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WILKES-BARRE, PA

SPORTS SHOWCASE

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

$1.50

LUZERNE COUNTY PUBLIC DEFENDER’S OFFICE

No rest for DEFENSE

Showing a heavy caseload, case files lie on the floor and atop the filing cabinets at the Luzerne County Public Defender’s Office.

NFL

TEXANS 31 BENGALS 10 COLLEGE FOOTBALL

SMU 28 PITTSBURGH 6 AHL

CRUNCH 4 PENGUINS 3 NHL

FLYERS 3 SENATORS 2 O’BRIEN TAKES HELM AT PSU

After a two-month search to replace legendary head football coach Joe Paterno, Bill O’Brien, 42, was formally introduced on Saturday. He reiterated his intention O’Brien to remain offensive coordinator for the New England Patriots for the duration of their playoff run. New England has a bye this weekend. Sports, 1C

INSIDE A NEWS: Local 3A Nation & World 5A Obituaries 2A, 8A B PEOPLE: Birthdays 6B C SPORTS: Scoreboard 2C Outdoors 10C D BUSINESS: Motley Fool 4D E VIEWS: Editorial 2E Forum 3E F ETC.: Puzzles 2F Books 5F Travel 6F G CLASSIFIED

WEATHER Adrienne Wren Partly sunny, cooler. High 39. Low 28. Details, Page 12C

CLARK VAN ORDEN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Al Flora, chief public defender, last month put limits on the cases his office will accept. He is concerned about the quality of representation his office can provide.

Caseload troubles office head Flora his office. But as caseloads continued to climb, so did his conILKES-BARRE – Lu- cern that illusion was becoming zerne County Chief Pub- reality. That concern was lic Defender the motivation behind Al Flora Jr. and his staff Editor’s note: his decision last have heard the taunts First of a two-part month to limit the countless times from series on funding defendants dissatis- and staffing issues type of cases his office will accept to juvefied with the represen- at the Luzerne niles, defendants tation they’ve been County Public Defender’s Office. charged with homiprovided. cide or a felony sexual The attorneys are not “public defenders,” as their ti- assault and persons who are intles state. They’re “public pre- carcerated, facing an involuntary tenders” who provide only an illu- mental health commitment or sion of an effective defense to state parole violation. The policy is designed to retheir clients. For years Flora considered the jab an insult to the attorneys in See DEFENDER, Page 12A

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By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER tmorgan@timesleader.com

By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER tmorgan@timesleader.com

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Attorney Joseph Saporito’s office at the Luzerne County Public Defender’s Office has piled-up paperwork.

Claiming they are underfunded and overworked, a growing number of public defenders throughout the nation are challenging the government entities that control their purse strings by refusing to take new cases. Luzerne County entered the fray last month when Chief Public Defender Al Flora Jr. announced his office would limit the number of cases it accepts because caseloads have become so high he can no longer guarantee effective representation to clients. Public defenders in several states, including Missouri, Florida, Tennessee and Ken-

“I am not going to sit by and see our office flounder under my watch.” Al Flora Chief public defender

tucky, have taken a similar hard line stance, said David Carroll, research director for the National Legal Aid and Defender Association, a non-profit organization that provides legal aid to low income people. “Public defenders across the country are starting to say, ‘We See NATIONAL, Page 12A

Front-runner for manager draws praise, some reservation Robert C. Lawton could become Luzerne County manager under home rule. By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

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Local defender’s hard line part of a national pattern

Robert C. Lawton will likely be Luzerne County’s first permanent home rule manager, generating curiosity about the 49-yearold California man and his past experience. Al Segalla, president of the Calaveras County Taxpayers Association, was impressed with Lawton’s performance as chief administrative officer in the northern California county from 2007-09.

“When he was here, he was very conscious of using good management skills to guard the people’s money,” Segalla said. “Our taxpayers group was satisfied with him.” Segalla believes Lawton left for a position in Solano County, Calif., where he had previously worked, because he faced pressure from some members of the elected Calaveras governing body. “There’s a faction in our local politics that wanted to expand government and increase taxes, and I don’t think he was anxious to do that,” Segalla said. Segalla said Lawton would help Luzerne County’s cost-cut-

“I think he’s the type of guy who will walk around and be able to put his finger on the pulse pretty quick. I think he’s a self-starter who can see a problem and fix it.” Walter Griffith Luzerne County controller

ting efforts. “He’d be good for that. He has to answer to supervisors, but he believes in representing the taxpayers,” Segalla said. “Depending on your politics, you’ll love or hate him.” Solano County Taxpayers member George Guynn Jr., who has faithfully attended county

government meetings for seven years, does not share Segalla’s opinion of Lawton. Guynn said he sees no eviSUBMITTED PHOTO dence that Lawton advocates savings and said Lawton has not Robert C. Lawton will likely be been receptive to taxpayers who Luzerne County’s manager under home rule. Originally attend meetings. See LAWTON, Page 6A

from New York, he worked recently in California.


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

Pittston Area board member gets DUI charge AVOCA – Police Friday filed driving under the influence charges against Pittston Area school director Bruce Knick. Knick, 42, of Lidy Road, Dupont was stopped on Dec. 7, according to court papers. A message left for Knick was not returned. He was charged with two counts of driving under the influence and motor vehicle code violations of failure to keep right, careless driving and turning movements and required signals. A preliminary hearing is scheduled for 1:45 p.m. on Feb. 28 before District Judge Andrew Barilla Jr. in Wilkes-Barre.

MEETINGS Borough eyes fee from out-of-town landlords

WEST PITTSTON – Councilman Pete Musinski Tuesday night requested solicitor Mark Bufalino research and write an ordinance requiring a monthly fee of $100 for future West Pittston property owners who live outside of the borough. Musinski’s request, which came at borough council’s meeting, was intended as a way to avoid absentee landlords.

Old penny auctions for $1.38 million

Associated Press

ORLANDO, Fla. — A once-cent copper coin from the earliest days of the U.S. Mint in 1793 has sold for a record $1.38 million at a Florida auction. James Halperin of Texas-based Heritage Auctions told The Associated Press on Saturday that the sale was “the most a United States copper coin has ever sold for at auction.” The coin was made at the Mint in Philadelphia in 1793, the first year that the U.S. made its own coins. Heritage officials said in a news release that the name of the buyer was not

“In the wake of the disasters in this town from September 8th, lots of homes are for sale…people are moving out of town,” he said. During the open floor, when a resident asked if it would apply to landlords living in nearby towns, Councilman Brian Thornton said the council would discuss tweaking the ordinance according to a radius of Luzerne County. Councilman Barry Hosier was elected for a two-year term as council president and John Hood was elected vice president. The position of president

Dr. Alfonsas Dainius January 6, 2012 Alfonsas Dainius, 90, Dallas, D r.passed away peacefully in the

1960. He then returned to the U.S. and presence of his son Friday after- was an intern at Fairlawn and Minoon, January 6, 2012 at the Geisin- riam hospitals in Worcester, Mass. ger Wyoming Valley Medical Cen- Alfonsas moved to Providence, R.I., ter. in 1964 and was Chief Resident at After being a three-time cancer the Rhode Island Medical Center in survivor (leg sarcoma, prostate Cx, Warwick, R.I., until moving to Pennand skin Cx), he was overwhelmed sylvania and residing in Dallas in by the combined effects of lung can- the early 1970s. cer, heart disease, and GI problems. Dr. Dainius then worked as MedDr. Dainius was born in 1921, in ical Director of the Northeast ReVieksniai, Lithuania, son of the late gion of the Pennsylvania DepartTadas and Barbora Tupikaite Daini- ment of Public Health, retiring in us. the mid 1980s. Forced in his early 20s to flee his Alfonsas was preceded in death homeland by the Soviet Union’s oc- by his wife, Agnieska Dainius, in cupation of Lithuania, he went to 1997 and by brothers, Felixas and Germany, where he became a med- Tadas, and sisters, Stanislava and ical student and met and married Barbora Dainaite. his wife, Agnes, also a refugee from Surviving are a son, Alfonsas A. Lithuania. Dainius, Dallas, and several nieces After World War II, he along with and nephews living in Lithuania. his polio-stricken wife and baby boy, Funeral will be held Tuesday, Jawere given the opportunity to immi- nuary 10, 2012 at 9:30 a.m. from the grate to the United States as "DP’s" Richard H. Disque Funeral Home (war displaced persons), an oppor- Inc., 2940 Memorial Highway, Daltunity for which he was always very las, with Mass of Christian Burial at grateful. Gate of Heaven Church, Dallas at 10 He arrived at Ellis Island in 1951 a.m. and settled in Worcester, MassachuInterment will be in Mount Olsetts, but returned to Germany to ivet Cemetery, Carverton. finish medical school, graduating Friends may call Monday 6 to 8 from the University of Munich in p.m.

Raymond F. Harmon January 5, 2012

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aymond F. Harmon, 85, a resident of West Nanticoke, passed away Thursday, January 5, 2012. Born March 27, 1926, in Swoyersville, he was the son of the late Raymond and Elizabeth Schlosser Harmon. He was a graduate of Luzerne High School and became a member of St. Faustina Parish, formerly St. Stanislaus Church. Raymond served in the U.S. Navy in the Pacific during World War II. After his honorable discharge from active duty, Raymond worked and retired from Tobyhanna Army Depot as a computer programmer and was also owner of Harmon’s Arco Station, West Nanticoke. He was also an original member and co-founder of Plymouth Township Recreational Park. Raymond was an avid hunter and fisherman, also a great golfer. He was preceded in death by a sister, Florence Harmon Mills. Presently surviving are his wife of 59 years, the former Doris Shumosic; daughters, Sandra Harmon and children, Desirea and Caleb, Arizona; Doreen Harmon Ellis and hus-

band, Joseph, and children, Sarah and Joey, Bear Creek; sons, Raymond and wife, Angela, and children, Erica and Robby, Texas; Rodney and fiancée, Lisa Boncal, and her children, Jessica and Steven, Nanticoke; sister Bernadine Harmon Lindquist and husband, Link; as well as several cousins, nieces and nephews. The funeral will be held Monday, January 9, 2012 at 9:30 a.m. from the Grontkowski Funeral Home P.C., 51-53 West Green Street, Nanticoke, with Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Faustina Parish ( Holy Trinity Church) with the Rev. James Nash officiating. Interment will be in Chapel Lawn Memorial Park, Dallas. Relatives and friends are invited to join his family for visitation and remembrances today from 4 to 7 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that memorial contributions may be made to St. Faustina Parish in his name.

Shawn H. Ray January 2, 2012

S

hawn H. Ray, 51, of Noxen died Monday, January 2, 2012 after a long battle with cancer. Born in Wilkes-Barre he was the son of the late Albert L. and Laura C. Martin Ray. He was a graduate of Lake-Lehman High School. Shawn was a veteran serving in the U. S. Navy A.S.W. cryto-key. After his service he was employed with International Computers and Telecommunications Corp., working with the U.S. Navy and U. S. Coast Guard F.R.A.M. programs at Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine. Mr. Ray was also employed by Harriman Associates, Auburn, Maine. He was an avid hunter and fisherman. He also enjoyed a pastime of riding motorcycles all over Maine and New England. Shawn loved his adopted state of More Obituaries, Page 8A

THE TIMES LEADER

Maine, having resided there for 20 years. He strongly urges everyone to visit the beautiful state. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his brother, Brian A. Ray. Surviving are his sisters, Karla Narkiewicz, Dallas; Grace Gelinas, Austin, Texas; brothers, Barry L. Ray and wife, Judy, Hazleton; Randall K. Ray and wife, Sharon, Forkston Township; several nieces, a nephew; great nieces. Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Tuesday, January 10, 2012 at 10:30 a.m. at St Therese’s Church, Shavertown. Relatives and friends are asked to go directly to the church. Arrangements are by Yeosock Funeral Home, Plains Township.

revealed but that he was “a major collector.” One of the coin’s earliest owners was a well-known Baltimore banker, Louis E. Eliasberg, Sr. “Mr. Eliasberg was nicknamed, ‘the king of coins’ because before his death in 1976 he assembled a collection that consisted of at least one example of every coin ever made at the United States Mint, a feat never duplicated,” Halperin said in the news release. The final bid for the coin last week was one of the largest sales at the Florida United Numismatists coin show and an-

nual convention, which runs through Sunday. Halperin said a five-dollar gold piece from 1829 also was sold. Officials say it shows no wear on its lettering, its Lady Liberty face or the chain of 13 linking rings on its back. “This coin is known as a ‘Chain Cent’ because the central design on the back is a chain of 13 linking rings. It represented the solidarity of the 13 original colonies, but some critics claimed the chain was symbolic of slavery, and the design was quickly changed from rings to a wreath,” Halperin said in the news release.

pro tem, who fills in when the president and vice president are absent, was then awarded to Musinski. Hosier delayed the appointment of council committees until a later date. Amanda Myrkalo

2010, Luzerne officials have discussed the possibility of a regionalized effort. Jancuska now wants his fellow council members to seriously consider the feasibility of approaching Courtdale. Also on Wednesday, borough tax collector John Lohman addressed the council regarding the possibility of utilizing the Don Wilkinson Agency Inc. to NEWPORT TWP. – Paul collect delinquent per capita Czapracki was unanimously taxes. re-elected president of the townLuzerne currently charges a ship board of commissioners, yearly fee of $5 for every borand John Zyla was unanimously ough resident between the ages voted vice president, during the of 18 and 65. Although the borcommissioners’ reorganization ough should be collecting meeting Tuesday night. roughly $6,000 annually, it genCzapracki will oversee the erally only receives between street department, Zyla, the $3,800 and $4,000, officials said. police department, Michael Lohman also reported the Roke, code enforcement, John borough is owed between Wilkes Jr., the fire department, $5,000 and $6,000 in fees that and Commissioner John Vishhave accumulated over the last nefski, parks and recreation. several years. The board also appointed the Wilkinson is seeking a threefollowing: township solicitor, year contract in which the agenRichard Shiptoski; township cy would charge 10 percent of engineer, Penn Engineering, and the total amount collected. The township manager, Richard agency already collects LuZika. zerne’s sewer fees and earned income taxes. During council’s reorganization meeting Jancuska was unanimously re-elected president while Anthony Perzia was LUZERNE – Council Presiunanimously selected to remain dent Mike Jancuska Wednesday as vice president. directed the police committee to B. Garret Rogan draw up a proposal for Luzerne to assume the police responsibilities for the borough of Courtdale. Ever since re-establishing the borough’s police force in July NESCOPECK – Sandy Wright

was elected to serve her sixth term as chairwoman of borough council at a reorganizational meeting on Tuesday. Councilman Joseph Coakley was selected as vice chairman and Richard Powlus, chairman pro-tem. David Medara was sworn in as a new member of council. In addition, council voted to sustain the prevailing public meeting date: the second Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. Tom Huntington

COURT BRIEFS

a then-13-year-old girl. Luzerne County Judge David Lupas sentenced Francis Castrignano, 21, of Deer Hill Road, on charges of statutory sexual assault and dissemination of explicit sexual material to a minor. Castrignano pleaded guilty to the charges in April. According to court papers, in January 2011, police said Castrignano had an inappropriate relationship with a 13-year-old girl and that they had sent nude pictures to each other.

Czapracki will head Newport Township

Luzerne will explore policing of Courtdale

Wright wins 6th term as leader of council

WILKES-BARRE – A man accused of robbing five businesses in two days waived his right to preliminary hearings in Wilkes-Barre Central Court on Thursday. Daniel Ungarsky, 28, of Wilkes-Barre, waived charges of robbery and forgery to Luzerne County Court. Other counts of robbery and forgery against Ungarsky were withdrawn. Ungarsky is accused of robbing the Taco Bell restaurant, Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre, on Nov. 13, and McDonald’s restaurant, Kidder Street, WilkesBarre, Uni-Mart on North Main Street, Plains Township, Dollar General on Dallas Memorial Highway, Kingston Township, and Family Dollar on Union Street, Pringle, on Nov. 13, according to arrest records. Police allege Ungarsky committed the robberies to support a heroin addiction and that after learning he used the same needle as someone infected with the AIDS virus, he “went on a rampage.” Ungarsky is also accused of stealing his grandmother’s checks he cashed at banks, according to the criminal com-

MUNICIPAL BRIEFS DURYEA - A meeting with the state Department of Environmental Protection, the Department of General Services and state and local officials has been scheduled at 6 p.m. Jan. 12 to discuss the flood control project in the borough. The meeting will be in the municipal building. The public is invited to attend. Also, a Christmas tree collection will be Friday, Jan. 13 and Friday, Jan. 27. Trees are to be placed at the curb and the borough’s street department will collect the trees.

plaint. WILKES-BARRE – A county assistant public defender charged with crashing his vehicle into a parked vehicle in August while driving under the influence waived his right to a formal arraignment Thursday. Jonathan D. Ursiak, 40, of Wyoming, waived his right to the arraignment on two counts of DUI and one count of operating a vehicle without proper insurance through court papers filed by his attorney Joseph Yeager. By waiving the arraignment, Ursiak entered a plea of not guilty. Ursiak was charged by Forty Fort police on Aug. 26 after they said his vehicle struck a parked vehicle while he was pulling into a parking lot of a convenience store. Forty Fort police said Ursiak displayed signs of intoxication and had a blood-alcohol level of .33 percent. An adult driver in Pennsylvania is considered intoxicated with BAC of .08 percent. WILKES-BARRE – A Shavertown man was sentenced Friday to seven to 14 months in county prison on charges he had an inappropriate relationship with PLAINS TWP. – Applications are being accepted for the rental of the Plains Lions Pavilion. Applications may be picked up at the municipal building, 126 N. Main St., Plains Township. Residents may submit an application during January; non-residents may submit applications beginning Feb. 1. For more information, call 822-1982. ASHLEY – The 2012 trash and recycling fee will be collected through Jan. 31. The fee is mandatory for all residents of the borough. Citations will be issued for nonpayment. The current green stickers expire Jan. 7. The fee for the first half of the year is $115 until Jan. 31; after

Kishbaugh wins post at Salem Township SALEM TWP. – Josh Kishbaugh became the chairman of the township supervisors at a reorganizational meeting conducted on Tuesday. Kishbaugh succeeds Robert Pearce, who became vice chairman. The third member of the board, Joseph Siecko, will serve as roadmaster. Public meetings will continue to be conducted on the second Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. In regular business, the supervisors accepted the resignation of Kathy John as receptionist/ treasurer, effective Dec. 31, 2011. Attorney Anthony McDonald, solicitor, was authorized to “take all necessary action” on a property at 531 E. Front St. McDonald was retained as solicitor for both the township and the planning board. Attorney Hugh Sumner is the zoning hearing board solicitor Tom Huntington

WILKES-BARRE – A Hanover Township man was sentenced Friday to three to six years in state prison on drug-related charges. Tyqwan S. Jones, 35, of South Regent Street, was sentenced on two counts of possession with intent to deliver and one count of delivery of heroin by Luzerne County Judge Tina Polachek Gartley. Jones pleaded guilty to the charges in October. According to court papers, in August 2010 Jones sold suspected cocaine and heroin to a police informant. Police then searched Jones’ residence, where they found a large sum of money, a scale and other related items. Jan. 31, the fee will be $125. Stickers for the full year are $230. The fee can be paid at the tax office Monday through Friday, 4 to 6 p.m., and Wednesday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to noon, during January. Starting Feb. 1, stickers can be purchased in the secretary’s office weekdays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., for $125. Stickers also can be obtained by sending a check or money order payable to Ashley Borough, 10 N. Main St., Ashley, PA 18706, or by depositing payment in the drop-off box in the vestibule of the municipal building. When using this method, residents are asked to add $1.56 for a half-year package or $2.07 for a full-year package for postage.

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LUZERNE COUNTY

2 armed robberies reported Two armed robberies were reported within several hours of each other in Foster Township and Hazleton. State police said two men entered the Uni-Mart on state Route 940 in Freeland around 8:45 p.m. Thursday. One of the men brandished a handgun and the other stood behind him. The gunman pointed the weapon at the man the register and demanded him to empty it. The second suspect then walked behind the counter, removed the drawer from the register, took out a $20 bill and handed it to the gunman. While behind the register the suspect saw a gun under the counter and took it. The two suspects fled to the rear of the store and drove off in a gray Mitsubishi Eclipse that was either missing a muffler or the muffler was damaged. The gunman was described as a white male, 5 feet, 10 inches tall and weighing 240 pounds. The second suspect was described as a black male, 5 feet, 8 inches to 5 feet, 10 inches, weighing 180 pounds. Hazleton police responded to a report of an armed robbery at the Turkey Hill Market, 800 Alter St. at 2:01 a.m. on Friday. Two men entered the convenience store. One of them had a gun and demanded money. They left with an undetermined amount of cash and store items. A clerk and customer in the store were not injured. There were no descriptions of the suspects. Anyone with information about the Hazleton robbery is asked to contact police at 570 459-4940 at either extension 509 or 515.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012 PAGE 3A

LOCAL AREA CRIME

New Year’s Day slashing of woman at café continues under police investigation

Despite attacks, Nanticoke calm By JERRY LYNOTT jlynott@timesleader.com

NANTICOKE – Even after he was brutally clubbed in a carjacking last June, Mayor Joseph Dougherty looked forward to his nightly walk. “When I got attacked it did not deter me,” he said Saturday before he headed downtown. The New Year’s Day slashing of a woman in The Prospect Street Café wasn’t keeping him inside and residents haven’t raised concerns about an increase of violent crimes in the city. “I was a victim of circumstance. I was in the wrong place at the wrong time.” Police are investigating the assault of Jennifer Mieczkowski, 30, of Nanticoke. She has to undergo additional reconstructive surgery on her face.

Dougherty sympathized with Mieczkowski, who waits for police to file charges in her case. “I wasn’t happy waiting a couple weeks,” he said. Police arrested three men who pleaded guilty on Dec. 29 to charges related to beating Dougherty and stealing his company car as he sat in it on South Chestnut Street near his residence. The men will be sentenced next month in Luzerne County Court. Nanticoke Detective Capt. William Shultzworked Dougherty’s case and has been working on the Mieczkowski case. “I don’t know all the facts yet,” said Shultz. He said investigators are attempting to talk to people who were in the bar at the time of the slashing, he said. As many as 50 people may have been there. “Interviewing that many people takes

time,” said Shultz. His department is getting assistance from the state police Bureau of Liquor Enforcement and the county District Attorney’s Office, he said. Shultz declined to comment on whether there has been an increase in the number of violent crimes in the city. The latest data available from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program showed a decrease. In 2010 Nanticoke reported 58 violent crimes compared to 74 in 2009, according to the reports of offenses know to law enforcement. The violent crimes in 2010 were: nine forcible rapes;11robberies; and 38 aggravated assaults. The totals for 2009 were: one murder/nonnegligent manslaughter; five forcible rapes; seven robberies; and 61 aggravat-

Women will learn how to run for office

SCOUTING

A former member of Congress will lead off the event, designed to help women get into politics.

WILKES-BARRE

By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

More river photos sought The Susquehanna Greenway Partnership has added a new “Flood” category and extended the deadline for entries into the Treasured Towns & Landscapes of the Susquehanna Photo Contest. The group will accept entries until Feb. 29. Trish Carothers, the partnership’s program director said, “We are looking for photos that tell the stories of the Susquehanna that celebrate the river and its towns as places of timeless value, shared memories and experiences, places to enjoy and to treasure always.” To learn more about the contest, its categories or to enter, go to at www.susquehannagreenaway.org. SCRANTON

Marker to honor Gov. Casey Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission Executive Director James M. Vaughan will attend the unveiling of a historical marker honoring former Gov. Robert P. Casey on Monday, which would have been his 80th birthday. The ceremony is set for 11:30 a.m. at Memorial Park, on Washington Avenue near Casey Woodlawn Street in Scranton. Casey, a Scranton native, served as governor of Pennsylvania from 1987 to 1995. He died in 2000, and his son, Robert P. Casey Jr., is the state’s senior U.S. senator. The senator and state Sen. John Blake are expected to be on hand for the event. WYOMING

Church to hold climate talk Citizen activist Hilde Binford, a member of one of the first groups to train with Al Gore in January of 2007, will present “The Climate Reality Project: The Facts about Climate Change and How to Solve It,” on Jan. 20 at 7 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Wyoming. The Climate Reality Project is dedicated to bringing factual information about the climate crisis into the mainstream and engaging the public in conversation about effective solutions. Founded and chaired by Gore, Nobel Laureate and former vice president of the United States, The Climate Reality Project has more than 5 million members and supporters worldwide. The UUCWV Church is located at the intersection of Church and Mount Olivet roads. Directions are provided on the website atwww.uucwv.org. A reception and open discussion will

ed assaults. A few blocks from where the slashing occurred, Luigi Carannante works behind the counter of his business, Antonio’s Pizza & Subs on East Main Street. He has read and watched the media reports of the attack. “Things happen in every town,” he said. Across the street Fran Stavetski showed the pepper spray she keeps near the register at On the Rise Gifts and Novelties. The store also installed security cameras and posted signs on the door indicating they are in operation. The measures were taken when stores were selling bath salts that have since been banned. The store did not sell them out of concern that it could be targeted for a robbery. “We didn’t want that,” said Stavetski.

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Waymart Boy Scout Troop 111 member Matt Witt, right, takes the blood pressure of fellow troop member Stephen Miller during the Northeastern Pennsylvania Council’s Merit Badge College at King’s College on Saturday afternoon.

The real big men on campus

Boy Scouts get ‘A’ for effort as King’s College helps them earn their merit badges. By RALPH NARDONE Times Leader Correspondent

WILKES-BARRE – Three hundred future leaders attended King’s College on Saturday for the Northeast Pennsylvania Council Boy Scouts of America’s 14th annual “Merit Badge College.” Scout organizers say the event provided young Scouts the opportunity to participate in classroom activities that allowed them to take a look into

Scouts earned mertheir futures. “Scouts can it badges in 30 differDavid Srebo, event orgaent disciplines includnizer from the council’s broaden from veterinary mediheadquarters in Moosic, their home troops ing cine, lifesaving, law, said the event gives particicomputers, citizenpant Scouts ways to delve and meet new ship, architecture, into their “vocations and people.” metalwork, plumbavocations.” He said he is Sam Levandoski ing, journalism and impressed by how “hardKing’s freshman Scouting heritage. working and focused” the Srebo said the Scouts young men are. had a perfect oppor“They seem to all be driven toward becoming Eagle Scouts,” tunity to see the collegiate setting as he said. Many were required to con- well as learn more about their interduct research, produce reports, build, ests from “experts” who volunteered draw or perform other work functions to conduct “learning modules” before arriving at King’s to earn their badges, Srebo said. See BADGES, Page 7A

Lessons on how to be a smart cookie

University of Scranton economics major senior Danielle Dembia teaches Girl Scouts about economics during Saturday’s Girl Scout Cookie College hosted by Split Rock Resort in Lake Harmony. Girls attended Cookie College classes in money management, people skills, goal-setting, marketing and business ethics. They also learned to make a business plan.

By SUSAN DENNEY Times Leader Correspondent

LAKE HARMONY – Having trouble saying no to that Girl Scout selling cookies? Don’t feel bad. She could be a CEO, a Cookie Entrepreneur Officer, and she learned her marketing skills at Cookie College. On Saturday, more than 200 Girl Scouts from Northeastern Pennsylvania gathered at Split Rock Resort to learn business skills that will make them better cookie sellers. Girls attended Cookie College classes in money management, people skills, goal-setting, marketing and business ethics. They also learned to make a business plan. Suzanne Moore, regional director for the North and Northeast Pennsylvania Girl Scouts in the Heart of PennsylvaSee COOKIE, Page 7A

PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER

SCRANTON – Getting more women to run for elective office is the theme of an upcoming conference titled “Ready to Run.” Delivering the keynote address will be Marjorie Margolies, a former congresswoman from Philadelphia and a staunch advocate for women in politics. Margolies, 69, served in Congress from 1993 to 1995. “I always told my children – be prepared to lose before you can expect to win,” Margolies said. “It’s not easy to be involved in politics, it’s extremely inconve- Margolies nient, especially for women. But you can R E A D Y never be afraid of los- T O R U N ing. Just stop being When: Jan. 28 afraid of being Where: University of afraid.” The all-day confer- Scranton – ence will be held on Brennan Hall Time: 8 a.m. to Jan. 28, in Brennan 5:30 p.m. Hall at The Universi- Speaker: Marty of Scranton. jorie Margolies, Women from Founder & throughout North- President of eastern Pennsylvania Women’s Campaign Internawho are considering tional running for office or Information: who have an interest Call Dr. Jean in getting involved in Wahl Harris or politics and public Stan Zygmunt service are encour- at the university, 941aged to attend. 7400 According to Dr. Jean Wahl Harris, Professor/Chairperson of the Political Science Department at the university, the conference will provide a place for valuable training. She said Ready to Run is a nonpartisan program of the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University that trains women to run for office, seek higher office, work on a campaign, get appointed to office or simply learn more about the political system. Harris said participants in the conference will learn from prominent elected and appointed leaders, campaign consultants, party officials and policy experts. The first day to begin collecting petitions for candidacy in the 2012 primary election is Feb. 15, and the last day to file for candidacy before the primaries is April 18. “Pennsylvania ranks in the bottom 10 of states as far as women representatives,” Harris said. “We’ve never had a woman governor. Women just don’t tend to run for office.” Harris said more women than men are getting college degrees and law degrees. She said a woman’s chance of winning is comparable to men. “Women who do get into politics do See WOMEN, Page 7A


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Shot congresswoman faces a May deadline to get on November ballot

B R I E F

Decision time for Giffords By KEVIN FREKING Associated Press

AP PHOTO

Dancing for the Dalai Lama

A Buddhist monk performs Kalachakra ritual dance in presence of Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama, unseen, during the Kalachakra Buddhist festival, in the town of Bodh Gaya, believed to be the place where Buddha attained enlightenment, Bihar, India, Saturday.

WASHINGTON — The signals are strong. One year after being shot in the head, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords is on a mission to return to the job she so clearly loved. Her husband and people near the threeterm congresswoman say she is highly motivated to recover from her injuries and get back to work in Washington, potentially using her inspirational story as a way to mend political differences in the nation’s capital. She faces a May deadline to get on the November ballot, meaning she has a few months to decide her next step. Her future will depend on a recovery that has progressed in remarkable fashion over the past year as she is now able to walk and talk. Her only interview occurred with

Giffords

ABC’s Diane Sawyer nearly 10 months after the shooting and showed how far she has come, but also how far she has to go. At the time, she did not speak in complete sentences and repeated her words to make her

point. “No, better. Um, better, better,” she said when asked about returning to Washington. The day after the interview ran, her congressional office released an audio recording that showed she had made progress in her communication skills in the two weeks that had elapsed between the interview and its airing. She read from a script and an aide

said it took multiple tries before she was comfortable with the result. “I’m getting stronger. I’m getting better,” Giffords said. “There is a lot to say. I will speak better.” Jared Lee Loughner, 23, who has been diagnosed with schizophrenia, has pleaded not guilty to charges stemming from the mass shooting Jan. 8, 2011outside a Tucson supermarket where Giffords was meeting with her constituents. He is being forcibly medicated at a federal prison facility in Missouri in an effort to make him mentally ready for trial. Giffords returned to Tucson on Friday from Houston to attend ceremonies to mark Sunday’s one-year anniversary of the shooting that killed six and injured her and 12 others.

GAMBLING ON SOME GREAT WEATHER

MIAMI

Girl beaten on school bus

even central Florida teenagers were arrested after authorities said they S punched and kicked a 13-year-old until

she was unconscious while on a school bus. The victim told authorities that Friday was her first time riding the bus and no one would let her sit down. About 75 children were riding the bus bound for a middle school in Ocala, a rural city north of Orlando. The victim said someone threw a shoe at her and she threw one back, according to an arrest report. One girl allegedly asked students if they wanted to hit the victim, then instructed the teens to form a circle and began hitting and kicking the victim. The victim, who is not being identified, was taken to the hospital and diagnosed with a concussion, severe bruising on her head and muscle spasms.

TEHRAN

Iran comments on rescue

Iran’s government on Saturday welcomed the U.S. Navy’s rescue of 13 Iranian fishermen held by pirates, calling it a positive humanitarian gesture. U.S. officials announced Friday that the fishermen had been rescued by a U.S. Navy destroyer on Thursday, more than 40 days after their boat was commandeered by suspected Somali pirates in the northern Arabian Sea. The rescue came just days after Tehran warned the U.S. to keep the same group of warships out of the Persian Gulf in a reflection of Iran’s fear that American warships could try to enforce an embargo against Iranian oil exports. Iran’s hard-line Fars news agency had a different take than its government, calling the rescue operation a Hollywood dramatization of a routine event. CAIRO

Christians note Christmas

Egypt’s Christians on Saturday celebrated their first Christmas since the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak, amid tight security and a display of national unity to allay fears of the growing power of Islamists. The Coptic Orthodox celebration follows an escalation in violence against the minority, an estimated 10 percent of Egypt’s 85 million people, over the past year. Many Christians blamed a series of street clashes, assaults on churches, and other attacks on radical Islamists who have become increasingly bold after Mubarak’s downfall. Celebrations of Orthodox Christmas began with a late night Friday Mass at Cairo’s main cathedral, which was attended by prominent figures from across Egypt’s political spectrum. They included leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood, an Islamist group whose associated political party has won nearly half the seats in parliament. SOUTH RUSSELL, OHIO

Horse needs new home

Wally the Walmart horse is looking for a new home. That’s the nickname given to a 9year-old standardbred horse that a humane society says was left at a northeast Ohio store by an Amish teenager more than two months ago. Humane Officer Christian Courtwright in Geauga County says the teen apparently unhooked the horse from a buggy, tied it to a rail at the Walmart in Middlefield and never came back for it. He says store employees noticed the horse the next day and tended to it until police took it to a caregiver.

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eb and Turk Irwin of Carlisle, Pa., walk on the Boardwalk during an unseasonably warm afternoon Saturday in Atlantic City, N.J.

Afghan abuse claim strains talks Investigators accuse American military of abusing detainees at its main prison in the country. By KAY JOHNSON Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghan investigators accused the American military Saturday of abusing detainees at its main prison in the country, bolstering calls by President Hamid Karzai for the U.S. to turn over control of the facility and com-

plicating talks about America’s future role in Afghanistan. The investigators also called for any detainee held without evidence to be freed, putting the U.S. and Afghan governments on a collision course in an issue that will decide the fate of hundreds of suspected Taliban and al-Qaida operatives captured by American forces and held indefinitely. Karzai took Washington by surprise Thursday when he ordered that the U.S. military turn over full control of the prison outside Bagram Air Base within one month, a seemingly impossible deadline

given U.S. security concerns about the prisoners and the Afghan government’s weak administrative capacity. The countries had been working on phasing a transfer of responsibility of the prison, which hold 3,000 detainees, over two years. The demand was the latest episode of political brinkmanship as negotiations continued for a Strategic Partnership Document with America that will determine the U.S. role in Afghanistan after 2014, when most foreign troops are due to withdraw. Karzai has demanded an end to unpopular night raids by U.S. troops.

Thousands hold prayer vigil in Syria for bombing victims By ALBERT AJI and BASSEM MROUE Associated Press

DAMASCUS, Syria — Thousands of regime backers massed at a mosque in the Syrian capital Saturday for funeral prayers for policemen killed in a Damascus bombing, as the government vowed to respond with an “iron fist” to security threats. Coffins bearing 11 policemen, covered with Syrian flags, were brought into the AlHassan mosque for the prayers, a day after the explosion ripped through a Damascus intersection, killing 26 people and wounding 63. Offi-

cials said the attack was a suicide bombing, the second in two weeks to hit the normally quiet Syrian capital. The regime of President Bashar Assad has touted the attacks as proof that it is being targeted by “terrorists.” But the country’s opposition demanded an independent investigation, accusing forces loyal to the Syrian regime of being behind the bombing to tarnish a 10-month-old uprising against Assad. The bombings have coincided with a mission AP PHOTO by Arab League observers in- Syrian mourners throw rice and rose petals at the coffin of vestigating Syria’s crackdown one of 11 slain Syrian officers during a mass funeral at AlHassan mosque, in Damascus, Syria, on Saturday. on the protest.

S U P E R PA C S

Donors enjoy the perks of secrecy

Committees backing top GOP candidates can shield their identities.

By JACK GILLUM Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Independent political groups backing top Republican candidates are taking advantage of federal rules that essentially let them shield the identities of their donors until after important primary elections this month. These political action committees, known as super PACs, notified federal election regulators in recent weeks that they intend to file their financial reports every month. Those requests, once approved, effectively will allow the groups to hold off disclosing the names of their contributors until after primaries in New Hampshire on Tuesday and South Carolina on Jan. 21. Without the change, those groups would have had to file reports before the GOP pri- Just this past maries. That week, a new would have given voters a political comclearer pic- mittee supture of the porting forwealthy activmer Pennists who could have sylvania Sen. over-sized in- Rick Santofluence in the rum made a GOP race and the general similar request to the election. Just this Federal Elecpast week, a tion Commisnew political sion. committee supporting former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum made a similar request to the Federal Election Commission. It would delay the next filing deadline to Jan. 31for the group, called the Red, White and Blue Fund. That’s the date of the Florida primary, after which candidates with little money will find it hard to continue the race. Groups backing GOP candidates Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich and Jon Huntsman also have said they would begin filing monthly reports, which they said eases administrative burdens. Before then, these PACs filed reports quarterly, a practice they said required submitting tedious reports before each state’s primary. Democraticleaning super PACs have not yet asked for similar extensions. The subtle administrative change is significant because such groups are expected to play a crucial role in this year’s election. In one case, the Romney-leaning Restore Our Future ran a series of attack ads against Gingrich that have been widely cited as a reason for the former House speaker’s plummeting support. Gingrich placed fourth in the Iowa caucuses behind Romney, Santorum and Texas Rep. Ron Paul. “It is secret money — you won’t know until after the primaries have occurred who helped fund them,” said Trevor Potter, a former Republican FEC commissioner and president of the watchdog group Campaign Legal Center.

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Fast action crucial for hip recovery Hospital’s interdisciplinary team works with family members to maintain quality of life.

PLAINS TWP. – Edwin Matthews, feels lucky to be alive. On Sept. 24, 2011, the 74-year-old resident of Nanticoke fell at his home while working on his car. He was taken to Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center’s emergency room, where he credits the interdisciplinary team there with not only saving his life, but maintaining the quality of his life. Matthews’ hip surgery was done within the 48-hour window, increasing the likelihood the patient will survive and thrive in the long term. As Matthews sat at the medical center Friday morning with Dr. Anthony Balsamo, orthopedic surgeon and director of the Geisinger Geriatric Fracture Care Program, it was clear the two not only have a relationship based on excellent medical services that Balsamo and his team have provided, but on mutual caring between the two. “You made me look good,” says Balsamo, of Matthews’ high level of compliance and quick recovery after his fall. Matthews and his wife, Arlene, in turn, laud the efforts of Geisinger along every step of that recovery. From the Emergency Room staff, the nurse coordinator, hospitalist and orthopedic surgeons themselves, every member of the team has a job to do, and Matthews believes that they do it well. Balsamo was also quick to point out family members are an intricate part of that team, as well. He remembers

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“He seems to think that staff people are superior to the public. The interactions we’ve had have not been very pleasant,” Guynn said. Lawton was Solano County’s deputy county administrator from January 2005 to January 2008, receiving a salary of $135,000. He returned as the county’s principal management analyst in January 2010, at a salary of $122,000. Lawton said in his Luzerne County application that he worked to reduce costs in Solano. Guynn is displeased with the Solano County administration overall, saying Lawton is “just a staff person and has to be with the politicians and what they’re going to do.” “The county is big on wasting public money. That has been my observation,” Guynn said. Tough conditions prevailed Calaveras County Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Diane Gray said Lawton was “very accessible and personable.” Gray said he had a “tough job” there. “We’re a small, rural community where small town politics are ugly. It was the beginning of a recession. He handled it all very well I thought,” Gray said, noting

Legislators set for discussion at breakfast

By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

By GERI GIBBONS Times Leader Correspondent

LAWTON

www.timesleader.com

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Director of Geriatric Fracture Care Dr. Anthony Balsamo, right, and partner Dr. John Lynott talk about orthopedic treatment and care as hip surgery patient Edwin Matthews of Nanticoke listens at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center in Plains Township on Friday morning.

how Arlene, a former nurse’s aide herself, took the time to learn how to assist her husband in his recovery. Families are also a good source of accurate information and continuing support. “The hip fracture patient needs to have a plan,” said Balsamo, “something to work toward and believe in.” He said patients need to move around after surgery, to decrease the incidence of pneumonia, skin breakdown, clotting and cognitive impairment. Balsamo emphasized even the choice of pain medication is important in insuring the patient can be “up and around” as quickly as possible. Dr. John Lynott, a relatively new member of the orthopedic team, said

Lawton believed county government must play a role in economic development. At the time of Lawton’s hiring, he was quoted saying he and his wife, Francine, were “thrilled” to move to Calaveras, which reminded them of the area in New York where the two of them grew up. In his Luzerne County application, Lawton said he gained approval of Calaveras County’s first structurally balanced budget in five years and first strategic plan while he was administrator there. The administration reduced general fund expenditures by 17 percent and put an additional 25 percent into reserves. Dave Haley, vice president and division manager at the real estate development company Castle & Cook Calaveras Inc., was quoted at the time of Lawton’s departure saying the county needed a more “strong” and “dynamic” chief administrative officer. Haley said last week the elected supervisors were -- and probably still are -- too controlling, which stifles the creativity and independent ideas of the chief administrator. The board should keep the manager accountable but not unnecessarily intervene, he said. “You have to be able to manage, and when you have a headstrong political body that doesn’t allow you do, that it’s very bad,” Haley said. Haley believes Lawton has the

the interdisciplinary approach insures every patient concern is addressed. He emphasizing it is not a “multidisciplinary approach” but an “interdisciplinary approach,” meaning that each member of the team works together and communicates effectively. Part of that effective communication can be attributed to Geisinger’s electronic medical record which provides up-to-the-minute patient information at each step of care. That medical record also contributes to the evidence-based model that Balsamo says allows the team to gather information that will not only assist individual patients but will help doctors identify trends in the long term. Both Lynott and Balsamo say that

knowledge and skills to be an effective manager in Luzerne County. Luzerne County’s charter is designed to prevent the 11-member part-time county council from interfering in daily operations. Seven council votes are required to terminate the manager. Lawton’s background Lawton graduated in social science from Orange County Community College in New York in 1982 and worked in various positions for the New York State Assembly and Senate through 1992. After receiving a bachelor’s degree in political science from the State University of New York at New Paltz in 1992, Lawton headed to the University of Iowa to attend school and work as a research fellow and teaching assistant. He obtained a master’s degree in political science from the university in 1994. He returned to New York, working in various county and state jobs over the next decade, except for a short stint as administrator of Marinette County, Wis. In December 2004, Lawton announced he was leaving his $50,000 position as chief of staff to the chair of the 15-member Schenectady County legislature to take a $94,000 position as deputy administrator in Solano County. Local officials impressed

with an upcoming “boomeratic generation” (those 65 and older), programs such as the Geriatric Fracture Program are key to improving both the length and quality of life of older adults. By connecting patients with resources needed to expedite their recovery, future injury can be avoided. Matthews and his wife can appreciate the statistics but are mostly glad that Edwin’s future looks promising. “I am even a volunteer here at the hospital,” said Matthews, a Eucharistic minister who administers Communion to patients in their hospital room. Balsamo, putting his hand on Matthews’ shoulder, says, “That is what it’s all about.”

Rick Morelli, the only Luzerne County Council member openly acknowledging Lawton’s ranking as the top finalist, said Lawton is the “total package.” Lawton views Luzerne County’s switch to a new government as a professional opportunity and impressed the interviewing team with his approachable style and experience handling layoffs, large staffs and big budgets in other counties, Morelli said. “He was a clear front-runner from the beginning,” Morelli said.

WILKES-BARRE – People who want to quiz their elected officials will have the opportunity on Jan. 28 when the League of Women Voters WilkesBarre sponsors its annual Legislative Breakfast. Jane Manganella, coordinator, said the annual event gives guests the opportunity to share breakfast with the legislator of choice and discuss issues that impact their lives. The breakfast is followed by a panel discussion that gives further op- I F Y O U G O portunity for guests to WHAT: League of hear legislators stances on Women Voters Legisissues in their responses lative Breakfast to written questions sub- WHERE: King’s College Campus mitted through a modera- Center, Sheehy Farmtor. er Center, 3rd floor The breakfast is being WHEN: at 8:30 a.m., held on the same day and Jan. 28 at the same time as the RESERVE: By Jan. “Ready to Run” confer- 23. Tickets are $15; ence at The University of checks may be sent to: LWVWB, P.O. Box Scranton. That event is 1480, Wilkes-Barre, designed to encourage PA 18703. Reservawomen to seek elective of- tions by phone at 675-3429. fice. Luzerne County is above the norm when it comes to women holding office – four of the eight representatives in Luzerne County are women: State Sen. Lisa Baker, R-Lehman Township; and state Reps. Phyllis Mundy, D-Kingston, Karen Boback, R-Harveys Lake, and Tarah Toohil, R-Butler Township. State Sen. John Yudichak, D-Plymouth Township; and state Reps. Eddie Day Pashinski, D-Wilkes-Barre, Mike Carroll, D-Avoca, and Gerald Mullery, D-Newport Township, will also be at the event. Manganella said seating is limited and she encouraged those planning to attend to make reservations by Jan. 23.

Luzerne County Controller Walter Griffith came into work on a recent Saturday because Lawton wanted to meet him while he was in town for the interview. “I think he’s the type of guy who will walk around and be able to put his finger on the pulse pretty quick. I think he’s a self-starter who can see a problem and fix it,” Griffith said. Lawton voluntarily told him, in the interest of full disclosure, that he chose to deed his Calaveras County property back to the mortgage holder when he had to

relocate because the property lost significant value with the market decline and couldn’t be sold. Council members have privately said Lawton’s credit history was good otherwise, though the short-sale may result in a higher premium if he must be bonded for county work. Griffith credits Lawton for volunteering the information about his property. “I think that goes to the guy’s character that he was open about it up front,” he said.


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BADGES Continued from Page 3A

throughout the day. The group, ranging in age from 13 to 17, included representatives from Hazleton to Honesdale with some participants from as far away as Bloomsburg, Lancaster and Rochester, N.Y., Srebo said. Sam Levandoski, a freshman at King’s and the Scouts’ Order of the Arrow chief, said he participated in the Merit Badge College for five years. He earned badges in law, citizenship and

COOKIE Continued from Page 3A

nia, explained the rationale for the event. “We wanted to run a ‘Cookie College’ event to teach girls good business skills,” she said. “Cookie sales are not just a fundraiser.” She said that selling cookies prepares girls for a future career in the business world. “It’s really anything – social marketing, setting goals or how to run an effective sale.” Many girls go into a cookie sale with a goal. Perhaps it’s summer camp or a trip with her troop. Moore said this year, girls will be even more motivated as Girl Scouting will celebrate its 100th anniversary in March. There will be many special anniversary events, including a big one in Washington, D.C. Girl Scouts will even be selling a new anniversary cookie called “Savannah Smile.” It’s a crescentshaped crisp cookie with a hint of lemon flavor. Megan Rusonis, 12, who attends school at Lake-Lehman, explained why she came to Cookie College. “We’re coming to learn about cookies. If we sell enough cookies we can go to Washington, D.C.” Kara Martin, 12, of Sweet Valley is also a student at Lake-Lehman. And she also wants to go to the 100th anniversary celebration. “I’ve been in Girl Scouts for seven years. We’re here to reach

Indian lore among others. “(The merit college) allows them an opportunity to learn new skills that they didn’t have a chance to learn previously,” Levandoski said. “Scouts can broaden from their home troops and meet new people. It’s a great time,” he said. Suzanne McCabe, director of event services at King’s College, said the college and the Boy Scouts share similar values. Former college president the Rev. James Lackenmier, an avid Eagle Scout, realized that and agreed to allow the Boy Scouts to use the college facilities 14 years ago, which started the annual tradition, she added. our troop goal of 250 boxes per girl.” She said Samoas are her favorite Girl Scout cookie. Tagalongs are the favorite cookie of Kaleigh Shission, 12, a Wyoming Area School District student. When asked what she had learned in Cookie College, she said, “I learned how to be nice to the customers and how to sell cookies.” And the worst part of selling cookies? “If there are rude customers, it’s hard to be nice to them.” Shission, too, has big plans. “My goal is to sell as many cookies as I can so we can go on a troop trip this spring.” Moore said that her organization partnered with The University of Scranton Students in Free Enterprise club to provide business training. She also quoted the Girl Scouts of America mission statement: “Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.” She said that cookie sales fit with this. “In everything we do, we try to instill those characteristics in a girl.” And what if you have a hankering for those Thin Mints but can’t find a highly-trained Girl Scout to provide them? No worries. Girl Scout cookies have gone high tech. You can go online to www.findcookiesnow.org to find a local cookie booth or even download an app for your iPhone or Android phone at www.gshpa.org.

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McCabe said the college always appreciates an opportunity to have young students attend the college and become exposed to the collegiate life. The Scouts are very respectful of the college and are not hard to “clean up after.” Srebo lauded the college adding they are “gracious hosts” offering full use of their facilities for the students and Scout leaders while the full-time students are on break. All Scout participants achieved the rank of “1st Class” and were required to wear their full “Class A” uniform and to behave under the BSA Scout Oath and Scout Law, Srebo said.

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so to make a statement and provide a public service,” Harris said. “Unlike many men who view it as a career choice.” Harris said research shows that political women change the public policy agenda and the way government works. “Women make our democracy more inclusive and more responsive to the concerns of all citizens,” she said. Margolies will present “Making a Difference: What

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012 PAGE 7A Women Need to Know.” Her organization, Women’s Campaign International, works with political leaders, activists, advocacy groups and nonprofit partner organizations to ensure that women have an opportunity to participate in the development of public policy, and that women’s issues are placed on local, regional and national agendas. “When I was first asked to run I was working at NBC and had to give up a pretty good job,” Margolies said. “I’m awfully glad I did it – it opened areas for me that wouldn’t have been opened before.” Margolies is no longer mar-

Women from throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania who are considering running for office or who have an interest in getting involved in politics and public service are encouraged to attend.

ried to Edward Mezvinsky, the former congressman from Iowa who did jail time for bank fraud. Her son, Marc, is married to Chelsea Clinton, daughter of former President Bill Clinton and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.


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MARY JANE DAVIS, formerly of Plymouth Avenue, WilkesBarre, died January 4, 2012, in Golden Living Center. Born January 4, 1925, in Wilkes-Barre, she was the daughter of the late Jess and Mable Cunningham. She was a graduate of Meyers High School, class of 1943. She formerly worked at the Kirby Health Center, WilkesBarre, and prior to retirement, at Pennsylvania State Disability Determination Center, Wilkes-Barre. She was a member of Firwood United Methodist Church and Serve Your City Club, both of Wilkes-Barre. She was preceded in death by her husband, William D., in 1981. Surviving are sons, Glenn Davis, San Francisco; Jeff and his wife, Kathy Davis, Wilkes-Barre. Funeral was held at the convenience of the family from MamaryDurkin Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre, with interment in Hanover Green Cemetery, Hanover Township. ATTORNEY JOSEPH A. GRAZIANO, age 83, formerly of both Old Forge and Clarks Summit, passed away early Thursday morning, January 5, 2012, at the Allied Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Scranton. He is survived by his five children, four daughters, Anne and Ellen Graziano, both of Clarks Summit; Susan Graziano-Glomb and husband, Robert, of Oak Hill, Virginia; Judy Graziano-Kirk and husband, Kerry of Fairfax, Virginia, and his son, James Graziano and wife, Vanessa of Leesburg, Va.; eight grandchildren, Jennifer and Kathleen Lavelle, Sean and Patrick Graziano, Christopher and Kelsey Glomb, Caroline and Sarah Kirk. A Mass of Christian Burial was held on Saturday at St. Benedict’s Church, Newton Ransom Blvd. in Clarks Summit. OLGA R. MECCA, 88, of Old Forge, died Saturday, January 7, 2012, at Community Care Hospice, Dunmore. She was the widow of Peter A. Mecca, who died May 9, 1993. She was preceded in death by a daughter, Carol Kneller, and a sister, Rose Riccardo. She is survived by her daughter, JoAnn Mecca and her husband, Rich James;, two sons, Joseph and his wife, Mary Pat, all of Old Forge; Robert and his wife, Deborah, Scranton; four grandchildren, Vanessa and Kerie Mecca, Amy Austin, Matt Kneller; three great-grandchildren, and a son in-law, Joseph Kneller, Honesdale. The funeral will be Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. from the Louis V. Ciuccio Funeral Home, 145 Moosic Road, Old Forge, followed by a 10 a.m. Mass at the Prince of Peace Parish St. Mary’s Church, West Grace and Lawrence streets, Old Forge. Interment will be in Cathedral Cemetery. Friends may call Monday 4 to 7 p.m. JOSEPH L. CONRAD, 70, of Washington Square Apartments, formerly of South Grant Street, Wilkes-Barre, passed away on Friday, January 6, 2012 at the WilkesBarre General Hospital. Joseph’s complete obituary will be published in Monday’s edition of the newspaper. Arrangements are by the Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, Wilkes-Barre. DR. CLIFFORD WACHTEL, of Kingston, died at home, Saturday morning, January 7, 2012. Funeral arrangements are pending from the Rosenberg Funeral Chapel, 348 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre. A full obituary will appear in Monday’s edition of The Times Leader. JOSEPH SABLE (SABALESKI), of Wilkes-Barre, died Saturday, January 7, 2012, in WilkesBarre General Hospital. Funeral arrangements pending from Mamary-Durkin Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St., WilkesBarre.

FUNERALS ATKINSON – Mildred, funeral services 8:30 p.m. today in the John V. Morris - Charles J. Leagus Funeral Home, 281 E. Northampton St., Wilkes-Barre Heights. Friends may call 2 to 4 and 7 p.m. until service time. COOLBAUGH – George Sr., funeral 11 a.m. Monday in the Richard H. Disque Funeral Home Inc., 2940 Memorial Highway, Dallas. Friends may call 10 a.m. until time of service. GELATKA – Lucy, funeral 9 a.m. Monday in the Baloga Funeral Home, Inc., 1201 Main St., Pittston (Port Griffith). Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St John the Evangelist Church, Pittston. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today in the funeral home. HOYES – Gertrude, funeral services 11 a.m. Monday in the Hugh B. Hughes and Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today. OPET – Alberta, funeral services 9 a.m. Monday in the Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park Avenue, Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Nicholas Church, Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 2 to 5 p.m. today in the funeral home PATYK (PADDICK) – Eleanor, Mass of Christian Burial 10:30 a.m. Monday in All Saints Parish, Plymouth. Friends may call 10 a.m. to Mass time at 10:30 a.m. in the church.

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Charles A. ‘Chuck’ Gutierrez Sr.

Raymond W. Slovinski

January 6, 2012

January 7, 2012

harles A. “Chuck” Gutierrez Sr., 84, of Hanover Township, C passed away Friday evening at Gold-

en Living Center-Summit, WilkesBarre. He was born on August 20, 1927 in Windber, Pa. Charles proudly served in the Army Air Force during World War II. He was a former member of St. John’s Roman Catholic Church, N. Main Street, Wilkes-Barre. Charles worked for H.A. Smith Painting and later owned and operated Charles Gutierrez Painting. He was always known for his hard work and excellent craftsmanship as a master painter. He loved sports, especially swimming at Harvey Lake, playing a game of baseball or golf. Charlie was a loving husband and father. He loved spending time with the grandchildren and great grandchildren Charles was preceded in death by two sisters, Victoria Ochoa, Lucille Purkey and a brother, Gabriel. Surviving are his loving wife of 56 years, Lorraine L. (Keller) Gutierrez; a daughter, Annette Delescav-

age, Miners Mills, three sons, Anthony, Wilkes-Barre; Charles A. Jr., Wilkes-Barre; Joseph, Shavertown; seven grandchildren; six greatgrandchildren; several nieces and nephews. Private funeral services will be held from Kniffen O’Malley Funeral Home Inc., 465 S. Main Street, Wilkes-Barre. Condolences can be sent to the family at www.BestLifeTributes.com.

Hilbert (Max) Hillard January 7, 2012

ary 7, 2012 at the Hospice of the VNA inpatient unit at St. Luke’s Villa, Wilkes-Barre. Max was born in Plymouth. He was a son of the late Charles and Dora Bowman Hillard. He attended Lake-Lehman High School. Max retired from UGI after 30 years. Max enjoyed golfing and was an avid fan of the Eagles and Phillies. He was a loving husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather. Max was a member of Trucksville United Methodist Church. Preceding Max in death, besides his parents, was a nephew, Kenneth Bowman Hillard. Surviving are his wife, the former Carol Ball; sons, Lee C. Hillard and wife, Donna, Hunlock Creek; Todd Hillard, Hunlock Creek; stepdaughters, Charlene Bonitz, Tunkhannock, Becky Gumble, Trucksville, Carol Wolfe and husband, Paul, Dallas; stepsons Douglas Sands and wife, Sherry, Larksville, John Beacham, Dallas, 14 grandchildren, one great grandson; brother, Kenneth Bowman and wife, Lilia, Reidsville, North Carolina; several nieces and

atilda M. Raklewicz, age 89, of M Dallas, formerly of Harveys Lake, passed away peacefully Satur-

nephews, including Loni Zardus, Lehman Township. Funeral services will be held Wednesday, January 11, 2012 at 10 a.m. from the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main Street, Shavertown, Pa. 18708. The Rev. James Davis will officiate. Interment will be made in Chapel Lawn Memorial Park, Dallas. Friends may call Tuesday, January 10, 2012 from 4 to 7 p.m. at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations in Max’s memory may be made to the Hospice of the VNA, C/O St. Luke’s Villa, 80 E. Northampton St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702.

January 6, 2012

P. Luzetsky, 68, of RooseS tephen velt Street, Edwardsville, passed

day, January 7, 2012 at Mercy Center, Dallas. She was born in Plymouth, daughter of the late Michael and Mary Zelinsky Ragunas. A graduate of Plymouth High School, she married her high school sweetheart, the late Charles J. Raklewicz in 1943. Matilda and her husband moved to Harveys Lake, where she later became Postmaster of the Harveys Lake post office, retiring in 1988 after 25 years of service. She was an active member and Past President of the Lithuanian Woman’s Club of Wyoming Valley. Matilda was a member of Our Lady of Victory Church, Harveys Lake. A truly devoted mother and grandmother, Matilda will be sadly missed by family and all who knew her. Preceding her in death were her husband, Charles J. Raklewicz; brother, Vincent Regunas and sister, Genna Lloyd. Matilda is survived by her son, Dr. Michael C. Raklewicz, Harveys Lake; daughters, Pamela Story and her husband, Mark, of Hope, Idaho, and Suzanne Cogswell, Dallas, granddaughter, Amanda Cogswell, Los Angeles, California, and grandson, Zachary M. Raklewicz, Harveys Lake; brother, Anthony

“Champ” of Newport News, Virginia. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held Tuesday, January 10, 2012 at 10:30 a.m. in Our Lady of Victory Church, Pole 26, Harveys Lake. The Rev. Daniel A. Toomey will officiate. Interment will be made in St. Casmir’s Cemetery, Muhlenberg, Pa. Friends may call Monday, January 9, 2012 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main Street, Shavertown, PA 18708. The family would like to thank the staff of Mercy Center for their kindness and compassion to Matilda and her family during her stay with them. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in Matilda’s memory to Mercy Center, 301 Lake St., Dallas PA. 18612.

Robert Keener January 5, 2012 obert Keener, of Wilkes-Barre, passed away on Thursday eveR ning, January 5, 2012 at Hospice

ville; son, Stephen A. Luzetsky, Plymouth; daughter, Lynne LuzetskyRopietski, Edwardsville; son, Scott A. Luzetsky, Plymouth; daughter, Amanda Luzetsky, Edwardsville; grandchildren, Stephanie Ropietski, Meghan and John Campbell, Robbi Austin and Emily Romanoskey; sisters, Priscilla Snee, Seven Lakes, N.C.; Sonia Davis, Lake Monticello, Va.; Christine Sakoski, Harveys Lake; Patricia Merman, Plymouth; as well as many nieces, nephews and cousins. Funeral services will be held Monday at 6:30 p.m. from the Kopicki Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey Avenue, Kingston. Friends may call Monday from 4 to 7 p.m.

Elaine Birosik January 7, 2012 laine Birosik, 72, of Hanover Township, entered into Eternal E Rest at home on January 7, 2010.

Her husband of 50 years is Joseph Birosik. Elaine was born in Wilkes-Barre, on August 23, 1939. She was the daughter of the late Filimon and Anna Zedock Brysten. She was a graduate of Hanover High School, Class of 1956. Elaine was formerly employed by Shapiro Industries, Wilkes-Barre, and the First Eastern Bank, Wilkes-Barre. She was a faithful member of St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church, Seneca Street, Wilkes-Barre. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her brother, Filimon Brysten. Surviving, in addition to her husband Joe, are children, Donna Kimmel and her husband, Thomas, Tobyhanna, and Daniel Birosik and his wife, Brenda, Hanover Township; the love of her life, her grandchildren, Dwayne, Jon, Tyler, Kaci and Madison, and great-grandson Nathan; her twin sisters, Ann Marie Zale and her husband, John, Dickson City, and Cammy Lewis and her husband, Ray, Hanover Township;

Wilkes-Barre; granddaughter Sara Witkosky, Wilkes-Barre; sister Jean Ornoski and her husband Chuck, Plains Township, and several nieces and nephews. Raymond’s funeral will be conducted on Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. from Mark V. Yanaitis Funeral Home, 55 Stark Street, Plains Township, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Benedict Church, WilkesBarre. Interment will follow in Denison Cemetery, Swoyersville. Friends may call Monday at the funeral home, from 4 to 7 p.m. Online condolences may be sent or directions accessed at www.yanaitisfuneralhome.com.

January 7, 2012

Stephen P. Luzetsky

away January 6, 2012 in WilkesBarre General Hospital after a lengthy illness He was born in Edwardsville, son of the late Stephen and Mary Luzetski Luzetsky. Stephen was a graduate of Edwardsville High School and was a lifelong resident of Edwardsville. He was employed by Kanars and Westinghouse before retiring from Acme Warehouse. He was a member of St. Vladimir’s Church and the Russian Club, both of Edwardsville. In 1967, he married his beloved wife of 42 years, the late Carol Ann Mazzaro Luzetsky, with whom he had five loving children. Stephen was very involved with every aspect of his children’s lives. He coached Edwardsville mini football as well as Ed-Lark little league and girls’ softball for over 20 years. Stephen had a true passion for his work and his family. In addition to his wife, he was preceded in death by his brother, John Luzetsky. He is survived by his children, daughter, Lisa A. Luzetsky-Campbell and husband, John, Edwards-

J

Matilda M. Raklewicz

(Max) Hillard, age 70, of H ilbert Trucksville, passed away Janu-

her Aunt Olga Marich; and several nieces, nephews and cousins. Funeral services will be held Tuesday at 9:15 a.m. from the Simon S. Russin Funeral Home, 136 Maffett St., Plains Township, with Requiem Services at 10 a.m. in St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church, 58 Seneca St., Wilkes-Barre, with the Very Rev. Michael Lepa, officiating. Interment will follow in Maple Hill Cemetery, Hanover Township. Family and friends may call Monday from 5 to 8 p.m. A Parastas Service will be held Monday at 7:30 p.m.

