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GOLackawanna

Sunday, June 24, 2012

INSIDE Page 5 – Scranton Mayor files lawsuit against City Council Page 15 – Obituaries Page 16 – Workouts that fit your budget Page 17 – Scranton StorySlam returns Page 18 – Crossword puzzle Page 23 – Little League playoffs begin

OUR TEAM

McGlynn

Howells

Robinson

Riedmiller

Andes

GO Lackawanna Editor Don McGlynn - 558-0113 dmcglynn@golackawanna.com Reporter/Photographer Rich Howells – 558-0483 rhowells@golackawanna.com Sports Reporter Tom Robinson Photographer Jason Riedmiller Advertising Representative Jill Andes – 970-7188 jillandes@timesleader.com News Tips/Obituaries 558-0113 news@golackawanna.com Missed Paper – 829-5000 Classified 1-800-273-7130 Advertising – 829-7101 Subscriptions – 1-800-252-5603 Office Hours 9a.m. – 6p.m.; M-F 109 New Street, Pittston, PA 18640

Drive in Downtown began on Thursday, June 21 with a screening of "The Muppets." The series will show movies on a large screen on North Washington Avenue in front of Lackawanna County Courthouse in Scranton for free on Thursdays in June and July. The series will continue on Thursday, June 28 with a screening of "Rudy." Movies begin at 8:45 p.m.

The GO Lackawanna Lower Valley edition publishes information about the communities in the Old Forge, Riverside and West Scranton school districts. Send your information to dmcglynn@golackawanna.com or 109 New Street, Pittston, PA 18640.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Overeaters Anonymous meetings, First Presbyterian Church, 201 Stone Ave., Clarks Summit, weekly, Mon. and Wed., 7 p.m.; Tues. and Thurs., 9:30 a.m. and Sun., 4 p.m. Info: 587-4313. Coal Mining info sought, Carl Orechovsky, research editor of Anthracite Archives, Old Forge, is seeking information about the coal mining industry during the 1950s and ’60s in Old Forge. Anyone interested with information or photos of mine openings, buildings, miners, breakers or stories of life and workings in the mines can contact Orechovsky evenings at 702.4217 or e-mail info@oldforgecoalmine.com. Free karate classes at the Taylor Community Center every Monday

and Wednesday, at 6 p.m. Children interested in learning Shinko-Ryu Karate can sign up in front of the center located at 700 S. Main St., Taylor. Those interested are required to sign up by June 30. For more information, email 570dojo@gmail.com . Girls on Guard a self defense class at Core Fitness, 1003 North Keyser Ave., Scranton on Wednesday, June 27 at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, June 30 at 2 p.m. Cost: $10. Info: 562.2579, or visit www.570dojo.com. Championship Pro Wrestling comes to Grants Martial Arts, located at 404 W. Main St., Plymouth on Saturday, June 30. Matinee show: doors open at 2:30 p.m., matches begin at 3 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the door, $8 for current military veterans. Info: visit ecpw1.com or call 607.727.4418 CPW is a Scranton based pro wrestling company that was formed in

2009. CPW is known for its family friendly events, local talent from the Scranton-Wilkes-Barre area, and big name stars from all across the globe. In recent times, CPW has merged with the Binghamton, NY based East Coast Pro Wrestling. Scranton Public Library Computer Learning Lab: Individual Assistance will be held Monday, July 2 from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.; Word 2007 Intermediate Level 2, Tuesday, July 3, 1 to 3 p.m.; Internet Basics Level 1, Tuesday, July 3, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.; The library will be closed Wednesday, July 4 to Saturday, July 7 in observance of Independence Day; Excel 2007 Intermediate Level 2., Tuesday, July 10, 1 to 3 p.m.; Internet Basics Level 2, Tuesday, July 10, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.; Excel 2007 Intermediate Level 2, Wednesday, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.; Excel 2007 Intermediate Level 2, Thursday, July 12 10 a.m. to noon; Internet Basics Level 1, Thursday, July 12, 2 to 4 p.m.; Intro to Computers Level

2, Friday, July 13, 10 a.m. to noon. Pre-registration with a valid Lackawanna County Library card is required for all sessions. Basic computer skills are required for some classes. STACKS Writing Group will be meeting at 6:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday of every month at The Banshee, 320 Penn Ave., Scranton. Writers are invited to send an unpolished sample of their fiction, maximum of 15 pages, to Stef and Chris at stackswritinggroup@gmail.com by Saturday, June 30, to be shared with other participants for constructive critique prior to first session on Tuesday, July 10. For more information, visit STACKS Writing Group on Facebook. ShelterFest 2012 will be held at the Griffin Pond Animal Shelter, 967 Griffin Pond Rd., Clarks Summit, on Saturday, June 30 from

noon to 3 p.m. The event, which is See COMMUNITY , Page 4

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

Issue No. 2012-176 Newsroom

829-7242 jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

Circulation

Jim McCabe – 829-5000 jmccabe@timesleader.com Published weekly by: Impressions Media 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Periodicals postage paid at Scranton, PA Postmaster: Send address changes to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711


Sunday, June 24, 2012

GOLackawanna

What: Scranton Shakespeare Festival presents “Midsummer Night’s Dream,” When: Saturday and Sunday, June 30 and July 1 at 6 p.m. Where: Nay Aug Park Info: https://www.facebook.com/ ScrantonShakespeareFestival or call 614.3313 Cost: Free

Bringing Shakespeare to EVERYONE DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

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ll traditions have their beginnings, and a group of actors is hoping that this weekend will be the start of one in Scranton. The REV Theatre Company’s production of “Midsummer Night’s Dream,” scheduled for Saturday and Sunday, June 30 and July 1, at 6 p.m. at Nay Aug Park, will serve as the inaugural Scranton Shakespeare Festival. The production is the first of

hopefully many. “There is a longstanding theatrical history in Scranton that is no more,” said Rudy Caporaso who plays Puck in “Midsummer Night’s Dream” and serves as co-artistic director. “A mission of ours…is to help create a renaissance of that.” “There’s no earthly reason that we can’t help to bring some of that back here, get some of that theater pride back.” Caporaso is a co-founder of the REV Theatre Company, along with “Midsummer Night’s Dream” director and co-artistic director Rosey Hay. The theater company is based in New York and has put on various incarnations of this production in several areas, including Binghamton, N.Y., New York City, Connecticut, and Philadelphia.

West Scranton native and University of Scranton graduate Michael Bradshaw Flynn met Hay and Caporaso when they came to do some work at the University of Scranton. He was later cast in REV’s Binghamton, N.Y. production of “Hamlet.” It was during that production that the idea for the Scranton Shakespeare Festival was born, with the three serving as co-founders. “I had always wanted to eventually do summer stock here… and we were throwing different ideas around, and then I remember seeing pictures of their production of ‘Midsummer’ that they did in Binghamton, and I remember thinking it would be very well received here,” said Flynn. Once a decision was made, Flynn began the process of bringing the production to the area.

He formed a committee made up of himself, Laurie Cadden, Michele Conaboy, who is also the play’s musical director and is a member of the cast, Suzanne Conaboy, Helene Runco, Tim and Gretchen Welby. The committee helped get the word out about the play, and was able to raise funds through donations and grants from a number of sources, including the Lackawanna County Arts Council and The Scranton Area Foundation, as well as numerous members of the community who donated what they could. In addition to monetary donations, members of the community have been donating themselves in other ways. The University of Scranton has offered rehearsal space and is housing some of the actors who are in from out of town, See SHAKESPEARE, Page 8

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, June 24, 2012

EDITOR’S NOTE Riverside’s Salutatorian Rebecca Ann Mekilo’s name was regretfully not included in Riverside High School’s graduation coverage, which ran in the June 10 issue of Go Lackawanna. The June 17 issue of Go

NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH HONORED

Lackawanna mistakenly said that the Junior Penguins donated a memorial tree to the Riverside School District. The Junior Penguins Limited Midget team’s players and parents are donating the tree.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR I watched the recent Commissioner’s meeting and I liked the idea that Commissioner Patrick O’Malley had (that) employees that work for the county should live in the county. As a resident of Lackawanna County, I feel the people that work for the county should be residents/property owners that know our hardships and our needs. To have employees hired that don’t live in the county, have no vested interest in our county. They take their check and spend it in their own county. Why should our tax dollars be taken out of our county and spent in other counties ? I would like to see these

tax dollars to be used in our area and not to be spent out of the area. I wish for these dollars to be recycled in our Lackawanna County. I think this is something that should be looked into. Give the non-resident employees of the county a certain time frame to move in and be part of our tax base. This will have a trickle down effect to all the businesses and economy of our county. I hope Commissioners Patrick O’Malley, Jim Wansacz and Corey O’Brien take that initiative to look into this. Thank you John Evans Taylor, Pa.

COMMUNITY Continued from page 2

an opportunity for individuals to meet and greet many of the shelter’s animals and the volunteers, is free. The shelter will introduce its new foster program to the community as well. ShelterFest will feature games, a bake sale, raffle baskets, dog training demos, grooming demos, and much more. Info: 585.0511 or visit http://www.facebook.com/

Members of Award the West Scranton Hyde Park Neighborhood Watch received a proclamation from the Scranton City Council prior to council’s meeting on Thursday, June 21. The proclamation was given to the group in honor of West Scranton Hyde Park Neighborhood Watch being selected as one of the recipients of the 2012 Neighborhood Watch Award of Excellence by the National Sheriffs’ Association. The Neighborhood Watch was nominated for the award by Scranton Police Chief Dan Duffy.

events/358960764158113/ The West Scranton Hyde Park Neighborhood Watch will hold its next meeting on Thursday, July 19 at 7 p.m. at All Saints Auditorium, 1403 Jackson St., behind St. Patrick’s Church. Info: http://hydeparkneighborwatch.wordpress.com/. Amazon Expedition will take place Thursdays in Mercatelli-Seglia Park on Birney Avenue in Moosic, July 12 through August 9 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Info: 457.7460 or email secretary@hopenepa.org.

Actors Circle at Providence Playhouse, 1256 Providence Rd. will present "Where the BLEEP is Poor Tom?" written by John McInerney, directed by Lou Bisignani, July 12 through 15, shows begin at 8 p.m. Cost: $8/$6/$4. Info: 342.9707. The Upward Bound Alumni Association of Wilkes University will celebrate the 45th Anniversary of Upward Bound with a reunion on Sunday, July 22 from 3 to 6 p.m. All former participants and staff are invited to join for this very special event on the campus of

Wilkes University behind the library. Info: 817.5096 or email Kelleyconner220@yahoo.com. The Second Annual Marley’s Mission Golf Tournament will be held on Thursday, August 9 at Mount Airy Casino Resort. There will be two tee times this year, the first at 8:30 a.m. and the second at 1 p.m. The cost of golf and dinner is $125. Lunch will be served at 11 a.m., cocktails at 6 p.m., and a casual dinner at 7 p.m. For information about golf sponsorships visit www.playforekidspa.com.


Sunday, June 24, 2012

GOLackawanna

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Doherty sues council over Recovery Plan

RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – Mayor Chris Doherty filed a lawsuit in the Lackawanna County Court of Common Pleas on June 21 against the City Council “supermajority” for refusing to place the Revised Recovery Plan on the agenda over the last several weeks. The lawsuit explains that in order for the city to secure $9,850,000 in unfunded borrowing from M&T Bank, a mandatory contingency on approval of the loan is the passage of a Revised Recovery Plan, an update of the city’s 2002 revision after first entering distressed status in 1992. Submitted to council on May 24, the mandates in the mayor’s plan include an increase in real estate tax millage rates by 29 percent in 2013, 20 percent in 2014, and 15 percent in 2015 to eliminate the remaining projected deficits for a total of a 64 percent increase over the next three years with a one percent increase in the non-resident earned income tax. It also includes selling or leasing the city’s storm water conveyance system to the Scranton Sewer Authority and the city’s parking meters to the Scranton Parking Authority as well as increases in refuse fees, the levying of an amusement tax, and acrossthe-board salary cuts. Doherty said in a phone interview on June 22 that he feels a lawsuit is the only option left to force council’s four-member “supermajority” of President Janet Evans, Vice President Frank Joyce, Pat Rogan, and Jack Loscombe to pass a revised plan. The suit excludes Councilman Bob McGoff, as he was the lone dissenting vote against council’s 2012 budget and the override of the mayor’s veto. McGoff made a motion on June 7 to add the mayor’s plan to council’s agenda for a vote, but was outvoted. “It is the only option because obviously we’re very low on funds. I’ve already paid $35 million in bills this year. Our budget is $71 million, so you basically have $36 million left of projected revenues coming in. $16 million of that is their hole in the budget, their borrowing,” Doherty said. “I proposed a tax increase (in the 2012 budget) and they rejected those ideas and they depend-

GO LACKAWANNA/RICH HOWELLS

Mayor Chris Doherty filed a lawsuit against members of Scranton City Council for refusing to place the Revised Recovery Plan on the agenda over the last several weeks.

ed on borrowing (in their budget). The banks said they want a plan to make sure they get paid back and they have been unwilling to do it. I actually sent them a plan myself and they rejected it. If they have a plan that a bank will give us the money, I’ll sign it.” The lawsuit says that as a direct result of this loss of funding, overdue bills are owed to Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Northeastern Pennsylvania; Dunmore Oil Company; Keystone Sanitary Landfill, Inc.; and Pennsylvania American Water Company, affecting the operations of all city departments, including police and fire headquarters. “This is about public safety now because it costs $60,000 a week to dump the garbage – that’s our tipping fee at the landfill. It’s about $40,000 a week for gas a diesel. Our payroll is a million dollars every two weeks on average. Blue Cross is $1.4 million every month,” Doherty said. “We have to pick up the garbage…The fire trucks have to show up. Council put this budget together. I sent them a budget. They said, ‘We have a better idea, citizens of Scranton. We’re not going to raise your taxes. We’re going to borrow, and that’s how we’re going to take care of you for

the next year.’ And they have to follow through on that commitment.” During the June 22 council meeting, the “supermajority” responded to the lawsuit. “It’s really a sign that the mayor is desperate… He was always planning on being out of (office) before the house of cards collapsed, and it’s starting to collapse now. It’s not because of this council. It’s because of the last 15 years of councils. It’s because of the mayor,” Rogan said. “I do not support the mayor’s plan for a second because of the tax increase. That being said, I do think that all five members of council and the mayor and any other interested parties, whether it be the unions, whether it be PEL, whether it be DCED, sit down and negotiate. If the mayor is not willing to negotiate in good faith, which may very well be the case, then it’s on him.” Evans said that despite meeting with the mayor for months to work on the plan, the final document did not include council’s suggestions, including the reclassification of the city from Class 2A city to a Third Class city, consideration of the Scranton Parking Authority’s financial insolvency, council’s opposition of the

sale of the city’s parking meters, and the failure to include a plan to begin payment of the 2011 Supreme Court decision in favor of the city’s public safety unions. The court found that Act 47 does not supersede the Policemen and Firemen Collective Bargaining Act, or Act 111, forcing the city to pay up on over $30 million in collective bargaining awards. “It has come to council’s attention that the mayor’s Revised Recovery Plan is flawed,” Evans said. “Since the mayor has refused the bulk of council’s recommendations, it behooves (the Pennsylvania Economy League) and (the Department of Community and Economic Development) to amend the significant flaws in the mayor’s plan…His proposed tax increases will crucify taxpayers and destroy our city neighborhoods.” She added that council was invited to a mediation session with DCED and the mayor, but she felt that all parties should meet publicly in Council Chambers, an offer that was turned down. Doherty feels the entire conflict could have been avoided if council had passed his version of the 2012 budget, which would have raised property taxes by 29.1 percent, but council decreased

that number to 4.8 percent. “If they didn’t want to do a plan, they should have just passed my increase. We wouldn’t be having this discussion. If they went with my budget the last two years, we would have $7 million of additional money and we wouldn’t have any problems. The banks would have full confidence in us because they would see a revenue stream,” Doherty commented, adding that chose to borrow money. “A budget is not a snapshot in time. It is a blueprint and a living document for a year…Council passed their own financial blueprint and now they won’t follow it by not funding it.” Loscombe said he found out that they were being sued through the media, not through the mayor, which he viewed as a sign of disrespect. “As far as the lawsuit goes, I’m looking forward to standing up for you in court and letting them know the truth,” Loscombe told the public during council’s June 21 meeting. “(The mayor and council) did have communication going for several weeks there, but I think as Mrs. Evans said, it’s the same old, same old. You walk out of there, you’re discussing something, you think you’re getting somewhere, you think you’ve worked a deal out, and you walk away and boom, you’re stabbed in the back.” The mayor also sued the “supermajority” in early 2010 when they attempted to trim the 2010 budget by $694,986 after it had already been adopted by the previous council majority. Presiding Judge Robert Mazzoni ultimately ruled in favor of the mayor, blocking council’s actions. “It’s not about City Council and the mayor sitting down and getting along or coming up with a Recovery Plan. It’s about a plan that the banks approve because the banks are the ones giving us the money…This $16 million is paid back over 10 years. Well, they want to make sure that there’s a plan in place going ahead,” Doherty said. “I hope this forces the issue even more that they understand that we’re in a dire situation. It’s very simple to do the math…This is not about a political philosophy or anything else. This is about money getting repaid.”


