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Volume 22 Issue 22

March 4, 2014

TU’s Online Degree in Paralegal Studies Ranked 5th Best in U.S.

T I F F I N U N I V E R S I T Y ’ S W E E K LY E L E C T R O N I C N E W S L E T T E R

Tif in Univer‐ sity’s BA in Paralegal Studies was ranked by Open Educa‐ tion Database (OEDB.org) as the 5th best online paralegal degree pro‐ gram in the U.S. OEDB’s rankings are based on calculations that contribute to the ideal online learning experience, including program cost; full‐ time to part‐time faculty ratio; institutional inancial aid; acceptance, retention, gradu‐ ation, default, job placement rates; and his‐ tory of accreditation. RANKING: http://oedb.org/rankings/ online‐paralegal‐programs/ According to OEDB, “Today's graduates from online paralegal programs are busy and in‐demand. In fact, Yahoo recently de‐ clared that pursuing a paralegal degree is a worthwhile investment. Professionals who assist lawyers and their irms in the legal process, paralegals are a necessary asset in the litigation world, and the educational path can be an attractive one for students, as it is often shorter and less expensive than pursuing a full‐ ledged law degree. While their studies might not take as long as a traditional lawyer's, paralegals should still be vigilant to only enroll in one of the top online colleges to ensure they receive top‐notch education.” Tif in University’s Bachelor of Arts in Para‐ legal Studies is designed for students who are interested in gaining substantive and

In this issue:

procedural knowledge of the legal system in order to gain employment under the supervision of a licensed attorney, in the role of a paralegal or legal assistant. According to Interim Dean, School of Grad‐ uate and Distance Education, Professor Virginia Arp, Tif in University’s BA in Para‐ legal Studies started as an online degree program strategically to provide excep‐ tional quality to our students across the United States. We are pleased to be recog‐ nized by OEDb (Open Education Database) as one of the top ranked high‐quality para‐ legal studies program in United States. This is a demonstration of the commitment by our faculty and program chair, Dr. Joyce Hall‐Yates. Dr. Joyce Hall‐ Yates has demonstrated a passion for the program and a commitment to the student learning experience through the creation of high‐quality online courses. “I love the paralegal classes I am tak‐ ing. They are rigorous, but hands‐on, so you are learning exactly what you would do in the real world. The professors are professionals in their ields, and they have irst‐hand experience”, said Tif in Universi‐ ty student Valentina Diaz. “This paralegal program has helped me better understand what the daily life of a paralegal entails. I have learned a great deal about documents and procedures that paralegals are a part of each and every day. Some of the most important aspects that have been a main topic of conversation in every class are the ethical obligations and issues that might arise in various scenari‐ os. The paralegal studies program at Tif in University has not only made me better prepared to enter the profession after graduation, but also to better understand legal aspects in other Criminal Justice clas‐ ses, said Tif in University student Rebecca Kozlowski. Issue Highlights:

Next GMW Breakfast

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Activities

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Classi ied (help wanted)

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Students at Model NATO (pg. 7‐8) Sports News (pgs. 12‐15) Scholarships (pg.16) New Winter Weather Policy (pg. 25)


Volume 22 Issue 22

March 4, 2014

REMINDERS 3-ON-3 Basketball Tournament Tif in University’s Sports Management Club has opened registration for their annual 3‐on‐3 bas‐ ketball tournament on March 30, 2014 in the Heminger Center. The tournament is open to middle school and high school student, and adult teams. Teams are guaranteed two games. Featured contests include a free throw and knock‐out competition with prize coupons from Napoli’s Pizza. Cost is $20 per team and $10 per team for TU stu‐ dents and alumni. All players will receive a draw‐ string sports bag courtesy of C.F. Professional Fi‐ nancial Services. For more information or to register go to http:// tu3on3.weebly.com or contact Joe Lofton at 412.901.1477 or at LoftonJB@tif in.edu

North Central Community Fraud Forum April 9 1 to 5 p.m. The forum will focus on criminal justice and social work. Included are experts in those ields to discuss how we can protect consumers and learn about programs and services offered by the Of ice of Ohio Attorney General.   More information to follow! 

NEXT ART GALLERY OPENING "Sustainability" March 20-April 17—Reception is March 20 from 5:30 to 7 p.m.

Sustainability, an exhibition presented by the Diane Kidd Gallery and the Tif in University Green Committee, features work by 29 artists whose work addresses recycling and environmentalism. The artists are from Ohio and the Midwest, and as far away as Arizona, New York, Louisiana and Maryland. Work includes sculptures and collages from recycled materials, photographs, sculpture, video and installation.

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Volume 22 Issue 22

March 4, 2014

Wrongful Conviction—Getting the Innocent out of Prison

Topic of Tif in University’s Next Good Morning World Breakfast Thursday, March 27 Tif in University’s next Good Morning World Breakfast lecture will take place on Thursday, March 27, when Mark Godsey and Dean Gillispie present Wrongful Conviction—Getting the Innocent out of Prison, at Camden Falls Reception & Conference Center, 2460 South SR 231, in Tif in, beginning at 8:00 a.m. Breakfast is served at 7:30 a.m. In the past 25 years, more than 1,200 inmates have been proven innocent and released from prison after serving time‐‐sometimes decades‐‐for crimes they didn't commit. The Ohio Innocence Project (OIP) has been one of the leaders in this movement. To date, the OIP has obtained the release of 17 innocent Ohio inmates, who together served nearly 300 years in prison. Come hear the stories of our system gone wrong, and what can be done to make it better. Mark Godsey Mark Godsey is the Carmichael Professor of Law and Director of the Ohio Innocence Project at the College of Law of the University of Cincinnati. He serves on the Board of the Innocence Network, and has been instrumental in leading the Innocence Move‐ ment around the globe. A former federal prosecutor, Godsey is considered a leading scholar, lawyer, and activist on the subject of wrongful convictions. He is the editor of the Wrongful Convictions Blog, and is a frequent commentator on the subject in the national press. Dean Gillispie Eyewitnesses linked Dean Gillispie to the rape of three women in Dayton, Ohio, in 1988. He was convict‐ ed despite his claims that he was camping in Kentucky at the time of the crimes. A federal judge overturned his conviction in Decem‐ ber 2011 based on the fact that prosecutors withheld information from the jury about the original investigation. Police investigators concluded that Gillispie did not it the victims’ description; he also had an alibi and there was no physical evidence. U.S. Judge Michael Merz recognized evidence that someone else had committed the rapes and that the police had engaged in misconduct which is delib‐ erately hiding or destroying evidence. Gillispie’s case is featured in Fatal Justice: Eight Myths that Convict the Innocent by Jim and Nan‐ cy Petro. While he was the Ohio Attorney General, Jim Petro sup‐ ported Gillispie’s innocence. All breakfast lectures take place at Camden Falls Reception Hall located at 2460 South State Route 231 in Tif in. The format is simple: breakfast is served buffet style at 7:30 a.m., the speaker will present at 8:00 with conclusion by 8:50 a.m. The cost is $12.00. Reservation: Call Lori Bentz, Tif in University, 419.448.3282 or email lbentz@tif in.edu. More information to come! Separate presentation at 6:30 p.m. in Chisholm Auditorium. 3