Community Care, Inpatient Unit, Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre, surrounded by his loving family. Born on October 22, 1920, in Kingston, Bob was the son of the late Morgan and Bessie (Skaden) Keener. Bob was raised in Kingston and was educated in Kingston schools. A United States Army veteran, Bob proudly served his country during World War II in the EuropeanAfrican-Middle Eastern Campaign. During his time of service, Bob was awarded the Good Conduct Medal, the American Campaign Medal, the World War II Victory Medal and the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with two bronze stars. Bob was employed by the Daron Block Company for 38 years and also worked part-time with Mamary Durkin Supply Company. Through the years, Bob graciously donated a total of 12 gallons of blood to the American Red Cross. Bob first donated blood to help a friend who was in need and later donated blood to help a 9-year-old girl who had leukemia. Bob was awarded numerous times for his donations. He received a special four-gallon pin from the Reverend Thomas Cappelloni and received a plaque on March 25, 1999 from the American Red Cross for his conscientious and valuable contribution by voluntarily donating 12 gallons of blood. In the 1950s, Bob was a coach for the Saint Therese Teener League. Bob was also a past member of the Meyers Band Parents and was a devoted member of the Lake-Lehman and King’s College football clubs. Bob was a devoted fan of Notre Dame Football and the New York Yankees. On his 90th birthday, Bob received various gifts and a personalized card from the New York Yankees players and executives. In 1995, Bob proudly gave a personalized and informative speech about his experiences during World War II to his grandson’s 5th grade

Jennie (Brutski) Schraeder January 6, 2012

W. Slovinski, 83, of R aymond Wilkes-Barre, passed away Sat-

urday morning in Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township, following a brief illness. Born in Wilkes-Barre, on October 24, 1928, he was the son of the late Michael and Mary Januszko Slovinski. He was a graduate of Coughlin High School, Class of 1947, and was a lifelong resident of Wilkes-Barre. Ray took over his father’s business, which is Slovinski Plumbing and Heating, in 1962. He passed the business to his son Brian in 1992 and still remained active on everyday jobs up to just a few weeks ago. He was a dedicated member of the former St. John the Baptist Church, Wilkes-Barre, until it closed. He was preceded in death by a brother Valerian, March 24, 1952 and by a sister Loretta L. Slovinski on June 1, 2005. Ray and his beloved wife, the former Pearl Kraftician, had been married for over 40 years. Surviving, in addition to his wife Pearl, are a son Brian and his wife Ellen, Plains Township; stepsons John Witkosky, Forty Fort; David Witkosky and his wife, Bonnie,

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class. Bob will be sadly missed by his family and friends and especially by his grandson Bobby Roper, of Sweet Valley; his daughters, Kathy Keener, of Wilkes-Barre and Maureen Roper, of Sweet Valley; his nieces, Diane Lauer and Donna Polakoski; and his two sisters-in-law, Betty Schimmelbusch and Margaret Werner. In addition to his parents, Bob was preceded in death by his loving wife of 65 years, Helen (Wandell) Keener, who passed away on December 20, 2011; his brothers, Byron, Al and Harold; his sisters, Dorothy, Peg and Florence. Bob is survived by his daughters, Kathy Keener, of Wilkes-Barre and Maureen Roper and her husband, Paul, of Sweet Valley; his only grandson, Bobby Roper, of Sweet Valley, who was the pride and joy of his life; his several loving nieces and nephews. The family would like to thank Cathy Nester and her staff at Diversified Nursing for their love and support, especially his nurse Mindy; also, a thank you to Judy, Kelly and Tracey for all their years of support and caring; also, to Dr. Cynthia Solomon for all her years of care. A special thank you to his private caregiver, Elaine Randazzo, for all her years of love, dignity and respect that she had shown Bob; and another special thank you to the nurses and staff at Hospice Community Care at Geisinger South WilkesBarre. At Bob’s request, the funeral will be private and held at the convenience of the family. There will be no public calling hours. Funeral arrangements are by Jacobs Funeral Service, 47 Old River Road, Wilkes-Barre. To send the family an online message of condolence, please visit www.jacobsfuneralservice.com. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Hospice Community Care, 601 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston, PA 18704 or to a charity of the donor’s choice.

ST.M A RY’S

M O N U M EN T CO .

ennie (Brutski) Schraeder, daughter of the late Thomas and Anna Brutski, of Wanamie, passed away Friday, January 6, 2012 at John F. Kennedy Hospital in Edison, N.J. Mrs. Schraeder had resided at the home of her daughter and son-in-law, Albert and Jean Kuchinskas, in Edison, N.J., since 1996. Jennie had been employed by Christie Fashions and Leslie Fashions in Glen Lyon and Daro Manufacturing Company in Wanamie as a seamstress prior to her retirement in 1980. Jennie was preceded in death by her loving husband, Joseph, who died in 1982; brothers, Stanley, Edward and John; sisters, Martha Polakoski, Josephine Textoris and Mary Sarsony. Jennie is survived by her daughter, Jean, and son-in-law, Albert Kuchinskas; grandchildren, Deborah Loman and her husband, Richard, Monroe, N.J.; Susan Caputo and her husband, Steven, Monroe, N.J.; four greatgrandchildren, Richard and Megan Loman and Christopher and Kimberly Caputo. “Little Nana” will be greatly missed by her devoted family and special companion, Roxy, a loving bichon that has kept her company at her bedside. Funeral services for Jennie will be held on Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. from the George A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 211 West Main Street, Glen Lyon, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. in Holy Spirit Parish/St. Adalbert’s Church, Market Street, Glen Lyon. Interment will be in St. Adalbert’s Cemetery, Glen Lyon. Family and friends may call on Tuesday from 9:30 a.m. until time of service at 10:30 a.m.

Josephine Mehales January 7, 2012 Mehales, 97, formerly of J osephine White Haven, passed away Saturday morning at the Mountain City Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Hazleton. Born in Freeland, she was the daughter of the late Frank and Agatha (Bazick) Topcewski. Prior to retirement, she was a caretaker at the Luzerne County Home for the Aged. She was a member of St. Casimir’s Roman Catholic Church, Freeland. Josephine was predeceased by her parents, husband, John Mehales, who died in 1962; a daughter, Josephine Farrell; a brother, Alexander, and sisters, Laura Yanoski, Mona Reagan, Stella Nygren and Helen Waldron. She is survived by a daughter, Hermine Paulmeno and husband, Joseph, Florida, grandson and caregivers, Mr. and Mrs. Marc Wilkinson, White Haven; 16 additional grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; four great-great grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held on Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. from the McHugh-Wilczek Funeral Home, 249 Centre Street, Freeland. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. in the Immaculate Conception Parish at St. Ann’s Church, Freeland, followed by burial in St. Patrick’s Cemetery, White Haven. Family and friends may call at the funeral home on Tuesday from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. More Obituaries, Page 2A

OBITUARY POLICY The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a photograph. A funeral home representative can call the obituary desk at (570) 829-7224, send a fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail to tlobits@timesleader.com. If you fax or e-mail, please call to confirm. Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is handling arrangements, with address and phone number. We discourage handwritten notices; they incur a $15 typing fee.

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No changes for lottery winners Nanticoke family will build a garage and vacation in Hawaii with $1 million prize.

By CAMILLE FIOTI Times Leader Correspondent

NANTICOKE – “She was so pale,” 19-year-old Lauralei Stewart said, describing her mother, Ann, after confirming on her computer on New Year’s Day that her parents had just become millionaires. Ann Stewart, 51, and her husband, Richard, 57, held one of the four winning $1 million tickets from the Pennsylvania Lottery’s Dec. 31 Millionaire Raffle

POLICE BLOTTER HAZLETON – Police are investigating a break-in at a residence in the 800 block of Alter Street. A rear window was entered between 3 p.m. Dec. 24 and 3 p.m. Monday and an undetermined amount of money was taken. EDWARDSVILLE – Police Monday charged Guy David Lomascolo, 23, of Apartment 101, 1000 Roosevelt Street, with possession of drug paraphernalia. When police responded to a domestic dispute at the residence, Lomascolo told them he was on probation in Luzerne County and was wearing a tracking device on his ankle. He admitted to smoking marijuana a

drawing. The other prizes, which have yet to be claimed, were sold in Erie, Delaware County and Philadelphia. Lauralei joined her parents, brother John, 15, and other family members at the Cocoa Hut on Middle Road Saturday to receive a giant $1 million check from Thomas Blaskiewicz, deputy executive director of Retail Operations of the Pennsylvania Lottery. Ann purchased the winning ticket on Christmas Eve at the Cocoa Hut. “I was having chest pains,” said Ann of when her daughter told her the ticket was a winner. The Newport Township couple are frequent customers at

the Cocoa Hut, where they regularly purchase other Lottery game tickets. “She comes in singing all the time,” said Cocoa Hut employee Joseph Yencha, who sold Ann Stewart the winning ticket. They don’t plan on making any major changes in their lives, said Ann, a hall monitor at Greater Nanticoke Area Educational Center. She and Richard, an ironworker at McGregor Iron Works in Dunmore,

plan to use their winnings to build a garage for two Opel GTs that Richard is refurbishing. “We also want to take our kids to Hawaii this summer,” Ann said, adding that she also might also buy a new car. Cocoa Hut manager Bob Wren said the Stewart’s win is the largest in the store’s history. “We had smaller ones, but BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER this is the largest,” he said. “It’s good to see regular people Lottery winners Richard and Ann Stewart of Newport Township win.” bought their $1 million ticket at Cocoa Hut store in Nanticoke.

few times a week and retrieved a smoking device from a cabinet, police said. He was taken into custody and a detainer was issued by county adult probation. HANOVER TWP. – State police Bureau of Liquor Control Enforcement reported the following: • Statistics for December: complaints, 114; visits to license establishments, 242; age compliance checks, eight; establishments that sold alcohol to minor, three; administrative citations, 12; warnings, 13; arrest for sales without a license, two; seized 21 liters of liquor and two gallons of beer. • 5 Star Cuisine Inc., 21A Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville, was recently cited with purchase of alcohol with insufficient funds.

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

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PENGUINS HOCKEY GAME AT THE ARENA

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Lee McCracken, left, Jacob Revak, Jeremy Grivensky, and Michael Bilski, all of Troop 100, Plains Township

Geneva Maldonado, left, Sulai Malpica, Jessica Williams and Shaelyn Marx, all of Troop 50591 of Bushkill

Boy Scouts of America Northeastern Pennsylvania Council Scout Executive Marcel Cinquina, left, and event adviser David Srebro

Sabrina Keller, left, Ashley Rivera and Alyssa Wetklow, all of Troop 50591 of Bushkill

AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Jake Trumbower, 9, left, Hunter Burke and Nick Zaboski

Jack, 9, left, and Billy Luke, 10

Kevin Wascavage of Troop 60, Mountain Top, left, Julian Welsch of Troop 55, Wilkes-Barre and Donavan Darienzo of Troop 34, Jessup

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C.J. Whispell, left, and Danny Williams, both of Troop 444, Sweet Valley

Emma Oley, left, Mikayla Reynolds and Kaleigh Shission, all of Troop 33902 of Swoyersville

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That decline has provided little relief to the Public Defender’s Office, which had a caseload of more than 5,000 criminal cases the past two years, on top of Continued from Page 1A thousands of associated hearduce what Flora says is an exces- ings that are not counted in casesive caseload that’s threatening load figures, Flora said Data complied by Flora show the office’s ability to provide effective representation to clients. the average caseload of the 11 Excessive caseload and lack of part-time attorneys who handled oversight were cited as contrib- adult cases the entire year in utors to the juvenile justice scan- 2011 was 244 cases (excluding dal that surfaced in 2009, leading those who handled only homito the convictions of thousands cides). One part-time attorney handled 311 of juveniles being cases. The five overturned. “When the office full-time attor“When the office neys dedicated falters or makes a falters or makes a to criminal court mistake and peo- mistake and peoaveraged 259 ple’s rights are violated, that’s when ple’s rights are vio- cases. Caseloads for you get elected offi- lated, that’s when full-time attorcials screaming to you get elected of- neys are closer to high heaven, ‘How standard. did this happen?’ ” ficials screaming to the Flora noted the Flora said. “We’ve high heaven, ‘How figures do not inalready had a major clude numerous problem. I’m trying did this happen?’ to prevent another.” We’ve already had a other hearings the full-time atPast and current torneys handle, county officials major problem. I’m including for have acknowledged trying to prevent bail, warrants there are staffing and extradition. shortages within another.” Starting in the Public DefendAl Flora er’s Office, but they Chief public defender 2010, attorneys took on the addsay Flora cannot ed burden of filreasonably expect the county to meet the standard ing their own appeals with the he is seeking. The District Attor- state Superior Court, which is a ney’s Ooffice also is facing chal- complex, labor-intensive process, Flora said. That job had prelenges. Flora said he wants the county viously been handled by Flora to come in compliance with until he took over as chief. The workload has left attorAmerican Bar Association standards, which say a full-time attor- neys little time to spend with ney should handle no more than their clients and to investigate 150 felony or 400 misdemeanor their cases, Flora said. In many cases. A part-time attorney instances, attorneys do not meet should handle half of that -- 75 fe- with the client until the preliminary hearing. lonies or 200 misdemeanors. He’s resorted to giving attorFlora offers data neys photos of the clients so they Statistics compiled by the Ad- can recognize them, he said. “The constitutional mandate ministrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts show that the number is not to provide a warm body in of criminal filings in Luzerne the courtroom. It is to provide efCounty court has decreased the fective assistance of counsel,” past few years, declining from a Flora said. “If I have a client and high of 7,774 cases in 2007 to the first time I’m meeting them 6,213 in 2010 – a 20 percent re- is at the preliminary hearing, what kind of representation am I duction.

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THE TIMES LEADER Secretaries for the Luzerne County Public Defender’s Office, Donna Million and Diane Sikorski, at their work stations. Chief Public Defender Al Flora says a heavy caseload for his office was behind his recent policy of limiting the types of cases the office will handle. He is looking for the county to increase staffing as government reorganizes along new lines in 2012 following the switch to home rule

DEFENDER

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can’t handle it any more,’ ” Carroll said. Carroll said the situation is particularly troublesome in Pennsylvania, where a recent report by an independent state task force highlighted numerous problems within the state’s indigent defense system. The report by the Joint State Government Commission said excessive caseloads and lack of training have seriously undermined the ability of public defender offices to effectively represent clients. “In many of Pennsylvania’s counties, the most brilliant and accomplished lawyer could not provide adequate representation because he or she simply would not have the time and resources needed to mount a constitutionally adequate defense,” the report said. Prosecutors get pinched Scott Burns, executive director of the National District Attorneys Association, said prosecutors nationwide also face significant challenges. “From our side we’ve dealt with prosecutors whose caseloads, frankly, are ridiculous,” Burns said. “They’ve seen their budgets slashed, yet prosecu-

tors’ offices are called upon to continue at the same level.” Burns noted district attorney offices are responsible for every single case that comes through court, whereas the public defenders represent only the portion of defendants who can’t afford private counsel. And much of the work performed by prosecutors doesn’t show up in caseload statistics. “Let’s say a prosecutor handled 500 cases last year. He also screened another 500 that he had to look at the police report, the evidence, call the officer, meet the victim … and then he decides it does not meet the standard of probable cause and declines to prosecute,” Burns said. “That doesn’t get weighed in the statistics.” As more public defenders refuse cases, prosecutors and judges have begun to question whether the standards they use to justify their positions are realistic. That’s led to legal battles in several states, including Missouri, where the state Supreme Court is considering whether a caseload limit imposed by that state’s Public Defender Commission is reasonable. The outcome of that case, involving Jared Blacksher, could have ramifications for Luzerne County as it goes to heart of the issue of whether a judge can override a public defender’s

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

giving that client?” County finances an issue Luzerne County Council Chairman Jim Bobeck, an attorney, said he agrees the Public Defender’s Office needs additional help. But he questioned if the ABA standards are realistic given the county’s financial condition. In order to meet ABA standards, the county would have to hire an additional 8.5 attorneys, according to a report issued last month by the Joint State Government Commission, a task force created by legislators to evaluate the indigent defense system in the state. “I think those standards are a model, but at this point, an unattainable model,” Bobeck said. First Assistant District Attorney Sam Sanguedolce said he also understands Flora’s frustrations, but prosecutors face challenges as well. Caseloads of individual prosecutors were not available. On average he said each assistant district attorney handles 70 to 150 cases a month on the trial list. That does not include multiple other cases they are working that are not yet trial ready. “I’m not surprised to learn (public defenders) are overburdened. I know it’s difficult to prepare for a case from a prosecutor’s perspective. I assume it’s just as difficult from the defense side. If you have 30 or 40 cases a month to get ready for a trial, it’s

very burdensome,” Sanguedolce said. Flora said he doesn’t expect the county to fulfill his staffing requests all at once. He’s proposing a several-year plan over which staff would gradually be hired. His concern, he said, is the new county council will do nothing. That’s not acceptable, Flora said. He’s prepared to keep the case limits in place until he feels caseloads have reached a reasonable level. Attorneys weigh in Several attorneys in the office said they don’t believe they’ve been ineffective in any case, but caseloads are becoming too much to handle. Ed Olexa has been a part-time public defender for two years. His caseload jumped from 215 in 2010 to 258 last year. Olexa handles the Hazleton area. He said roughly 50 percent of the cases are felonies. He also has a private practice and is finding it increasingly difficult to represent public defender clients. “For the number of hours I’m contracted to work, if you divide the number of cases I have, I have nine minutes per week per client,” Olexa said. Flora said attorneys in the office do the best they can, and many work well beyond the 1,000 hours they are paid for. Michael Kostelaba, who han-

load of the attorneys. A special master appointed to review the standard gave a mixed review, Kelly said. “He said it’s not inaccurate, but he’s not sure if it’s accurate enough to justify the problems it causes to the rest of the justice system,” Kelly said. Kelly acknowledged that refusing cases creates a quagmire for the court, but she contends that’s not the issue. “The point we’re trying to make is it’s not a question about Quantifying workload the rest of the system. It’s not OK to say we don’t want to inCat Kelly, director of the Misconvenience anyone else, so let’s souri Public Defender Commission, said each public defender’s continue to force poor people to settle for a body beside them office in the state assigns a nuinstead of lawyer because the meric value to each case that sky will fall if we comply with reflects the average number of attorney hours it requires based the constitution.” In Luzerne County, Flora on its complexity. A felony case will be assigned based his decision on American more hours than a misdemeanor, Bar Association standards, for example. Once the office hits which say a defense attorney should handle no more than 150 a maximum number of hours felony or 400 misdemeanor each month, it refuses to accept any new cases, regardless of the cases in a year. Statistics in his office show attorneys, particularcharges against the defendant. ly those who are part-time, are “We established an average handling well above that stannumber of hours we expect a dard. case to take based on national The Joint State Government standards and experience. We Commission Report reviewed measure how many case hours data from Luzerne County and come in the door against the determined the Public Defendnumber of attorney hours availer’s Office needs an additional able,” she said. 8.5 attorneys to meet the ABA But prosecutors have quesstandard. tioned whether that methodolBurns has not reviewed the ogy accurately reflects the work-

decision to turn down a case. Blacksher was charged with theft and sought representation from the public defender’s office that covers Christian County, Missouri. He was denied, even though he met financial eligibility, because the office had hit a maximum caseload for the month in which he applied. A judge, over the objections of the public defender, ordered the office to represent Blacksher anyway.

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Public Defender Caseloads American Bar Association standard for full-time public defenders is 150 felonies or 400 misdemeanors per attorney per year. Data provided by the Luzerne County Public Defenders office suggests nearly all attorneys exceed those standards. Attorney Cases Handled Part-Time 2010 2011 Diff. Jonathan Blum 205 193 -12 Mark Clinton** 150 17 -Thomas Cometa 273 311 38 Demetrius Fannick* 0 4 4 Steven Greenwald 264 254 -10 Michael Kostelaba 330 269 -61 Girard Mecadon 260 268 8 Christopher O'Donnell 265 202 -63 Ed Olexa 215 258 43 William Ruzzo* 6 7 1 Joseph Saporito 258 243 -15 John Sobota 205 246 41 Ferris Webby 255 245 -10 Joseph Yeager 265 198 -67 Part-time total 2,951 2,715 -236 Part-time average 245 244 -1 *Handles only homicides, excluded from averages **Clinton resigned April 2011, excluded from 2011 average Full-time 2010 2011 Diff. Dannielle Bruno* 0 55 55 John Donovan 238 289 51 Charles Ross 255 257 2 Mark Singer 230 284 54 Joseph Sklarosky Jr 248 206 -42 Cheryl Sobeski-Reedy** 15 0 Jonathan Ursiak 250 259 9 Full-time totals 1,242 1,306 64 Full-time average 248.4 259 10.6 *Bruno was hired Sept. 2011, excluded from averages **Sobeski-Reedy moved to juvenile cases March 2010, excluded from averages Total PT & FT From prior year Grand Total

4,187 4,065 1,350 1,475 5,537 5,540

Mark Guydish/The Times Leader

Flora said he understands he faces a tough challenge in convincing the county council to increase staffing given the lack of public support for indigent defense. “The public looks at the Public Defender’s Office as we represent the scumbags of the world, why would we want to give them money?” Flora said. “If you don’t believe in the Constitution, then shut the office down. This is not mob rule.”

agency of the Public Defender’s Office to determine how many people are needed to ensure the office can operate effectively. That decision will ultimately be up to the county manager, who has not yet been named. Measuring workloads “We need to look at a compariDetermining how many cases son with other counties and come to an agreement on how an individual attorney should many people get hired for the handle is far more complicated, Burns said, due to differences in office,” Bobeck said. Flora did his own survey in the complexity of each case and 2010, comparing his office, other factors. They include: court scheduling, the number of which has a full-time equivalent of 15.5 attorneys, to public demagisterial districts that must fender offices in four other third be covered and number of misclass counties with similar popcellaneous hearings they must ulations and criminal caseloads: attend. Berks, York, Dauphin and Lan“It’s a complicated issue. caster: There are a lot of things that Berks County had 24 full-time need to be weighed in determining how hard people work, what attorneys; York, 19 full-time; Dauphin, 23 full-time and Lanthe caseload is and what is reacaster, 25 full-time and two sonable,” Burns said. part-time. Because of the many variaLuzerne County also has bles, there can be no bright line rule to follow, he said. Each state fewer support staff, such as and county must do an individu- secretaries and investigators. Luzerne has six support staff, al assessment of the specific circumstances in deciding what compared to 10 to 13 in each of the other four counties Flora is, or is not, a reasonable casesurveyed. load for public defenders and Flora said he hopes to amicaprosecutors. bly resolve his staffing issues Flora said he would welcome an independent evaluation of his with the new county council, but he said he is prepared to go to department – an idea that’s court if necessary. supported by county council “I am not going to sit by and Chairman Jim Bobeck. Bobeck said he’d like to see an see our office flounder under my watch,” he said. efficiency study by an outside Pennsylvania report and could not say if it’s an accurate reflection of the situation in Luzerne County. Speaking generally, he said numbers alone don’t tell the whole story.

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dled 269 cases in 2011, said he routinely works on weekends and into the early morning hours to handle all his cases, without added compensation. Kostelaba said he does it because he loves the work. But he acknowledges, it’s starting to wear on him. “You can do a two-minute drill for two minutes, but you can’t do it for two years,” he said. Ferris Webby, a 30-year veteran of the office, said he’s also been pushed to his limits. “I’ve never seen it this bad,” Webby said. “It’s coming to a point, and we’re very close to it, that it is going to collapse. I don’t want to be here when that happens.” And things are going to get worse now that Joseph Sklarosky Jr., a full-time public defender, left the office to assume a judgeship on the Luzerne County Court. Flora said he has not been told yet whether he will be permitted to hire a replacement for Sklarosky. Interim county manager Tom Pribula said he doesn’t believe that’s going to be an issue because Sklarosky’s position was included in the 2012 budget. Even if he gets permission to hire a replacement, Flora said the office will be struggling because the new attorney isn’t likely to have the extensive experience of Sklarosky, who worked for the office for 15 years. The new attorney’s caseload will have to be significantly less.

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

TOM MOONEY REMEMBER WHEN

Memories of a more practical way of living

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was nice, but I would really like to visit France or Italy. The food and art would be the inspiration for traveling to those places. We loved visiting New York. There’s so much going on when you turn each corner in the Big Apple. You never know what the next neighborhood is going to bring. What keeps you busy outside of work? “My daughter plays field hockey for Dallas High School and I am joining others in trying to get the playing field in shape due to some damage by construction that took place last year.” First car you owned? “It was a 1976 blue Chevette. It was my ‘Vette’.” What is your finest moment through the years? “I would definitely have to say when we hit our 25th anniversary. It was a high point that signified we had really made it as a successful business. I remember being nervous even after our first 10 years. Twenty five years felt great, like we really did it.

waved to my buddy Alner as I spotted him putting out bundles of newspapers for recycling day. He’s a good environmentalist, but what he said next started me thinking. “If people had begun doing this 100 years ago we wouldn’t be in such dire straits,” he said.” I nodded and smiled. “Alner, old friend, it’s great that you’re recycling, but we folks of 2012 can still learn a few things.” “Yeah?” he said. Well, to make a long story short, within a few moments we were taking a little walk down a street in Wyoming Valley back in 1948, courtesy of my powers of metaphysical travel. It’s a handy thing to have. We no sooner arrived when a small truck pulled up to the curb next to us and out jumped a uniformed man with two wire carriers holding glass bottles of milk. Alner watched, transfixed, as the milkman went up to one porch after another, dropping off a quart or two, and picking up the empties. “I can’t believe it,” said Alner. “We toss cardboard cartons in the trash.” I flashed him a knowing grin. “That’s how they manage free garbage collection. Their soda’s in glass bottles too. Just think, everybody recycles and the word hasn’t even been invented yet.” “Beep beep,” came a youthful voice. “Hush, Bobby, you mustn’t be so rude,” said a mother to her child as they walked past us, pulling a coaster wagon containing two cardboard boxes of groceries. Waiting until the folks were out of earshot (mustn’t betray us as time travelers), I said “There’s shopping day, 1948 style. Folks go down to the neighborhood market and load up the week’s order in the kid’s wagon. Not a teaspoon of gasoline is used.” Alner couldn’t take his eyes off them. “Where do they get the boxes?” he asked. “Stores hang onto them when their stock comes in,” I replied. “The plastic bag that takes forever to disintegrate is a couple of decades in the ‘enlightened’ future.” A passerby carrying a black device strapped to his back nodded to us. “What’s that contraption?” asked Alner. The man walked onto a nearby front porch, where a woman holding a scissors and some knives beckoned to him. Unstrapping the device from his back, he turned a crank and a raspy sound came from the machine. “That’s the scissors grinder,” I said. “He’ll sharpen your knives, scissors ��� anything you need to cut with, so — you don’t have to throw them out.” Alner sighed. “OK, I get it. That’s how my grandmother always kept the cutlery she was given as a wedding present.” I nodded. “You’re catching on. You know, if we were here in the winter we’d see a guy coming around to pick up tubs of ashes from the coal furnaces. They’re thrown on icy roads.” Just then a horn sounded. “Look, down the street,” I said. “That guy in the horse-drawn wagon is the ragman. He’ll take any old fabric you’ll give him and turn it into cleaning cloths or who knows what else. He announces he’s here by blowing a little paper horn, a neat tradition.” “I’ve been tossing my old shirts in the trash,” said Alner in a subdued voice. Alner looked at the guy in the wagon and gave a thumbs-up. The ragman answered back — with a little toot on his horn.

John Gordon writes about area people for the Meet feature. Reach him at 970-7229.

Tom Mooney is a Times Leader columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.

MCT PHOTOS

Ava Weaver, front left, 5, skips with her cousin Lakeisha Stauffer, front right, 5, while out for a walk with Stauffer sisters (back left) Lanita, 10, Autumn Rose, 15, and Karla, 13.

BRIDGING WORLDS African-American children nagivate Mennonite culture By CAROLYN DAVIS The Philadelphia Inquirer

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HILADELPHIA — Janelle and Jasmine Newswanger lead simple, contented lives in one of Pennsylvania’s Mennonite communities. The 17-year-old twins drive a horse-drawn buggy, wear long dresses and white head coverings, and see their friends at church on Sundays. Done with education at 14, after finishing eighth grade, Jasmine works as a teacher’s aide, and Janelle helps her mother around the house, They are among about 100 speaking Pennsylvania Dutch and English. children, most of them The girls blend in with the people in their lives, set apart in only black, born to women who one way. Janelle and Jasmine are African were incarcerated at PennAmerican. They are among about 100 chilsylvania prisons and sent dren, most of them black, born to by their mothers to Mennowomen who were incarcerated at Pennsylvania prisons and sent by nite foster families in Centheir mothers to Mennonite foster families in Central Pennsylvania tral Pennsylvania as part of as part of an informal caretaking program. About 29 remain in an informal caretaking Mennonite homes. The children navigate two program. About 29 remain worlds as they grow up in white insular cultures. in Mennonite homes. Some, like Janelle and Jasmine, have been with Mennonite families for years and ultimately adopted. Others continue in a temporary status as their birth mothers struggle with addiction, the law, and their parenting roles. These young lives upend and bend notions of community, family, identity — and what makes a happy, healthy childhood when birth parents are unavail-

Above: Autumn Stauffer, right, explains to her daughter Lanita, 10, that the stain on her hand as a result of playing with walnut shells will wear off, as brothers Rolando, left, 6, and Malachi, center, 8. Stauffer, a black Mennonite in Shippensburg, Pa., is raising five children she had with her white husband and three adopted children of color. Left: Justin Stauffer, 38, is married to Autumn, and the father of their children in a mixed race Mennonite family in Shippensburg, Pa.

See MENNONITE, Page 7B

MEET RALPH DELPRIORE BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

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alph DelPriore is the owner of the Dough Company on Kidder Street in Wilkes-Barre. DelPriore, 57, is a graduate of Wyoming Area High School and Wilkes University where he received a degree in biology. He and his wife, Carla, have a son, James, 17, and daughter, Isabella, 14. They also have a 5year-old Bichon dog named Baci. They live in Dallas.

You said that you did not see yourself going into your field of study, biology, after college. What was it about the restaurant business that enticed you? “My parents and my aunt and uncle owned Grico’s restaurant in Exeter. I used to bus tables and help with food preparations and cleanup when I was growing up. After college I was at that age where I was looking for something to do. The restaurant business just called me back.” You also mentioned that if not for the restaurant industry you may have been a teacher like your four sisters. Do you find satisfaction in being a mentor to new employees at the Dough Company? “There are so many aspects in this field that people do not see. The teaching of individuals that come in here gives me a great sense of pride as does being host to the loyal customers and guests that frequent the establishment. It makes me feel really good that people like what my staff and I are doing. Part of that is the

menu development that takes place in order to ensure a broad range of items that people will enjoy.” Speaking of your menu, what are some of your personal favorites that you might recommend? “Pizza! I love our pizza. Anchovies are the official topping of our family. So if you like them like my sisters and I do, they compliment the pizza greatly. As for our pasta, I would suggest the lasagna.” What foods do you keep in your fridge at home? “We usually have pizza and spaghetti sauce and maybe wine at times.” So when you have a nice bottle of wine uncorked and you are relaxing in front of the television or stereo, what’s playing? “I like the classics like “Casablanca” and “Annie Hall.” As far as regular television shows go, my wife and I enjoy “Modern Family.” We both like David Bowie in the CD player. Beyond the realm that is your living room and the Dough Company, where would you like to visit in the United States or abroad? Where have you visited? “We went to Hawaii on our honeymoon and that


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eighann Burke and Joseph F. Molinaro Jr. are happy to anL nounce their engagement and

upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of James J. Burke Sr., Mountain Top, and Colleen R. Burke, Wilkes-Barre. She is the granddaughter of the late Eugene A. and Dorothy Burke and Leon S. and Ruth L. Kennedy, WilkesBarre. She is a 1997 graduate of Hazleton Area High School and graduated magna cum laude from Luzerne County Community College, earning her Associate in Science Elementary Education degree. She is studying early childhood and elementary education at Bloomsburg University and will graduate in May, 2012. The prospective groom is the grandson of the late Frank “Pops” and Theresa “Nan” Molinaro, Hazleton. He is a 1982 graduate of Hazleton Area High School and the owner and operator of Underground Tattoo Shop, Hazleton. Together, the couple also manages and performs in the band Y.M.I. and the acoustic duo Y.M.I.aDUO. The couple will exchange vows in August of 2012.

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ricia A. Cooper and Joseph M. Sack, together with their families, announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Robert and Nancy Cooper, Plymouth. She is the granddaughter of Elizabeth Cooper and the late Robert Cooper and the late Edward and Rosina Maxwell, all of Plymouth. The prospective groom is the son of Joseph and Denise Sack, Hanover Township. He is the grandson of the late Norman and Irene Bugay, Wilkes-Barre Township, and Natalie Sack and the late Joseph Sack, WilkesBarre. Tricia is a 2005 graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School and earned an associate’s degree at Luzerne County Community College. Tricia is employed by Wyoming Valley Health Care, Wilkes-Barre. Joseph is a 2004 graduate of Hanover Area High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Penn State. He is employed by Crawford Technical Services, Hershey. The couple will exchange vows and have their reception Sept. 22, 2012, at the Stroudsmoor Country Inn, Stroudsburg.

aclyn Doyle and Brian Kelly, together with their families, Jannounce their engagement and

upcoming wedding. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Jack and Joanne Doyle, Havertown. She is the granddaughter of the late Joseph and Mary Natoli and Thomas Doyle and the late Mary Doyle, all of Philadelphia. The prospective groom is the son of Bill and Betty Jane Barrett, Wilkes-Barre, and Jack and Cheri Kelly, Kingston. He is the grandson of the late Nicholas and Bess Spagnola, Wilkes-Barre, and the late Jack and Rosemary Kelly. Jaclyn is a 2003 graduate of Cardinal O’Hara High School, Springfield. She earned her bachelor’s degree in history with a minor in accounting from the University of Scranton in 2007 and her master’s degree in accounting in 2009 from the University of Virginia. She is employed by Liberty Property Trust, Malvern, as a financial analyst and certified public accountant. Brian is 2003 graduate of Bishop Hoban High School, WilkesBarre. He earned a bachelor’s degree in computer information systems from the University of Scranton in 2007 and earned his master’s degree in information technology in 2010 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He is employed as a systems engineer by Lockheed Martin Corp., King of Prussia. The couple will exchange wedding vows on Aug. 25, 2012, in St. Pius X Church, Broomall.

THE TIMES LEADER

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llison Nicole Estright, Pittsburgh, and Joseph Stanley Bednash, Dallas, are engaged to be married. Miss Estright is the daughter of Brian and Catherine Estright, Hollidaysburg. The bride-to-be is a 2004 graduate of Hollidaysburg Area Senior High School and a 2008 graduate of Juniata College, Huntington. She is employed at Family Foundations Early Head Start, Pittsburgh. Joseph is the son of Stanley and Sheryl Bednash, Dallas. He is a 2004 graduate of Dallas High School and a 2007 graduate of the University of Pittsburgh. He is pursuing a degree in medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. A June 16, 2012, wedding is being planned at Our Lady of Victory Catholic Church, State College.

Grasso and Steven Gaa, toA pril gether with their parents, an-

nounce their engagement and upcoming marriage. April is the daughter of Diane and Angelo Grasso, Swoyersville. She is the granddaughter of Mary Grasso and the late Angelo Grasso Sr., both of Dallas, and Mary Lushefski and the late Edmund Lushefski, both of Plymouth. April is a graduate of Wyoming Valley West High School and earned her bachelor’s degree in communication studies from East Stroudsburg University in 2006. She recently earned her master’s degree in communication arts at Marywood University and is working as a freelance production artist for Poor Richards Promos, Dickson City. Steven is the son of William and Mary Gaa, Matamoras. He is the grandson of Peg Gaa and the late Bob Gaa, both of Old Saybrook, Conn., and the late John and Dorothy Walsh, Fitchburg, Mass. Steven is a graduate of Delaware Valley High School and earned his bachelor’s degree in computer and information systems from Bloomsburg University. He is employed as a software engineer at GfK Healthcare, East Hanover, N.J. The couple will exchange vows Sept. 21, 2012, in Dalton.

s. Rosann Hanson and Mr. M Mark Hanson of Wapwallopen, Pa., announce the engage-

ment of their daughter, Kimberly Ann Hanson, to Jason Edward Davidek, son of Ms. Sharon Cochran and Mr. Terrence Davidek, Fawn Township, Pa. The bride-to-be graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science and economics and a Master of Education degree in administration and policy studies. Kim is active in many political and civic organizations, most recently serving as member of the Pittsburgh Urban Magnet Project Board of Directors. Kim works for Direct Energy Business, LLC, where she is responsible for managing a legal team that prepares business contracts for a host of businesses throughout the country. The prospective groom earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science from Penn State University and a master’s degree in public policy and management from the University of Pittsburgh. He works as the director of public relations and transportation for the South Butler County School District. He has also served as a township supervisor in Fawn Township since 2003. A September 2012 wedding is planned.

Kimball, Marusak oanne Kimball and William JtheirFrank Marusak, together with families, announce their

engagement and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Debbie Wolfe, Nanticoke, and the late Larry Kimball. The prospective groom is the son of John and Sheila Marusak, Nanticoke. Joanne and William are both graduates of Greater Nanticoke Area High School, Nanticoke. Joanne is employed as a jewelry specialist at JCPenney, Wilkes-Barre. She is also pursuing her dream in the nursing field. William is employed by Meier Supply, Wilkes-Barre, and a 12year veteran of the 109th, having served in Iraq. They are both members of the Honey Pot Active Fire Department. The couple will exchange vows in the presence of family and friends on March 3, 2012, at the First United Methodist Church, Nanticoke.

r. and Mrs. Joseph Garlan are pleased to announce the M engagement of their daughter,

Leah, to James Fahy of Medford, N.J. Leah is a graduate of Dallas High School. She earned her Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Life University in Marietta, Ga., and a Masters of Acupuncture from The Won Institute of Graduate Studies. Leah owns and practices at the Pennridge Wellness Center in Bucks County. James earned his Juris Doctor degree from Widener Law School in Wilmington, Del. He is employed by LexisNexis.

r. and Mrs. James Stachowiak, Bear Creek, announce M the engagement of their daugh-

ichael Loughlin and Rena M Rosenblum, together with their families, announce their

Gaa, Grasso

Garlan, Fahy

Stachowiak, Williams

Loughlin, Rosenblum

Davidek, Hanson

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engagement and upcoming marriage. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Jeffrey and Magnolia Rosenblum, New Rochelle, N.Y. She is the granddaughter of Ruth Rosenblum, Miami Beach, Fla.; the late Lawrence Rosenblum; and the late Arturo and Melida Jaramillo, Cali, Colombia. Rena is a 2005 graduate of New Rochelle High School, New York. She earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Haverford College in 2009. Rena is pursuing a master’s degree in community counseling at the University of Scranton. She is employed as an accounts payable clerk at United One Resources. The prospective groom is the son of William and Mary Loughlin, Plymouth. He is the grandson of the late John and Bernadine Mooney, Plymouth, and the late Lewis and Margaret Loughlin, Kingston. Michael is a 1998 graduate of Bishop O’Reilly High School, Kingston. He attended Penn State University and earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education at Bloomsburg University. He is employed as a therapeutic staff support worker at Children’s Service Center. Rena and Mike are both actively involved with the Epilepsy Foundation of Eastern Pennsylvania, where they met as volunteer counselors at Camp Achieve, a camp for children with epilepsy. The couple will exchange vows in June of 2012.

ter, Brianna Stachowiak, to Brian Williams, son of Benjamin Williams, Warrior Run, and Margaret Williams, Wilkes-Barre. The bride-to-be recently graduated from Luzerne County Community College with a degree in court reporting. The prospective groom earned an associate’s degree in business management from Luzerne County Community College and a bachelor’s degree in organizational management from Ashford University. He is employed at Travelocity. A September 2012 wedding is planned and the couple will live in Wilkes-Barre.

Anna Maslowski to celebrate 100th birthday nna Maslowski A of Plymouth will observe her

100th birthday on Jan. 15, 2012. Anna is in good health and enjoys hearing from friends and family. Her husband Anthony B. Maslowski died in 1985. Anna was employed in her early years by Atwater Throwing Company and later by Heavenly Shoe Company. She was a member of the Charles T. Adams Senior Citizens Club in Wilkes-Barre, where she crocheted and helped to serve meals. She is a member of the former St. Casimir Church in Lyndwood, now St. Robert Bellarmine. Anna has three children, seven grandchildren and eight greatgrandchildren who she adores.

SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES The Times Leader allows you to decide how your wedding notice reads, with a few caveats. Wedding announcements run in Sunday’s People section, with black-and-white photos, free of charge. Articles must be limited to 220 words, and we reserve the right to edit announcements that exceed that word count. Announcements

must be typed or submitted via www.timesleader.com. (Click on the "people" tab, then “weddings” and follow the instructions from there.) Submissions must include a daytime contact phone number and must be received within 10 months of the wedding date. We do not run first-year anniversary announcements or announcements of weddings that took place more than a year ago. (Wedding

photographers often can supply you with a black-and-white proof in advance of other album photographs.) All other social announcements must be typed and include a daytime contact phone number. Announcements of births at local hospitals are submitted by hospitals and published on Sundays.

Out-of-town announcements with local connections also are accepted. Photos are only accepted with baptism, dedication or other religious-ceremony announcements but not birth announcements. Engagement announcements must be submitted at least one month before the wedding date to guarantee publication and must include the wedding date. We

cannot publish engagement announcements once the wedding has taken place. Anniversary photographs are published free of charge at the 10th wedding anniversary and subsequent five-year milestones. Other anniversaries will be published, as space allows, without photographs.

Drop off articles at the Times Leader or mail to: The Times Leader People Section 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Questions can be directed to Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or e-mailed to people@timesleader.com.


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Chmarney, Hawke icole Anne Chmarney and Carson David Hawke were N united in marriage on Aug. 26,

2011, by a close family friend the Rev. Jack Lambert at Our Lady of Victory, Harveys Lake, Pa. The bride is the daughter of David and Christine Chmarney, Dallas, Pa. She is the granddaughter of Christine Klug and the late Paul Klug, Dallas, Pa., and the late Michael and Mary Chmarney, Port Blanchard, Pa. The groom is the son of Timothy and Sharon Hawke, Tunkhannock, Pa. He is the grandson of the late Clifford and Jeanne Miller Hawke, Trucksville, Pa., and the late Jerome Gilgallon and MaryLou Downend, Clarks Summit, Pa. The bride is a 2001 graduate of Bishop O’Reilly High School and a 2005 graduate of King’s College, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration. She earned her master’s degree in business administration from Wilkes University in 2009. She is the director of recruitment at CareGivers America, Clarks Summit, Pa. The groom is a 1999 graduate of Tunkhannock High School and a 2003 graduate of Penn State University, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration and marketing. He is the director of AEC Services at Huntsville Executive Search, Dallas, Pa. The bride was escorted down the aisle by her father and given away by her parents. She chose her cousin, Lindsay Busch, as her maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Mana Chmarney, sister in-law of the bride; Angelina Scarano, friend of the bride; Laurie Hoyt, sister of the groom; and Corrine Klug, cousin of the bride. The groom chose his best friend, Philip McCarthy, as his best man. Groomsmen were Ryan McGrady, Mark Frisco, Brian Woods, and Jason Kuzma, all friends of the groom. Scripture readings were given by Mary Busch, aunt of the bride, and Ryan Klug, cousin of the bride. Prayer of the faithful was given by Tim Rogers, cousin of the groom. The bride was showered on June 5, 2011, at Bistro Bistro, Kingston, Pa. by family and friends, hosted by the bride’s family. A rehearsal dinner was hosted by the parents of the groom at Irem Country Club, Dallas, Pa. An evening reception was held at The Newberries, Dallas, Pa. The couple honeymooned in the Bahamas. They reside in Centermoreland, Pa.

BIRTHS Nesbitt Women’s & Children’s Center at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital Swallick, Gloria and Chris, Mountain Top, a son, Dec. 20. Howells, Kendra and Robert Smith Jr., Nanticoke, a daughter, Dec. 20. Nardone, Kristen and Joe, Pittston, a daughter, Dec. 21. Roberts, Ranee J. and James J. Henderson, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Dec. 22.

olleen Celeste Connell and Adam Christopher Kerchner were united in marriage Sept. 10, 2011, in St. John the Baptist RC Church, New Freedom, Pa., by the Rev. Deacon Michael Bahn. Colleen is the daughter of Dan and Ann Redding Connell, New Freedom. She is the granddaughter of the late Joseph “Cork” and Jean Redding and Michael and Helen Connell, all of Pittston. Adam is the son of Alan and Joan Kerchner, Glen Rock, Pa. Bridget Connell, sister of the bride, was the maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Heather Karstetter, sister of the bride; Catie Flaherty, cousin of the bride; and Nilam Trivedi and Jamie Oberlin, friends of the bride. Delaney Bowles, cousin of the groom was the flower girl. Mark Rill was the best man and groomsmen were Howard Snow, Cameron Sterner, Jarad Spence and Andrew Lander, all friends of the groom. Ring bearers were Tanner and Hunter Jackson, nephews of the bride. The evening reception was held at the Crowne Plaza, Timonium, Md. Colleen and Adam both graduated from Susquehannock High School, Glen Rock, Pa. Colleen is a 2005 graduate from Penn State University. She is an account manager at Enterprise Holdings. Adam is an IT specialist at Southern York County School District. The couple honeymooned on a cruise and reside in Glen Rock, Pa.

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The Litchkowskis aul and Angela Litchkowski, Jacksonville, Fla., formerly of P Nanticoke, are celebrating their

40th wedding anniversary today, Jan. 8. The couple was married at St. Francis Church, Nanticoke, by the Rev. Ralph Ferraldo. Paul is the son of the late John and Caroline Litchkowski, East Union Street. He comes from a family of seven siblings. His brothers are Frank and Charles and the late John Litchkowski. His sisters are Carol Womelsdorf, Nancy Dunn and Mary Castillo. Angela is the daughter of the late Amerigo Frank and Margaret Augenti, West Green Street. She has two sisters, Marie Benson and Frances Kollar, and a brother, Frank. They are the parents of three wonderful children, Michael and his wife, Jennifer, Duryea; Kathleen Salek; and John, Colorado. They are blessed with two loving grandchildren, Dana Marie and Dugan.

r. and Mrs. James J. Pahler, M Wilkes-Barre, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on Nov. 11,

The Wolfes r. and Mrs. Dennis Wolfe, Hunlock Creek, recently celebrated their M 25th anniversary. They were married

Nov.1,1986, in the First Primitive Methodist Church, Plymouth. Matron of honor was Patricia Carpenter, sister of the bride. Best man was Robert Kachinko, friend of the groom. Mrs. Wolfe is the former Lori Howe, daughter of the late Albert and Emily Howe. Mr. Wolfe is the son of the late Gerald and Catherine Wolfe. They are the parents of Nicole Wolfe, Luzerne. They were honored at a party given by their daughter and attended by family and friends at Serenity Wellness and Dance, Luzerne. For the occasion Nicole became an ordained Reverend and, as a surprise, renewed her parents’ vows. They are planning a trip to celebrate.

Woo, Mountain Top, a son, Dec. 23. Karasek, Tracy and Jesse Matias, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Dec. 23. Rodzon, Terra and Nick Fisher, Shickshinny, a daughter, Dec. 23. Gallup, Sara and John Paul C. Lech, Plymouth, a daughter, Dec. 24. Frink, Kimberly and Matthew Cassidy, Drums, a daughter, Dec. 24. Berryman, Monica and Jonathon, Tunkhannock, twin sons, Dec. 24. Moran, Sherry R. and Leonard Trocki, Edwardsville, a son, Dec. 24.

Maslar, Eva and Karl Traynham, Nanticoke, a son, Dec. 22.

Smith, Victoria and Eric Johnson, Luzerne, a son, Dec. 25.

Kepp, Angel and Michael J. Golden, Hanover Township, a son, Dec. 23.

Belotti, Jessica, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Dec. 25. Parry, Tara and Kenny Thomas, Plymouth, a son, Dec. 26.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012 PAGE 3B

Night at the Races planned at St. Andre Bessette St. Andre Bessette Parish, Wilkes-Barre, will have a Night at the Races on Jan. 28 in Monsignor Curran Hall, Holy Saviour Worship Site, 52 Hillard St., WilkesBarre. Doors open at 6 p.m. and post time is 7 p.m. The event includes several races and a pick-a-pony bonus race with plenty of chances to win cash and a variety of raffle and door prizes. A special losers’ raffle will give those who place non-winning bets extra chances to win theme baskets. Food and beverages are included in the $5 ticket price. Tickets are on sale now and can be obtained by calling the parish office at 823-4988. Reserved seating for parties of eight or more is available. Horses are available for purchase at $10. Owners of winning horses receive $50. Committee members, from left, first row, are Dolores Yesuvida, Geri Krufka and Nancy Amesbury. Second row: Jeff Snyder, Bob Cirko, Jane Cirko, Sandy Snyder, Mimi Tosh and John Rushton.

WSCTC council holds homecoming semi

The Pahlers

Dorman, Brittney and Douglas Fisher, Exeter, a son, Dec. 22.

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2011. They were married on Nov. 11, 1961, by District Justice Thomas Nelson. Their attendants were John Williams, brother of the bride, and the late Rita Kellar, sister of the groom. Mr. Pahler is the son of the late John and Margaret Pahler and is retired. Mrs. Pahler, the former Mary Louise Williams, is the daughter of the late Gower and Louise Williams and is employed part-time at Wegman’s. The golden anniversary was marked by a family celebration with a dinner at St. Andrew’s Church, Wilkes-Barre, given by their children. They are the parents of five children, Margaret and her husband, Bill Sharksnas; Rita Pahler; James and his wife Renate Pahler; Thomas Pahler; and Linda Pahler. They are the grandparents of six grandchildren, Christina and husband Tom Polomchak; Adrienne and husband Nick Drago; James Pahler; Alexander Sharksnas; James Benczkowski; and Tara Sauchak. They also have three great-grandchildren, Benjamin Polomchak, Nadia Polomchak and Dominic Drago. Their son James and his family traveled from Germany to join in the family celebration.

The West Side Career and Technology Center Student Council recently held its Homecoming semi-formal at Bentley’s in Ashley. The theme was Mardi Gras and the colors were purple, green and gold. Music for the event was provided by The Lesser Evil D.J. and pictures were taken by Photos by Andy. Advisers are Peggy Mullin and Ray Eichler. Members of the Homecoming Court, from left: Derrick Eyerman, Homecoming Prince; Kayla Walsh, Homecoming Princess; Kevin Adams, Homecoming King; Bethany Bielut, Homecoming Queen; Stan Sopata, Homecoming Prince; and Sarah Golembewski, Homecoming Princess.

Miners-Mills Triangle Club members bring gift bags to Head Start Members of the Miners-Mills Triangle Club recently visited the Luzerne County Head Start, Plains Center. Each child received an individual photo with Santa, a blanket from Head Start and a gift bag from the Triangle Club. The club provided juice and cookies and the children presented Santa with home-made cards. Some of the participants, from left, first row, are Hailee Souder, Tomas Avila, Kayden Kennedy-Hosier, Fabian Thomas, Megan Gartner, Brayden Roote and Jazmyn Espinoza. Second row: Nicholas Kennedy-Hosier, Santa, Aaliyah Dudzik, Parth Patel and Jo Ann Wade, holding Danica Symon.

NAMES AND FACES Brooke Piscotty, 6, a member of the Hot Tamales Competition Line at the David Piscotty Blight School of Dance, WilkesBarre, recently competed at Talent Olympics at the Fernwood Hotel and Resort in the Poconos. Piscotty competed in the 3-6-year-old solo age division for tap, jazz and hip hop. She took first place in tap and second place in jazz and hip hop. Piscotty also won the ‘Tiny Miss Dance’ title for the 3-6 age division for the highest score on her tap routine. She is the daughter of Ken and Georgene Piscotty, Hanover Township.

Coughlin High School French Club holds food drive The Coughlin High School French Club organized a holiday food drive to benefit the Weinberg Food Bank. Students, faculty and staff contributed 1,000 food items. The French IV class won a pizza party for collecting the most donations. Cecelia Gulius, vice president of the French Club, was the coordinator for the drive. Some of the participants, from left, first row, are John Jones, Kallista Myers, Cecelia Gulius, Alia Sod, Allison Peck, Sally Sosa, Allison Novak, Danyelle Barrow and Jade Matusick. Second row: Kelvin Mejia, Esteban Espinoza, Corey Hauser, Becky Wilk, Tiffany Young, Paul Scull and Stan Shuleski.


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THE TIMES LEADER

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Jakob T. Hartz

Natasha K. Mihalko

Jakob Tristan Hartz, son of Chuck and Loree Hartz, Portland, Ore., is celebrating his ninth birthday today, Jan. 8. Jakob is a grandson of Tom and Marie Hartz, Lake Silkworth; Darald and Jackie Christensen, Beaverton, Ore. He is a greatgrandson of the late Joseph and Genevieve Dorrance, WilkesBarre. Jakob has a sister, Hunter, 1 1.

Natasha Katharine Mihalko, daughter of Taras Mihalko, Dallas, and the late Lori Mihalko, is celebrating her ninth birthday today, Jan. 8. Natasha is a granddaughter of Barry and Marion Mihalko, Larksville, and Bernard and Carol Savage, Wilkes-Barre. She is a greatgranddaughter of Christine Mihalko, Coalport. Natasha has a sister, Samantha, 10.

Pi Beta Gamma Club holds Christmas party The Pi Beta Gamma Club of Wyoming Valley recently held its annual Christmas party at the Wyoming Valley Country Club. Jane Straub was the chairperson and Betty Straub, Delphine Kaminski, Carla Kaminski and Susan Najaka were committee members. Several prizes were won by members and guests. Attendees, from left, first row, are Susan Najaka, Celia Kovalich, Irene Jones, Betty Straub, Delphine Kaminski, Patricia Clinton, Bernadine Clark and Florence Sowa. Second row: Norma Metcalf, Marcia Knorr, Jean Chepolis, Mary Ann Smith, Ruth Sorber, Jane Straub, Joyce Latoski, Carla Kaminski, Diane Pelczar, Rita Galat, Sandy Margavage and Patricia Reese.

Lake-Lehman scholarship established

Holy Redeemer National Honor Society installs new officers for 2011-12

The Lake-Lehman Foundation has established a new scholarship in memory of John Peter Farrell, a member of the Lake-Lehman School Board of Education who was killed in an automobile accident in April. His wife, Lorraine, and his family have established the annual $500 scholarship that will be presented to a graduating LakeLehman High School senior student at the Lake-Lehman Foundation Tea on April 15. Other scholarships presented by the Foundation include the Lake-Lehman Foundation Scholarship, Knights of the Round Table Scholarship, Constance Petroski Krupinski ’51 Memorial Scholarship and the Nicholas Drahus Jr. Memorial Scholarship. LakeLehman students can apply by visiting the Lake-Lehman Foundation web site at www.lake-lehman.k12.pa.us and clicking on the ‘foundation’ tab, or by stopping by the high school guidance office. Donations for any of the scholarships can be made to the non-profit Lake-Lehman Foundation Scholarship Fund at Lake-Lehman Foundation, P.O. Box 277, Lehman, Pa. 18627. From left, are James McGovern, superintendent, Lake-Lehman School District; Lorraine Farrell; and Bill Holena, treasurer, LakeLehman Foundation.

IN BRIEF FORTY FORT: Wyoming Seminary Lower School is holding a Merit Scholarship Exam for fourth- through seventhgraders not already enrolled at the school on Feb. 4 at the Forty Fort campus. Up to five half-tuition, meritbased scholarships will be awarded to students who display outstanding performance on the competitive exam. There is also need-based financial aid available to those who qualify. Scholarship winners who maintain at least a B average and who remain in good standing will receive the same amount

per year through eighth grade. All students planning to take the exam should complete a visit to the Lower School, shadowing a class day with a current student, on or before Feb. 20 to qualify for an award. Exam registration will be at 8:15 a.m. and the exam will start at 8:30 a.m. and end at 11 a.m. Parents are invited to stay for a presentation, tour and refreshments. For more information about the exam, or to register, call the Lower School Admission Office at 570-718-6610. For more information about Wyoming Seminary, visit the school’s web site at www.wyomingseminary.org/ takethetest.

Holy Redeemer High School’s National Honor Society recently installed officers for the 2011-2012 school year. Officers were selected by a faculty committee based on qualifications and the candidates’ presented platform. Officers will coordinate club service projects under the direction of adviser Maureen Janoski. National Honor Society officers, from left: Jeff Capaci, vice president, Mountain Top; Sara Cavanaugh, treasurer, Plains Township; Nicole Phillips, secretary, Pittston; and Dalton Ell, president, Plains Township.

The merit scholarships are awarded to students who combine outstanding performance on the competitive exam with a solid record of citizenship and academic and extra-curricular achievement. For each subsequent year while attending Wyoming Seminary, these stuKINGSTON: Wyoming Seminary College Preparatory School dents receive the same amount. Interested students must will hold a Scholarship Exam for eighth- and ninth-grade students complete the scholarship application by Jan. 27 and register not already enrolled at the for the exam. There is no regisschool on Feb. 4 at the school’s tration fee. Kingston campus. On the day of the exam, regisUp to 10 four-year scholarships will be awarded, including tration will be at 9 a.m. and the one full-tuition scholarship, two exam will be given at 9:30 a.m. at the Upper School campus. two-thirds tuition scholarships, During the exam, parents are three half-tuition scholarships encouraged to attend a disand four $5,000 scholarships.

takes over the reigns as president for 2012. Members and guests planning to attend the meeting are asked to make reservations by contacting Mary Wallace at 825-1664. New members are welcome.

HANOVER TWP.: Andy Mehalshick, lead investigator of WBRE-TV’s Eyewitness News I-Team, will address the Crime Clinic of Greater Wyoming Valley at its monthly luncheon meeting at noon on Tuesday at Wyoming Valley Country Club. Mehalshick, a Wilkes University graduate, joined WBRETV in 1985. He has won numerous journalism awards and has appeared on national newscasts. For much of his reporting career, he covered the police and crime beats. His reporting has been recognized by the Associated Press, the Pennsylvania Chief’s of Police Association and State Attorney General District Justice David Barilla

cussion on how to maximize their students’ chances for college opportunities. They may also attend the Student Showcase and a financial-aid session. Following the exam, prospective families are invited to join current students and faculty for the President’s Luncheon hosted by Dr. Kip Nygren. The afternoon will end with campus tours. For more information on the exam and to request an application, call the Upper School Office of Admission at 570-2702160. For more information about Wyoming Seminary, visit the school’s web site at www.wyomingseminary.org/ takethetest.

GUIDELINES

Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge Photographs and information must be received two full weeks before your child’s birthday. To ensure accurate publication, your information must

be typed or computer-generated. Include your child’s name, age and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and their towns

of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime contact phone number. We cannot return photos

submitted for publication in community news, including birthday photos, occasions photos and all publicity photos. Please do not submit precious

or original professional photographs that require return because such photos can become damaged, or occasionally lost, in the production process.

Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 18711-0250.

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Early birth deepens bond for adoptive couple, birth mom

MENNONITE Continued from Page 1B

By VIKKI ORTIZ HEALY Chicago Tribune

MCT PHOTO

Sixteen-year-old twins Janelle Newswanger, left, and Jasmine Newswanger, have lived almost all their lives with a white Mennonite family in Cumberland County, Pa., since their mother gave birth to them in a Pennsylvania prison.

in a bun, common among Mennonite women. Their Philadelphia aunt braided their hair into tight cornrows. “They thought it would be fun,” Janelle said. It wasn’t fun. It hurt. What’s most important to the twins’ biological grandmother, Margaret Garris of West Philadelphia, is not their hair style. “They are happy and healthy,” Garris said. “That’s the main thing.” Garris talks regularly over the phone with her granddaughters and sees them once or twice a year. The girls know about their African-American culture because they know their birth family, she said, adding that one of their halfsisters talks to them about black history. Still, Janelle and Jasmine know little about slavery or the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. His name is familiar, they said, though they know nothing about him. The twins do not see black history as relevant. “To our own life?,” Jasmine asked. “No, I don’t think so.” They said they had not felt prejudice themselves, and they chuckled about how their young nephew asked whether their arms were brown because they were left in the oven too long — a connection he made based on what happens when cookie dough is overbaked. The girls’ limited grasp of African American history does not overly worry Richard Gelles, dean of the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice: “There’s a general lack of

knowledge about the civil rights movement whether you’re black, white, or green.” But their happiness is a good sign. Research shows it is developmentally healthier for children to be in permanent homes as soon as possible, he said, no matter the race of the family. “It is important for a child to be able to know he or she has someone who will be there for him or her in an unqualified relationship.” The girls feel that way about their Mennonite family. Asked whether they loved their birth mother, they hesitantly said they did, explaining, “We’re supposed to like everyone.” Do they love Ruth? Immediately, the twins enthusiastically nodded yes. A white Mennonite family can raise a healthy black child, said Toni Oliver, vice president of the National Association of Black Social Workers. But race does matter in America. “We make decisions about people’s value and capabilities based on race.” If these children are racially isolated, she said, they have no role models to counter negative images and stereotypes of blacks. Joseph Crumbley, an expert in transracial adoptions and fostering, doubted the girls would always be around tolerant Mennonites. “If they’re going to stay in that bubble, then fine,” he said. “Once they leave that bubble, they’re still looked at as African-American children.”