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Lawsuit creates obstacle in repaving road DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackwanna.com

OLD FORGE- Guy DiAndriole asked the Old Forge Borough Council what the status was on the borough repaving Edgewood Drive in the Rosemount Estates development during its regular meeting on Tuesday, June 19. DiAndriole said the road has been in poor condition for over seven years and needs to be taken care of. “No matter what direction you go in you can not drive on that road,” said DiAndriole. “Pave the road, that’s all everybody wants. Why has it dragged on this long?” “I think everyone here would like to do something about the road, but I remind you we’re being sued,” said Council President Brian Rinaldi. Council explained that a lawsuit filed by the Homeowners Association against the Old Forge Borough has complicated repaving Edgewood Drive. Borough solicitor William Rinaldi declined to go into detail about the lawsuit after the meeting, but during the meeting said that “the last I head they wanted all the roads ripped up… (and) repaved.” If the borough were to repave Edgewood Drive there is no guarantee that the law suit would be dropped. “How can we do that? How can we go in there and just go over the top nice, make it a nice level surface, and then continue to be sued, end up losing in court?” said Brian Rinaldi. “(Then) we have to rip up what we did for you and redo the roads again. How can we take that chance?” DiAndriole recommended the council have a meeting with the members of the community involved in the lawsuit and ask them if they would drop the lawsuit if the one road was repaved. Solicitor Rinaldi said council would be allowed to discuss the matter, but no formal decision to hold a meeting has been made. In other business, Old Forge Borough Council voted in favor of lowering sewer fees from $25 a quarter, $100 a year to $10 a quarter, $40 a year. Council recommended that individuals with delinquent sewer fees to pay them as soon as possible.

Sunday, June 24, 2012

Council approves FEMA grant RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – City Council voted unanimously to accept a grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to restore firefighter positions laid off over the past year on June 21, but expressed disappointment that the amount of the grant was reduced by Mayor Chris Doherty. The city applied for and received $8,175,860, which could have rehired up to 32 firefighters and filled 18 positions reduced through attrition, but that amount was reduced to $5,068,080 to fund salaries and benefits for just 30 positions, including 13 recently recalled positions and the remaining 17 currently laid off. “I’ll bring back every firefighter we laid off, but I’m not in a position to hire an additional 20 firemen. Now, for the next two years, it wouldn’t cost me anything, but that third year, the city would have to cover that cost, so I’d be paying about $1.5 million, $1.6 million of additional costs. It’s wrong of me to do that,” Doherty explained in a June 22 phone interview. “It’s what has been done in the past. Let’s take these free things now and let somebody else pay for it, and I’m not going to do that…You have to do what’s fiscally responsible.” According to letter correspondence between the city and FEMA, the city would incur an additional hardship of 66 percent of the salaries for one year if they could not afford to keep the 20 new hires on after the grant ran out. Applying for the grant on Feb. 24, the city laid off eight firefighters in August 2011 to save money and 29 more in January to balance the 2012 budget. After a series of fires throughout the city in March, 13 firefighters were rehired following criticism from the fire union and the public. Council unanimously moved the grant legislation to sixth and seventh order on Thursday to pass the money through as quickly as possible, but was frustrated that the full amount of the grant was not accepted. “This is a done deal, and it happened, basically, without the approval or the input of Scranton

GO LACKAWANNA/RICH HOWELLS

Engine 7 on 1917 Luzerne St. is one of several fire stations in the area that experiences brownouts.

City Council. I’m sure that council would have notified these (federal) departments that it felt strongly that we should be accepting the greatest number and the greatest dollar amount possible,” Council President Janet Evans said. “I am very appalled by the fact that the mayor is returning some of the money that could have been used to put more firefighters back on the job. As we know, we could have applied for this (again) in two years and, in addition to that, there are many people eligible to retire, which could have saved on unemployment costs, but we have what we have right now,” Council Vice President Frank Joyce added. Councilman Pat Rogan said that Doherty has had “this grudge against the public safety unions since day one,” and Councilman Jack Loscombe agreed that this was another example of the mayor not being able to work with and negotiate with the public safety unions. “I think it’s a slap in the face to everyone in the city, to compromise public safety,” Loscombe commented. “The only reason I’ll be voting for it is so we can get this money here before the mayor decides to send the rest of it back…He’ll take any grant for a park that he can’t maintain, but he’ll turn away money to provide safety which your tax dollars are paying for.” IAFF Local 60 President John

Judge IV said the union’s working relationship with the mayor has improved since January, but they were unable to convince Doherty to keep the other $3.1 million. “I think it’s an absolutely ridiculous move on the city’s part to turn back that money. It’s free money, no strings attached,” Judge said. “It’s further mismanagement of the city.” Judge refuted the administration’s numbers of over $1 million in additional costs after the grant’s expiration. “They wouldn’t have to pay the pension. They wouldn’t have to pay the health care, which is a big part of that cost,” he said. “They can always reapply. They could have gotten those positions again in two years when their term expired. They could have continued with that grant. It would have cost pennies on the dollar even if they had to pay that workers’ unemployment compensation.” Judge feels that the Hill Section and Keyser Valley/West Side will be most affected by the lack of 20 additional employees. “The requirements of the grant make the city put four firefighters on every piece of equipment, so the firefighters that are being called back from laid off status will actually fill the current companies that are open as the fourth men. We will continue to experience brownouts over in the central city area, the Tripp

Park area, and the Keyser Valley/West Side area…that we are experiencing now,” he continued. “Obviously, it won’t allow them to reopen the engine in the Hill Section, which if he had taken those additional bodies, it would have eliminated or severely reduced the brownouts in the city and may have allowed them to open up the engine in either Tripp Park that they permanently closed or the engine in the Hill Section that they had permanently closed.” U.S. Senator Bob Casey wrote a letter of support in March to FEMA regarding the grant and followed up with a call to FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate to stress the importance of adequately staffing the Scranton Fire Department. In a June 20 e-mail, Casey said that it is his job to fight for every possible resource to protect Pennsylvania communities and ensure that his constituents have a sense of security, which includes fighting for grants to help those communities staff their fire departments to maintain safety. “The city has to make those determinations,” Casey responded via e-mail regarding the reduction of the grant. “My job is to do whatever I can to get federal dollars that will help us give people a sense of security and just get as much help as we can for our firefighters.”


Sunday, June 24, 2012

GOLackawanna

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Starting a new chapter DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

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ost children dread going to the principal’s office, but last week it was the only place Kiera Evans and Izzie Larson wanted to be. The Whittier Elementary School students were two of many who stopped by Principal Ann McDonough’s office on the last day of school, Tuesday, June 19, looking to get one last hug goodbye. McDonough, who announced her retirement in March, said in the days leading up to the end of her 37-year career with the Scranton School District, there has been an overwhelming show of support from the students and faculty. “They’ve been unbelievable, they don’t want me to go,” said McDonough. A product of the Scranton School District herself, attending grades kindergarten through 12 in the district and graduating from West Scranton High School, McDonough began her career as a teacher. She taught pre-school at Hamilton Elementary School her first year, and Audubon Elementary her second. She became an appointed teacher the following year, and taught at Hamilton, Lincoln-Jackson and Jefferson elementary schools over the course of seven years. She was made acting principal of Lincoln-Jackson Elementary School in September of 1985 and was then appointed as principal in February of 1986. “I love teaching, absolutely, but as a principal you have an opportunity to impact all of the kids,” said McDonough. “I’ve been so blessed to have so many special moments, but most importantly is to see former students. They come back and tell me what they’re doing and how successful they are.” One of McDonough’s success stories, Isaac Tripp Elementary School fifth-grade teacher Jennifer Zaleski, had the unique experience of working for McDonough after being a student at LincolnJackson. “It was a wonderful experience, (she’s) very hands-on, always there to help you,” said Zaleski.

Zaleski said a prime example of McDonough’s hands-on approach was when students from the Pocono Mountain School District, who were involved in a pen pal program with Lincoln-Jackson students, came to visit the school in West Scranton. McDonough fired up the grill and made hamburgers and hot dogs for all the students. “She was there all afternoon in her apron flipping burgers,” said Zaleski. “She was all about being a team player.” The site of McDonough pitching in and helping out was nothing new to the students. Zaleski said McDonough made it a point

to be at as many activities for the students as possible, even after they left the school.” “She still goes to West Scranton High School’s graduation to see former students (graduate),” said Zaleski.” “She gives the students a sense that they matter to her.” Zaleski worked under McDonough for eight years, until Lincoln-Jackson was closed in 2010 and she was transferred to Isaac Tripp Elementary, and McDonough was transferred to Whittier Elementary School. Switching to Whittier, which currently has an enrollment of over 400 students, from LincolnSee CHAPTER, Page 8

Lackawanna County Commissioner Patrick M. O’Malley recognized Ann F. McDonough’s 35 years of service to the Scranton School District as a teacher and principal. McDonough retired at the end of the 2011-12 school year.

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Whittier Elementary School principal retires


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GOLackawanna

SHAKESPEARE Continued from page 3

local restaurants have offered the actors free meals and some residents have even gone shopping for the group. “The community has been phenomenal…it makes me emotional, because they’re so incredibly generous and forthcoming. They are cooking and bringing food and donating of themselves in terms of necessary production value stuff that we need,” said Caporaso. The group’s repayment to the community will be the free showing of “Midsummer Night’s Dream” on Saturday and Sunday. For any Shakespeare buffs who might be wondering, the “A” missing from the title wasn’t a mistake, it was eliminated by REV, and it’s one of several alterations the group has made to the production. “Our production is not your grandfather’s Shakespeare,” said Caporaso. “It’s very contemporary, very energetic, very athletic, very vibrant, there’s music, there’s song and dance in it.” The production offers an urban take on Shakespeare’s comedy, with the actors in modern dress, and the show features a number of contemporary songs, including “Mr. Sandman,” “Why Do Fools Fall in Love” and “Makin’ Whoopee.” The changes and additions have been made in an effort to make the play more appealing and accessible to a broader audience, but the one thing that hasn’t changed is story and the language of the play. “The story is still absolutely true, and our illustrious director Rosey Hay…she’s quiet skilled and adept, she’s worked with the (Royal Shakespeare Company), and she tells the story beautifully and crystal clearly,” said Caporaso. Flynn, who now resides in Hoboken, N.J., is serving as the play’s producer and is playing Nick Bottom in the show. He said the cast, which is made up of a mix of professional equity actors from out of town as well as local actors, has been blending together nicely. “To speak honestly, we had a readthrough, and usually you feel like there’s a weak link in the production, and I really have to say it was such a strong read-through…and I’m feeling pretty great about the talent and composition of actors and directors. I think it’s going to be a very strong production,” said Flynn. For more information on the Scranton Shakespeare Festival, visit https:// www.facebook.com/ScrantonShakespeareFestival or call 614.3313

Sunday, June 24, 2012

Dancing the night away DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

I

n life, there are people who see a problem and do nothing and those who take action. Anissa Salerno is someone who has chosen the latter. The Old Forge resident put together “Not Your Average Tweens Dance,” a dance for children with special-needs in grades third through fifth, held on Wednesday, June 27, at the Keyser Valley Community Center. “There’s just no dances for the disabled kids,” said Salerno. “The Arc… puts on a dance, but they’re for older, mentally challenged people, and that’s kind of where I got the idea.” Salerno began investigating dances in late February, hoping to find one her 10year-old son Vito, who is developmentally delayed, could attend. After realizing there was a need for something like this, and deciding she was going to be the person to fill it, Salerno began planning the event in April. She credits being able to put the dance together so quickly to Suzy Lochie and Sally Calpin, who volunteered their time, and Dr. Nick Chiumento, who made a donation. Their help, along with a number of donations made by various groups, allowed Salerno to offer the dance free of charge to the students of several school districts, including Old Forge, Pittston, Riverside and Lake-

CHAPTER Continued from page 7

Jackson, which had an average enrollment between 245 and 280 students, was something of an adjustment for McDonough, but she was up for the challenge. “It was a big change, coming to a bigger building, a bigger staff, but I don’t think I did anything differently. My modus operandi was still the same, to be accessible. I didn’t change who I was just because I had larger numbers. I still wanted it…to have a family atmosphere,” said McDonough. Whittier was housed in Saint Mary’s for the first four months of the 2010-11 school year before moving to their current location on Orchard Street in Scranton

GO LACKAWANNA/JASON RIEDMILLER

Devon Brown, Sally Calpin, Anissa Salerno, Suzy Lochie, Laslo, back row, from left, Kelsy Calpin and Vito Salerno, first row, attended “Not Your Average Tweens Dance” on Wednesday, June 27 at the Keyser Valley Community Center.

land. Salerno said originally she reached out to other school districts that were unable to participate due to various reasons. Even though they didn’t participate this year, she said she will be extending them an invitation again to a future dance. “We are hoping that this becomes yearly, so this way the kids have something to look

in January of 2011. After getting used to the new building, McDonough said retirement was not McDonough on her mind when school started this past fall. “I didn’t have any inclination I’d retire, but as the year went on, looking at where the district is, where I am in my life, what opportunities I had, a friend of mine opened her own travel agency and wanted me to work for her,” said McDonough. “I always said that I didn’t want to stay too long at the fair. And, I didn’t want to be burned out or (have people) say, ‘She shouldn’t be here, or she can’t do her job,’ so I wanted to go while I still love what I do and

forward to at the end of the year,” said Salerno. In addition to the dance at the end of the school year, Salerno said discussions have also begun to hold a dance at the beginning of the school year as well. Anyone interested in volunteering to help out with or attend a dance can call Salerno at 840.1289 for more information.

was still respected.” McDonough said she doesn’t consider this a retirement, but entering a new chapter of her life. She’s already taken a job with Thomas Tours, something she’s tried to explain to her students. “I had a little guy…gave me the biggest bear hug, and he said, ‘I don’t want you to go,’ and I said, ‘Well you know all those places that you read about in books? That’s what I’m going to be able to do now, I’m going to be able to travel and see those places. Don’t you want me to do that?’ and he said, ‘Only if I can come with you,’” said McDonough. In a way, McDonough will be taking that student with her as he and the district have become a part of her, and even though she will no longer be working there, she said she will still be a

part of the Scranton School District in one way or another. “I am so proud of being a student of the Scranton School District, a teacher in the Scranton School District, and an administer of the Scranton School District,” said McDonough. “I wish the television stations and radio stations and newspapers would be able to spend more times in our schools and see all of the great kids that we have and the talent and skills that we have and the wonderful staff. If they ever could go back and look at all the kids that have graduated from our school district and all the things they’ve done in their lives, from doctors to lawyers to dentists to teachers to principals to CEOs of companies, it’s just phenomenal. I’m blessed. I loved being a part of this school district, and I will always be an advocate.”