Volume 22 Issue 22

THIS WEEK’S

March 4, 2014

Alpha Phi Sigma National Criminal Justice Honor Society Advocates of Children 2013

Tuesday GLASS Meeting - One Girl, Five Gays panel discussion Main 13 5:00pm

Wednesday Dragon Writers' Guild Meeting Main 23 3:30pm Karoake Contest sponsored by Kappa Kappa Psi Osceola Theatre 9:30pm

Thursday Art Enthusiasts Meeting Hayes 111 7:30pm TU Roman Catholic Club Meeting Main 21 9:30pm

The Alpha Phi Sigma National Criminal Justice Honor Society recognizes aca‐ demic excel‐ lence of Under‐ graduate and Graduate stu‐ dents of Crimi‐ nal Justice. On February 19, AEK’s advisor Dr. Jeffry Stockner and the chapter president JessiThe Goals of ca Durey visited Patchworks House to Alpha Phi Sig‐ present director Barb Flood with the ma are to honor check from National Headquarters. and promote academic excellence; community service; educational lead‐ ership and unity. The national membership for the honor society requires a 3.2 GPA for undergraduate students and a 3.4 GPA for graduate students. The Alpha Epsilon Kappa (AEK) Chapter at Tif in University takes pride in raising the standards higher than the national level with the mini‐ mum GPA being a 3.6 for undergraduate students and a 4.0 for graduate students. In 2013, the national chapter selected the theme of ‘Child Endangerment’ to encourage local chapters to support a child advocacy center within their community. The Patch‐ works House is a local family service agency offering sup‐ port and services to many children and families within Tif‐ in and the surrounding areas. A group of AEK members toured the facility on December 4, 2013. After touring the facility, the AEK president, Jessi‐ ca Durey, noted, “The visit to Patchworks House was an eye opening experience to an often overlooked area rele‐ vant to the criminal justice system. The scope of services provided at Patchworks House, to ensure the support and safety of children and families, deserves the highest recog‐ nition.” In coordination with the theme of ‘Child Endanger‐ ment’, National Headquarters provided a check in the amount of $250 to present to the critical local agencies necessary to protect children.

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Volume 22 Issue 22

March 4, 2014

TU TO HOST PROFFESSOR AUTHOR

Ohio Poetry Association Seventy-Sixth - Ohio Poetry Day Contest

In 1938, the State of Ohio set the third Friday of eve‐ ry October as Ohio Poetry Day. This was the irst po‐ etry day established by a state government in the United States. Tif in University School of Arts and Sciences is sponsoring #12 Literary Personas of the Ohio Po‐ etry Day Contest in honor of the late Dr. Janet Hanna. Poems submitted to this contest should be poetic representations of literary characters; e.g., Janet Hanna's poem "Hamlet, the Transfer Student," which is written from the point of view of one of Hamlet's college professors observing him as he received news of his father's death. Dr. Janet Hanna, Associate Professor of English and Communication Arts, was a faculty member at Tif in University from AY 1999‐2000 through AY 2005‐2006. While at Tif in University she served on numerous committees and most im‐ portantly as the Dean for the School of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Hanna had a great love for English, writing, and poetry.

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On Thursday, April 17, from 12:30 to 1:45 p.m., Tif in Uni‐ versity will host Dr. Michael Dziedzic, Ad‐ junct Professor at Georgetown University and author of "Policing the New World Disorder: Peace Operations and Public Safety." The presentation will take place in Chisholm Auditorium of Frank's Hall. Dr. Dziedzic is a Senior Program Of icer in the Center for Postcon lict Peace and Stability Operations at the United States Institute of Peace. He is presently en‐ gaged in compiling a number of case studies for a book to be entitled "Overlooked Enemies of Peace: Subdu‐ ing Illicit Power Structures." A retired United States Air Force (USAF) colonel, Dr. Dziedzic served as a senior military fellow at the Institute for National Strategic Studies, National Defense University, where he focused on peace operations, Latin American regional security affairs, and transna‐ tional security threats. During his 30 years with the Air Force, he served in a variety of capacities, including profes‐ sor of national security studies at the National War College, and strategic mil‐ itary planner for the United Nations Mission in Kosovo. His recent publica‐ tions include: The Quest for Viable Peace: International Intervention and Strategies for Con lict Transfor‐ mation and Policing the New World Dis‐ order: Peace Operations and Public Safety.


Volume 22 Issue 22

Tif in University to Host Annual International Dinner on Saturday, March 29

Tif in University will hold its 23rd An‐ nual International Dinner “The World in Rhythm” on Saturday, March 29, in the Gillmor Student Center, located on campus. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. and dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. According to Jamie Marinis, Director of Multicultural Services, the dinner will feature cuisines from across the globe with recipes submitted by the students and employees of Tif in Uni‐ versity. Entertainment will feature the diverse talents of our own interna‐ tional students, along with a variety of groups from the TU Music Depart‐ ment, and headlining performers, Son Gitano. Grupo Son Gitano is a young, dynamic and eclectic group from Cleveland, Ohio that combines the unique styles from Spain, South America, Puerto Ri‐ co and the U.S. to create the ultimate Latin fusion and musical experience.