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did some discing this year,” Jasmine said, referring to farm equipment that prepares soil for planting. One evening, the twins and Ruth were preparing dinner. “Janelle, du wenig mei nei.” Put in a little more, Ruth said, and Janelle added baked beans to the spaghetti soup. Before dinner, the girls went to a market owned by the family of some friends. The friends, two white sisters, and the twins instantly smiled when they saw each other, and all four began chattering and giggling. Janelle and Jasmine were the only black children at school, which didn’t bother them. “We had each other,” Janelle said. “Everyone was used to seeing us,” said Jasmine, so no one treated them differently. “I seem like everyone else. I don’t think about it,” she said, “I just think about having friends.” The Newswangers tried to be race-sensitive as they raised the two — they gave them black dolls and books with African Americans pictured in them. A black woman who lived in the area befriended the girls, Ruth said. They see other African-American children who live with Mennonite families at church and social gatherings, and they keep in touch with their birth family. The sisters described one visit about seven years ago, when hair styles entangled their two worlds during a visit with their grandmother, aunt, and two half-sisters. Jasmine and Janelle normally wear their hair pulled back

CHICAGO — The adoption counselor caught Rebecca Bennett on her cellphone and delivered an urgent message from the birth mother: “The baby is coming early. You have permission to be at the hospital. Go quickly. Go now!” ItwasthedaylastJunewhenBennett and her husband, Joshua, were scheduled to have their second meeting with the 35-year-old Chicago woman who had chosen them — from among dozens of couples — to adopt her baby. They were planning to discuss the child’s name, visiting rights and other important details. But medical complications brought the 4-pound boy into the world two monthsearly,thrustingtheBennettsinto a premature-birth adoption that, experts say, happens more often than might be expected. About one in every eight adoptions starts in a neonatal intensive care unit, according to the Cradle, the Evanston, Ill., agency that facilitated the adoption. The numbers mirror the rate of premature births in the state and country. And just as medical complications vary from one premature birth to another,thewayadoptionsunfoldafterababy is born prematurely also differ in every situation — so much so that the Cradle requires all prospective parents to attend a workshop focused on adopting at-risk children. This Christmas, just days after their son’s adoption became official, the Bennetts consider the thriving Atticus their greatest gift of all. The birth and adoptive families are grateful for the unlikely friendship they now share after months taking turns by the newborn’s incubator, exchanging text and email messages about his progress and handing off bottles of breast milk. “There were a thousand times where I wanted to say, ‘Wow. We just did a really good job with a completely awkward conversation,’” said Rebecca Bennett. “We just pulled together and got to know each other while we were pulling for Atticus.” Rebecca and Josh Bennett of Evanston, Ill., both 35, were used to things coming later, not earlier, than expected. The couple married in 2004 and had planned to have children. But after years of infertility problems, they signed on with the Cradle in 2009. Like other prospective parents hoping to adopt through the agency, the Bennetts prepared a handmade brochure describing themselves through photographs, stories and lists of quirky facts. The blue booklet tied with yellow ribbon described how Rebecca taught a music appreciation course at Northwestern University and how Josh had a

successful career in marketing. There were pictures of each of them holding smiling babies. The booklet was appealing enough thatonceamonth,forayear,counselors from the agency called to say the Bennetts were finalists in a birth mother’s search for an adoptive family. But month after month, the child went to someone else. The birth mother, who is not being named to protect her identity, is from the East Coast and began searching there for adoptive parents. At first, she thought it would be easier for the child to grow up far away from Chicago, where she became pregnant after an affair with a married man. But as her pregnancy progressed, the idea of an open adoption, in which she could negotiate planned contact with the child, became more appealing. When they met face to face, their conversation flowed so freely that the couple and the birth mother didn’t need the help of the facilitator assigned to the case. Inthecaronthedrivehome,thebirth mother felt certain that she didn’t need to meet anyone else. “That’s it,” she recalled saying aloud. “They’re the ones.” After the Bennetts learned they had been chosen to adopt Atticus, they forced themselves to remain cautiously excited. They knew they could be disappointed. In about a fifth of adoptions, the birth mother decides to keep her baby, officials said. And while birth parents relinquish the rights to a child early in the adoption process, the adoptive parents officially become mom and dad only after legal paperwork is approved by the courts, a process that takes place after a child has been in a home for six months. With that always in mind, the Bennetts initially allowed themselves to buy only the most basic of baby supplies: a portable play pen, car seat, stroller, three onesies and three bottles. Their feelings of uncertainty only increased when they learned the baby they were adopting was born seven weeks early and would need to stay in intensive care as he learned to eat and breathe on his own. The birth mother would keep the legal right to all decisions involving the baby at the hospital. “We told ourselves until everything is final, we should view ourselves as foster parents,” said Josh Bennett. “We were trying to protect ourselves.” But whenever the Bennetts felt especiallyvulnerableoroverwhelmedabout putting their trust in a stranger and offering their love to a struggling infant, they forced themselves to remember they weren’t alone. The birth mother “was trusting us with so much, with Atticus,” Rebecca Bennett said. “I kept reminding myself that the least I could do is trust back.”

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able. The popular image of Mennonites is of stoic, white followers in the countryside. Yet blacks, originally recruited by missionaries, have been in the flock for years, including in Philadelphia and other cities. In 1897, the first African Americans in the United States were baptized as Mennonites and joined a Juniata County church, said historian Tobin Miller Shearer, a Mennonite and assistant professor of history at the University of Montana who studies interactions between white and African American Mennonites. Now, he said, “There seems to be a predilection, or at least a tendency, for conservative white Mennonites to be engaged in the practice of adoption across race lines.” Good intentions fuel the caretaking, Shearer said, but, “Hosts are not equipped themselves to equip their children to live within a racist society.” Debate roils around transracial adoptions and fostering in general. Are youngsters better served by going to a permanent home as soon as possible, or by waiting for a same-race household? That question also hovers over the children from the Philadelphia region who live in rural Pennsylvania. Ruth Newswanger and her husband are Old Order Mennonites who shun cars, TVs, computers, and cellphones at their Cumberland County, Pa., home. Jasmine and Janelle’s birth mother, a Philadelphian, was in prison elsewhere in the state when the girls were born and the Newswangers got a call from a church friend involved in the prison ministry. Would they care for the babies? The Newswangers, who have four biological children, said yes, acting on their belief that “you should share what you have,” Ruth, 55, said. The twins twice returned briefly to their biological mother, the second time for a year when they were about 2 1⁄2 years old. Relatives sent them back both times. When the Newswangers finally adopted them two years ago, the girls were elated. “We could write our last name Newswanger,” Jasmine said. Along with their name, they share a daily routine. “We milk cows every morning and every evening. We also

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

H.S. WRESTLING

Perfect records vanish in finals

PSU FOOTBALL: “I’m not here to be Joe Paterno. There’s only one Joe Paterno. And so what I’m going to try to do is be Bill O’Brien.”

The new guy

Four unbeaten wrestlers fell in the last round of the WVC Tournament on Saturday. By DAVE ROSENGRANT drosengrant@timesleader.com

LEHMAN TWP. — Creating the first blemish on an undefeated wrestler’s season record at the midway part of the campaign is a memorable event. That’s how four grapplers felt on Saturday after the finals of the Wyoming Valley Conference Tournament as a quarTo see additional tet of unbeatens photos, visit went down in www.times the championleader.com ship. The most exuberant to knock off an undefeated was Wyoming Valley West’s Kyle Krasavage, who took down Meyers’ Vito Pasone (15-1) for the gold medal at 126 pounds in a battle of two top-ranked grapplers in the state. Krasavage netted a 10-3 victory to improve his mark this season to 14-1. “This is a big win because he’s ranked second in the state in 2A,” Krasavage said. “I came in confident. I thought I was going to win the whole time and I just pulled through.” See WRESTLING, Page 6C

AHL

Crunching defeat for Penguins Syracuse goalie’s big save halts Wilkes-Barre/Scranton rally in the final seconds. By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE TWP. — Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins forward Geoff Walker was happy with the two goals he scored in Saturday’s contest against the Syracuse Crunch. But it was CRUNCH the one that got away that weighed on his mind the PENGUINS most. The Penguins were down by a goal with 17 seconds to play and an extra attacker on the ice. It was in that situation that Walker found himself alone in the right

AP PHOTO

Penn State’s new football coach Bill O’Brien is surrounded by the media after he was introduced during Saturday in State College. O’Brien, who is currently the offensive coordinator for the New England Patriots, replaces Joe Paterno.

O’Brien tries to pick up the pieces at PSU

By CHRIS DUNCAN AP Sports Writer

See PENGUINS, Page 6C

AP PHOTO

LIVE High School Basketball Tune into Service Electric’s Ch. 2 Mon. Jan. 9th: Girls Basketball Hazleton @ Crestwood - 7:15pm Tues. Jan. 10th: Boys Basketball Dallas @ Holy Redeemer - 7:15pm For a complete schedule go to www.sectv.com

AFTER A SO-CALLED careful, comprehensive and crucial search for a new head football coach, this is the best Penn State could come up with. A no-name. One of the most storied college football programs in the nation named Bill O’Brien to lead the Nittany Lions out of their darkest period and into a bright future. Who’s brilliant idea was this? If you’ve never heard of this guy, you’re not alone. Most people haven’t. He has no head coaching experience. O’Brien’s greatest claim to fame was becoming offensive coordinator this season for a New England Patriots team that already won three Super Bowls. And nobody would have noticed O’Brien was in that role if he didn’t get into that shouting match on the sideline with Patriots quarterback Tom Brady a couple weeks ago. Is this any way to replace a legend like Joe Paterno? “I’m not here to be Joe Paterno,” O’Brien emphatically said. “What I’m going to try to do is be Bill O’Brien.” But not even O’Brien can know who that is when it comes to his identity as a head coach.

See NOBODY, Page 5C

Texans cruise to victory in first time in playoffs

Texans running back Arian Foster (23) runs for a touchdown against the Bengals during the fourth quarter Saturday.

A search that yields a nobody

See TEXANS, Page 7C

AFC WILD CARD GAME

HOUSTON — The Houston Texans turned to their kids, then to their stars to win the first playoff appearance in INSIDE: Saints franchise histoexplode against ry, a 31-10 rout of Lions. 7C the bungling Cincinnati Bengals. J.J. and T.J. and Andre and Arian. Rookie J.J. Watt’s leaping interception return for a touchdown late in the first half propelled the

OPINION

Texans in Saturday’s AFC wildcard game. Third-string quarterback T.J. Yates, another rookie pressed into action, then threw a

program. Introduced as the 15th head football coach in school history in the ballroom of the Nittany Lion Inn, O’Brien said he fully underSTATE COLLEGE — Before Bill O’Brien faced the lights, his stood that many Penn State alumni and lettermen are confused or wife and youngest son entered the room. Within a minute of angered over his hire. taking their seats in the front row, an armada of “I’m not here to be Joe Paterno,” O’Brien said. photographers rushed up to snap a few shots. MORE/INSIDE “There’s only one Joe Paterno. And so what I’m “Oh, wow,” gaped 6-year-old Michael, already •Respected assistant going to try to do is be Bill O’Brien. And we’re going clad in a No. 25 Silas Redd jersey. Larry Johnson will be to do the best we can to continue the success that “Oh, wow is right,” mother Colleen said. back. 5C he’s … had here for many, many years. Better get used to it. Dad isn’t anonymous any •Tom Bradley issues “We’re going to show respect for Coach Paterno more. statement. 5C and what he did here, and we’re going to move The guy who few had heard of a week ago was •PSU recruit Eugene forward to a new era of Penn State football. And introduced as Penn State’s new head coach on Lewis happy with hiring. 5C hopefully he’s proud of it at the end of the day.” Saturday. His contract runs for five years and will While many Penn State officials have avoided earn him approximately $2.5 million annually, invoking Paterno’s name since the Hall of Fame which includes revenue from TV, radio and Nike coach was fired Nov. 9, O’Brien made it a point to talk about him on top of a base salary of $950,000. throughout the day. Though he will return to his other job as offensive coordinator for the New England Patriots on Monday, O’Brien will do so as the man charged with repairing Penn State’s shattered football See O’BRIEN, Page 5C

3

PAUL SOKOLOSKI

Uncharted waters O’Brien spent 14 seasons as a college assistant, first at Georgia Tech, then Maryland, then Duke, and none of those programs were exactly national powers. He later coached wide receivers and quarterbacks for four seasons on Bill Belichick’s staff in New England, before he was elevated to offensive coordinator this season. That offense scored 513 points to lead the AFC and ranked second in the NFL with averages of 317.8 passing yards and 428 total yards per game while catapulting the 13-3 Patriots into the AFC’s top seed heading into their divisional playoff opener next week. Penn State was apparently blown away by those numbers. “He’s going to be a winner, and he’s going to put on a show,” predicted John Nichols, who served on Penn State’s search committee for a new head coach. “You’re not going to see the offense sluggish.” That remains to be seen. Let’s see how O’Brien’s offense looks with Matt McGloin trying to make it go instead of Brady before making the new coach out to be anything more than a passing fancy. “A football program of this caliber requires a special kind of leader,” said Penn State’s new president Rodney Erickson. “I think he has the leadership, the skills to succeed.” But nobody knows for sure. And that’s scary, at a time when the Lions need a sure thing. Couldn’t Penn State find a

By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

L O C A L C A L E N D A R This Week's Events MONDAY, JAN. 9 GIRLS BASKETBALL Berwick at Wyoming Area, 7:15 p.m. Coughlin at Pittston Area, 7:15 p.m. GAR at MMI Prep, 7:15 p.m. Hanover Area at Lake-Lehman, 7:15 p.m. Hazleton Area at Crestwood, 7:15 p.m. Holy Redeemer at Dallas, 7:15 p.m. Northwest at Meyers, 7:15 p.m. Tunkhannock at Wyoming Valley West, 7:15 p.m. Wyoming Seminary at Nanticoke, 7:15 p.m. HS BOWLING Hazleton Area at John Paul II, 3 p.m.

TUESDAY, JAN. 10 BOYS BASKETBALL Wyoming Area at Berwick, 7:15 p.m. Pittston Area at Coughlin, 7:15 p.m. Wyoming Valley West at Tunkhannock, 7:15 p.m. Crestwood at Hazleton Area, 7:15 p.m. Dallas at Holy Redeemer, 7:15 p.m. Meyers at Northwest, 7:15 p.m. Lake-Lehman at Hanover Area, 7:15 p.m. MMI Prep at GAR, 7:15 p.m. Nanticoke at Wyoming Seminary, 7:15 p.m. HS RIFLE North Pocono at Berwick, 4 p.m. HS SWIMMING Wyoming Seminary at Wyoming Valley West, 4 p.m. Lake Lehman at Berwick, 4:30 p.m. Abington Heights at Elk Lake, 4:30 p.m. Hanover Area at Dallas, 4:30 Delaware Valley at West Scranton, 4:30 p.m. Abington Heights at Elk Lake, 4:30 p.m. Valley View at Scranton, 4:30 p.m. Tunkhannock at Scranton Prep, 4:30 p.m. HS WRESTLING Tunkhannock at Crestwood, 7 p.m. MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Luzerne CCC at PSU Worthington, 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 11 HS SWIMMING Pittston Area at Dunmore, 4 p.m. Coughlin at Wyoming Area, 4 p.m. Nanticoke at Meyers, 4:30 p.m. HS WRESTLING (all matches 7 p.m.) Berwick at Tunkhannock Coughlin at Pittston Area Nanticoke at GAR Dallas at Hanover Area Lake-Lehman at Meyers Hazleton Area at Wyoming Valley West MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Delaware Valley at Wilkes, 6 p.m. King’s at DeSales, 8 p.m. PSU Lehigh Valley at PSU Hazleton, 8 p.m. Misericordia at Eastern, 8 p.m. WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL King’s at DeSales, 6 p.m. Misericordia at Eastern, 6 p.m. Delaware CCC at PSU Hazleton, 6 p.m. Delaware Valley at Wilkes, 6 p.m. COLLEGE SWIMMING Misericordia vs. Lebanon Valley, 6 p.m. COLLEGE WRESTLING Wilkes at Hunter, 3 p.m.

THURSDAY, JAN. 12 GIRLS BASKETBALL Crestwood at Coughlin, 7:15 p.m. Dallas at Wyoming Area, 7:15 p.m. Lake-Lehman at Meyers, 7:15 p.m. Nanticoke at MMI Prep, 7:15 p.m. Northwest at GAR, 7:15 p.m. Pittston Area at Hazleton Area, 7:15 p.m. Tunkhannock at Berwick, 7:15 p.m. Wyoming Seminary at Hanover Area, 7:15 p.m. Wyoming Valley West at Holy Redeemer, 7:15 p.m. HS BOWLING Hazleton Area at Columbia Montour Vo-Tech, 3 p.m. HS RIFLE Stroudsburg at Berwick, 4 p.m. HS SWIMMING Berwick at Hanover Area, 4:30 p.m. Wyoming Valley West at Lake-Lehman, 4:30 p.m. Wallenpaupack and Holy Cross at Valley View, 4:30 p.m.

FRIDAY, JAN. 13 BOYS BASKETBALL Wyoming Area at Dallas, 7:15 p.m. Berwick at Tunkhannock, 7:15 p.m. Coughlin at Crestwood, 7:15 p.m. Hazleton Area at Pittston Area, 7:15 p.m. Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Valley West, 7:15 p.m. Meyers at Lake-Lehman, 7:15 p.m. GAR at Northwest, 7:15 p.m. Hanover Area at Wyoming Seminary, 7:15 p.m. MMI Prep at Nanticoke, 7:15 p.m. HS WRESTLING Wyoming Seminary at Eastern States Classic Meyers at Hanover Area, 7 p.m. HS SWIMMING Holy Redeemer at All-American Invitational, 11 a.m. Pittston Area at Wyoming Area, 4 p.m. MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL PSU Hazleton at PSU Beaver, 8 p.m. WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL PSU Hazleton at PSU Beaver, 6 p.m. COLLEGE WRESTLING King’s at Bud Whitehill Duals, 9 a.m.

SATURDAY, JAN. 14 GIRLS BASKETBALL Wyoming Seminary at Lakeland, 2:15 p.m. MMI Prep at Weatherly, 2:30 p.m. Crestwood at North Pocono, 7:15 p.m. Williamsport at Hazleton Area, 7:15 p.m. HS WRESTLING Wyoming Seminary at Eastern States Classic Coughlin at Lehighton Duals Lake-Lehman, Nanticoke at Elk Lake Tournament Hanover Area at Jersey Shore Duals Wyoming Valley West at Pittston Area, 7 p.m. Scranton at Meyers, 7 p.m. Nanticoke at Dallas, 7 p.m. HS SWIMMING Holy Redeemer at All-American Invitational, 11 a.m. Hazleton Area at Williamsport, 11 a.m. MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL PSU Hazleton at PSU New Kensington, noon Wilkes at Manhattanville, 3 p.m. Eastern at King’s, 3 p.m. Misericordia at FDU-Florham, 3 p.m. WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Wilkes at Manhattanville, 1 p.m. Eastern at King’s, 1 p.m. Misericordia at FDU-Florham, 1 p.m. COLLEGE SWIMMING King’s at Messiah, 1 p.m. Arcadia at King’s, 1 p.m. Albright at Misericordia, 1 p.m. COLLEGE WRESTLING King’s at Bud Whitehill Duals, 9 a.m.

T R A N S A C T I O N S FOOTBALL National Football League INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Signed WR Jarred Fayson.

HOCKEY

National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES—Reassigned F Drayson Bowman to Charlotte (AHL). CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Activated D Steve Montador from injured reserve. Assigned D Dylan Olsen to Rockford (AHL). FLORIDA PANTHERS—Reassigned RW Bill Thomas to San Antonio (AHL). ECHL ECHL—Suspended Chicago’s Chaz Johnson one game and fined him an undisclosed amount as a result of his actions in a Jan. 6 game against Chicago. GWINNETT GLADIATORS—Signed F Aaron Bendickson.

SOCCER

Major League Soccer MONTREAL IMPACT—Named Denis Hamlett assistant coach and Nicolas Gagnon assistant coach for the U21 team and technical assistant of the Impact soccer schools.

COLLEGE

NORTH CAROLINA—Announced the NCAA granted FB Devon Ramsay a hardship waiver, giving him an extra year of eligibility in 2012.

F O O T B A L L NFL Playoff Glance Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 7 Houston 31, Cincinnati 10 Detroit at New Orleans, late Sunday, Jan. 8 Atlanta at New York Giants, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at Denver, 4:30 p.m. Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 14 Atlanta, N.Y. Giants or New Orleans at San Francisco, 4:30 p.m. Pittsburgh or Denver at New England, 8 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15 Houston at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Detroit, Atlanta or N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 4:30 p.m. Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 22 TBD Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 29 At Honolulu NFC vs. AFC Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 5 At Indianapolis

W H A T ’ S

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COLLEGE FOOTBALL 9 p.m. ESPN — GoDaddy.com Bowl, Arkansas St. vs. N. Illinois, at Mobile, Ala.

GOLF

9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Africa Open, final round, at East London, South Africa (same-day tape) 5:30 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Tournament of Champions, third round, at Kapalua, Hawaii

MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Noon BTN — Indiana at Penn State 1:30 p.m. CBS — Wisconsin at Michigan 5:30 p.m. FSN — Arizona at Southern Cal 6 p.m. BTN — Purdue at Minnesota 7:30 p.m. FSN — California at Oregon

NFL

1 p.m. FOX — Atlanta at N.Y. Giants 4:30 p.m. CBS— Pittsburgh at Denver

NHL

5:30 p.m. CSN — Philadelphia at Ottawa 7:30 p.m. NBCSP — Detroit at Chicago

RODEO

2:30 p.m. NBC — PBR, Madison Square Garden Invitational, at New York (same-day tape)

AMERICA’S LINE

CAMPS

By Roxy Roxborough

The Pro Staff Baseball Camp is returning for its 25th year of operation and will hold signups for the next three months. This camp will work on developing baseball skills, as well as concentrating on pitching and hitting and will run for six weeks beginning in the spring. Openings exist every night from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and Saturday from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. The cost of the camp is $300 with a $150 deposit upon registration and the rest of the balance can be paid before the player leaves the camp. For questions and information, call Rich at 570-903-1336 or Ron at 570-575-2116. Jerry Greeley’s Player Development Baseball Academy is set for January and February at King’s College. Jerry Greeley, head baseball coach at King’s, has announced that King’s will once again be hosting. The academy will take place on Jan. 29 and Feb. 5, 19, 26 in the Scandlon Gymnasium. The academy will be divided into two segments: the Grand Slam segment for players in K-6 grades, and the Stars of Tomorrow segment for in 7-12 grades. Both will offer hitting, pitching, defensive, catching, training and fundamental sessions. For additional information, go to kingscollegeathletics.com or email baseball@kings.edu. Early registration is recommended since session size is limited.

INJURY REPORT: On the NFL board, Pittsburgh RB Rashard Mendenhall is out. College Basketball

NFL Favorite

Points

Underdog

NFC Wildcard Playoff GIANTS

2

Falcons

8.5 Points 1.5

COLLEGE WRESTLING

9 p.m. BTN — Northwestern at Wisconsin Eds: VERSUS is now NBC Sports Network, reflected here as “NBCSP”

H O C K E Y National Hockey League EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA N.Y. Rangers............... 39 26 9 4 56 116 82 Philadelphia ................ 39 24 11 4 52 133 115 New Jersey ................. 41 23 16 2 48 114 117 Pittsburgh .................... 40 21 15 4 46 123 106 N.Y. Islanders.............. 38 14 18 6 34 90 120 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston.......................... 38 26 11 1 53 141 73 Ottawa .......................... 42 21 15 6 48 129 139 Toronto ........................ 41 21 15 5 47 133 131 Buffalo.......................... 41 18 18 5 41 107 121 Montreal....................... 41 16 18 7 39 109 114 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Florida .......................... 41 20 13 8 48 107 115 Winnipeg...................... 41 20 16 5 45 109 119 Washington ................. 38 21 15 2 44 114 110 Tampa Bay................... 40 17 20 3 37 109 136 Carolina ....................... 42 14 21 7 35 110 141 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago........................ 41 24 13 4 52 132 120 Detroit .......................... 40 25 14 1 51 131 92 St. Louis....................... 40 23 12 5 51 103 89 Nashville ...................... 40 21 15 4 46 106 112 Columbus .................... 40 11 24 5 27 95 130 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver ................... 42 26 13 3 55 138 102 Minnesota.................... 41 21 14 6 48 95 98 Colorado ...................... 42 23 18 1 47 114 116 Calgary ........................ 42 18 19 5 41 100 123 Edmonton .................... 41 16 22 3 35 111 119 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose ...................... 37 22 11 4 48 107 87 Dallas ........................... 40 23 16 1 47 112 114 Los Angeles ................ 42 20 15 7 47 88 93 Phoenix........................ 41 19 17 5 43 103 108 Anaheim ...................... 39 11 22 6 28 92 129 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Saturday's Games Vancouver 4, Boston 3 Philadelphia 3, Ottawa 2, OT Dallas 4, Edmonton 1 Columbus 1, Los Angeles 0 Winnipeg 2, Buffalo 1, OT Toronto 4, Detroit 3 Montreal 3, Tampa Bay 1 New Jersey 3, Pittsburgh 1 Colorado at St. Louis, late Carolina at Nashville, late N.Y. Islanders at Phoenix, late Minnesota at Calgary, late Washington at San Jose, late Today's Games Philadelphia at Ottawa, 5 p.m. Detroit at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Anaheim, 8 p.m.

American Hockey League

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA St. John’s .............. 34 21 8 4 1 47 121 100 Manchester ........... 38 21 15 0 2 44 99 99 Worcester.............. 34 16 11 3 4 39 93 93 Portland ................. 35 16 14 2 3 37 94 110 Providence............ 37 16 18 1 2 35 82 108 East Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Hershey ................. 35 20 8 4 3 47 133 102 Norfolk ................... 36 21 12 1 2 45 129 102 Penguins.............. 36 19 12 1 4 43 108 105 Syracuse ............... 34 15 15 3 1 34 110 113 Binghamton........... 39 16 21 1 1 34 100 117 Northeast Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Connecticut........... 36 19 11 2 4 44 115 107 Albany .................... 36 16 13 5 2 39 88 110 Adirondack............ 35 18 15 1 1 38 100 98 Springfield ............. 34 16 16 1 1 34 99 100 Bridgeport ............. 36 15 17 3 1 34 100 111 WESTERN CONFERENCE Midwest Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Charlotte................ 35 20 12 2 1 43 95 88 Milwaukee ............. 31 20 10 0 1 41 99 79 Chicago ................. 33 17 12 1 3 38 94 91 Peoria .................... 36 17 16 2 1 37 108 107 Rockford................ 34 12 18 1 3 28 105 126 North Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Toronto .................. 37 19 13 3 2 43 102 95 Rochester.............. 35 16 13 4 2 38 102 104 Hamilton ................ 34 15 14 1 4 35 83 101 Grand Rapids........ 33 14 13 4 2 34 102 106 Lake Erie ............... 35 16 17 1 1 34 86 94 West Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Oklahoma City ...... 36 23 9 1 3 50 109 84 Abbotsford ............. 34 22 10 2 0 46 91 83 Houston.................. 35 18 8 2 7 45 98 91 San Antonio ........... 35 17 16 2 0 36 82 98 Texas...................... 32 14 16 0 2 30 93 98 NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for an overtime or shootout loss. Saturday's Games Hamilton 4, Toronto 1 St. John’s 3, Manchester 2 Springfield 5, Connecticut 4, SO Hershey 5, Adirondack 2 Bridgeport 4, Portland 0 Providence 5, Worcester 2 Rochester 3, Binghamton 2 Syracuse 4, Penguins 3 Albany 3, Norfolk 1 Charlotte at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Rockford at Texas, 8 p.m. Lake Erie at Chicago, 8 p.m. Grand Rapids at Abbotsford, 10 p.m. Today's Games Portland at Worcester, 3 p.m. Oklahoma City at Hamilton, 3 p.m. Connecticut at Springfield, 3 p.m. Charlotte at Chicago, 4 p.m. Bridgeport at Providence, 4:05 p.m. Houston at San Antonio, 4:30 p.m. Rochester at Hershey, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at Peoria, 6 p.m. Rockford at Texas, 6 p.m.

G O L F Tournament of Champions Par Scores At Plantation Course at Kapalua Kapalua, Hawai'i Yardage: 7,411;Par 73 Second Round Steve Stricker ....................................68-63—131-15 Webb Simpson..................................68-68—136-10 Kevin Na.............................................73-64—137 -9 Martin Laird........................................68-70—138 -8 Jonathan Byrd....................................67-71—138 -8 D.A. Points.........................................71-69—140 -6 Chris Kirk ...........................................75-66—141 -5 Bryce Molder .....................................71-70—141 -5 Keegan Bradley.................................69-72—141 -5 Aaron Baddeley.................................75-68—143 -3 Scott Stallings ...................................74-69—143 -3

PK

Wisconsin

6.5

DePaul

3.5

Massachusetts

Valparaiso

PK

WRIGHT ST

Underdog

DETROIT

2.5

Arizona No Illinois

Monday

NC STATE Purdue

BCS Championship Game Alabama

1.5

Louisiana St

Favorite

Points

Underdog

T’Wolves

2

WIZARDS

NBA

Magic

6.5

KINGS

THUNDER

5.5

Spurs

SUNS

7

Bucks

BLAZERS

11

Cavaliers

LAKERS

7

Grizzlies

WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

1 p.m. FSN — Memphis at UTEP 2 p.m. BTN — Northwestern at Indiana 3 p.m. FSN — Oklahoma at Texas A&M 4 p.m. BTN — Nebraska at Iowa

PENN ST

MICHIGAN VILLANOVA

Go Daddy.Com Bowl Arkansas St

Underdog

6.5

LASALLE

College Football Favorite

Points

Indiana

BRONCOS

AFC Wildcard Playoff Steelers

Favorite

B A S K E T B A L L National Basketball Association EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Philadelphia...................... 5 2 .714 New York .......................... 4 4 .500 Boston ............................... 4 4 .500 Toronto.............................. 3 5 .375 New Jersey....................... 2 7 .222 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami................................. 8 1 .889 Atlanta ............................... 6 3 .667 Orlando ............................. 5 3 .625 Charlotte ........................... 2 6 .250 Washington ...................... 0 7 .000 Central Division W L Pct Chicago............................. 7 2 .778 Indiana............................... 6 2 .750 Cleveland.......................... 4 3 .571 Milwaukee......................... 2 4 .333 Detroit................................ 2 6 .250 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio ...................... 5 2 .714 Memphis ........................... 3 4 .429 Dallas ................................ 3 5 .375 New Orleans..................... 2 5 .286 Houston............................. 2 6 .250 Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City ................. 7 2 .778 Denver............................... 6 2 .750 Portland............................. 5 2 .714 Utah ................................... 4 3 .571 Minnesota ......................... 2 5 .286 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers..................... 3 2 .600 L.A. Lakers ....................... 5 4 .556 Phoenix ............................. 3 4 .429 Sacramento ...................... 3 5 .375 Golden State..................... 2 5 .286 Friday's Games Atlanta 102, Charlotte 96, OT New Jersey 97, Toronto 85 New York 99, Washington 96 Philadelphia 96, Detroit 73 Indiana 87, Boston 74 Oklahoma City 109, Houston 94 Denver 96, New Orleans 88 Cleveland 98, Minnesota 87 Chicago 97, Orlando 83 Utah 94, Memphis 85 L.A. Lakers 97, Golden State 90 Phoenix 102, Portland 77 Saturday's Games Atlanta 109, Chicago 94 Indiana 99, Charlotte 77 Miami 101, New Jersey 90 New York 103, Detroit 80 Oklahoma City 98, Houston 95 Philadelphia 97, Toronto 62 Denver at San Antonio, late New Orleans at Dallas, late Utah at Golden State, late Milwaukee at L.A. Clippers, late Today's Games Minnesota at Washington, 1 p.m. Orlando at Sacramento, 6 p.m. San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Cleveland at Portland, 9 p.m. Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Monday's Games Minnesota at Toronto, 7 p.m. Indiana at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Atlanta at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m. Charlotte at New York, 7:30 p.m. Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m. New Orleans at Denver, 9 p.m.

GB — 11⁄2 11⁄2 21⁄2 4 GB — 2 21⁄2 51⁄2 7 GB — 1 ⁄2 2 31⁄2 41⁄2 GB — 2 21⁄2 3 31⁄2 GB — 1 ⁄2 1 2 4 GB — — 1 11⁄2 2

B O X I N G Fight Schedule Jan. 6 At Key West, Fla. (ESPN2), Dyah Davis vs. Alfonso Lopez, 10, super middleweights. At Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, Indio, Calif. (SHO), Luis Ramos Jr. vs. Raymundo Beltran, 10, lightweights;Michael Perez vs. Omar Figueroa Jr., 10, lightweights. Jan. 7 At Heredia, Costa Rica, Bryan Vazquez vs. Eugenio Lopez, 12, for Vazquez’s interim WBA World super featherweight title. Jan. 13 At Las Vegas (ESPN2), Teon Kennedy vs. Chris Martin, 10, junior featherweights. Jan. 14 At Offenburg, Germany, Arthur Abraham vs. Pablo Oscar Natalio Farias, 10, super middleweights;Robert Stieglitz vs. Henry Weber, 12, for Stieglitz’s WBO super middleweight title. Jan. 20 At Palms Casino Resort, Las Vegas (SHO), Rico Ramos vs. Guillermo Rigondeaux, 12, for Ramos’ WBA World super bantamweight title. Jan. 21 At Philadelphia (NBCSP), Eddie Chambers vs. Sergei Liakhovich, 10, heavyweights;Gabriel Rosado vs. Jesus Soto-Karass, 10, junior middleweights. At Guadalajara, Mexico, Miguel Vazquez vs. Ameth Diaz, 12, for Vazquez’s IBF lightweight title. Jan. 27 At Northern Quest Casino, Airway Heights, Wash. (ESPN), Ruslan Provodnikov vs. David Torres, 10, junior welterweights;Ji-Hoon Kim vs. Alisher Rahimov, 10, lightweights. Jan. 28 At Turning Stone, Verona, N.Y., Brian Minto vs. Tony Grano, 10, NABF heavyweight title eliminator. At Springfield, Mo., Cory Spinks vs. Sechew Powell, 12, IBF junior middleweight title eliminator. Feb. 3 At Quebec City, Quebec (SHO), Pier Olivier Cote vs. Maurico Herrera, 12, for Cote’s IBF Inter-Continental light welterweight title. At Las Vegas (ESPN2), Yordanis Despaigne vs. Edison Miranda, 10, light heavyweights. Feb. 4 At Frankfurt, Germany, Yoan Pablo Hernandez vs. Steve Cunningham, 12, for Hernandez’s IBF cruiserweight title;Enad Licina vs. Alexander Alexeev, 12, for the vacant European cruiserweight title;Eduard Gutknecht vs. Vyacheslav Uzelkov, 12, for Gutknecht’s European light heavyweight title. At San Antonio (HBO), Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. vs. Marco Antonio Rubio, 12, for Chavez’s WBC middleweight title;Nonito Donaire vs. Wilfredo Vazquez Jr., 12, for the vacant WBO junior featherweight title. Feb. 10 At Uncasville, Conn. (ESPN2), Demetrius Andrade vs. Derek Ennis, 12, IBF junior middleweight eliminator. Feb. 11 At Houston (HBO), Jose Miguel Cotto vs. Jose Luis Castillo, 10, welterweights. At Las Vegas (SHO), Victor Ortiz vs. Andre Berto, 12, welterweights;Erislandy Lara vs. Ronald Hearns, 10, middleweights. Feb. 17 At Arlington, Texas (ESPN2), John Molina vs. Alejandro Sanabria, 10, lightweights. Feb. 18 At Olympic Hall, Munich, Vitali Klitschko vs. Dereck Chisora, 12, for Klitschko’s WBC heavyweight title. At Durango, Mexico, Jorge Arce vs. Lorenzo Parra, 12, for Arce’s WBO bantamweight title. Feb. 24 At the Galen Center, Los Angeles (ESPN2), Juan Carlos Burgos vs. Cristobal Cruz, 12, junior lightweights;Efrain Esquivias vs. Alex De Oliveira, 10, super bantamweights. Feb. 25 At Stuttgart, Germany, Alexander Povetkin vs. Marco Huck, 12, for Povetkin’s WBA World heavyweight title. At St. Louis (HBO), Marcos Maidana vs. Devon Alexander, 12, welterweights;Adrien Broner vs. Eloy Perez, 12, for Broner’s WBO junior lightweight title.

1 10.5 1

Butler SO CALIFORNIA Maryland MINNESOTA

California

2.5

OREGON

DREXEL

PK

Virginia Comm

SIENA

4.5

Niagara

ST. PETER’S

3.5

Rider

Iona

13

MARIST

1

Columbia

ELON MANHATTAN

PK

Fairfield

NHL Favorite

Odds

Underdog

Flyers

-$120/ even

SENATORS

BLACKHAWKS

-$120/ even

Red Wings

DUCKS

-$145/ +$125

Blue Jackets

Feb. 29 At Hobart, Australia, Daniel Geale vs. Osumanu Adama, 12, for Geale’s IBF middleweight title;Kali Meehan vs. Kertson Manswell, 12, heavyweights. March 3 At Duesseldorf, Germany, Wladimir Klitschko vs. Jean-Marc Mormeck, 12, for Klitschko’s WBA Super World-IBF-WBO-IBO heavyweight titles. At Staples Center, Los Angeles (HBO), Yuriorkis Gamboa vs. Rocky Juarez, 12, lightweights. March 10 At TBA, Puerto Rico (SHO), Orlando Salido vs. Juan Manuel Lopez, 12, for Salido’s WBO featherweight title. March 17 At Madison Square Garden, New York (HBO), Sergio Gabriel Martinez vs. Matthew Macklin, 12, middleweights. March 24 At Johannesburg, South Africa, Nkosinathi Joyi vs. Katsunari Takayama, 12, for IBF minimumweight title. At Reliant Arena, Houston (HBO), Erik Morales vs. Danny Garcia, 12, for Morales’s WBC super lightweight title;James Kirkland Vs. Carlos Molina, 10, junior middleweights.

C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L NCAA Men's Basketball Saturday's Scores EAST American 82, Colgate 54 Bloomfield 76, Sciences (Pa.) 52 Bloomsburg 87, Clarion 85 Brandeis 52, NYU 49 Bridgeport 67, Queens (NY) 64 Bryant 59, St. Francis (Pa.) 56 Bucknell 75, Army 59 Buffalo 66, Kent St. 65 CCSU 68, Robert Morris 53 Cabrini 87, Immaculata 81 Cedarville 91, Malone 89, OT Charlotte 57, Saint Joseph’s 52 Chestnut Hill 86, Concordia (N.Y.) 73 Cornell 78, Albright 60 Dayton 87, Temple 77 DeSales 72, Widener 69 Duquesne 66, St. Bonaventure 52 Edinboro 90, East Stroudsburg 84 Farmingdale 101, Mount St. Vincent 85 Felician 61, Goldey Beacom 60 Harvard 63, Dartmouth 47 Haverford 74, Dickinson 71 Holy Cross 84, Lehigh 78 Holy Family 77, Nyack 71 King’s (Pa.) 82, Lycoming 80 LIU 79, Quinnipiac 75 Lafayette 65, Navy 63 Lebanon Valley 81, Stevenson 60 Loyola (Md.) 77, Canisius 62 Maine 89, UMBC 70 Montclair St. 77, Kean 63 Mount St. Mary (NY) 68, Old Westbury 64 Mount St. Mary’s 66, Fairleigh Dickinson 45 NJ City 65, Rutgers-Camden 54 Philadelphia 86, Post (Conn.) 75 Pitt.-Bradford 69, Penn St.-Altoona 57 Pitt.-Johnstown 89, W. Virginia St. 76 Richmond 70, Rhode Island 53 Rosemont 58, Marywood 43 Rowan 78, Ramapo 72 Rutgers-Newark 59, College of NJ 56 Seton Hall 66, Providence 57 St. Francis (NY) 99, Sacred Heart 84 St. John Fisher 72, Utica 60 St. Vincent 72, Washington & Jefferson 59 Stonehill 63, St. Rose 59 Syracuse 73, Marquette 66 Ursinus 71, Johns Hopkins 55 Wagner 89, Monmouth (NJ) 79 Washington (Md.) 84, Gettysburg 82, OT West Virginia 74, Georgetown 62 Wilkes 74, Penn St.-Wilkes-Barre 46 William Paterson 73, Richard Stockton 71 Wilmington (Del.) 83, Caldwell 78 Xavier 67, Fordham 59 SOUTH Alabama 74, Georgia 59 Alcorn St. 63, Jackson St. 60 Bethune-Cookman 59, NC A&T 56 Campbell 77, Presbyterian 65 Chattanooga 65, Appalachian St. 63 Clemson 79, Florida St. 59 Coastal Carolina 80, Charleston Southern 77, OT Coll. of Charleston 66, Furman 43 Davidson 96, Georgia Southern 74 Delaware 75, William & Mary 64 Denver 67, South Alabama 50 Duke 81, Georgia Tech 74 E. Kentucky 63, SE Missouri 59 ETSU 76, Mercer 61 Florida A&M 62, NC Central 60 Gardner-Webb 65, High Point 61, OT George Mason 61, Georgia St. 58 Hampton 57, Howard 55 Jacksonville St. 72, Tennessee St. 65 Kentucky 79, South Carolina 64 LSU 81, Mississippi 55 Longwood 85, NJIT 70 Louisiana-Monroe 54, FIU 50 MVSU 67, Alabama St. 60 Middle Tennessee 65, Louisiana-Lafayette 53 Morgan St. 73, SC State 68 Norfolk St. 78, Md.-Eastern Shore 72 North Carolina 83, Boston College 60 North Florida 88, Florida Gulf Coast 81, OT Northeastern 68, James Madison 56 Northwestern St. 83, Texas St. 68 Notre Dame 67, Louisville 65, 2OT Old Dominion 75, Towson 38 SC-Upstate 68, Kennesaw St. 53 SIU-Edwardsville 69, UT-Martin 65 Savannah St. 72, Coppin St. 60 Southern Miss. 71, Tulane 66, OT Stetson 73, Jacksonville 61 Tennessee 67, Florida 56 The Citadel 73, Samford 62 Troy 67, W. Kentucky 65 UCF 81, East Carolina 63 UNC Asheville 98, Liberty 75 UNC Wilmington 86, Hofstra 80 Vanderbilt 65, Auburn 35 Virginia 52, Miami 51 W. Carolina 67, Wofford 57 Wake Forest 58, Virginia Tech 55 Winthrop 91, VMI 84 FAR WEST BYU 81, San Francisco 56 Colorado 71, Washington St. 60 Idaho 63, Fresno St. 59 New Mexico 85, North Dakota 57 Portland 53, Pepperdine 43 Washington 57, Utah 53 SOUTHWEST Arkansas St. 75, North Texas 72 Baylor 73, Texas Tech 60 E. Illinois 74, Houston Baptist 62 Iowa St. 74, Texas A&M 50 Kansas 72, Oklahoma 61 Lamar 103, Cent. Arkansas 67 Marshall 63, Rice 61 Oral Roberts 97, S. Dakota St. 75 SMU 57, Tulsa 55 Stephen F. Austin 63, SE Louisiana 36 Texas 58, Oklahoma St. 49 Texas Southern 84, Prairie View 49 Texas-Arlington 85, Nicholls St. 55 Arkansas-Little Rock 40, Florida Atlantic 38 MIDWEST Akron 65, Miami (Ohio) 60 Ball St. 78, W. Michigan 69 Bowling Green 67, Ohio 57 Cent. Michigan 85, Toledo 69 Cleveland St. 69, Loyola of Chicago 48 E. Michigan 47, N. Illinois 40 Illinois 59, Nebraska 54 Illinois St. 75, Evansville 73 Kansas St. 75, Missouri 59 Missouri St. 69, Indiana St. 63 Oakland 93, Indiana-Purdue Indianapolis 81 Ohio St. 76, Iowa 47 South Dakota 76, Missouri-Kansas City57 St. John’s 57, Cincinnati 55 W. Illinois 75, IP-Fort Wayne 65 Wichita St. 83, S. Illinois 73 Youngstown St. 71, Ill.-Chicago 50

MEETINGS Ashley-Hanover Girls Babe Ruth Softball will meet at 7 p.m. on Monday Jan. 9th at the Ashley Fire Hall. All board members are required to attend. Parents and interested parties are invited to attend. Crestwood Boys Basketball Booster Club will hold its meeting Monday, Jan. 9, at 7 p.m. at Cavanaugh’s. We will be discussing the whiteout t-shirt sale, team picture updates, the winter social in February and the end of the season banquet. Parents of boys’ basketball players are invited to attend. Hanover Area Cheerleading Booster Club will hold its next meeting Monday, Jan. 9th at 7 p.m. at the high school cafeteria. Kingston/Forty Fort Little League will be meeting on Monday, Jan. 9th at 7 p.m. at the Kingston Rec Center. All interested members are encouraged to attend. South Wilkes-Barre Little League will meet today at 6 p.m. at the Riverside Café on Old River Road. Plans for the upcoming season will be discussed. The Crestwood Football Booster Club will hold its next meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 10, at 7 p.m. at King’s Restaurant. Parents of players and supporters of the program are invited to attend. For more information, call Tony at 430-7351. The District 2 Wrestling Coaches’ Association will hold its annual meeting on Sunday, Jan. 15 at noon at the Tunkhannock Fire Hall. All head wrestling coaches and assistants are invited. Coaches can contact President Phil Lipski for more info at pjlipski@comcast.net. The Holy Redeemer Softball Booster Club will meet Tuesday, Jan. 10th at 7 p.m. in the Holy Redeemer High School cafeteria. The Hanover Area Cheerleading Booster Club will meet Monday, Jan. 9 at 7 p.m. at the high school

www.timesleader.com

cafeteria. The Lady Patriot Basketball Booster Club will have its monthly meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 10th at 7 p.m. in the high school lobby. Upcoming events will be discussed. The booster club is still selling $1 raffle tickets that will be raffled off at Monday’s home game. The booster club is also selling tickets to win a 32 inch flat screen TV. Tickets are $5 each or three for $10. The TV will be raffled off on Jan. 30th. All parents are encouraged to attend Tuesday night’s meeting. The Wyoming Area Softball Parents Association will be meeting Tuesday, Jan. 10th at 6:30 p.m. at Sabatini’s Pizza on Wyoming Avenue in Exeter. Plans for the upcoming softball season in addition to fundraisers will be discussed. Parents of students in grades 7th through12th who have signed up for the upcoming softball season are urged to attend and participate in the planning process. REGISTRATION/TRYOUTS Duryea Little League will hold registrations for 2012 season on Jan. 24, 25, 26 and 31 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Duryea Borough building. This includes Little League, Softball, Teeners (Junior/Senior League). Fees are as follows: individual sign up for Little League or Softball $55, family signup for Little League or Softball $65, individual sign up for Teeners (Junior/Senior League) $65, family sign up for Little League or Softball, and Teeners (Junior/Senior League) $75. There will be no fundraiser. Coaches please bring your driver’s license at this time so you can be processed for a background check (no fee required. (Any questions contact Ron Ralston at 655-0203. Plains Little League/Softball will hold registration for players 4 years of age and up at Plains American Legion on the following dates. Jan. 18, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Jan. 21, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.; Feb. 1, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Feb. 12, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Interested coaches/volunteers must have their driver’s lLicense/ photo ID at time of registration. South Valley Girls Fastpitch, an affiliation of Babe Ruth Softball, will be holding sign-ups Jan. 11 and Jan. 18 from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Nanticoke Elementary Center gymnasium. The cost is $40 for the first child, $5 for each additional child. For more information, please contact Steve at 417-7217, Jay at 239-6779 or Ed at 417-1119. UPCOMING EVENTS GAR Annual Football Awards Banquet will be held Sunday, Jan. 15 in the school cafeteria. Banquet starts at 1 p.m., doors open at noon. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for children ages 7-12, and free for children ages 6 and under. Price includes awards ceremony, buffet meal and refreshments. There will also be a theme basket raffle Advanced ticket purchase is recommended by calling 829-0569. There will be a limited number of tickets available at the door. The Knights of Columbus Council 302 will conduct a basketball free-throw Competition at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 14 at the Wyoming Valley CYC on South Washington Street in Wilkes-Barre. All children ages 10-14 are eligible. Entry forms will be available at the CYC, Grandpa’s Workshop on Scott Street in Wilkes-Barre and Lasting impression on River Street in Plains. For more information, call

Bulletin Board items will not be accepted over the telephone. Items may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped off at the Times Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 18711-0250.

S O C C E R British Soccer (Home teams listed first) England FA Cup Third Round Birmingham 0, Wolverhampton Wanderers 0 Barnsley 2, Swansea 4 Brighton 1, Wrexham 1 Coventry 1, Southampton 2 Crawley Town 1, Bristol City 0 Dagenham & Redbridge 0, Millwall 0 Derby 1, Crystal Palace 0 Doncaster 0, Notts County 2 Everton 2, Tamworth 0 Fleetwood Town 1, Blackpool 5 Fulham 4, Charlton 0 Gillingham 1, Stoke 3 Hull 3, Ipswich 1 MK Dons 1, Queens Park Rangers 1 Macclesfield 2, Bolton 2 Middlesbrough 1, Shrewsbury 0 Newcastle 2, Blackburn 1 Norwich 4, Burnley 1 Nottingham Forest 0, Leicester 0 Reading 0, Stevenage 1 Sheffield United 3, Salisbury 1 Swindon 2, Wigan 1 Tottenham 3, Cheltenham 0 Watford 4, Bradford 2 West Bromwich Albion 4, Cardiff 2 Bristol Rovers 1, Aston Villa 3 League One Carlisle 4, Leyton Orient 1 Chesterfield 0, Exeter 2 Hartlepool 2, Rochdale 0 Tranmere 2, Brentford 2 Walsall 2, Bournemouth 2 League Two Aldershot 0, Oxford United 3 Crewe 3, Plymouth 2 Morecambe 1, Northampton 2 Southend 3, Port Vale 0 Scotland Scottish Cup Fourth Round Dundee 1, Kilmarnock 1 Airdrie 2, Dundee United 6 Cowdenbeath 2, Hibernian 3 Falkirk 2, East Fife 0 Forfar 0, Aberdeen 4 Hearts 1, Auchinleck Talbot 0 Inverness 1, Dunfermline 1 Livingston 1, Ayr 2 Motherwell 4, Queen’s Park 0 Partick Thistle 0, Queen of South 1 Raith Rovers 1, Morton 2 Ross County 7, Stenhousemuir 0 St. Johnstone 2, Brechin 1 St. Mirren 0, Hamilton 0 Third Division Annan Athletic 1, Clyde 0 Elgin 3, East Stirling 1 Montrose 1, Stranraer 3 English Football Leading Scorers Robin van Persie, Arsenal, 17 Demba Ba, Newcastle, 15 Sergio Aguero, Manchester City, 14 Wayne Rooney, Manchester United, 13 Ayegbeni Yakubu, Blackburn, 12 Edin Dzeko, Manchester City, 10

Emmanuel Adebayor, Tottenham, 9 Daniel Sturridge, Chelsea, 9 Mario Balotelli, Manchester City, 8 Steven Fletcher, Wolverhampton Wanderers, 8 Frank Lampard, Chelsea, 8

W O M E N ’ S B A S K E T B A L L Saturday's Scores EAST American U. 56, Colgate 43 Army 67, Bucknell 64 Bloomfield 76, Sciences (Pa.) 49 Bloomsburg 75, Clarion 68 Bridgeport 59, Queens (NY) 50 Bryant 57, St. Francis (Pa.) 52 CW Post 58, St. Thomas Aquinas 51 Caldwell 56, Wilmington (Del.) 50 Canisius 59, St. Peter’s 54 Concordia (NY) 69, Chestnut Hill 65 Edinboro 70, East Stroudsburg 50 Fairfield 63, Manhattan 59 Fairleigh Dickinson 63, Mount St. Mary’s 58 Farmingdale 62, Mount St. Vincent 35 Felician 70, Goldey Beacom 63, OT George Washington 54, Fordham 43 Haverford 60, Albright 48 Holy Family 70, Nyack 45 Immaculata 47, Cabrini 41 Iona 71, Niagara 61 Ithaca 69, Nazareth 48 Johns Hopkins 66, Ursinus 61 Kean 66, Montclair St. 64 Kenyon 71, Oberlin 46 Kings (Pa.) 83, Neumann 54 Lehigh 75, Holy Cross 60 Loyola (Md.) 67, Siena 54 Lycoming 71, Wilkes 59 Marist 82, Rider 56 Marywood 79, Rosemont 37 Messiah 74, DeSales 56 Michigan St. 75, Penn St. 65 Monmouth (NJ) 65, Wagner 42 Mount St. Mary (NY) 72, Old Westbury 44 NYU 66, Brandeis 57, OT Navy 60, Lafayette 55 Penn St.-Altoona 66, Pitt.-Bradford 60 Penn St.-Fayette 87, Penn Tech 66 Philadelphia 79, Post (Conn.) 73 Pitt.-Johnstown 72, W. Virginia St. 70 Princeton 83, Penn 48 Providence 60, DePaul 52 Quinnipiac 59, St. Francis (NY) 43 Ramapo 71, Rowan 65 Regis 77, Lesley 26 Robert Morris 86, CCSU 72 Rutgers 58, Cincinnati 47 Rutgers-Camden 53, NJ City 37 Rutgers-Newark 62, College of NJ 55 Sacred Heart 74, LIU 59 Saint Joseph’s 86, UMass 58 St. Bonaventure 61, Duquesne 53 St. John Fisher 77, Utica 69 St. Joseph’s (LI) 65, Russell Sage 46 St. Vincent 75, Washington & Jefferson 68 Syracuse 83, Pittsburgh 60 UMBC 75, Maine 55 Vermont 57, Hartford 50 Washington (Md.) 65, Gettysburg 50 West Virginia 61, Villanova 56 William Paterson 88, Richard Stockton 69


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012 PAGE 3C

➛ WWW.TIMESLEADER.COM/SPORTS

PENGUINS SUNDAY LAST FIVE GAMES

Dec. 28 at Hershey W, 6-5

Dec. 31 Bridgeport W, 4-2

Wednesday Norfolk L, 5-1

Friday Rochester W, 4-3

NEXT FIVE GAMES

Saturday Syracuse 7:05 p.m.

Tuesday at Norfolk 7:15 p.m.

Jan. 14 at St. John’s 6:30 p.m.

Jan. 15 at St. John’s 3 p.m.

Jan. 20 Manchester 7:05 p.m.

Jan. 21 Syracuse 7:05 p.m.

Fantasy GM

BRIAN STRAIT

Penguins defenseman Brian Strait had a little trouble choosing just one when it came time to fill out a few spots on his fantasy hockey roster. When you see who he had to decide between, the indecisiveness was understandable. But when it came time to pick his All-Time Great, Strait didn’t hesitate. After all, as a defenseman who grew up in Boston, who do you think Strait would pick?

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins center Zach Sill, left, scores the game’s first goal against Springfield Falcons’ goaltender Gustav Wesslau 37 seconds into the first period at Mohegan Sun Arena.

Diverse portfolios

By TOM VENESKY tvenesky@timesleader.com

Enforcers aren’t the only players who are expected to be able to play the game anymore. The same concept – one in which players are expected to contribute in areas outside of their typical roles – applies to everyone as far as the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins are concerned. That’s why head coach John Hynes wasn’t surprised when center Zach Sill, a traditional fourth line energy type, erupted for three goals in two games earlier this week. “We don’t want our players to be one-dimensional,” Hynes said. “We like to have our players not only be energy guys, hard workers, good defensive guys or enforcers, but also players that can make plays.” That’s something that is hitting home with the Penguins energy players such as Sill, Brandon DeFazio and Geoff Walker. Sure, it’s great when they go out and crash and bang, but they’re also expected to put the puck in the net on occasion. Sill said the expanded roles are a necessity because today’s game is so fast that players simply can’t be onedimensional anymore. “You can’t just play your top two lines all the time,” he said. “If this team is going to be successful, you need to have guys like myself and DeFazio chipping in once in a while. Same reason why we need guys on our first line to create energy for us now and then. The way this team is built, you need everybody chipping in on every part of the game.” Sill’s development as a player since he broke into the AHL in 2009 is a testament to that. In his rookie season, Sill registered five goals in 54 games with the Penguins. At that time, Sill said, he came into the league strictly as an energy-type player. “I always had a little bit of offensive talent, but I never really used it a lot,” Sill said. That changed last season when he scored 11 goals in 80 games, and even this season with six goals in 28

WBS Penguins understand necessity to expand roles

BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins left wing Brandon DeFazio attacks the goal against Syracuse goalkeeper Iiro Tarkki at Mohegan Sun Arena.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Penguins Geoff Walker moves the puck past Patrick McNeill of the Hershey Bears.

games. As Sill became established in the league, his game began to expand. “Later in the season you’ll see it happen as guys get more comfortable with each other on the ice. It’s all part of the development,” Sill said. Sill’s path is one that DeFazio expects to follow. He prides himself as a fourth line energy player, but at the same time DeFazio also has five goals, including three game winners. “Your first year you just want to do the right things and you have a tendency not to step outside of yourself too much,” he said. But eventually, if a player wants to stick in the lineup and progress, he has to adopt other roles in addition to the one that got him into the league in the first place. That applies to everyone, including the fourth line energy players, Walker said. But he admitted that sometimes it takes a while for a player to find a role that fits before he can focus on other areas. “You have to be able to chip in offensively sometimes and it doesn’t matter what your role is,” Walker said. “Myself and Nick Petersen play different roles out there and his job is obviously different than mine. “But the one thing we have in common is that we’re both going to try to score and help out offensively.” Because today’s game is a fast one, DeFazio said energy players can make it far. But he also pointed out that the energy guys in the NHL also do pretty well offensively, and it’s something he wants to develop early in his career. “You can’t have a single role. You can’t get away with just running around and hitting,” DeFazio said. “In today’s game you need to bring more than one thing to the team, and for an energy guy that means providing offense also. “As I grow in this game I want to add more elements. You still have to bring your main role as an energy guy, but if you want to play more and advance you have to know what you’re doing in the offensive zone.”

FORWARD – Claude Giroux (Philadelphia) and Evgeni Malkin (Pittsburgh), “Giroux has had a great year so far and Malkin has stepped up and been the guy this season. Those are my top two. I’d take them both.” DEFENSEMAN – Nicklas Lidstrom (Detroit), “He’s having another really good year. At his age, he’s one of the best top three defenseman ever.” GOALTENDER – Marc-Andre Fleury (Pittsburgh) and Tim Thomas (Boston), “Fleury is one of the best every year. Thomas has done everything for his team.” POWER PLAY SPECIALIST – Pavel Datsyuk (Detroit), “He’s one of the most talented guys in the NHL right now. On the power play he’s able to create space for other guys and make plays as good as anyone.” PENALTY KILL SPECIALIST – Craig Adams (Pittsburgh), “This is a tough one because there are a lot of guys who do it really well. Adams is a smart player and is great at blocking shots.” SHOOTOUT SPECIALIST – Patrick Kane (Chicago), “He has a good shootout percentage and his moves are fun to watch.” ENFORCER – Steve MacIntyre (Pittsburgh), “He’s the scariest guy in the NHL.” AGITATOR/PEST – Scott Hartnell (Philadelphia), “I noticed him when I was watching the Winter Classic. He’s a talented player and a good agitator.” HEAD COACH – Dan Bylsma (Pittsburgh), “No question about this one.” ALL-TIME-GREAT – Bobby Orr (Boston), “I’d like to see a defenseman in our era do what he did. It won’t happen. He could score over 100 points and he controlled the game at all times.” Bobby Orr


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Johnson retained on defensive line

Popular Penn State assistant is first choice to join staff of new coach Bill O’Brien. By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

STATE COLLEGE — The alumni and donors that packed into the ballroom at the Nittany Lion Inn applauded for Bill O’Brien. But they clapped louder and longer when the new Penn State head coach said this: “Larry Johnson, the defensive line coach who has been here for many years … is committed to coaching on my staff, and I look forward to working with Larry.” On a day when the Nittany Lions named a new football coach for the first time since February 1966, the biggest news may have been the return of Johnson, one of the program’s most successful

O’BRIEN Continued from Page 1C

In the wake of the Jerry Sandusky scandal, emotions are still raw throughout the Penn State community. O’Brien said one of his most important duties is reaching out to people. “In order to get this football family moving in the right direction – and I’m the leader of that – it’s my job to bring all the different sides together,” O’Brien said. “I understand there’s some controversy out there right now. I see that, I understand that. … We respectfully request the opportunity to earn your trust.” That’s one of many obstacles for O’Brien to overcome as he transitions from the Patriots to Penn State. The 42-year-old Massachusetts native will remain in State College today to meet with his players this afternoon before heading back Foxborough to help prepare the Patriots for a Saturday playoff game while trying to salvage the Lions’ recruiting class. “I don’t think it’s going to be easy,” O’Brien said of splitting time between the two jobs until the end of New England’s season. “I think it’s something that’s been done before, though. “I’m not as concerned about signing ‘this many’ kids the next three weeks. I’m concerned about the next 10 to 20 years here. So I think the best thing that I can do is show our team the loyalty and commitment I have for the Patriots. And go there, do the best job I can for the Patriots. … Won’t be a lot of sleep.” Another important task is fill out a coaching staff, something O’Brien said he hopes to accomplish in the next “three or four days.” Larry Johnson has already agreed to remain on board as the defensive line coach, but the rest of Paterno’s former staff remains in limbo. Acting athletic director Dave Joyner called O’Brien the unanimous first choice of the school’s six-person search committee. “We talked to him several times,” Joyner said. “I talked to

and beloved assistant coaches. “I’m excited. I’m excited for my players and my family,” Johnson said. “I get a chance to continue to move forward with what I believe in at Penn State. And to be a part of the healing process is really important to me.” Johnson – who has spent 16 years coaching in college, all with Penn State – is the only member of Joe Paterno’s old staff confirmed to be returning to work under O’Brien. As he did for the previous 12 seasons for the Lions, Johnson will be the team’s defensive line coach. After Paterno was fired on Nov. 9, Johnson was elevated to co-defensive coordinator while still working with the down linemen. Asked whether he would also like to be considered for the fulltime defensive coordinator job, Johnson replied, “Doesn’t matter

to me. A title doesn’t make me who I am. “I’ve been here this long without a title. Your success speaks for itself as a coach. I’m OK without a title, to be honest with you.” It’s that type of attitude that endeared him to players and fans alike. And O’Brien, too. Projected to be the only link to the old staff, the burden falls on Johnson to resuscitate Penn State’s wounded recruiting effort in the short time left before national signing day on Feb. 1. “He’s been a great defensive line coach for a number of years,” O’Brien said. “And then I’ve asked him to basically guide us through the recruiting process right now these three weeks because he knows a lot about these guys they have committed or that they’re recruiting. “So no additional responsibili-

ties other than just making sure he lets us know all about these guys, where they fit, who they are and where they live. That’s going to be what he does in the immediate future.” Johnson and O’Brien sat down for a few hours Friday night after the Patriots coordinator flew into State College to finalize his deal. Though Johnson had interviewed for the head job himself, he said last week he would like to stay on staff as an assistant given the right situation. After discussing football and life with O’Brien, Johnson said he made up his mind to stick with Penn State at about 1 a.m. Saturday morning, some 10 hours before the introductory press conference. Johnson said he took a “couple hours” to come to his decision. “I had to go home and pray about it,” he said. “You always

AP PHOTO

Larry Johnson answers a reporter’s questionsJohnson will remain in his position on the new Penn State staff.

have to listen, try not to make a real knee-jerk decision this early. Go home, talk to family and really have a chance to talk to all my kids and really just kind of talk it out. That’s just who I am.” And Penn State is happy to have him back. “Larry Johnson is a great per-

Going the distance with Nittany Lions

THE BILL O’BRIEN FILE BORN: October 23, 1969, Dorchester, Mass. FAMILY: Wife Colleen, sons Jack (9) and Michael (6) ALMA MATER: Brown (1992) PLAYING CAREER: Linebacker and defensive end (1990-92) COACHING CAREER: Tight Ends, Brown, 1993; Inside Linebackers, Brown, 1994; Offensive Graduate Assistant, Georgia Tech, 1995-97; Running Backs, Georgia Tech, 1998-2000; Offensive Coordinator, Georgia Tech, 2001; Assistant Head Coach and Offensive Coordinator, Georgia Tech, 2002; Running Backs, Maryland, 2003-04; Offensive Coordinator and Quarterbacks Coach, Duke, 2005-6; Coaching Assistant, New England Patriots, 2007; Wide Receivers, New England Patriots, 2008; Quarterbacks Coach, New England Patriots, 2009-10; Offensive Coordinator and Quarterbacks Coach, New England Patriots, 2011; Head Coach, Penn State, 2012. OVERALL RECORD: No previous head coaching experience ASSISTED UNDER: George O’Leary (Georgia Tech); Ralph Friedgen (Maryland); Bill Belichick (New England Patriots) HIGHLIGHTS: Georgia Tech running game finished no lower than third in Atlantic Coach Conference in three seasons as the position coach for the Yellow Jackets. Georgia Tech led the ACC in passing and finished third in scoring in 2001. Under O’Brien’s tutelage, Patriots quarterback Tom Brady became the first unanimous Associated Press MVP in 2010. This season, the Patriots are second in the NFL in total offense (428 yards per game) and passing (317.8 yards); and tops in the AFC in scoring (32.1 points).