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GOLackawanna

The Gino J. Merli Veterans Center, located at the corner of Mulberry Street and Franklin Avenue, was packed on Saturday, June 16 for the unveiling of the memorial in honor of 2nd Lt. Carol Ann Drazba, R.N., U.S. Army Nurse Corps. Drazba was the first American military woman to be killed in the Vietnam War. The event featured keynote speakers Brigadier General Wilma Vaught of the Women’s Memorial Museum in Arlington, Va., and Major General Jimmie Keenan, Chief Commander of the Army Nurse Corps. Funds for the memorial were raised by the Friends of the Forgotten. In addition to the memorial, the four Dunmore residents who also lost their lives in Vietnam-2nd Lt. Anthony Joseph Battista, SP4 Thomas William Malloy, SP4 Karl Francis Rynearson and Pvt. Thomas Michael Wharton, were honored, their names were engraved on a bench.

Sunday, June 24, 2012

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GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012

PAGE 11

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, June 24, 2012

A one-man band

Taylor resident performs in piano competition RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

W

henever Andrew Gallagher sees a piano, he immediately has to sit down and play it. It’s no wonder, then, that he was chosen as a finalist in the Junior Division of the 2012 Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic Piano Competition on Sunday, June 10 in the Sordoni High Definition Theater at the WVIA Studios in Pittston. The performances will be featured in a radio broadcast on WVIA FM on Sunday, June 24 at 2 p.m.

The 15-year-old Taylor resident, who will be going into tenth grade at Riverside Junior/Senior High School in the fall, was among the 11 finalists chosen from 27 original contestants, with five finalists in the Junior Division, grades seven through nine, and six finalists in the Senior Division, grades 10 through 12. “My parents said that I had to learn an instrument. They didn’t care what it was – it could be steel drums, bagpipes, piano, anything – and I chose piano as my first instrument,” Gallagher recalled. “I love playing piano. I love the fullness of being able to put on a concert without needing anyone else for background or anything like that. I can do everything myself.” Starting around nine years old, Gallagher has been playing the piano for over one-third of his life, performing at Carnegie Hall in New York City at 14, but he didn’t stop there – he took up percussion in fifth grade, played gui-

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tar for a while, and also owns a trumpet, clarinet, flute, and ukulele. With influences ranging from Edvard Grieg to Billy Joel, he has also starting writing his own pieces and plans to put on a concert with music he composed as his Eagle project for Boy Scouts. “With all the stuff that I do, I don’t have much time to myself, so practicing can become a challenge to get time in,” he said. “I do a lot compared to most people. I do track and cross country, I do the three different bands. I took martial arts for a couple points. I do AV, which is sound and lighting for my school’s plays, and Boy Scouts.” His love of music, however, continues to drive him, so when he saw the competition advertised and his piano teacher asked if he would try out, he was ready with “March of the Dwarfs” by Grieg and “Etude Allegro” by Yoshinao Nakada. “With music, I’m used to playing in front of people because I’m in my school’s concert jazz and marching bands…I was more so nervous about what the judges would think rather than the audience,” Gallagher explained. “The ‘March of the Dwarfs’ was very technical. I had to move my hands and jump around a lot. It was extremely fast compared to other stuff that I’ve played.” The finalists performed their two selections before a panel of judges including Sister Joan

Paskert of the Marywood University music faculty, Eugene Albulescu of the Lehigh University music faculty, and Lawrence Loh of Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic. Gallagher made it to the final round and ended up one of the top five finishers. “I was happy that I got to the finals, but I didn’t win so I could have done better. I want to do it again when they have it again,” he said. “I’ll be in eleventh grade then, which will be the senior division, so it will be harder competition.” Already looking towards his future, Gallagher said he will probably minor in music to become a percussion instructor as a secondary profession, but his ultimate goal is to enter the medical field. “Since I’ve been little, I’ve always wanted to be a veterinarian or a doctor,” he shared. Other Junior Division performances featured on the special broadcast will be by Dominick Cristofori D’Alessandro of West Pittston, Marala Mackarey of South Abington Township, Kyler McAllister of Jefferson Township, and Sienna Marie Tabron of Wilkes-Barre. The Senior Division finalists will be showcased Sunday, July 1 at 2 p.m. WVIA FM can be found at 89.9 FM in northeast Pennsylvania, 90.3 FM in Clarks Summit, and can also be heard via an online stream at http:// www.wvia.org/radio/listen-live.

GO LACKAWANNA/RICH HOWELLS

Andrew Gallagher started playing the piano at age nine.

Andrew Gallagher was chosen as a finalist in the Junior Division of the 2012 Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic Piano Competition.

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Sunday, June 24, 2012

SHAMROCK CLUB PLANS FUNDRAISER

The newly formed Shamrock Club met for the second time recently at the Minooka Legion Post, 2929 on Birney Avenue in Scranton, and more than doubled its original size. At its inception, members decided that 100 percent of the funds raised will go to neighbors in need in the Minooka and South Side sections of Scranton, and the borough of Moosic. The group is planning a fundraising party in September in Mercantile Park in Moosic, which will feature bands, food, and games. Barry Gilhooley, a retired member of the Scranton Police Department, has been named chairman for this event. The Shamrock Club is seeking new members and all are welcome. For more information, call 342.7498. The members of the Shamrock Club include, sitting, from left, Sharon Bonan, Paul Roche, Marty Judge, Bill Fox, Jerry Connolly, Ted Helkoski, Jack Donelan, standing, Mike Olsofksky, Joe Connolly, Tom Conway, Donny Siekierka, Joe Barrett Jr., Joe Barrett Sr., Brian King, John Lamont, Jim Mott and Barry Gilhooley.

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GOLackawanna

13

Children taken out of parents’ custody

Taylor Borough Police were forced to take two children out of their parents’ custody after the parents were arrested on June 19. Police were called to 119 Storrs St., Taylor on a reported domestic disturbance on Tuesday morning. According to the police criminal complaint, police encountered Denise Tomasko, who appeared to be intoxicated at the home. Next door, police found Brent Fallon, who also appeared to be intoxicated. According to the complaint, Fallon started a fight with Tomasko, because Tomasko was using heroin Tuesday morning and did not feed their 6- and 4 –year-old daughters. Tomasko claims that during the fight Fallon threw a phone at her left ear. Tomasko admitted that she and Fallon had used heroin and oxycontin over the last few days. She also admitted that on Tuesday she took soboxone, which she has a prescription for.

With permission, police proceeded to search the house. According to the complaint, during the search officers located both new and used hypodermic needles, metal spoons with controlled substance residue, a glassine packet and an unidentified white pill. While searching Fallon, Chief Leonard Mickavicz found a bottle of clonazepan, which were prescribed to Fallon, and eight xanax tablets, which Fallon said belong to a friend. Tomasko is being charged with endangering the welfare of children and possession of drug paraphernalia. Fallon is being charged with endangering the welfare of children, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a controlled substance. Fallon and Tomasko’s two daughters were placed into protective custody and turned over to Lackawanna County Children and Youth Services. -Don McGlynn

Welcoming the next generation of railroad preservationists 2012 RailCamp at Steamtown Historic Site

Andrew Torba, center, a philosophy major with minors in entrepreneurship and political science, won the 10th Annual Great Valley Business Plan Competition (GVBPC) with his teammates Mike Toma, left, from Kings College and Charles Szymanski, right, from Drexel University. Their company, Kuhcoon LLC, an interactive social media management and growth service, is housed in the Scranton Enterprise Center. This year’s GVBPC awarded $100,000 in cash and in-kind support to two entrepreneurial teams. Those eligible to enter the competition include students from the region’s 14 colleges and universities along with non-collegiate entrepreneurs. Torba, a Moosic native, will graduate in 2013 from the University of Scranton. .

The National Railway Historical Society (NRHS), in partnership with the National Park Service at Steamtown National Historic Site (NHS), will conduct RailCamp 2012 from July 8 to 13. This program began in 1998 as a pilot project to create a forum where high school students could learn about the world of railroading, and share ideas and interests with peers from other areas of the United States. At Steamtown NHS, participants also have the opportunity to learn about the history, technology and people of the industry . RailCampers selected for participation in this year’s program will receive an introduction to the principles of historic preservation, gain first-hand experience in railroad operations and explore a variety of transportation career opportunities. While students explore a wide

variety of railroad and rail-related subjects during their stay in northeastern Pennsylvania, RailCamp also partners with Amtrak and the Canadian Pacific Railway to include day-trip visits to Amtrak’s Philadelphia and Bear, Del. facilities, and Canadian Pacific Railway’s Binghamton, N.Y. rail yards. Each year, counselors recruited from the ranks of the NRHS, an organization founded in 1935 and consisting of more than 13,000 members in 160 chapters throughout the United States, join National Park Service Rangers and volunteers to make RailCamp a fulfilling and rewarding experience. During the weeklong program, RailCamp counselors are available 24-hours a day to serve as instructors and mentors for the students. For more information, visit http://railcamp.com/program/ railcamp.


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, June 24, 2012

Geisinger board approves $125.7M upgrades for CMC When Geisinger and Community Medical Center agreed to an affiliation agreement last year, it came with the promise of a $160 million investment over the next seven years. On Thursday, June 21 the Geisinger Health System Foundation Board of Directors fulfilled the bulk of that pledge. Geisinger has approved $125.7 million in capital funding to enhance patient care in Lackawanna County. Included in the improvements are an $80 million facility expansion of Geisinger-Community Medical Center; $25.7 million to construct a new physician office building in Scranton, and a $20 million project that is already underway to upgrade the health system’s information technology unit. Now in the design phase, the $80 million facility expansion at Geisinger-Community Medical Center is scheduled to begin next spring and will include 13 operating suites, a new inten-

sive/critical care unit and medical office space. The majority of the Community Medical Center campus, including the operating rooms and intensive care unit, was built in 1967, with facility additions in 1990 and 2005. In addition to the enhancements on the Geisinger Community Medical Center campus at Mulberry Street and Colfax Avenue, Geisinger is also moving forward with a new $25.7 million Physician Office Building to replace the health system’s current community practice facility along Route 307 at Lake Scranton. The new site is located at the Mount Pleasant Corporate Center near Scranton High School. When completed in May of 2014, it will be home to Geisinger primary care, pediatric subspecialties, gynecology and other selected specialty outreach. The $20 million information technology upgrade – which includes Geisinger’s electronic health information technology – is already in progress.

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OBITUARIES

Sunday, June 24, 2012

Sandra L. Nocera JUNE 15, 2012

Sandra L. Nocera, Old Forge, died Friday, June 15, 2012 at the Evergreen Skilled Nursing Center, Scranton. She was married to Joseph "Bobo" Nocera. The couple celebrated their 53rd wedding anniversary on April 29. Born in Old Forge, she was a daughter of the late William and

Dorothy Hughes JUNE 21, 2012

Dorothy Hughes, of the Bellevue section of Scranton, died Thursday morning, June 21, 2012, in Geisinger CMC VNA Hospice Unit. Her husband is William Hughes Sr. Born in Plains Township, she was a daughter of the late Enio and Gina Regna. Educated in Plains High School, she was a member of St. Ann’s Basilica Parish and was a member of the Christian Women’s Fellowship at Trinity Congregational Church. Along with her husband and son, she was the owner/proprietor of Gemma’s Pizza on Railroad Avenue, Scranton. Dorothy was a loving mother and gammy who was known to her friends and customers as Mamma Gemma. She is also survived by her son, William Hughes Jr., and wife Sheila, Scranton; and her daughter, Rhonda Grzymski, and husband Kevin, Shavertown; four grandchildren, Kyra, Gabrielle and Ethan Grzymski, and Bryce Hughes. Her funeral was held on Saturday, June 23 with services at 9:30 a.m. in the Edward J. Chomko Funeral Home, 254268 Railroad Ave., West Scranton, by the Rev. Frank Shimkus, Pastor of Trinity Congregational Church, Scranton. In lieu of flowers, memorials can be sent to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Online condolences can be made at www.chomkofuneralhome.com.

GOLackawanna

Leona Neipert Brown. She attended the Old Forge Public Schools. Prior to her retirement, she was employed by WEA Manufacturing and the Old Forge school cafeteria. She was a member of the Prince of Peace Church, Old Forge. Sandra was a devoted and loving wife, mother and grand-

mother. She enjoyed camping and trips to the casino. The family extends a special thank you for the compassionate care given by the staff at the Evergreen Skilled Nursing Center, Dr. Armondo Sallavanti, Denise Talerico and her best friend, Albina Ciliberto. Sandra was preceded in death by a sister, Rosella Warpus. Surviving are two sons, William, Joseph and wife, Christine, all of Old Forge; daughter, Jo-Ann

Fisher and husband, Rod, Duryea; two brothers, William "Bud" Brown, Ransom; James Brown, Clarks Summit; nine grandchildren, Brittany and Joey Fisher; Bill, Nico, Alexandra, Cassandra, and Joey Nocera, Brian and Eric Wrubel; nieces, and nephews. The funeral was held Monday, June 18 from the Louis V. Ciuccio Funeral Home, 145 Moosic Road, Old Forge, followed by Mass at St. Lawrence’s Church, Old Forge.

Dorothy M. Clunan

she worked for many years. Throughout the years, she made many baby hats and blankets, which she graciously donated to all the area hospital. She was a faithful parishioner of Mary, Mother of God Parish at Holy Rosary Church. Also surviving are a son, Michael Bugonowicz, Hanover Township; three step-daughters, Nancy Joyce, Maureen Locker and Kelly Clunan; a step-son Joseph Clunan, all of Scranton; a brother, Frank Suponcis and wife, Ceil, Luzerne; a sister, Theresa Laforet, North Olmsted, Ohio; 10 grandchildren and five great grandchildren; nieces and nephews.

A daughter Faith Deutermann, who passed away May 25, 2012; a sister Mary Benarick and three brothers, Michael, Joseph and Edmund Suponcis preceded her in death. A Memorial Mass will be held at Mary, Mother of God Parish at Holy Rosary Church at a later date. Interment with military honors will be Cathedral Cemetery. There will be no public calling hours. Arrangements by the Semian Funeral Home, 704 Union St., Taylor. Please visit www.semiancares.com to share memories or extend condolences.

JUNE 13, 2012

Dorothy M. Clunan, 87, of Taylor, died Wednesday at Regional Hospital of Scranton. Her faithful and devoted husband, Gerard of 28 years survives her. Born on September 20,1924, in Forest City, she was the daughter of the late Michael and Gertrude O’Koren Suponcis. On November 11, 1943, Dorothy enlisted to faithfully serve our country with the US Army during WWII. She was a medical technician and was awarded the good conduct medal. In 1989, she retired from Anemostat, where

Theodore J. Brooks JUNE 20, 2012

Theodore J. Brooks, age 91, died Wednesday afternoon, June 20, 2012, at the Riverside Rehabilitation and Nursing Center, Taylor. He was the husband of Eleanor Mroczkowski Brooks, who passed away in 2001. He was born in Exeter, a son of the late John and Joanna Kozlowski Brooks, and was a graduate of the Old Forge High School. He was employed as a machinist for Garwood Industries, Exeter, and was an expert Schwinn Technician for Sickler’s Bicycle Shops in Wilkes-Barre and Scranton. He was a member of Prince of Peace Parish and the former St. Michael’s Church, Old Forge. He was an Army Air Corps Veteran of World War II stationed in the Galapagos Islands, and he also served in the Civilian Conservation Corps in Idaho.