March 4, 2014

The International Dinner is a popular tradition at Tif in University. It pro‐ vides a unique opportunity for Inter‐ national and American students to share their heritage with the campus and the Tif in community through food, arts, and entertainment. Today, there are 195 international students attending Tif in University representing 29 countries. The coun‐ tries represented include: Argentina, Australia, the Bahamas, Bangladesh, Belgium, Brazil, Cameroon, Canada, Central African Republic, China, France, Germany, India, Jor‐ dan, Kosovo, Latvia, Libya, Mexico, Ni‐ geria, Romania, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Trinidad & To‐ bago, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, and Venezuela. The International Dinner typically sells out quickly. Tickets are $12 each. To purchase tickets, please call (419) 448-3357, email MarinisJL@tif in.edu, or visit the Student Affairs Of ice in the Gillmor Student Center.

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ABOUT DRAGON NEWS Published by the Of ice of Media Relations & Pub‐ lications, Drag‐ on News is Tif‐ in University’s weekly electron‐ ic newsletter. To submit news, write copy as you wish it to be read, attach art, and email to DragonNews@ti f in.edu each Monday by Noon. Dragon News will appear in everyone’s email box on Tuesday morn‐ ing. Full page liers must be reduced to 1/2 page. If you submit a full page lier, it may be edited to one column (1/2 page either hori‐ zontally or verti‐ cally). All news is subject to approval.


Volume 22 Issue 22

March 4, 2014

TU Students Experience Model NATO plex in Suffolk, Virginia, the Sen‐ Dean Jaimie Orr and Dr. Brooke ate Armed Services Committee, on Shannon accompanied thirteen Capitol Hill, Washington DC, and Tif in University students to Wash‐ the Portuguese and Estonian Em‐ ington D.C. to the Model NATO bassies. Also, they were able to Conference held February 13 – 16. visit the Pentagon and meet with experts on the Southeast Asian and Paci ic region and the Of ice of In‐ ternational Security Affairs for Eu‐ rope and NATO. Three members of the team were honored: Ashleigh Fittipaldi and Michael Gibbons re‐ ceived Superior Delegate in Com‐ mittee Award for the representa‐ tion of Estonia in the North Atlan‐ tic Council and Brian Turner was awarded the Distinguished Dele‐ gate Award. Dr. Brooke Shannon, Two nations were represented at when asked about the trip, stated, the conference by the TU students: “The members of this organization Portugal and Estonia. Represent‐ continue to impress me not only in ing Portugal were Danielle Kinkaid, their level of professionalism, but mostly, in their sense of purpose Valentina Diaz, Kelsey DeRidder, Jacqueline Lindsay, Brian Turner beyond themselves. They truly believe in a mission to make the and Brandon Weller; and repre‐ senting Estonia were Michael Gib‐ world better”. bons, Haley Goth, John Nowicki, Christopher Gerrity, Nick Kla‐ witter, Ashleigh Fittipaldi and Beckie Kozlowski.

Here are some observations of the students themselves on the trip:

Overall Model NATO experience from a Freshman, by Jacqueline The University has been sending Lindsay - As an aspiring criminal students to the conference since justice professional the 2014 Mod‐ 2009. Dean Orr observed: el NATO trip to Washington D.C. “Experiential learning is the most allowed me to put my future goals effective tool available to us as ed‐ into perspective. In the company ucators, and simulations such as of knowledgeable staff leading the the Model NATO are probably the way, we were able to engage in a most valuable programs I can think once in a lifetime opportunity. of to let our students see how the With visits to the Pentagon, Joint skills and concepts they study have Staff, and Allied Command Trans‐ direct application to the real formation, students were able to world.” get a feel for the types of accom‐ While the group was in the Wash‐ plishments that can be had through ington area they were able to visit hard work and dedication to the ield. the Headquarters of Allied Com‐ mand Transformation in Norfolk, Virginia, The Joint Staff (J7) com‐ 7

NATO HQ, Allied Command Transformation, by Michael Gibbons - Attending the Model NATO conference in Washington, D.C. was a great experience because it further developed my research, public speaking, negotiating, and consensus building skills. This an‐ nual trip was further compliment‐ ed by a brie ing and tour of the NATO Transformation Command Headquarters in Norfolk, VA. Re‐ ceiving a brief from senior NATO representatives truly aided in put‐ ting my academic work into per‐ spective. Sitting in the same brie ‐ ing room as senior NATO leaders and being able to ask questions and interact with the professionals that are actually making the deci‐ sions was a valuable experience. I would highly recommend this trip to all National Security and Home‐ land Security majors. Senate Armed Services Committee, by Danielle Kinkaid ‐ The 2014 Model NATO conference that we attended was an incredible ex‐ perience. Along with the confer‐ ence, we had the opportunity to meet with the majority and minori‐ ty leaders of the Senate Armed Ser‐ vices Committee. These men were able to enlighten us to the world of politics and enhance our knowledge base in regards to the Senate. They were eager to hear our questions and answer them from both sides of the political aisle. With their expertise, we were


Volume 22 Issue 22

able to further understand some of the issues that the United States has been addressing. The Senate Armed Services Committee was another amazing addition to our Model NATO experience. Of ice of the Secretary of Defense (Policy), The Pentagon, by Kelsey DeRidder ‐ The pentagon experi‐ ence was incredible; we met with high ranking of icials, and had a small tour of the pentagon. We met with a representative of the Of ice of Secretary of the Defense for Poli‐ cy, specializing in the South and South Eastern Asia. He briefed us on big problems taking precedent in the Australian and Southern Asia region. He also discussed the im‐ portance of communication in the workplace as well as interagency communication. We then moved on to the International Security Af‐ fairs for Europe and NATO. This

March 4, 2014

tions from every possible aspect. Since the Portuguese delegation had come prepared to ask ques‐ tions, the ambassador also gave us the Portuguese perspective to show what their country would say about a speci ic topic. For a student hav‐ ing the privilege to actually sit down with an of icial ambassador, and having conversation is price‐ less. Not many students can say that they spent extra time studying to sit down with important dele‐ gates and of icials, to get their point of view on issues that are im‐ portant today. Model NATO taught me better communication skills.