Former Valley West star Lewis ready to give new Penn State coach a big reception. By JOHN ERZAR jerzar@timesleader.com

A message that reads like his final farewell

The hiring of Bill O’Brien as Penn State’s new football coach did one thing for Eugene Lewis. It solidified the former Wyoming Valley West star’s verbal commitment to play for the Nittany Lions in the fall. “Actually, it made my decision easier,” said Lewis, who played quarterback the past two seasons but will be moved to receiver at the collegiate level. “I’m excited about it and I’m interested to see what kind of offense he’s going to run.” So excited that the 6-foot-3, 200-pound Lewis said he is ready to tell other colleges that they are likely out of the running. He has offers from nearly two dozen Division I programs, with Oregon turning up the recruiting in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky scandal that resulted in Joe Paterno’s firing. “I’m going to probably tell some of the coaches that I’m sure about going to Penn State,” Lewis said. “I’ll thank them for everything they’ve done in recruiting me, but I’m pretty sure Penn State is what I want to do.” O’Brien’s name didn’t surface as a major candidate until last Sunday and he was a relative unknown compared to others rumored for the job. Lewis, though, liked the fact O’Brien is coming from the New England Patriots where he is the offensive coordinator. “He’s at a place where they win and they win a lot,” Lewis said. “Bill Belichick is one of the best coaches in the NFL. He’s under great people and handles himself in a great way.” Lewis only caught the tail end of O’Brien’s press conference. O’Brien is prohibited from contacting him and other high

Passed over, Tom Bradley releases letter of appreciation for his time at Penn State.

NOBODY

By DEREK LEVARSE dlevarse@timesleader.com

STATE COLLEGE — It had everything but the word “goodbye.” After four years as a player and 33 more as a coach, Tom Bradley faces a possible future away from Penn State. On Saturday, he authored a letter to the Penn State community, expressing his pride and admiration for his alma mater. “No matter the challenges that the university may face, Penn State will always have my support,” Bradley wrote. “This is forever my home and forever my family. It is important that we come together to support our players and our university. Now is the time to demonstrate that we are – and always will be –

him individually several times, and every time I talked to him, the more impressed I was. I think you saw it. He’s a humble guy. He has a lot of fire in his belly.” One high-profile endorsement came courtesy of his current boss in New England. “Over the course of his long coaching career, Bill O’Brien has met every personal and professional challenge head on with great passion and competitiveness,” Patriots coach Bill Belichick said in a statement. “I expect Bill to draw on his deep background in college

Bradley

Penn State.” Bradley, the Nittany Lions’ long-time defensive coordinator, was named interim coach on Nov. 9 after the firing

of Joe Paterno. He had applied for the full-time job but was informed Friday afternoon by acting athletic director Dave Joyner that he had not been picked to succeed Paterno. On Saturday, Joyner insisted that Bradley was seriously considered for the head job, which ultimately went to New England Patriots offensive coordinator Bill O’Brien. “A lot of consideration,” Joyner said. “We didn’t interview a lot of people. We thought about a lot of people, we talked to a lot of people, but we didn’t officially interview a ton of people. “But Coach Bradley got a lot of

son, a great man, a great individual,” acting athletic director Dave Joyner said. “If you’ve ever talked to any players that have played here, you know how they feel about him. “I’m thrilled that Larry Johnson is staying on this staff to help this program.”

AP PHOTO

Penn State’s new football coach Bill O’Brien, poses with his wife Colleen O’Brien and their son Michael, 6, after he was introduced.

football and the NFL to continue attracting and developing top players. “For five years, Bill’s outstanding work with our quarterbacks and entire offense has led to re-

serious consideration. “Tom Bradley’s a fine person. He’s a great coach. And when I talked to him yesterday, it was expected, but he was very magnanimous. He was very gracious. He talked to me about maintaining the Penn State family.” Though defensive line coach Larry Johnson is the lone coach from Paterno’s staff confirmed to return, Joyner said that Bradley and the rest of the assistants will sit down with O’Brien this week as the new coach fills out his staff. “I’ve made that known to all of the coaches,” Joyner said. “Now, realistically, some may not be here. That’s the way life is, and they know that, and we’ve had that conversation. I was very clear that coach O’Brien wants to talk to all of them. It wasn’t that we singled Larry out. He just happened to get in line first.” But Bradley has brushed off questions about potentially returning as an assistant under a

cord-setting performances. His presence and command before our team has grown into that of a inspirational leader. This is a great match between a storied program and a old-school football coach.”

new head coach, and his remarks Saturday could be read as both a thank you to the university and a farewell letter. Some former Penn State lettermen such as Brandon Short and LaVar Arrington have expressed their displeasure at Joyner’s decision to go outside Penn State to hire Paterno’s replacement. Joyner said he expected some of the vitriol he has received “to a degree” but said he believes that attitude will begin to change. “If there’s been anything negative, people will tend to say that before they start saying positive things,” Joyner said. “So I think you’re seeing, more and more, as people think about this program and Coach O’Brien, they’re starting to say, ‘Hmm. Wait a minute. I can see what these people (were thinking).’ “And hopefully after today, you’ll see some of what we saw, a lot of what we saw, in Coach O’Brien.”

Continued from Page 1C

hot commodity, a proven track record, a name-brand to sell the program’s faithful? “Would I have liked a standing head coach? Sure,” said Nichols, who reiterated his role on the search committee was largely an academic representation. “But the pool out there of standing head coaches, it actually is not as impressive as it looks from the outside.” Here’s how it appears from the inside. Penn State couldn’t land a head-turning coach with star quality, so they turned to a guy who would save them some bucks. O’Brien’s five-year contact at $2.5 million per year ranks in the middle of the pack of Big Ten coaches.

school players until he retakes an NCAA recruiting exam. Penn State assistant Larry Johnson, the “I’m excit- only member of Paterno’s ed about it staff confirmed to be and I’m interested returning, said Saturday that he into see to call what kind tends recruits today. of offense Penn State host most he’s going will of its 2012 to run.” recruiting next Eugene Lewis class in WVC standout weekend and PSU recruit State College. Lewis made his verbal commitment in August and didn’t sway despite the upheaval in Happy Valley. Several times during the high school season he reaffirmed his pledge to the Lions. “I’m excited to talk to him and build a relationship,” Lewis said. Lewis played receiver only a handful of plays this season, catching three passes for 24 yards. As a sophomore, he caught 26 passes for 606 yards and eight touchdowns during the regular season. He is coming off a solid performance in the Offense-Defense All-American Game in Dallas, Texas. “It was good,” Lewis said. “I played wide receiver and had two catches. And I did all the punt returns, too. My first punt return I had about 20 yards on it. A lot of them I fair caught, and another I returned about 10 or 15 yards.” Lewis’ football career might have one more stop before Penn State, as the Pennsylvania roster for the Big 33 Game is scheduled to be released today.

A cost-cutting move? “There’s no such thing as a perfect coach,” reasoned Nichols. Sometimes these guys from nowhere turn out to be Andy Reid, who came out of obscurity as a Green Bay Packers assistant to lead the Philadelphia Eagles to five NFC championship games and a Super Bowl appearance. Sometimes they wind up as Charlie Weiss, the last offensive coordinator to come to college off Belichick’s New England staff before bombing at Notre Dame. “I believe in myself,” O’Brien said. He won’t have much time to earn Penn State’s faith. Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.


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COLLEGE ROUNDUP

Hammonds helps King’s hand Lycoming first loss The Times Leader staff

WILKES-BARRE – Lycoming’s Ihsann Davis watched his last-second leaning jumper hit the backboard and rim out as King’s held on to claim an 82-80 win over the previously unbeaten Warriors Saturday afternoon at Scandlon Gymnasium. Kyle Hammonds drained a pair of free throws with 11 seconds left to play to put the Monarchs up 81-78. Davis sank both ends of a one and-one to cut the lead to 81-80. The Monarchs’ Kyle Stackhouse hit the second of a pair of free throws with four seconds left to set the scene for the final shot. The Monarchs hit 12-of-28

attempts from beyond the arc and shot 7-of-15 in the second half. Hammonds led the Monarchs in scoring with 18 points including shooting 4-of-9 from long range and adding five assists. Meyers alum Keyton Winder posted a double-double with 16 points and 10 rebounds. Wilkes 74, PSU Wilkes-Barre 46

Matt Mullins scored a gamehigh 21 points and junior Tyler Breznitsky came off the bench to add 18 more tallies as Wilkes cruised to a win in non-league action Saturday afternoon at the Marts Center.

Kendall Hinze joined Mullins and Breznisky in double figures, finishing with 11 points and nine rebounds. Frank Peters led PSU WilkesBarre with 14 points and a game-high 12 rebounds.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

King’s 83, Neumann 54

Celia Rader led four players in double figures with 19 points and four rebounds. Marissa Manning followed with 12 points and two blocks. Paige Carlin tallied 10 points, six rebounds and three assists, and Katlin Michaels also added 10 points with two assists. Brittany Muscatell chipped in

WRESTLING Continued from Page 1C

Wyoming Area’s Andy Schutz (132 pounds), Coughlin’s Frankie Mahmoud (138) and Hazleton Area’s Chad Hoffman (195) also were victorious over previously undefeated wrestlers. The bout between Krasavage and Pasone pitted two of the most exciting grapplers to watch in the area as the near-capacity crowd at Lake-Lehman was into every move of the match. Krasavage jumped out to a 5-0 lead and was up 7-1 after the second period by recording three takedowns. From there, he relaxed and held on for the victory. “My game plan was to get in his face, keep him moving try to get an angle and get a different kind of shot, one that I usually don’t hit,” said Krasavage, who also earned the tournament’s Outstanding Wrestler Award. Krasavage’s win might have been even more important because it helped secure the team championship for the Spartans, who scored 156.50 points, holding off Coughlin (156) by a half point and Pittston Area (152.50). The Spartans also crowned a champion in Travis Roper at 120 and a pair of runner-ups in James Wright (106) and Tom Smulowitz (170) and three third-place medalists to help in the scoring. “It shows that we’re working hard and wrestling well and now we have to go from here, it’s just another day,” Spartans coach Steve Barber said. “I hope that we’ve shown that we’re right there with everyone else.” Schutz pulled out a last-second victory over his rival, Austin Harry, getting his first win over the Lake-Lehman grappler this season in three tries. The Warriors junior picked up reversal with four seconds left in the match for a 6-5 win. “There wasn’t much going through my mind, just try and wrestle,” Schutz said. “I knew time was running out and he’s tough.” Mahmoud dealt Berwick’s Kevin Laubach his first setback of the season with a 7-5 overtime decision and his first tournament title in his high school career. Hoffman handed Nanticoke’s Pedro Bracero his first loss

PENGUINS Continued from Page 1C

faceoff circle with the puck on his stick. Walker ripped the potential game-tying shot toward the net, but Syracuse goaltender Jeff Drouins-Deslauriers made a brilliant blocker save to squelch the Penguins last opportunity to even things up. “That would’ve been a nice one to get,” Walker said. “He (Deslauriers) played really well tonight.” Deslauriers was the biggest reason behind the Penguins’ 4-3 loss to the Crunch. He stopped 32 shots, including numerous highlight reel saves in the third period that frustrated the Penguins. The loss drops the Penguins to 19-121-4 and they remain in third place in the East Division, two points behind Norfolk. “Our biggest enemy tonight was their goaltender,” Penguins coach John Hynes said. “He came up with some huge saves late in the game. He was our biggest enemy.”

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Kyle Krasavage (front) earns congratulations after his win over Meyers’ Vito Pasone in the 126-pound finals of the Wyoming Valley Conference tournament on Saturday at Lake-Lehman.

of 2011-12 with a fall in 3:03. “I knew the bracket was tough and I had to wrestle as tough as I could,” Mahmoud said. “And now that I won I have more confidence in myself to do things I want to do.” Coughlin’s Brad Emerick was the lone unbeaten to make it through the tournament with a still flawless record. The Crusaders junior pinned Pittston Area’s Chris Wesolowski in 2:55 in the finals to run his mark to 13-0 and to pick up his third tournament title this season to go along with the Phoenixville and Kiwanis events. “I wanted it a lot. I took third last year and I wanted to do better than last year,” Emerick said. “I’m just trying to wrestle the best I could and hope for a nice district title at the end.” The Crusaders and Hazleton Area crowned the most titlists on Saturday night. Joining Emerick and Mahmoud was Bobby Hawkins at 106. Hazleton Area’s Larry Romanchik (113) pulled off the biggest upset of the night defeating Pittston Area’s Jamie Scarantino, who was the top seed by a 6-4 But not the only one. Time was the other, as the Penguins pressed in the late stages of the third period and generated several sure-thing scoring chances on seemingly every shift before the clock expired. Bryan Lerg felt the frustration after he skated across the crease, stopped at the post and held the puck as Deslauriers went down. With the top half of the net open, Lerg lifted a shot only to have Deslauriers raise his leg and make the save with his skate. “I’d like to have that one back,” Lerg said. “(Deslauriers) was on fire.” After a 1-1 tie in the first period – Matt Rust connected for the Penguins – Syracuse pulled away in the second. A Ben Street hooking penalty put the Crunch on the power play, and former Penguin Luca Caputi dished a pass to Kyle Cumiskey in the slot to give Syracuse a 2-1 lead. The Crunch scored again minutes later when Kyle Palmieri stopped behind the Penguins net, reversed direction and put a back-

score. Cougar 220-pounder Taylor Schermerhorn also won for the fourth-place finishers (118.50 points) with a fall over GAR’s Zachary Faust. Meyers’ Darren Stucker (145 pounds), Berwick’s Anthony Talanca (152), Crestwood’s Matt Hammerstone (160), Tunkhannock’s Charlie Generotti (170) and Hanover Area’s Steve Radzwilla (182) all won their first WVC tournament championships. Team Scores: 1. Wyoming Valley West (WVW) 156.50; 2. Coughlin (Cou) 156; 3. Pittston Area (PA) 152.50; 4. Hazleton Area (Haz) 135; 5. Lake-Lehman (LL) 118.50; 6. Crestwood (Cre) 111; 7. Meyers (Mey) 110; 8. Berwick (Ber) 98, Dallas (Dal) 98; 10. Hanover Area (Han) 75; 11. Wyoming Area (WA) 69; 12. Tunkhannock (Tun) 65; 13. Nanticoke (Nan) 60; 14. GAR (GAR) 58 Finals 106 – Bobby Hawkins (Cou) dec James Wright (WVW) 6-2 113 – Larry Romanchik (Haz) dec Jamie Scarantino (PA) 6-4 120 – Travis Roper (WVW) dec Justin Elick (Mey) 12-9 126 – Kyle Krasavage (WVW) dec Vito Pasone (Mey) 10-3 132 – Andy Schutz (WA) dec Austin Harry (LL) 6-5 138 – Frankie Mahmoud (Cou) dec Kevin Laubach (Ber) 7-5, OT 145 – Darren Stucker (Mey) dec Angelo Lussi (PA) 3-1 152 – Anthony Talanca (Ber) pinned Maurice Wood (Nan) 4:42 160 – Matt Hammerstone (Cre) maj dec Bill Dixon (Dal) 12-4 170 – Charlie Generotti (Tun) dec Tom Smulowitz (WVW) 5-1 182 – Steve Radzwilla (Han) dec Roger Legg (Cre) 16-7 195 – Chad Hoffman (Haz) pinned Pedro Bracero (Nan) 3:02

hander between Brad Thiessen’s skate and the post to make it 3-1. But the Penguins weren’t finished. “We had as many opportunities as they did and we were playing good hockey,” Hynes said. “Our team was headed in the right direction.” Less than two minutes into the third period, Walker deflected an Alex Grant point shot for a power play goal to cut the Crunch’s lead to 3-2. It was the fourth time in the last five games that the Penguins scored a power play goal. A hustle play by Brian Gibbons gave the Penguins another momentum boost minutes later when he blew by a Syracuse defender and broke in on Deslauriers, who made the initial save and another off the rebound to Jason Williams in the slot. Palmieri then blasted a onetimer from the slot minutes later to make it 4-2. But the Penguins answered when Walker put a shot over Deslauriers’ shoulder to draw within one with seven minutes left.

with eight assists and eight rebounds. Lycoming 71, Wilkes 59

Two players for Wilkes scored in double digits: Whitney Connolly with 13 and Megan Kazmerski with 13. Kazmerski also added six rebounds and one steal.

WRESTLING

RIT 30, King’s 16 King’s 30, Oswego State 20

The King’s wrestling team split a pair of matches at the annual Pennsylvania/New York Duals on Saturday at Lycoming. All-American Mike Reilly improved to 18-1 on the year 220 – Taylor Schermerhorn (Haz) pinned Za-

chary Faust (GAR) 5:05 285 – Brad Emerick (WVW) pinned Chris Wesolowski (PA) 2:55 Semifinals 106 – Wright (WVW) dec Glazenski (Han) 4-2; Hawkins (Cou) pinned Tomasura (LL) 3:52 113 – Scarantino (PA) dec Gray (Cre) 7-2; Romanchack (Haz) dec Degraba (Dal) 2-1 120 – Roper (WVW) maj dec Ciprich (Cou) 16-6; Elick (Mey) pinned Vopava (Haz) 1:27 126 – Pasone (Mey) pinned MacMillan (LL) 1:02; Krasavage (WVW) tech fall Woznock (Ber) 19-3, 3:25 132 – Harry (LL) dec Cheek (WVW) 10-4; Schutz (WA) pinned Alston (Mey) 3:09 138 – Laubach (Ber) dec Heck (WA) 8-3; Mahmoud (Cou) maj dec Wesolowski (PA) 12-4 145 – Stucker (Mey) pinned Meloro (Cou) 2:40; Lussi (PA) tech fall Geroski (Cre) 18-3, 5:59 152 – Talanca (Ber) dec Carty (Mey) 7-1; Wood (Nan) dec Ardo (PA) 5-3, OT 160 – Hammerstone (Cre) pinned O’Brien (WA) 5:45; Dixon (Dal) dec Dwyer (WVW) 5-3 170 – Generotti (Tun) tech fall Maslowski (Nan) 15-0, 4:35; Smulowitz (WVW) dec Biesadeski (Haz) 9-5 182 – Radzwilla (Han) pinned Cowman (WVW) 5:15; Legg (Cre) pinned Dragon (LL) 1:00 195 – Hoffman (Haz) pinned Artsma (Dal) 3:40; Bracero (Nan) dec Minich (PA) 7-4 220 – Faust (GAR) pinned Ropietski (Han) 2:24; Schermerhorn (Haz) dec Jola (Ber) 3-0 285 – Emerick (Cou) pinned Gresham (GAR) :30; Wesolowski (PA) dec Drake (Tun) 4-2 Third Place 106 – Glazenski (Han) dec Korch (Cre) 5-1 113 – Stuart (LL) dec DeGraba (Dal) 4-0 120 – Lutecki (PA) dec Ciprich (Cou) 9-2 126 – Ritz (Cre) pinned Spachman (Haz) :49 132 – Cheek (WVW) dec Alston (Mey) 7-5 138 – Heck (WA) pinned Wesolowski (PA) :43 145 – Cordes (WVW) dec Macosky (Dal) 3-1, OT 152 – Vitale (Han) dec Ardo (PA) 5-3 160 – Dwyer (WVW) dec O’Brien (WA) 2-1 170 – Oliveri (Dal) maj dec Taylor (GAR) 9-1 182 – Olson (Cou) dec Dragon (LL) 6-1 195 – Barbacci (LL) dec Artsma (Dal) 6-4 220 – Phillips (Cou) dec Danaher (PA) 3-2, OT 285 – Gresham (GAR) dec Ohl (Ber) 8-4 Fifth Place 106 – Johnson (Haz) forfeit Tomasura (LL) 113 – Gray (Cre) DQ Luton (GAR) 120 – Vopava (Haz) forfeit Talanca (Ber) 126 – Woznock (Ber) maj dec MacMillan (LL) 9-1 132 – Soboleski (Ber) dec Rush (PA) 8-1 138 – Nealon (Mey) dec Mingy (Dal) 4-2, OT 145 – Meloro (Cou) dec Geroski (Cre) 10-4 152 – Carty (Mey) dec Welkey (GAR) 13-11 160 – Vannucci (Cou) pinned Wright (LL) 2:35 170 – Biesadeski (Haz) pinned Maslowski (Nan) 1:23 182 – Cowman (WVW) pinned Nallin (PA) 2:06 195 – Minich (PA) pinned Jones (GAR) 2:47 220 – Ropietski (Han) pinned Jola (Ber) 2:40 285 – Drake (Tun) forfeit Jones (LL) Third Round Consolations 106 – Johnson (Haz) pinned Conner (Ber) :38; Korch (Cre) dec Stonier (Tun) 7-1 113 – Stuart (LL) maj dec Brady (Nan) 12-0; Luton (GAR) pinned Tirko (WVW) 3:39 120 – Talanca (Ber) pinned Klimovitch (Dal) 4:03; Lutecki (PA) forfeit Pavlichko (Tun) 126 – Spachman (Haz) forfeit Young (Dal); Ritz (Cre) pinned Mauriello (WA) 3:18 132 – Rush (PA) dec Mussoline (Haz) 13-11, OT; Soboleski (Ber) maj dec O’Day (GAR) 10-0 138 – Mingy (Dal) dec Masters (Haz) 2-0; Nealon (Mey) dec Packer (Tun) 7-5 145 – Macosky (Dal) dec Kyttle (Ber) 6-1; Cordes (WVW) dec Siegel (Tun) 4-1 152 – Vitale (Han) pinned Gulius (Cou) 1:32; Welkey (GAR) dec Winters (LL) 6-4 160 – Vannucci (Cou) maj dec Eck (Han) 14-4; Wright (LL) maj dec Colatosti (Nan) 15-6 1 70 – Taylor (GAR) dec Brodginski (Cre) 7-1; Oliveri (Dal) pinned Cole (Cou) 3:38 182 – Olson (Cou) pinned Reese (GAR) 2:39; Nallin (PA) pinned Hamilton (Nan) 4:42 195 – Jones (GAR) pinned Sweeney (Cre) 4:04; Barbacci (LL) forfeit Whiting (WA) 220 – Danaher (PA) pinned Monk (Dal) 3:16; Phillips (Cou) pinned Gregory (Tun) :46 285 – Jones (LL) pinned Womer (Cre) 3:59; Ohl (Ber) pinned Popovich (WA) 2:42 Consolation Semifinals 106 – Glazenski (Han) pinned Johnson (Haz) 2:52; Korch (Cre) maj dec Tomasura (LL) 10-0 113 – Stuart (LL) dec Gray (Cre) 8-3; Degraba (Dal) DQ Luton (GAR) 120 – Ciprich (Cou) default Talanca (Ber) :55; Lutecki (PA) pinned Vopava (Haz) 2:00 126 – Spachman (Haz) dec MacMillan (LL) 12-9; Ritz (Cre) pinned Woznock (Ber) 3:23 132 – Cheek (WVW) maj dec Rush (PA) 12-1; Alston (Mey) dec Soboleski (Ber) 6-4 138 – Heck (WA) dec Mingy (Dal) 10-4; Wesolowski (PA) dec Nealon (Mey) 11-9, 3OT 145 – Macosky (Dal) dec Meloro (Cou) 8-6; Cordes (WVW) dec Geroski (Cre) 1-0 152 – Vitale (Han) dec Carty (Mey) 10-4; Ardo (PA) tech fall Welkey (GAR) 19-2, 4:32 160 – O’Brien (WA) pinned Vannucci (Cou) 2:59; Dwyer (WVW) pinned Wright (LL) 3:41 170 – Taylor (GAR) pinned Maslowski (Nan) 3:55; Oliveri (Dal) dec Biesadeski (Haz) 6-4 182 – Olson (Cou) dec Cowman (WVW) 7-3; Dragon (LL) pinned Nallin (PA) 2:08 195 – Artsma (Dal) pinned Jones (GAR) 3:42; Barbacci (LL) dec Minich (PA) 9-3 220 – Danaher (PA) dec Ropietski (Han) 6-3; Phillips (Cou) dec Jola (Ber) 3-1, OT 285 – Jones (LL) dec Gresham (GAR) 3-2, 4OT; Drake (Tun) pinned Ohl (Ber) 1:48

Oswego’s Kyle Sheridan. with a pair of victories at 184. Reilly bested RIT’s Tyler Brent Wilkes takes four at Ursinus 12-1 before earning a hardfought 8-7 win over Oswego’s The No. 14 Wilkes wrestling Cameron Mills. team finished a perfect 4-0 at Former Lake-Lehman star the North/South Duals held at Shane Stark gained a 4-2 victory Ursinus. Senior 149-pounder over Nick Fuschino of RIT beAnthony Dattolo led the way fore pinning Eric Anderson of with a 3-0 mark collecting his Oswego in 3:03. 100th career win in his final Chris Mazzocchi also won match of the afternoon. both matches at 149, tallying a The Colonels began the day pin of Adam Hugunine of RIT in with a 24-13 win over Merchant 4:34 before winning 10-8 over Marine, then followed with a Brendan Heffernan of Oswego. 32-6 drubbing of No. 20 Stevens. At 285, Peter Dwyer was also a Wilkes finished the day by double-winner. Dwyer won his claiming a 19-18 decision over first match with a 3-1 decision No. 19 Messiah and a 36-12 over Nick Stewart of RIT before victory over West Chester. registering a 2-0 decision over

HIGH SCHOOL ROUNDUP

MMI Prep posts victory over Tech

The Times Leader staff

FREELAND – Kristen Purcelli posted a double-double to propel MMI Prep to a 55-34 victory over Columbia-Montour VoTech in a non-conference girls basketball game Saturday. Purcelli grabbed 10 rebounds and contributed 19 points for the Preppers. Twelve of her points came in a fourth-quarter effort that saw MMI Prep outscore Tech by a 25-11 margin. The Preppers’ Maria Carrato and Kayla Karchner each chipped in 12 points. Brittany Musselman added 15 points for the Rams.

COLUMBIA-MONTOUR VO-TECH (34): Schnickley 1 0-1 2, Musselman 4 7-8 15, Cragle 1 6-8 8, Crawford 1 3-4 5, Williamoski 2 0-0 4, Ventura 0 0-0 0, Creasoli 0 0-0 0. Totals: 9 16-19 34. MMI PREP (55): Purcelli 7 5-6 19, Stanzida 3 1-2 7, Lobitz 1 0-0 2, Carrato 4 3-8 12, Shearer 1 1-6 3, Karchner 5 1-4 12, Lara 0 0-0 0. Totals: 21 11-28 55. CMVT............................................ 12 3 8 11 — 34 MMI................................................ 5 15 10 25 — 55 3-Point Field Goals— CMVT none; MMI 2 (Carrato, Karchner)

Tamaqua 44, Hazleton Area 33

Maria Streisel scored a gamehigh 16 points to lead Tamaqua past Hazleton Area. The Cougars were led by Josie Bachman with 10 points. HAZLETON AREA (33): Bono 1 0-0 2, Schoennagle 2 2-2 7, Wolk 1 0-0 2, Marchetti 0 0-0 0, Sitch 0 0-0 0, Pfeil 0 0-0 0, Woznick 0 1-2 1, Bachman 4 1-2 10, Ciccozzi 2 0-0 4, Carter 1 0-0 2, Zamonas 2 0-0 5. Totals 13 4-6 33. TAMAQUA (44): Hope 5 4-6 14, Demetriades 0 0-0 0, Trainer 0 0-0 0, Kabilko 0 4-6 4, M. Streisel 4 8-10 16, C. Streisel 3 0-0 7, Valesak 0 0-0 0, Solt 0 3-4 3. Totals 12 19-26 44. Hazleton Area ...................... 8 13 6 6 - 33 Tamaqua ............................... 12 14 8 10 - 44 3-Point Field Goals: Schoennagle, Bachman,

Zamonas, C. Steisel.

Crestwood 70, Susquehanna 23

Sydney Myers scored 18 points to carry Crestwood to a victory over Susquehanna. Amy Jesikiewicz added 10 points for the Comets. Amber Dubanowitz led Susquehanna scorers with six points.

SUSQUEHANNA (23): Carmody 2 0-2 4, Hargett 1 0-0 2, Barnes 0 0-0 0, Burdick 0 0-0 0, Hargett 0 0-0 0, Carvin 1 0-0 2, Mroz 1 0-0 2, Dubanowitz 3 0-0 6, Bianco 1 0-0 2, Serfilippi 2 1-1 5, Williams 0 0-0 0. Totals: 11 1-3 23. CRESTWOOD (70): Kendra 0 0-0 0, Lutz 2 0-0 6, Andrews 1 2-2 4, Mazzoni 1 0-0 2, Rutkowski 2 0-0 4, Gegaris 4 0-0 9, Cronauer 1 0-0 2, Myers 7 4-6 18, Jesikiewicz 4 0-0 10, Hislop 2 0-0 5, Ciavarella 1 0-0 2, Muse 1 0-0 2. Totals: 29 8-10 70 Susquehanna............................... 4 6 6 7 — 23 Crestwood .................................... 26 19 15 10 — 70 3-Point Field Goals— SUS none; CRE 4 (Jesikiewicz 2, Ciavarella, Gegaris)

H.S. WRESTLING

Wyoming Seminary 54, St. Anthony’s (N.Y.) 13

Winning nine straight bouts at one point, the Blue Knights cruised to victory over their out-of-state opponent. Ty White, Jack Walsh, Matt Doggett and Evan Botwin recorded pins for Seminary in the win. 106 – Ben Lamantia (SA) dec. Danny Boychuck, 2-0; 113 – Joe Ruff (SA) pinned Michael Casey, 1:19; 120 – Evan Botwin (WS) pinned Marshall Winston, 3:53; 126 – Dom Malone (WS) maj. dec. Sam Ward, 21-8; 132 – Jamel Hudson (SA) maj. dec. Jesse Holton, 15-6; 138 – Ty White (WS) pinned Kevin Jackson, 2:52; 145 – Jack Walsh (WS) pinned Andrew Pryor, 3:22; 152 – Cohl Fulk (WS) maj. dec. Matthew Szilagyi, 16-3; 160 – Ryan McMullan (WS) dec. John Vrasadas, 11-9; 170 – Eric Morris (WS) tech. fall Chris Salerno, 15-0; 182 – Connor Wasson (WS) maj. dec. Peter Corbett, 13-2; 195 – Matt Doggett (WS) pinned Neil Impellizeri, 3:00; 220 – A.J. Vizcarrondo (WS) maj. dec. Andrew Auriemma, 16-5; 285 – Michael Johnson (WS) won by forfeit; Note: Match started at 132 pounds.

Stricker leads Tournament of Champions The Associated Press

KAPALUA, Hawaii — Steve Stricker took a big step toward booking another trip to Maui with a 10-under 63 to build a five-shot lead Saturday through two rounds at the Tournament of Champions. Stricker played his final five holes in 5 under, including a 3wood to 12 feet for eagle on the 15th hole that gave him some sep-

aration from Webb Simpson and the eagle-eagle finish by Kevin Na. Stricker was at15-under131and will be paired Sunday with Simpson, who shot 68. Na was not even part of the picture until holing a 5-iron from 221 yards for eagle on the 17th, and then hitting 3-wood to 10 feet for eagle on the final hole. NOTES: Pittsburgh reassigned D Robert Bortuzzo on Saturday and was in the lineup against Syracuse. Bortuzzo hadn’t played since Dec. 8 when he suffered a concussion. Before being called up to Pittsburgh on Nov. 29, Bortuzzo appeared in 11 games for Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, registering a goal and two assists.

AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER

Penguins’ defenseman Robert Bortuzzo and Dan Sexton of the Crunch go after the puck Saturday night.

The goal was Walker’s second of the game and the Penguins would generate several more chances. Eric Tangradi nearly tied it with less than a minute left when he deflected a shot while posted in front. The puck went

under Deslauriers but rolled just wide of the goal. “We did a lot of good things tonight and we had our chances,” Walker said. “If there’s ever a time you can take positives from a loss, it’s tonight.”

Syracuse .................................................... 1 2 1 — 4 Penguins .................................................... 1 0 2 — 3 First Period—Scoring – 1. SYR, Matt Smaby 1 (Holland) power play 10:29. 2. WBS, Matt Rust 2 (Thompson, Gibbons) 11:13. Penalties – SYR, Holland (tripping) 8:19; WBS, Walker (interference) 8:52; SYR, Bell (elbowing) 19:18. Second Period—Scoring – 3. SYR, Kyle Cumiskey 2 (Caputi, Holland) power play 6:36. 4. SYR, Kyle Palmieri 20 (Caputi, Rodney) 9:25. Penalties – WBS, Street (hooking) 5:00; SYR, bench-served by Palmieri (too many men) 11:30; WBS, Strait (interference) 14:07; Third Period—Scoring – 5. WBS, Geoff Walker 7 (Grant, Tangradi) power play 1:33. 6. SYR, Kyle Palmeiri 21 (Bell) 12:10. 7. WBS, Geoff Walker 8 (Grant) 13:08. Penalties – SYR, Smaby (tripping) :51; WBS, Bortuzzo (high-sticking) 3:05; SYR, bench-served by Holland (too many men) 7:09. Shots on goal—Syracuse– 9-9-11-29; Penguins – 12-8-15-35 Power-play Opportunities—Syracuse – 2 of 4; Penguins – 1 of 5 Goaltenders—Syracuse – Jeff Drouin-Deslauriers 6-7-0 (32 saves – 35 shots); Penguins – Brad Thiessen 12-10-2 (25-29) Starters—Syracuse – G Jeff Drouin-Deslauriers, D Matt Smaby, D Kyle Cumiskey, LW Mark Bell, C Brandon McMillan, RW Kyle Palmieri; Penguins – G Brad Thiessen, D Brian Strait, D Robert Bortuzzo, LW Brandon DeFazio, C Zach Sill, RW Ryan Craig Three Stars—1. SYR, Kyle Palmieri (two goals) 2. WBS, Geoff Walker (two goals) 3. SYR, Luca Caputi (two assists) Referee—Francis Charron. Linesmen–Jud Ritter, Bob Fyrer Attendance—6,243


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012 PAGE 7C

Saints overpower Lions

By BRETT MARTEL AP Sports Writer

NEW ORLEANS — Drew Brees and the Saints keep pouring on the points, rolling up the wins and rewriting the record books, too. Brees led an unstoppable offense by throwing for 466 yards and three touchdowns, and New Orleans poured it on in the second half for a 45-28 NFC wildcard victory over the Detroit SAINTS Lions on Saturday night. New Orleans broke the postLIONS season mark for total yards with 626, beating the record set 49 years ago. Brees hit on 33 of 43 passes while throwing for the most yards in a regulation playoff game. He highlighted his night with three completions of at least 40 yards. As usual, the quarterback had plenty of help from an offense that set an NFL record for yards from scrimmage this season (7,474). The Saints (14-3) will travel to San Francisco (13-3) for next Saturday’s second-round game. Matthew Stafford threw for 380 yards and three TDs for the Lions (10-7), who simply could not keep pace in their first playoff appearance since 1999. They have lost seven straight postseason games. All-Pro receiver Calvin Johnson had 12 receptions for 211 yards and two touchdowns in his playoff debut for Detroit, but that was not nearly enough as the Saints’ defense responded in the fourth quarter with two interceptions by Jabari Greer. The teams combined for 1,083 yards, tying an NFL playoff record set by Buffalo and Miami on Dec. 30, 1995.

AP PHOTO

New York Giants quarterbacks Eli Manning (10) and David Carr loosen up duringpractice Friday.

Falcons longing to experience a win

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TEXANS Continued from Page 1C

40-yard touchdown pass to Andre Johnson in the third quarter and Arian Foster followed with his second touchdown of the game, a 42yard run in the fourth quarter, to finish off the Bengals. After nine seasons of missing the playoffs, the AFC South champion Texans (11-6) are heading to AFC North winner Baltimore (12-4) next Sunday. “This is a special day,” Houston coach Gary Kubiak said. Watt returned the first of rookie Andy Dalton’s three interceptions 29 yards for a score that broke a 1010 tie with 52 seconds left in the

Atlanta has been to more playoffs lately, but Giants have most success there.

By TOM CANAVAN AP Sports Writer

AP PHOTO

New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees leaps for a first down against the Detroit Lions during the second half of an NFL wild card playoff football game Saturday in New Orleans.

Pierre Thomas rushed for 66 yards and one touchdown, while Sproles added 51 yards, two scores and several other clutch plays. Marques Colston overcame an early fumble with seven catches for 120 yards, including a 40-yarder to set up Jimmy Graham’s short TD grab. Robert Meachem had four catches for 111 yards, including a 56-yard score. Devery Henderson added a 41-yard touchdown reception. New Orleans showed guts and

got a little good fortune on a decisive 14-play, 80-yard scoring drive in the fourth quarter. The Saints ran Sproles around left end on fourth-and-2 at the Lions 40 and gained 3 yards. Soon after, Brees’ pass as he was clobbered by Nick Fairley went right through the hands of defensive back Aaron Berry. Berry would regret that drop two plays later as Sproles bolted 17 yards to make it 31-21. Stafford tried to get some of that back quickly, throwing deep for Titus Young, but Greer ran

under it and picked it off. Four plays later, Brees spotted Meachem behind blown coverage for his long score to make it 38-21. The Lions became only the second visiting team all year to lead at halftime in the Superdome, where the Saints were unbeaten during the regular season. New Orleans has won nine in a row overall. However, the Saints opened the second half by driving 78 yards to take their first lead on Brees’ 31-yard pass to Henderson.

half. Yates then hit Johnson on a TD pass late in the third quarter, and Foster added his long scoring run to close out the scoring. Cincinnati was in the playoffs for the third time in seven seasons, but the Bengals (9-8) haven’t advanced since beating the Houston Oilers following the 1990 season. Foster scored on an 8-yard run in the first quarter to tie the score at 7, and finished with 153 yards on 24 carries. Daltonwas24of42for257yards, while Yates was 11 of 20 for 159 yards in the first playoff game in the Super Bowl era matching two rookie quarterbacks. As the final seconds ticked away, Kubiak walked down the sideline wearing a broad smile and

smacked hands with players and assistant coaches. He embraced Johnson — the franchise’s best player — in a moment that was a decade in the making. And two rookies helped make it happen. Houston took Watt with the11th overall pick in last year’s draft, a cornerstone for the reconstruction of the Texans defense. He started all 16 games and led the team with 13 tackles for loss. But he’d never picked off a pass. Watt saw this one coming, measuring his jump when Dalton dropped back and snatching the ball withbothhands.Hesprintedtothe end zone as the capacity crowd exploded, and he raised both hands after reaching the end zone.

Watt became the sixth defensive linemen to return an interception for a touchdown in postseason history — excluding the Super Bowl — and the first rookie to do it. “He’s been exceptional,” Kubiak said. “He’s played like a 4- or 5-year player. That was a huge play. That got us a lot of momentum going into halftime.” Dalton, meanwhile, rolled his eyes and shook his head as he walked to the Cincinnati bench and watched the replay on the giant scoreboard. It was just his second interception in his last seven games. The Bengals outplayed the Texans for most of the first half before that, holding down Houston’s offense and controlling time of possession.

OK coach, can we put him in Canton just yet? Parcells, who rarely praised players as future Hall of Famers, may be one soon. The Associated Press

CANTON, Ohio — Bill Parcells moved one step closer to Canton on Saturday when the Pro Football Hall of Fame released a list of 15 modern-era finalists for enshrinement that included the Super Bowl-winning coach. Wide receivers Tim Brown, Cris Carter and Andre Reed, running backs Jerome Bettis and Curtis Martin and former Kansas City Chiefs guard Will Shields also made the cut when the 26 semifinalists were pared down through a mail ballot. The final list of candidates also includes two senior nominees: former Steelers defensive back Jack Butler and former Lions guard Dick Stanfel. The Hall’s selection committee meets in Indianapolis next month. A finalist must receive 80 percent of the vote to be selected. Between four and seven en-

shrinees will be announced the day before the Super Bowl on Feb. 5, and inducted in August in the Hall’s 50th Parcells class. Parcells and Shields were the only two candidates to make the list of finalists in their first year of eligibility. The notable exclusions from the semifinal list include former NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue, ex-Chargers coach Don Coryell and running backs Roger Craig and Terrell Davis. Parcells is considered a firstyear candidate under new requirements that were put in place in 2008, after he had been a nominee in 2001 and 2002. The new rule makes it mandatory for coaches, like players, to be retired for five consecutive seasons. Before that, coaches were eligible immediately upon retirement. Parcells won two Super Bowls with the New York Giants in 1987 and 1991, then coached the Patri-

AP FILE PHOTO

AP FILE PHOTO

Pittsburgh Steelers running back Jerome Bettis (36) in a 2006 divisional playoff game.

Former Minnesota Vikings wide receiver Cris Carter celebrates a touchdown catch in 1998.

ots and Jets before retiring in 1999. He returned to coach the Cowboys in 2003. Bettis ranks fifth on the NFL rushing list with 13,662 yards in 13 seasons, three for the Rams and a decade with the Steelers, with whom he won the 2006 Super Bowl in his final game. Martin ranks fourth with 14,101 yards

with the Patriots and Jets from 1995-2005. Other finalists include DB Aeneas Williams, DEs/LBs Chris Doleman, Kevin Greene and Charles Haley, DT Cortez Kennedy, C Dermontti Dawson, offensive tackle Willie Roaf and former San Francisco 49ers owner Edward DeBartolo, Jr.

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — The New York Giants are only four years removed from their last Super Bowl victory, and they have nothing on the Atlanta Falcons in terms of postseason experience. The Giants (9-7) will be the novices Sunday when they host the Falcons (10-6) in an NFC wild-card game at MetLife Stadium. New York is returning to the postseason after a two-year absence that put coach Tom Coughlin’s job in jeopardy, while the Falcons will be appearing in the playoffs for the second straight year and third time in four seasons. The Falcons’ experience may not mean much, considering quarterback Matt Ryan has failed to lead the team to a win. The Falcons were the conference’s No. 1 seed for the playoffs last year, and were blown out by the eventual Super Bowl champion Packers in the NFC semifinals. “Yeah, it’s about time we won,” Falcons receiver Roddy White said. “This is our third time in the playoffs in four years. It’s about time we get a W. We’ve been lacking in that case and everyone wants to win really, really bad. We want to get that first win out of the way and after that

UP NEXT ATLANTA at N.Y. GIANTS TV: 1 p.m., today. FOX-56 OPENING LINE: Giants by 3½ LAST MEETING: Giants beat Falcons 34-31 OT, Nov. 22, 2009

you just take them one by one.” Eli Manning and the Giants enter the playoffs with momentum after an inconsistent season. They have won three of four, beating Dallas on the final weekend of the regular season to win the NFC East title. The late run has many making comparisons to the 2007 title sprint. New York gained confidence late by pushing then-undefeated New England in the last game of the season and rode it to four straight playoff road wins, capped by the upset of Tom Brady and the Patriots in the championship game. The other similarity is the Giants’ pass rush has gone to another level, recording 11 sacks in the last two games. Manning, who was the Super Bowl MVP, agrees some of the core group is left from the franchise’s third championship team. “That’s probably all we want to get into at that point,” said Manning, who threw for a career-best 4,933 yards this season. “We have a lot of guys that weren’t there.”

Once again, fortunes hanging up in the air Paths that changed for Steelers and Broncos in 2006 playoffs cross again. By ARNIE STAPLETON AP Pro Football Writer

DENVER — Champ Bailey had the interception in his grasp and the end zone in his sights as Hines Ward began to fall and the fluttering football hung in the air, along with the fortunes of two of the NFL’s most storied franchises. Ward somehow came down with the deflected pass from Ben Roethlisberger, holding on despite a jaw-jarring hit from John Lynch. Bailey pounded the ground with his fist in disgust and the Pittsburgh Steelers commenced with their 34-17 dismantling of the Denver Broncos in the AFC title game following the 2005 season. That watershed afternoon of Jan. 22, 2006, sent the Steelers and Broncos on divergent paths, and they meet again Sunday in an AFC wild-card game at Sports Authority Field in snowy Denver. “That game catapulted us to a Super Bowl victory,” Pittsburgh defensive end Brett Keisel said. It sent the Broncos on a nosedive that would take them through three coaches, four quarterbacks, six defensive coordinators and a whole lot of misery before returning to the playoffs this year. The Steelers are 69-35 since that fateful contest, winning two titles and narrowly missing a third in a 31-25 loss to Green Bay in last year’s Super Bowl, rivaling their run in the 1970s. The Broncos have gone 44-52

UP NEXT PITTSBURGH at DENVER TV: 4:30 p.m., today. CBS-WYOU OPENING LINE: Steelers by 8 LAST MEETING: Steelers beat Broncos 28-10, Nov. 9, 2009

with just one winning season and no playoff appearances. “You can look at the direction we both headed after that. They went up, we went down,” Bailey said. “We haven’t been back, they’ve won two since then. It’s funny how it played out. But that was then, this is now. We have a chance to turn things around here and that’s what we expect to do this weekend.” The Broncos, who won the middling AFC West at 8-8, host the heavily favored Steelers (12-4), who lost the AFC North on a tiebreaker to Baltimore, on what’s expected to be a snowy Sunday afternoon in Denver. Memories of the pivotal ‘05 conference championship are fresh in the minds of the 16 Steelers and two Broncos — Bailey and linebacker D.J. Williams — who are still on their respective rosters. “We started getting hot in the playoffs, wasn’t nobody that was going to stop us,” Steelers linebacker Larry Foote recounted. “When we beat Indy, it didn’t matter who we were going to play, we were going to get to the Super Bowl. They were in the wrong place at the wrong time.”


CMYK PAGE 8C

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

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THE TIMES LEADER

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

NBA ROUNDUP

LeBron’s hot start scorches N.J. Nets

Attendance takes dip throughout postseason

Economy, matchups are reasons given for decline in fans at many bowl games.

The Associated Press

RALPH D. RUSSO AP College Football Writer

NEW ORLEANS — When Nevada and Southern Mississippi met in the Hawaii Bowl, the crowd — if you can call it that — at the 50,000-seat Aloha Stadium made it look as if a high school game was in progress. That might not even be fair. The Hawaii state championship actually outdrew the Hawaii Bowl this season by 1,000. Bowl attendance was down 2.1 percent overall this season through the first 31 games of the 35-game postseason. Bowl officials point toward a struggling economy as the reason for the dip in fans attending games, but the luck of the draw also plays heavily into how well a postseason game does at the gate. One thing you can count on: The solution for those unsightly rows of empty seats won’t be a big reduction in the full, some would say bloated, calendar of 35 bowl games. The Hawaii Bowl had its attendance drop by about 22,000 to 19,411, mostly because Hawaii didn’t make it back to the game this season. The Music City Bowl in Nashville, Tenn., had a drop of about 14,000 from last season’s game, which matched up Tennessee and North Carolina. This season, Mississippi State played Wake Forest. On the plus-side was The Little Caesar’s Pizza Bowl, which had an increase of 14,000 at Ford Field in Detroit to see Western Michigan play Purdue. “We’re not down a ton, I think we’re down a notch,” said Tina Kunzler-Murphy, the executive director of the MAACO Bowl Las Vegas and the chairwoman of the Football Bowl Association. She said the average overall attendance for bowl season has been more than 50,000 — that’s with a sellout crowd expected for Monday’s BCS title game at the Superdome between No. 1 LSU and No. 2 Alabama. “I think historically the FBA has supported keeping a top on the number of bowl games,” Kunzler-Murphy said. “I think we’ve watched the numbers with the NCAA. If you talked to most people those numbers are probably where they need to be.” Dennie Poppe, NCAA vice president for Division I baseball and football, said the bowl licensing subcommittee will review the postseason in February, and that it is too soon speculate why attendance is down. “It could be a mix of several factors such as the pairings, economy, proximity of the bowls for some fans, etc.,” he said in an email. Bowls rely on the participating schools to buy an allotment of tickets to distribute to their fans. Those allotments can range from around 3,000 to a game such as the Humanitarian Bowl in Boise, Idaho, to 17,500 for one of the top-tier BCS games. So even if it looks as if there are plenty of good seats available, it’s possible that those empties have been paid for by universities. As the bowl schedule has expanded over the years, organizers have placed a greater emphasis on placing teams relatively close to home to give fans a more manageable trip to the game. It’s not just the price of a game ticket that can scare fans away, but the price of a plane ticket. Sometimes even having a team from nearby doesn’t help, particularly if that team isn’t very good. The Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl in San Francisco drew 29,878 to AT&T Park to watch UCLA play Illinois, down from the 41,063 for last season’s game between Nevada and Boston College.

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AP PHOTO

SMU wide receiver Jeremy Johnson (17) celebrates with wide receiver Darius Johnson (3) after a touchdown against Pittsburgh in the first half of the BBVA Compass on Saturday in Birmingham, Ala.

SMU jumps out to defeat Pitt Mustangs score quickly to give coach June Jones his 100th career victory. By CHARLES ODUM AP Sports Writer

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — SMU has not lost this season when it scores first or puts up at least 21 points. The Mustangs were quick to check off both benchmarks to give coach June Jones his 100th collegiate win. SMU put up three first-quarter touchdowns, including scoring runs and passes by J.J. McDermott, to beat Pittsburgh 28-6 Saturday in the BBVA Compass Bowl. “I’m really proud of the defense,” Jones said. “Really the defense has been that way all year. They’ve been the reason we’ve won eight games. We haven’t been as sharp on offense as we’ve been in years past.” Rishaad Wimbley ran for two scores for SMU (8-5), which tied a school record by playing in its third straight bowl under Jones. Before Jones’ arrival in in 2008, SMU had played in the postseason since beating Notre Dame in the 1984 Aloha Bowl. Jones said he didn’t talk to his players about his approaching milestone, but he said his 100th win as a college coach “means a

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lot to me.” “I’ll never forget these guys for that win,” he said. McDermott completed 16 of 26 passes for 239 yards and a touchdown, to Darius Johnson early in the

first. Pittsburgh (6-7) was held without a first down and fell behind 21-0 in the first quarter. Kevin Harper kicked field goals of 32 and 34 yards. The Panthers were coached by defensive coordinator Keith Patterson, who took over after Todd Graham left to coach at Arizona State. It was Patterson last game before he starts his new job as the defensive coordinator at Arkansas State. “”The one thing I kept challenging everybody on the team to do is to finish,” Patterson said, adding there were many distractions for players and coaches. “But I felt really good about the effort that they gave,” he said. “They represented as well as they possibly could.” Pittsburgh’s newly hired coach, former Wisconsin offensive coordinator Paul Chryst, flew into Birmingham on Saturday and watched the game from

the press box level. Chryst visited with Pitt alumni and fans before the game. He said he wanted to maintain a respectful distance from the team until the game ended, signaling the start of his era. “This is the culmination of their season,” Chryst said. “This wasn’t me.” Chryst said he has “a lot of appreciation for how they’re finishing things out” after Graham’s unexpected exit. McDermott beat Pitt’s blitz when lobbed a 50-yard touchdown pass to Johnson for the Mustangs’ first touchdown. Johnson had seven catches for 120 yards and was named the game’s MVP. The 50-yard catch was the longest in the six-year history of the bowl. “We talked about it on the sideline and we knew it was going to be open, Johnson said. “I just had to make the catch.” After McDermott’s 1-yard run capped an eight-play drive to push the lead to 14-0, Ja’Gared Davis hit Pitt quarterback Tino Sunseri, forcing a fumble that was recovered by Taylor Reed at the Panthers’ 27. McDermott’s 19-yard pass to Cole Beasley set up Wimbley’s 2-yard touchdown run. Wimbley added a 1-yard touchdown run in the third quarter. Pitt was making its second

straight appearance in the bowl after beating Kentucky in last year’s game. A series of key plays went against Pitt in the second quarter. Following the field goal, Pitt recovered an onside kick, but the officials said there was an inadvertent whistle before the ball was recovered. Pitt fans booed as the officials said another kickoff was necessary. “Both officials came over and apologized to me and said they made a bad call,” Patterson said. “They were very apologetic. There’s nothing you can do about that. But that was a big momentum-changer. It kind of got us into the game a little bit. We were fired up from that point on.” With SMU still leading 21-3 later in the quarter, Pitt drove from its 16 to a first and goal at the Mustangs’ 10. On third down from the 5, Sunseri’s pass bounced off tailback Isaac Bennett. The deflection was caught by SMU linebacker Stephon Sanders for an interception. The half ended with Pitt again coming away with no points at the end of a long drive. Harper’s 47-yard field goal attempt hit the left upright to end a 14-play drive. Jones said SMU running back Jared Williams suffered a probable broken left leg in the fourth quarter.

BASEBALL

Larkin hopes to finally hear call from hall Bert Blyleven were elected, and Former Reds All-Star is the leading candidate to gain the his chances figure to be helped by the lack of top newcomers. game’s highest honor. “I certainly have some anxiety By RONALD BLUM AP Sports Writer

NEW YORK — Barry Larkin plans to play golf in Florida on Monday morning. Then he’ll return to his home in the Orlando area and await the most prized telephone call in baseball. He is the leading candidate to gain election to the Hall of Fame when voting by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America is announced. “It’s a shot of immortality. The best of the game in the history — in the history of the game,” he said Thursday. “To be emblazoned into that history of the game is a tremendous honor.” A player needs at least 75 percent of the votes to gain election. A 12-time All-Star and the 1995 NL MVP, Larkin received 51.6 percent of the votes when he appeared on the ballot for the first time in 2010. His percentage increased to 62.1 percent last year, when he fell 75 votes short as Roberto Alomar and

about it, but not really nervous. I have a great perspective on it,” Larkin said during a telephone interview with The Associated Press. “I had a chance to speak to Jim Rice, who got inducted on his 15th time, and he really put me at comfort and ease and said, ‘You know, it’s really out of our hands, and there’s nothing we can really do about it. We don’t campaign for it, and it is what it is.”’ Spending his entire major league career with the Cincinnati Reds from 1986-04, Larkin hit .295 with 198 home runs, 960 RBIs, 2,340 hits and 379 stolen bases. He won three Gold Gloves and the 1990 World Series. He had hoped to return for a 20th season in 2005 at age 40, but retired after the Reds told him they didn’t want him back. “In 2005, I wasn’t really sure if I was completely done playing. I still had that question,” he said. “I don’t have that anymore. I know it’s the right move. It was the right decision. It was time to

AP FILE PHOTO

Cincinnati Reds’ Barry Larkin is the leading candidate to gain election to the Hall of Fame.

move on.” And because he retired then, he can join one of baseball’s most select groups. Of the 206 former big leaguers selected for the Hall, just 47 spent their entire careers with a single major league team and only two with the Reds: Johnny Bench and Bid McPhee. Larkin misses the camaraderie of spending 7½ months a year with teammates but re-

mains around ballparks. He broadcast for the MLB Network from 2009-10, then moved to ESPN last year. He’s a spring training instructor for the Reds, and has gone to South Korea and Brazil as an envoy for Major League Baseball and the State Department. A day after the announcement, the Hall of Fame holds a news conference in New York for anyone voted in.

NEWARK, N.J. — LeBron James returned to the lineup and scored 22 of his 32 points in the first quarter, and the Miami Heat rolled to a 101-90 victory over the New Jersey Nets on Saturday night despite playing without Dwyane Wade. Wade missed his third straight game with a bruised left foot, but James had the game under control by the time his All-Star teammate arrived at his seat on the bench. James made his first seven shots, leaping high for dunks, lobs and blocked shots and showing no effects from the sprained left ankle that forced him to miss a game. The NBA’s leading scorer added nine assists and seven rebounds. 76ers 97, Raptors 62 PHILADELPHIA — Andre Iguodala had 14 points and 10 rebounds, and Jrue Holiday also scored 14 points to lead the Philadelphia 76ers to their fourth straight win, 97-62 over the Toronto Raptors on Saturday night. Lou Williams scored 13 points, and rookie Nikola Vucevic had nine points and 10 rebounds for the Sixers. A year after starting 3-13, the Sixers are 5-2 and the early leaders in the Atlantic Division. The Sixers blew the game open in the third quarter, using a 30-8 run to build a 25-point lead. Knicks 103, Pistons 80 AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Amare Stoudemire scored 22 points and Mike Bibby added 16 to lead the New York Knicks to an easy 103-80 victory over the Detroit Pistons on Saturday night. Carmelo Anthony scored 13 points in three quarters for New York, which led 64-42 at halftime and by 29 after three. The Detroit fans had little to cheer about — except when highlights of Lions touchdowns from their playoff game in New Orleans were shown on the big screen. Pacers 99, Bobcats 77 INDIANAPOLIS — Roy Hibbert scored 20 points to help the Indiana Pacers beat the Charlotte Bobcats 99-77 on Saturday night. Hibbert, who briefly left the game with a sprained right ankle, also had eight rebounds and three blocks. Tyler Hansbrough scored 15 points, Darren Collison had 14, and Danny Granger and George Hill each added 13 for the Pacers (6-2), who improved to 3-0 at home. Indiana was coming off an 87-74 win at Boston on Friday night. Thunder 98, Rockets 95 HOUSTON — Kevin Durant hit a jumper with 22 seconds left and nailed two free throws to give the Oklahoma City Thunder a 98-95 win over the Houston Rockets on Saturday night. Durant finished with 27 points and six rebounds, Russell Westbrook added 25 points and six assists, and reserve Nazr Mohammed had a season-high 17 points and six rebounds for the Thunder. Hawks 109, Bulls 94 ATLANTA — Josh Smith scored 25 points, Joe Johnson and Vladimir Radmanovic each added 17 and the Atlanta Hawks beat Chicago 109-94 Saturday night to snap the Bulls’ six-game winning streak. Spurs 121, Nuggets 117 SAN ANTONIO — Danny Green scored a season-high 24 points to help the San Antonio Spurs beat the Denver Nuggets 121-117 on Saturday night.


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OUTDOORS Man bags jail time for shots Terrance E. Weiss Jr. of Madison Township in Lackawanna County on Dec. 16 pleaded guilty in the Lackawanna Court of Common Pleas to one count of recklessly endangering another person, terroristic threats, and hunting under the influence of alcohol stemming from an incident that occurred during the first day of the 2010 rifle bear season. He was sentenced to 8-23 months incarceration with credit for time served and faces revocation of Pennsylvania hunting license privileges. On the morning of Nov. 20, 2010, Wildlife Conservation Officer Mark Rutkowski and Deputy Wildlife Conservation Officer Edward Page responded to reports of a baited area at a property near Hornbeam/Cemetery Road in Madison Township and entered the rear of the property to investigate. The two were in a wooded area and approaching a small cabin when they heard a man shouting obscenities and threatening to shoot them. WCO Rutkowski reported three shots from a large caliber firearm were fired in their direction and he and DWCO Page scrambled for cover. After being pinned down for several minutes, the two officers were able to retreat to safety and call for backup. A command post was established and a Pennsylvania State Police helicopter monitored the area. Weiss was located outside the cabin and taken into custody by Game Commission personnel. He admitted shooting three shots toward the officers with a 30.06 caliber rifle. The loaded rifle with one empty casing was found in the cabin along with a large quantity of alcoholic beverage containers. Two empty shell casings were also present on the ground below a window of the cabin that matched the caliber of the firearm. A large amount of food items on the ground at the rear of the cabin was consistent with those commonly used to bait bears. Weiss was taken to Moses Taylor Hospital in Scranton for chemical and alcohol testing.

“THERE NEEDS TO be more habitat work and timber management on public lands. There’s too much mature timber on public lands.”

TOM VENESKY OUTDOORS

They should’ve just stuck to license display

I

TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO

Chris Denmon, of the Quality Deer Management Association, determines the age of a buck brought into the check station in Sweet Valley during opening day of deer season in 2010.