William Willard Clark Sr. JUNE 18, 2012

William Willard Clark Sr., of the Greenwood section of Moosic, died Monday afternoon, June 18, at Geisinger Community Medical Center. He is survived by his loving and devoted wife of 53 years, the former Sally J. Llewellyn Clark. Born in Scranton, on September 9, 1935, he was the son of the

He was an avid hunter who hunted until he was in his 80s. He also had a love for fishing. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Cynthia Koss; a brother, Francis Brooks; sisters Florentine Graham, Zelma McCloskey and Nancy Strzalka. Surviving is a son, Ronald J., and his wife, Pat, Lehman Township; four grandchildren; three greatgrandchildren; sisters Stephanie "Pat" Sickler, Swoyersville; Rosemary Ash and Joan Travis, both of Michigan; nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held Monday, June 25 at 10 a.m. in St. Mary’s Church, Grace and Lawrence St., Old Forge. Interment will be in St. Stanislaus Cemetery, Old Forge. There will be no public calling hours. Contributions may be made to Meals on Wheels of Lackawanna County. The Palermo and Zawacki Funeral Home Inc., 409 N. Main St., Old Forge, is in charge of arrangements.

late William T. and Tillie Kautz Clark. Prior to his retirement, Bill worked for Harper-Collins, Dunmore, for 38 years. His family was the center of his life, especially his grandchildren. He always enjoyed telling a good joke and was an avid Cowboy’s fan. Also surviving are three daughters, Debra Crawford and husband, Darryl; Lori Cook and Linda Propes and husband, George; all of Scranton; four sons, Barry and wife, Ellen, Avoca; William Jr.; James and wife, Sandy all of

Scranton; Albert, Moosic; 23 grandchildren; 21 great grandchildren; a brother Brenton, Moosic; and a sister Elizabeth Raebel, Scranton; nieces and nephews. The funeral was held Friday, June 22 in the Semian Funeral Home, 704 Union St., Taylor, with services by the Reverend Arden Hollister. Please visit www.semiancares.com to share memories or extend condolences.

15

Anne J. Bordo JUNE 19, 2012

Anne J. Bordo, 81, Old Forge, died Tuesday, June 19, 2012, at The Jewish Home of Eastern Pennsylvania. Surviving are daughter, Karen Bordo; son, Teddy Kresky; four grandchildren; several nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial was held Friday, June 22 in St. Mary of the Assumption Church, Old Forge, celebrated by the Rev. Joseph Cipriano, former pastor. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made, in Anne’s name, to the Griffin Pond Animal Shelter, 967 Griffin Pond Rd., Clarks Summit, PA 18411. Please visit www.KearneyFuneralHome.com for directions or to leave an online condolence.

Emma Josephine Goham JUNE 17, 2012

Emma Josephine Goham, age 90, of the Belin Village section of Moosic, passed away Sunday evening, June 17, 2012, at Geisinger Community Medical Center in Scranton. She was preceded in death by her beloved husband of 44 years, Thomas F. Goham, on August 25, 1998. She is survived by her son, Thomas D. Goham of West Chester; her brother, Aldo Leonori of Scranton; and numerous nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial was scheduled for Saturday, June 23 in St. Mary of the Assumption Church, Prince of Peace Parish, in Old Forge. Arrangements are under the care of the Thomas P. Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 517 N. Main St., Old Forge.

In Memory

Patrick L. Conflitti February 10, 1918 ~ June 23, 1972

Forty years ago, It broke our hearts to lose you, But you did not go alone, For part of us went with you, The day God called you home. You are forever in our hearts. With Love from your Children and Grandchildren


16

GOLackawanna

Sunday, June 24, 2012

How to stay fit on budget

I

t seems that every three out of five people that I know are on some sort of diet or follow a fitness plan. From expensive shakes to underused gym memberships, people are paying a crazy amount of money to get a beach body for the summer. It’s not rocket science that getting fit requires some sort of exercise.

Make sure to research gym memberships and compare the monthly cost for each family member. Most gyms offer a free trial period to test everything out, whether it is three days or 30 days make sure you try before you buy. It’s important to take all membership benefits into consideration before making a one year commitment. Ask if there are any fees for canceling membership early or freezing membership. Baby sitting service is a must for me, but some gyms charge extra or charge a daily fee to use this benefit. Hours of operation and schedule of classes are also important. Join with a friend in order to take advantage of special deals and to keep each other motivated to get the most out of a membership. Most people think that Planet Fitness offers the best deal for a gym; however, for me it doesn’t offer any of the membership benefits like exercise classes or babysitting services. Subscribe to discounted fitness magazines. Check sites like DiscountedMags.com for deals less than $4 a year for fitness magazines. These magazines will help keep you motivated, provide work out tips, low calorie food recipes and even detailed home workouts can be fun to read. Find the best deals on fitness apparel by using coupons and browsing discount racks. I tend to find the best sneaker deals on clearance since most of the styles are just outdated or the sporting goods store is just looking to make room for new styles.

DEAL DETECTIVE JENNA URBAN Don’t be afraid to purchase fitness apparel at Wal-Mart, Sam’s Club, or Target. Not only can you find some great deals, but the quality of the items are similar to brand name clothing they just don’t have a brand name logo on the product. Working out at home can save you a ton of money. Check your on-demand stations or try to DVR exercise programs. Look to rent fitness DVDs from the library or purchase them online from Amazon.com, which sells discounted, used DVDs and games. If you own a gaming system, look to buy games that allow you to work out to Zumba or dance party type themes. Most gaming systems offer a variety of work out games that are fun and inexpensive. Don’t rush out and buy expensive exercise equipment that will someday act as storage for clothing. For a successful workout at home, purchase light weights and an exercise ball. One of my favorite workout videos is the Jillian Michaels’ “30 Day Shred,” because they’re quick 30 minute workouts and there’s low overhead on equipment. Last time that I checked, walking was free. Try to go for a 30 minute walk every day or at least four times a week. Research shows that brisk walking for 10 minutes, three times a day can be as beneficial as walking 30 minutes. There are times that I plan my walk around errands like going to the post office, mini trips to the drugstore or taking the kids to the park. Staying fit doesn’t have to break the bank. It’s important to know in advance how much money you can dedicate a year to fitness and plan activities and goals around that budget. There are ways to be successful with all types of budgets, just find the one that works for you. Do you have a fitness tip that saves you money? Share it with us at facebook.com/golackawanna

Phil Vahey

Ryan Levan

BLUE DEVILS KEEP IT CLEAN

GO LACKAWANNA/RICK NOTARI

Mike Vieira directs residents to the Old Forge High School football team’s car wash on Saturday, June 16 at Ace Hardware on Main Street in Old Forge.

Ken

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Sunday, June 24, 2012

Airing local dirty

LAUNDRY Scranton StorySlam brings local celebrities on stage By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

Everyone has some “dirty laundry” in their hamper, but not everyone is brave enough to air it out in front a crowd. But, for the sake of entertainment and good old-fashioned storytelling, Abington Heights High School rising senior Zoe McNichols and her mother, Pamela McNichols, have gathered a group of local celebrities to do just that for the second Scranton StorySlam, where they will share a true, personal, five-minute story without notes inspired by the theme “Dirty Laundry.” The first, held at the former Vintage Theater in Scranton in March, was organized by Zoe as her senior project with the help of Maureen McGuigan, the Lackawanna County Deputy Director for Arts and Culture. She was inspired by a storyslam in Brooklyn, N.Y. produced by The Moth, an organization that conducts live storytelling events, and IF YOU GO decided that Scranton What: Scranton would be the next among StorySlam many other major cities Where: The Banshee, to adopt the events. 320 Penn Ave., “It was such a big sucScranton cess. We had over 160 When: Saturday, June 30, doors 7 people at the last event, p.m., show at 8 p.m. and people loved it. PeoCost: $5, all ages ple expressed that they More info: wanted to be able to tell www.scrantonstotheir own stories. When ryslam.com Zoe did it as a senior project the first time, we anticipated that it would get a warm reception here in Scranton. Ideally, we wanted it to be something that was ongoing like it is in other cities,” Pamela McNichols explained. “We had no idea what we would get, and we never expected such a great turnout.” Following that success, the second is scheduled for Saturday, June 30 at The Banshee, 320 Penn Ave., Scranton, a venue that will not only be more comfortable, but allow the storyslams to grow. “The Banshee is much larger and can handle a lot more people…They serve food and have over 50 craft beers on tap, so I think people will be happy. And they’re willing to do an all-ages show, so we can continue to include the teens. At the last event we had kids all the way up to people in their 70s. It was a wide audience,” she said. “We always pick a general theme just to tie the See LAUNDRY, Page 22

GOLackawanna

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Sunday, June 24, 2012


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012

PAGE 19


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, June 24, 2012

DeVaughn Chollette and Jonathan Kobrynich.

The graduation was held in West Scranton High School’s auditorium.

Salutatorian Jonathan Kobrynich

Destiny Kupchak and Sierra Bachman.

West Scranton High School held its graduation on Tuesday, June 19.


Sunday, June 24, 2012

GOLackawanna

21

WEST SCRANTON GRADUATION 2012

Valedictorian Maura Sare.

GO LACKAWANNA/JASON RIEDMILLER

West Scranton High School held its 70th Commencement Ceremony on Tuesday, June 19 in the school’s auditorium. The class valedictorian is Maura Sare. The class salutatorian is Jonathan Kobrynich. Members of West Scranton’s Class of 2012 are: Fyonna Marie Abbott, Dregg Ackies, Kristopher Michael Adkins, Christopher Ajodha, Justin Michael Ambrozia, Rafael Aquino, Samantha Ann Arvonio, Sierra Marie Bachman, Tyrell DeVaughn Bacon, Tyrone Derrell Bacon Jr., DaShawna Brianna Baldwin, Joseph N. Baress, Lyndsay Frances Bartos, Nancy Anne Bartosch, Bria Best, Calvin William Bloom, Ross Anthony Joseph Bonaddio II, Seth Michael Bowen, Alicia Renee Boyette, Mar’ve Elisabeth Brent, Geyshelle Brown, Aryssara Bryndzia, Alicia Lynn Buck, Gary Robert Buzzinski, Shauna Lee Carey, Carla Elena Castro, Nathaniel Cespedes, Garrett Michael Cerra, Davendra Chatterpaul, DeVaughn V. Chollette, Alycen Marie Ciccotti, Paul Joseph Cimino, Lindsay Anne Cockerill, Jerry James Cocozello, Michelle Theresa Collins, Kristin Ann Conroy, Marissa Ann Conway, Toni Mae Cope, Leah Cornejo, Michael Kane Crowell, Megan Deninno, Jacob Pasquale DeSarno, Isabella DiBileo, Margaret Colleen Donnelly, Dylan Wade Doran, Kaitlyn Nicole Ekdahl, Pamela Ashleigh Eremo, Dylan Evans, Jessica Lynn Evans, Joe Evans, Eric Ramon Evo, Leyna Marie Fabbri, Brett Feigenwinter, Madeline Estelle Ferrara, Laea Marie Figula, Ryan J. Fiori, Chante Nicole Forester, Chastity Ann Fox, Samantha Joy Freeman, Stephanie Samone Gadson, Frank Christopher Galdieri, Erick Garcia, Casey Marie Gaul, Kevin Aloysius Getts, Ryan Michael Pedro Ghantous, Colleen Gilbert, Brandon Anthony Gogas, Vincent James Goldstein, Gabriella Marie Goldstein, Joseph Leonard Granville, Elizabeth Ann Graziano, John M. Graziano Jr., Martina Green, Galen M. Haggerty, Christina Renea Hallock, Brendon Thomas Harris, Cassidy Lyn Harrity, Adam Jeffrey Hayes, Tom Hendry, Jesse G. Hernandez, Vanessa Hernandez, Noe Herrera, Yovany Herrera, William Richard Hoffman Jr., Catrina Lenn Howey, Jackelyn Pamela Huanira, Paul Hunsinger, Tawny Ann Husosky, Jeremy Incelli, Nicole Marie James, Richard Jenkins Jr., Andrea Shawnese Johnson, Jessica Elizabeth Johnson, Brian Jones, Damian Thomas Jones, Raven Marie Jones, Shelby Elizabeth Karboski, John Allan Kearney, Matthew Ed-

ward Kearney, Dana Lynn Kearney, Tina Marie Keiper, Corey Ryan Kelly, Daniel James Kelly, Sierra Faith Kennedy, Kelsie Marie Kiehart, Robert Kitchen, Jonathan Paul Kobrynich, Thomas Joseph Kraser, Destiny Marie Kupchak, Victoria Lynn Kusy, David Stephen Labukas, Moira Kelcey Langan, Matthew Langan, Connor Ryan Langan, Courtney Lasher, Samantha J. Lee, Nick Ryan Leshinski, Dylan Paul Lindberg, Vyacheslav Litvin, Tyler William Loney, John Andrew Long, Marisha Christine Lozada, Dominic Joseph Ludovici, James Lamarr Maconeghy Jr., Patrick Malloy, Nathan Manning, Andrew A. Martinelli, Tyler James Matis, Alexander James Matoushek, Carlos Jermaine Matthew, Morgan Ann Matyjevich, Kc Mauleon, Kevin McGeehan, Khadijah D. McNeill, Kailey Mellen, Kyle John Meyers, Victoria Louise Miller, Sabrina Michele Miller, Vince Miller, Pamiek Minor, Marcus Jerome Moody, Jessica Raine Moser, Glynn David Murphy Jr., Mary Alice Murphy, Keita Jamar Murray, Jason Mutschler, Amethyst Elizabeth Myers, Macy Elizabeth Nicholson, Kendra Jean Nidoh, Janel Theresa Nidoh, Brigid H. Noakes, Steven Nolan, Adam Noone, Jessica Nowakowski, Dalaila Angeli Ortiz, Caitlin Marie Padden, Jerome P. Palauskas III, Mason David Payonk, Lindsay Michele Pendrak, Gina Noel Petrillo, Joseph Peter Price, Tyler Jacob Rakauskas, Daniel Robert Repshis III, Kody Richardson, Marvin F. Rodriguez, Marcos R. Royce, Shane Alan Royce, Kyle Saldonis, Maria Christina Salerno, Angelina Adrienne Salmons, Tessa Salzmann, Maura Erin Sare, Chapell Renee Sawyer, Catarina Ann Schroeder, LaToya L. Shafe, Breanna Ashley Shafer, Elizabeth Marie Skitzki, Anthony Maurice Smith, Andrew Soulinhavong, Belinda Sanglavy Souriyavong, Robert D. Southard Jr., Matthew Sowka, Brooke Marie Spindler, Mia Stanvitch, Victoria M. Sterling, Jasmine Samone Stokes, Tessa Renee Stratz, Ashley Olivia Strein, Mariah Strickland, Dereck Ryan Sutton, Malcolm Lee Sweeting, Albert John Taylor, Brian Pawor Temsamrit, Rebecca Topa, Shanice Shoviri Tucker, Melissa Marie Tuffy, Anna Margaret Tunney, Gabrielle Valvano, Rosanelly Veloz Espinal, Brian Robert Voytek, Brianna Walsh, Malin Mary Walsh, Tara Walsh, Natalie Marie Wasko, Cameron Justin Williams, Bethany Amber Rachel Youshock, Michael Anthony Zaccheo, and Kathryn Elizabeth Zellers.