Joint Staff J7, Joint and Coalition War ighting, by Nick Klawitter ‐ While on our annual Model NATO trip to Washington D.C. our team had the unique opportunity to visit the J7 headquarters of the Joint Staff. While there, we met with top of icials who are developing cutting edge military training and planning. We received a brief from the direc‐ tor of the facility, who is a civilian with the equivalent rank of a four star general. They gave us an in‐ depth look at where the U.S. mili‐ tary wants to be and what they are doing to get them there. Along with gave our group insight on some of the brief from senior of icials we the issues the countries we will be received a personal tour of the se‐ cure facility meeting employees in representing at the Model NATO (Estonia and Portugal) are dealing many of the different departments with. This made the trip to the Por‐ in joint forces development. tugal embassy easier. The infor‐ mation I gathered at the Pentagon The Joint Chiefs of Staff, by Brian changed my perspective. I chose to Turner - During my trip to Wash‐ ask more speci ic questions and to ington DC, with my fellow GAO research other issues that Portugal Members, we got to visit the Joint could face in the future as opposed Chiefs of Staff of ice in Suffolk, Vir‐ to what issues Portugal was facing ginia. This was a truly humbling experience for me, to see the inner at the moment. workings of our government on Portugal Embassy, by Valentina one of its highest levels. One of the Diaz ‐ The Ambassador to Portugal reasons I joined GAO was to see the bigger picture of how things get himself gave us a brief summary and made sure to answer our ques‐ done. Over the last year I became 8

used to just taking orders and do‐ ing what I was supposed to do with the United States Coast Guard; I wanted to know what was on the other side of the glass and where and how the orders came down and how decisions and policy were made. While sitting in their brie ing room going over all the upcoming training exercises and distinct are‐ as of the Department of Defense, I got a new view and understanding of how complex and integral the department is. It was amazing to see how far in the future the De‐ partment of Defense is planning, along with all the Allied countries that we were working with on a daily basis. Estonian Embassy, by Ashleigh Fittipaldi ‐ At the 2014 Model NATO trip Tif in University repre‐ sented two countries Portugal as well as Estonia. My colleagues and I researched about our countries to gather knowledge to best represent what they would stand for on cer‐ tain issues currently going on around the world. To better our perspective we went to the Estoni‐ an Embassy; Jonatan Vsevivo was the speaker for this Embassy. He gave us facts and information that enabled us to represent Estonia in the way it should be represented. My overall experience at the Em‐ bassy, as well as the model NATO trip, was excellent. I am very thankful that I was given the oppor‐ tunity.


Volume 22 Issue 22

March 4, 2014

STUDENT SUCCESS CENTER Student Success Center Midterm Week Schedule The Student Success Center (SSC) will be closing on Thursday this week at 2:00 pm and will not be open on Friday. Plan ahead to get help preparing for your midterms. The SSC will reopen after Spring Break on Monday, March 17. The Student Success Center is looking to hire tutors for the 2014-2015 school year. There will be a need for English/Writing tutors, Math tutors, Accounting tutors and more. If interested please pick up an application in the Student Success Center (SSC) in Friedley Hall. All applications and recommendations are due by March 28. If you want to work with a peer tutor one on one, you can call the SSC at 419-448-3324, e-mail at ssc@tiffin.edu, or simply stop in and make an appointment. GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR MIDTERMS AND HAVE

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Volume 22 Issue 22

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By Shane O’Donnell inishes his Dragons career Sports Information Director second in career scoring

Men's Basketball A dominating paint perfor‐ mance by Walsh proved too much for Tif in University (11‐16, 7‐15 GLIAC) to over‐ come, as the Cavaliers beat the Dragons in their season inale 82‐60. Walsh held a 36‐14 scoring edge inside, outrebounded the Dragons 39‐23, and had a whopping 25‐4 edge in se‐ cond chance points in the win. But it wasn't until the second half that the Cava‐ liers inally put the tenacious Dragons away. The Dragons, ired up on Senior and Alumni Day, ex‐ ploded out of the gate on a 13‐3 to start the game. But Walsh regrouped and re‐ sponded in kind, going on a 12‐2 run that tied the game at the 13:14 mark. Tif in continued to battle. Trailing by 11 with 2:41 to go in the half, the Dragons inished on a 9‐2 run to trail just 38‐34 at halftime. The game got away from the Dragons at the 12:44 mark of the second half. Trailing 53‐46, the Dragons allowed Walsh to explode on a 27‐11 run over the next 10 minutes that effectively end‐ ed the game. Walsh shot 55 percent for the game, including 58 per‐ cent in the second half. Tif in shot 42 percent.from the loor. Joe Graessle ended his su‐ perb Dragons career with 16 points, 6 rebounds, and 5 assists to lead the team. He

with 2149 points. Before the men's game, he was honored with a presentation by GLI‐ AC representative Danielle Harris for becoming the GLIAC's career scoring lead‐ er in his last game against Ohio Dominican. Overall Graessle inishes with 1575 points in GLIAC play. Khaleal McCormick added 13 points, while Ashton Khan had 11 points. Jona‐ than Sutherlin had 6 points and 6 rebounds. Women's Basketball Tif in University (7‐19, 4‐18 GLIAC) closed out their 2013 ‐14 season with a narrow loss to visiting Walsh Uni‐ versity 86‐77, falling in the closing minutes in a game that saw 15 ties and 14 lead changes. After the Dragons took a close 45‐44 halftime edge into the locker rooms, the game remained close, with Tif in clinging to a 73‐72 lead with 6:32 to play. But the Cavaliers exploited 17 TU turnovers and put to‐ gether a 14‐2 run over the remaining 6:00 to put the game away. Overall the Cav‐ aliers managed a 20‐10 edge in points off turnovers. Walsh also held a big re‐ bounding advantage 46‐32. They were led by 25 points from Kelsey Funderburgh. The Dragons got a strong showing from senior Jillian Adams, who inished with 21 points and 10 rebounds in her Dragons inale. Karli Mast also had 14 points and 4 assists, while Kaylee Pat‐ ton also had 11. Bre Nau‐ 12