Nature’s rain deer

Deer management association’s findings show correlation between precipitation and buck growth.

and didn’t have to compete,” he said. Antler dimensions were also down this year, but only slightly because much of the antler development is based on the buck’s nutritional intake from the year before, according to Denmon. By TOM VENESKY The check station began operating one tvenesky@timesleader.com year after the Pennsylvania Game Commission implemented antler restrictions in Since 2003 several members of the the state. For three years after the move, North Mountain Branch of the Quality Denmon said, antler sizes and body Deer Management Association have weights of the bucks brought to the stachecked more than 400 deer at the check tion increased. They have since peaked station they hold on the first day of rifle and stabilized, he said. deer season each year. While antler restrictions have been a They’ve seen some interesting trends benefit, Denmon said there are other long the way, including a correlation between the spring and summer rainfall and things that can be done to further improve antler growth, along with a spike in antler the state’s deer herd. “There needs to be more habitat work size that has plateaued. and timber management on public lands,” This season 52 deer – all bucks – were he said. “There’s too much mature timber brought to the group’s check station in on public lands. Sweet Valley. The trend of rainfall equa“I’d like to see the Game Lands become ting to bigger antlers and heavier weights a separate management unit. We hunted was reversed a bit. “The first four years when we had high- State Game Lands 57 on the last Saturday this rifle sason and cut seven tracks in the er rainfalls it was mirrored with bigger first half hour. After that we found none. racks and body weights because the vegeDeer numbers need to be studied on tation was more lush,” said branch presiGame Lands and antlerless license allocadent Chris Denmon. “This year looks like it may go the other way because too much tions should be made based on those findings.” rain caused a lot of crop failures in the The largest buck brought into this seaagricultural areas.” son’s check station was a 10-point with an This season the check station results 18-inch spread, and the heaviest buck had showed that average weights were down a field dressed weight of 180 pounds. for the age classes of 1.5 to 3.5 by nine, Denmon said the chapter will keep eight and four percent, respectively. The operating the check station in the future, reason why the weights dropped a little although it is difficult at times to find less for the 3.5 year-old bucks was likely due to competition for food, Denmon said. volunteers. “It’s kind of hard to get guys to give up “The early age classes are still competing for better food sources, while the older that first day of rifle season. It was tough for me to give it up the first couple years deer already had those areas established

T H E TA L E O F T H E TA P E •Results from the 2011 deer check station conducted by the North Mountain Branch of the Quality Deer Management Association: TOTAL – 52 deer (all bucks) Percent by age class 1.5 – 15 percent 2.5 – 29 percent 3.5 – 34 percent 4.5 – 12 percent 5.5 – 10 percent Average weight by age class 1.5 – 97 lbs. 2.5 – 117 lbs. 3.5 – 137 lbs. 4.5 – 145 lbs. 5.5 – 158 lbs. Average antler spreads 1.5 – 8 inches 2.5 – 1 1 7⁄8 inches 3.5 – 15 inches 4.5 – 16 3⁄8 inches 5.5 – 18 1⁄2 inches Average beam lengths 1.5 – 9 3⁄4 inches 2.5 – 13 1⁄4 inches 3.5 – 17 7⁄8 inches 4.5 – 19 5⁄8 inches 5.5 – 21 3⁄4 inches Average antler circumference 1.5 – 2 1⁄2 inches 2.5 – 3 1⁄8 inches 3.5 – 3 7⁄8 inches 4.5 – 4 3⁄8 inches 5.5 – 4 1⁄2 inches

we had the check station,” Denmon said. “But as long as we have guys who are successful in archery season and don’t mind giving up that day, we’ll keep it going.”

OUTDOORS NOTES The North Mountain Branch of the Quality Deer Management Association will hold its annual antler scoring session today at 1 p.m. in the old Noxen School in Noxen. Members and non-members of QDMA are welcome to bring in antlers that they would like to have scored that had been harvested during any year or any location. The North Mountain Branch also encourages folks to come out and see what others may have harvested and possibly learn more about deer management or the branch’s activities throughout the year and hopefully get some new volunteers for some upcoming habitat projects. You can learn more about the North Mountain Branch and their activities by logging onto www.northmtnbranchqdma.org or by calling 477-2238 or emailing cddeers72@frontier.com. The Nanticoke Conservation Club will hold its annual ice fishing derby on Feb. 4 at Frances Slocum State Park. The derby runs from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Weigh-in is from 12:30 to 1 p.m. and registration begins at 7 a.m. in the Environmental Education Building. Adults (16 and older) are $10 and children age 9 and younger

are free. Cash prizes for heaviest fish are in the following categories: bass, perch, trout, crappie, bluegill and pickerel. Thin ice date is two weeks after Superbowl Saturday. An ice fishing clinic will also be offered for all ages. For more information, contact the club at nanticokeconservationclub@msn.com or visit nanticokeconservationclub.com. The Northeast Regional Coyote Hunt sponsored by District 9 of the PA Trappers Association, will be held on Feb. 3, 4 and 5. A $2,000 grand prize will be awarded for the heaviest coyote, a $250 prize for the heaviest coyote turned in each day and $100 will be awarded for all coyotes turned in during the hunt. Coyotes taken in Bradford, Susquehanna, Wayne, Wyoming, Lackawanna, Pike, Luzerne and Sullivan counties during the three-day hunt are eligible. Coyotes must be taken by legal hunting methods only and not with traps or cable restraints. Weigh-in will be held at the Triton Hose Co. in Tunkhannock from 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday & Saturday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday. Weigh-in ends at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 5. A weigh-in dinner, included in the entry fee, will be held for all entrants

on Sunday from 1 to 3 p.m. A $25 entry fee is due by Jan. 21 (fee includes dinner). After Jan. 21 the fee is $30 and entries will not be accepted after 10 p.m., Feb. 1. For more information call 570-942-6895, 570-679-2318 or emailprice@nep.net. Include “coyote hunt information” in the subject. Huntington Mills United Sportsmen will hold their 10th Annual Coyote Hunt on Friday-Sunday, Jan. 20-22. Weigh-in will be at the clubhouse on 251 Waterton Road in Huntington Mills. The hunt begins on Friday, Jan. 20 at 12:01 a.m. Weigh-in times are Friday and Saturday (Jan. 20 and 21) 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday, Jan. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. A $1,000 grand prize will be awarded for heaviest coyote and second place will be $500. There will also be a smallest coyote pool, gun raffle and 50/50 drawing. A breakfast buffet will be served on Jan. 22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Entry fee is $25 and must be in by Jan. 18. Entries can be mailed to United Sportsmen Camp 271, P.O. Box 85, Huntington Mills, PA 18622 or emailed to huntingtonmillsunitedsportsmen@yahoo.com. For more information call 2563933 or 683-5472.

An ice fishing derby will be held at Lake Jean on Jan. 15 – rescheduled from Jan. 8 due to unsafe ice conditions. Registration fee is $10 per person and there’s an optional $5 pickerel lunker. Registration is from 5:30-7 a.m. at the west boat launch off of Route 487. The derby runs from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. A second ice fishingderby will be held at Long Pond in Wayne County on Jan. 22. For more information, email Christopher Jones atbigbuck326@aol.com. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Chapter of the Ruffed Grouse Society will host its fourth annual Winter Dinner on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Farmers Inn, 1597 Hillside Road in Shavertown. A social hour will begin at 6 p.m. and dinner will be served at 7 p.m. The buffet style dinner is open to the public at a cost of $22 for adults and $18 for children ages 5-16. Youngsters under age 5 are free. While this is not a typical RGS fundraiser, there will be a few raffle items available to help make this a fun event. All guests are asked to bring a gender-free wrapped gift. For more information and/or tickets contact Brian Clark at 570-983-9918.

’ve lost my wallet once or twice over the years, but I’ve never lost my hunting license. I always knew where it was – in a license holder pinned to the back of my hunting coat. In the fall, my license was pinned to the back of an orange vest that I wear for turkey hunting – same thing with the spring gobbler season. I use the same orange vest for small game hunting, so there wasn’t an issue there. When the rifle deer season rolled around, the license and its holder were always transferred to my heavier, orange coat. Two worn holes held it securely. I wore the same coat for any small game hunting that I did in the late season, so the license stayed put. Same thing with my fishing license. It’s always attached to a brown vest that I wear during trout season. When I switch to bass and panfish in the summer, the fishing license was pinned onto an old baseball cap that I wear during those hot days in the boat. The system worked flawlessly every year. I never lost a hunting or fishing license and never minded pinning it to a coat, vest or hat. I never had a limb tear my license holder off my coat, nor did I ever drop my hat into a river or stream and have my license float away. But it’s all a moot point now. Change of plans Last month Gov. Tom Corbett signed into law House Bill 735, which removes the requirement for hunters and trappers to display their licenses. The new law takes effect on Feb. 13. The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission is expected to follow suit soon. Not having to display a hunting or fishing license isn’t a big deal in the grand scheme of things. Certainly there are much more pressing issues out there. But I still don’t think the change was necessary. Having to display one’s license had its benefits. A license pinned on the back of a coat gave initial confirmation to Wildlife Conservation Officers, landowners and even other hunters that you did indeed purchase a hunting license. Sure, the license had to be seen up close to determine if it was valid, but I’m willing to bet that most of the time they are. Another plus that came with displaying a license was the license holder itself. In mine I always stored a twist tie for attaching tags and a pencil to fill them out. I also put my driver’s license inside and left my wallet at home. I’ll continue to do so, as the new law doesn’t prohibit anyone from placing their license in a holder and pinning it to the back of their coat. I’d much rather do that than carry my wallet in my back pocket and worry about it falling out or getting wet. Proponents of the new law argue that Pennsylvania was one of only two states requiring hunters to display their licenses. To me, that’s not much of an argument. When it comes to hunting, Pennsylvania is unique and I don’t care what other states do or don’t do. It’s irrelevant. One concern that I’ve heard about the proposal is perhaps more people will go hunting without buying a license. Since you don’t have to display it, how will anyone know if you purchased one or not? Could this mean that WCO’s will now have to personally check every hunter they encounter, make them break out their wallet and show their license? It seems like an unnecessary burden to me. Hunting licenses have been displayed by hunters for nearly 100 years and the system worked fine. It’s a tradition that should’ve remained pinned on our backs.


CMYK THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012 PAGE 11C

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Syracuse toughs out win vs. Marquette

Notre Dame downs UConn in overtime

season, defeating No. 8 Connecticut 67-60 in coach Jim Calhoun’s return from a three-game NCAA suspension.

The Associated Press

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Kris Joseph scored 17 points, Brandon Triche added 16, and topranked Syracuse remained unbeaten with a gritty 73-66 victory over No. 20 Marquette on Saturday. Syracuse (17-0, 4-0 Big East) is two wins away from matching the school’s best start, established a decade ago.

West Virginia 74, No. 9 Georgetown 72 MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — Truck Bryant scored 25 points and West Virginia ended No. 9 Georgetown’s 11-game winning streak with a 74-62 victory on Saturday.

No. 2 Kentucky 79, South Carolina 64 LEXINGTON, Ky. — Terrence Jones hit his first eight shots to finish with 20 points and No. 2 Kentucky beat South Carolina 79-64 on Saturday in the Southeastern Conference opener for both teams. The Wildcats (15-1, 1-0) have won seven straight and came in as the preseason favorite to win the SEC for the 45th time. They used an 11-0 run to end the first half to take a comfortable lead against South Carolina. No. 3 North Carolina 83, Boston College 60 CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Harrison Barnes scored 25 points and No. 3 North Carolina opened Atlantic Coast Conference play by pulling away to beat Boston College 83-60 on Saturday for its eighth straight win. Tyler Zeller added 20 points for the Tar Heels (14-2, 1-0). The preseason league favorites shot 47 percent, took control with a big first-half run and used an even bigger spurt late to claim its 27th straight win at the Smith Center. No. 4 Baylor 73, Texas Tech 60 LUBBOCK, Texas — Pierre Jackson scored 19 points and No. 4 Baylor beat Texas Tech 73-60 on Saturday. Brady Heslip had 16 points and Quincy Miller finished with 15 for the Bears (15-0, 2-0 Big 12), who are off the best start in school history. Duke 81, Georgia Tech 74 ATLANTA — Ryan Kelly scored 21 points, Seth Curry

Notre Dame 67, No. 11 Louisville 65 LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Eric Atkins scored six points in the second overtime Saturday, propelling Notre Dame to a 67-65 victory over No. 11 Louisville. Tennessee 67, No. 13 Florida 56 KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Kenny Hall scored a season-high 13 points as Tennessee upset No. 13 Florida 67-56 on Saturday to open the Southeastern Conference season.

AP PHOTO

Marquette’s Vander Blue battles Syracuse’s Kris Joseph for a loose ball on Saturday in Syracuse, N.Y.

added 15 and No. 5 Duke beat Georgia Tech 81-74 on Saturday. Duke (13-2, 1-0 Atlantic Coast Conference) avoided consecutive defeats for the first time since Feb. 11 and Feb. 15, 2009. Glen Rice Jr. scored a seasonhigh 28 points and Mfon Udofia finished with 19 points for Georgia Tech (7-8, 0-1 ACC). The Yellow Jackets, who never led, have lost four straight. No. 6 Ohio State76, Iowa 47 IOWA CITY, Iowa — Jared Sullinger scored a season-high 28 points and sixth-ranked Ohio State pounded Iowa 76-47 on Saturday. Deshaun Thomas added 10 points for the Buckeyes, who won for the second time on the road.

No. 23 Kansas State 75, No. 7 Missouri 59 MANHATTAN, Kan. — Rodney McGruder scored 20 points to lead No. 23 Kansas State past No. 7 Missouri 75-59 Saturday. Missouri (14-1, 1-1 Big 12) entered the day as one the nation’s four remaining unbeaten teams but never threatened in the final 30 minutes. Marcus Denmon led the Tigers with 17 points while Michael Dixon added 16.

No. 14 Kansas 72, Oklahoma 61 NORMAN, Okla. — Travis Releford scored 28 points to set a career best for the second straight game, Thomas Robinson added 18 points and No. 14 Kansas used a big surge just after halftime to beat Oklahoma 72-61 Saturday. No. 22 Harvard 63, Dartmouth 47 CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Oliver McNally scored 17 points, hitting a 3-pointer during an 8-0 run that gave the Crimson the lead for good, and No. 22 Harvard pulled away with a dominant second half to beat Dartmouth 63-47 in their Ivy League opener on Saturday.

No. 25 Gonzaga 80, Santa Clara 58 Rutgers 67, No. 8 Connecticut SPOKANE, Wash. — Sam 60 Dower scored 17 points and No. PISCATAWAY, N.J. — Fresh25 Gonzaga pulled away in the man Eli Carter continued his second half for an 80-58 win scoring streak with 19 points over Santa Clara on Saturday and Rutgers beat a Top Ten night for the Bulldogs’ eighthteam for the second time this straight win.

The Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Natalie Novosel sank six free throws in overtime and Skylar Diggins scored 22 points to help No. 3 Notre Dame rally to beat second-ranked Connecticut 74-67 on Saturday. Novosel finished with 20 points, including a 10-for-11 showing from the line for the Irish (15-1, 3-0 Big East), who won their 12th straight game. Notre Dame snapped UConn’s 57-game conference winning streak. The Huskies last lost in the Big East to Rutgers in 2008. No. 4 Stanford 67, Oregon State 60 STANFORD, Calif. — Nnemkadi Ogwumike had 33 points and 16 rebounds to go over both 2,000 points and 1,000 boards for her career, and Stanford rallied from a rare halftime deficit to beat Oregon State and preserve a 71-game home winning streak.

their best start since going 17-2 in 2007-08. No. 13 Texas Tech 69, Missouri 63 COLUMBIA, Mo. — Chynna Brown scored 17 points to help Texas Tech remain unbeaten with a victory over Missouri. No. 17 Wisc-Green Bay 88, Wisconsin-Milwaukee 53 MILWAUKEE — Julie Wojta scored 27 points and had 12 steals, leading WisconsinGreen Bay to a victory over Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She set the school and Horizon League record for steals in a game. Providence 60, No. 20 DePaul 52 PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Teya Wright had 19 points and 12 rebounds to help Providence upset DePaul. It was the Friars’ first win over a ranked opponent since Jan. 7, 2009, when they took down then-No. 20 Pittsburgh.

Michigan State 75, No. 22 Penn State 65 STATE COLLEGE, Pa. — Taylor Alton scored a careerhigh 20 points and Michigan State held off a late Penn State rally to upset the Nittany Lions. Alton hit six 3-pointers and had 11 of the team’s first 16 points as the Spartans built an early 18-9 lead. When Alton went to the bench, No. 10 Rutgers 58, Porsche Poole took over — Cincinnati 47 scoring 10 points during a PISCATAWAY, N.J. — April 15-2 run to help Michigan State build a 22-point lead. Sykes had 11 points and 11 rebounds as Rutgers beat Oklahoma State 70, Cincinnati. No. 23 Texas 51 Monique Oliver added 15 STILLWATER, Okla. — Liz points. Donohoe had 13 points and The Scarlet Knights (13-2, 2-0 Big East), who won their 13 rebounds to help Oklahoma State upset Texas. fourth straight and are off to

Michigan 73, No. 8 Ohio State 62 ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Courtney Boylan scored 19 points and Sam Arnold added 13 to help Michigan hand Ohio State its first loss of the season. The Buckeyes (15-1, 2-1 Big Ten) were looking to extend their longest win streak since 2007 to 16 games.

NHL ROUNDUP

Briere’s hat trick gives Philly OT win The Associated Press

451

MONTY SAYS

PHILADELPHIA — Danny Briere’s hat trick with 5.3 seconds left in overtime lifted the Philadelphia Flyers to a 3-2 victory Saturday over the Ottawa Senators. The victory was the second straight for the Flyers, and it snapped Ottawa’s four-game winning streak. The teams traded goals in the third period. Briere scored his second of the game and his 12th goal of the season, which deflected off Ottawa defender Chris Phillips’ stick, tying the game at 2-2. Devils 3, Penguins 1 PITTSBURGH — Ilya Kovalchuk and Adam Henrique each had a goal and an assist and the New Jersey Devils handed the Pittsburgh Penguins their fourth consecutive loss, 3-1 on Saturday night. Dainius Zubrus also scored, Zach Parise had two assists and Martin Brodeur made 41 saves for the Devils, who beat the Penguins for the second time in eight days and moved past them into sixth place in the Eastern Conference.

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Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

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With the teams even at 1, Benn went hard to the net, collected the rebound of Adam Burish’s shot, and lifted the puck over sprawling Edmonton goaltender Nikolai Khabibulin at 7:03 of the final period. It was Benn’s 13th of the season.

Blue Jackets 1, Kings 0 LOS ANGELES — Curtis Sanford made 31 saves for his sixth career shutout, defenseCanucks 4, Bruins 3 man Grant Clitsome ended a 22-game goal drought, and the BOSTON — Henrik Sedin Columbus Blue Jackets beat the broke a tie with the third of Los Angeles Kings 1-0 Saturday. Vancouver’s four power-play Sanford started back-to-back goals and the Canucks beat the games for the first time since a defending champion Boston 12-game stretch from Nov. 17 Bruins 4-3 on Saturday in the through Dec. 10 when coach first game between the teams Scott Arniel benched Steve since the Stanley Cup finals. The Bruins won their first title Mason. in 39 years by taking the last two games of the seven-game series. Maple Leafs 4, Red Wings 3 TORONTO — Joffrey Lupul Stars 4, Oilers 1 scored at 7:10 of the third period to help the Toronto Maple Leafs DALLAS — Jamie Benn beat the Detroit Red Wings 4-3 scored twice, including the after blowing a three-goal lead tiebreaker in the third period, Saturday night. rookie Richard Bachman made With the game looking to 25 saves and the Dallas Stars extended their home dominance have slipped out of Toronto’s over the Edmonton Oilers with a control, Lupul grabbed a rare turnover from Henrik Zetterberg 4-1 victory on Saturday.

behind the net and lifted a shot over goalie Jimmy Howard. Jets 2, Sabres 1, OT BUFFALO, N.Y. — Johnny Oduya scored 57 seconds into overtime, lifting the Winnipeg Jets to a 2-1 win over the Buffalo Sabres on Saturday night. Coyotes 5, Islanders 1 GLENDALE, Ariz. — Shane Doan scored at the buzzer for the first hat trick of his 16-year NHL career, leading the Phoenix Coyotes to a 5-1 victory over the New York Islanders on Saturday night. Canadiens 3, Lightning 1 MONTREAL — Mike Blunden and Max Pacioretty scored in the second period, Carey Price made 23 saves, and the Montreal Canadiens beat the Tampa Bay Lightning 3-1 on Saturday night. Predators 5, Hurricanes 2 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Patric Hornqvist scored two powerplay goals to lead the Nashville Predators to a 5-2 win over the Carolina Hurricanes on Saturday night.

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Philadelphia Flyers’ Danny Briere celebrates his goal in the third period of an NHL hockey game against the Ottawa Senators, Sat-

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CMYK PAGE 12C

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

NATIONAL FORECAST Partly sunny, cooler

WEDNESDAY

39° 28°

MONDAY

THURSDAY

Cloudy, p.m. showers

Mostly sunny

Partly sunny

39° 25°

43° 29°

FRIDAY

Cloudy, a.m. showers

45° 30°

SATURDAY Partly sunny, cooler

45° 35°

New York City 43/31 Reading 45/28

Harrisburg 44/28

Atlantic City 48/32

Yesterday Average Record High Record Low

Heating Degree Days*

55/31 34/19 63 in 1998 3 in 1988

Yesterday Month to date Year to date Last year to date Normal year to date

22 239 2175 2613 2622

*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s mean temperature was below 65 degrees.

Brandywine Valley

Highs: 41-47. Lows: 27-33. Partly sunny skies today.

Philadelphia 47/33

Temperatures

The Finger Lakes

Highs: 26-36. Lows: 20-30. Partly to mostly sunny, locally breezy.

Pottsville 41/26

State College 40/26

75/62

The Jersey Shore

Wilkes-Barre 40/25

Delmarva/Ocean City

Highs: 48-49. Lows: 26-36. Mostly sunny skies.

Yesterday Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

0.00” 0.11” 0.56” 0.11” 0.56”

Sun and Moon

Sunrise 7:29a 7:29a Moonrise Today 4:33p Tomorrow 5:37p

Sunset 4:51p 4:52p Moonset 6:46a 7:27a

Today Tomorrow

River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday. Susquehanna Wilkes-Barre Towanda Lehigh Bethlehem Delaware Port Jervis Full

Stage 4.54 2.90 3.07

0.75

16.0

3.86

-0.24

18.0

Last

Jan. 9

Chg. Fld. Stg -0.16 22.0 0.02 21.0

New

First

Forecasts, graphs and data ©2012

Weather Central, LP For more weather information go to:

www.timesleader.com National Weather Service

607-729-1597

38/28

City

Yesterday

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis

10/1/.01 67/50/.00 66/33/.00 59/30/.00 47/40/.00 71/40/.00 44/31/.00 47/37/.00 60/45/.00 37/23/.00 47/37/.00 79/64/.00 76/54/.00 48/34/.00 64/41/.00 59/48/.00 75/52/.00 41/33/.00 37/25/.00

City

Yesterday

Amsterdam Baghdad Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Dublin Frankfurt Hong Kong Jerusalem London

48/43/.00 66/46/.00 25/21/.00 43/34/.22 88/63/.00 46/43/.00 46/39/.19 59/54/.00 63/45/.00 52/45/.00

Jan. 16 Jan. 23 Jan. 30

Today Tomorrow 15/-1/c 63/49/sh 48/38/pc 42/25/s 35/30/pc 53/42/c 41/35/pc 37/31/pc 62/41/c 34/16/sf 37/29/pc 79/66/s 75/62/c 45/29/pc 58/41/s 71/46/s 76/66/s 39/33/pc 38/26/pc

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10/6/c 65/50/sh 48/34/pc 38/31/s 40/31/c 54/42/sh 45/35/pc 40/34/pc 47/39/r 46/27/s 40/32/pc 80/67/s 68/49/t 46/31/s 61/41/s 75/50/s 76/67/pc 45/35/pc 45/28/pc

City

Yesterday

Myrtle Beach Nashville New Orleans Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Ore. St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, DC

73/48/.00 62/51/.01 75/56/.00 68/40/.00 59/38/.00 42/22/.00 72/44/.00 71/46/.00 51/39/.00 47/37/.00 53/36/.00 35/32/.25 72/48/.00 59/55/.00 63/41/.00 45/37/.00 72/54/.00 74/43/.00 68/36/.00

WORLD CITIES

Today Tomorrow 48/42/pc 65/38/s 37/14/s 41/36/sh 93/75/s 51/43/c 41/35/sh 68/60/c 54/41/s 50/44/pc

49/43/sh 63/40/s 38/15/s 39/34/rs 98/79/s 48/38/c 39/36/r 69/61/c 50/40/sh 54/42/c

City

Yesterday

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Juan Tokyo Warsaw

70/41/.00 27/18/.00 37/32/.00 54/45/.00 88/75/.00 75/48/.00 57/36/.00 83/73/.17 48/39/.00 36/30/.02

Today Tomorrow 60/48/c 55/40/sh 74/59/c 51/35/s 47/35/c 46/27/c 77/54/s 64/42/pc 40/27/pc 46/38/pc 47/29/pc 34/20/pc 72/55/c 70/45/s 57/44/s 53/43/pc 77/54/s 61/36/s 48/36/pc

60/48/sh 56/43/sh 74/60/c 47/36/sh 45/37/c 48/28/s 77/58/pc 66/41/s 42/28/pc 49/38/sh 49/33/s 37/23/s 57/38/sh 74/48/s 58/43/s 49/41/sh 78/56/pc 60/38/s 49/34/pc

Today Tomorrow 71/43/pc 19/9/s 33/29/sn 48/43/pc 80/73/t 81/60/s 58/40/s 82/73/sh 47/36/s 40/33/rs

75/44/pc 22/18/s 31/25/sn 51/44/sh 79/72/t 78/54/s 57/38/s 81/72/sh 49/35/s 37/31/rs

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A nice mild week is in store for us as high pressure continues to move through our region. Today will be partly cloudy but a bit cooler. We will have mostly sunny skies on Monday. Milder air will help us reach 43 on Tuesday with partly sunny skies. Clouds will move in on Wednesday and showers will pick up in the evening. Rain showers will continue overnight into Thursday and it will be windy. The rain will move out during the early afternoon. On Friday, cooler air will settle in. We will see partly sunny skies. Saturday looks like it will be a nice but chilly day with a high around 35 and partly cloudy skies. - Michelle Rotella

Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snow flurries, i-ice.

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76/66

79/66

ALMANAC Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport

Precipitation

63/49

62/41

60/36

15/-1

Poughkeepsie 43/22

48/36

71/46

Highs: 12-48. Lows: 30-33. Mostly sunny skies today.

Towanda 37/25

41/35

43/31

37/29

48/28

Highs: 37-42. Lows: 24-26. Partly cloudy skies today.

Albany 38/20

38/26

34/16

61/47

The Poconos

Binghamton 34/25

Scranton 38/24

35° 25°

TODAY’S SUMMARY

Syracuse 33/26

Today’s high/ Tonight’s low

45/34

Partly sunny

35° 27°

REGIONAL FORECAST

53/43

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TODAY

NATIONAL FORECAST: A frontal boundary stretched across the southeastern United States will be responsible for scattered showers and a few thunderstorms from eastern Texas to the Carolinas. Meanwhile, look for scattered snow showers to develop over parts of the Great Lakes. High pressure over the Intermountain West will keep most of the western United States dry today.

TUESDAY


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Luxury brands make their mark in China By BARBARA DEMICK Los Angeles Times

BEIJING — Barely a decade ago, Beijing bicyclists pedaled down alleys here lined with courtyard houses that had no indoor toilets. Now, the alleys have been replaced by a wide avenue lined with Lamborghini, Ferrari, Bugatti and Rolls-Royce dealerships. In 2011, Chinese bought more Lamborghinis and Rolls-Royces than anybody else in the world. In time for Chinese New Year this month, Rolls is unveiling a “Year of the Dragon” model with hand-embroidered versions of mythical animals on leather headrests.

Prices start at $1.6 million. China is on the verge of becoming the leading market for just about everything over-the-top expensive. Companies obsessed with China a few years back for its flagrant counterfeiting now see it as their most promising customer, especially at a time when so many other nations are scrimping. Gucci’s sales in China in the first half of 2011 were up 39 percent; Bottega Veneta’s more than 80 percent. Prada plans to open 50 shops over the next three years. Chinese fashionistas are displacing those immaculate Japanese women in

their Burberry scarves as the world’s leading consumers of luxury goods. The consulting firm McKinsey & Co. projected that China will bump Japan out of first place by 2015 as the leading market for pricey goods. Even with the softening of China’s real estate market, the source of much new money, some analysts believe the Chinese already top the luxury market. In fact, the sales figures understate Chinese spending because the rich here do much of their shopping abroad to avoid high taxes on luxury items and See BRANDS, Page 2D

RON BARTIZEK BUSINESS LOCAL

MCT PHOTO

Men represent 45 percent of the market for luxury handbags in China, a Coach executive says. Purses are practical because it’s not uncommon for men to carry wads of cash and use public transportation.

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Housing market could take some time to rebuild

CVS Extra Bucks program. If you’re not familiar with it, this week is a good time to start. There are two offers that will net back you all your money: A Syntha-6 meal replacement bar is $1.89 and you’ll get $1.89 back in Register Rewards, which is a coupon printed out on your receipt for a future store purchase. Also free this week is a Kids Omega Smart Ultimate Fish Oils 60-count bottle. You pay $10 and get a $10 coupon printed on your receipt. Finally, if you love Powerade, you’ll love this deal at Price Chopper. Use the coupon on the front page of the grocer’s circular and nab five free bottles when you buy 10.

s there a curriculum for entrepreneurs? “I used to think it could be taught,” said Robert Williams, the new director of the Center for Economics and Entrepreneurship at Misericordia University. Now he sees his role as more traditional, bringing together business and academia for the benefit of both, on both institutional and individual levels. Internships are key, and Williams tries to coordinate them for the best fit. “A business needs someone that they can eventually hire,” he said. But the relationship is a two-way street, and he requires that host businesses provide job descriptions, so the intern has meaningful and measurable work to do. On the flip side, business owners “get to mold a bit of the curriculum” in the direction of what they “A business need from graduates. needs someWilliams, 40, has a one that they bit of entrepreneurial can eventublood in his veins. After a dozen years in ally hire.” various positions with Robert Williams nonprofit organizations, he struck out on his own by opening two high-end bath and body stores. The workload didn’t seem like it would be much different from his last job, in which he managed a school services provider that rapidly grew from six employees to 500. Even then, “It was just me by myself” handling budgets, payroll and expense accounts. The retail stores came after Williams and his wife, who had just given birth to the couple’s first child, moved to Milford from New York City. Tired of dealing with a long commute, “I thought I should do something closer to home,” he said. That was 2006, a year before the first inklings of the Great Recession. “We did gangbusters” until the recession hit. “We were selling high-end luxury products,” the kind of thing people could easily cut back on. When the tide turned, Williams did what too many entrepreneurs don’t; he decided to shut the doors before things went further south. From what he’s seen, today’s students, raised in an economy dominated by Wal-Mart and other corporate behemoths, could use a lesson in the relationship between their performance and their employer’s success. “They have no idea of the risk that most people take on when they step into that realm called entrepreneurship,” he said, since it’s easy to assume a huge company has plenty of money whether or not they show up on time or try a little harder to please customers. I agree that without the desire to run their own show, people can’t become entrepreneurs in the same way they might gain enough training to be chemists or accountants. But I think those with the necessary drive and instincts can learn to be entrepreneurs. That was my experience; working for small, mostly family-owned businesses most of my career, I watched my bosses for clues on how to be successful. When my time came, even though I was terrified at the possibility of failure, I had a wealth of good examples from which to draw. But entrepreneurship isn’t for everyone. Long hours and sleepless nights come with the territory, straining family relationships. So having a secure job with benefits isn’t such a bad deal. “This year I got to celebrate Christmas with family,” Williams said, and weekends off aren’t hard to take, either. But then he says, “There’s nothing like being your own boss.” I agree, but every boss needs skilled, reliable employees, so I hope he succeeds at his new job.

Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. Follow him on Twitter @TLAndrewSeder

Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor, may be reached at rbartizek@timesleader.com or 570-970-7157.

By KATHLEEN LYNN The Record

HACKENSACK, N.J. — The housing market — staggering under a slow economy and still paying for the excesses of the boom years — may start to stir to life in 2012. But experts warn that a real rebound is still several years away. “Our outlook is that things (in 2012) will be a little bit better than 2011,” said Patrick Newport, an economist with IHS Global Insight. “But that’s not saying much.” Blame the economy, with unemployment topping 8 percent. If economic and job growth pick up in Tthe housing 2012, housing is likemarket is still ly to get a boost. But that’s a big “if.” IHS suffering a expects the U.S. hangover economy to grow at from the wild an anemic 1.6 pertimes of 2004 cent — or possibly even tip into recesand 2005 sion as a result of Europe’s debt problems. “Our view is that the economy isn’t going to grow fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate,” said Newport. “That’s one of the reasons that it will take the housing market another 1 1/2 to two years to get back on track and start growing again.” “People are not going to come out and make the most expensive purchase of their lives if there’s any uncertainty about their jobs,” said Robert Denk, an economist with the National Association of Home Builders, who predicts that home construction won’t return to normal levels until 2015. And the housing market is still suffering a hangover from the wild times of 2004 and 2005, when questionable mortgage practices inflated prices to unsustainable levels, and allowed unqualified buyers to get into homes they couldn’t afford. Newport expects prices nationwide to slide another 5 or 10 percent in 2012, as the foreclosure pipeline gets moving again, dumping distressed properties on the market. Foreclosed properties tend to sell at a discount of 20 to 30 percent, according to several studies. Lower prices have left many homeowners (especially those who paid high prices at the market peak) owing See HOUSING, Page 2D

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

Pastor Dave Elick, of the New Life Community Church in Mountain Top, shows the two new natural gas furnaces the church installed in 2010 converting from oil. The conversion costs paid for itself in two years.

HEATING UP More customers are turning to natural gas By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

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saw a record number of home and business owners convert their buildings’ primary heating source from electric, oil or coal to natural gas, is on pace to set a new record this year.

Company spokesman Joe gas, foremost of which is the low Swope said that from Oct. 1, cost. As the price of oil continues to 2010 through Sept. 30, 2011, more than 9,000 conversions rise and the cost of natural gas were performed throughout drops, more homeowners and UGI’s coverage area. Of those, businesses are opting to spend 1,665 were commercial custom- some money now to eventually ers, 5,506 residential and 1,856 save much more later. Dave Elresidential customers who al- ick, pastor of New Life Commuready had natural gas for some nity Church in Mountain Top, appliances but weren’t using it said his congregation made the for heating. In Luzerne County decision in 2010 to convert an oil alone, there were approximately furnace in the church’s 95-year540 conversions to natural gas old fellowship hall to natural gas and to remove two oil furnaces in the latest fiscal year. Swope said several factors are increasing interest in natural See GAS, Page 2D

Musselman offers a deal that could be right up your alley YOU’LL BE HAPPY to see an offer for a free game of bowling from applesauce maker Musselman’s in today’s coupon inserts. You’ll be sad to find out that no bowling alleys in Luzerne County are participating in the promotion. But if you’re willing to drive north — and eat that applesauce — you can still be rewarded. You can take the bowling voucher to South Side Bowl in Scranton and Valley Lanes near Carbondale. Make sure you bring along the required proof of purchase from a Musselman’s single serve applesauce cup product. Go to www.musselmans.com to print additional free-game vouchers. To make the deal juicer, there’s also a $1 off two packages of the product

He’s bringing entrepreneurial spirit to school

ANDREW M. SEDER

STEALS & DEALS coupon. Weis Markets has them on sale this week, three packs for $5, so you’ll get three for $4. Here’s this week’s best use of coupons found in today’s edition of The Times Leader: • Rite Aid has all Nature’s Bounty vitamins and supplements buy-one, get-one-free. There’s a $3 off any fish oil supplement coupon and a $1 off any vitamin or supplement coupon in today’s paper. Use them both if you buy those products. • Rite Aid also is the sweet spot for candy as they have Hershey’s candy bars buy-one, get-one-free. Plus, use the free Hershey’s Air Delight aerated

milk chocolate when you purchase any Hershey’s milk chocolate bar coupon to score two free bars for the purchase of one. No coupon is required for this deal, but you do need your CVS Extra Care Card. Buy a Mars candy bar for 75 cents and get a 75 cent coupon good for a future purchase printed on your receipt. Perhaps you can use that coupon, along with the $1 off coupon found in today’s newspaper to pay just $2.24 for a bottle of Listerine. Then you’ll get a $2 coupon printed out on your receipt for another store purchase. The fun — and savings — just never end. Walgreens, for those of you unfamiliar with the pharmacy chain, has something called Register Rewards. It’s similar to Rite Aid’s Up Rewards or


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more on their homes than the properties are worth. Of course, the lower prices have also made it easier for buyers to afford homes. And once the foreclosure bottleneck is cleared, many low-priced properties will come onto the market, said Patrick O’Keefe, an economist with J.H. Cohn in Roseland, N.J. The multifamily market — especially for rentals — is the only area where construction has started to pick up again. AvalonBay Communities Inc., a Northern Virginia-based rental company, is building new apartments in three New Jersey locations. “People are renting for a variety of reasons, including insecurity about their jobs,” said Ron Ladell, a vice president with AvalonBay. As the homeownership rate has dropped from a record 69.2 percent in 2004 to 66.3 percent in the third quarter of 2011, millions of people have turned to renting, he pointed out. At the same time, he said, “there’s a dearth of supply — for the last three or four years, there’s been no building.” For the most part, new home construction has been bumping along at the lowest levels since World War II. “We’re expecting some recovery in 2012, and a little more momentum in 2013,” Denk said. Even so, in 2012, builders are

GAS Continued from Page 1D

in the sanctuary and replace them with energy-efficient natural gas furnaces. Two years later the former $500 monthly oil bill has been cut in half. Swope said that for years the cost of oil and gas “often tracked each other, but now with the development of Marcellus Shale that is no longer the case.” He said that as the price of oil has been volatile, natural gas prices have remained stable and even down from just a few years ago. “For the first time in a long time there’s a significant disparity in the prices,” Swope said. He estimated that an average home with oil heat would pay about $1,000 more annually than a home with natural gas as a heating source. The close proximity of the Marcellus Shale formation, which some believe holds the second largest natural gas deposits in the world, is a factor in keeping prices down, Swope said. The Shale formation is located deep underground from New York to Ohio and West Virginia. Northeastern Pennsylvania counties where drilling is taking place include Wyoming, Susquehanna, Bradford, Tioga and Lycoming. As more drilling operations become operational more gas is produced and more publicity is focused on the product. It’s spurring stable prices and more awareness of natural gas as an option for home heating. “Everyone knows it’s there.

BRANDS Continued from Page 1D

electronics. So far, the Chinese haven’t approached the excesses of the socalled New Russians, who after the Soviet collapse were quickly flaunting diamond-encrusted baubles and mega-yachts. After all, China is still at least nominally a communist country, and the culture is rich with proverbs about the terrible things that can befall you for showing off. (“A tall pine attracts more wind” and “Man should avoid fame like a pig avoids fattening,” to name two.) Yet for some, conspicuous consumption, particularly in the social media era, does not seem to be a problem. Young women post photographs of themselves on microblogs with their Hermes handbags. The son of an auto tycoon uploaded on the Chinese equivalent of YouTube a

Steven Youngblood, WilkesBarre, has joined the firm’s Wilkes-Barre office. Youngblood is a senior in the audit and accounting department. He graduated from King’s College with a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting.

PNC BANK, NORTHEAST PA

MCT PHOTO

Framer Cruz Cortez, of California, uses a nailer to construct a frame of Building Three Tower D in Wood-Ridge, N.J. AvalonBay Community is constructing a mixed-use development called Wesmont Station.

“Our view is that the economy isn’t going to grow fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. That’s one of the reasons that it will take the housing market another 1 1/2 to two years to get back on track and start growing again.” Patrick Newport An economist with IHS Global Insight

expected to construct only about 40 percent of what’s needed just to keep up with population growth, which Denk said is about 1.2 million units a year. In 2013, home construction will come to only 60 percent of nor-

mal levels, he predicted. With the U.S. population growing by about 3 million a year, the housing market needs about 1.5 million new homes a year, Newport said. But he expects that builders won’t ramp

up to that level until mid-2013 or 2014. “Ultimately, demographics will bring the housing market back to life,” Newport said. “The question is when is that going to happen?”

“For a while oil and natural gas were pretty close, oil was cheaper for a little stretch in the 1980s but now it’s gotten out of hand and I don’t know if it’s ever coming back.”

Andrew Gavlick, Wilkes-Barre, has been promoted to assistant vice president. Gavlick joined PNC in 2006 as a mortgage loan officer for PNC Mortgage. Presently, he is the branch manager for Gavlick the Blakeslee office. Gavlick is a graduate of Wilkes University, with a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in business administration organizational leadership.

UNITED METHODIST HOMES Sharon Ritsick has joined The Wesley Village Campus as personal care services director. She previously served as administrator at the Homes from Senior Ritsick Health Care Solutions, Scranton Manor Personal Care Center. Ritsick earned her Bachelor of Science in nursing from Wilkes University and also holds a personal care home administrator’s certification. She has worked in health care for 26 years, as an oncology nurse, home health nurse and personal care home consultant.

SUSQUEHANNA BREWING COMPANY Guy Hagner is joining the new brewery as its packaging manager/quality assurance

Russ Newell Jr. President of supply and distribution at Newell Fuel Service, Trucksville

www.timesleader.com

manager. Hagner’s background includes high-quality nanobrewery and microbrewery startups. His brewing career includes Pabst Brewing Company; Brewmaster at Dixie Brewing Company, New Orleans, Louisiana; brewmaster at the Lion Brewery in Wilkes-Barre, and founder of the Franconia Brewing Company Inc. in Mount Pocono, serving as brewmaster and president.

KEYSTONE ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS, ENGINEERS AND SURVEYORS, LLC, Alexander N. Urda has been appointed by the Broome County Legislature membership on the Broome County Soil and Water Urda Conservation District Board of Directors to serve as a project engineer in the Civil Engineering Department. He has more than 13 years experience in civil engineering including site planning and design.

FRIEDMAN ELECTRIC Susan Mondlak Fenske has been appointed the new solar specialist in the Energy Solutions Department. Susan has nearly 20 years experience in Mondlak Fenske the technology and energy markets. Her experience in energy efficiency began in the San Francisco Bay area. The Times Leader publishes announcements of business promotions, hirings and other noteworthy events on Sundays. Photographs may be included as space allows. Submit an announcement by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com, by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711; or by fax to 829-5537. Photos in jpeg format may be attached to emails.

HONORS & AWARDS

We’re not going to run out,” Swope said. That, in turn, “limits volatility” in the price for the commodity. Flooding caused by the onetwo punch of Tropical Storm Lee and Hurricane Irene that damaged homes and business from West Pittston to Shickshinny also may have boosted conversions last year. “A lot of people lost their heating systems,” Swope said. Swope said that many homeowners used the disaster as a chance to convert their heating source to natural gas since they were going to have to replace a furnace anyway. He said it’s not clear how many conversions were a direct result of the flooding, but said there was a fourweek waiting period for hookups in what’s normally a quick turnaround project. Swope said while the conversion process is relatively easy and affordable, a potential customer needs to be close to an existing natural gas main to make it worthwhile. If a home or business has a main running by it, tapping in

will cost next to nothing. But if the gas company has to go more than 50 feet, the expense could be substantial. And tying in to the existing gas lines isn’t the only cost. Paying for a gas furnace, which could run a few thousand dollars, would be the bigger expense. But Swope said the way the costs for the two fuels are trending, the new furnace could pay for itself in just a few years. Elick said that’s been the case at his church. The overall cost of the changeover was about $7,500 and in just two years the savings have paid off the two new furnaces and the conversion of a third one, allowing the church to divert the monthly savings to ministry programs. “The initial outlay (of money) was a bit of a concern,” Elick

Heating oil suppliers feel loss Russ Newell Jr., president of supply and distribution at Newell Fuel Service in Trucksville, said companies such as his have been seeing the conversion trend over the past few years and don’t see it ending. “The drilling nearby certainly isn’t hurting anything,” Newell said, adding that he sees no end to the growing disparity between oil and natural gas costs. “For a while oil and natural gas were pretty close, oil was cheaper for a little stretch in the 1980s but now it’s gotten out of hand and I don’t know if it’s ever coming back,” Newell said.

video shot from behind the wheel of his $4.5 million Bugatti Veyron sports car weaving through traffic in the southern city of Chongqing. “People are more extroverted. They have no problem showing off their wealth,” said Klaus Paur, an auto industry analyst and managing director in the Shanghai office of Synovate Motoresearch. He recalls that when he came to China in 2003, the wealthy drove large Mercedeses and Audis, invariably in black. Chinese officialdom has something of a love-hate relationship with luxury goods, officials relishing their own creature comforts while deploring anybody else doing it too flagrantly. China still has 150 million people living on less than $1 a day. And it maintains some of the highest taxes in the world on luxury goods, adding up to 60 percent to the cost — which is why rich Chinese have become such prodigious shoppers abroad.

The word “shechi,” or luxury, is banned in advertising and company names, said Ouyang Kun, who runs a trade group in Beijing called the World Luxury Association. “The government feels luxury items are only affordable for a few people. They don’t want to create unharmonious feelings among the people,” he explained. The Chinese equivalent of Rodeo Drive is a four-block strip in the heart of old Beijing along Jinbao Street, whose name appropriately means “gold treasure.” The street was built in 2002 out of two traditional hutongs, or alleys, one named Jinyu, or “goldfish,” and the other Yaba, or “mute man,” part of a larger redevelopment project that displaced more than 4,000 families. Along the same row as the luxury car dealerships is a branch of Hong Kong’s Jockey Club and a seven-story mall where a Bottega Veneta handbag made of African crocodile skin can set you back $51,000 and a jewel-en-

crusted cellphone $132,000. Expensive simply for the sake of expensive is all the rage. At a trade show on the resort island of Hainan in November, promoters unveiled a gold-plated toilet costing more than $200,000. The recently opened Black Swan Luxury Bakery (that’s the English name; it’s the Black Swan Art Bakery in Chinese because of the ban on shechi) made headlines with a multitiered, cream-swathed wedding cake in the front window with a $314,000 price tag. The phenomenon isn’t limited to Beijing. Drive through most dusty provincial capitals now and you’ll see high-end shops in the center of town, often alongside the People’s Square — a popular name in deference to communist tradition. In Chongqing, a city once famous for its revolutionary zeal, a fivestory Louis Vuitton shop opened in September, overshadowing the iconic Liberation Monument.

United Methodist Homes recently honored employees for their many years of service. CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

The New Life Community Church in Mountain Top has converted its heating system from oil to natural gas. Its pastor says the savings have been apparent.

said, but those fears were allayed when the first gas bills arrived. And that’s something of which oil companies are well aware.

Donna Casey, administrative assistant, Wesley Village, was honored for her 33 years of service. She began her career in a temporary trailer on the campus before Casey the Wesley Village buildings were constructed. Jerry Sulkoski, plant operations director, was recognized for 32 years of Sulkoski service at Wesley Village. During his tenure he hired three staff members who now each have 25 years of

BUSINESS AGENDA OSHA’S IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION: Tuesday, 9-1 1 a.m., Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce, 20 W. Broad St. Information on how OSHA regulations affect residential contractors. Chamber members $25; nonmembers, $30, includes materials and continental breakfast. Reservations required online at www.hazletonchamber.org, by calling 455-1509 or by email at jferry@hazletonchamber.org. MANAGING RECEIVABLES: Wednesday, 1 1:45 a.m., Purkey’s Pink Apple, Tunkhannock. Wyoming County Chamber of Commerce luncheon with speakers George Gay, a volunteer with the small-business mentoring group SCORE, and Amy Kowalski with Adams Enterprises.Free to members and $10 for nonmembers. To reserve, call 570-8367755 or e-mail Robin@wyccc.com. CEO LUZERNE ROUNDTABLE: Thursday, 1 1 a.m.-1 p.m., Top of the 80s, Hazleton. Robert T. Sweet, economist and managing director of MTB Investment Advisors, will discuss the economic outlook for 2012 and the outlook for capital markets. $36 for Northeast Pennsylvania Manufacturers and Employers

service. Janice Corby, housekeeping director at the Tunkhannock Campus, was honored for 30 years of service. Barbara Soltishick, housekeeping/ laundry aide for United Methodist Homes, was honored for 26 years of service. Paul Kotowski, of Scranton Electric Heating and Cooling in Scranton, was selected as the latest monthly winner of its annual VIP Installation Showcase, a contest that honors industry professionals for outstanding installations of Lochinvar boilers from Lochinvar LLC. Submit announcements of business honors and awards to Business Awards by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250; or by fax to (570) 829-5537. Photos in jpg format may be attached to email.

Association members; $72 for nonmembers, includes lunch. To register, call 622-0992 or email kreeser@maea.biz. OSHA TRAINING IN GENERAL INDUSTRY: Thursday-Friday, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce, 20 W. Broad St. For general industry workers, supervisors, safety managers, or other individuals responsible for safety in their organizations. Chamber members $175; nonmembers, $225, includes training materials and lunch. BUILDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION DINNER: Jan. 21, The Waterfront, Plains Township. Warren Peter, Pennsylvania Builders Association 2012 president, will present the installation of officers and directors of the Building Industry Association of Northeastern Pennsylvania. Shawn Prohaska of Invisible Fence of NEPA/No-Burn of NEPA is the 2012 BIA president. Call 570-287-3331 for information or reservations. Send announcements of upcoming events by email to tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail to Business Agenda, Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 or by fax to 829-5537. Include a contact phone number and email address. The submission deadline is Wednesday for publication on Sunday.


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MarketPulse

Debt hangover?

Consumers are no longer as cautious about borrowing as they were during the recession. They’ve borrowed more money 11 of the past 12 months. The latest Federal Reserve figures are through October, and don’t cover the holiday shopping season. But it’s clear consumers have been spending more freely, and their confidence has been rising. David Joy, chief market strategist with Ameriprise Financial, doesn't see a risk that consumer debt will get out of control. HERE’S HIS TAKE:

InsiderQ&A

What’s driving the recent increase in consumer borrowing? Consumers spent very little over the last three years, and paid down debt. Now, they’ve arrived at the point where some spending has become necessary. For example, the monthly automobile data show that cars are wearing out and need to be replaced. There’s also a certain fatigue with being frugal. The American consumer has historically been a prodigious spender. And I think they get to a point where they simply say, “I'm going to reward myself, after three years of being pretty good.”

Joy

Why do you think consumers will be able to manage their recent increased borrowing? They’ve been pretty good at holding the line on spending for the last several years, so they have more capacity to satisfy either needs or wants in this environment. And the unemployment rate has come down a bit. So that helps, although the improvement hasn’t been rapid. Also, people have paid down debt over the past few years, so total debt outstanding is down. And the cost of servicing debt is down, because interest rates are so low. While consumer borrowing is on the rise, that’s not been the case with mortgage borrowing? Consumers have to some extent separated mortgage debt from consumer debt — debt from credit cards, and auto and student loans. For most people, mortgage debt seems to be a separate issue from the fact that my car needs to be replaced, or I need a new pair of shoes, or I want a new television. Consumers seem to have compartmentalized these two categories of debt. What risks threaten the increase in consumer borrowing? This trend could run its course if the economy shows very little improvement in the next several quarters. We’re seeing a burst of economic activity to make up for some of the spending that was absent during the previous three years. Consumer spending is about 70 percent of the economy, so the spending we’re seeing is certainly helping. It’s not robust yet, but that’s not surprising, given that unemployment remains high, and housing prices are down. I don’t worry about the increased consumer borrowing leading to a new debt bubble, as much as I worry that it could just be a shortterm burst of activity. If it proves to be short, that will leave the economy growing at a very sluggish rate. Do you see any investment opportunities arising from the recent consumer spending trends? Automobile stocks are attractive. Auto sales aren’t yet back to prerecession levels, but they’re rising at sustainable levels. The industry has streamlined and and downsized, so it can certainly be profitable at these sales levels.

The number of flu cases

FEELING GREAT? DRUGSTORES MAY NOT BE Flu shots are a big revenue maker for drugstores and pharmacies in supermarkets and discounters. But November and December were so warm that they reduced the number of flu cases and in turn, the number of flu shots being given out in stores, according to Citi Investment Research & Analysis. People tend to get the shots when they hear about other people being sick. Citi reported that Walgreen said its pharmacies gave 5 million flu shots in November, down from 5.4 million a year ago. The drop could affect the revenue of the retailers, Citi said. But if the number of flu cases rises in January , February and March, the stores could make back the money.

BASKING IN THE WARMTH OF HOLIDAY SALES It’s not just signs of a stronger economy that encouraged consumers to spend during the holidays. The weather in December was much warmer and drier than last year, and that made it easier for people to make it to stores and malls, according to Planalytics. The company, which analyzes weather and retail sales trends, says we just had the warmest December in five years and the least snow for the month in 10 years. The entire holiday season had the least amount of snow in more than 50 years. The downside to the warmer weather was that it reduced demand for seasonal merchandise – hardware stores weren’t selling many snow shovels.

DEFENSIVE INVESTING 2011 was a bad year for most kinds of stocks. Large caps suffered – the S&P 500 was virtually unchanged and the Russell 1000 Large Cap Index rose just 1.5 percent. The Russell 2000, which includes small caps, fell 4.2 percent. But the Russell 1000 Defensive Index rose 9 percent. It includes stocks from the Russell 1000 that are less vulnerable to the ups and downs of the economy. Defensive stocks usually include health care companies, consumer products makers and utilities. They also include big dividend payers. The largest stocks in the Russell defensive index include big oil companies and technology firms as well.

Reported weekly during December 995 in 2010 and 2011 2010 2011 Data not available for the week ending Dec. 31, 2011 386

744

689

363

97

64

48

37

Dec.3 Dec.10 Dec.17 Dec.24 Dec.31 Source: Citi Investment Research & Analysis

The stock market is already benefiting from “the January effect.” That’s the term market strategists use for the buying investors often do the first month of the year, when they pick up stocks sold in December. There are other market trends that are supposed to follow the calendar. Here are some:

What is it: At the start of each year, investors buy the 10 stocks in the Dow with the highest dividend yields. They’re called Dogs because stocks with high yields either have large dividends or low stock prices. The record: The strategy hasn’t worked much this last decade. The Dogs did worse as a group than the overall Dow in 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008 and 2009. Did it work last year: Yes, for the second straight year. The Dogs of the Dow rose 12 percent, led by a nearly 31 percent rise in McDonald’s. The Dow rose just 5.5 percent.

What it is: As January goes, so goes the year. The adage says that if the S&P 500 rises in January, the full year will probably be a good one. If the S&P 500 has a poor January, a winning year is less likely. The record: Since 1945, a good January has been followed by a winning year 86 percent of the time, S&P says. A down January has been hit-or-miss in its accuracy. It has been followed by a losing year only 56 percent of the time. Did it work last time: No. The S&P 500 rose 2.3 percent in January 2011. For the full year, it slipped 0.003 percent.

Sell in May, go away

Election year syndrome

What it is: The adage urges investors to sell stocks in May and wait until the autumn to return. That way, they can avoid what is usually the worst six-month stretch for the market. One possible reason for its poor performance: Volume is low due to vacations. The record: Since 1950, the Dow has gained an average 0.4 percent from May 1 through Oct. 31. Over the next six months, it has risen an average of 7.5 percent. Did it work last year: Yes. The S&P 500 reached its high for 2011 on the last day of April. It fell 19.4 percent by Oct. 3. From May 1 through Oct. 31, it fell 8.1 percent.

What it is: The first 10 months of a presidential election year tend to be rocky for stocks. This may be because investors don’t like uncertainty. After the election is over, the S&P 500 tends to rise. The record: Since 1948, the S&P 500 has gained an average of just 0.3 percent the first 10 months of a presidential election year. But in the last two months, the S&P 500 has risen an average 1 percent. Did it work last time: No. The S&P 500 fell 34 percent the first 10 months of 2008, when the financial crisis was at its height. It fell 6.7 percent the last two months of the year.

LocalStocks 52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN RANK %RTN LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD

Air Products

APD

72.26 6

98.01

86.32

1.13

1.3

s

s

1.3

Amer Water Works

AWK

25.17 9

32.78

31.90

0.04

0.1

s

s

0.1 +30.00

+.34

2

6.7

15

2.7

1 18.9a

18

2.9

Amerigas Part LP

APU

36.76 6

51.50

44.68

-1.23

-2.7

s

s

-2.7 -2.03

2 13.2

19

6.6

Aqua America Inc

WTR

19.28 5

23.79

21.45

-0.60

-2.7

t

s

-2.7 —1.56

2

1.4

22

3.1

Arch Dan Mid

ADM

23.69 4

38.02

29.07

0.47

1.6

t

s

1.6 —6.20

3

0.0

9

2.4

AutoZone Inc

AZO

246.26 0 343.90 338.04 13.07

4.0

s

s

4.0 +35.46

1 23.3

17

...

Bank of America

BAC

0.62

11.2

s

s

11.2—56.93 5 -27.1

...

0.6

Bk of NY Mellon

BK

0.54

2.7

s

s

-9.7

9

2.5

Bon Ton Store

BONT

-0.66 -19.6

t

t -19.6—77.53 5 -37.8

...

7.4

CVS Caremark Corp

1.7

s

s

16

1.6

4.92 2

15.31

6.18

17.10 3

32.50

20.45

2.23 1

17.49

2.71

CVS

31.30 0

41.85

41.46

Cigna Corp

CI

36.76 5

52.95

43.61

1.61

3.8

s

CocaCola

KO

61.29 8

71.77

68.93

-1.04

-1.5

s

Comcast Corp A

CMCSA 19.19 7

27.16

24.69

0.98

4.1

Community Bk Sys

CBU

21.67 0

28.91

28.41

0.61

2.2

Community Hlth Sys

CYH

14.61 2

42.50

18.31

0.86

Entercom Comm

ETM

4.61 3

13.63

6.97

Fairchild Semicond

FCS

10.25 2

21.02

12.19

Frontier Comm

FTR

Genpact Ltd

G

Harte Hanks Inc

2.7—33.43 4 1.7 +19.78

1

6.7

s

3.8 +11.89

1

0.5

9

0.1

s

-1.5 +12.34

1

9.8

13

2.7

s

s

4.1 +10.44

2

-1.7

17

1.8

s

s

2.2 +7.45

2

7.6

14

3.7

4.9

s

s

4.9—52.80 5 -12.6

7

...

0.82

13.3

s

s 13.3—37.77 4 -20.0

7

...

0.15

1.2

t

s

1.2—26.03 4

-6.8

9

...

-7.2

4.79 1

9.84

5.11

-0.04

-0.8

t

t

-0.8—38.64 4

13.09 3

18.16

14.52

-0.43

-2.9

t

t

-2.9 —1.63

2 15.7a

19

1.2

HHS

7.00 3

13.74

8.91

-0.18

-2.0

t

s

-2.0—28.28 4 -17.9

13

3.6

Heinz

HNZ

46.99 8

55.00

53.02

-1.02

-1.9

r

s

-1.9 +13.50

1

6.3

17

3.6

Hershey Company

HSY

46.24 9

62.38

60.69

-1.09

-1.8

s

s

-1.8 +29.50

1

6.0

23

2.3

Kraft Foods

KFT

30.21 0

38.05

37.55

0.19

0.5

s

s

0.5 +23.79

1

4.2

21

3.1

Lowes Cos

LOW

18.07 9

27.45

26.34

0.96

3.8

s

s

3.8 +11.23

1

-2.4

19

2.1

34 14.7

91.05

M&T Bank

MTB

66.40 6

79.45

3.11

4.1

s

s

4.1 —6.04

3

-5.0

12

3.5

McDonalds Corp

MCD

72.14 0 101.59 100.60

0.27

0.3

s

s

0.3 +38.97

1 20.5

20

2.8

NBT Bncp

NBTB

17.05 7

24.98

22.31

0.18

0.8

s

s

0.8 —5.05

3

1.1

13

3.6

Nexstar Bdcstg Grp

NXST

4.59 7

10.28

8.35

0.51

6.5

s

s

6.5 +41.53

1 10.8

...

...

PNC Financial

PNC

42.70 8

65.19

59.91

2.24

3.9

s

s

3.9 —1.96

2

-1.9

10

2.3

PPL Corp

PPL

24.10 8

30.27

28.52

-0.90

-3.1

t

s

-3.1 +12.31

1

-0.2

11

4.9

Penna REIT

PEI

6.50 4

17.34

10.75

0.31

3.0

s

s

3.0—18.81 4 -15.1

...

5.6

PepsiCo

PEP

58.50 6

71.89

65.39

-0.96

-1.4

s

s

-1.4

3.3

16

3.2

Philip Morris Intl

PM

55.85 9

79.96

77.08

-1.40

-1.8

s

s

-1.8 +38.43

1 25.1a

16

4.0

Procter & Gamble

PG

57.56 9

67.72

66.36

-0.35

-0.5

s

s

-0.5 +5.76

2

3.2

17

3.2

Prudential Fncl

PRU

42.45 5

67.52

52.73

2.61

5.2

s

s

5.2—11.79 3

-7.6

7

2.7

SLM Corp

SLM

10.91 5

17.11

13.78

0.38

2.8

s

s

2.8 +6.34

2 -22.0

15

2.9

+.86

2

SLM Corp flt pfB

SLMBP 39.00 1

60.00

39.50

0.50

1.3

t

t

1.3

...

0.0

Southn Union Co

SUG

24.18 9

44.65

42.40

0.29

0.7

s

s

0.7 +74.09

1 10.6

21

1.4

TJX Cos

TJX

42.55 0

66.55

66.46

1.91

3.0

s

s

3.0 +47.58

1 18.9

19

1.1

UGI Corp

UGI

24.07 5

33.53

28.48

-0.92

-3.1

t

s

-3.1 —7.26

3

4.3

14

3.7

Verizon Comm

VZ

32.28 8

40.48

38.33

-1.29

-3.3

t

s

-4.5 +11.25

1

6.5

15

5.2

WalMart Strs

WMT

48.31 9

61.06

59.00

-0.76

-1.3

s

s

-1.3 +12.05

1

6.4

13

2.5

Weis Mkts

... 11.7

WMK

36.52 7

42.20

39.99

0.05

0.1

t

s

0.1 +7.30

2

3.0

15

3.0

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).

Stock Screener

+25

Chevron (CVX)

+16.6

Microsoft (MSFT)

-7

Procter & Gamble (PG)

+3.7

Source: FactSet

InterestRates

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose slightly last week, but it remains near its record low. Lower Treasury yields typically translate into lower rates on loans and savings accounts for consumers. The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage fell to 3.91 percent last week, according to Freddie Mac. That matched its record low, set two weeks earlier.