22

GOLackawanna

Sunday, June 24, 2012

LAUNDRY Continued from page 17

night together and all the stories together and also to allow the storytellers the freedom to take it wherever they want to go…We wanted something that would get people’s attention, so it’s a little bit racy, but it’s a broad theme, so storytellers can take it in any direction. In fact, some of them are taking it literally, or they might have a combination of talking about laundry but also airing dirty laundry in that they’re going to be sharing secrets about themselves or their families.” Local actor Conor McGuigan will return as Master of Ceremonies, and the storytellers this time are poet and manager at Library Express Andrea Talarico; comedian and Rock 107 DJ Dave DiRienzo; filmmaker and Community Film Project President Jeff Fowler; poet and co-founder of Prose in Pubs Jim Warner; freelance writer, SEO at Solid Cactus, and NEPA BlogCon co-organizer Mandy Boyle; documentarian and playwright Maureen McGuigan; comedian, actor, and accounting instructor Nancy Cummings; and illustrator, educator, and AFA Gallery’s Drawing So-

NEPA BlogCon co-organizer Mandy Boyle will serve as one of the storytellers for Scranton StorySlam.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CHRIS WORONCHUK

Jeff Fowler, Nancy Cummings and Ted Michalowski will participate in Scranton StorySlam on Saturday, June 30 at The Banshee.

cial host Ted Michalowski. “We look for people who are active in the art community – writers, performers, people that kind of have a following that will want to come out and hear them tell a story…It’s nice if people know them. That kind of helps because then you can really generate some hype about the event, and

then more people come out,” McNichols noted. Courageous audience members can also spill their secrets on stage, as two of 10 spots in the lineup are reserved for those who put their name in a hat and will be chosen at random. A panel of judges, including Marywood University professor Laurie McMil-

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lan and Tunkhannock Area High School teacher Katie Wisnosky, will decide the winner, who will take home fifty dollars and a Slammy, the Scranton StorySlam trophy. “I like the sense of community when everyone’s there. It’s such an engaging environment, because when you’re telling a story,

it’s different than reading a story. There’s a spontaneity to it. People just have a really good time, and I like that it’s like a literary event that people are excited about. They obviously want something like this because so many people came out the last time, and I’m hoping that’s the case this time because that will tell me that this community really likes this kind of engagement, relating to others,” McNichols observed. “I’m looking forward to the stories, of course, and also just being together and having a good time. The storytellers really get excited and their friends really enjoy hearing the tales…I can’t wait to hear what kinds of stories people come up with…The possibilities are endless.”


Sunday, June 24, 2012

GOLackawanna

SPORTS BRIEFS

LITTLE LEAGUE

Playoff brackets set D

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

istricts 17 of Pennsylvania Little League set its many baseball and softball playoff brackets this week. Play was scheduled to get underway earlier this week in Little League (11-12-year-old) softball and Saturday, June 23 for Little League (11-12) baseball. The 9-10-year-old baseball tournament joins in today, Sunday, June 24 with various age groups to follow. District 17 administrator Mike Serino said that the district will host the 9-10-year-old softball Eastern Regional at Christy Mathewson’s Fleetville field this summer.

“Right now, there is no Little League World Series at that age,” Serino said. “The farthest they go is regionals, although it is in the works to change that. “There will be teams from nine or 10 states coming in to play.” The Eastern Regional begins July 28. A look at each age group of District 17 baseball and softball play: 9-10 BASEBALL Old Forge, Moosic, Taylor and West Scranton all have teams entered in the 12-team event, which starts today, Sunday, June 24 with three pools of four teams each. Taylor hosts a doubleheader today. Old Forge and Moosic play each other in a 1 p.m. Pool B game. Taylor hosts Abington National at 3 in Pool C. West Scranton opens with a 3 p.m. game against Connell Park/East Scranton at East Scranton in Pool C. Pool play continues with doubleheaders Tuesday and Thursday. Moosic hosts a doubleheader Tuesday. Old Forge and West Scranton, which will play at the Lackawanna Little League Field, each host doubleheaders Thursday. Taylor and West Scranton meet Thursday at 7:30 p.m.

All teams play games Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday to complete round-robins within their pools. The top two in each pool advance to double-elimination play which begins June 30. 9-10 SOFTBALL Old Forge is one of four teams entered in the tournament. Play begins Monday, June 25 with Old Forge facing Jefferson at North Pocono at 5:30 p.m. to start the double-elimination event. 10-11 BASEBALL West Scranton and Old Forge are entered in the seven-team event. West Scranton is in Pool A where it will play Christy Mathewson at North Pocono July 3 at 7:30 p.m. in the first of its three pool games. Old Forge will host both of its games in Pool B, where it goes against Abington American July 3 and Abington National July 5 in 5:30 p.m. games. The double-elimination portion of the tournament starts July 9. 10-11 SOFTBALL Old Forge will play at Christy Mathewson July 10 at 6 p.m. in the first game of a best-of-three championship series.

LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL West Scranton is in Pool A, Moosic and Taylor in Pool B and Old Forge in Pool C for the 12team tournament that was scheduled to begin Saturday, June 23. Pool play continues with games Monday and Wednesday. Old Forge will host a Monday doubleheader in which it is scheduled to face Jefferson at 7:30 p.m. The tournament then proceeds to double-elimination.

LITTLE LEAGUE SOFTBALL Old Forge, Christy Mathewson and North Pocono make up a three-team, double-elimination event that is already underway. JUNIOR LEAGUE BASEBALL West Scranton and Old Forge are part of the nine-team field that will play a double-elimination bracket. Following a single game Friday, the tournament has four winners’ bracket quarterfinals set Saturday, including West Scranton against Christy Mathewson at 10 a.m. and Old Forge against Connell Park/East Scranton at Connell Park at 1 p.m. JUNIOR LEAGUE SOFTBALL Old Forge will play Christy Mathewson at Factoryville July 3 at 6 p.m. to begin a doubleelimination tournament that also includes North Pocono. SENIOR LEAGUE BASEBALL West Scranton is part of a seven-team double-elimination tournament and will host a doubleheader July 1 when it begins. West Scranton will play Christy Mathewson that day at 1 p.m. before South Scranton and North Pocono meet in another winners’ bracket quarterfinal.

SWB Yankees to be renamed The Scranton/WilkesBarre Yankees took steps Wednesday, June 20 toward having the franchise renamed. Art Matin, CEO of Mandalay Baseball and acting general manager of the SWB Yankees, LLC, said in a press release that the team is seeking help in determining a new name. “We want people throughout NEPA and surrounding areas to help rename your hometown baseball team,” Matin said. Fans can enter their choice for the team name at swbyankees.com. Entry forms will also be available at the team’s temporary front office location at 50 Glenmaura National Blvd., Suite 101, Moosic. The winning submission will receive a prize package that includes two season tickets for 2013. Six finalists will be selected and announced in early June. The community will then be able to vote for its favorite name until July 30. The Yankees will return to Moosic for the 2013 season after the reconstruction of PNC Field is complete. The team reached 10 games over .500 on June 17 despite playing its entire 2012 schedule away from home. McMyne’s team takes first-half title Old Forge graduate Kyle McMyne was part of the California League Northern Division first-half championship for the Bakersfield Blaze. McMyne went 1-1 with a 6.23 earned run average in nine relief appearances during the first half. He was a second-round pick by the Cincinnati Reds in the 2011 Major League Baseball Draft. Spangenberg in all-star game Abington Heights graduate Cory Spangenberg started at second base for the California League Tuesday, June 19 night when it lost to the California League, 9-1, in an all-star game between the

23

two advanced Class A leagues in Winston-Salem, N.C. Spangenberg, a secondyear pro playing for the Lake Elsinore Storm, went 0-for-1 with a walk. He batted eighth in the California League order. Spangenberg batted .291 in 66 games in the first half of the season. Wartman excels in Big 33 Game Valley View graduate and Penn State recruit Nyeem Wartman was one of the defensive leaders for Pennsylvania throughout a 24-21 overtime loss to Ohio in the Big 33 Football Classic June 16 at Hersheypark Stadium. Wartman made four tackles, including one for a threeyard loss, and assisted on six others. He also broke up a pass. Wartman started at outside linebacker. Miners win opener, 21-20 The NEPA Miners held on for a 21-10, non-league victory over the Capital City Atoms June 16 in their football season opener at Scranton Memorial Stadium. Joe Piazza and Jayson Davis each threw touchdown passes for the Miners. Nick Del Grosso caught three passes for 48 yards and Marc Best ran 12 times for 75 yards. Shane Tosh had 10 tackles and Aaron Rushin had 2 1/2 sacks to lead the defense. The Miners were scheduled to be back in action Saturday night against the Red City Outlaws. Marywood plans soccer camp Marywood University will be hosting a two-day soccer camp for girls entering Grades 9 to 12. The camp, which will be held August 4 and 5, has a cost of $150 for overnight campers and $125 for commuters. Group discounts are available. For more information, contact Marywood women’s soccer coach Andrew Smith at 592.4261 or aesmith@marywood.edu. -compiled by Tom Robinson


PAGE 24

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GOLackawanna

TITLE IX 40TH ANNIVERSARY

Sunday, June 24, 2012

SIGNS OF THE TIMES

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

T

he signs along Keyser Avenue welcome drivers from Scranton into Taylor by celebrating the Riverside School District’s state champions. The unbeaten 1986-87 Lady Vikes basketball team is recognized on one sign. Heidi Wolfsberger’s 1998 title in the 3200-meter run is remembered on the other. The two state titles, which each came in Class AA, are signs of how things have changed since 1972. Title IX celebrated its 40th anniversary Saturday.

Prior to Title IX, the Lady Vikes basketball players and Wolfsberger could not have won state championships. They did not exist for girls in Pennsylvania. Title IX, which was part of the Education Amendments to the Civil Rights Act of 1964, made it illegal for schools receiving federal financial assistance to discriminate, on the basis of sex, in any education program or activity. As a legal requirement and moral obligation, Title IX was not about the state titles. It was about the chance to participate in and the residual opportunities that often evolved from sports and the pursuit of state titles. With the help of alterations that were made in the years after it was passed, Title IX covered recruitment, admissions, financial aid, facilities, housing, course offerings and access to programs and activities that included sports. Sports have often been at the forefront of the debates that surrounded Title IX and the visible changes that have resulted.

GO LACKAWANNA/JASON RIEDMILLER

Riverside School District’s state champions are still being celebrated with two signs along Keyser Avenue in Taylor.

Tom Nageli, who coached Riverside to the state basketball title and another championship game appearance, noticed how much more acceptable it became for younger girls to be playing basketball once the high school girls found success. Nageli’s first team included freshman Paula Oleksy, an eventual 2,000-point scorer, and a talented sophomore class. “A lot of the younger kids started looking up to them and coming to the games,” said Nageli, who took over for the 1978-79 season. “Before I took over, I never noticed girls playing basketball on the corners or in the parks. “Then, there seemed to be more and more girls playing and

even girls playing against boys and it kept getting better.” Nageli found a group of young women eager to learn all they could about the game. The quality of basketball being played rose quickly with Riverside leading the way to the development of a strong Lackawanna League. “Our girls could really shoot the ball,” Nageli said. “The only thing that might have been a little different was the physicality of the game, but as far as passing, dribbling, shooting, we had the same skills as the boys and I really felt as people came to realize this, that is what made girls basketball really start to take off.” Oleksy moved on to a successful career at Mansfield University

and the Lady Vikes built their state title run around a new group. Senior captains Mary Lisowski, Lisa Sporer and Jennifer Oustrich went on to Division I, II and III college careers respectively. “We had girls get their educations paid for because of basketball,” Nageli said. Some of the top players kept contact with the game by coaching on different levels when their playing days were done. Heidi Wolfsberger Peoples did the same. She returned to teach at Riverside, coached in the successful Marywood University cross country program and kept her running career going. A six-time district champion in track and field, Peoples went on

to win Division III All-American honors 11 times at Moravian University between cross country, indoor track and field and outdoor track and field. She won a national indoor 1,500-meter title and was a two-time national cross country runner-up. Peoples has since become one of the nation’s top female road racers, winning two Steamtown titles and finishing 29th among women at the Boston Marathon. In addition to the state championships produced at Riverside, the Old Forge girls have had a history of success in basketball and softball on the Class A levels. The Lady Devils reached the 2009 state softball final where they lost to Curwensville, 1-0.

“The only thing that might have been a little different was the physicality of the game, but as far as passing, dribbling, shooting, we had the same skills as the boys and I really felt as people came to realize this, that is what made girls basketball really start to take off.” — Tom Nageli


Sunday, June 24, 2012

TITLE IX 40TH ANNIVERSARY

GOLackawanna

27

40 years of change in sports By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

T

itle IX did its best to guarantee opportunity. It could not guarantee acceptance. One of the most significant steps in the women’s rights movements took place 40 years ago this weekend. Congress passed Title IX of the Education Amendments to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on June 23, 1972.

“Sports” are not specifically mentioned in the wording of Title IX. Equal access to all educational programs was the key. Athletic programs were part of the educational experience and after 1972 it was no longer legal to limit the number of available programs and the chance to obtain athletic scholarships to male athletes only. “No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation under any educational programs or activity receiving federal financial assistance,” according to Title IX. Public schools had to show they were progressing toward gender equity in the sports they offered. The progress sometimes moved slowly but it was guaranteed to happen unless schools wanted to risk the loss of funding and potential lawsuits. Title IX could create opportunities for Michele Symosh Long, but she soon found out acceptance would take longer. Long was on the first high school girls’ basketball and softball teams at Old Forge. When the current principal of All Saints Academy in West Scranton became the school’s first female 1,000point scorer in basketball, there were some who saw the accomplishment as meaningless. “Back in the day 40 years ago, you were trying to prove yourself to the male athlete,” Long said. Long found this was true of faculty members as well as fellow students. “I can remember vividly when I scored my 1,000th point, they put a showcase up in the lobby,” she

FILE PHOTO

The Old Forge High School female 1,000-point scorers, pictured from left, kneeling, Krista Renzi Galella, Marissa Hastings, and Kim Kaville; standing, Michele Symosh Long, Linda Branas, Aimee Thomas, Ann Marie and Jack Dougherty - representing their daughter Jackie Dougherty Cusano, Tanya Gillette, Vita and James Giacometti - representing their daughter Aimee Giacometti Marsico, and Allison Pikulski Lucarelli

said. “There was a male coach who wanted to know what was going on and said this was utterly ridiculous. “You had to fight for everything.” Long’s accomplishment received better treatment beginning in February. Banners recognizing all of the school’s 1,000-point scorers, girls and boys, were raised at the gym in the culmination of the senior project for Michael Long, a 2011 graduate and Michele’s son. The imbalance remains with female sports lacking an alternative to match football in profile and participation. Otherwise, girls and boys sports are very close to equal in participation, following and financing in high school and the women’s sports continue to gain on their men’s

counterparts on the college level. Title IX improved access to higher education, financial aid and housing for female students often with the help of its profound impact on athletics. It was the action responsible for removing barriers to courses like criminal justice and industrial arts for female students as well as allowing male students to take home economics. Before Title IX, only four Lackawanna County public schools participated in a girls basketball league and that was just getting started. The other schools that had teams often conducted them on an informal basis with once-aweek practices, no junior varsity and just a handful of games, often played as a prelim to a boys game. The Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association was

not yet conducting girls state championships. On the national level, about one in 27 high school girls – fewer than 300,000 total—were involved in sports, according to the Associated Press. Less than 32,000 played sports in college and the National Collegiate Athletic Association ignored many of them, leaving it up to the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women to produce the biggest events. Less than two years later, high school sports participation by girls had more than quadrupled to 1.3 million. Resistance remained, leading to the Department of Health, Education and Welfare being assigned the task of developing the guidelines for how changes would be implemented and ad-

herence to Title IX would be assessed. Most of those regulations specifically addressed athletic programs. Long remembers being in a multi-purpose room to work on ball-handling skills only for practices in the early years because the boys had the gym – and the baskets – whether it was to prepare a varsity, junior varsity or junior high team. “We never could have the gym right after school, because the boys had to have it,” she said. Launching varsity basketball and softball teams had often been the starting point. Other options were being added to the mix. And, programs were growing to include junior varsity and junior high feeder programs, matching See CHANGE, Page 28


28

GOLackawanna

TITLE IX 40TH ANNIVERSARY

Title IX gave girls the chance they deserved

CHANGE Continued from page 27

their male counterparts. Former Riverside girls basketball coach and athletic director Tom Nageli remembers the expansion of the number of programs and levels offered being an emphasis late in his career. Earlier, Nageli witnessed the growth in basketball while building District 2’s most successful girls program. Nageli recalls Riverside and Dunmore playing for the district title in his first season in 1979. The game was played at 10 in the morning in a virtually empty Scranton Catholic Youth Center. By the time the Lady Vikes made their first state championship game appearance in 1982, the road to Hershey included multiple busloads of fans following the Riverside girls. The Lady Vikes were unbeaten Class AA champions in 1986-87, by then outscoring and outdrawing the school’s successful boys team, at times. Riverside alone drew more than 1,000 fans for some of its biggest games. To the outsider, the Riverside girls had reached equality. At the time, however, the team locker room was a converted storage room more suited for its eventual use as an office. The girls were jammed into their little office while the boys had their own locker room. “That’s just the way it was,” said Jennifer Oustrich, one of the senior captains on the state championship team. “They didn’t have locker rooms and things like that for the girls. The girls kind of took a backseat, but I never saw it that way while I was at Riverside. “They treated us really well because we were so successful. Maybe if we weren’t winning, it would have been a little different.” During the era that the Lady Vikes excelled, there was an increase in lawsuits on the college level as women fought to make sure Title IX was being followed. Being an avid sports fan and reader of Sports Illustrated at the time, Oustrich said she was aware of the Title IX issues and would occasionally be mad about what she saw. The overall warm feelings toward the state champions, however, kept any ill feelings from becoming too strong.