man had 9 points and 9 re‐ bounds, Katie Miller added 9 with 4 assists, and Jessica Farr had 7 points. Wrestling Junior Kevin Christ‐ man placed as the Tif in Uni‐ versity wrestling team com‐ peted at the NCAA Division II Midwest Super Region‐ al,Saturday at the Heminger Center. The Dragons scored 19 points to inish 14th. #14 Indianapolis scored 125.5 points to win by nearly 19 points over #9 McKendree. Rounding out the top ive were #5 New‐ berry (3rd – 105.5 points), #19 Ashland (4th – 100 points) and #13 Maryville (5th – 99 points). At 285‐lbs, Christman took a tough 3‐2 loss to Chris Gid‐ dens (UNC‐Pembroke) in the ifth place match. Softball Tif in University (4‐1) banged out 13 hits en route to a solid 7‐5 win over St. Joseph's at the Southern In‐ diana Spring Classic. Tif in scored twice in the se‐ cond inning, three times in the third, and twice more in the fourth inning in winning their fourth in a row.Madison Yanek got the win with 5.2 innings of relief work in which she allowed 5 hits and 2 earned runs. Caitlin Houk had 2 hits for 2 RBI, while Taylor Yeater added 2 hits with an RBI. Payton Denman had 2


Volume 22 Issue 22

while junior Nick Calan‐ dra and Olesick had two hits each. Sophomore Logan Sendelbach (0‐2) gave up ive hits, ive runs, two earned, walked two and struck out three in 6.7 in‐ nings. In the nightcap, the Dragons drew irst blood. Vernau crushed a triple and scored on a single by Co‐ ield. Southern Indiana would take a 4‐1 lead after seven innings. In the eighth, McCurry dou‐ bled to left center ield and moved to third on a single by Olesick. Calandra had a sacri ice ly that scored McCurry, making it 4‐2. The Screaming Eagles scored twice in the bottom half to seal the game. For Tif in, McCurry had three hits. Freshman Dan Sexton (0‐2) gave up six hits, three runs, two earned, walked three and struck out two in 5.3 innings. Equestrian Sophomore Elizabeth Volk got the Dragons on the board with a 4th place inish in the Novice Equitation Over Fences class and 3 points towards the team to‐ tal. Senior Michelle Hol‐ man ended her regular sea‐ son with a win in the Inter‐ mediate Equitation on the Flat class adding 7 points to the team total. The Novice Equitation on 13

the Flat class saw sen‐ ior Lauren Burdin ride to 4th place, junior Jessica Paule to 5th and sophomoreElizabeth Volk in 6th. In the Beginner Walk/Trot/ Canter Equitation class Evie Painter rode to a well de‐ served 5th and recently pointing up into Advanced Walk/Trot/Canter Equita‐ tion class freshman Taylor McCluskey took home 6th. Graduate assitant Alexandra Kemp‐Thompson competed and won both the Alumni Equitation over fences and on the lat classes on Sun‐ day. She also competed on Saturday in the same classes, claiming 1st over fences and 3rd on the lat. Mid way through the day Lake Erie College took a mo‐ ment to allow each team a chance to recognize the hard work and dedication put forth by the seniors of each visiting team. The Dragons thanked hunt seat senior captains Lauren Bur‐ din and Rachael Hudson for their time with the team over the last 4 years, as well as senior Michelle Hol‐ man for her success in the two short years she had as a Dragon. The Dragons inished the day 7th out of 12 teams with a total of 13 points. Dragon hunt and western individual quali iers will compete next on Saturday, March 15th at the IHSA Zone 6 Region 1

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hits with a double, while Kaitlin Grue‐ newald had 3 hits with a double and RBI. Tamara Link drilled a home run and Katie Toomey added a double. Baseball Sophomore Cole McCur‐ ry and Garrett Vernau had at least three hits each as the Tif in University baseball team (1‐6) dropped a dou‐ bleheader to Southern Indi‐ ana (5‐4) 7‐3 and 6‐ 2, Saturday afternoon at USI Baseball Field. In the irst game, Southern Indiana struck quickly scor‐ ing two in the bottom of the irst. In the third inning, Tif‐ in used a hit and a pair of errors to get on the board. In the sixth inning, Vernau led off ripping a single through the right side. With two outs, he stole second and scored on a booming double from sopho‐ more Kirk Olesick. The Screaming Eagles scored in the bottom of the sixth to take the lead 3‐2. In the top half of the sev‐ enth, with one out, sen‐ ior Mario Rodriguez singled and moved to third on a hit from freshman Kyle Len‐ to. Freshman Zach Cof ield hit a sacri ice ly to plate Ro‐ driguez. USI scored four runs over the next two in‐ nings to seal the game. For Tif in, Vernau went 3‐for ‐5 and scored two runs

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Finals hosted at the Universi‐ ty of Findlay. Hunt seat qual‐ i iers include seniorLauren Burdin and junior Jessica Paule in the Walk/Trot/ Canter Equitation class, sen‐ ior Michelle Holman in the Novice Equitation Over Fenc‐ es class, sophomore Lauren Satter ield in the Intermedi‐ ate Equitation Over Fences class and graduate assis‐ tant Alexandra Kemp‐ Thompson in both Alumni Equitation on the Flat and Over Fences. Western quali‐ iers include junior Colin O'Bryan in the Walk/Jog Horsemanship class, sen‐ ior Nicole Bruck, jun‐ ior Jessica Paule and fresh‐ man Kayla Hughes in the In‐ termediate II Horsemanship class, junior Joshua Gerschutz in the Novice Horsemanship class, and senior Michelle Holman and junior Emilie Seyfang in the Advanced Horsemanship class. Men's Tennis Tif in University (7‐3, 3‐0 GLIAC) continued to post up‐ sets in the Midwest Re‐ gion on Sunday, this time knocking off Northwood (ranked 26th in the nation and 2nd in the Midwest Re‐ gion) 6‐3. Tif in held a 2‐1 lead after doubles play. Robbie Ball/ Agustin Mangone posted a tough 8‐6 victory, while Ben Fievet/Jordan Simon‐ Chopard won 8‐2. Nicholas Almeida/Kyle Johnson fell 8‐ 4. The Dragons dominated play in three of the six sin‐