Money market mutual funds

Consult the January barometer

0.68

+16%

IBM (IBM)

Joyce Rosenberg, Jenni Sohn • AP

Buy the dogs of the Dow

TICKER

Exxon (XOM)

Treasury, mortgage rates still low

Investing by the book

COMPANY

Top five stocks in the Russell 1000 Defensive Index and how they did in 2011

PRIME FED Taxable—national avg RATE FUNDS Fidelity Select Money Market FRIDAY 3.25 .13 Tax-exempt—national avg 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 BMO Tax Free MMF/Class Y 1 YR AGO 3.25 .13

Ares Capital Reynolds American Sempra Energy International Paper Intel Valero Energy Chevron American Water Works Honeywell International Foot Locker Time Warner Target Wal-Mart Stores Omnicom Group Norfolk Southern

SOURCE: FactSet

Data through Jan. 4

COMPANY

TICKER

ARCC RAI SRE IP INTC VLO CVX AWK HON FL TWX TGT WMT OMC NSC

0.01 0.11 $ 2,500 min (800) 544-6666 0.01 0.11 $ 1,000 min (800) 236-3863

FRIDAY YIELD

1WK

2.27 3.91 3.79 4.81 8.10 1.05

0.01 0.12 0.03 -0.03 -0.24 0.05

FRIDAY YIELD

1WK

0.02 0.14 0.04 0.26 0.86

0.00 -0.01 -0.01 0.02 0.03

s r s s t

s t s t t

-0.12 -0.16 -0.13 -0.40 -1.22

0.15 0.33 0.18 0.83 2.39

0.07 0.01 0.16 0.78

10-year T-Note 1.96 30-year T-Bond 3.02 Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.

0.08 0.13

t t

t -1.45 r -1.51

3.72 4.77

1.72 2.72

U.S. BOND INDEXES Broad market Lehman Triple-A corporate Moody’s Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman Municipal Bond Buyer U.S. high yield Barclays Treasury Barclays

TREASURYS 3-month T-Bill 1-year T-Bill 6-month T-Bill 2-year T-Note 5-year T-Note

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR t t s t t t

t t t t t t

3.29 5.31 4.22 5.95 10.15 2.46

CHANGE 1MO 3MO 1YR

TICKER

FRIDAY NAV

WK CHG

4WK

American Funds BalA m ABALX American Funds BondA m ABNDX American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX BlackRock GlobAlcC m MCLOX BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX Dodge & Cox Income DODIX Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX Fidelity Contra FCNTX Fidelity Free2020 FFFDX Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX Fidelity Spartan 500IdxInv FUSEX FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX Permanent Portfolio PRPFX T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX Vanguard 500Inv VFINX Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX Vanguard InflaPro VIPSX Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX Vanguard TotIntl d VGTSX Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX Vanguard Welltn VWELX Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX

18.46 12.54 48.98 32.27 35.19 35.94 29.32 16.79 27.58 26.45 28.73 18.37 17.12 18.45 13.33 29.22 103.79 68.46 13.25 82.74 36.25 45.24 2.11 2.13 19.02 12.46 12.43 52.83 27.21 11.60 10.31 10.90 10.90 10.90 10.90 46.64 23.46 32.39 6.54 53.58 117.73 117.73 11.08 14.19 116.96 116.97 28.80 14.08 10.65 12.38 10.98 10.98 13.11 31.82 31.83 31.81 55.64 31.67 54.70 26.17

+.25 -.01 -.24 +.15 +.03 +.55 +.59 +.03 +.49 +.29 +.33 +.21 +.19 +.21 +.03 -.02 +2.15 +1.00 +.13 +1.85 +.52 +.75 +.01 +.01 +.07 +.05 +.06 +.38 +.16 +.06 +.02 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.55 +.40 +.56 +.05 +.85 +1.93 +1.93 +.01 +.08 +1.92 +1.92 +.48 +.05 +.01 +.11 -.02 -.02 +.05 +.52 +.53 +.52 +.08 +.33 +.57 +.39

+1.3 +.7 +1.0 -.2 -2.3 +1.1 +.3 +1.9 +1.7 -.9 +2.4 -.6 -.7 -.6 +1.2 -2.5 +2.2 -.3 +.5 -.5 +.8 +1.7 +2.5 +2.4 +.3 -.8 -.8 -1.7 +.1 +.3 +.6 +1.4 +1.4 +1.4 +1.4 -1.7 +2.5 -.1 +2.3 +.4 +1.8 +1.7 +.6 +.6 +1.8 +1.8 +1.6 +1.7 +.4 +.4 +.7 +.7 -2.4 +1.6 +1.6 +1.5 +1.9 +2.0 +2.0 +2.0

GROUP, FUND

52-WK HIGH LOW

-0.85 -1.18 -0.35 -0.78 0.80 -1.13

MutualFunds

2.15 3.73 3.36 4.81 6.61 0.96

52-WK HIGH LOW

RETURN/RANK 1YR 5YR +4.5/A +6.8/C +2.6/A -7.1/C -13.4/C -1.1/C -3.8/D +5.5/A -.7/C -6.5/C +7.3/A -2.7/C -3.4/C -2.5/C +5.1/E -15.7/E -3.9/D +.4/B -.8/D +.1/B +1.0/A +2.4/A +2.8/B +2.3/C -9.1/A -2.2/E -1.9/E -9.8/A +1.2/C +3.1/A +2.1/B +4.4/E +4.6/E +4.8/E +4.5/E +4.4/A -.3/C -.3/B +3.3/C -.7/B +2.4/A +2.3/B +8.3/A +14.0/A +2.4/A +2.4/A +1.5/B +10.2/B +2.2/B +.1/A +8.0/A +8.0/A -13.7/C +1.5/B +1.5/B +1.3/B +10.1/A +4.2/A +4.3/A +2.5/B

+2.7/B +3.5/E +1.0/C -.6/B -1.2/A +1.1/A -.1/D +1.9/C -.4/C +1.1/A +.5/B +4.0/B +3.2/B +4.3/B +6.3/B -3.2/A -3.6/E +3.0/A +1.4/C +4.4/A +2.6/B +.2/B +3.1/C +2.6/D -.3/A +9.2/A +9.5/A -.3/A +4.6/A +5.9/A +5.2/A +7.6/A +7.8/A +8.0/A +7.7/A +9.0/A -.5/B +1.5/C +6.7/A +5.9/A +.2/B +.1/B +6.9/A +7.7/B +.2/B +.3/B +.8/A +5.1/B +4.4/B +1.6/A +6.4/B +6.4/B -3.2/B +.8/B +.8/B +.7/B +6.2/A +3.8/A +3.9/A -.9/B

Rank: Fund’s letter grade compared with others in the same performance group; an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.

What’s popular is rarely cheap

When the health of the economy and stock market is so uncertain, the steadiness of dividend-paying stocks looks more attractive. That’s one reason dividend-paying stocks did so much better than others last year. Dividend payers in the S&P 500 rose an average of 1.4 percent in 2011, including dividends. Stocks in the index that don’t pay a dividend fell an average of 7.6 percent. But the problem is that last year’s strong performance for dividend stocks means that many no longer look like cheap buys. McDonald’s stock, for example, trades at 20 times its earnings per share over the last 12 months. That’s higher than the 14 times that the S&P 500 trades at. This screen from Citi analyst Keith Miller shows stocks with dividend yields of at least 2 percent that he says also look reasonably priced. Intel, for example, has a 3.3 percent dividend yield. But it trades at only 10 times its expected earnings per share over the next 12 months. Investors are worried about slower sales across the PC industry because of disk-drive factory shutdowns in Thailand due to flooding.

MIN INVEST PHONE

YIELD

CLOSE

$15.51 40.76 55.27 30.10 25.11 20.42 110.18 31.38 55.53 24.12 36.49 50.00 59.71 44.74 75.05

1-YR

-7.1% 23.3 7.1 8.6 21.3 -16.8 19.0 24.0 2.1 29.8 10.6 -17.5 9.1 -5.9 19.3

PRICEEARNINGS RATIO (BASED ON DIVIDEND NEXT YIELD 12 MOS.)

9.2% 5.5 3.5 3.4 3.3 3.0 3.0 2.9 2.7 2.7 2.6 2.5 2.5 2.3 2.3

10 14 12 10 10 5 8 16 12 12 12 12 12 13 12

p p p p

Dow industrials

+1.2% WEEKLY

Nasdaq

+2.7% WEEKLY

LARGE-CAP

S&P 500

+1.6% WEEKLY

SMALL-CAP

Russell 2000

+1.2% WEEKLY

p p p p p p p p

+1.4%

MO +1.2%

YTD +1.0%

MO +2.7%

YTD +1.8%

MO +1.6%

YTD

+0.6%

MO +1.2%

YTD


CMYK PAGE 4D

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

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B

U

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S

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THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

The Motley Fool

ÂŽ

LEAPs of Faith

What are LEAPs? — H.H., Decatur, Ill. They’re long-term options, ones that expire after more than a year from their issue date. Standard options let you purchase the right to buy (via “call� options) or sell (via “put� options) a fixed number of shares of a stock at a fixed price within a fixed time period, typically a few months. Here’s an example: If you think that Tattoo Advertising Co. (Ticker: YOWCH), trading at $40 today, will soon be at $60, you might buy call options for $6 per share that let you buy the shares at $45. That will ultimately cost you $51 per share, netting you a $9 profit — but only if the stock hits your target before the expiration date. Options such as these often end up expiring worthless. That’s why LEAPs, with their longer time frames, can be more attractive, despite costing more. They give the underlying stock more time to move. Options are not for beginning investors, and many successful and experienced investors steer clear, too. Still, used sensibly, they can make you money. Learn more at www.cboe.com/LearnCenter and www.fool.com/investing/options/ options-a-foolish-introduction.aspx. *** What’s the “efficient market theory�? — C.S., Monticello, Minn. It suggests that all available information about a stock is known and factored into its price. Thus, an investor shouldn’t be able to find undervalued or overvalued stocks. There are strong and weak forms of this theory, and it’s not embraced by all. We Fools tend to see the market as generally efficient, but there are still occasional inefficiencies that alert investors can take advantage of. A well-regarded book on the topic is Burton Malkiel’s “A Random Walk Down Wall Street� (W.W. Norton, $30).

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trol over them while you’re alive, but they technically belong to the trust. When you die, a trustee passes the property on to your specified heirs. Other options include “payable on death� designations on bank accounts (where the contents of the account pass immediately to the designated beneficiary on your death) and retirement accounts such as IRAs and 401(k)s (where you also specify beneficiaries). Most states permit securities held by brokerages and others to pass to beneficiaries without going through probate. Many states permit a certain amount of property to be inherited without going through probate, too. Don’t die “intestate� — without leaving behind a will or trust. In such cases, the government takes over and follows strict procedures, dividing your property according to formulas. You don’t want your estate tied up in probate for years. Consult a professional, and visit www.aarp.org/money/estateplanning or www.smartmoney. com/retirement/estate-planning, or read “Plan Your Estate� by Denis Clifford (NOLO, $45).

Plan That Estate Ignoring the vital issue of estate planning can cost your loved ones a lot of money, heartache and aggravation one day. Here’s an introduction to the topic. Probate is the legal process of administering an estate. It involves demonstrating that a will is valid, cataloging the belongings of the deceased, getting the belongings appraised, distributing the property, paying debts and taxes, transferring titles and more. Probate can be a hassle, sometimes costing between 5 percent and 10 percent of an estate’s value. Also, property remains in limbo while in probate, which can last months or even years. Although probate has some good points, such as being a fairly unbiased system, it can be avoided if you plan ahead. One way to avoid probate is through a living trust or a life estate trust, where you formally transfer the title of various properties to your heirs before you die. You retain con-

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A Slow Revolution

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I read an article years ago, saying that LED light fixtures provide significant energy savings over compact fluorescent bulbs, with a nice white spectrum. With a minimum of research, I dropped $700 on Cree, a dominant player in the technology, and ended up losing money. — Chris, London The Fool Responds: A compelling product is rarely enough. LED bulbs are indeed very efficient, requiring relatively little power to put out strong light. But for now, they remain rather costly, and that’s keeping many people from buying them, even if the long-term economic argument makes sense. Such bulbs are selling for around $20 to $30 apiece these days. That doesn’t mean they’re doomed, though. As long as their manufacturers have staying power, as demand grows and production scales up, costs will come down. But as with any investment, you need to be sure the company is healthy, well-managed and in a good competitive position. You don’t want it to run out of money or have a rival eat its lunch. Cree has other lines of business, too, such as LED chips for video screens and gaming displays. Do you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, you’ll win a Fool’s cap!

Here’s a litmus test for stocks, via Warren Buffett: Say you knew that the day after you bought a stock, the market would close for five years, so no matter what happens, you’re stuck. Would you still invest? The best companies have sustainable competitive advantages — or moats. Consider Procter & Gamble, with its dividend yield recently at 3.2 percent. Its success stems from its portfolio of strong brand names (think Tide, Crest, Pampers) and its cost advantages, such as being able to inexpensively produce new varieties of best-sellers. Here are a few more: s $IAGEO RECENTLY YIELDING  percent, sports a massive brand portfolio including Jose Cuervo, Smirnoff and Guinness. s *OHNSON  *OHNSON RECENTLY yielded 3.6 percent, with brand names such as Tylenol and BandAid, a collection of pharmaceutical and medical device patents, and a robust research pipeline. s 0HILIP -ORRIS )NTERNATIONAL

recently yielding 4.1 percent, owns seven of the top-selling international cigarette brands, including Marlboro. s 0EPSI#O WITH A RECENT YIELD OF 3.2 percent, dominates the salty snack category with its Frito-Lay collection of brands. Its direct-tostore delivery system keeps competitors off the shelves, too. Any of these massive-moat dividends would make a solid addition to your portfolio. (The Motley Fool’s newsletter services have recommended shares or options on all five companies.)

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THE TIMES LEADER

E

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

KEVIN BLAUM IN THE ARENA

This morning, take measure of Santorum THE CHUBB Theater in Concord, N.H., is 1,170 miles east of Iowa and 999 due north of Columbia, S.C. For Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum each capital city is light years away from his near victory in last week’s Iowa caucuses. Santorum and his fellow candidates for the Republican presidential nomination are set to debate the issues this morning, before a national television audience on a Special Edition of “Meet the Press,” live from the historic Chubb Theater, two days before the first in the nation New Hampshire primary. On Saturday night, ABC News was to sponsor a similar event from 9 to 11 p.m. on the campus of Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. It featured the same cast of candidates. But unfortunately, while ABC anchors Diane Sawyer and George Stephanopoulos were moderating, Al Michaels and Cris Collinsworth were broadcasting the NFL playoff game between Detroit and New Orleans, on NBC. Consequently, few people probably heard or saw whether a mighty evergreen was felled in the woods surrounding Saint Anselm’s. Chances are Saint Anselm’s debate registered little on Charles Richter’s scale of things while overnight ratings will likely demonstrate that candidate families and “Arenareaders” were the only viewers not watching the Saints of New Orleans. ABC’s scheduling glitch only places greater emphasis upon this morning’s meet-up among Santorum, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, Congressman Ron Paul of Texas and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Virginia. With less then 48 hours remaining until polls open throughout the Granite State, and 13 days before the pivotal Republican primary in South Carolina on Jan. 21, the stakes could not be higher for the former senator from Pennsylvania. In the Oct. 4, 2009 edition of “In the Arena,” having previously made note of Sen. Santorum’s repeated trips to Iowa, I wrote: With a compelling message, the possibility of a Santorum presidential bid is no more far-fetched than the probable Sarah Palin plan to the nomination. … (B)ut Santorum is very bright while Palin is, well, you know. With a compelling message, Santorum could be expected to shine in debates before the conservative party faithful. In a party where moderates need not apply, Santorum remains a favorite among the far right. With a compelling message, he could provide an option for Republicans aghast at the discovery that Palin (now Romney) is their undisputed Republican front-runner. Santorum also might benefit from two front-loaded events on the national political calendar. The January 2012 Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary are critical to securing the Republican nomination. Both require direct contact with individual voters. This helps Santorum who, in intimate settings, is one of the most likable guys you will ever meet. It is true. Throughout the years I’ve found Rick Santorum to be a genuinely nice guy, extremely bright and a person with whom you could surely enjoy a cold beverage. What’s more, through incredibly hard work and perseverance, he came within eight votes of capturing that first 2012 contest on the road to the presidency. But the path now becomes steeper and more expensive. This morning’s debate is critical for the 53-year-old father of seven (one deceased). Many Americans will watch only to take measure of the man – Santorum. Will they see the senator I remember, the one who delivered a powerful victory speech from Des Moines, Iowa, on Tuesday night? Or will it be the strident archconservative who often says “unusual” things, in a seething tone, with a look of agitation and a manner incompatible with the word “presidential”? I am interested to see which Rick Santorum arrives at the Chubb this morning. Kevin Blaum’s column on government, life and politics appears every Sunday. Contact him at kblaum@timesleader.com.

JOE BUTKIEWICZ OPINION

Hey, Momma, we’re all sure gonna miss you

A

MCT ILLUSTRATION

W

By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR

Associated Press

ASHINGTON — Baby boomers take note: Medicare as your parents have known it is headed for big changes no matter who wins the White House in 2012. You may not like it, but you might have to accept it. • Dial down the partisan rhetoric and surprising similarities emerge from competing policy prescriptions by President Barack Obama and leading Republicans such as Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan. • Limit the overall growth of Medicare spending? It’s in both approaches. • Squeeze more money from upper-income retirees and some in the middle class? Ditto. • Raise the eligibility age? That too, if the deal is right. See MEDICARE, Page 6E

AP FILE PHOTO

President Barack Obama speaks at the White House in Washington.

t the funeral home viewing for the late Van Rose, many pleasantries were shared about the peculiar characteristics of our recently departed sports writer until a very good friend of his — a prominent member of the community— blustered in the door and uttered his heartfelt opinion. “He was a crazy little son of a bitch.” We all laughed. Van would have laughed, too. The veteran reporter died on Dec. 29, nearly 30 years after he started at The Times Leader. Van worked in the news and then sports departments. I started in features. Our paths crossed in 1995 when we worked together on the Arts and Leisure Team. I assigned the stories and he wrote about country music and TV and whatever came his way. He continued to wear the uniform from his days writing about horse racing and baseball — baggy blue jeans and a trademark baseball cap. He was grateful for assignments, editing and the camaraderie of the team. “I just want you to know,” he would insist, “that I just love what I’m doin’.” He also loved country music, racing horses, women and the University of Kentucky Wildcats basketball team, not necessarily in that order. Van wasn’t a great writer. He was given to hyperbole and cliché. Infamously, he struggled to write the lede — the introduction — of most of his stories. “Once I get the lede a monkey could write it.” I imagine every editor he ever had helped Van find the lede. But afterward, the monkey usually turned out a pretty good story. That was because Van was a pretty darn good reporter. He had a knack for getting people to talk and for spotting news, be it a country music talent or a departing coach. When he was drafted to return to news for a short time for an investigation in Nanticoke, he promised to bring back “buckets of dirt.” He did. “Don’t you worry about a thing,” he’d endlessly assure me. I didn’t worry. There have been much better writers who were much less reliable than Van Rose. He delivered; better writers often did not. He was a gentle soul and a gentleman, but his accent, his stature and his peculiarities, made him a target for jokes by his peers. Van’s soft Kentucky drawl transformed his vocabulary into something comical to natives of Northeastern Pennsylvania. His “sombitchin” modifier was trademark. And it was the sports writer Jerry Kellar who coined Van’s nickname. “I’m-a going for supper,”Van said. “I’m-a” evolved into “Momma” (pronounced mah-ma) and that’s what the folks in The Times Leader sports department called Van. “Momma, did you file that story?” “Hey, Momma, the Nanticoke coach called for you.” That sort of kidding went on for 30 years. We talked about it way back when. “Van I hope that kidding isn’t bothering you.” “Oh, I don’t mind that. They’re just having fun.” More recently, Van turned 68. He was an only child who had no family. He had been through heart surgery and diabetes. He was worried about dying alone. There’s solace in knowing that when Van’s energy and ability were flagging the members of the sports department and the nightside news staff worked quietly — and at their own expense — to compensate for the colleague they had publicly kidded. They had him covered. Van joins too many others from our newsroom who have died. Reporter Marita Lowman, columnist Hank Pearson, copy editor Charlie Bell, managing editor Bill Griffith and sports writer Jerry Kellar. It was suggested that when Van reached heaven that the first person to greet him would be Jerry Kellar who would have asked about Van’s “britches” or his late arrival. And Van’s first words would be “What’s fo supper?” I bet there is a cheeseburger deluxe on the horizon Van Rose. God speed. And go Wildcats.

Joe Butkiewicz is Executive Editor of The Times Leader. Reach him at 829-7249.


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➛ S E R V I N G T H E P U B L I C T R U S T S I N C E 18 81

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

Editorial

THE TIMES LEADER

www.timesleader.com

OUR OPINION: OVERSIGHT

Don’t add bang to drilling boom

K

NOCK KNOCK Who’s there? The natural gas industry. The natural gas industry? What do you want? We came to tell you we’re starting up a new pipeline out here. Really? When? In 3 … 2 … 1 …And listen to that gas surge by! … Of course the gas industry can’t surprise residents quite that thoroughly. After all, installing pipelines involves heavy equipment, clearing land, and truck loads of very large pipe. Not to mention the red tape of government permits and right-of-way. But a story in The Times Leader Friday suggested the above scenario is a bit closer to reality than many would like. Residents in Dallas Township criticized Williams Field Services LLC for poor communications about the date natural gas would start to flow through a freshly completed pipeline. Notification letters were delivered to nearby homes Wednesday saying the gas would start flowing within

the next few days. “Why couldn’t they have said something sooner?” lamented Fairground Road resident Jane Tolomello. Why indeed. The public might be less wary of such short notice if people had more confidence in industry self-policing and government oversight. The industry is prone to venting gas lines with scant notice, surprising residents who suddenly smell that “rotten egg” odor. And the Philadelphia Inquirer recently ran a four-part series detailing incidents of shoddy welding in the rapidly installed lines as the industry booms. The Inquirer also demonstrated in depressing terms how scant government oversight is. “Hundreds of miles of highpressure pipelines already have been installed in the shale fields with no government safety checks - no construction standards, no inspections, and no monitoring,” reporters Joseph Tanfani and Craig R. McCoy wrote. The government needs to catch up, lest “knock knock” become “BOOM! BOOM!”

QUOTE OF THE DAY “We must follow what the state Constitution dictates, and that is to keep counties and municipalities whole unless absolutely necessary.” Jay Costa The state Senate minority leader plans to ask the state Supreme Court to overturn new legislative district maps.

OTHER OPINION: RESERVES

Open-eyed look at natural gas

N

ATURAL GAS, trapped in shale across the United States, is the latest answer to the dream of increased energy independence for the nation. Cheap (relatively speaking), abundant and a source of good-paying, long-term jobs. What’s not to love? Let’s set aside unanswered environmental questions and routine gripes about Pennsylvania’s ineptitude at securing some form of public money from the use of our resource – admittedly hard enough tasks – and deal with what’s at the core of the natural-gas hype. That there is 100 years of energy just waiting for us to tap. Prayers answered; dreams come true; the world has taken on a rosy hue. If it’s true. It might be, but it is at least equally likely that it is not. There’s a great blog on Slate.com by Chris Nelder, titled “What the Frack,” that offers a more realistic look at naturalgas potentials. According to the blog, the 100-year claim came out of an April 2011 report by the Potential Gas Committee. These are petroleum engineers and geoscientists, but they are industry insiders. And the complete story is a different one. Isn’t it always?

The industry report breaks shale gas reserves into categories of proven, probable, possible and speculative. The proven reserves, based on 2010 use of natural gas by Americans, would last us 11 years. Adding probable resources to the proven ones gives us 21 years of supply. Either way, that’s a fast fall from a century of energy security. And even if all the reserves, even the speculative ones, turn out to be real and not just a figment of a profit-seeking industry’s imagination, total reserves at 2010 consumption levels would stack up to 95 years – they just rounded up a little. The U.S. Energy Information Agency uses different methods for calculating recoverable shale gas; in one of its scenarios, the United States reverts to a natural-gas importer by 2035. As with most things, we suggest that neither the most liberal, at 95 years, nor the most conservative, at 11, estimate is the most accurate number. The real number falls somewhere in between. A century of increased energy independence sounds almost too good to be true. At the least, it’s speculative; at worst, it’s a fairy tale. Lebanon Daily News

Pastors can make a call to revive marriage in America ONLY 51 percent of American adults are currently married – a record low – down from 72 percent in 1960, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of Census data. There are three major factors behind these trends. First, the number of never-married Americans has nearly doubled, from 15 percent to 28 percent, from 1960 to 2010. Pew said that many couples are cohabiting instead of marrying because “they fear divorce.” Why? Many are adult children of divorce who do not want to live through such pain again. Second, the number of divorced and unremarried people has grown from 5 percent to 14 percent of the population. Third, in the last 50 years, the median age at which people first marry has jumped six years – to 26 for women and to 29 for men. What’s troubling to me is not the later age at which people marry, which is generally wise, but the fact that so many have never married. Only 72 percent of today’s adults have ever married, versus 85 percent in 1960. This is a big cultural change. What is behind this shift? Another recent Pew survey reported that four in 10 Americans think marriage is “becoming obsolete.” What’s particularly interesting is that 47 percent of those who think marriage is becoming obsolete say they would like to marry; virtually the same share (45 percent) of unmarried adults who think marriage is not becoming obsolete say they want to

COMMENTARY MIKE MCMANUS wed. Those numbers suggest a strategy for churches, which perform nine of 10 weddings: Make a case for marriage from the pulpit. True, there aren’t many cohabiting couples in church, but there are millions of churchgoing parents of adult children who do not know what to say to them. What are the best arguments that pastors might make about the value of marriage? I recommend that clergy read “The State of Our Unions: Marriage in America 2011,” by the Institute for American Values. Its co-authors are W. Bradford Wilcox of the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia and Elizabeth Marquardt of IAV’s Center for Marriage and Families. Their report, “When Baby Makes Three,” provides scientific evidence of what every pastor has long believed: “Couples who both agree that ‘God is at the center of our marriage’ are at least 26 percentage points more likely to report that they are ‘very happy.’” While 50 percent of both men and women report being very happy, of those who believe God is at the center of their marriage, 77 percent of women and 76 percent of men are very happy. These more religious couples are also more likely to report high levels of commitment and a pattern of generous behavior

Make a case for marriage from the pulpit. True, there aren’t many cohabiting couples in church, but there are millions of churchgoing parents of adult children who do not know what to say to them. toward one another. “In other words, marital spirituality is linked to beliefs and behaviors that strengthen the marriage bond,” said the report. Similarly, mothers and fathers who see parenting as one of “life’s greatest joys” are about twice as likely to reporting being very happy in their marriages. It is one of the “top five predictors of marital success.” What is their secret? Two answers are shared housework chores and sexual satisfaction. One surprise is that the happiest wives and husbands today “are those with no children and those with four or more children.” Another important factor is education. Americans without college degrees are three times as likely to divorce in the first 10 years of marriage compared with those with college education. Most important, however, is a shared faith that endows marriage “with transcendent significance.” Attending services together is a top predictor of marital stability. Mike McManus is president and co-chair of Marriage Savers. His email is mike@marriagesavers.org. For information, visit www.marriagesavers.org. He wrote this for the Baltimore Sun.

Start early to save for your child’s college education EDUCATION BEYOND high school is a key to success later in life. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, 62 percent of all U.S. jobs now require a minimum of two-year or fouryear degrees or special post-secondary training. That number is expected to increase to 75 percent by 2020. Unfortunately, at the same time that some form of higher education is becoming more important, it’s also becoming increasingly more expensive. The College Board calculates that college costs have risen faster than the rates of inflation over this previous academic year. In fact, the average cost for tuition and fees at four-year public institutions has increased nearly 51 percent over the last 10 years, after adjusting for inflation. While the statistics might be daunting, there is a simple way to make higher education more accessible and affordable: Start saving even a small amount as soon as possible. Often we see parents worrying about their children’s academic preparation for college, but financial preparation is equally important. In fact, according to a recent study in the Journal of Children and Poverty, researchers at the Center for Social Development at Washington University in St. Louis found that children with a savings

COMMENTARY JOAN MARSHALL account in their name were approximately six times more likely to attend college than those with no account. The amount saved was not important – only that they had some form of savings that were dedicated to higher education. The sooner a family starts to save for higher education, the more affordable it will be. However, many families think they don’t need to prepare for higher education expenses when their child is an infant or toddler, often putting off the task until their child is in high school. State-sponsored and taxadvantaged college savings plans, called 529 plans after section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code, allow families to start saving from the time their child is born. In fact, saving for higher education can start in a 529 savings plan as soon as a couple begins to think about starting a family if the parent enrolls as the account holder and names himself or herself as beneficiary. Prospective grandparents can even open accounts the same way, as can any relative or family friend. The more time an investment for higher education has to grow, the more valuable it can be. And those investments do not need

to be designated only for four-year degrees. 529 savings plans can also be used for a two-year degree, eligible technical or trade training, room and board, books or other qualified expenses. 529 plans help families finance all forms of higher education and training throughout the country. People often fear making decisions and investments they can’t reverse down the road, but 529 plans offer more flexibility than many realize. The money can easily be transferred to a different beneficiary – another child or even the parents – for qualified advanced education and training. Or the family can simply take the money out of the plan (subject to certain fees, taxes and a 10 percent federal penalty on the earnings portion of the withdrawal). The College Savings Plans Network’s website, www.collegesavings.org, offers noncommercial information that allows families to research each state’s plans to select the best one for their needs. The costs and importance of higher education will only continue to rise – but with smart planning and early savings, higher education and the benefits it brings can be a reality for all families, not just some. Joan Marshall is executive director of the College Savings Plan of Maryland and chairwoman of the College Savings Plans Network for 2010-11. She wrote this for the Baltimore Sun.

Editorial Board PRASHANT SHITUT

PRASHANT SHITUT President and Interim CEO/Impressions Media JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor

MARK E. JONES Editorial Page Editor

President and Interim CEO/Impressions Media JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ Vice President/Executive Editor

RICHARD DEHAVEN Vice President/Circulation

ALLISON UHRIN Vice President/ Chief Financial Officer


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Santorum takes stage as plausible candidate AFTER every other conservative alternative to Mitt Romney crashed and burned (libertarian Ron Paul is in a category of his own), from the rubble emerges Rick Santorum. But he isn’t just the last man standing. He is the first challenger to be plausibly presidential: knowledgeable, articulate, experienced, of stable character and authentic ideology. He’d been ignored largely because he appeared unelectable – out of office for five years, having lost his Senate seat in Pennsylvania by a staggering 17 points in 2006. However, with his virtual tie for first in Iowa, he sheds the loser label and seizes the momentum, meaning millions of dollars’ worth of free media to make up for his lack of money. He’s got the stage to make his case, plus the luck of a scheduling quirk: If he can make it through the next three harrowing primaries, the (relative) February lull would allow him to build a national campaign structure before Super Tuesday on March 6. Santorum’s electoral advantage is sociological: His common-man, working-class sensibility would be highly appealing to battleground-state Reagan Democrats. His fundamental problem is ideological: He’s a deeply committed social conservative in a year when the country is obsessed with the economy and when conservatism is obsessed with limited government. Republicans, after all, swept the 2010 election on economic concerns and opposition to big government. The tea party revolution was not about gay marriage. Which is why so much tea party fervor attaches to Paul. Santorum did win the tea party vote in Iowa. But because he was such a long shot, his record did not receive much scrutiny. It will now. He is no austere limited-government constitutionalist. He participated in George W. Bush’s compassionate conservatism, which largely made peace with big government. Santorum, for example, defends earmarks and supported No Child Left Behind and the Medicare prescription drug benefit. It’s a perfectly defensible philosophy – but now he’ll be called upon to actually defend it. Moreover, Iowa is anomalous. It’s not just that the Republican electorate is disproportionately evangelical and thus highly receptive to Santorum’s social conservatism (as to Mike Huckabee’s in 2008). It’s that Iowa’s economy is unusually healthy with only 5.7 percent unemploy-

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ANOTHER VIEW

A photograph by Aimee Dilger and words by Mark E. Jones

COMMENTARY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER ment, high agricultural prices and strong real estate values. Although the economy did rate as a major issue in the entrance poll, in such relative prosperity it registers more as a concern for the nation than as a visceral personal issue – diminishing the impact of Romney’s calling card, economic competence. For his part, Romney remains preternaturally inert. His numbers, his demeanor, his campaign are flat-line steady: no highs, no lows, no euphoria, no panic. With one minor exception. Romney wasn’t expected to do very well in Iowa. A top-three finish would have been good; a first or second, a surprising success. But feeling his Iowa prospects rise, he let fly a lastminute high. (Two hairs were seen dangling over his forehead.) He began touting his chance of winning, thus gratuitously raising expectations. That turned a hairline victory into something of a setback, accentuating his inability to break out of his flat-line 25 or so percent support. How flat? His final 2012 Iowa vote count deviated from his 2008 total of 30,021 by six votes. (Not six percent. But a party of six.) For a front-runner who can’t seem to expand his base, he’s been fortunate that the opposition has been so split. But the luck stops here. Michele Bachmann is gone. Rick Perry will skip New Hampshire, then dead man walk through South Carolina. And then there is Newt. Gingrich is staying in. This should be good news for Romney. It’s not. In his Iowa nonconcession speech, Gingrich was seething. He could not conceal his fury with Paul and Romney for burying him in negative ads. After singling out Santorum for praise, Gingrich launched into them both, most especially Romney. Gingrich speaks of aligning himself with Santorum against Romney. For Newt’s campaign, this makes absolutely no strategic sense. What a lineup. Santorum and Gingrich go after Romney, whose unspoken ally is Paul, who needs to fight off Santorum in order to emerge as both No. 1 challenger and Republican kingmaker, leader of a movement demanding respect, attention and concessions. And Jon Huntsman goes after everybody. Is this any way to pick a president? Absolutely. It works. Charles Krauthammer’s email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.

e punch the clock. We watch the clock. We race against the clock. So ponder this for a minute: Does time truly march on, or do we march to it, W clanging our cymbals and doing our silly dances?

A new challenge for Israel comes from within OVER THE six decades since its founding, Israelis have faced, and continue to face, countless threats to their country’s survival as the democratic state of the Jewish people. That threat comes from abroad and from neighboring countries that would like to see Israel cease to exist. But today Israel also suffers from selfinflicted wounds. And some of those wounds are becoming infected. Among Israel’s highly diverse population, two different Jewish groups include members whose views represent a direct affront to the character and the survival of the state. Both groups, for different reasons, are enemies of Israel, even if they are convinced that their actions are justified. If they were to succeed, Israel would ultimately disappear. Whenever you hear about attacks on Palestinians by Israeli settlers, about olive trees being uprooted or mosques torched, chances are you are hearing about the work of the Hilltop Youth, a gang of young settlers who break Israeli law in their efforts to prevent the Israeli government from removing any unauthorized settlements or making any conces-

nation. The other Jewish group that threatens Israeli democracy can be found among the ultra-orthoFRIDA GHITIS dox. About 10 percent of Israel’s Jews are ultra-orthodox, living in a world most of us would sions to Palestinians. In one of their boldest “price never choose or comprehend, and some of their views are tag” attacks, as they call their hard to accept for the rest of us. criminal rampages, several dozen of them recently went on There is nothing wrong with people opting to live as they a rampage against an Israeli wish. And, if there is one counarmy base in the West Bank, try on earth where people who lobbing rocks at Palestinians follow the most orthodox inand at Israeli soldiers. They terpretation of Jewish law injured, among others, an Isshould live, that, of course, is raeli army commander. Israel. The overwhelming majority But it’s not always easy to of Israelis were horrified at the incident. Prime Minister Benja- reconcile the beliefs of that min Netanyahu called it “a stain minority with the views of most on our democracy.” The author- Israelis, who are fiercely modern, progressive and liberal. At ities vowed to crack down. times, and in particular places, I’m glad this incident hapsuch as the orthodox neighpened, because it shocked Israelis awake about the outrages borhoods of Jerusalem, views of a group that claims to act on clash, sometimes violently. Among the country’s ultrabehalf of the Jewish people. Supporters of Israel in the Unit- orthodox, some have gone to ed States and elsewhere should extremes – by assaulting marchers in Israel’s gay pride parade, be no less troubled, and they should demand that Israel keep for example. They routinely rip down advertising posters showthe pressure and put an end once and for to settler violence, ing women. Most recently, they have made headlines because of particularly when it targets their efforts to separate men Palestinians. The conflict with Palestinians and women in public transmust be settled though negotia- portation, relegating women to the back of the bus. tions. This kind of violence The Israeli Supreme Court makes a mockery of Israel’s has ruled segregation, on buses founding principles and of its or elsewhere, plainly illegal. self-image as an enlightened

COMMENTARY

The police have vowed to crack down on any effort to impose segregation or discriminate against women. The challenge to freedom does not end there. The orthodox in Israel are politically organized and they leverage their political power far beyond their numbers in the population. The overwhelming majority of Israelis deplore the antidemocratic actions of the ultraorthodox and the sickening behavior of the radical settlers. People who support Israel do it for one principal reason: because Israel, despite its many flaws, is a country that shares the values cherished in modern democratic societies: equality of the sexes, freedom of religion, freedom of expression and rule of law. If Israel allows any of those freedoms to erode, as some activist minorities want, the majority of the population, who want a modern society, will suffer. And Israel will justifiably lose international support, something it can ill afford if it wants to survive the many other threats it still faces, and remain the world’s only Jewish democratic state. Frida Ghitis writes about global affairs for The Miami Herald. Readers may send her email at fjghitis@gmail.com.

Follow five sensible rules to make safe use of natural gas industry POLITICAL LEADERS from both parties argue that natural gas could save our economy, the environment and promote our national security. Is this so? Or is it just a dream? It turns out that the way one develops natural gas will determine whether it is a serious help to our energy and climate problems, or a dangerous extension of bad habits. On the face of it, natural gas looks terrific. The United States – and many other countries – have abundant domestic supplies. The cost, per delivered unit of energy, is about a third of that of oil. It is cheap and fast to build power plants fueled by natural gas. And when burned, it emits only half as much carbon as coal. So what’s not to like? Well, things are not so simple. Under the best conditions, we might enjoy those benefits; but under more adverse conditions gas can be a worse generator of greenhouse gas than coal, can wreak massive local environmental destruction and can undermine energy efficiency and renewable

likely to be far worse in, say, Russia. This gives us Rule One for smart natural gas development: No leaks in the system. We have to know, for HAL HARVEY certain, that the whole process is tight and stays that way. There’s more we need to ensure, energy. And without a strong set of because of the economics of energy policies to guide natural gas develsystems and how that drives the opment, the worst case is far more choice of options in the electricity likely. Start with climate change: Generat- system. It starts with a basic economing a kilowatt-hour’s worth of electric- ic truth: Once a coal-fired plant is built, it is incredibly cheap to run. ity with a natural gas turbine emits only about half as much CO2 as gener- Once built, our coal plants run forever. The median age of a coal plant in ating the same electricity at a coal the United States is 44 years, and fully plant. Half-off is pretty good. But unburned natural gas turns out to be a a third of them were built during or before the Eisenhower administration. very powerful greenhouse gas: One What this means is that when we molecule of leaked gas contributes as add new natural gas power plants to much to global warming as 25 molethe electricity system, it does not, cules of burned gas. That means that through pure market forces, displace if the system for the exploration, excoal. Instead, it displaces other new traction, compression, piping and alternatives, which generally means burning of natural gas leaks by even new renewable energy. If half-CO2 gas 2.5 percent, it is as bad as coal. is displacing zero-CO2 renewables, So, how much does the gas system leak? No one knows. Estimates range well, that’s hardly a victory. So, Rule Two: Use gas to shut down old coal. from 1.5 percent to as high as 8 perMake this an explicit condition. cent. The final three rules have to do Even near the low end of that range, gas can be as bad as coal. And whatev- with local environmental conditions. We all have seen the films of people’s er the leaks in the U.S. system, it is

COMMENTARY

tap water catching fire after a nearby gas well was put in. That’s because of lousy construction quality: Bad well casings allow gas to leak into the aquifer. They also can allow in fluids from hydraulic fracturing (fracking) when that method is used to tap a new gas well. Rule Three: Strong standards for wells, with effective monitoring and enforcement. Then there is the damage that wells can do to the gas site. Many wells extract brackish water and other nasty byproducts, such as benzene and toluene from deep underground, and spill the mixture onto nearby farmlands – literally salting the earth. The water is a large-scale byproduct of the gas extraction, and, at the request of then-Vice President Dick Cheney’s energy task force, it is exempted from any regulations under the Clean Water Act. Rule Four: Don’t allow these toxic streams to poison the land. Finally, choosing where and how to drill is important. Many of the new natural gas technologies entail massive surface disturbance. Roads, drilling rigs, compressors, pipelines, drainage ponds and large amounts of heavy equipment are required for each well. And wells are densely placed,

sometimes one for every 10 acres. This means that many natural gas fields are industrial wastelands. After drilling, cattle ranches in the West have been left unsuitable even for cows, never mind wildlife. We need to zone the natural gas development so that it is kept out of ecologically important areas, and we need strong drilling, operating and reclamation standards so that gas doesn’t become a scorched-earth energy strategy. Gas can do a great deal for our energy future. But if it is mishandled, it can instead serve up great problems – in land destruction, water quality and climate change. Five rules get it right: Don’t allow leaky systems; use gas to phase out coal; have sound well drilling and casing standards; don’t pollute the landscape with brackish water; and drill only where it is sensible. Let’s do this right. Hal Harvey is the founder of the ClimateWorks Foundation. He has served on presidential commissions under the first President Bush and President Clinton, and he serves on an advisory board for the U.S. Department of Energy. He wrote this for the Los Angeles Times.


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One-size-fits-all evaluation systems disastrous for educational reform PRESIDENT Barack Obama’s “Race to the Top” initiative motivated states to develop teacher evaluation systems based on how well students perform on standardized tests. One dozen states were funded in the first two rounds of the competition. In round three, Pennsylvania won more than $41 million in education funding, according to an announcement in late December. . One of the outcomes of Race to the Top has been various “value-added measure systems” that use students’ past test scores to predict future scores, and to measure teaching and learning. If students perform as predicted, teachers are seen as “average.” Teachers can be rated “above average” or “highly effective” if their students beat predicted outcomes, or “below average” if students do worse. Tennessee was the first state to receive Race to the Top funding. Its valueadded measure system has received a lot of attention, largely because of its flaws. For example, two-thirds of its educators teach subjects that are not tested. Social studies, art, music, science and physical education teachers, as well as special educators, specialists who work with challenged or gifted students and teachers who team-teach

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JOSEPH ROGAN must be evaluated based on other teachers’ reading or math scores. Civil rights groups challenged the District of Columbia’s system. Highly rated teachers are concentrated in affluent schools, while schools in less affluent neighborhoods are staffed by lower-rated educators. The reality is that teachers in impoverished areas find it much more difficult to eke out gains. Teachers that are assigned to the city’s impoverished schools are far more likely to be seen as inferior, denied tenure and dismissed – no matter how well-prepared or caring they are in the classroom. In New York, 700 principals – the people charged with doing the ratings – recently protested that state’s valueadded measure system. They observed that standardized tests are woefully inaccurate and unreliable. The move to improve evaluation is based on the assumption that we are falling behind the rest of the world because our teachers are not good enough. Indeed, although the United States’ schools are showing improvement, our relative rankings have dipped. Our competitors around the world have poured resources into improving their

peers, effort, parents, student mobility, curriculum quality and access to materials and resources. Methodological issues abound. For example, students who have had a series of either effective or ineffective teachers might demonstrate either better or worse achievement in later years. Is it fair, then, that achievement or failure is attributed solely to their current teachers? Also, a teacher whose students show gains might be an expert at helping students master a range of worthwhile knowledge, but also might instead teach to the test. The value-added measure system’s house of cards falls when we examine the integrity of standardized tests, especially those built on the cheap. Last summer, the Los Angeles Times published elementary teachers’ test-based rankings. The National Education Policy Center found that the newspaper’s procedures were “demonstrably inadequate” and its rankings a “disservice to the teachers, students and parents,” according to the article. When the researchers applied a different research tool, they found a completely different result. Teachers do far more than fill students’ buckets. They contribute to important outcomes, such as socio-emotional wellness, civic engagement, moral character, open-mindedness and motivation for continued learning – all of which are not measured by standardized

tests. What test considers what it takes to get and keep a job, solve a social problem, settle an argument, have a successful marriage, raise a family, volunteer to help flood victims or participate in a community? When teachers complain about such matters, they appear defensive. However, if done properly, teachers would welcome the results of evaluations. When done poorly, to save money or for political purposes, evaluations are unfair and a waste of resources. Teachers should be concerned. In September, President Obama effectively cancelled the ridiculous “No Child Left Behind” mandate that all students be “proficient” by 2014. Teachers have not rejoiced, because the standardized tests remain. However, instead of holding states and districts responsible, the new arrangement places the whole burden of success or failure at the hands of individual teachers. Value-added measure systems seem so simple, but teaching and learning – and thus the evaluation of teachers and learners – are complex. As we discovered with No Child Left Behind, onesize-fits-all systems are disastrous. Educational reform cannot fit on a bumper sticker.

Seniors enjoy Santa program

Highland Manor Personal Care Home. With the support of many businesses, institutions, and the Senior Networking Alliance, we collected more than 1,800 gifts from their generous patrons and employees. Keystone College’s Sports Management and Recreation Team graciously hosted a gift-wrapping party. Gifts were delivered to seniors throughout the week of Dec. 19. These seniors, otherwise without company during the holidays, were as touched by the consideration of the community and their brief visit from “Santa” as they were by any gifts received. Thank you for making this program such a success.

Joseph Rogan is a professor of teacher education at Misericordia University in Dallas Township. Contact the author at jrogan@misericordia.edu.

LETTERS FROM READERS

Council candidate thanks supporters

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COMMENTARY

systems. Most of these nations have nationalized education. Many cynics want to abolish our U.S. Department of Education and trash its efforts to develop a globally competitive curriculum. Other nations respect educators, while ours are the latest targets of those people who want to eliminate unions. In a recent paper, Laura Goe of the Education Testing Service – the producer of many standardized tests and thus a major beneficiary of the testing movement – discussed the pros and cons of value-added measure systems. One reason to support them, she says, is that they are inexpensive. Performancebased assessments are more effective, but are costly. For example, in the New Haven, Conn., Change Project, teachers helped to develop a comprehensive system that considers scores, but also focused on excellent teaching. To frequently and thoroughly evaluate its nearly 2,000 teachers, the district needed an ample cadre of dedicated principals. Real evaluation is impossible without evaluators. Many Pennsylvania schools do not have a full-time principal. Goe’s concerns outweigh her support. She urged “extreme caution” because, she argued, value-added measure systems alone are “insufficient” to determine the impact of teaching, thus “it is difficult, if not impossible to isolate an individual teacher’s contributions to student achievement” relative to other factors such as school characteristics,

Jane Walsh Waitkus Dorrance Township

Disorder quickly strikes council

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et the games begin! Only three days into the new year and our new Luzerne County government and the “Urban boys” refuse to participate in a joint swearing-in ceremony for county council and an anonymous source is providing the names of the candidates for the county manager position. That didn’t take long. Alec Frank Wilkes-Barre

Writer pushes for more recycling

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hy is it so hard for some people to recycle? All you have to do is separate your garbage from your paper, plastic and aluminum. I don’t understand why so many Americans find it so difficult to spend a couple of extra minutes every week to save resources, the planet and money. About 80 percent of what Americans throw away is recyclable, yet our recycling rate is only 28 percent. Every “garbage night,” I see piles upon piles of recyclable material out for the trash pickup. It makes me sick. Recycling is easy. In Mountain Top, there is a recycling container for paper, as well as one for aluminum, located at the

local elementary school, and the township recycling center is open every Wednesday and Saturday. Americans use 2.5 million plastic bottles every hour. You might not see the problem with the lack of recycling enthusiasm in this country, but I sure do. Where do you think all of the trash goes? It is polluting our oceans and ecosystems. So much of it is lying on the road or in your local park or backyard. If all of the newspapers alone that are printed in America were recycled, we could save about 250 million trees every year. I think that is a big deal! If you care at all, recycle this newspaper once you are done reading it. Brittany Ayers Fairview Township

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extend my deepest thanks to the community, and especially to our partnering organizations, for helping us make the eighth annual “Be a Santa to a Senior” program a huge success. With your help, we were able to provide gifts to 800 needy seniors throughout our area. Jessica Engel, our community service representative, coordinated this community effort, bringing the warmth of the holiday spirit to donors and recipients alike. This program identified deserving seniors with the help of Meals on Wheels, Serving Seniors Inc., Compassionate Care Hospice, Golden Living Center, Oakwood Terrace and

Bob Vielee President/Owner Home Instead Senior Care Clarks Summit

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am very grateful for the support of many people who voted for me in the recent Luzerne County Council election. Thank you so much for your warm welcome when I knocked on your door to ask you for your vote and spoke with you at community events. Thank you to all who called me after the election to express regret about my loss. I feel honored and blessed to have the support of so many voters in Luzerne County. Special thanks to the 18,419 people who voted for me. I entered the county council race because I want to help people, and that has not changed. I will do whatever I can to be of service to the

residents of Luzerne County. Good luck to the newly elected Luzerne County Council.

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LETTERS FROM READERS

Drilling output not worth risks

SEND US YOUR OPINION Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days. • Email: mailbag@timesleader.com • Fax: 570-829-5537 • Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., WilkesBarre, PA 1871 1

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ow much natural gas is under the ground in Pennsylvania? Ask your friends who get royalty checks, and they’ll tell you there is a decline over the first year – as much as half less. And the following year, further large declines. Is there a finite amount of gas under our ground that will deplete in a few years? Here is a quote from an article in Slate, the online magazine, exploring this question: “The claimed lifetime productivity, or estimated ultimate recovery, of individual wells was also overstated, (geologist Arthur) Berman found. The production decline curves modeled by well operators predict that production will fall steeply at first, followed by a long, flattened tail of production. Berman’s analysis found a better fit with a model in which production falls steeply for the first 10 to 15 months, followed by a more weakly hyperbolic decline. Shale-gas wells typically pay out over one-half their total lifetime production in the first year. So operators must keep drilling continuously to maintain a flat rate of overall production.” Is it worth ripping up our countryside and our inner Earth for a few years worth of gas? Is it worth the risk of changing our air quality, water quality and environment for the worse to bring up a few years of gas? There are better, renewable, nonpolluting technologies out there for us to pursue, put our money into and develop to make us energy independent without risks to our land and health. Join our group, “Citizens for Clean Water,” and check out our website at www.nepagasaction.org. There has got to be a better

way to be energy independent and have clean, cheap energy for all. Vera Scroggins Citizens for Clean Water Brackney

Sportsmen add much to economy

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have had it with the ranting of Mr. David Kveragas and his ilk, putting down the hunters and general sportsmen and women of this state. Let’s say that every man, woman and child in this state quits our outdoor sports, and does not buy a single hunting, fishing or trapping license. It means that the Pennsylvania Game Commission and Fish and Boat Commission would no longer exist; about 1,200 men and women would have to look for jobs. Not one trout would be stocked in a stream in this state, not one pheasant would be stocked. All hunting clubs, fishing camps, trap, skeet and sporting clay clubs would no longer function! We’ll drop the licenses and insurance on our fourby-fours, campers, SUVs, ATVs, ski mobiles, boats and let your camps fall into disrepair. We’ll quit paying taxes on the land, and the parcels will go into foreclosure. Well, has a light come on yet? A red flag! Hang on, there’s more. If you own a sporting goods store, don’t even think about opening the door! Make a coffee shop out of it. No one shows up at the Harrisburg outdoor show in February! Are we up to a billion dollars yet? Since there is no hunting or

trapping in this state, in about three years the deer population will have exploded to a point that car damage will be in the hundreds of thousands; insurance companies’ rates will go ballistic. Body and fender shops will go on overtime. No trapping: fox and coyote populations out of sight. Well, if you don’t get the point by now, I might as well save my ink. But Montana loves our money! Fred Murray Shavertown

Keep Sunday free of hunting

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am responding to a reader’s letter to the editor in favor of Sunday hunting. There should be no Sunday hunting because the majority of people don’t want it. We want to enjoy wildlife of all species that one day. Hunters have six days; we have one. More people should look at and enjoy these creatures instead of wanting to kill everything that moves; otherwise, it doesn’t say much for our humanity. I know we need to have hunting to control overpopulation. But I have been around for more than 70 years and know from what I see in my travels through Northeastern Pennsylvania there is no animal overpopulation. As far as deer, rabbits, etc., eating your vegetation, there are many helpful sources in stores to keep them away. As long as we keep tearing

down our forests and overrunning our game lands, there will be no place for these animals to seek food except in your yard! To want to be able to hunt down animals every day is truly a sad commentary on us so-called humans. God bless. Louise Plisko Moosic

Dallas Twp. voter feels penalized

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n reference to the letter to the editor that I had published in The Times Leader (Dec. 10), I am appalled that no one but me is up in arms over the revelation that Dallas Township residents seemingly are subject to a voting tax that discourages the less affluent from voting for fear of being hounded by tax collection agencies if they can’t afford the per capita school tax. Voting is supposed to be for all of us. Don’t people care that the township apparently is involved in a pay-to-vote scheme? After having my wages garnished, I worry about my financial state enough to fear ordering out for lunch. I bet the people who work at the tax collection agency don’t have such worries after taking money from people such as me who can ill afford to have their wages garnished. George Brian Ferrell Dallas

Workers deserve support of unions

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o discontinue collective bargaining, whether in the public or private sector, is an ill-conceived exercise; I label it a political move to destroy unionism. Can you imagine what corporations would do with this power?

Greed would go deeper. This was tested in Poland. It resulted in the birth of “solidarity.” Rather than be at the mercy of political dictates, we must rely on labor management negotiations to resolve workplace issues. One must never forget that workers produce products and profit. Wherever and whenever events occur in which basic human rights are in jeopardy, the unions in America should provoke an impacting reaction and not fear to take to task those people who would attempt to deny union members of the most important of all human factors: dignity and security. Workers in all sectors of our country aspire to more human conditions and to share in the fruits of their labors in the area of wages, Social Security and an opportunity for cultural growth. We are compelled as a caring society to give encouragement, support and hope to all people in the world struggling for basic justice and human dignity. We of labor seek to have the rights of its membership protected and respected. Thomas Scarnato Old Forge

Retirees target of Dem strategies

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urrent political strategies will have catastrophic outcomes. They are aimed at the working middle class and will harm retirees, present and future. President Obama and his “minions,” including U.S. Sen. Robert Casey of Scranton, are

playing the old shell game: now you see it, now you don’t. They are robbing all classes of their future retirements by pushing for yet another cut in the Social Security payroll tax rate. This will be funded by borrowing money from China, etc., or inflating our currency. Later, the age limit will be raised, and there will be cuts in benefits and the amount of checks. The small amount workers see in their checks now will never make up for their lost Social Security benefits. This is like a farmer selling his “seed corn” for next year’s planting. The government is broke and has unfunded liabilities it cannot pay. All the trust fund money is gone, spent by Congress. Worthless IOUs are all that’s left. Now Congress has gone a step further, taking it before it goes into the fund. This is truly shameless behavior. “Obamacare” has taken half a trillion dollars from Medicare to insure millions of uninsured. This will take away benefits from all classes of Medicare participants. Also, because of coming cuts to payments, doctors will no longer take Medicare patients. It’s happening now. Democrats can’t have it both ways, pronouncing they are protecting Social Security and Medicare while taking from both of them. While pretending to be defenders of the faith, Democrats have turned out to be heretics. I hope voters, particularly seniors, remember how cowardly all this is. James U. Sinclair Wright Township

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Claimants who are represented by attorneys are three times more likely to get benefits than claimants without representation. The rules are thousands of pages long, complex and change frequently.


CMYK SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

MEDICARE

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With more than 1.5 million baby boomers a year signing up for Medicare, the program’s future is one of the most important economic issues for anyone now 50 or older. Health care costs are the most unpredictable part of retirement, and Medicare remains an exceptional deal for retirees, who can reap benefits worth far more than the payroll taxes they paid in during their careers. AP FILE PHOTO “People would like to have what they used to have. What House Budget Committee they don’t seem to understand is Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, Rthat it’s already changed,” said Wis. gestures during a news Gail Wilensky, a former Medicare conference on Capitol Hill in administrator and adviser to Re- Washington. publicans. “Medicare as we have known it is not part of our future.” “People would like to Two sets of numbers underhave what they used to score that point. First, Medicare’s giant trust have. What they don’t fund for inpatient care is projected to run out of money in 2024. At seem to understand is that point, the program will col- that it’s already lect only enough payroll taxes to changed. Medicare as we pay 90 percent of benefits. Second, researchers esti- have known it is not mate that 20 to 30 percent of part of our future.” the more than $500 billion that Gail Wilensky Medicare now spends annually Former Medicare administrator is wasted on treatments and and adviser to Republicans procedures of little or no benefit to patients. Taken together, that means policymakers can’t let Medicare ers and medical providers to be keep running on autopilot and more cost-conscious. Obama they’ll look for cuts before any does it with a powerful board that can force Medicare cuts to payroll tax increases. Privatization is the biggest di- service providers if costs rise bevide between Democrats and Re- yond certain levels and Congress fails to act. publicans. Like several elements of Currently about 75 percent of Medicare recipients are in the tra- Obama’s health care overhaul, ditional government-run, fee-for- the Independent Payment Adservice program and 25 percent visory Board is in limbo for are in private insurance plans now, but it is on the books. If the board survives Republican known as Medicare Advantage. Ryan’s original approach, part repeal attempts, it could beof a budget plan the House come one of the government’s passed in the spring, would most important domestic agencies. have put 100 perThe White cent of future reHouse wants to tirees into priONLINE: keep the existing vate insurance. Medicare: www.medstructure of MediHis latest plan, icare.gov care while “twistdeveloped with Ryan-Wyden plan: ing the dials” to Sen. Ron Wyden, http://tinyurl.com/ct7utja control spending, D-Ore., would said a current keep traditional Medicare trustee, Medicare as an economist Robert option, competReischauer of the Urban Instiing with private plans. Older people would get a tute think tank. Ryan’s latest approach is arfixed payment they could use for private health insurance or guably an evolution of the curtraditional Medicare. Propo- rent Medicare Advantage prinents call it “premium support.” vate insurance program, not a radical change, Reischauer said. To foes, it’s a voucher. Under both of Ryan’s ver- That’s particularly so if tradisions, people now 55 or older tional Medicare remains an opwould not have to make any tion. “In the hot and heavy political changes. GOP presidential candidates Mitt Romney and debate we are in, participants are Newt Gingrich praise his latest exaggerating the difference between the proposals,” he said. plan. During failed budget negotiaHow would it work? Would it save taxpayers money? Would it tions with Republicans last shift costs to retirees as Ryan’s summer, Obama indicated a wilearlier plan did? Would Con- lingness to make more major gress later phase out traditional changes to Medicare, including Medicare? Those and other gradually raising the age of eliquestions must still be answer- gibility to 67, increasing premiums for many beneficiaries, reed. “I’m not sure anybody has vamping co-payments and decome up with a formula on this ductibles in ways that would that makes people comfortable,” raise costs for retirees, and cutsaid health economist Marilyn ting payments to drugmakers Moon, who formerly served as a and other providers. “I was surprised by how trustee helping to oversee Medimuch the president was willing care finances. White House spokesman Jay to offer in terms of Medicare Carney says the Wyden-Ryan changes without a more thorplan “would end Medicare as we ough vetting and discussion,” know it for millions of seniors,” said Moon. Obama says he will causing the traditional program veto any plan to cut Medicare benefits without raising taxes to “wither on the vine.” But what administration offi- on the wealthy. Democrats are still hoping to cials don’t say is that Obama’s health care law already puts in use Ryan’s privatization plans as place one of Ryan’s main goals by a political weapon against Relimiting future increases in publicans in 2012, but the Medicare debate could cut both ways. Medicare spending. Ryan would do it with a fixed For the 76 million baby boomers payment for health insurance, signing up over the next couple adjusted to allow some growth. of decades, it will pay to be In theory that compels consum- watching.

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SECTION F SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

AP PHOTO

Executive producer Mark Wahlberg attends the final season premiere of ’Entourage’ at the Beacon Theatre in New York.

New life its own thriller By AMY LONGSDORF For The Times Leader

The tribute band Arrival will bring the pop music of the Swedish band ABBA to the F.M. Kirby Center tonight.

MARY THERESE BIEBEL

mbiebel@timesleader.com

I

n her native Sweden, Jenny Gustafsson said, people who attend concerts are fairly laid-back. When ABBA-loving crowds get together in the United States, it’s more fun. • “The American audience is the absolute best,” said Gustafsson, who sings with the ABBA tribute band Arrival. “You’re crazy over here. Everybody knows all the lyrics because they’ve seen (the play or movie) ‘Mamma Mia.’ They’re singing along, and their grandmothers are singing along.” • Arrival performs at 7 tonight at the F.M. Kirby Center, bringing the pop music introduced to America in the 1970s by the original foursome Bjorn Ulvaeus, Benny Andersson, Agnetha Faltskog and Anni-Frid Lyngstad.

See ABBA, Page 4F

Don’t worry. The musicians of Arrival will not forget to sing ‘Dancing Queen.’ The tribute band saves it for last because it’s a favorite at American concerts.