Sunday, June 24, 2012

GO LACKAWANNA/JASON RIEDMILLER

A banner in the Old Forge High School gym lists the players who reached the 1,000-point mark.

When fans – male and female alike – watched teams like the Lady Vikes play, the prejudices were slowly worn down. “Realistically, it was all about some male coaches who were chauvinists because they thought girls should be home cooking and cleaning not in the gym playing basketball,” said Long, who went on to play two years of softball at East Stroudsburg State. Such reactions are much less common as a result of the changes forced by Title IX. “I think it has become accepted that there are female athletes and there are good female athletes,” Long said. And there are millions of female athletes. More than three million high school girls – virtually one in two – participate in sports. There were another 191,000 playing NCAA sports during the 2010-11 college school year. “Title IX was the second-most important piece of civil rights legislation passed in this country,” North Carolina State athletic director Debbie Yow told The Associated Press. “Had it not passed, the options and opportunities for women in this country and the world would be vastly different.” The banner that is visible for all visitors to the Old Forge gym now proudly lists Michele Symosh first, displaying Symosh Long’s accomplishments along with the boys at the school and the other girls who followed her to the 1,000-point mark. “I think times have changed,” Long said. “I’m happy that the opportunities are there for the girls nowadays because they deserve it.”

Girls can play sports, too. It seems so obvious now that it can be difficult to believe that for much of the history of sports in the United States, the extent of participation by female athletes was restricted. Sometimes as a society, we need laws to force us to start doing what we eventually realize was the right thing all along. Forty years ago, before Title IX was passed June 23, 1972, the lack of opportunities restricted the impact girls made in their high schools and on their college campuses. It should not be seen as a coincidence that women earned only nine percent of all medical degrees and seven percent of all law degrees at the time. Title IX addressed equality in educational as a whole, but wound up having its most direct impact through sports. At various times in the past 15 years, I have asked successful active female athletes about their understanding of Title IX. Often, they are unsure of exactly what Title IX is. Those who lived through it or look back on it later in life have a greater understanding of what a large role the legislation plays in modern lives. We can expect our students to be appreciative of those who made their opportunities possible. At the same time, a case can be made that the lack of awareness comes from the fact that changes in the law have allowed us to live under standards that should have been in place all along. When Paula Wedlock Finn was helping West Scranton win the first two of its three Lackawanna League divisional girls titles in 1994 and 1995, she was not thinking that Title IX helped put a basketball in her

KEEPING SCORE

TOM ROBINSON hand. “It was something I was oblivious to at the time, until I got into college and then I (knew) a little bit about it," Finn said. "Starting off at a young age in sports, it was something that I didn’t realize because I grew up with two other sisters in sports and my father always instilled in us that we could do everything that boys could.” As a high school guidance counselor, and someone who helped advise student-athletes as they weighed scholarship offers, Finn has become much more aware. Older physical education teachers have told Finn about the days when they limited basketball for girls to half-court specialists with no one running up and down the floor. “When you talk to the generation now about the inequality prior to Title IX, they look at you like you’re crazy,” said Finn, a Windsor, N.Y. resident who has taken a break from her guidance counselor duties at Union-Endicott High School while she has young children at home. “They don’t really have any knowledge of that because it was so before their time. “I think in a way that’s a positive because we’ve come such a long way since Title IX. “Even from when I was in high school in 1995, it seems like there are so many more female athletes getting college scholarships.” Finn was a four-year starter at West Scranton where she was captain of the championship team her senior year. Her basketball skills helped open up college options and she went on to St. John Fisher in Rochester, N.Y. where she was again a four-year starter and played in three NCAA Division III tournaments.

From her current perspective, she knows sports contributed to her college and career paths. “It opens so many possibilities for women and for girls to be able to participate in sports to be able to have the same opportunities that boys do,” Finn said. “If you look at the research, we know that playing sports and being involved in sports is such a positive for so many kids.” Jennifer Oustrich, who grew up playing sports with her older cousins and brothers, has enjoyed many of those positives that sports can offer. Oustrich went from being one of the captains of Riverside’s 1987 state championship basketball team to getting a chance to observe the formation of the Women’s National Basketball Association as a student at the University of Utah in 1996. While she missed out on the evolution of Pennsylvania girls basketball in the 1970s, Oustrich appreciated getting to witness the creation of the most successful women’s professional basketball league. The Utah Starzz were one of the original eight WNBA franchises in 1997 and played in Salt Lake City until 2003. “We got to see the coaches and talk about Title IX,” said Oustrich, who lives in Taylor and works at the Tobyhanna Army Depot. “We got to see how things were prepared. They really put a lot of time and energy into getting the WNBA team off the ground in Utah. “ … It was a fun time to be taking that class knowing that all that was in the works and the WNBA was going to be a realization.” The WNBA, which is in its 16th season, was another step in showing that female athletes can compete on all level of sports. All they ever needed was someone to make it possible.


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012

PAGE 29

The Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS®, Inc.

Open House Directory SUNDAY, JUNE 24TH, 2012

Scranton

1218 Luzerne St.

1:30-2:30PM

Prudential Preferred Properties

Scranton

1024 River St.

11AM-12:30PM

Scranton

847 Moosic St.

12-1PM

Scranton

324 Ferdinand St.

12-1:30PM

Scranton

305 Park Ledge Ln.

12-2PM

Coldwell Banker Town & Country

Scranton

538 Fig St.

1-2:30PM

Coldwell Banker Town & Country

Old Forge

309 McClure St.

1-3PM

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Mayfield

816 Lackawanna Ave.

1-3PM

O’Boyle Real Estate

Dickson City

1025 Lincoln St.

1-2PM

Prudential Preferred Properties

Glenburn

21 S. Waterford Rd.

1-3PM

Realty Network Group

Nicholson

Box 1538 Baylor Rd.

1-2:30PM

O’Boyle Real Estate

Union Dale

904 South Main St.

1:30-3PM

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Bear Creek

210 Meadow Run Rd.

2-4PM

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate

Duryea

73 Cranberry Terrace

2-4PM

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Realty Network Group Prudential Preferred Properties Realty Network Group

Visit timesleader.com & Click “Homes” to see the most up to date list of Open Houses


PAGE 30

FAMILY CIRCUS

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

STONE SOUP

THE ARGYLE SWEATER DRABBLE

CLASSIC PEANUTS


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012

PAGE 31

TM

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KELLY VOLKSWAGEN 736 S. Main Ave • Scranton PA 18504 www.kellyvw.com • (570) 347-5656


PAGE 32

MARKETPLACE

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012

golackawanna.com

100 Announcements 200 Auctions

300 Personal Services 400 Automotive

500 Employment 600 Financial

700 Merchandise 800 Pets & Animals

900 Real Estate 1000 Service Directory

To place a Classified ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@golackawanna.com 150 Special Notices

NEPA-AIRSOFT

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 110

Lost

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

120

Found

FOUND MOWER

Nice red Snapper In Hanover Township, near route 29. Wheels were taken off of it. Mower is new. Cell # 570-760-6717

150 Special Notices

WHAT IS AIRSOFT? Airsoft is a military simulation sport in which players participate in mock combat with military-style replica weapons & tactics. Come visit us at: www.nepaairsoft.com A Web Site Dedicated to the Airsoft Community in NorthEast Pennsylvania and surrounding areas. Home of the Patriots Airsoft Squad We are always looking for New Members! Contact us today at: webadmin@ nepa-airsoft.com

for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm        ADOPTION: Loving couple hopes to adopt a baby. We promise a lifetime of love & security for a newborn. Please call Lori and Mike at 1-888-499-4464

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

GRAND MARQUIS ‘99 GS Well maintained, Smooth riding, 4.6L, V8, RWD, Auto, Power windows, power locks, New Inspection, Serviced, Silver over blue. Good tires $3,750 Call 823-4008

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 412 Autos for Sale

BMW ‘06 X5 All wheel drive,

CADILLAC ‘11 STS 13,000 Miles, 310

Attorney Services

Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

To place your ad call...829-7130

Showroom condition. Price reduced $34,900 MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

FORD `07 FOCUS SES Sedan

Alloy wheels, heated seats, CD player, rear spoiler, 1 owner, auto, air, all power, great gas mileage, priced to be sold immediately! $6,995 or best offer. 570-614-8925

FORD ‘02 MUSTANG 409

Autos under $5000

MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR

6 cylinder automatic. 52k original miles. Florida car. $1500. 570-899-1896

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS ‘99 GS

GTRedCONVERTIBLE with black

top. 6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $17,500 570-760-5833

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130

519 Wyoming Ave Scranton 570-961-5945 www.tomsgarage andsales.com Silver, 4.6L, V8, Auto, power steering, power brakes, power windows & locks. 104k, New Inspection! Great Condition! Call 570-823-4008

To place your ad call...829-7130

TOYOTA ‘09 CAMRY

18,000 Miles, 1 owner, 4 cylinder. $16,500 MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

412 Autos for Sale

PORSCHE `01 BOXSTER S 38,500 miles. Black

with beige interior. 6 speed transmission. Air & CD player. Excellent condition. $17,600. Call 570-868-0310

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

VOLKSWAGEN ‘00 BEETLE

2.0 automatic, air 67k miles $6400. 570-466-0999

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

CHEVY ‘10 CAMARO SS

11,100 miles Gray $29,499

DODGE ‘09 CALIBER SXT

SXT 29,200 miles Red $12,995

GMC ‘08 SIERRA SLT

LOADED w/ Plow 25,600miles White $31,495

FORD ‘08 EXPLORER

Eddie Bauer 36,000 miles, Black $20,995

FORD ‘08 EDGE LIMITED AWD 28,000 miles, Red $22,995

HYUNDAI ‘07 SANTA FE

FWD 74,000 miles Gray, $13,495

TOYOTA ‘06 SIENNA LE

34,000 miles Light Blue, $15,900

CHEVY ‘03 SUBURBAN LT 85,000 miles Silver, $10,900

MERCEDES ’00 BENZ ML320 70,000 miles, Black, $8,899

HONDA ‘00 PASSPORT

Black, 88,000 miles

DOMESTIC & FOREIGN SALES & SERVICE

Specializing in A/C Ser vice

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... Looking for the right deal IN CLASSIFIED!

on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

& Auto Sales

61,000 miles, $20,595 WARRANTY MAFFEI AUTO SALES 570-288-6227

MINIMUM DRIVEN IN

ALSO PAYING TOP $$$

Autos under $5000

North Eastern PA Airsoft

PAYING $500 Full size 4 wheel drive trucks

409

DODGE ‘02 VIPER GTS 10,000 MILES V10

6speed, collectors, this baby is 1 of only 750 GTS coupes built in 2002 and only 1 of 83 painted Race Yellow it still wears its original tires showing how it was babied. This car is spotless throughout and is ready for its new home. This vehicle is shown by appointment only. $40,900. call 570-760-2365

TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT

112K miles. Blue, 5 speed. Air, power windows/locks, CD/cassette, Keyless entry, sunroof, new battery. Car drives and has current PA inspection. Slight rust on corner of passenger door. Clutch slips on hard acceleration. This is why its thousands less than Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO. Make an offer! Call 570-592-1629

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. Reduced price to $26,000. Call 570-825-6272

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 439

Motorcycles

To place your BMW 2010 K1300S ad call...829-7130 415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE $49,000

FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD

All original $12,000

MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL $24,000

MERCEDES ‘29

Kit Car $9,000 (570) 655-4884 hell-of-adeal.com

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

Only 460 miles! Has all bells & whistles. Heated grips, 12 volt outlet, traction control, ride adjustment on the fly. Black with lite gray and red trim. comes with BMW cover, battery tender, black blue tooth helmet with FM stereo and black leather riding gloves (like new). paid $20,500. Sell for

$15,000 FIRM.

Call 570-262-0914 Leave message.