March 4, 2014

gles matches. Ball (6‐4, 6‐1), Johnson (6‐2, 6‐1) and Man‐ gone (6‐2, 6‐2) all won in straight sets. Tif in got its other point in an epic three set match from Almeida 6‐7, 6‐4, 11‐9. Simon‐Chopard lost a close match 7‐6, 6‐4, while Fievet retired due to injury in a short irst singles match. "Sometimes when you are playing a national power‐ house in tennis or any sport, you may freeze up a bit. We did not do that today," said Head Coach Phil Conley. "Today we really came to play. We showed what we are really capable of do‐ ing. Robbie Ball continues to play some of the best tennis I have seen in my ive years coaching. Kyle Johnson has been making great strides. We have talked about being more patient from the base‐ line and to look for his op‐ portunity and today he really did that. We are looking for‐ ward to playing in Hilton Head next week and keeping this high level of tennis go‐ ing." Track and ield Brittany Darby, Lamar Har‐ grove and Wilner Marcel‐ in had school record perfor‐ mances as the Tif in Univer‐ sity men's and women's track teams competed at the GLIAC Champion‐ ships, Saturday at the Bier‐ mann Center.

14

On the women's side, Ash‐ land leads Grand Valley State, 64‐55. Findlay is third with 20 points while Hills‐ dale, Malone and Northern Michigan are tied for fourth with 15 points. Tif in is tied for seventh with 11 points. Ashley DeWitt placed third in the 20‐LB weight with a toss of 61 feet, ive inch‐ es. Deborah Broderson scored 3367 points to inish fourth in the Pentathlon. In the pre‐lims of the 60‐meter dash, Brittany Darby ran an NCAA provisional time of 7.71. She tied the school rec‐ ord set in 2009 by Andrea Bader. In the 200m dash, Darby and Deskins both quali ied for the inal with NCAA Provi‐ sional times (25.28, 25.37). Qualifying for the inal as well was Chyna Da‐ vis in the 60m hurdles (8.87), Deskins in the 400m dash (59.12) and Theresa Scott in the 60m dash (7.77). On the men's side, Grand Val‐ ley State leads Ashland, 54‐ 31. Rounding out the top ive is Findlay (3rd – 26 points), Lake Erie (4th – 13 points) and Hillsdale (5th – 12 points). Lamar Hargrove had the fastest time in the 60m dash at 6.80. That hit the provi‐ sional standard and broke the school record of 6.84 set by Anthony Thomas in 2010. Hargrove also had the fastest qualifying time in the 200m dash (21.62). Both


Volume 22 Issue 22

Reginald Mortel won the 400m dash with a mark of 48.33. That hit the NCAA Provisional Standard and broke the ieldhouse rec‐ ord. Ishan Garrett was se‐ cond in the 200m dash (21.83, Provisional). Third place inishes came from Wilner Marcelin in the 60m hurdles (7.99, school record, Provisional) and To‐ ny Marshall in the 60m dash (6.90). On the women's side, Grand Valley State scored 159 points to win by almost 47 points over Ashland. Round‐ ing out the top ive were Findlay (3rd – 75 points), Hillsdale (4th – 59 points) and Tif in (5th – 55 points). Sarah Clow was third in the shot put with an NCAA Auto‐ matic toss of 50 feet, two inches. That broke the school record of 50 feet, ½ inch set last year by Ashley DeWitt. Brittany Dar‐ by placed second in the 60m dash (7.68). She hit the Pro‐ visional Standard and broke the school record of 7.71 set by Andrea Bader in 2009. Taylor Deskins was runner‐ up in the 200m dash with a provisional time of 25.18. Provisional qualifying marks came from Katie Gerhardt in the shot put (47 feet, 7.25 inches) and Theresa Scott in the 60m dash (7.71).

15

Spor ts Ne ws

marks set the ieldhouse rec‐ ord. In the 60m hurdles, Marcelin ran 8.03 to hit the NCAA Pro‐ visional mark and break his own school record. Reginald Mortel ran the quickest 400m dash at 48.94. Quali‐ fying for the inals was Dom Colvin in the 200 and 400m dashes (22.16, 49.40, Provi‐ sional), Ishan Garrett in the 200 and 400m dashes (21.83, Provisional, 49.46), Stephon Goodwin in the 60m dash (6.86, Provi‐ sional), Tony Marshall in the 60m dash (6.93), and Mortel in the 200m dash (22.23, Provisional). Sarah Clow and Lamar Har‐ grove automatically quali‐ ied for nationals as the Tif‐ in University men's and women's track teams com‐ peted at the GLIAC Champi‐ onships, Sunday at the Bier‐ mann Center. On the men's side, Grand Valley State edged Ashland, 162 to 138.50. Rounding out the top ive were Tif in (3rd – 79 points), Findlay (4th– 63.50 points) and Lake Erie (5th – 50.50 points). Hargrove won the 200‐ meter dash with an NCAA Automatic time of 21.34. That is the second fastest in the country and set a GLIAC and ieldhouse rec‐ ord. He was also runner‐up in the 60m dash (6.84). Har‐ grove was named the GLIAC Male Freshman Track Ath‐ lete of the Year.

March 4, 2014


Volume 22 Issue 22

March 4, 2014

The following scholarship opportunities for the upcoming 2014- 2015 academic year. Please be sure to read carefully through the speci ic quali ications for each scholarship, as you may qualify and apply for more than one. The following scholarships are offered through a collaborative effort by the Of ice of Institutional Diversity and the Of ice of Student Outreach: Dragon Diversity Scholarship Five, $2,000 scholarships will be awarded for 2014 ‐15 (minority and female students); Full‐time, un‐ dergraduate student (scholarship athletes are not eligible) Cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0 or above. Open to all majorsDomestic under‐represented (minority) student currently enrolled and planning to enroll in the 2014‐15 academic yearActive in extra‐curricular and co‐curricular a ctivities relat‐ ed to diversity; Special consideration given to stu‐ dents with inancial need. Dragon Leadership Scholarship Five, $3,000 scholarships and ten, $2,000 scholar‐ ships will be awarded for 2014‐15. Full‐time, un‐ dergraduate student (scholarship athletes are not eligible) Cumulative GPA of 2.75 or above ; Open to all majors; Active leader of campus community; Preference given to sophomore and junior student leaders 3. Marathon Minority Scholarship Four, $2,500 scholarships will be awarded for 2014‐15. Full‐time, undergraduate sophomore or junior; Cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher; Business or related major; Domestic, under‐represented