A crop of Oscar hopefuls faces stiff competition: themselves By STEVEN ZEITCHIK Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Comb the list of actors contending for an Oscar this year, and you might think you’re seeing double. Award season sometimes brings the occasional star with a pair of movies in the running, but this year more than a half-dozen performers could find their biggest rival in the mirror. The list of award hopefuls with multiple movies is long and diverse: Brad Pitt, Carey Mulligan, Viola Davis, Ryan Gosling, Jessica Chastain, Michael Fassbender and George Clooney, who, with his turn as a grieving father in the low-key drama “The Descendants,” will try to win his first lead-actor Oscar even as he’s pushing “The Ides of March,” the political drama he directed, produced,

Davis

Chastain

co-wrote and costars in. “I always feel like I’m competing against myself,” Clooney told the Los Angeles Times. “Every morning I feel like I’m competing against myself.” The actor might have been joking, but as the race heats up for the February awards, Clooney and the others are caught up in the knotty issues that come with seeking accolades — not to

Pitt

Fassbender

“It’s just incredibly risky to open yourself up to a newcomer,” said Avy Kaufman, a leading casting director who has worked on Fassbender’s “Shame” and “The Bourne Ultimatum.” “Even independent films want names these days, and there just aren’t many that (financiers) will accept. So moviegoers see the same people again and again.” Clooney is perhaps the biggest name. In “The Ides of March,” about the forces out to bring down an idealistic presidential contender (Clooney), the actor makes a timely comment about the contemporary political process. Oscar voters might want to nominate him in any one of the categories in which he’s eligible, including supporting actor. But in doing so, they might decide

mention ticket sales — for two films. Those challenges include deciding which movie to favor on the campaign trail and the possibility that attention for one film will undermine the other. The trend is a symptom, experts say, of a film-industry culture in which only a handful of stars can get a movie off the ground, as studios and financiers become more conservative about casting. See ROLES, Page 4F

Mark Wahlberg’s transformation from party animal to family man is complete. If you need proof, consider this: During a recent interview in Manhattan, the 40-year-old father of four lamented staying out late the night before. Late for him these days is 9:30 p.m. “There’s nothing better than what I did last night, which was go out to dinner with my wife (Rhea Durham) at 6:30 p.m. and I was in bed by 9:30,” he says. “And that was actually a late night for me because when I’m home (in Los Angeles), I’m usually in bed by 8:30 p.m. Then I wake up early in the morning and I have the whole day to do what I want, and I never wake up feeling guilty. So, it’s a good thing. “I stopped hanging out with my friends at night, and I don’t really miss it. You think you miss it until you go back, and it’s the same old thing. … I mean, I still have golf. That’s my only other guilty pleasure, but I don’t focus on playing golf as much as I used to because I’m just not that good at it.” Lucky for Wahlberg, there “There’s nothare plenty of othing better er things he’s good at, includ- than what I did ing acting and last night, producing. He shows off both which was go talents in “Con- out to dinner traband,” a thriller opening Fri- with my wife day about a re- (Rhea Durham) tired smuggler enjoying a quiet at 6:30 p.m. life with his wife and I was (Kate Beckinsale) and chil- in bed dren when he’s by 9:30." drawn back into the game after his brother-in-law (Caleb Landry Jones) finds himself in debt to a local crime boss (Giovanni Ribisi). Worried his family might be a target of Ribisi’s wrath, Wahlberg agrees to one last job. He assembles a crew (Ben Foster, Lukas Haas) and takes to the sea with hopes of bringing back millions in counterfeit cash. “I like this character,” Wahlberg says. “He’s a guy who’s pretty tough, but I think he’s smarter than he is tough. He has to react to a lot of different situations and circumstances. And he’s really fighting to protect his family. I can certainly relate to that.” Wahlberg earned an Oscar nomination for his turn as a single-minded FBI agent in Martin Scorsese’s “The Departed,” but, cinematically speaking, he usually finds himself on the wrong side of the law. “My character in ‘Contraband’ is no angel,” Wahlberg notes. “He’s (a criminal), but he’s doing it for the right reasons, and he’s doing it to protect and provide for his family. The other guys in the movie, thankfully, are worse than me, and they’re not as likeable or charismatic. But my character is the kind of guy that I like to root for. I can try to pull off the squeaky-clean thing, but I don’t know if that’s necessarily my cup of tea.” Wahlberg began his producing career See WAHLBERG, Page 5F


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BONUS PUZZLE "SECRET RETREAT" Gail Grabowski

DIAGRAMLESS

www.timesleader.com

The Sunday Crossword

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

CRYPTOGRAMS

ARIES (March 21-April 19). You need to figure out how you can delegate more of your workload. By trying to do everything, you are stopping yourself from moving toward a goal you greatly desire. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). One small action in the morning will significantly change the trajectory of your day. The ambitious endeavor you wish to take on will be accomplished in small, daily practices. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You will make things work, and then later, when asked how you did it, you won’t have a good answer. That’s because you don’t have to know consciously how to solve a problem in order to do so. CANCER (June 22-July 22). It will be lucky for you to be around people who have many interests and a generally enthusiastic tone. You’ll have something fresh to add to the social mix, and when you add it, vitality will sweep over you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Beware of the armchair critics. Their theories may sound reasonable from the comfort of climatecontrolled living rooms, but everything is different in the reality of application and action. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). A long stretch of seriousness this afternoon makes you realize how much you really need humor in your life. Laughing and creating cause for the laughter of others are two of your greatest pleasures. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You will feel absolutely driven to start and finish a certain project all in one day. It’s as though you are overtaken by the desire to do so. Ask yourself what deeper motive you might be trying to accomplish. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You’ll be asked to perform a specific function over and over. Sound nutrition and good hydration will help you complete more repetitions than you would otherwise be able to do. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). What you do to make the environment more pleasant for yourself will improve things for others. So don’t hesitate to speak up. Someone else will be immediately glad that you did. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). It will be easy for you to see your relationships as agreements with a ledger balance to keep track of the give and take. Maybe it’s not the most romantic view, but it’s the reason you’re such a stellar partner. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You’ll be acutely aware of the difference between what you do for fun and what you do for money. Taking part in an activity that falls into both categories will bring you good fortune. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You want to know what everyone wants to know but few have the guts to say: “What’s in it for me?” Being realistic about this will help you feel open enough to give of yourself. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Jan. 8). Your finger is on the pulse this year. Attuned to the prevailing style, buzzwords and financial trends, you’ll turn your savvy into profit. When you show a little imagination in February, you get the opportunity to experiment on someone else’s dime. Romance fills your spring. Practical arrangements are settled in June. Gemini and Leo people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 40, 1, 22, 39 and 14.

Puzzle Answers on 3F


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WONDERWORD

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PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION

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DEAR ABBY ADVICE

Wedding plans cause mother-daughter drama Dear Abby: I have recently become engaged. I have been planning this day since I was a little girl. My problem is my mother. She’s a little bit of a control freak. She plans to pay for the wedding — which is nice and I appreciate it — but at the same time I feel like she’s ignoring my plans and substituting hers. Every time I tell her what I’d like, she tries to persuade me to do what she wants. I even tried once being rude and telling her that she has had four weddings and this one is mine, but she got defensive when I tried to be frank with her. I feel like nothing I suggest is good enough. I don’t want to spoil this for her because I’m her only daughter, but I don’t want her spoiling it for me because HOPEFULLY this will be my only wedding. — Losing Patience in Louisiana

PREVIOUS SUNDAY’S SOLUTION

LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE ANSWERS Bonus Puzzle

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Dear Losing Patience: This may not be what you would like me to say, but as long as your mother is footing the bills for your wedding, she will have some say in the planning. If you prefer to make this a one-woman production, thank her warmly for her generous offer and tell her you can’t accept it,

ON THE WEB For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com

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1. A cat’s New Year’s resolution: get my claws and a bite in on that weird guy with a beard who gives me a shot every year. 2. A cranky dog’s New Year’s resolution: I will not give chase until I see the stick leave my silly master’s hand. 3. Here are resolutions that all of us could keep: slow down, make sure to watch more TV, avoid more work at the office and procrastinate! 4. A cat’s resolutions: sleep at least twenty three hours per day, don’t bother catching mice, fight more with the ball of yarn and go ballistic if someone grabs my tail. 1/8

HOW TO CONTACT: Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069

1/8 1/8

and that you will be planning and paying for your wedding yourself. Dear Abby: I work in a small, quiet office. My boss sits at the desk across from me and spends a great deal of time biting his nails. The noise drives me crazy and turns an otherwise pleasant work experience into a stressful one. I’ve tried turning up the radio, to no avail. Do you have any suggestions on how to tell my boss that he has a loud and nasty habit? —Trapped With a Nail-Biter Dear Trapped: No, I do not, and I recommend against you doing it. Be thankful he’s not biting his toenails. Abby shares more than 100 of her favorite recipes in two booklets: “Abby’s Favorite Recipes” and “More Favorite Recipes by Dear Abby.” Send a business-size, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $12 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby — Cookbooklet Set, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included in price.) To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send a business-sized, selfaddressed envelope, plus check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)

By Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


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ROLES Continued from Page 1F

not to vote for him a second time in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Descendants,â&#x20AC;? depriving him of a shot at Best Actor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think you ever really see an actor get shut out when they have two movies,â&#x20AC;? said veteran award consultant Cynthia Swartz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But you do see one movie get chosen over the other.â&#x20AC;? In 2006, Leonardo DiCaprio appeared likely to be nominated for his role as a cop working undercover in the mob in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Departed,â&#x20AC;? the Martin Scorsese-directed blockbuster that went on to win best picture. But he was overlooked for his work in that film and instead shortlisted in the lead-actor category for his part in the Africa-set drama â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blood Diamond,â&#x20AC;? a movie that

ABBA Gustafsson sings the part Faltskog once did, while Vicky Zetterberg, who founded Arrival in Sweden in 1995, represents Lyngstad. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m the blond one,â&#x20AC;? Gustafsson said in a telephone interview during which her 7-month-old daughter, Bonnie, could be heard cooing in the background. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is her second tour listening to all these songs,â&#x20AC;? Gustafsson said of the baby. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last year

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drew a more mixed critical and commercial response. This year Pitt could find himself in a similar situation. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaigning in the supporting-actor category for his performance as a stern 1950s father in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Tree of Lifeâ&#x20AC;? and in the lead-actor category for his role as a wisecracking baseball executive in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moneyball.â&#x20AC;? Three actresses this year could face similar scenarios. Davis is a front-runner for a lead-actress Oscar nomination for her turn as a steely maid in the race drama â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Help.â&#x20AC;? But that performance could siphon off support from her supporting role in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,â&#x20AC;? a Sept. 11-themed hopeful that came out just before Christmas. Chastain, Davisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Helpâ&#x20AC;? costar, is in the running for her roles in two other films besides the civil-rights tale â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Tree of Lifeâ&#x20AC;? and the supernatural dra-

ma â&#x20AC;&#x153;Take Shelter.â&#x20AC;? Mulligan, meanwhile, has been drawing interest for her supporting turn in the dark heist movie â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drive.â&#x20AC;? But she could have those hopes offset by interest in her supporting turn as a drifter chanteuse in the sex drama â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shame.â&#x20AC;? The situation is most fraught, say experts, when contenders have a pair of lead performances, as the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences does not allow an actor or actress to be nominated twice in a given category. That means that, this year, the actors branch members who fill out their nomination ballots for lead actor will be forced to choose between Goslingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turn as a stoic type in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Driveâ&#x20AC;? and as a conflicted campaign manager in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ides.â&#x20AC;? Likewise, Fassbender, who is generating heat for his role as Carl Jung in the period drama â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Dangerous Methodâ&#x20AC;? and for his role as a sex addict in

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shame,â&#x20AC;? can only be nominated for one of them. Filmmakers can sometimes find themselves in this position too â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Steven Spielberg and Werner Herzog, for instance, each bring out two contenders this year. But the dual-role problem especially affects actors, whose presence on the award circuit is most critical. In a time when seasonal events â&#x20AC;&#x201D; screenings, interviews and panels â&#x20AC;&#x201D; have multiplied exponentially, equal promotion for each is simply impossible. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a matter of which movie an actor feels stronger about,â&#x20AC;? said one well-known award consultant who requested anonymity because of the sensitive nature of client relationships. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And sometimes it comes down to whether they want to go for the prettier girl (lead actor) or for the sure thing (supporting actor).â&#x20AC;?

IF YOU GO

Or hoping for love: â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you change your mind, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m the first in line. Honey, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m still free,â&#x20AC;? comes from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Take A Chance on Me.â&#x20AC;? Or simply celebrating a night of fun: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can dance! You can jive! Having the time of your life!â&#x20AC;? comes from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dancing Queen.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We always save that one for last because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the most popular one over here,â&#x20AC;? said Gustafsson, who herself pre-

fers the touching ode to a lost relationship, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Winner Takes It All.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the thing about ABBA. They have so many different songs. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re good in different ways,â&#x20AC;? said the singer, who began practicing for her current job as a child, without even realizing it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My parents used to listen (to ABBA music) all the time. They had all the records. I used to sing in front of the mirror with the hairbrush.â&#x20AC;?

What: ABBA: Arrival When: 7 tonight Where: F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, Public Square, Wilkes-Barre Tickets: $34, $24 More info: 826-1100

Continued from Page 1F

E

she was listening in my tummy.â&#x20AC;? The ABBA repertory includes many infectiously upbeat tunes and lyrics, often about such topics as giving in to love: â&#x20AC;&#x153;How could I ever refuse? I feel like I win when I lose,â&#x20AC;? comes from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Waterloo.â&#x20AC;?

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BOOKS Series going strong

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“Breakdown” by Sara Paretsky; Putnam ($26.95) “Vanished Kingdoms: The Rise and Fall of States and Nations (Viking), by Norman Davies:

Y

For The Associated Press

ou may never have heard of the of Hitler’s invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1939. Poland was tied to Lithuania for centuries, a “Kingdom of the Rock,” though for half a millennium it dominated European force that Davies calls “Litva.” Its a sizable piece of Scotland. It cen- neighbors separated them and devoured Potered on two fortified hills that land three times in the 1700s. Contradicting overlook the River Clyde at Dum- Davies’ theme of countries’ disappearance, Pobarton (“Camp of the Britons”), near today’s land was resurrected twice, after World Wars I and II. Glasgow. Occasionally, Davies misses a chance to exIn his new book, “Vanished Kingdoms: The Rise and Fall of States and Nations,” British ploit the light touch. King Dagobert made Paris the capital of historian Norman Davies names “Kingdom of “Neustria” after the Roman emthe Rock” among 15 Eurasian History buffs will find pire fell. He inspired a satirical countries he cites by unfamiliar song that may have been written titles such as “Litva” and “Rumuch to admire in the syn.” They illustrate the dedicabook’s 830 pages. Davies more than a thousand years after his reign. Roughly translated, it tion of his book to “those whom includes 74 maps, direct begins: “Good King Dagobert (the historians tend to forget.” lout!) Put his pants on inside out His theme: All governments quotations and poems. ...” disappear or lose power in time. The king’s spiritual adviser reHistory buffs will find much to admire in the book’s 830 pages. Davies in- sponds, starting a ridiculous dialogue about cludes 74 maps, direct quotations and poems. proper royal dress. Davies doesn’t quote furSome of the verse is patriotic doggerel in a ther. Some writers think the satirist wrote at variety of languages, with translations in En- the time of the French Revolution in the 1790s, ridiculing monarchs and priests. glish that mock supernationalist silliness. If so, the satirical point has changed. The The 15 countries vary in importance. Ukraine eventually absorbed “Rusyn,” better words have a catchy tune, and the political known as Carpatho-Ukraine. Its independence song has become a nursery rhyme. Almost any lasted just one March day during the upheaval French child can sing it for you.

WAHLBERG Continued from Page 1F

with HBO’s “Entourage,” a semiautobiographical account of his early days in Hollywood. Since then, he’s overseen a handful of films (“We Own The Night,” “The Fighter”) and TV shows (“In Treatment,” “Boardwalk Empire.”) “Contraband,” a remake of the 2009 Icelandic film “ReykjavikRotterdam,” was pitched to Wahlberg’s production company by its star, Baltasar Kormakur, who hoped to direct an English-language remake. “I watched the original, and I just thought it was really cool,” Wahlberg says. “You always see a foreign film and you go, ‘Wow, that would make for a great American movie.’ But it doesn’t

By CARL HARTMAN

AP PHOTO

Mark Wahlberg’s family includes son Michael Brendan, daughter Ella, and wife Rhea.

usually translate. But this was fresh and different, and we thought it would work. Then we sat down with Baltasar and hired a great writer, and it started coming together.” Wahlberg insists that produc-

ing his own movies isn’t as distracting as it sounds. “When I’m acting, in between action and cut, I’m just focused on that. But all the other times, I’m usually thinking about the big picture.” Occasionally, Wahlberg uses his boss-man status to get out of doing love scenes. “If a scene has anything to do with me kissing someone, my wife isn’t going to like it so then I’m going to have to fight to get it cut out,” Wahlberg admits. “Those are the important issues. I usually try to choose my battles wisely. “In the film I’m shooting now (‘Broken City’ with Catherine Zeta-Jones), there’s a love scene, and it was pretty graphic and I was, like, ‘I really don’t want to do that. I don’t think it’s necessary.’ My compromise was that I said I’d be nude in this other scene by myself. … So I still had to be buck

naked for six hours, but it wasn’t with someone else.” In addition to “Broken City,” Wahlberg is considering a sequel to “The Fighter,” the acclaimed boxing drama about brothers Dickie (Christian Bale) and Mickey Ward. Both Bale and Melissa Leo took home Oscars last year for their roles in the film, which Wahlberg starred in and produced. For most of his career, Wahlberg has resisted the lure of sequels even though he was pitched continuations of “The Italian Job,” “Shooter” and “The Departed.” But “The Fighter 2” seemed like a knock-out to him. “With ‘The Fighter,’ we think it’s worth exploring the biggest part of Mickey Ward’s life,” Wahlberg says. “The only reason why anyone even knows who Mickey Ward is is because of his battles with Arturo Gatti.

By OLINE H. COGDILL Sun Sentinel (MCT)

It hardly seems possible that 30 years have passed since Sara Paretsky introduced Chicago private detective V.I. Warshawski in “Indemnity Only,” and helped change the mystery/thriller genre forever. Along with Marcia Muller’s Sharon McCone and Sue Grafton’s Kinsey Millhone, Paretsky’s V.I. showed that women could be strong, insightful private detectives as capable and as determined to fight for justice as any man. This triumvirate of authors broke the genre’s conventions and cliches in favor of crime fiction that evolved into social novels, showing people as they truly lived, and opened the door for new voices with varied backgrounds. “Breakdown,” V.I.’s 30th anniversary novel, continues the approach that Paretsky has always followed — melding current events, politics and old-fashioned gumshoe detecting. “Breakdown’s” riveting plot mixes the mania for vampire and supernatural novels, especially among tweens, virulent TV broadcasters, tabloid journalism, xenophobia and dirty politics. It’s a labyrinthine plot that moves through myriad Chicago neighborhoods, from mansions to modest apartments. In “Breakdown,” V.I. heads to a cemetery in the middle of the night to round up a group of middle school girls who sneaked away after curfew. The girls belong to the Twilight-esque Carmilla Club, which follows the novels about Carmilla, Queen of the Night who is a shape-shifting raven. But the girls’ initiation ritual is interrupted by V.I. who also finds the body of a man stabbed vampire-style a few feet away. V.I. wants to get all the girls away from the cemetery before the cops arrive, but she is especially concerned about the media learning the identity of two of the girls — the daughter of Sophy Durango, a liberal U.S. Senate candidate, and the granddaughter of Chaim Salanter, a wealthy Jewish businessman and Holocaust survivor who supports Durango’s campaign. Both Sophy and Chaim have been the targets of extreme mudslinging by hate-spewing TV host Wade Lawlor. Intense suspense complements the complex plot, which never slows down. Paretsky skillfully juggles the myriad story threads, while never making the “Breakdown” feel overloaded. While Paretsky usually delivers wellrounded villains, “Breakdown” has few shadings in its characters’ personalities. The main villain is easy to spot and when revealed becomes a regular Chatty Cathy about motives and secrets. “Breakdown’s” finale feels both rushed and drawn-out, as if Paretsky was unsure how to end it. Still, V.I.’s quest for justice continues to be a highlight of this series as Paretsky continues to show new aspects of the detective. Fundamentally, V.I.’s values have never changed but she has become more multi-faceted.

“The fights took such a toll on those guys. Physically they were never the same after them. Obviously Arturo is no longer with us, but Mickey has horrible vision problems. His brain has shifted many times.” While Wahlberg might seem to be a workaholic, he insists his family always comes first. “I need to be a good servant to God and my faith, a good husband, a good father, a good son, a good friend, a good brother and uncle and a good neighbor. Those are the important things that I focus on,” he says. “If I succeed in this business and fail at being a parent or a husband, then I’ve done it all for nothing, and I’ve failed.” Born on Boston’s hardscrabble South Side, Wahlberg had about 20-25 scrapes with the law before winding up in jail for 45 days on an assault charge. Not long after-

ward, he vowed to go straight and found success as a rapper and underwear model (under the name Marky Mark). With 1994’s “Renaissance Man,” he made the transition to acting and hasn’t looked back. “I’m so appreciative of all the things that I’ve been able to do and the things that I’ve been able to overcome,” he says. “I was given a second chance in this life, and that’s not something that comes easy. So, I don’t want to do anything to mess it up. “People are always, like, ‘Just come out with us for one night?’ For what? I have everything that I want. I’m so blessed and so fortunate, and I start every day by getting on my hands and knees. … If it all went away today, I’d be happy because of the things that I was able to experience and the things that I’ve learned along the way.”


CMYK PAGE 6F

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

EXPLORING TASMANIA

Tiny island is nature-lover’s dream By CARRIE OSGOOD

Associated Press

H

OBART, Tasmania — Last March, I embarked on a mini-road trip around Tasmania, the island off the southeast corner of Australia that is about the size of West Virginia. Tassie, what Aussies affectionately call their smallest state, is a nature-lover’s dream, with enough history and culinary delights to satisfy urbanites. While its landscape has similarities to New Zealand’s North Island, with lush, rocky, “Lord of the Rings” countryside, it is unequivocally Australian, with carnivorous marsupials, eucalyptus forests and a mellow, rustic spirit.

Tasmania is best explored by tourist information center for ascar, which can be daunting for in- sistance coordinating my itinerAP PHOTOS dependent travelers. Like other ary, the woman I spoke with rec- Friendly beaches in Freycinet National Park, Tasmania, Australia. While its landscape has similarities to New Zealand’s North Island, Commonwealth countries, mo- ommended nearby Mount Fields with lush, rocky, Lord of the Rings countryside, Tasmania is unequivocally Australian, with carnivorous marsupials, eucalyptus forests torists in Australia drive on the National Park, calling it “magic.” and a mellow, rustic spirit. Much to my delight, the park’s left, in cars where the driver sits on the right. Yet it is rather easy diverse scenery was breathtak- tour buses and school groups to to “hire” a car in Australia. For- ing. I especially enjoyed the two- prove it. Once I escaped the eign drivers licenses in English hour hike that took me through a crowds, I appreciated the place are honored, and insurance is in- lush, fern forest passing three more than I expected. Roaming corporated into the affordable magnificent waterfalls, including through the historic buildings, the wheelchair-accessible Russell exhibitions and ruins transported rental package. Driving a lovely little car like Falls. I wove around massive eu- me back in time. The grounds the Nissan Micra, a four-door var- calyptus trees that radiated the were compelling, and I could feel iation of the Volkswagen Beetle most intoxicating fragrant scent. the melancholy remnants of the not available in the United States, Just relishing the simple act of area’s dark history. Kangaroos play at the TasmaHaving grown up watching nian Devil Conservation Park on breathing centered made the driving me, infusing a viscer- “Looney Tunes” cartoons, I could the Tasman Peninsula. experience that IF YOU GO al pleasure from be- not visit Tasmania without seeing much more fun. ing in such a beauti- a real Tassie devil. I visited the The roads in Tas- TASMANIA: www.disful place. It was mag- Tasmanian Devil Conservation mania are narrow, covertasmania.com/ Fly from Sydney, MelPark in time for a feeding. The ic, indeed. winding and fre- bourne or Brisbane in Waterfall Bay in Tasman National Park. The Tasman Pen- dark, dangerous, dog-size aniquently only two Australia or by overinsula, an hour mals running around like malanes with no shoul- night ferry from Melsoutheast of Hobart, niacs put on quite a show. They der, so driving the bourne. is one of the main made disconcerting crunching compact car helped Southern Hemisphere tourist destinations noises while gleefully devouring the roads feel a little seasons: DecemberFebruary summer coastal in Tasmania, saturat- animal bones. It was sad to learn more spacious. temperatures average in ed with a wide range that a widespread, deadly disease I based my trip in the 70s; June-August Hobart, the state’s offers wet wintry weather. of attractions, in- forced nature’s most endearing cluding dramatic garbage disposals to be added to capital city of more ocean scenery, his- the endangered species list. than 200,000 peoI capped my road trip by drivple in the southern part of the is- torical landmarks and an animal land. It was raining when I ar- park. The panoramic views from ing up the east coast to Freycinet The Port Arthur Historical Site rived, so I thought it was a sleepy my coastal walk along Waterfall National Park. I stayed in Coles contains hospital ruins. little town. But when the sky Bay in Tasman National Park Bay, the gateway town to the picWhile I didn’t have enough cleared, the city came alive with were jaw-dropping, with spectac- turesque peninsula. While my its active harbor and the vision of ular rock and sea formations, and weak knee stopped me from hik- time to explore Tasmania’s many towering Mount Wellington. waterfalls that dove off high cliffs ing down to dip my toes into pris- other sites, I’m glad I left this glotine Wineglass Bay, I still made it rious corner of the world with While not as culturally gregari- into the rich teal-blue ocean. The Port Arthur Historical up to the lookout and was able to plenty of excuses to return. ous as other parts of Australia, the Site, the convict settlement that explore other nooks and vistas residents were warm and kind. Russell Falls in Mount Field National Park. My favorite part of the city was housed some of the worst British throughout the park. Strolling the festive Salamanca Market, criminals in the mid-1800s, is the barefoot along the silky-soft, mingling with artisans, buskers most significant cultural land- white-sand Friendly Beaches was and locals celebrating their sunny mark in Tasmania, and has the an unexpected highlight. Saturday. I purchased quality souvenirs and gifts, while savoring delicious, fresh, local food. When I visited Hobart’s helpful • NYC Canal St. Shops • Ocean City, NJ • Rehoboth Beach, DE • Wildwood, NJ • Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ • IKEA Shopping • Cape May, NJ • King of Prussia Shopping • Knoebles • Baltimore Harbor SUN. FEB. 26TH, $199 • Wine Fest, Watkins Glen • NJ Meadowlands Flea Market WED. MAR. 14TH, $175 • NYC San Gennaro Fest. • NYC Southside Seaport • NYC (Times Sq.) ORCHESTRA SEATS incl. bus & show ticket • Sands Casino • Phila. 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LOST. Cat. Grey & white, long haired, declawed housecat, no collar. Pure white chest & front legs. Name is Sammy. Ran away near Freemont St. & Luzerne Ave. Birthday gift. Please call 570-655-4996

6 Cyl., 98K

* $

6 Cyl., Station Wagon, 151K, Runs Great

110

4,990*

5,990

$

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS

Lost

412 Autos for Sale

$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN, DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!

NOBODY Pays More 570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!

110

Lost

ALL JUNK CAR & TRUCKS WANTED Highest Prices Paid!!!

412 Autos for Sale

Legals/ Public Notices

LEGAL NOTICE DEADLINES Saturday 12:30 on Friday Sunday 4:00 pm on Friday Monday 4:30 pm on Friday

FREE REMOVAL Call Vito & Ginos Anytime 288-8995

Wednesday 4:00 pm on Tuesday

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Thursday 4:00 pm on Wednesday

120

Found

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

412 Autos for Sale

135

412 Autos for Sale

Tuesday 4:00 pm on Monday

Friday 4:00 pm on Thursday Holidays call for deadlines You may email your notices to mpeznowski@ timesleader.com or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to The Times Leader 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 For additional information or questions regarding legal notices you may call Marti Peznowski at 570-970-7371 or 570-829-7130

PUBLIC NOTICE The City of Pittston Government Study Commission will meet at 6:00 PM in Pittston City Hall 35 Broad Street, Pittston, PA 18640, on Monday, January 9, 2012. Government Study Commission meetings are open to the Public. Inquiries concerning the Government Study Commission meetings should be directed to the City Clerk’s office at (570)654-0513, during regular business hours Monday through Friday 9:00AM to 4:00PM except holidays. Joseph Moskovitz Pittston City Clerk

150 Special Notices

I’ll be there! Chippendales at Genettis – Jan 13th! bridezella.net

CHRISTMAS SALE

Gold, Silver, Gold Plated, Rings, Necklaces, Bracelets also Costume Jewelry. GREAT PRICES! Something for every occasion.

Prices cannot be beat! 134 RTE. 11, Larksville 570-855-7197 570-328-3428

DO YOU ENJOY PREGNANCY ?

Would you like the emotional reward of helping an infertile couple reach their dream of becoming parents? Consider being a surrogate. All fees allowable by law will be paid. Call Central Pennsylvania Attorney, Denise Bierly, at 814-237-7900

PAYING $500 MINIMUM DRIVEN IN

Full size 4 wheel drive trucks

ALSO PAYING TOP $$$

for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm


PAGE 2G

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

150 Special Notices

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

ALL JUNK CAR & TRUCKS WANTED

ACME AUTO SALES

ACURA 06 TSX

CHRYSLER ‘04

Highest Prices Paid!!! FREE REMOVAL Call V&G Anytime 288-8995

MONTY SAYS

343-1959

1009 Penn Ave Scranton 18509 Across from Scranton Prep

GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT, NO CREDIT

310

Attorney Services

Find that new job.

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal The on an automobile? Times Leader Turn to classified. It’s aClassified showroom in print! Classified’s got section. the directions! What a great run The Digger had with his man Tebow! That is all over now. Steelers 28 Broncos 10. Sorry, Rick...maybe next year... probably not.

ATVs/Dune Buggies

HAWK `11 125CC Auto, key start, with reverse & remote control. $950. OBO 570-674-2920

HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV

NEW!! Full size adult ATV. Strong 4 stroke motor. CVT fully automatic transmission with reverse. Electric start. Front & rear luggage racks. Long travel suspension. Disc brakes. Dual stage head lights. Perfect for hunters & trail riders alike. BRAND NEW & READY TO RIDE. $1,695 takes it away. 386-334-7448 Wilkes-Barre

Autos under $5000

CHEVY `00 BLAZER 2 door. New brakes,

shocks & exhaust. Tires fairly new. 92,561 miles. Asking $3,600 or best offer (570) 823-0881

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad.

DODGE `95 DAKOTA

2WD V6. Regular Cab/6Ft. 5 speed. 113,000 miles. Runs like a champ. Needs some work. $1,400. 570-814-1255

ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA LEADER. E DER.

WORK WANTED experienced

in home care. I will work in your home taking care of your loved one. Personal care, meal preparation and light housekeeping provided. References, background check also provided. Salary negotiable. 570-8369726 or (cell) 570-594-4165

150 Special Notices

timesleader.com

360

Instruction & Training

EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-2203984 www. CenturaOnline.com

150 Special Notices

Octagon Family Restaurant

375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651

570-779-2288

Wednesday-Sunday Open at 4 pm Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza 135

406

409

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

Legals/ Public Notices

Leather. Moonroof. $9,880

135

Legals/ Public Notices

INVITATION FOR BIDS The Housing Authority of the County of Luzerne will receive Bids for Building Modernization and Improvements to Scattered Housing in Edwardsville (Project Number PA57-23) and Newport Township (Project Number PA57-19). The projects are located at various addresses as outlined in the Project Manual. Bids will be received until 10 a.m. on the 26th day of January, 2012 at the Housing Authority of the County of Luzerne, Administration Offices, 250 First Ave., Kingston, PA 18704 at which time all Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. The Contract is for the following project: CONTRACT #1 – GENERAL CONSTRUCTION Contract Documents, including Drawings and Project Manual, may be examined at Williams Kinsman Lewis Architecture, 82 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA. Contract Documents can be purchased starting Wednesday, January 4, 2012 for a nonrefundable fee at ABL Graphics, 124 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA. Telephone: 570-825-7050. The Project Manual is in one binding and the Drawings are bound separately from the manual. A mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held at the Housing Authority of the County of Luzerne, Administration Offices, 250 First Ave., Kingston, PA at 8 a.m. on January 10, 2012. Mandatory contractor site visits are scheduled for 8 a.m. on January 11th and 12th. A meeting place will be established at the Pre-Bid Conference. Each Bid, when submitted, must be accompanied by a Bid Guaranty which shall not be less than 5% of the amount of the Bid, as hereinafter specified under the “Instructions to Bidders.” The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for a satisfactory Performance Bond and a Labor and Material Payment Bond. Bond Companies for Bid Bonds must be listed in the U.S. Treasury Circular No. 570. Attention is called to the provisions for Equal Employment Opportunity and the payment of not less than the minimum salaries and wages as set forth in the Non-Technical Specifications. All contractors and subcontractors will be required to adhere to Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 as amended. The Housing Authority reserves the right to reject any and all Bids and to waive any informalities in the bidding. No Bid shall be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days subsequent to the opening of the Bids, without the consent of the Housing Authority of the County of Luzerne. The Housing Authority Of The County Of Luzerne David J. Fagula, Executive Director

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

HYUNDAI ‘00 ACCENT 4 cylinder. 5 speed. Sharp economy car! $2,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

LEO’S AUTO SALES 92 Butler St Wilkes-Barre, PA 570-825-8253

MAZDA ‘96 PROTEGE 4 door, 4 cyl, auto. $1,650 Current Inspection On All Vehicles DEALER

PONTIAC ‘00 GRAND AM White. 4 door. 4

cylinder. Auto. AM/FM/CD. 155,000 miles. Extra snow tires on rims. New brake and inspection. Runs very good! $2,500 570-466-7427

WE BUY CARS Highest prices paid for good cars

Eastern Auto

570-779-9999 412 Autos for Sale

ACURA `06 TL 4 Door 3.2 VTEC 6

Cylinder engine Auto with slapstick. Navigation system. 57k miles. Black with Camel Leather interior. Heated Seats. Sun Roof, Excellent condition. Satellite Radio, Fully loaded. $18,000. 570-814-2501

ACURA `06 TL

White Diamond 80K original miles, 1 Owner, Garage Kept, Camel Leather Interior, 3.2L / 6 Cylinder, 5-Speed Automatic, Front/Rear & Side Airbags, ABS Navigation System, 8Speaker Surround System, DVD /CD /AM/FM/ Cassette, XM Satellite Radio, Power & Heated Front Seats, Power Door Locks & Windows, Power Moonroof, 4 Snow Tires Included!.... And Much, Much, More! Car runs and looks beautiful $16,500 Firm Call 239-8461

Line up a place to live in classified!

AUDI `96 QUATTRO A6 station wagon.

143k miles. 3rd row seating. $2,800 or best offer. Call 570-861-0202

250 General Auction

Call Our Auto Credit Hot Line to get Pre-approved for a Car Loan!

800-825-1609

www.acmecarsales.net

11 AUDI S5 QUATTRO CONVERTIBLE Sprint blue/black, tan leather, auto, 7 speed, turbo, 330 HP, Navigation, AWD 09 CHRYSLER SEBRING 4 door, alloys, seafoam blue. 08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX SE, blue, auto V6 07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL, silver, grey leather 07 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS, navy blue, auto, alloys 07 CHRYSLER 300 LTD, AWD, silver, grey leather 06 MERCURY MILAN PREMIER, mint green, V6, alloys 06 NISSAN MAXIMA SE silver, V6, sunroof 06 DODGE STRATUS SXT, red 05 DODGE NEON SXT, red, 4 cyl, auto 05 CHEVY IMPALA LS burgundy, tan leather, sunroof 05 VW NEW JETTA gray, auto, 4 cyl 05 CHEVY MALIBU MAXX, white, grey leather, sunroof 04 NISSAN ALTIMA SL, 3.5 white, black leather, sun roof 03 VW JETTA GLS, black, auto, sunroof 03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO, mid blue/light grey leather, navigation, AWD 02 MUSTANG GT, V8, green, black leather, 5 speed 01 CHEVY LUMINA LS, 4 door, burgundy, 72K 01 VW JETTA GLS, green, auto, 4 cyl 01 VOLVO V70 STATION WAGON, blue/grey, leather, AWD 00 PLYMOUTH NEON purple, 4 door, auto 98 MAZDA MILLENIA green 98 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS, black

SUVS, VANS, TRUCKS, 4 X4’s

08 JEEP COMPASS SPORT, silver, 4 cyl, auto, 4x4 08 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB, white, 5.7 Hemi, 4 door, 4x4 08 CADILLAC ESCALADE black, black leather, 3rd seat, navigation, 4x4 07 CHRYSLER ASPEN LTD, silver, 3rd seat, 4x4 07 DODGE DURANGO SLT, blue, 3rd seat 4x4 07 CHEVY UPLANDER silver, 7 passenger mini van 07 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT, blue grey leather, 7 pax mini van 06 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR XLS, AWD, blue auto, V6 06 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN ES, red, 4 dr, entrtnmt cntr, 7 pass mini van 05 FORD F150 XLT, extra cab, truck, black, V8, 4x4 05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LT, blue, grey leather, 4x4 05 BUICK RANIER CXL gold, tan, leather, sunroof (AWD) 04 DODGE DAKOTA Club cab, black, auto, V-8, 4x4 04 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER, silver, black leather, 3rd seat, AWD 04 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER, 4x4 black, black leather, 3rd seat, 04 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE OVERLAND graphite grey, 2 tone leather, sunroof, 4x4 04 CHEVY SUBURBAN LS, pewter silver, 3rd seat, 4x4 03 FORD WINDSTAR LX green 4 door, 7 pax mini van 02 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 7 passenger, mini van, gold, AWD 02 CHEVY 2500 HD reg. cab. pickup truck, green, auto, 4x4 01 F150 SUPERCREW XLT, green, 4 door, V8, 4x4 truck 00 GMC SIERRA SLE, extra cab, pewter silver, V8, 4x4, truck 00 CHEVY BLAZER LT black & brown, brown leather 4x4 98 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO SE, silver, V6, 4x4 96 CHEVY BLAZER, black 4x4 89 CHEVY 1500, 4X4 TRUCK

BMW `01 X5

4.4i. Silver, fully loaded, tan leather interior. 1 owner. 103k miles. $8,999 or best offer. Call 570-814-3666

250 General Auction

DIRECTED BY A SECURED PARTY!

“Online Auction”

Jan. 12, 9am - Jan. 13, 6pm, 2012 LIQUIDATION of INVENTORY NEW! Toys (thousands). NEW! Zippers, more than 3,000,000. 1201 W. Elizabeth Ave, Section E#1 Linden, NJ 07036

Register to bid online, in real time, at: WWW.PROXYBID.COM

Details: Col. Steve Sitar & Co. (570) 586-1397 Pa.Lic. AU2124-L www.sitarauctions.com

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

AUDI `01 A6 QUATTRO

123,000 miles, 4.2 liter V8, 300hp, silver with black leather,heated steering wheel, new run flat tires, 17” rims, 22 mpg, German mechanic owned. $6,495. OBO. 570-822-6785

BEN’S AUTO SALES RT 309 W-B Twp. Near Wegman’s 570-822-7359

10 Malibu LS $11,495 10 Fusion SEL $14,995 09 ESCAPE XLT $11,495 10 SUZUKI SX4 $12,495 10COBALT SPORTY $9,995 08 RANGER 50K $10,995 Full Notary Service Tags & Title Transfers

BMW `07 328xi

Black with black interior. Heated seats. Back up & navigation systems. New tires & brakes. Sunroof. Garage kept. Many extras! 46,000 Miles. Asking $20,500. 570-825-8888 or 626-297-0155 Call Anytime!

BMW `99 M3

Convertible with Hard Top. AM/FM. 6 disc CD. 117 K miles. Stage 2 Dinan suspension. Cross drilled rotors. Cold air intake. All maintenance records available. $11,500 OBO. 570-466-2630

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

BUICK `04 CENTURY

Well equipped. Power locks & windows. Auto. A/C. Excellent condition. 64k miles. Asking $6,200. Call 570-829-0886

BUICK `05 LACROSSE

Metallic Gray. Heated leather seats. Traction control, 6 way power front seats, remote start. Rear park assist. New tires. 41,400 miles. $11,000 570-696-2148

CADILLAC ‘06 STS

AWD, 6 cylinder, Silver, 55,000 miles, sunroof, heated seats, Bose sound system, 6 CD changer, satellite radio, Onstar, parking assist, remote keyless entry, electronic keyless ignition, & more! $16,500 570-881-2775

CHEVROLET ‘06 CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE

Silver beauty, 1 Owner, Museum quality. 4,900 miles, 6 speed. All possible options including Navigation, Power top. New, paid $62,000 Must sell $45,900 570-299-9370

CHEVY `97 ASTROVAN

Beautiful, 4 door. Power steering & brakes. 8 cylinder. Excellent condition. $3,000. Negotiable. 570-762-3504

CHEVY ‘08 COBALT LS Auto. CD Player. $9,440

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

CHEVY 08 IMPALA LTZ

Metallic gray, sunroof, leather, Bose Satellite with CD radio, heated seats, traction control, fully loaded. Remote Start. 50k miles. $16,995 or trade. (570) 639-5329

CHEVY ‘11 MALIBU LT Moonroof. 7K miles. $15,880

SEBRING CONVERTIBLE

Silver, 2nd owner clean title. Very clean inside & outside. Auto, Power mirrors, windows. CD player, cruise, central console heated power mirrors. 69,000 miles. $4900. 570-991-5558

CHRYSLER ‘08 SEBRING

Leather. Heated seats. DVD Player. $11,880

CHEVY`10 CAMARO

SS2. Fully load, V8, jewel red with white stripes on hood & trunk, list price is $34,500, Selling for $29,900. Call 570-406-1974

CHRYSLER `06 300 4 door sedan in per-

fect condition. Full service records. All luxury options and features. 25.5 MPG. $12,800. Call 570-371-1615

JAGUAR `00 S TYPE

4 door sedan. Like new condition. Brilliant blue exterior with beige hides. Car is fully equipped with navigation system, V-8, automatic, climate control AC, alarm system, AM/FM 6 disc CD, garage door opener. 42,000 original miles. $9,000 Call (570) 288-6009

JAGUAR ‘94 XJS CONVERTIBLE

412 Autos for Sale

PONTIAC 08 VIBE

Low miles. AWD. $13,860

PORSCHE `85 944

Low mileage, 110,000 miles, 5 speed, 2 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, power windows, power mirrors, AM/FM radio, CD changer, leather interior, rear defroster, tinted windows, custom wheels, $8,000. (570) 817-1803

SUZUKI ‘10 SX4 4x4 6,000 miles. $14,000. ‘08 Ford F250, 4x4 4,000 miles, 4 door, 8 foot bed/with or without plow. $45,000. All showroom new! 570-826-0200 or 570-868-3968

TITLE TAGS FULL NOTARY SERVICE 6 M ONTH WARRANTY

DODGE `02 DURANGO SLT all All power, 4.7,

leather, 7 passenger, running boards, 80,000 miles, CD player, new tires. $6,500. 570-877-9896

DODGE `02 NEON

SXT. 4 door. Automatic. Yellow with black interior. Power windows & locks. FWD. $3,500. Call 570-709-5677 or 570-819-3140

HONDA `07 ACCORD

V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1 owner with maintenance records. Slate blue with leather interior. Sunroof. Asking $12,500. Call 570-239-2556

HONDA `09 CIVIC LX-S

Excellent condition inside & out. Garage kept. Regularly serviced by dealer, records available. Option include alloy wheels, decklid spoiler, sport seats, interior accent lighting (blue), Nose mask and custom cut floor mats. Dark grey with black interior. 56K highway miles. REDUCED! $13,300. Call 570-709-4695

VITO’S & GINO’S Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks Highest Prices Paid!!

FREE PICKUP

HYUNDAI ‘06 ELANTRA Tan, 4 door,

clean title, 4 cylinder, auto, 115k miles. Power windows, & keyless entry, CD player, cruise, central console heated power mirrors. $3900 570-991-5558

VOLKSWAGEN ‘00 BEETLE 2.0 automatic, air 67k miles $6400. 570-466-0999

ALL JUNK CARS! CA$H PAID

570-301-3602

MARZAK MOTORS

SCION `06 XA 67,000 miles,

TOYOTA 07 CAMRY LE Low miles. One owner. $12,750

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

TOYOTA ‘09 COROLLA S Auto. 4 Cylinder. $14,629

601 Green Ridge St, Scranton

9999999

CHEVY ‘05 AVEO, 4 door, silver, auto, 79k miles $3,995 CHRYSLER ‘04 SEBRING TOURING, silver, 4 door, auto, 139k miles, loaded $3,995 FORD ‘04 TARUS SE, 4 door, white/gray cloth interior, all power options $ FORD ‘03 WINDSTAR, green exterior, tan cloth interior, power options, front/rear A/C-heat $3,995 DODGE ‘00 DURANGO, black/tan, 4 door, 4x4, 3rd seat, loaded, 146k miles $3,995 LINCOLN ‘00 TOWNCAR, leather interior, 4 door, loaded with options $3,995

MERCEDES ‘29

350 V8. Original owner. Automatic transmission. Rare tuxedo silver / black vinyl top with black naugahyde interior. Never damaged. $6,000. Call 570-489-6937

LEXUS `01 ES 300 80,000 miles,

WANTED!

FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD

Kit Car $9,000 (570) 655-4884 hell-of-adeal.com

power windows & locks, great gas mileage. $8,200/OBO 570-606-5634

‘10 Dodge Caravan SXT 32K. Silver-Black. Power slides. Factory warranty. $17,299 ‘09 Jeep Libery Limited Power sunroof. Only 18K. Factory Warranty. $19,799 ‘09 DODGE CALIBER SXT 2.0 Automatic, 24k Factory Warranty! $11,999 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS Only 18K! One Owner - Estate Sale. Factory Warranty. $11,999 ‘08 SUBARU Special Edition 42k, 5 speed, AWD. Factory warranty. $13,199 ‘08 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 4x4, Regular Cab, 63K, Factory Warranty $13,199 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS 4 door, only 37K! 5 Yr. 100K factory warranty $11,599 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS 60k. Factory warranty. $9,599 ‘05 HONDA CRV EX One owner, just traded, 65K. $12,799 ‘05 Suzuki Verona LX Auto. 64K. Factory warranty. $5,299 ‘01 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Executive 74K $5,799

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT

$49,000

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649 excellent condition, all options. Recently serviced. New tires. $9,300. 570-388-6669

CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE

$24,000

CROSSROAD MOTORS 570-825-7988

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

700 Sans Souci Highway WE SELL FOR LESS!!

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

All original $12,000

Mint Condition Magnolia red, with palomino beige leather interior. This car rates a 10 in & out. 4 new tires and services. Florida car. $10,500. 570-885-1512

288-8995 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

412 Autos for Sale

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

VOLKSWAGEN `09 Beetle. Excellent condition. $16,500. CHEVY EQUINOX ‘05. Very good shape, new brakes. $13,000 (570) 262-8863

CHEVY`75 CAMARO

FORD `52 COUNTRY SEDAN CUSTOM LINE

STATION WAGON V8, automatic, 8 passenger, 3rd seat, good condition, 2nd owner. REDUCED TO $6,500. 570-579-3517 570-455-6589

FORD ‘28 MODEL A Sport Coupe.

Rumble Seat. Professionally Restored. Ford Blue with tan canvas top. $15,225 570-339-1552 after 5:00pm

MERCEDES 1975

Good interior & exterior. Runs great! New tires. Many new parts. Moving, Must Sell. $2,300 or best offer 570-693-3263 Ask for Paul

Must Sell! Appraised for $9,200 • All original

45,000 miles • 350 Rocket engine • Fender skirts • Always garaged Will sell for $6,000 Serious inquires only 570690-0727

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

FORD `90 TRUCK

17’ box. Excellent running condition. Very Clean. $4,300. Call 570-287-1246

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with GMC ‘98 SIERRA 3500 Convertible 4WD Stake Side,

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. $28,000. Call 825-6272

MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR

6 cylinder automatic. 52k original miles. Florida car. $1500. 570-899-1896

350 V8, Auto. 75,000 miles on current engine. 12' wood bed, body, tires, interior good. Excellent running condition. New generator, starter, battery. Just tuned and inspected. $6,900. Call 570-656-1080

439

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON `03 NIGHTTRAIN New rear tire. Very good condition. 23K miles. $8,500. Call 570-510-1429

AUTO SERVICE

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

DIRECTORY

9999999

570-955-5792

VOLVO `06 XC90 AWD, navigation, 2 NISSAN `08 XTERRA DVD’s, white/beige Grey, Mint condition.

35K miles. New, allseason tires. Sirius radio. 2 sets of mats, including cargo mats. $18,400. Call 570-822-3494 or 570-498-0977

OLDSMOBILE `97 CUTLASS SUPREME Museum kept, never

driven, last Cutlass off the GM line. Crimson red with black leather interior. Every available option including sunroof. Perfect condition. 300 original miles. $21,900 or best offer. Call 570-650-0278

PONTIAC `04 VIBE

White. New manual transmission & clutch. Front wheel drive. 165k highway miles. Great on gas. Good condition, runs well. $3,000 or best offer 570-331-4777

leather seats, heated front seat, 7 passenger, all power options, moon roof, 70K miles. Balance of 100,000 mile warranty. Must see to appreciate! $19,850. TRADE WELCOME. 570-829-3929 20 Scott St, Wilkes-Barre

new. Sun roof, CD loader, all power. 98,000 miles, $2,950, OBO 570-702-6023

VOLVO 850 ‘95 WAGON Runs good, air, automatic, fair shape. $1,800. 347-693-4156

AFFORDABLE FEES Divorce DUI Adoption BANKRUPTCY debt relief agency helping people file bankruptcy IRS Tax Disputes Attorney Marjorie Barlow 570-344-6543

BANKRUPTCY

FREE CONSULT

Guaranteed Low Fees Payment Plan! Colleen Metroka 570-592-4796 Bankruptcy $595 Guaranteed Low Fees www.BkyLaw.net Atty Kurlancheek 825-5252 W-B

468

Auto Parts

310

Attorney Services

INSURANCE ESTIMATES COLLISION REPAIRS FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

Phone 570-823-2211 Fax: 570-824-0553

105 West Saylor Ave Plains, PA 18702

472

Auto Services

$ WANTED JUNK $ VEHICLES LISPI TOWING All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

570-574-1275

Call 829-7130 To Place Your Ad Attorney Services

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY

FREE PICKUP

Don’t Keep Your Practice a Secret!

Auto Repair

RICK’S BODY SHOP

VOLVO `95 940 STATIONWAGON Looks and runs like

LAW DIRECTORY

310

470

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

We pick up 822-0995

VITO’S & GINO’S Like New Tires $15 & UP! Like New Batteries $20 & UP! Carry Out Price 288-8995

WANTED

Cars & Full Size Trucks. For prices... Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562

DIVORCE No Fault $295 divorce295.com Atty. Kurlancheek 800-324-9748 W-B ESTATE PLANNING /ADMINISTRATION

Real Estate & Civil Litigation Attorney Ron Wilson 570-822-2345 Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

468

Auto Parts

468

Auto Parts

Harry’s U Pull It

AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES***** PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED VEHICLES!!! DRIVE IN PRICES Call for Details (570) 459-9901 Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!

Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!! DRAWING TO BE HELD DECEMBER 31 www.wegotused.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012 PAGE 3G

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N 2012 S C AN H ERE FO R S ERVIC E S PEC IAL S

NO W TA KING R ESER VA TIO NS FO R TH E A LL NEW A LL

ELEC TR IC NISSA N LEA F

HAS ARRIVED !

TH E Y EA R M AY H AVE C H A N G ED B U T TH E D EA LS K EEP O N

ROLLING ROLLING 2012 N 2012 NISSAN ISSAN V VERSA ERSA 1 1.8S .8S

STK#N 21327 M O D EL# 11412 M SR P $17,190

2012 N 2012 NISSAN ISSAN S SENTRA ENTRA 2.0SL 2.0SL

HATCHBACK HATCHBACK

STK#N 20792 M O D EL# 12312 M SR P $22,860

3

A VA IL A B L E A T TH IS P R IC E

$

B U Y FO R

15 ,9 9 5

*

W / $5 0 0 N M AC AP R R EB ATE AN D G ET 1.9 % FO R 6 0 M O N TH S

A VA IL A B L E A T TH IS P R IC E

OR

$

L EAS E FOR

169

*

B U Y FO R

P ER M O. 18 ,9 9 5 $

*

W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $5 0 0 N M AC CAS H

P lu s Ta x.

OR

$

L EAS E FOR

199

*

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

*$199 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $13,030.20; m u s t b e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity. Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50

2012 N 2012 NISSAN ISSAN A ALTIMA LTIMA 2 2.5S .5S SEDAN SEDAN

2011 N 2011 NISSAN ISSAN M MAXIMA AXIMA S SV VS SPORT PORT SDN SDN STK#N 20831 M O D EL# 16211 M SR P $37,825

O VER 30 A VA IL A B L E A T TH IS P R IC E

B U Y FO R

19 ,0 5 6

*

W / $15 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $75 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

OR

$

L EAS E FOR

199

*

2011 N 2011 NISSAN ISSAN 370Z 370Z C COUPE OUPE

P ER M O. 3 0 ,8 2 5 W / $2 5 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $5 0 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

P lu s Ta x.

$

STK#N 21073 M O D EL# 22211 M SR P $23,905 4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

M U ST BE SEEN!

3 4 ,5 8 0

$

*

319

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

SA VE $3000 O FF M SR P !

B U Y FO R

2 0 ,9 0 5

*

W / $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE *S a le Price p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .

2011 N 2011 NISSAN ISSAN M MURANO URANO S A AWD WD 3

$

*

L A ST 2011 ROGUE A VA IL A B L E!

*S a le Price p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .

STK#N 20706 M O D EL# 23211 M SR P $32,130

OR

L EAS E FOR

2011 N 2011 NISSAN ISSAN R ROGUE OGUE S A AWD WD

W/ W/ SPORT SPORT PKG PKG

B U Y FO R

*

*$319 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $18,156; m u s t b e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity. Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $2300 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .

L A ST 2011 Z W ITH C U STO M INTER IO R !

V6, 6 S p eed , S p o rtPkg, Cu s to m L ea ther, Hea ted S ea ts , Cu s to m Hea d lin er, Am a zin g On e OfA K in d Z!!!

SA VE $7000 O FF M SR P !

B U Y FO R

$

*$199 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $12,862.80; m u s t b e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity. Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $825 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .

STK#N 20833 M O D EL# 41161 M SR P $38,580

L A ST 2011 M A XIM A

V6, CVT , S p o rtPkg, L ea ther, M o o n ro o f, Bo s e, Allo ys , F lo o r M a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s , M u ch M o re!

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, 20% F lo o rM a ts & O FF! S p la s h Gu a rd s

2011 N 2011 NISSAN ISSAN P PATHFINDER ATHFINDER S SV V4 4X4 X4 STK#N 21000 M O D EL# 25211 M SR P $34,930

A T TH IS P R IC E! LA ST O NES!

V6, AW D, CVT , PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts , S p la s h Gu a rd s , & M u ch M o re!

$

L EA TH ER , M O O NR O O F & NA VIG A TIO N

*$169 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $9282.60; m u s t b e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity. Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50

STK#N 20558 M O D EL# 13112 M SR P $23,820

$

5

4 Cyl, CVT , Na viga tio n , Au d io Pkg, L ea ther, S p cl Va lu e Pkg, F lo o r M a ts , S p la s h Gu a rd s a n d M u ch M o re!

4 Cyl, Au to , A/ C, Plu s Pkg, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts , Ca rgo Orga n izer, M u ch M o re!

!

SA VE $6000 O R M O R E O N A L L 2011 P A TH FINDER S!

V6, Au to , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, Allo ys , F lo o rM a ts & T ru n k M a t

B U Y FO R

2 5 ,9 9 5 OR $ *

W / $2 5 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $5 0 0 N M AC CAS H

L EAS E FOR

299

*

$

P ER M O.

B U Y FO R

2 8 ,9 3 0

W / $2 5 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE

P lu s Ta x.

*$299 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $14,779.80; m u s t b e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity. Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1700 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .

*

OR

$

L EAS E FOR

329

*

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

*$199 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $14,670.60; m u s t b e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity. Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $3300 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .

SEN SATIO N AL SAVIN G S O N ALL 2012’S!

*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils . **As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f O c t2 0 11. All Pric es b a s ed o n im m ed ia te d elivery in s to c k vehic le o nly. All o ffers ex pire 1/3 1/12 .

Th e

#1 N

K E N

N

is s a n

De a le rin

P O L L O CK

IS S A

N

N

.E. PA

1-8 66-70 4-0 672

229 M U N DY S TRE E T W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .

w w w .ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om

®


PAGE 4G

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

AM E ER RI CA CA ’ S

N EW EW

CA CA R

A LTER LTER N A ATI TI V E

YOU CA N’T M ISS W ITH P RICES LIK E TH IS! CAR S 2 010 FORD F150 CREW CA B 4 X 4 TR U CK S VEH ICL ES

CO N VER TIB L ES S U V’S VAN S

IN AL L P R ICE R AN G ES

P W , P L , Au to, Air

MSRP W H EN N EW

$

OU R P R ICE

$34,755

24,755

*

D on ’t M a k e A $10 ,0 0 0 M is ta k e

TTHH EER ERR EE’ E’’SS NN OO WW OO RR RR IIEES ESS WW IITTHH NN AATTIIOO NN WW IIDD EE! E!!

YOO UR Y U R SAT SAT ISFAC SFA C T IO N IS O U UR R G UARANT U A R A N T EE. EE. 2 011 DODGE DA K OTA QUA D CA B ( BIG H ORN ED.)

2 011 GM C CA NYON CREW CA B

#18372, Alloys, P W , P L , 4x4, V6

#18378, Alloys, P W , P L , 4x4, Au to

N OW

$

21,326 *

2 011 JEEP GR A ND CH EROK EE A W D

$

#18432, L eather, S u n roof, H. S eats, S yn c S tereo

25,48 8 * 2 011 NISSA N P ATH FINDER SV

#18446, Alloys, P W , P L , K eyless

#18441, Alloys, 3rd Row, RearAir, 4x4, Au to

$

23,98 9 *

N OW

2 010 TOYOTA COROLLA S

#18404, Au to, P . W in d ow s, P . L ocks, K eyless En try

$

13,993 *

#18438, L eather, Alloys, RearS p oiler, P W , P L

14,68 8 *

#18429, Alloys, CD , P . W in d ow s

18 ,539

*

#18383, L eather, M oon roof, Alloys, P . S eat, Au to, On ly 29K M iles

$

17,8 99

*

Au to, P . W in d ow s, P . L ocks, Certified ! 3 L eftTo Choose F rom !

N OW

2 011 HYUNDA ISA NTA FEAW D Alloys, K eyless En try, Rem ain d erofF actory W arran ty, 4 To Choose F rom

20 ,955 *

2 010 V OLV O S4 0

#18409, Au to, M oon roof, Alloys, Rem ain d erofF actory W arran ty

$

2 009 H YUNDA I A CCENT

#18325, Alloys, CD , P . W in d ow s, K eyless En try

16,8 8 8 *

N OW

$

M ANAG ER’S SPECIAL!

2 009 H UM M ER H 3 4X 4

N OW

#18421, Au to, P . W in d ow s, P . L ocks, CD , K eyless En try

$

14,98 7

*

$

#18418, Au to, P . W in d ow s, K eyless En try, CD

$

14,975 *

2 008 SUBA RU LEGACY LIM ITED

#18346, AW D , L eather, S u n roof, Heated S eats

$

#18384, Alloys, P W , P L , CD

N OW

$

20 ,599

*

#18443, 7 P assen ger, P w rRearL iftgate

$

2 010 H YUNDA ISONATA GLS $

13,792 *

13,390 *

2 011 DODGE DURA NGO CREW 4 X 4

16,990 *

#18734, P W , P L , CD , K eyless

12,998 *

2 010 K IA FORTE EX

Au to, P . W in d ow s, P . L ocks, 2 To Choose F rom

*

18 ,58 8 *

#18344, Au to, Alloys, P . W in d ow s, P . L ocks

22,8 65 * $

$

2 010 CH EV Y COBA LT LT

#18370, 7 P assen ger, P . W in d ow s, K eyless En try, L ow M iles

$

N OW

2 010 H ONDA CIV IC LX SEDA N

#18371, S u n roof, K eyless, P W , P L , CD

2 010 V OLK SW AGEN JETTA

#18391, V6, Alloys, P . W in d ow s, K eyless En try

9,999 *

2 010 CH EV Y TRAV ERSE AW D

17,98 4 * 12,98 8

$

21,98 6 *

2 011 JEEP LIBERTY SP ORT 4 X 4

#18296, Au to, Air, CD , S at. Rad io

13,8 90 *

2 010 H YUNDA IELA NTRA GLS $

2 008 H ONDA ACCORD EX L

2 010 DODGE CA LIBER SX T

2 011 H YUNDA I SONATA GLS

26,78 5 *

$

2 011 DODGE NITRO 4 X 4 $

$

$

2 010 DODGE AV ENGER R/T $

$

N OW

2 011 CH EV Y EQUINOX LT AW D

N OW

21,326 *

2 010 FORD FLEX SEL

Alloys, K eyless En try, P . S eat, All New D esign , 4 To Choose F rom

N OW

$

N OW

27,914 *

2 010 CHRYSLER SEBRING TOURING

#18240, L ow M iles, Alloys, P ow erTop , CD , Au tom atic

$

15,765 *

H U R R Y! S A L E EN D S D EC 3 0 TH FIN AN CIN G AS L O W AS

1.9

%

AP R

V IS IT O U R 2 N D L O C ATIO N AT 2 M ER ED ITH S TR EET, C A R B O N D A L E, P A

CH ECK OU T OU R FU L L IN VEN TOR Y B U Y N AATION T I O N W IIDD E OF B OTH L OCATION S AT AANN D S AAVE VE n a tio n w id e c a rs a le s .n e t M on d a y- Frid a y 9 a m - 8 p m S a tu rd a y 9 a m - 5 p m

2 9 0 M U N D Y S TR EET, W IL K ES - B A R R E AT TH E W YO M IN G VA L L EY M A L L

TTHH OOUU S AANN D S !

C A L L 3 0 1- C A R S

PRICES + TAX & TAGS. ARTWORK FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. OFFERS END 12/31/11.

OVER

20 0

VEH ICL ES AVAIL AB L E

Ou r Volu m e S a ve s You

$$$

Eve ryd a y!


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com 439

Motorcycles

BMW 2010 K1300S

Only 460 miles! Has all bells & whistles. Heated grips, 12 volt outlet, traction control, ride adjustment on the fly. Black with lite gray and red trim. comes with BMW cover, battery tender, black blue tooth helmet with FM stereo and black leather riding gloves (like new). paid $20,500. Sell for

442 RVs & Campers

SUNLINE SOLARIS `91

25’ travel trailer A/C. Bunk beds. New fridge & hot water heater. Excellent condition. $3,900. 570-466-4995

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

Leave message.