HARLEY `05 DYNA LOWRIDER Black / gold, 2,000

miles, original owner, extra pipes & helmet. $13,500. 570-237-1103

439

Motorcycles

HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON SPORTSTER CUSTOM Loud pipes. Near Mint 174 miles - yes, One hundred and seventy four miles on the clock, original owner. $8000. 570-876-2816

HARLEY DAVIDSON `07

Road King Classic FLHRC. Burgundy / Cream. 6 speed. Cruise control. Back rests, grips, battery tender, cover. Willie G accessories. 19,000 miles. $13,250. Williamsport, PA 262-993-4228

HSoft ARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80 riding FLH. King of the Highway! Mint original antique show winner. Factory spot lights, wide white tires, biggest Harley built. Only 28,000 original miles! Never needs inspection, permanent registration. $7,995 OBO 570-905-9348

SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800 GL INTRUDER Garage kept, no rust, lots of chrome, black with teal green flake. Includes storage jack & 2 helmets. $3600 570-410-1026

To place your ad call...829-7130

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

442 RVs & Campers

FOREST RIVER`08 5TH WHEEL

Model 8526RLS Mountain Top,PA $18,500 570-760-6341


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 442 RVs & Campers

SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS Travel Trailer. 29’,

mint condition, 1 slide out a/c-heat. Stove, microwave, fridge, shower inside & out. Many more extras, including towing, hitch equipment & sway bars. Satellite dish & stand. Reduced. $10,900. Selling due to health issues. 570-842-6735

TRAVELCRAFT ‘93

28’ Motorhome 52,000 miles $12,000 negotiable. 570-333-5110

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

WINNEBAGO ‘81 LOW LOW MILES

42,000+ ALL NEW TIRES GREAT PRICE $4000 CALL 570-825-9415 AFTER 5 PM

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

CHRYSLER `02 TOWN & COUNTRY

Luxury people mover! 87,300 well maintained miles. This like-new van has third row seating, power side & rear doors. Economical V6 drivetrain and all available options. Priced quick sale for $5,495. Generous trade-in allowances will be given on this top-of-the-line vehicle. Call Fran 570-466-2771 Scranton

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

MERCURY `03 MOUNTAINEER

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Find a newcar online at

timesleader.com AWD. Third row seating. Economical 6 cylinder automatic. Fully loaded with all available options. 93k pampered miles. Garage kept. Safety / emissions inspected and ready to go. Sale priced at $6995. Trade-ins accepted. Tag & title processing available with purchase. Call Fran for an appointment to see this outstanding SUV. 570-466-2771 Scranton

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

ONLY ONL NLLY ONE N LE LLEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

MITSUBISHI `11

OUTLANDER SPORT SE AWD, Black interi-

or/exterior, start/ stop engine with keyless entry, heated seats, 18” alloy wheels, many extra features. Only Low Miles. 10 year, 100,000 mile warranty. $22,500. Willing to negotiate. Serious inquires only - must sell, going to law school. (570) 793-6844

522

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY 468

Auto Parts

FORD ‘02 EXPLORER

All Junk Cars & Trucks To place your ad call...829-7130 Wanted Highest FORD ‘73 F350 Prices Stake Body Truck Paid In CA$H

FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

Education/ Training

506 Administrative/ Clerical

BEAUTY

Spa Hospitality Team

The Woodhouse Day Spa is currently hiring for Full Time Front Desk Staff. Must be available to start immediately. Position requires outstanding customer service skills; shift includes days, evenings & some Saturdays. Please apply in person at the spa. Monday-Friday 9-6. 387 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. EOE

522

Red, XLT, Original non-smoking owner, garaged, synthetic oil since new, excellent in and out. New tires and battery. 90,000 miles. $7,500 (570) 403-3016

55,000 Original miles - garage kept, only 2 owners, hydraulic lift gate, new tires, battery and brakes. Excellent condition. $7500. Call 570-687-6177

PAGE 33

Education/ Training

BANQUET, RESTAURANT & CATERING Facility located in Northeast PA is seeking experienced

Computer Science Teacher/IT Support

Scranton Preparatory School is seeking qualified applicants for a computer science teacher/ IT support with at least a B.S. in a computer-related field, strong knowledge of advanced computer science topics as well as general information technologies. Teaching experience preferred. Applicants should send resume by July 3, 2012 to: Mr. Patrick Marx 1000 Wyoming Ave. Scranton, PA 18509 or email pmarx@ scrantonprep.com

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal LINE COOKS, CHEFS on an automobile? AND SOUS CHEFS Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! BANQUET SALES Classified’s got MANAGER the directions! Positions are full

time with heath benefits, vacation, personal time and competitive salary/ wages. If you are a motivated individual with great people skills and can work in a fast pace environment submit your resume and join our team. Send resume to:

BOX 4070

c/o Times Leader 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

KITCHEN STAFF

Experienced Only Part-time. Day 1 benefits - Medical, Dental, Eye. 401k program. Meal plans. Apply online: redlobster.com/ employment.

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

CERTIFIED DIESEL MECHANIC WANTED

Mountain Productions, Inc is seeking a full time, first shift certified diesel mechanic for our Wilkes-Barre location. Duties include preventative maintenance and repair of our fleet of tractors, trailers and straight trucks in a safe and cost efficient manner in a pre-established mechanic shop with tools provided. Salary begins at $20.00/hour and is commensurate with experience. A minimum of 2 years experience is preferred. Send your resume and qualifications/certification to Jim Evans at jim@mountain productions.com

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

TECHNICIAN

Industry leader in electronic security/ fire systems has immediate opening for service/installation tech. Alarm installation experience required. EOE, health, eye, dental, 401K. Fax resumes to 288-8633 or email to jodiew@ hillmansecurity.com Hillman Security Luzerne, PA

To place your ad call...829-7130 542

Logistics/ Transportation

DELIVERY DRIVER HOME CITY

ICE COMPANY Position opened for a Route Delivery Driver. “B” class CDL license is needed for this position. 40+ hours/week. Great pay! Based in Wilkes-Barre. Fill out application at www. homecityice.com, Wilkes-Barre Division, or email rwetterau@ homecityice.com Drivers: Local/Fulltime/Weekly Minimum pay Weekend/Casual positions also available CDL-A, 2 years experience. 23 yoa GoPenske.com #1203677 or 866-823-0357

542

Logistics/ Transportation

OWNER OPERATORS – CLASS A Dedicated In/Out of

Hazelton Daily!!! *Repeat Lanes Customers *Paid ACTUAL MILES – Ld/Empty!!!! *Dry Van - No Touch - Drop/Hook *300 mile radius – No NYC *Deep fuel discounts *Paid fuel tax and tolls *Base Plate Program *No Escrow Required *Low cost Tractor Insurance if needed *Much more!! Call or visit website to start process 1-888-446-4642 www.transcorr.com

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Drivers: Company Great Pay/Hometime! No-Touch! 80% D&H. CDL-A with 1 year experience. 866-564-8639 x107

TRI-AXLE DRIVER

3-4 years experience. Local work. Start immediately. Call Danny Jr. at 570-237-1734

548 Medical/Health

Healthcare Highland Manor Nursing Home

RN CHARGE NURSE/ SUPERVISOR Full Time 7-3

Seeking organized, professional RN to assist with day to day responsibilities of the nursing unit. Every other weekend/ every other holiday. LTC and supervisory experience preferred. Send, fax, email or deliver resume to: 750 Schooley Ave. Exeter, PA 18643 Ph: 570-655-3791 Fax: 570-655-4881

don-highland@seniorsnorth.com Also seeking experienced

CNAS Full Time 3-11/11-7 Every other weekend and every other holiday. Apply in person. EOE

To place your ad call...829-7130

548 Medical/Health

Resident Care Aides NOW Hiring

Per diem all shifts, weekend shifts and 12 hour shifts needed, Part time may lead to Full time. SIGN ON Bonus for experienced applicants. Must be reliable, and compassion for the elderly. Must have a high school diploma or GED. Apply in person:

Keystone Garden Estates

100 Narrows Rd Route 11 Larksville, PA 18651

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Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 548 Medical/Health

RN/LPN- PART-TIME

A

PART TIME POSITION IS AVAILABLE AT

FREELAND HEALTH CENTER, FREELAND, PA. THREE DAYS A WEEK. NO BENEFITS. GO TO WWW.RHCNEPA.COM FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.

EOE

M/F/V/H

AA

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

600 FINANCIAL 610

Business Opportunities

NEPA FLORAL & GIFT SHOP Including delivery van, coolers, all inventory, displays, computer system, customer list, website and much more. Turn key operation in prime retail location. Serious inquiries please call 570-592-3327

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 610

Business Opportunities

JAN-PRO COMMERCIAL CLEANING OF NORTHEASTERN PA Concerned about your future?

BE YOUR OWN BOSS Work Full or Part time Accounts available NOW throughout Luzerne & Lackawanna, Counties We guarantee $5,000.to $200,000 in annual billing. Investment Required We’re ready –Are you? For more info call

570-824-5774

Jan-Pro.com

630 Money To Loan “We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

To place your ad call...829-7130

700 MERCHANDISE 744

Furniture & Accessories

SOFA/LOVESEAT Retail $1200. like new $250. firm. 825-5062 after 4pm


PAGE 34

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 744

Furniture & Accessories

FURNISH FOR LESS

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607

    Mattress: A Queen Size Pillow Top Set Still in Plastic Can Deliver $150 570-280-9628

MOVING SALE

Canadelx White counter height kitchen set with 4 swivel chairs, entercenter, tainment coffee table, dining room set with server, living room blue Drexel sofa, 2 wing back chairs and tables, large oak cherry entertainment center, new black leather recliner, sofa & loveseat & much more. Call 570-288-5555

758 Miscellaneous GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER ITEMS CRIB convertible, like new $200. Easy set 12’ pool $50. 19” polo chrome rims/ tires $1,500. 1940 wood crib set best offer. 822-3068 WATER SKIS (5) 420. each. Snow ski poles $25. Hand made tool box $40. Canvas carry on bags (3) $20. each. Concrete deer ornaments (3) $75. each. Schwinn boy’s bike (2) $75. each. Fishing equipment call for details. 570-675-5046

776 Sporting Goods

SHUFFLEBOARD

with an electric scoreboard. 21’ long. Excellent condition. Asking $2450. 570-675-5046

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

BUYING SPORT CARDS Pay Cash for

baseball, football, basketball, hockey & non-sports. Sets, singles & wax. 570-212-0398

800 PETS & ANIMALS 815

Dogs

PAWS TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE

PAGE 35

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY LEADER. ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA E DER D . timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

CHIWEANIES Look like mini

Dachshunds. 2 females. Cute & lovable. 1st shots. $150 each 570-822-4694 Call after 2 pm or leave message.

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 ENGLISH BULL / TERRIER PUPPIES CKC

8 weeks 2 males 2 females. Solid white & brendle. Vaccinated & dewormed. $1,000 neg. 570-855-6774

ITALIAN CANE CORSO Mastiff Puppies

ICCF Registered & ready to go! Parents on premises. Blue.Vet Checked 570-617-4880

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 906 Homes for Sale Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

906 Homes for Sale

HANOVER TWP.

New Construction. Lot #2, Fairway Estates. 2,700 square feet, tile & hardwood on 1st floor. Cherry cabinets with center island. $399,500. For more details: patrickdeats.com (570)696-1041

LUZERNE COUNTY Secluded 3 level

home on 15 acres located in Black Creek Township (near Hazleton). Detatched garage. Private gated driveway. Call 570-459-8658

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

WILKES-BARRE

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 906 Homes for Sale

EXETER

OPEN HOUSE

Sunday, June 24th, 1 pm -4pm 102 IDA CIRCLE Six year old 4 bedroom home, 3 baths. Two car garage, eat-in kitchen, living, dining & family rooms, office/study, utility room & fireplace. Gas forced air furnace, central air, unfinished basement, fully landscaped, & deck. $255,000. forsalebyowner .com 800-843-6963 Listing #23758584

WILKES-BARRE

Parsons Section 5 bedroom, 1 bath. Garage. Corner lot. Nice location. Out of flood zone. $30,000 negotiable. Call 570-814-7453

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

EDWARDSVILLE

SWOYERSVILLE 1st block S. Franklin St. Historic District. Beautiful 3 story building. 2,300 square feet on first floor. Commercial & residential use. 8 parking spaces. $395,000. Call 570-824-7173

941

62 Bohac Street Charming brick front ranch, in a well kept neighborhood, 2 bedrooms, large eat-in kitchen, tile bath, large closets, hardwood floors, 1st floor laundry, full basement, low maintenance aluminum siding, shed, nice yard, asking $105,000 Call 908-876-4108 or 908-797-6682

909

Income & Commercial Properties

PITTSTON

FOR SALE 5 Unit Money Maker Available immediately. Fully rented, leases on all five units. Separate utilities, new roof in 2007, 3 new gas furnaces, off street parking for 6 vehicles, 3 bay garage. Over $29,000 in rents. A true money maker for the serious investor. Must Sell! $145,000. Call Steve at (570)468-2488

To place your ad call...829-7130 912 Lots & Acreage

HARVEYS LAKE Beach Street. 2 nice

building lots. Approx 100 x 150 each. Public sewer available. Paved road. Surveyed. $19,995 each.570-822-7359

21 Pugh Street. Quiet, one way street, half double, cleaned and freshly painted, 2.5 bedrooms, living room, dining room, kitchen, with washer/dryer hookup. Gas heat. Small yard, small pets considered with additional rent. $530.00 per month + security & last months rent. No section 8. Call 570-793-6566

room. Washer/dryer included. No pets. $500/month includes heat & water. Security deposit required. 570-357-1383

FORTY FORT 82 Yates St.

1st floor, 1 bedroom, quiet neighborhood, off-street parking, washer/dryer hook-up. No pets $550/month + utilities. Available July 1st. Call 570-287-5090

FORTY FORT

COMING UNITS

(check availability)

America Realty Efficiencies $500+ utilities 288-1422

Remodeling in progress, all 2nd floors, all new kitchen appliances, laundry, parking. 2 year leases, No pets or Smoking, Employment application mandatory.

JENKINS TOWNSHIP

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

DALLAS floor, 1

2nd bedroom, quiet, fridge and stove, off-street parking. Garbage, sewer, water included. No pets. $400/ month plus lease and security. 570-690-1003

Studio, refrigerator & stove, all tile flooring, off-street parking. $500/ month + utilities, security & 1st month. Call 570-655-0539

KINGSTON

2nd floor, 3 bedrooms, very clean, refrigerator & stove, washer/ dryer, yard, offstreet parking, no pets. $800/month, plus utilities & security. Call (570)814-8116

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE

KINGSTON 2 Apts. Available Bring Rover or Kitty & move right in. 1 or 2 bedroom apt. Off street parking, coin laundry on premises. $450-$600/ month + gas heat & electric. Call (570) 262-1577

KINGSTON

EXETER 2nd floor, 1 bed-

941

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED Architect designed, light, bright 2nd floor 1 bedroom with secure entry. Carpeted. Air conditioned. Laundry facilities. Extra storage. Off street parking. References, security, lease. No smokers please. $490/ month + utilities. Call 570-287-0900

South Meade St., 1st floor, secure building, $525/month. Hardwood floors, washer/dryer hookup, dishwasher, central air & heat. Tenant pays electric and gas heat. Off street parking. Income verification & 1 month security. 570-824-8517

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED! LINE UP Looking for the right deal GREAT DEAL on an A automobile? Turn to INclassified. CLASSIFIED

It’s a showroom print! Looking forinthe righ Classified’s on an got automobile? the directions! Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in got 941 Classified’s Apartments/ the directions!

Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms

KINGSTON

- Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

To place your ad call...829-7130

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!!

Deluxe duplex, 2nd floor, 3 bedrooms, den, 1.5 bath, living and dining rooms, eat in kitchen , all appliances+ washer/dryer, carpeted, A/C, garage, no pets/smoking. Lease required 570-287-1733

MOUNTAIN TOP WOODBRYN 1 & 2 Bedroom.

No pets. Rents based on income start at $405 & $440. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. 570474-5010 TTY711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

PITTSTON MUST SEE!!!! Modern 1 bedroom,

sunroom/patio, all appliances. Off street parking. Air, utilities by tenant. No Pets. $575/mo. 1 month security & references. Call 570-655-6598 leave message

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WEST PITTSTON

2nd floor, 4 rooms. Hardwood floors. Heat and hot water included. No pets. No smoking. Call 570-479-4069

To place your ad call...829-7130

www.mayflower crossing.com Certain Restrictions Apply*

WYOMING 2nd floor.

Completely remodeled. Large, 2 bedroom + den/computer room/office. Hardwood floors, new carpeting in living room & dining area. Washer/ dryer hookup, offstreet parking, no pets. Great location! $750/month + utilities, security & references. Call (570) 885-1922

WYOMING

Monument Ave 2 bedroom 2nd floor apartment. Stove & fridge included. Ample off street parking. Secure, safe neighborhood. $550 + utilities. Call 570-357-1138

944

Commercial Properties

DOLPHIN PLAZA

Rte. 315 1,000 & 3,800 Sq. Ft. WILL DIVIDE OFFICE / RETAIL Call 570-829-1206


PAGE 36

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 1135

Hauling & Trucking

ALWAYS READY HAULING Property & Estate Cleanups, Attics, Cellars, Yards, Garages, Construction Sites, Flood Damage & More. CHEAPER THAN A DUMPSTER!! SAME DAY SERVICE Free Estimates 570-301-3754

1204

Larry Neer 570-606-9638

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

1213

We Need Your Help!

