kopec HUMFORD REALTY 570-822-5126

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! KINGSTON

64-66 Dorrance St. 3 units, off street parking with some updated Carpets and paint. $1500/ month income from long time tenants. W/d hookups on site. MLS 11-3517 $99,900 Call Jay A. Crossin Ext. 23 CROSSIN REAL ESTATE 570-288-0770

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 PAGE 27G

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130


PAGE 28G

SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

     

  Space Available - Mundy Street - Wilkes-Barre

FOR LEASE

6000 SF

Medical - Office

Mundy Street - Wilkes-Barre

Ideal for medical, office, rehab, etc. Located next to Allied Services John Heinz Campus and side entrance to Home Depot. Easy access to Interstate 81. Explore these Prime Commercial Properties Exclusively from Humford â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Now Available For Lease and Sale FOR LEASE Country Club Shopping Center 7,500 SF - End Cap (former Movie Gallery) Space could be expanded to 10,000/sf or subdivided. Additional parking lot could be paved for high traffic tenant.

H U M F O R D 944

Commercial Properties

Commercial Lease Courtdale location Ideal for: Veterinarian Office Manufacturing / Industrial Space Storage Space

1000 SF - 5000 SF Space Available. 5000 SF Warehouse Space with loading docks, office, heat, and plumbing. $3.60 - $12 sf/yr + NNN, lease negotiable. Call Cindy King 570-690-2689 www.cindykingre.com

944

Commercial Properties

PITTSTON

OFFICE SPACE Attractive modern

office space. 2 suites available. Suite A-4 offices, plus restroom and storage includes utilities, 700 sq. ft. $650/month Suite B-2, large offices, 2 average size offices, plus restroom and storage plus utilities, 1,160 sq. ft. $1000/month Call Charlie 570-829-6200

RETAIL-BBUILDING W T ILKES

ARRE

WP

12,000 sf. Route 309. Exit 165 off I81. 570-823-1719 570-675-4400

DOLPHIN PLAZA

Rte. 315 1,000 & 3,800 Sq. Ft. WILL DIVIDE OFFICE / RETAIL Call 570-829-1206

PITTSTON COOPERS CO-OP

Lease Space Available, Light manufacturing, warehouse, office, includes all utilities with free parking. I will save you money!

Find homes for your kittens! Place an ad here! 570-829-7130

2 units available - 2,800 SF & 725 SF - located on the top (10th) floor. Overlooking the Wyoming Valley. Tenant improvement allowance. Call for more details.

Anchored by Thomasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Super Foodtown with 8 inline tenants. Center has strong sales volume and is located on the coming home side of Route 309, which is also the main thruway from Wyoming County to/from Wilkes-Barre.

Dallas

315 PLAZA 1,750 SQ. FT. & 3,400 SQ.FT OFFICE/RETAIL 570-829-1206

WEST PITTSTON

OFFICE SPACESix Containing separate offices, 1 large meeting room. Segregated bathrooms. Kitchenette. Total recent renovation. Great location. Lot parking in rear. $3,500 monthly. 570-299-5471

950

Half Doubles

DALLAS 298 Upper

Demunds Road AVAILABLE NOW! 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath. W/d hookup, yard maintenance trash, water, sewer included. Off street parking, No pets. $800/mo + 1 month. security 991-0051

950

Half Doubles

HANOVER TWP.

221 Boland Ave. 1 bedroom. $325+ utilities Call Mark at (570) 899-2835 (917) 345-9060

KINGSTON

$695/month. New bath, kitchen, living room, dining, 2 1/2 bedrooms. Water, sewer & recycling included. Gas fireplace. New flooring, ceiling fans. Washer/dryer hook up. Lease & security. Call after 6 pm. 570-479-0131

KINGSTON Newly renovated, 3

bedrooms, 1 bath, kitchen, dining room & living room. Private drive, No pets & no smoking. $725 +utilities, references & credit check. No section 8. Call 570-288-3274

It's that time again! Rent out your apartment with the Classifieds 570-829-7130

KINGSTON TOWNSHIP Available immedi-

ately. 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, backyard, front porch, large kitchen, $570 per month, Call 570-357-0712 Kingston, 3 BEDROOM, 1 bath in Kingston; $500/month; gas heat; being shown Saturday, 5/12 from 10am to 2pm; applications available at that time; bring credit report, current pay stub; security deposit $500; ready for occupancy after 5/13; 949-3227780 for further info; small pets considered.

FOR LEASE Dallas Shopping Center 1050 SF Space is between Sen. Bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office and Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cutting Crew

FOR LEASE WB Center 39 Public Square 2,800 SF Wilkes-Barre

Public Square

Dallas

Contact Rob Finlay, CLS â&#x20AC;˘ 570.822.5126

R E A L T Y 950

Half Doubles

NANTICOKE Large 1/2 Double, 3 bedrooms, large kitchen, fenced in yard. $550 per month + utilities. Garbage & maintenance fees included. No Pets, 1 month security deposit. References. 477-1415

PITTSTON

119 Lambert St. Spacious 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 baths, cherry kitchen, lots of closets, basement, yard. References + 2 months security. $700 month + utilities. 570-947-7887

PITTSTON Remodeled 3 bed-

room double block. Fenced yard. Pool. $700. Includes garbage, sewer & heat. First / last monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rent + security. No pets. References. Available May 7. Call 570-954-0655

PITTSTON TWP.

MAINTENANCE FREE!