DAELIM 20064,700 06 CHEVY COLORADO 150 CCs. miles. 70 MPG. New battery & tires. CREW CAB Z71 $1,500; negotiable. 78K MILES. HARLEY 2011 HERITAGE SOFTTAIL Black. 1,800 miles. ABS brakes. Security System Package. $16,000 firm. SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY 570-704-6023

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 Electra Glide, Ultra Classic, many chrome accessories, 13k miles, Metallic Emerald Green. Garage kept, like new condition. Includes Harley cover. $12,900 570-718-6769 570-709-4937

NEWER 31-10-15 HANKOOK TIRES. 4WD, AUTO, POWER WINDOWS LOCKS. TRUCK RUNS LIKE NEW. 5 CYLINDER GREAT ON GAS HAVE LEER CAP & NERF BARS AND BED LINER, CD, AIR LIGHT BLUE WITH BLUE INTERIOR. $14,500 570-575-5087 OR 570-718-1834

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

CADILLAC `99 ESCALADE 97k miles. Black

with beige leather interior. 22” rims. Runs great. $8,500 Call 570-861-0202

HARLEY DAVIDSON CHEVROLET `07 EQUINOXwith AWD gray LT ‘03 Dyna Wide Glide Maroon Excellent condition garage kept! Golden Anniversary - silver/black. New Tires. Extras. 19,000 miles. Must Sell! $10,000. 570-639-2539

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05 V-ROD VRSCA

Blue pearl, excellent condition, 3,100 miles, factory alarm with extras. $10,500. or best offer. Tony 570-237-1631

interior. Remote start, cruise, AC, tilt wheel, power windows & locks, AM/FM/CD. New inspection. New tires, brakes and routers. Well maintained car. Will provide CarFax & maintenance records. $9,500 (570) 332-6728

CHEVROLET `08 LT HSoft ARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80 AWD.EQUINOX 92,000 miles. riding FLH. King of the Highway! Mint original antique show winner. Factory spot lights, wide white tires, biggest Harley built. Only 28,000 original miles! Never needs inspection, permanent registration. $7,995 OBO 570-905-9348

HONDA ‘84 XL200R

8,000 original miles, excellent condition. $1,000. 570-379-3713

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

V6. Silver. CD changer. Power locks. Keyless entry. $12,000 (570) 814-0462

CHEVY `99 SILVERADO

Auto. V6 Vortec. Standard cab. 8’ bed with liner. Dark Blue. 98,400 miles. $5,500 or best offer 570-823-8196

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY 05 SILVERADO

2WD. Extra cab. Highway miles. Like new! $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

MOTO cc. GUZZI `03 1,100 1,900

miles. Full dress. Shaft driven. Garage kept. Excellent condition. $6000. Health Problems. Call 570-654-7863

POLARIS ‘00 VICTORY CRUISER 14,000 miles,

92 V-twin, 1507 cc, extras $6000. 570-883-9047

442 RVs & Campers

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC NOW BACK IN PA.

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, , awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

CHEVY ‘10 EQUINOX LT

Moonroof. Alloys. 1 Owner. $19,995

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

CHEVY ‘99 BLAZER

Sport utility, 4 door, four wheel drive, ABS, new inspection. $4200. 570-709-1467

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHRYSLER 02 TOWN & COUNTRY V6. Like new!

R/T. AWD. Alloys. $14,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

FORD `04 EXPLORER

Eddie Bauer Edition 59,000 miles, 4 door, 3 row seats, V6, all power options, moon roof, video screen $12,999. 570-690-3995 or 570-287-0031

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘97 F150 4X4 Auto. V6. New

570-735-1487 WE PAY THE MOST IN CASH

FORD ‘00 EXPLORER XLT. CD. Power

seats. Extra Clean! $3,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

To place your ad call...829-7130

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

750

Jewelry

JACKO’S

Paying Top Cash Dollar for Your Gold & Silver!

$1 Gold Coin paying $100 to $500 & up $2.50 Gold Coin paying $600-$1,000 & up $3 Gold Coin paying $500 to $1,000 & up $5 Gold Coin paying $600 to $3,000 & up $10 Gold Coin paying $1,200 to $2,200 & up $20 Gold Coin paying $1,900 to $4,000 & up Also paying top dollar for scrap gold & silver.

Š Š Š Š Š Š

570-855-7197

570-328-3428

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

JEEPAuto. 04 LIBERTY V6.

Black Beauty! $6,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

JEEP ‘06 WRANGLER Only 29K miles! $16,495

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

JEEP ‘07 GRAND CHEROKEE

4WD & Alloys. $15,880

wheel drive. 5 speed. 6 cylinder. Like new! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD 02 F150 Extra Cab. 6

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

JEEP 98 CHEROKEE SPORT

2 door. 4x4. 6 cylinder. Auto. Like new! $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

LEXUS `06 GX 470

Cypress Pearl with ivory leather interior. Like new condition, garage kept. All service records. All options including premium audio package, rear climate control, adjustable suspension, towing package, rear spoiler, Lexus bug guard. 52,000 miles.

$25,995

(570) 237-1082

Cylinder, 5 speed. Air. 2WD. $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

GMC `05 SAVANA

1500 Cargo Van. AWD. V8 automatic. A/C. New brakes & tires. Very clean. $10,750. Call 570-474-6028

HONDA 06 CRV SE Leather & Moonroof. $14,990

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HYUNDAI ‘06 SANTE FE LTD

Leather. Moonroof. One owner. $13,450

speed. 23 MPG. 102K highway miles. Silver with black interior. Immaculate condition, inside and out. Garage kept. No rust, maintenance records included. 4wd, all power. $6,900 or best offer, trades will be considered. Call 570-575-0518

RANGE ROVER ‘07 SPORT Supercharged

59,000 miles, fully loaded. Impeccable service record. $36,000 570-283-1130

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

ALL JUNK CAR & TRUCKS WANTED Highest Prices Paid In Cash!!! FREE REMOVAL Call V&G Anytime 288-8995

600 FINANCIAL 610

FORD 01 F150 XLT Extra cab. 2

JEEP `03 Rare. LIBERTY5 SPORT.

Jewelry

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

750

new! $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

BUYING 11am to 6pm

39 Prospect St • Nanticoke

JEEP 03 LIBERTY 4x4. Sunroof. Like

inspection! $4,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

451

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

DODGE 07 CALIBER

AWD. 1 owner. $17,880

price! $3,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

Only 13K miles! Remote Starter. $19,995

HONDA ‘09 CRV LX

CHEVY 99 SILVERADO 4X4 Auto. V8. Bargain

451

TOYOTA 09 RAV 4

$5,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

$15,000 FIRM. Call 570-262-0914

Call 570-288-1246 or 570-328-6897

451

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012 PAGE 5G

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

MAZDA 03 MPV VAN V6. CD Player.

1 owner vehicle!! $2,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

NISSAN `04 PATHFINDER ARMADA Excellent condition.

Too many options to list. Runs & looks excellent. $10,995 570-655-6132 or 570-466-8824

SUBARU `03 BAJA

Sport Utility 4 door pickup. 68K. AWD. 4 cylinder. 2.5 Litre engine. 165hp. Bedliner & cover. Premium Sound. $10,700. Call 570-474-9321 or 570-690-4877

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

SUZUKI `03 XL-7

BEER & LIQUOR LICENSE FOR SALE LUZERNE COUNTY $22,000 For More Info Call 570-332-1637 or 570-332-4686

TAX REFUND COMING?

INVEST IN YOURSELF WITH JAN – PRO Quote from current Franchisee, “I started with a small investment & I have grown my business over 600%. It definitely changed my life and I would recommend Jan-Pro.” * Guaranteed Clients * Steady Income * Insurance & Bonding * Training & Ongoing Support * Low Start Up Costs * Accounts available throughout WilkesBarre & Scranton

570-824-5774

Jan-Pro.com

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649

RECESSION PROOF BUSINESS Enter the exciting

world of insurance restoration. Complete training in emergency & structural repairs. NJ based Co. Call for franchise package

1-800-298-6688

630 Money To Loan “We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

700 MERCHANDISE 708

85K. 4x4. Auto. Nice, clean interior. Runs good. New battery & brakes. All power. CD. $6,800 570-762-8034 570-696-5444

SUZUKI `07 XL-7 56,000 miles,

automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, all power, CD player, leather interior, tinted windows, custom wheels, $13,000 Call 570-829-8753 Before 5:00 p.m.

TOYOTA 02 TACOMA 4WD. SR5. TRD. V-6. $11,425

Antiques & Collectibles

$ ANTIQUES BUYING $

Old Toys, model kits, Bikes, dolls, guns, Mining Items, trains & Musical Instruments, Hess. 474-9544 COINS. Walking Liberty halves, 1936D, 1939P,1939S,1938p1947p $80. 570-287-4135 YEARBOOKS: From most area schools. 1930’s to recent years. $25 and up 570-825-4721

710 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Business Opportunities

Appliances

APPLIANCE PA RT S E T C .

Used appliances. Parts for all brands. 223 George Ave. Wilkes-Barre 570-820-8162

710

Appliances

MICROWAVE GE over range, 7 months old, white, excellent condition $75. 570-474-0281 570-371-1866 Why Spend Hundreds on New or Used Appliances? Most problems with your appliances are usually simple and inexpensive to fix! Save your hard earned money, Let us take a look at it first! 30 years in the business. East Main Appliances 570-735-8271 Nanticoke

712

Baby Items

CRIB F.P. 3 In 1 travel tender crib or playpen $20. 570-654-4113

716

Building Materials

DECK treated wood. you pick up FREE Harding area. 570-287-8410

720

Cemetery Plots/Lots

MEMORIAL SHRINE CEMETERY 6 Plots Available

May be Separated Rose Lawn Section $450 each 570-654-1596

MEMORIAL SHRINE

LOTS FOR SALE 6 lots available at Memorial Shrine Cemetery. $2,400. Call 717-774-1520 SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY

724 Cellular Phones

APPLE IPHONE 4 S Brand new with

64GB Memory and Apple iPad 2, 64GB with wifi-3g this are factory unlocked with Complete accessories (Well packed & sealed in original company box) and can be used with any network provider of your choice Email: order@tradebitlimited.com or skype: wg.fields for more information.

726

Clothing

CLOTHING boys size 2T blanket sleepers; 9 total; $12. excellent condition Men’s large long sleeve dress shirts (Chaps, Eddie Bauer, Natica, Perry Ellis) excellent condition; asking $5 each 570-333-0966

COAT

KENNETH COLE Beige, size 6, hardly worn. $75. 570-855-5385 COAT men’s Columbia warm green color coat size xl $10. Girls brown London Fog jacket, hood & flowers embroided on 1 sleeve, size 7-8 asking $10. 570-650-8710 Designer Clothes at Discount prices. Your favorite current styles. Convenient, local fashions, with no shipping or return hassles. Wed., Fri. & Sat. 11 - 5 Thurs. 12 - 6 100 Wyoming Ave. Wyoming, PA

730

Computer Equipment & Software

LAPTOP Used Gateway P4 XP Pro 3Ghz w/1 Gig RAM, 80Gig HD, DVD Burner and 15” Screen. Loaded with Office 2007. $225. 283-2552

732

Exercise Equipment

TREADMILL Lifestyler Expanse 2000 0-10 MPH speed, 2.5 hp motor, power incline, programmable speed & incline. Paid $1,000. Sacrifice for $400. 570-675-4777

744

744

Furniture & Accessories

DESK, wood computer desk , pull out keyboard tray, lower shelf to hold tower off the floor, has rollers for easy moving 31 1/2”w x 19 1/2”d x 55 1/2 “h $40. Maple 3 shelf open back book stand 9 p3/4”w x 23 1/2”l x 28 1/2”h $20. Wooden lamp with shade hangs on wall, $20. Kaz cool moisture humidifier with air cleaning filter, 20-24 hour operation, on-off switch, directional spout $15. 570-288-8689 DINING TABLES 3 2 with extensions for $35. each. 1 dark finish oval for $25. Antique dressing table $35. 570-825-3888 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, oak, $60. Call Mark at 570301-3484 or Allison at 631-6635. ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, oak, 46” h, 40”w. Will hold up to 26” TV, has drawers & shelves, excellent condition. $50. 570-696-1703

FURNISH FOR LESS

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607 KITCHEN SET solid light wood with white legs, excellent condition, asking $125. 570-639-3151 LAMPS (2) parlor stand up, grey metal & black. $25 each. 570-740-1246 LAMPS 2 large living room lamps, brass base with cream colored shade, brand new asking $30 each or $50 for pair. Call 570-239-9945 LAMPS set of 2 brass table lamps with cream color shades. Paid $85 each asking $50 for pair. Great condition. Call 474-0753 LOVE SEAT, white $100. Kitchen Table marble top $300. Queen Waterbed mattress & heater $100.570-655-8598

BED FRAME full size, headboard, maple, good condition $50. 570-824*5114 after 4pm BRAND NEW P-TOP QUEEN MATTRESS SET!! Still in bags! $150!! MUST SELL!! Call Steve @ 280-9628!! CAPTAIN bed, twin maple, headboard, 2 large drawers on side & 4 small in back $100. 570256-7943 or 570266-9155 (cell) COUCH & sleeper loveseat, blue print, fair condition $50 for both 696-0187 END TABLE $20. 570-654-4113

WILKES-BARRE

82 DIVISION STREET Sat. & Sun. Jan. 7th & 8th 9 am - 4 pm Uncommon Mansion Estate Sale of Prominent Family. From 1920 to 1990, they lived like royalty. Since then, much was left untouched. Fine Antique Furniture. Vintage Jew-elry. Significant Porcelains & China. Antique Dolls. MidCentury Decoratives & Furniture Galore. Art Glass. Crystal. Hat Vases. Couture Dresses. Antique Linen Collection. Couture Hats, Purses & more! Near Hanover Cross Rds. From Old River Rd., turn left at KFC. Left on Lee Park Ave. right on Division St. House next to corner. No early birds. SO MUCH FOR EVERYONE. NOT TO BE MISSED!

752 Landscaping & Gardening SOLID PAVER BRICKS for side walks, red with variations. Approximate 936 available. $0.30 each. Call 696-1267.

754

Machinery & Equipment

ENGINE 3 HP Briggs & Stratton engine in good condition mounted on a 2 wheel sprayer with hose & nozzle that needs work. $75. 570-693-1918 SNOW BLOWER Ariens Model SS 322, electric start $175. 570-574-9633 SNOW THROWER Ariens 7hp electric start, tire chains, 24” cut just serviced, runs well $395. 570-636-3151 SNOWBLOWER ATTACHMENT 42” for the FASTATTACH lawn tractor includes chains & weights. Free to go. Used one season. 570-563-3081

758 Miscellaneous

FREE AD POLICY

The Times Leader will accept ads for used private party merchandise only for items totaling $1,000 or less. All items must be priced and state how many of each item. Your name address, email and phone number must be included. No ads for ticket sales accepted. Pet ads accepted if FREE ad must state FREE. One Submission per month per household. You may place your ad online at timesleader.com, or email to classifieds@ timesleader.com or fax to 570-831-7312 or mail to Classified Free Ads: 15 N. Main Street, WilkesBarre, PA. Sorry no phone calls.

MOVING! I F S

MANY TEMS OR ALE! Curio cabinet, armoire, dresser & mirror, night stand & lamps, complete queen bed set, couch, tv’s with remotes (several sizes), stereo/ record player with records, used fridge washing machine, & electric stove with hood, humidifiers, silverware and small appliances (coffee maker, toaster, blender, etc). (570) 872-3483 PHONE: hearing impaired phone (MiracleEar) $25 Opentech (miracle phone) for the hearing impaired l, instructional video also included, $25. Milk can with lid, painted black has decal, good condition $30. Hamilton Beach slow cooker $10. Soup tureen & ladle $8. Electric Mr Coffee 12 cup $8. Micro Perk microwave coffee maker makes 4 cup, additional glass maker $5. Beautiful 2 piece wall planter by syrocco $25. 570-650-8710

Medical Equipment

RAMPS pair of aluminum loading ramps for loading quad/lawn tractor, like new $100. KerSun Omni 104 kero heater 18,500 BTUs, good condition $50. 570-574-9633

Twin sets: $159 Full sets: $179 Queen sets: $199 All New American Made 570-288-1898

POWER CHAIR Jazzy Select, $500. WALKER with wheels $45. 570-829-2411

SEWING MACHINE Columbia commercial blind stitch, good condition. $200. 655-0404

SOFA matching sofa & chair and a half, good condition $350 for both. Coffee table, 2 end tables $200 for all 3 tables. 239-2376

758 Miscellaneous

MATTRESS SALE

We Beat All Competitors Prices!

Mattress Guy

TV Armoire with lighted curio on top $75. 570-954-2712

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

EDWARDSVILLE Vendor & Craft Market 681 Main Street Vendors wanted & space available for crafts. Open every day but Monday. DESIGNER CLOTHING, CARS, TOYS, SOFT AIR GUNS, AVON, MANY NEW MISC ITEMS, CIOLLECTIBLES & MORE 570-417-1269 570-855-2703

LUZERNE

Furniture & Accessories

BED FRAME classic style, queen size raised panel, headboard, footboard & side rails. Black wood finish. Asking $200. assembly required, easy instructions included. 570-283-3086

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets

177 Main Street Sat., Jan 7th, 10-4 Sun., Jan. 8th, 10-1 Furniture, household items, tools, golf clubs, dirt bike, & much, much more!

FindYourIdeal Employee!Placean adandendthe search! 570-829-7130 askforanemploymentspecialist

756

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275 BEDLINER & tailgate cover, 5 star, over rail, 7’ bed, great condition, off 83 Ranger, fits others, White Haven. $50. 570-443-9766 BEDLINER: 89 Chevy S10 truck bedliner, standard 6’ cab $15. Battery charger 6/12 volt, 2/6 amp, new $25. Chevy small block headers with gaskets $20 both. Holley 4 barrel carb 600 cfm rebuilt $90. Gong Show movie DVD $10. Large frameless mirror 36”X42” $40. 5 storm windows $15. 570-740-1246 BEDROOM SET Thomasville 7 drawer bureau with mirror, 2 matching night stands $300. obo 570-994-7921 CANES & walking/ hiking sticks made from slippery maple trees, different shapes & sizes, 30+ available $4 & $5. each. CHRISTMAS ITEMS & household items over 200 available, flowers, vases, wreaths, lights, glasses, knick-knacks, lamps, candles, 4 piece luggage set, electric watches, belt trimmer all for $55. 570-735-2081. CARRIER Sears Black X-Cargo Sport 20 car top carrier with lock and key. Measures 67 1/2 x 26 1/4 x 20 1/4. Excellent condition. Asking $125. 570-829-4776 GLASS DOOR. 4 way glass door for bath tub. $25 570-331-8183

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130 LUGGAGE Samsonite Spinner 21” carry on asking $70. 570-825-5440 POPCORN BUTTER SERVER automatic $295. 570-636-3151 RECORDS LPs, 78s, 45s, 60s, 70s, 80s & 90’s. $1. each.. 829-2411

TIRES 2 used Winterforce 215/70R15 tires on rims from 2000 Chevy Venture $80. 570-474-0935 TV STAND black, glass shelves top & bottom 44”l x 22”w x 20”h, like new condition $75.654-

784

Tools

RETROFIT LASER guide for most 10” miter saws, works great! $10. call 570-696-1267

792

Video Equipment

BLU-RAY PLAYERS with streaming video, wifi, remote, manual, 1 Sony, 1 Sharp $25 each. Curtis 13.3” LCD TV remote, manual $20 Both like new. 570-833-2598

794

Video Game Systems/Games

RAGE Anarchy Edition for PS3. Brand new in factory packaging. Comes with 2 codes to download Wasteland sewer mission & Anarchy Edition Pack $50. 570-793-7085 Wii - (2) Bowling Balls, brand new $5 each. CHARGER, Nyko for Wii, 4 ports with batteries and covers. Like new $15. 570-693-2612 XBOX 360 firmware installed. 4 games included-$350. DVD player Toshiba, remote excellent condition $15. 570-472-1646

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

PAYING TOP DOLLAR for Your Gold, Silver, Scrap Jewelry, Sterling Flatware, Diamonds, Old High School Rings, Foreign & American Paper Money & Coins. WE WILL BEAT PRICES! We Buy Tin and Iron Toys, Vintage Coke Machines, Vintage Brass, Cash Registers, Old Costume Jewelry, Slot Machines, Lionel Trains & Antique Firearms. IF YOU THINK IT’S OLD BRING IT IN, WE WILL GIVE YOU A PRICE. COME SEE US AT 134 RTE. 11, Larksville 570-855-7197 570-328-3428

The Video Game Store 28 S. Main W.B. Open Mon- Sat, 12pm – 6pm 570-822-9929 / 570-941-9908

$$ CASH PAID $$ VIDEO GAMES & SYSTEMS Highest $$ Paid

776 Sporting Goods

Guaranteed Buying all video games & systems. PS1 & 2, Xbox, Nintendo, Atari, Coleco, Sega, Mattel, Gameboy, Vectrex etc. DVD’s, VHS & CDs & Pre 90’s toys,

BIKE ProForm XP70 exercise bike & Proform 675 cardiocross trainer elliptical both like new. $75. each. 570- 696-9979

1150 S. Main Scranton Mon - Sat, 12pm – 6pm 570-822-9929

762

Musical Instruments

PIANO/UPRIGHT FREE. MOVING 570-479-1810

EVERLAST HEAVY BAG with chain $40. 570-954-2712 FOOSEBALL TABLE, very good condition, $75. OBO. 570-262-7923 GOLF BAG, Precise professional, black/ navy standup bag, putter tube, ball holder, 6 pockets in excellent condition. $20. 570-696-1267.

GOLF CLUBS Callaway X-20 Flighted 5.5 iron set 4-PW steel shafts $125 Ben Hogan BH-5 iron set 3-PW graphite shafts $75. Taylor Made Burner 2.0, 6 iron, new. $35.498-4556 Snowboard Millennium 3 with Bindings with Burton snow board boots, size 9. $199. Nike Mercurial’s Soccer Spikes size 10 paid $159 will sell $50. Call Mark at 570-3013484 or Allison at 631-6635. TONY LITTLE AB lounge extreme paid $160. sell $90. still in box.288-9889

780

Televisions/ Accessories

TELEVISION: GE. 28” works good, needs remote $80. 570-740-1246 TV BRACKETS, wall mount, 1 holds large set $39. 1 for smaller set $29. 570-636-3151 TV Phillips 32” HD wide screen, flat front, tube $50. 570-696-0187 TV Sylvania 15” LCD TV/DVD 6 tear $35. 570-696-0187 TVS 36” Super Scan color TV measuring 34” W, 29 1/2” H, 25” D manufactured by Sears $75. 14” RCA color TV $20. 14 w X 13” h X 14” D. 570-288-8689

The Video Game Store

VITO’S & GINO’S Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995

WANTED JEWELRY

WILKESBARREGOLD

(570)48GOLD8 (570)484-6538

Highest Cash Pay Outs Guaranteed Mon-Sat 10am -6pm C l o s e d S u n d a ys

1092 Highway 315 Blvd (Plaza 315) 315N .3 miles after Motorworld

We Pay At Least 80% of the London Fix Market Price for All Gold Jewelry

London PM Gold Price

Jan. 6: $1,616.50 Visit us at WilkesBarreGold.com Or email us at wilkesbarregold@ yahoo.com


PAGE 6G

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

0.9% for24-36 m on ths a n d 1.9% for37 to 60 m on th on a ll n e w 2012 A c c ord , Civic (e xc lud e s Hyb rid s ), Cros s tour, Fit, Od ys s e y, P ilot, a n d Rid ge lin e m od e ls $0 DO W N

G AS M ILEAG E 28 CITY/39 HW Y

G AS M ILEAG E 23 C ITY/ 34 H W Y

$0 DO W N

2012 Hon d a

2012 H on d a

CIV IC L X

$

• M odel#FB2F5C EW • 140-hp 16-V alve SO H C i-V TEC ® • 5-Speed A utom atic Transm ission • A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System • Pow er W indow s/ Locks/M irrors • C ruise C ontrol• R em ote Entry • 160-W att A M /FM /C D A udio System w ith 4 Speakers • A BS • D ual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags (SR S) • Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant Position D etection System (O PD S) • Side C urtain A irbags ***LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $12,043 .50

205/ 205/M O.***O .***

A CCO RD L X

• M odel#C P2f3C EW • 177-hp 16-V alve D O H C i-V TEC ® Engine • 5-Speed A utom atic Transm ission • Pow er W indow s/Locks/M irrors • R em ote Entry • C ruise C ontrol• A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System • 160-W att A M / FM /C D A udio System w ith 6 Speakers • V ehicle Stability A ssistTM (V SA ® ) w ith Traction C ontrol• A BS • Sual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags (SR S) • D ual-C ham ber Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant Position D etection System (O PD S) • Side C urtain A irbags

$

2219/ 19/M OO.**.**

**LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $13 ,3 11.00

G AS M ILEAG E 22 C ITY/ 30 H W Y

G AS M ILEAG E 17 CITY/24 HW Y

$0 DO W N

2012 H on d a

P IL O T L X

• 250-hp 24-V alv e SO H C i-V TEC ® • 5-Speed A utom atic Trans m is s ion • 8 Pas s enger Seating • V ariable Torque M anagem ent® 4-W heelD riv e Sy s tem (V TM -4® ) • V ehic le Stability A s s is tTM (V SA ® ) w ith Trac tion C ontrol• Pow er W Indow s /Loc k s / M irrors • Front and R ear A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration Sy s tem • 229-W att A M /FM /C D A udio Sy s tem w ith 7 Speak ers inc luding Subw oofer • R em ote Entry • A BS • D ual-Stage, M ultiple-Thres hold Front A irbags (SR S) • Front Side A irbags w ith Pas s enger-Side O c c upant Pos ition D etec tion Sy s tem (O PD S)

$

319/ 319/M O.**** O . ****

2012 Hon d a

CR-V E X

• M odelR M 4H 5C JW • 185-hp • 2.4-Liter,16-V alve SO H C i-V TEC ® 4-C ylinder Engine • R ealTim e A W D w ith Intelligent C ontrolSystem ™ • V ehicle Stability A ssist™ (V SA ® ) w ith Traction C ontrol • A utom atic Transm ission • C ruise C ontrol• A /C • O ne-Touch Pow er M oonroof w ith Tilt Feature • R em ote Entry System • Bluetooth® H andsFreeLink ® • M ulti-angle rearview cam era w ith guidelines • 160-W att A M /FM /C D A udio System w ith 6 Speakers • Bluetooth® Stream ing A udio • Pandora® Internet R adio com patibility • SM S Text M essage Function • U SB A udio Interface • A nti-Lock Braking System (A BS) • D ual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags (SR S) • Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant Position D etection System (O PD S) • Side C urtain A irbags w ith R ollover Sensor

IN S TO CK!

****LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $28,470.00

*BAS E D ON 2008-2009 E PA M IL E AGE E S T IM AT E S , RE F L E CT ING NE W E PA F UE L E CONOM Y M E T HODS BE GINNING W IT H 2008-2009 M ODE L S . US E F OR COM PARIS ON PURPOS E S ONL Y . DO NOT COM PARE T O M ODE L S BE F ORE 2008. Y OUR ACT UAL M IL E AGE W IL L VARY DE PE NDING ON HOW Y OU DRIVE AND M AINT AIN Y OUR VE HICL E . AL L OF F E RS E XPIRE 1/ 31/ 2012.

M AT AT T B U R N E H O N D A 1110 WYOMING AVE. • SCRANTON • 1-800-NEXT-HONDA w w w. M a t t B u r n e H o n d a . c o m

M A AT TT T B U UR RN N EE

H O ON N DD A A PR R EE - O W W N N EE DD

C EE N NT T EE R R

W e To o k In A lo t o f Fres h Tra de & O ff ! E R L ea s e Vehicles in D ecem ber fo r YO U E H K LO O ! t u o s A CCO R D S u 1 ..9%9% 2 ..9%9% 36 M O S.

SH SH OO PP AT AT WW WW WW ..MM ATTB ATTBUURRNNEE HH OONNDD AA. .CCOOMM 96 H O N D A C IV IC EX C PE R ed,99K M iles

N ow

$4,750

02 TO Y O TA C A M RY LE SEDA N G ray,79K M iles

$8,500

N ow

N ow

$8,950

05 HO NDA C RV LX 4W D

M oss,115K M iles

S ilver,105K M iles

$10,500

$6,950

R ed,84K M iles

06 H O N D A C IV IC LX SD N A s Traded

1.9%

R ed,99K M iles

03 HO NDA C IV IC EX C O UPE

N ow

$10,500

C CAL AL LL :1-800-N :1-800-NEE X XTH TH O ON NDD A A

H O N D A ’S

01 NISSA N A LTIM A G XE SDN N ow

60 M O S.

36 m os

06 A C C O RD 07 A C C O RD 08 A C C O RD 07 A C C O RD 08 A C C O RD 08 A C C O RD 07 A C C O RD

ACCORD S

LX SDN N avy,5 S peed,68K...................NO W EX SDN G ray,51K..................................NO W LXP SDN G ray,30K..............................NO W EXL SDN N avy,23K..............................NO W EX SDN S ilver,42K................................NO W EXL V 6 SDN N avy,55K.....................NO W EXL V 6 SDN P ew ter,26K..................NO W

$11,950 $14,950 $15,950 $16,250 $16,500 $16,500 $16,950

02 M A ZD A M ILLEN IA SE SD N

2.9%

N ow

60 m os

09 A C C O RD LX SDN R ed,13K..................................NO W 09 A C C O RD LXP SDN B urgandy,26K..............................NO W 10 A C C O RD LX SDN W hite,19K................................NO W 09 A C C O RD EX SDN G reen,21K...............................NO W 09 A C C O RD EX SDN B lack,19K................................NO W 09 A C C O RD EXL B lack,27K...........................................NO W 10 A C C O RD EXL SDN W hite,25K............................NO W

04 H Y U N D A I XG 350 SD N

B lack,79K M iles

$16,950 $16,950 $17,750 $18,950 $18,950 $19,950 $20,950

S ilver,97K M iles

$6,950

04 V W JETTA G LS SDN

03 H O N D A C IV IC LX SD N

N avy,40K M iles

N ow

S ilver,50K M iles

$8,950

09 FIT SPO RT R ed,15K......................................NO W $15,750

EX B lack,103K

EL EM EN T 4W D

LX S ilver,98K

$9,250

N ow

04 H O N D A C R V 4W D

FIT

$7,500

N ow

05 FO R D EXPLO R ER BA U ER 4X4

$10,950 $9,950

W hite,72K,W as $14,500

N ow

$11,250

08 ELEM EN T LX S ilver,56K...............................N O W $15,950 10 ELEM EN T EX O range,10K............................N O W $21,950 05 TO Y O TA C A M RY LE SDN S ilver,67K M iles

$11,500

N ow

08 D O D G E G R A N D C A R A V A N SXT W hite,79K M iles

N ow

$11,950

IN S IGHT HYBRID

05 HO NDA A C C O RD LX SDN

10 IN SIG H T EX B lue,21K M iles...........................N O W $16,950 10 IN SIG H T EX G ray,22K...................................N O W $18,500

09 HY UNDA I SO NA TA G LS SDN V 6 S ilver,45K M iles

S ilver,42K M iles

N ow

$12,500

N ow

$12,500

O DYS S EY

04 SUBA RU IM PREZA W RX SDN S ilver,68K M iles

N ow

$12,950

07 SU BA R U IM PR EZA A W D

S ilver,39K,W as $17,950

N ow

$15,750

09 H Y U N D A I SO N A TA G LS SD N B row n,40K M iles

N ow

$13,500

08 N ISSA N A LTIM A “S” SD N

PIL OT 4W D

$15,950

N ow

N ow

$18,950

B lack,29K M iles

N ow

$22,500

N ow

09 PILO T EXL S ilver,35K.....................................NO W $26,950 09 PILO T TO URING NA V I N avy,47K.........NO W $27,950

W hite,13K M iles,W as $18,950

CI V I C

LX C PE G ray,41K.................................N O W LX SD N G ray,41K,5 S peed....................N O W EX C PE B lue,52K.................................N O W LX SD N Titanium ,36K..........................N O W EX SD N W hite,41K,5 S peed...................N O W LX SD N G old,12K...............................N O W LX C PE N avy,30K................................N O W LX SD N S ilver,17K.............................N O W LXS SD N S ilver,16K...........................N O W EX SD N B lue,22K................................N O W

$12,950 $13,500 $14,250 $14,950 $15,250 $14,950 $15,950 $15,950 $16,500 $16,950

06 N ISSA N M A XIM A SE SD N

08 NISSA N Q UEST “S”

P earl,55K M iles

06 PILO T EXL R ed,71K.......................................NO W $17,950

08 C IV IC 04 DO DG E RA M 2500 06 C HEV Y C O LO RA DO 08 C IV IC Q UA D C A B SLT 4X4 XC A B 4X4 10 C IV IC S ilver,57K M iles B lack,47K M iles N ow $16, 950 N ow $16,950 09 C IV IC 08 C IV IC 08 C IV IC 09 C IV IC 10 C IV IC 10 C IV IC 08 H Y U N D A I 10 D O D G E N ITR O 09 C IV IC V ER A C R U Z A W D SE 4W D B lue,27K M iles

10 O DY SSEY EXL G ray,15K...............................NO W $29,500 10 O DY SSEY TO URING N avi,R .D V D ,G ray,26K NO W $32,250

08 C RV 09 C RV 08 C RV 08 C RV 10 C RV 09 C RV 09 C RV 09 C RV 10 C RV 10 C RV 11 C RV

CRV 4W D

EX B lack,43K.............................................NO W LX G reen,34K............................................NO W LX B lue,38K..............................................NO W EXL R ed,63K............................................NO W LX B lack,22K.............................................NO W EXL B lue,41K...........................................NO W EXL B lack,38K..........................................NO W EXL Titanium ,26K.....................................NO W EXL B lue,23K...........................................NO W EXL W hite,21K.........................................NO W EXL R ed,14K............................................NO W

$18,750 $18,950 $17,950 $17,950 $20,500 $20,950 $21,500 $21,950 $24,950 $24,950 $26,950

D isclosure:1.9% - 36 m os,2.9% - 60 m os thru A .H .F.C .W -A -C on C ertified A ccords.C ertified H onda’s have 1yr - 12k B asic W arranty.B alance of 7yr - 100K P ow ertrain W arranty from in-service date.

G ray,48K M iles

$13,750

N ow

06 V O LV O S60T A W D SD N

09 TO Y O TA M A TR IX “S” A W D

G reen,50K M iles

N ow

$15,950

R ed,56K M iles

N ow

B lack,58K M iles

B lack,20K M iles

$17,250

N ow

N ow

$17,350

08 TO Y O TA TA C O M A C LUB C A B TRD 4X4

10 G M C TERRA IN SLE 4W D M ocha,38K M iles

$15,950

07 M A ZDA C X-7 TO URING A W D

08 JEEP LIBERTY SPO RT 4W D N ow

$15,500

$22,500

N avy,46K M iles,W as $26,500 N ow

$22,500

( (5 57 70 0) )3 34 411 -11 4 40 00 0 • • 11 -8 80 00 0-8 82 22 2-2 211 11 0 0

1 1 1 0 W Y O M M

I N G A V E . • S C R A N T O N , PA

1 8509

w w w .m a ttb u rn e h o n d a .co m

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h u rs d a y 9 -8 :0 : 0 0 • F rid i d a y 9 -5 &

S a tu rd a y 9 -3 :3 :3 0


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012 PAGE 7G

ARE WHY BUY YOU A MEMBER... ANYWHERE ELSE? • #1 in Customer For Sales & OFTHE

I love my suzuki car club! WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR? JOIN THE GROWING RANKS TODAY!

HUGE

SELECTION

Service Satisfaction ** • A National Top 10 Sales Volume Dealer For The 2nd Straight Year*** • The Best Deals in NEPA • Don’t Believe Us!

COME SEE THE JD POWERS AWARD WINNING

KIZASHI!

AVAILABLE IN AWD!

2011 JD POWER MOST APPEALING

MIDSIZE CAR

ASK OUR CUSTOMERS!

1ST PLACE AWARD Suzuki Kizashi

** BASED ON SUZUKI DISTRICT RANKINGS FOR 2011 *** BASED ON SUZUKI NATIONAL SALES VOLUME RANKINGS FOR 2010 & 2011

2012 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD Stk#S1749

2012 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 4WD

2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI S AWD

Stk# S1947

YOUR AWD HEAD QUARTERS

Stk# S1792

Power Windows/Locks, Keyless Entry, CD, A/C $

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

18,019* 16,699* $

- 500* - 500***

Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty

LOW FINANCE RATES!

SALE PRICE $

15,999*

2012 SUZUKI EQUATOR EX CAB 4x4

Stk#S1893

Power Windows/Locks, Keyless Entry, CD, Alloy Wheels, Bedliner, 6Ft Box

27,239* 25,749* $

$

THANK YOU NEPA FOR A GREAT 2011

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

- 1,250* - 500***

Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty

SALE PRICE $

23,999*

Navigation, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, CD $ MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

Automatic, AM/FM/CD, Power Windows/Locks, Keyless Entry

24,154* 22,499* $

23,519* 22,299* $

$

MSRP w/ Add Ons $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

- 1,000* - 500***

Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty

- 1,000* - 500***

Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty

SALE PRICE

$

20,799*

SALE PRICE $

WHAT COUNTS IS THE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE! WE WON’T DISAPPOINT YOU!

20,999*

2012 SUZUKI SX4 SEDAN

AWARD WINNING SERVICE

Stk#S1766

LE Popular Package, Power Windows/ Locks, Keyless Entry, CD

18,289* 17,299* $

$

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

- 1,000* - 500***

Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty

SALE PRICE

$

15,799*

VEHICLES FOR ALL BUDGETS!

MEET OUR CUSTOMERS

* ALL PRICES + TAX & REGISTRATION. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ALL REBATES AND DISCOUNTS INCLUDED. **BASED ON SUZUKI NATIONAL SALES VOLUME REPORTS FOR 2010. THIS IS A COMBINED OFFER. MAKE YOUR BEST DEAL ON A PACKAGE PRICE. ***OWNER LOYALTY REBATE, MUST HAVE OR OWN SUZUKI VEHICLE IN HOUSEHOLD. +2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI JD POWERS HIGHEST RANKD MIDSIZE VEHICLE (APPEAL) STUDY JULY 2011. OFFERS END JAN 31, 2012.

EXIT 175

81 INTERSTATE

ROUTE 315 ROUTE 315

KEN POLLOCK SUZUKI

CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE! WE’RE EASY TO FIND!

JUST OFF EXIT 175 RTE I-81 • PITTSTON

SCAN HERE FOR MORE INFO


PAGE 8G

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

1-888-307-7077

BAD CREDIT NO CREDIT L TOELE! FR

Can e W elp H

1-855-313-LOAN

A New Way To Buy Your Next Car SAFE, SIMPLE, SECURE www.ApproveMyCredit.com

2011 DODGE DAKOTA QUAD CAB 4X4

SLT Equipment, Miles As Low As 14K, Choose From 3

Starting At

$23,995

USED CARS

2008 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL

All Wheel Drive, One Owner

$

20,900

2010 KIA RIO

2010 CHEVY AVEO SDN’S

Stk# 1684

Choose From 2, Tons of Warranty

11,900

2010 HYUNDAI ACCENT SDN

Must See Local Trade, One Owner

11,995

$

2003 GMC YUKON DENALI

$

Balance of Warranty

11,995

$

$

11,995

2010 VW BEETLE CPE

2010 CHEVY HHR

2010 FORD FOCUS SDN’S

2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING

2011 TOYOTA CAMRY

Just 33K Miles

LT Package, Nice Miles!

Choose From 2, SE Package

Stk# 1811

Stk# 1859

12,995

$

13,995

$

2009 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

$

14,900

2008 FORD F-150 SUPER CAB 4X4

$

2010 NISSAN ALTIMA

$

19,995

14,900

$

2010 DODGE CHARGER

15,900

2010 CHRYSLER 300

Stk# 1782

Stk# 1797

16,900

2011 NISSAN ROGUE AWD

$

$

19,900

2009 SUBARU FORESTER LIMITED

2011 HYUNDAI TUCSON AWD

2010 CHEVROLET SILVERADO REG CAB 1500 4X4

2010 FORD EXPLORER AWD

2011 BUICK REGAL

$

2011 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE AWD

2010 FORD TAURUS LIMITED

23,900

16,900

23,900

23,900

$

2011 DODGE RAM CREW CAB 4X4

$

Stk# 1857

$

2011 FORD ESCAPE AWD

Stk# 1681

Stk# 1858

Stk# 1783

22,900

22,900

$

$

2010 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 4X4 EXT CAB

2011 CHEVY CAMARO LT

Stk# 1535

Power Galore, Tons of Warranty

23,900

$

25,900

$

$

34,900

23,995

2010 MERCEDES 300C AWD

Stk# 1833

29,900

$

2011 CHEVY SUBURBAN AWD

Stk# 1649

32,900

22,900

2010 DODGE JOURNEY RT4 AWD

Stk# 1431

24,900

20,900

2011 GMC TERRAIN AWD

$

Stk# 1845

$

AWD, Local Low Mileage Trade

2011 DODGE CHALLENGER SE

2009 CADILLAC CTS

$

16,995

2009 CHEVY EQUINOX LS

18,900

Stk# 1731

$

$

Stk# 1791

2010 CHEVY TRAVERSE AWD

2011 GMC ACADIA AWD

34,900

Local Trade, Low Miles

21,995

22,900

2010 CHEVY TAHOE AWD

$

Stk# 1537

$

$

Stk# 1855

Stk# 1521

$

2010 TOYOTA TACOMA 4WD REG CAB PICKUP

Stk# 1794

22,900

22,900

2010 HONDA CIVIC

15K Miles, Black Beauty

21,900

Stk# 1801

16,900

$

Stk# 1597

2010 JEEP WRANGLER 4DR

$

Stk# 1650

Stk# 1796

$

Stk# 1694

21,900

22,900

Stk# 1688

2010 CHEVY EXPRESS 2500 CARGO

18,900

$

$

$

2010 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

$

2010 JEEP COMMANDER AWD

Stk# 1836

21,900

2010 TOYOTA COROLLA

Stk# 1732

18,900

AWD

16,900

$

14,995

15,900

2011 DODGE NITRO AWD

Stk# 1734

$

14,995

Stk# 1542

$

2010 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR AWD

$

15,900

30K Miles, Silver Beauty

$

$

2010 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS

16,900

Stk# 1837

$

Stk# 1739

$

2011 CHEVY IMPALA LT

Local Trade, Low Miles

2010 DODGE AVENGER R/T

$

$

2008 BUICK LUCERNE

16,995

Stk# 1802

14,900

13,900

7 Passenger, Rear DVD, Local Trade

2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE

$

$

2008 KIA SEDONA LX

Stk# 1848

34K Miles, Local One Owner

$

13,995

2011 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL

All Wheel Drive, 19K Miles

$

34,995

*In stock vehicles only. Prices plus tax & Tags, All rebates applied. See Salesperson for Details. Financing must be approved thru ally bank. See dealer for details.

1-888-307-7077 HOURS: Monday Thru Thursday 8:00am - 7:00pm Friday & Saturday 8:00am - 5:00pm


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012 PAGE 9G

V isitus 24/ 7 a twww.v a lleyc hev ro let.c o m TH E W E SE L L M O R E TOP D OL L A R TH AN P R E -O W N E D FOR CH E V Y’ S TRA DE -I N S

C ars • Trucks • R V’s • M otorcycles • A TV’s • C om m ercial

W E SE L L AL L M AK E S & M OD E L S!

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

BLUE RIDGE MOTORS

WE’RE LIGHTING IT UP!

800 PETS & ANIMALS 810

Cats

CATS & KITTENS 12 weeks & up.

All shots, neutered, tested,microchipped

VALLEY CAT RESCUE

824-4172, 9-9 only

2003 BUICK CENTURY

Custom Sedan

2000 M AZDA B3000 SE

4x4

O N LY 50K M ILES

#12164A , V6, A T, A /C , C ruise, C D , Pow er M irrors, O nly 59K M iles

$

#12026A , V6 A utom atic, A ir C onditioning, A M /FM C D , H ard Tonneau C over, A lloy W heels

7 995*

$

,

2005 CHEVRO LET IM PALA LS

8 795* ,

2001 CH EV Y ASTRO Van

O N LY 14K M ILES #11655B,V6,A uto,PW ,PD L,A /C ,A M /FM /C D , A lum inum W heels,H eated O utside M irrors

$

8 999*

#Z2627, V6, A uto.w / O D , D eep Tinted G lass, C argo Bin Pkg, Locking Rear D ifferential

$

,

2007 CHEVY CO BALT

10 995* ,

2006 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER

LT Sedan

LS 4W

O N LY 46K M ILES

D

SU N RO O F

#12136A ,2.2LA uto.,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Spoiler, C D ,Traction C ontrol

$

#12165A , A uto., C lim ate C ontrol, Keyless Entry, Bose 6 D isc C D Player, 1 O w ner

10 999* ,

2005 D O D G E CARAVAN SXT

$

100%

,

2006 PO NTIAC TO RRENT

12 499 ,

2010 H O ND A CIVIC LX

Sedan O N LY 24K M ILES

$

14 999* ,

2006 G M C CANYO N SL R EG CAB 4x4

#12172A A , A uto, A ir, PW , PD L, Keyless Entry, A M /FM /C D , 1 O w ner

$

15 900 ,

*

2009 SUBARU LEG ACY O UTBACK SD N AW D

15 995 ,

*

2009 M ERCURY M ARINER 4W D

A LL W H EEL DRIVE

ONE O W N ER

ONE O W N ER

22K M ILES

#Z2510A ,4 C yl,A uto,P/SPB,A /C ,Sunroof,42K

#12345A , 4 C yl., 2.5LA uto., A ir, Sunroof, PW , PD L, A M /FM C D , 1 O w ner, 22K M iles

16 854* ,

2007 CHEVY CO LO RADO EXTENDED CAB 4W D

$

16 957* ,

2008 CHEVRO LET CO LO RADO

Crew Cab 4x4

$

17 497* ,

$

19 487* ,

8’ BO X

ONE O W N ER

JANUARY

MANAGER’S SPECIAL

2012 SUZUKI SX4 AWD CROSSOVER

19 900* ,

2007 N ISSAN TITAN

$

Crew Cab 5.6LE

Unlim ited 4W D

#12342A ,V8 A uto.,A /C ,Leather,PW ,PD L,Pow er Seats, FrontBucketSeats,C ruise,A M /FM C D ,44K M iles

*

#Z2581,3.8LV8 A utom atic,PW ,PD L,Rem ovable Roof Panels,Privacy G lass,Fog Lam ps,C D

$

23 999 ,

EXT CAB D URAM AX D IESEL 4X4

*See dealer for details. Includes $500 rebate and $500 Suzuki Owner Loyalty.

Pre-Owned Cars

2010 Suzuki Kizashi SE AWD

2008 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2011 Chevrolet 2500 Cargo Van

$18,995

$15,995

$21,995

18K Miles

3500 Reg Cab 4W D w / Plow

BRA N D N EW STA IN LESS STEEL PLO W

#11543A ,D uram ax D ieselV8 A uto.,A ir,PW M ,PD L,Pow er Seat, Bed C ap,Step Rails,Locking Rear D ifferential,Low M iles,1 O w ner

24 999* ,

Freshly Serviced

*

O N LY 26K M ILES

#12102A , 6.0LV8, A uto., A ir, PW , PD L, H D Trailering Eqp., A uto Rear Locking D ifferential, 1 O w ner

$

2008 Toyota Tacoma 4x4

2005 Chevrolet Dump TK

$16,995

$18,995

60K Miles

TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130 Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

BOXER PUPPIES!

1 Male remaining. AKC Registered. Tail docked. 1st shots. $650. Ready now. Call 570-821-5635

PUG PUPPIES

13K Miles

Poms, Yorkies, Maltese, Husky, Rotties, Golden, Dachshund, Poodle, Chihuahua, Labs & Shitzus. 570-453-6900 570-389-7877

Pet Services

MAKE YOUR LIFE EASIER Teach your dog

2007 CHEVY SILVERADO

2005 CHEVY SILVERADO

PAWS

840

100,000-mile/7-year *

23K Miles

$

The power of engineering.

RANG LER

O N LY 33K M ILES

,

Stock #300017

,

2008 JEEP SAHARA W

Dogs

SHIH-TZU PUPPIES

713 N STATE ST., CLARKS SUMMIT, PA • 570-586-6676 • WWW.CHERMAKAUTO.COM M-TH 8-7 • F 8-5 • SAT 8-1

20 950

815

Parents on premises Shots Current. $500 570-250-9690

AMERICA’S #1 WARRANTY 100,000-Mile /7-Year Power train Limited Warranty. Fully Transferable. No Deductible.

KITTENS, FREE, brothers, overloveables, bonded must go together to responsible home. Loves people, cats. Sweethearts. Urgent transport. 570-299-7146

Adorable ACA registered fawn pug puppies. Shots, wormed, and vet checked. 5 female and 2 male. Ready to go 01/08/12. $450. 570-837-3243

MSRP $18,019

#Z2624, V8, A T, A /C , PW , PD L, P.H eated M irrors, Locking Rear D ifferential, H D Trailering Eqp, Low M iles

#12245A , V8 A utom atic, A ir C onditioning, A lloy W heels, PW , PD L, O nly 44K M iles, C ap

20 999

SUVS

Ext Cab Classic4W D

REG CAB 4W D

$

-

2007 CHEVY SILVERAD O

2007 FO RD F-250

$

VANS

$15,995

#Z2619, 5 C yl, A uto, PS, PB, A /C , PW , PL, Tilt, C ruise, 43K

#Z2618, 2.9LI4 A utom atic, A ir, Insta-Trac 4x4 Transfer C ase, A M /FM /C D /M P3, O ne O w ner

-

For You!

SPECIAL

ONE O W N ER

O N LY 22K M ILES

blueridgecars.net

#Z2582,3.5LA utom atic,A ir,PW ,PD L,A lum inum W heels, C D ,Bedliner,Fog Lam ps,O nly 42K M iles

$

Credit Approval

We’re Here CARS

ONE O W N ER SU N RO O F

KITTEN FREE 7 months old, male orange tabby, neutered, shots, declawed. Indoor cat only. 909-6248

Ph. 570-871-4299

VISIT US ONLINE!

#12048A , V6 A uto., A ir, Leather H eated Seats, A M /FM 6 D isc C D Player

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

(Next To Grande Pizza)

Finance with a National Company Don’t Overpay Due To Credit OVER 150 VEHICLES AVAILABLE!

AW D

#11728A ,A T,A /C ,7 Passenger,PW ,PD L, C aptains C hairs,RoofRack,Low M iles,1 O w ner $ *

4150 Birney Ave. Moosic, PA

51 S. Wyoming Ave. Edwardsville, PA Ph. 570-714-2621

11 999*

SU N RO O F

$

NOW WITH 2 LOCATIONS! TO SERVE YOU.

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED!

basic skills. Classes starting 1/21 & 1/22. Adults & Puppies. Call Mary at 570-332-4095 for more info.

Find that new job.

The Times Leader Classified section.

2006 Chrysler PT Cruiser

$7,995

27 999* ,

*Prices plus tax & tags. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Select pictures for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors.

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad.

K E N W A L L A CE ’S

•1-800-444-7172 V A L L E Y 821-2772 601 K id d e rS tre e t, W ilke s -Ba rre , P A CHE V ROL E T

Mon.-Fri. 8:30-7:00pm; Sat. 8:30-5:00pm

EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.

2004 Chevrolet Impala LS Freshly Serviced

$8,995

2010 Suzuki Grand Vitara 4x4 15K Miles

$18,995

2004 Suzuki XL-7 LX 4x4

$9,995

ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com


PAGE 10G

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012 PAGE 11G

Over 172,000 mobile readers per month.

Advertise your business on The Times Leader’s mobile website.

Call 970-7101

THE TIMES LEADER |

PLACE Over YOUR OWN 47,000 cite the CLASSIFIED people The Times AD Leader as their primary source ONLINE! IT’S FAST AND EASY! PLUS, YOUR AD WILL RUN FREE FOR ITEMS PRICED UNDER $1000. GO TO “CLASSIFIED ADS” AND CLICK ON “PLACE YOUR AD.”

for shopping information.

*2008 Pulse Research

What DoYou HaveTo Sell Today?

IN LUZERNE COUNTY – AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY 1024

Building & Remodeling

Chimney Service

CAVUTO CHIMNEY SERVICE

& Gutter Cleaning Free Estimates Insured 570-709-2479

CHIMNEY REPAIRS Parging. Stucco.

1st. Quality Construction Co.

Stainless Liners. Cleanings. Custom Sheet Metal Shop. 570-383-0644 1-800-943-1515 Call Now!

Senior Citizens Discount!

COZY HEARTH CHIMNEY Chimney Cleaning, Rebuilding, Repair, Stainless Steel Lining, Parging, Stucco, Caps, Etc. Free Estimates Licensed & Insured 1-888-680-7990 570-840-0873

Roofing, siding, gutters, insulation, decks, additions, windows, doors, masonry & concrete. Insured & Bonded.

State Lic. # PA057320

570-299-7241 570-606-8438 ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST 825-4268. Remodel / repair, Windows & Doors

NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION

All Types Of Work New or Remodeling Licensed & Insured Free Estimates 570-406-6044

1039

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

NUMBER

NEWSPAPER

1039

1057Construction & Building

GARAGE DOOR

Sales, service, installation & repair. FULLY INSURED HIC# 065008 CALL JOE 570-606-7489 570-735-8551

ONLYONE ONL NLYONE L N LE LLEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

Chimney Service

A-1 1 ABLE CHIMNEY Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All types of Masonry. Liners Installed, Brick & Block, Roofs & Gutters. Licensed & Insured 570-735-2257

Find homes for your kittens! Place an ad here! 570-829-7130

1078

Dry Wall

MIKE SCIBEK DRYWALL

Hanging & finishing, design ceilings and painting. Free estimates. Licensed & Insured. 328-1230

MIRRA DRYWALL Hanging & Finishing Textured Ceilings Licensed & Insured Free Estimates

(570) 675-3378 1084

Electrical

GRULA ELECTRIC LLC Licensed, Insured, No job too small.

570-829-4077

SLEBODA ELECTRIC Master electrician Licensed & Insured Service Changes & Replacements. Generator Installs. 868-4469

1093

Excavating

MODULAR HOMES/EXCAVATING

570-332-0077 Custom excavating, foundations, land clearing, driveways, storm drainage, etc.

1132

Handyman Services

1132

Handyman Services

The Handier Man

We fix everything! Plumbing, Electrical & Carpentry. Retired Mr. Fix It. Emergencies 23/7

299-9142

1135

Hauling & Trucking

AA1AAlways C L E Ahauling, NING

cleaning attics, cellar, garage, one piece or whole Estate, also available 10 & 20 yard dumpsters.655-0695 592-1813or287-8302 AAA CLEANING A1 GENERAL HAULING Cleaning attics, cellars, garages. Demolitions, Roofing & Tree Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or 542-5821; 814-8299 AAA Bob & Ray’s Hauling: Friendly & Courteous. We take anything & everything. Attic to basement. Garage, yard, free estimates. Call 570-655-7458 or 570-905-4820

DO IT ALL HANDYMAN

Painting, drywall, plumbing & all types of interior & exterior home repairs. 570-829-5318

www.bianepa.com

Customize the way your ad looks and then find it in the next day’s edition of The Times Leader, in our weekly newspapers and online at timesleader.com.

ONE AUDITED

Professional Services Directory

Call the Building Industry Association of NEPA to find a qualified member for your next project. call 287-3331 or go to

Our online system will let you place Announcements, Automotive Listings, g Merchandise, Pets & Animals, Real Estate and Garage Sales.

*Your ad will appear in the next day’s paper if placed online before 4 p.m. Mon. through Thurs. Place on Friday before 1 p.m. for Saturday’s paper and before 4 p.m.

CALL AN EXPERT

PRO FORCE PAINTING & CONSTRUCTION Interior & exterior painting. All types of remodeling,& plumbing. Front and back porches repaired & replaced Call 570-301-4417

1078

Dry Wall

DAUGHERTY’S DRYWALL INC.

Remodeling, New Construction, Water & Flood Repairs

570-579-3755 PA043609

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Mark’s Handyman Service

Give us a call

We do it all! Licensed & Insured

570-578-8599

RUSSELL’S

Property & Lawn Maintenance LICENSED & INSURED Carpentry, painting, plumbing, snow plowing & general home & business repairs. Free Estimates 570-406-3339

1135

Hauling & Trucking

HAUL ALL

HAULING & PAINTING SERVICES. Free Estimates. 570-332-5946

Mike’s Scrap

Five Dollars & Up Cleaning & hauling of wood, metals, trash & debris from houses, yards, garages, etc. Free estimates SAME DAY SERVICE

570-826-1883

VERY CHEAP JUNK REMOVAL! Licensed, Insured & Bonded. Will beat any price, guaranteed! Free Estimates. Over 10,000 served.

570-693-3932

1156

Insurance

NEPA LONG TERM CARE AGENCY

Long Term Care Insurance products Reputable Companies. 570-580-0797 FREE CONSULT longtermcare@ verizon.net

ALL KINDS OF HAULING & JUNK REMOVAL

TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL REMOVAL DEMOLITION Estate Cleanout Free Estimates 24 HOUR SERVICE SMALL AND LARGE JOBS! 570-823-1811 570-239-0484

CASTAWAY HAULING JUNK REMOVAL

823-3788 / 817-0395

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here GET THE WORD OUT in the Classifieds! with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130 570-829-7130

1189 Miscellaneous Service

VITO’S & GINO’S Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks Highest Prices Paid!!

FREE PICKUP

288-8995 Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

1195

Movers

BestDarnMovers Moving Helpers Call for Free Quote. We make moving easy. BDMhelpers.com 570-852-9243

1204

Painting & Wallpaper

M. PARALIS PAINTING

Int/ Ext. painting, Power washing. Professional work at affordable rates. Free estimates. 570-288-0733

1225

Plumbing

BERNIE THE PLUMBER

& HOME BUILDER “SAME DAY SERVICE” Why Pay more? Interior & exterior. We do hardwood floors, furnaces, water heaters - all your home remodeling needs. Pay when you’re pleased. All work guaranteed. Free Estimates. 570-899-3123

1252

Roofing & Siding

J.R.V. ROOFING

570-824-6381 Roof Repairs & New Roofs. Shingle, Slate, Hot Built Up, Rubber, Gutters & Chimney Repairs. Year Round. Licensed/Insured ŠFREE EstimatesŠ *24 Hour Emergency Calls*

WINTER ROOFING Special $1.29 s/f Licensed, insured, fast service 570-735-0846

1276

Snow Removal

SNOW

PLOWING ŠCommercial

ŠIndustrial ŠResidential ŠDRIVEWAYS ŠSIDEWALKS

ŠSALTING

VITO & GINO’S 570-574-1275


PAGE 12G

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

KEN POLLOCK

PRE-OWNED

SALES EVENT

NEW YEAR

2009 NISSAN SENTRA SEDAN

#S1641A, S Package, Power Windows/ Locks, Automatic, 1-Owner

10,499

$

8,799

$

$

2008 TOYOTA YARIS

9,899

$

13,599*

*

2011 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA PREMIUM 4X4

#S1801A, Alloy Wheels, Running Boards, 1-Owner with Only 12K Miles!

14,599*

17,199*

$

13,799

2006 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 4X4

#P14420, Alloy Wheels, Sport Package, Sunroof, Manual, Power Windows/Locks, Low Miles

#P14552A, Sunroof, Leather, 3rd Row, Alloy Wheels, Nice SUV!

#P14571, Long Box, Auto, V8, PW, PL, Alloy Wheels, Nice Truck!

*

$

16,950

$

$

2009 JEEP WRANGLER 2DR 4X4

#P14440, Custom Wheel Package, Push Bar with Light Kit, Ready For The Snow!

2011 TOYOTA TACOMA ACCESS CAB

2009 SUBARU FORESTER AWD SUV

*

16,999*

*

#P14514, Alloy Wheels, Power Sliding Doors, 2nd Row Bucket Seats, 3rd Row

19,599

2010 HYUNDAI SANTA FE 4x4

#P14513, Alloy Wheels, Auto, Power Windows/Locks, CD, 1-Owner

17,899*

$

17,599*

$

2010 JEEP WRANGLER 2DR 4X4

Hardtop, Lift Kit With Custom Wheel Pkg, Upgraded Bluetooth Radio, Low Miles!

Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Sunroof, Power Windows/Locks, 2 To Choose From @

23,299*

21,599

$

$

*

2010 SUZUKI KIZASHI SLS SEDAN

2012 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA ADVENTURE 4X4

#S1191A, Heated Leather, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Only 4K Miles!

Heated Leather, 18” Alloy Wheels, Custom Interior, PW, PL, 1-Owner w/ Only 4K Miles

$

14,850*

2008 SUZUKI XL-7 AWD

$

17,699*

$

#P14457A, Sport Package, Alloy Wheels, 3rd Row, Auto, PW, PL, Great 4x4!

*

PRE-OWNED SUZUKI SALE

#S1683A, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, CD, Roof Rack, 1-Owner

$

$

$

2010 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD

#S1675A, Premium Pkg, Automatic, CD, Power Windows/Locks, All Wheel Drive

#P14495, Automatic, Power Windows/ Locks, CD, Balance of Factory Warranty

2008 HONDA CIVIC SI COUPE

#S1857A, SR5 Pkg, Rear View Camera, PW, PL, 1-Owner, Low Miles

10,799

9,899*

*

2010 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD

#P14501, Panoramic Sunroof, Chrome Wheel Pkg, Auto, CD, Nice Car!

#P14478, Automatic, Dual Airbags, CD, A/C, Balance of Factory Warranty

#S1578A, Automatic, Dual Airbags, A/C, 1-Owner!

2007 JEEP COMMANDER 4X4

2010 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS SEDAN

13,799

17,599*

2006 PONTIAC G6 GT SEDAN

2010 KIA RIO SEDAN

13,699*

$

13,499*

*

$

*

#S1625A, Heated Leather, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, CD, Power Seat

$

2010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY VAN

9,499

$

*

2008 HONDA ACCORD EXL SEDAN

$

$

#P14529, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, Only 34K Miles!

8,899

*

#S1895A, Automatic, Alloy Wheels, Power Windows/Locks

*

15,699

#P14478, Automatic, CD, Dual Airbags, A/C, Balance of Factory Warranty

#P14496, Automatic, Power Windows/ Locks, CD, Great Car!

11,599*

$

#P14536, Automatic, Power Windows/ Locks, CD, A/C, Dual Airbags, 1-Owner

#P14532, Leather, Sunroof, 3rd Row, Alloy Wheels, PW, PL, CD

2007 FORD FOCUS HATCHBACK

*

2006 SUBARU LEGACY OUTBACK WAGON AWD

$

2009 HYUNDAI ACCENT SEDAN

#P14538, Leather, Sunroof, Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, All Wheel Drive!

11,399

2007 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER 4X4

• 3 Day or 150 Mile Money Back Guarantee** • 30 Day/1000 Mile Limited Warranty** • All Value Vehicle Outlet Cars Pass PA State Inspection**

#S1691A, Low Miles, 1-Owner, Automatic, CD, Dual Airbags

$

12,799

CHECK OUT OUR VA L U E V E H I C L E O U T L E T

2005 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT AWD

2009 MAZDA 6 SEDAN

$

WE’RE CELEBRATING THE START OF A NEW YEAR WITH GREAT DEALS ON OUR ENTIRE PRE-OWNED INVENTORY. DON’T MISS YOUR CHANCE TO START YOUR YEAR RIGHT.

2008 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS SEDAN

*

2010 CHEVY COBALT LT SEDAN

2011 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA LIMITED 4X4

#S1854A, Heated Leather, Sunroof, Navigation, 18” Alloys, 1-Owner w/ Only 8K Miles!

22,799*

21,599*

$

$

* 2.49% Based on 60 months. Must