Anonymous Tip Line 1-888-796-5519 Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office

Painting & Wallpaper

A.B.C. Professional Painting 36 Yrs Experience We Specialize In New Construction Residential Repaints Comm./Industrial All Insurance Claims Apartments Interior/Exterior Spray,Brush, Rolls WallpaperRemoval Cabinet Refinishing Drywall/Finishing Power Washing Deck Specialist Handy Man FREE ESTIMATES

533

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

Permanent, full time position for repair and installation of automotive lifts, and other hydraulic, pneumatic and electronic automotive equipment. Experience as a technician would be helpful. Full benefits program.

To apply please send your resume to: PANZITTA SALES AND SERVICE 72 George Ave., Wilkes-Barre, PA, 18705 or email james@panzittasales.com

468

Auto Parts

468

Auto Parts

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES $375 AND UP

Paving & Excavating

ALSO BUYING HEAVY EQUIPMENT H

NOBODY Pays More

PAVING & SEAL COATING Patching, Sealing, Residential/Comm Licensed & Insured PA013253 570-868-8375

Logistics/ Transportation

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

EQUIPMENT MECHANIC

Mountain Top

542

PAGE 37

570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!

542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

Logistics/ Transportation

Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly, after completion of 90 day probation period. ***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT (12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week) ***75 cent night shift pay differential offered. ***Pay increase based on skill development. Take charge...LEARN AND EARN!

MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL TIME EXPERIENCE Skills Required: • High School Diploma/GED • Computer Skills • Valid Driver’s License • Criminal Background Check • Pass Pre-Employment Drug Screen & Physical *Mehoopany Location * Benefits Available *

A regional multimedia company headquartered in Wilkes-Barre, we provide news, information and entertainment across multiple media platforms. Our flagship publication, The Times Leader, and several weekly and specialized publications serve the readers and advertisers of northeastern Pennsylvania well. We provide commercial and other services in the region and surrounding states. Building on our solid print foundation, we offer various multimedia products: website development; social media marketing; search engine optimization and marketing; QR code marketing and tracking; and many other services. We currently offer these employment opportunities:

Inserter/Packager - Part Time Night shift positions available in our Packaging Department. Experience is preferred, but we will train the right candidate. This position reports directly to the Packaging Supervisor. Duties include, but are not limited to: • Opening of insert skids • Feeding of circulars into assigned hoppers • Stackdown of ROP • Clean-up of Packaging Department at the end of assigned shift Employees must be able to work flexible hours, be able to lift at least 25 lbs., and have reliable transportation. Pre-employment drug screening required.

Digital Sales Specialist Immediate opening for a self-motivated salesperson with a strong desire to succeed. Must be able to develop and maintain strong business relationships with clients and understand and deliver clients’ media needs through all aspects of the job. This requires excellent customer service skills, strong organizational skills and high energy. Must have knowledge of online advertising and marketing, website development and social media. We offer competitive starting salary plus commissions, excellent benefits package including medical and dental insurance, life and disability insurance, and 401k plan.

Sales Account Executive The Weekender – Northeast PA’s #1 arts & entertainment free weekly - is looking for a bright, enthusiastic sales account executive. Successful candidates will have strong desire to be part of a winning team. Responsibilities include servicing existing accounts, generating new business, and digital media sales. You will be rewarded with a competitive base salary + commissions, and receive a benefits package including medical and dental insurance, life and disability insurance, 401(k) plan, and paid vacation. Pre-employment drug screening and background check required. Bachelor’s degree preferred.

EVERY THURSDAY IN JUNE from Noon-4pm at the Tunkhannock Public Library

Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com. Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.

Please indicate position you are interested in and send cover letter, resume and salary history to:


PAGE 38 944

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 Commercial Properties

315 PLAZA 1,750 SQ. FT. & 3,400 SQ.FT OFFICE/RETAIL 570-829-1206

950

Half Doubles

KINGSTON

3 bedroom, 1 bath, half double, $700 plus utilities, sewer included. No pets.1st months, last months + deposit. Call 570-443-0770

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 KINGSTON

Penn St. 1/2 Double, 2 bedroom. Newly remodeled. Gas Heat. Washer & dryer hookup, yard, parking. Not Approved for Section 8. No pets. $550 + utilities. 570-714-1530

NANTICOKE

Huge, 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath in Hanover Section. Parking, $625 per month, $1,250 due at signing. Nice park across the street. Call 570-851-6448 leave message.

WILKES-BARRE

Parsons Section 3 bedroom half double. Off street parking. Pets welcome. $550/mo. Credit / Criminal check required. Call 570-266-5333

953 Houses for Rent

HAZLETON EAGLE ROCK R E S O RT Gated Community. 4 bedrooms, 3 full baths, and 1.5 bath. Beautiful custom home, finished basement, stone fireplace, many many amenities, including swimming pool, golf, tennis, skiing, fitness center, among more... Located on a lakeview property, Quiet & Secure, $1200/per month, For rent OR for sale. No pets. Please call 215-416-2497

953 Houses for Rent

953 Houses for Rent

KINGSTON

208 Spruce Avenue Available July 1 Single family home for rent. 1,480 sq. ft. 3 bedrooms with closets. 1.5 baths. First floor laundry room. Tile bath & kitchen. Gas heat & hot water. Hardwood floors. Gas fireplace. New, upgraded carpets. Modern kitchen with new dishwasher & gas stove. New windows. Deadbolt locks. Full basement. Residential street. Fenced yard. Front porch. Private driveway. Background & credit check. $790 + utilities, 1 month security & 1 year lease. Call Bill. 215-527-8133

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

WILKES-BARRE TWP.

Newly remodeled. 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, off street parking, fenced yard, some pets okay, appliances included. $800/month + utilities & security Call (570) 899-2665

Find A New Friend In The Times Leader Classified

To place an ad call 829-7130 412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

www.minookasubaru.com

When the city gets slicker.

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

FOR SALE OR RENT! Adults Only Campground

Fleetwood Cimarron 5th wheel. 36.5C. ‘88 model. In good condition. Located in beautiful 150 acre tree farm in Maine. Swimming pools, hiking trails, ponds, rec halls, potlucks & activities. Dogs welcome. Beautiful site rental with huge maple tree in front & bubbling brook in back. For Rent: $350/weekly $1,000/monthly For Sale: $3,500 (570) 762-3747

The 2012 Legacy comes with Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive standard, plus the balance and control of a SUBARU BOXER® engine. Calling all corners.

PLAINS

144 Farrell St. Available July 3 Single family home for rent. 1,470 sq ft. 3 bedrooms with closets and 1.5 baths. First floor laundry room. New gas water heater. Air conditioning. New heating gas boiler & upgraded carpets. Modern kitchen. New gas stove. New 21 cubic foot refrigerator. New windows, gas fireplace, deadbolt locks. Full basement with gas wall heater. Residential street. Shed. Fenced yard. Covered back porch. Private driveway. 1 year lease. Background & credit check. $790 + utilities & security deposit. Call 215-527-8133 Ask for Bill

WILKES-BARRE

13 Poplar St Available July 1 1,450 sq. ft single home for rent. 3 bedroom with closets. Washer / dryer included. 1st floor bath. Great kitchen with dishwasher, new 21 cubic ft refrigerator & new gas stove. Wall to wall carpeting. Outside patio with wooded fenced yard. Deadbolt locks. Energy efficient windows. New ceiling fans. New gas boiler & water heater. Residential street. $730 + utilities, 1 month security & 1 year lease. Background / credit check. Call Bill 215-527-8133

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY

• Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive • 31 mpg hwy • 170-hp SUBARU BOXER® engine • 2011 IIHSTop Safety Pick

• Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive • 29 mpg hwy • 2011 IIHSTop Safety Pick • Built in our zero landfill plant

1015

$

$

Appliance Service

ECO-FRIENDLY APPLIANCE TECH. 25 Years Experi-

ence fixing major appliances: Washer, Dryer, Refrigerator, Dishwasher, Compactors. Most brands. Free phone advice & all work guaranteed. No service charge for visit. 570-706-6577

239 $999 $0 $239

$1,238

CAB-11

PER MONTH LEASE 36 MONTHS 30,000 TOTAL MILES

Down Payment Security Deposit First Month’s Lease Payment

Total Due at Lease Signing

25,900 % 0.9 FINANCING AVAILABLE

CDB-11

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 1057Construction & Building

ALL INTERIOR & EXTERIOR

Renovations, flood and fire damage, garages, siding and roofing, Free Estimates. 25 years experience, licensed, insured. PA079799 Call 570-446-2973

570-346-4641 • 1-800-982-4054 www.minookasubaru.com HOURS: MONDAY THRU THURSDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 8:30 P.M. FRIDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 5:00 P.M. • SATURDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 2:00 P.M. CLOSED SUNDAY EPA estimated fuel economy for Legacy and Outback 2.5i CVT models. Actual mileage may vary.Top Safety Picks given by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (iihs.org).Tax andTags not included. Financing contingent on lender approval. Call for details.


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012

PAGE 39

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$

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$

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#Z 2636, 3.6L A utom atic, PW , PD L, H eated M irrors, Rear Roofl ine Sp oil er, 6 D isc C D , 3rd Row Seating

$

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$

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$

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KEN

W A LLA CE’S

• 1-800-444-7172 VA LLEY 821-2772 601 Kid d er Street, W ilkes-Ba rre, PA CHEVROLET

,

Sca n From M ob ile D evice For M ore Sp ecia ls

M o n .- Thu rs .8:30- 8:00p m ; Frid a y 8:30- 7:00p m ; Sa tu rd a y 8:30- 5:00p m

EXIT 1 70B O FF I- 81 TO EXIT 1 . BEAR RIGH T O N BU SIN ESS RO U TE 309 TO SIXTH L IGH T. JU ST BEL O W W YO M IN G V AL L EY M AL L .


PAGE 40

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012

K E N

P OL L OCK

N IS S A N

TH E NUM BER 1 NISSAN DEAL ER IN TH E S TATE O F PA IN NEW S AL ES VO L UM E AND C US TO M ER S ATIS FAC TIO N FO R APRIL

GE T W

A THE T T E N T I O N 2012 N IS S A N

W

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A

H A T YO U

N

T S TA RTS

SA LES EV EN T A L TIM A

S E DA N

$

5 0 0 0 O FF M S R P B U Y FO R

19 ,15 5

*

OR

+ T/T

W / $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0 N M A C C A P TIV E C A S H

$

18 9

$

*

2 A T TH T H IS IS P R IC IC E

2012 N IS S A N M A XIM A 3.5S S E DA N L IM ITE D E DITION

B U Y FO R

2 0 ,9 5 0

2 8 ,8 3 5 W / $ 2 0 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0 N M AC C A P TIV E C A S H

OR

+ T/T

$

28 9

* P

ER M O. + T/T

2 A T T H IS IS P R IC IC E

*$289 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $18,948; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1000 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .

2012 N IS S A N P A THFIN DE R IS S 4X4 2 PA RT ICITC HEIS

A LL 2012 IN STO C K 500000 O FF

STK#N 21980 M O D EL# 25012 V IN # 621718 M SR P $31,965

$

2 6 ,9 6 5 W / $2 0 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $2 5 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

*

+ T/T

OR

$

299

*

SA VE $8000 O FF A LL NEW 2012 A R M A DA S IN STO C K

STK#N 21418 M O D EL# 26212 V IN # 603187 M SR P $45,595

V8, Au to , PW , PL , CD, Ba cku p Ca m era , Allo ys , Ru n n in g Bo a rd s , Bo s e, Hea ted M irro r, Blu eto o th & M u ch M o re!

$8000 O FF M SR P

$

B U Y FO R

3 7,5 9 5 W

/ $250 0

N IS S A N

*

+ T/T O R

R EB ATE

$

499

* P

ER M O. + T/T

*$499 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $20,518; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $100 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . * Ta x

a nd

ER M O. + T/T

2 AT T THH IIS S P R IICC E

S A V E

P ER M O. + T/T

*$299 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $15,663; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1750 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .

2012 N IS S A N A RM A DA S V 4X4 LTAHSISITS OP NR EICICAET

229

*P

$5000 O FF A L L 2012 M U R A NO S IN STO C K

V-6, CVT . A/ C. PW , PDL , Cru is e. T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re

$

B U Y FO R

2 7,5 2 5

*

$

OR

+ T/T

W / $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0 N M AC C A P TIV E C A S H

2 79

*P

ER M O. + T/T

2 A T TH T H IS IS P R IC IC E

*$279 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,587; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1500 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .

2012 N IS S A N ROGUE S V A W D SA VE $4000 O FF M SR P STK#N 21528 M O D EL# 22412 V IN # 382082 M SR P $26,870

O V ER 70 A V A IL IL A B L E

O N A L L 2012 SV R O G U ES IN STO C K

4 Cyl, CVT , Allo y W heel, Po w erS ea t, Ba cku p Ca m era , In telligen tK ey & M u ch M o re!

$

B U Y FO R

2 2 ,8 70

*

+ T/T

OR

$

229

*

P ER M O. + T/T

W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE 2 A T T H IS IS P R IC IC E & $5 0 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H *$229 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14,779; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .

2012 N IS S A N FRON TIE R CRE W CA B S 4X4 STK# 21902 M O D EL# 32212 V IN # 443274 M SR P $27,790

TO O T

6 Cyl, Au to , 4x4, PW , PDL , Allo ys , K eyles s & M u ch M o re!

B U Y FO R

$

R A C E

SA VE $5000 O FF M SR P !

6 Cyl, CVT , S u n ro o f, S m o ked Allo y W heels , Po w erS ea t, In telligen t K ey & M u ch M o re!

*

+ T/T

OR

W / $ 10 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0 N M AC C A P TIV E C A S H

STK#N 21359 M O D EL# 16112 V IN # 819004 M SR P $33,835

B U Y FO R

*

M U RA N O

40 4 0 M U R A NO S A V A IL IL A B L E

O N A L L N EW 3 8 A LTIM A S IN S TO C K

*$229 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $13,066; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.

*$189 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $12,319; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1810 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .

$

STK#N 21472 M O D EL#3212 V IN # 211509 M SR P $32,525

4 Cyl, CVT , PW , PL , Cru is e, Allo ys , F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!

4 Cyl, CVT , A/C, AM /F M /CD, T ilt, Cru is e In telligen tK ey, Cru is e & M u ch M o re!

N OW !

2012 N IS S A N “S ”A W D

STK#N 22071 M O D EL# 15112 V IN # 255181 M SR P $25,950

STK#21003 M O D EL# 13112 V IN # 144280 M SR P $24,155

$

CO U P E S & S E DA N S

COUP E

VEH IC L E 2012**

$5000 O FF M SR P

2 A V A IL IL A B L E AT T THH IS IS P R IICC E

6 Cyl, Au to , 4x4, 16” W heels , Rea rDefro s t, Bed lin er& M u ch M o re

$

B U Y FO R

2 2 ,79 0 W

*

+ T/T

OR

$

/ $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0 C A P TIV E C A S H

239

*

P ER M O. + T/T

*$239 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,396; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.

2012 N IS S A N TITA N K IN G CA B S V 4X4 $8000 O FF M SR P

STK#N 21429 M O D EL# 34412 M SR P $35,180

L A ST K IN IN G C A B IS A T T H IS P R IC IC E

8 Cyl, Au to , 4x4, PW , PL , K eyles s , Cru is e, T iltW heel, Allo ys & M u ch M o re

$

B U Y FO R

2 7,18 0 &

*

+ T/T

W / $30 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE $ 13 5 0 V A L U E TR U C K R EB ATE

*S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs .

Ta g a d d it io na l. Pr io rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gr a phic a l Er r o r s . A ll r eb a t es & inc ent ives a pplied . * *0 % A PR in lieu o f r eb a t es . As k fo rd et a ils . * * As perN is s a n M o nt hly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f A pr il 2 0 12 . A ll Pr ic es b a s ed o n im m ed ia t e d eliver y in s t o c k vehic le o nly. A ll o ffer s ex pir e 6 /3 0 /12 .

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Go Lackawanna 06-24-2012