2 Large Bedrooms. Off-Street Parking No Smoking. $600 + utilities, security, last month. 570-885-4206

PLAINS

2 bedroom, modern quiet, w/w, w/d hookup, gas heat. $500. No pets. Security & lease. 570-332-1216 570-592-1328

WILKES-BARRE 1/2 double. 3 bed-

rooms. Wall to wall carpeting, washer / dryer hookup. Fenced in yard. $475 plus utilities and security. Call 570-472-2392

Shopping Center is located in the heart of the Back Mountain prior to the Route 309/415 split. Center has two entrances, traffic light and a traffic count of approximately 32,000 cars daily.

www.humford.com â&#x20AC;˘ Broker Protected 953 Houses for Rent

953 Houses for Rent

DALLAS

SWOYERSVILLE Completely remodeled Large 2 story, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, single family home including refrigerator, stove, dishwasher & disposal. Gas heat, nice yard, good neighborhood,. Off street parking. Shed. No pets. $995 / month. 570-479-6722

FOR SALE OR RENT Single home in gated retirement village. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage. Granite countertops, hardwood floors, gas fireplace, appliances included. Quiet 55 plus community. No Pets. One year lease. $1675/mo + utilities & security. Monthly maintenance fee included. 570-592-3023

EXETER

1st floor, 7 rooms, large closets. Hardwood floors. New gas furnace. Garage. No dogs, no smoking. $1200/ month, plus utilities & security, includes yard maintenance, water & garbage. Call 570-407-3600

HUNLOCK CREEK 2,000 square foot

home,In walking distance to Moonlake park. Home has 3 Bedrooms, fireplace recreation room, utility room, furnace room. 2 car garage. Nice, Quiet neighborhood, large lot. $1200 per month. Sewage and water included. Call 570-675-4313 570-301-3322

KINGSTON

3 bedrooms, tiled bath & kitchen, carpeting throughout, finished basement room, refrigerator & stove, off-street parking, no pets, Fenced yard & shed. $800/month, + utilities, last & security. 570-256-0984

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

WILKES-BARRE

Safe Neighborhood One 3 Bedroom $625 One 2 bedroom $585 Plus all utilities, references & security. No pets. 570-766-1881

956 Miscellaneous HARVEYS LAKE Seasonal Rental. 1/1, full kitchen, enclosed boat slip with Deck on Lake. $1250 per month, utilities included. Call Stephen @ 570-814-4183

962

KINGSTON HOUSE Nice, clean furnished room, starting at $340. Efficiency at $450 month furnished with all utilities included. Off street parking. 570-718-0331

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in bussiness with classified!

WILKES-BARRE

Furnished room for rent. Close to downtown. $90/week + security. Everything included. Call 570-704-8381

965

KINGSTON

3 bedrooms,1 bath, Off street parking, Pets ok with certain approval, $650/per month,plus security Call 570-288-1561

NANTICOKE Desirable

Lexington Village Nanticoke, PA Many ranch style homes. 2 bedrooms $900 + electric only

SQUARE FOOT RE MANAGEMENT 866-873-0478

Rooms

Roommate Wanted

MOUNTAIN TOP Male homeowner

looking for responsible male roommate to share house. Minutes away from Industrial Park. Off street parking. Plenty of storage. Furnished room. Large basement with billiards and air hockey. All utilities included. $425. Call Doug 570-817-2990

971 Vacation & Resort Properties BRANT BEACH, LBI, NEW JERSEY 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, sleeps 10. 1 block to the beach 1/2 block to the bay. Front porch, rear deck, all the conveniences of home. Many weeks still available. $1,000 to $1,950. Call Darren Snyder 570-696-2010

Marilyn K. Snyder Real Estate, Inc. 570-696-2010

HARVEYS LAKE

Furnished Summer Home. Weekly and/ or Monthly. Starting June to end of August. Washer & dryer. Free boat slips. Wireless internet. 570-639-5041

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a showroom in print! Classifiedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got the directions! OCEAN CITY . MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

WILDWOOD CREST Ocean Front, on

Find your next vehicle online.

timesleaderautos.com

Find that new job. The Times Leader ClassiďŹ ed section.

the beach. 1 bedroom condo, pool. 5/04/12 - 6/22/12 $1,250/week 6/22/12 - 9/7/12 $1,550/week 570-693-3525

KINGSTON OFFICENTERS New Bridge Center 480 Pierce Street

OfďŹ centerâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;250 250 Pierce Street

OfďŹ centerâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;270 270 Pierce Street

Park OfďŹ ce Building 400 Third Ave.

974 Wanted to Rent Real Estate

HARVEYS LAKE

BOATHOUSE with bathroom facility wanted to rent June, July & August Call 609-613-0981

OfďŹ centerâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;220 220 Pierce Street

HUNTING LAND WANTED TO LEASE

Minimum 100 acres+ with at least 50% wooded. Call 570-231-9544

Need a Roommate? Place an ad and find one here! 570-829-7130

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad. ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com

Professional OfďŹ ce Rentals Full Service Leases â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Design â&#x20AC;˘ Renovations â&#x20AC;˘ Various Size Suites Available Medical, Legal, Commercial â&#x20AC;˘ Utilities â&#x20AC;˘ Parking â&#x20AC;˘ Janitorial Full Time Maintenance Staff Available

For Rental Information Call:

1-570-287-1161 www.lippiproperties.com

Times Leader 05-13-2012  

The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 05-13

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