(minority) student currently enrolled and planning to enroll in the 2014‐15 academic year; Actively involved in student activities; Special consideration given to students with inancial need. 4. Marathon Diversity Excellence Scholarship Three, $500‐1000 scholarships will be awarded for the 2014‐15. Full‐time student; Cumulative G.P.A. of 3.2 or above; An under‐represented mi‐ nority student (African American, Hispanic Ameri‐ can, Native American, or female) / inclusion of all ethnic/minority groups being eligible; Participa‐ tion in campus or community activities; Major in disciplines that are more closely tied to Marathon Petroleum Corporation needs and business (Accounting, Finance, Computer and Information Systems, Marketing, Human Resources [graduate level only], Homeland Security/Terrorism & Law Enforcement) Students interested in applying for one or more of the above scholarships must complete the follow‐ ing: 1. Scholarship application (attached) 2. Two reference forms (one faculty member and one organization advisor) 3. Written essay describing how your involve‐ ment and experience positively contributes to leadership and/or diversity at Tif in University (200‐500 words, typed). Application and all supporting documentation must be submitted by 5:00 pm on Thursday, March 6, 2014 to: Of ice of Student Affairs Attn: Jamie Marinis 155 Miami St. Tif in, OH 44883

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Volume 22 Issue 22

March 4, 2014

TIFFIN UNIVERSITY HEALTH CARE SERVICES 419.448.3429 WELLNESS & COUNSELING 419.448.3578

Weekly Yoga EVERY WEDNESDAY in the Chapel. Noon – 1

Located in the Seneca House

Appointments Preferred Walk-Ins Welcome

All are welcome No experience is necessary.

OPEN Mon, Tues, Thurs. 8 to 4:30 Wed. 8 to 8 Fri. 8 to 12 NOON

Please bring a yoga mat or towel.

Nurse Practitioner Licensed Professional Counselor

Questions may be directed to lketter@tiffin.edu

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Volume 22 Issue 22

March 4, 2014

Have you considered Grad School? THINK ABOUT IT!

Master of Education (MED)

Why not take some time to consider continuing your education this spring or summer with one of Tif in University’s graduate programs. Earning a graduate degree will not only help you reach pro‐ fessional goals, but many careers are now requir‐ ing an advanced degree.Graduate students are of‐ ten on the cutting edge of their industries, becom‐ ing pioneers in their ields. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the average worker with a master's degree will net an additional $10,000 or more per year than those with only a bachelor's degree. Working only twenty years after earning your mas‐ ter’s degree can bring in additional income of $200,000. The cost of graduate school tuition is obviously well worth the expense. We would love to have an opportunity to discuss our graduateprogram with you in detail. I also encourage you to complete the online application at http://www.tif in.edu/apply/ grad/. The application will secure a seat for you in the program and put you on the road to success. As an alumnus of the Tif in University bachelor’s degree program you will be eligible for a discount on TU graduate school tuition. This discount will save you $150 per credit hour. In addition, as an alumnus, the application is quick and simple!

·Information Technology ·Higher Education Administration Master of Humanities (MH) ·Art & Visual Media ·Communication ·English: Literature and Writing ·Creative Writing ·Film Studies Master of Science in Criminal Justice (MSCJ) ·Criminal Behavior ·Crime Analysis ·Forensic Psychology ·Justice Administration ·Homeland Security Administration

Questions? Contact Graduate Admissions at 800-968-6446, ext. 3510 or email grad@tiffin.edu.

Tiffin University offers a variety of graduate degree programs including: Master of Business Administration (MBA) ·Finance, General Management ·Healthcare Administration ·Human Resource Management ·International Business ·Leadership ·Marketing ·Sport Management 18


Volume 22 Issue 22

March 4, 2014

The Spring 2014/Summer 2014 gradua on aplica on deadline is quickly approaching! If you  plan on comple ng your degree by the end of Spring 2014 or Summer 2014 please submit  your completed applica on to the Registra on and Records office in Seitz Hall by 5:00 PM  on FEBRUARY 1, 2014. You can also fax or mail it to the number/address listed on the bo om  of the applica on.  

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Volume 22 Issue 22

March 4, 2014

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Volume 22 Issue 22

March 4, 2014

TIFFIN UNIVERSITY ARTS & EVENTS MASTER CALENDAR 2013-2014 DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE:

Spring 2014 Semester Friday, March 7 (leave at 8:00 am); Sunday, March 16 (pick up at 6:00 pm) Spring Break Airport Shuttle International Student Services Gillmor Parking Lot; DTW and CMH airports ISS Of ice 419‐448‐5133, Transportation@tif in.edu Free; open to all students who submit request form by February 14th Friday, March 14 Staff Holiday (Spring Break) Wednesday, March 19, 11:00 am – 12:00 pm Food & Culture Series: Ghana International Student Services Chisholm Auditorium, Franks Hall Jamie Marinis, 419.448.337 or MarinisJL@tif in,edu Free; open to students, staff, and faculty; students earn co‐curricular credit Thursday, March 20, 7:30 – 9:00 a.m. Good Morning World Breakfast Lecture A speaker from The Innocence Project, a public policy organization dedicated to exonerating wronfully convicted people through DNA testing and reforming the criminal justice system to prevent future injustice. Camden Falls Conference Center, Tif in Lori Bentz, bentzl@tif in.edu or 419‐448‐3282 $12 at door. Free to TU faculty, staff and students Thursday, March 20 Opening Reception for “Sustainability” Group Exhibit Diane Kidd Gallery Diane Kidd Gallery Lee Fearnside: fearnsidel@tif in.edu Free Thursday, March 20‐ Thursday, April 17 “Sustainability” Group Exhibit Diane Kidd Gallery Diane Kidd Gallery Lee Fearnside: fearnsidel@tif in.edu Free Thursday, March 27, 2014 6:30 p.m. 21


Volume 22 Issue 22

EVENT: LOCATION: CONTACT: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: LOCATION:

March 4, 2014

Ohio Innocence Project Chisholm Auditorium Dr. Steven Hurwitz, 419.448.3284, shurwitz@tif in.edu March 28, 29, 30 (2014) (Fri and Sat eves at 8:00pm, Sun at 3:00pm) Spring Theatre Production The Dragon's Den Players Osceola Theater Dr. Mary Grennen ‐ 419‐448‐3376 or grennenmv@tif in.edu $4.00; open to the public Saturday, March 29, 5:30 pm – 9:00 pm International Dinner International Student Services and World Student Association Gillmor Gymnasium Jamie Marinis, 419.448.337 or MarinisJL@tif in,edu Tickets are $12; open to public Sunday March 30, TIME ‐ TBD Final Four Shootout (Three-on-Three Basketball Tournament) Sports Management Club Chisholm Auditorium Bonnie Tiell. btiell@tif in.edu or 419.448.3261 $15 per team ‐ Open to the Public (Student Discount). FREE Drawstring Bag Wednesday, April 2, 11:00 am – 12:00 pm Learn a Language in an Hour: Portuguese International Student Services Room 120, Franks Hall Jamie Marinis, 419.448.337 or MarinisJL@tif in,edu Free; open to students, staff, and faculty; students earn co‐curricular credit Thursday, April 3 – Friday, April 4 2013 ProMusic Festival TU Music Department The Ritz Theatre Ali Rees, reesa@tif in.edu Tickets TBA Saturday April 5, 1:00 PM Tif in University Ticket Sales Program at Cleveland Indians Sports Management Club and AMA Marketing Club Progressive Park, Cleveland Bonnie Tiell. btiell@tif in.edu or Danielle Foster FosterDM@tif in.edu $15 to students, staff, faculty, and general public Sunday, April 6 Academic Honors Ceremony Gillmor Student Center Gymnasium 22


Volume 22 Issue 22

CONTACT: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT:

March 4, 2014

Ellen Lucius, 419.448.3299. or luciuse@tif in.edu Thursday, April 10, 5:30 PM / 8:00 PM TU Women's Leadership Seminar & Reception WLS Committee Gillmor Student Center ‐ Osceola Theater Vickie Galaska galaskavm@tif in.edu 419.448.3595 Free for irst 125 students, staff, faculty, and general public; students earn co‐curricular credit Friday, April 11, 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Summit to Success TU School of Business Osceola Theatre Lori Distel, distella@tif in.edu Saturday, April 12, 7:30pm TU Band and Choirs Concert TU Music Department Osceola Theatre Ali Rees, reesa@tif in.edu Free Sunday, April 13, 7:30pm TU Dance Team Spring Showcase Music Department Gillmor Center Gym 419‐448‐3366, gig@tif in.edu Free Friday, April 18 Staff Holiday (Good Friday) Sunday, April 20 (approximately) Easter Host Program International Student Services Various Jamie Marinis, 419.448.337 or MarinisJL@tif in,edu International students and TU faculty and staff Thursday, April 24 6:30 – 8 p.m. Senior Reception/Opening for Annual Student Art Show Diane Kidd Gallery Diane Kidd Gallery Lee Fearnside: fearnsidel@tif in.edu Free Sunday, April 27, 7pm TU Music Spring Showcase 23


Volume 22 Issue 22

PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION: DATE: EVENT: PRESENTED BY: LOCATION: CONTACT: ADMISSION:

March 4, 2014

Music Department Osceola Theatre 419‐448‐3366, gig@tif in.edu Free Thursday, April 24‐ Thursday, May 15 Annual Student Art Show Diane Kidd Gallery Diane Kidd Gallery Lee Fearnside: fearnsidel@tif in.edu Free Friday, May 2 and Monday, May 5 (leave at 8:00 am) End of Year Airport Shuttle International Student Services Gillmor Parking Lot; DTW and CMH airports ISS Of ice 419‐448‐5133, Transportation@tif in.edu Free; open to all students who submit request form by April 11th

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Volume 22 Issue 22

March 4, 2014

UPDATED WINTER WEATHER POLICY Tif in Campus If a Level 3 snow emergency is of icially declared for Seneca County by the Sheriff, classes on the Tif in campus will be cancelled and University of ices will be closed. Unless otherwise communicated by the President or the President’s designee, classes will be held and University of ices will be open if a snow emergency is at Level 1 or Level 2 or in other cases of severe winter weather. If a snow emergency at Level 3 has been of icially declared for Seneca County, University employees are not expected to travel to the Tif in campus. Unless otherwise communicated by the President or the President’s designee, faculty members are expected to travel to the Tif in campus to teach their classes and staff members are expected to travel to the Tif in campus to report for work if a snow emergency for Seneca County is at Level 1 or 2 or in other cases of severe winter weather. If a Seneca County snow emergency is at Level 1 or 2 or in other cases of severe winter weather and an employee chooses not to report for work, the employee must inform his or her supervisor as far in advance as possible and staff members must take annual leave. An exception to this policy will be made for any employee who lives in a county other than Seneca Coun‐ ty that of icially has a Level 3 snow emergency when Seneca County’s snow emergency is at Level 1 or 2. In this case, the employee is not expected to travel to the Tif in campus, but must inform his or her su‐ pervisor as far in advance as possible. If an instructor is not able to travel to the Tif in Campus due to severe weather, the instructor must make arrangements for a colleague or others to take his/her class or may request permission from his or her School Dean as far in advance as possible to teach the class electronically using Moodle. Each Tif‐ in Campus course has a Moodle shell that can be used to create discussion opportunities, send emails to students, and/or communicate assignments. If classes are being held during severe winter weather, and a commuter student does not attend class due to health reasons or safety concerns, the instructor should allow the student an excused absence. If classes have been cancelled and University of ices have been closed, certain staff members may be designated by the President or the President’s designee as “essential personnel” and may be asked to report for work. Any hourly staff member who is asked to work when the campus has been closed will be paid at a rate of time and one‐half per hour. Any exempt staff member who is asked to work when the campus is closed will be given compensatory time off at a later date. Locations Other Than the Tif in Campus For Tif in University classes that are taught at locations other than the Tif in campus, instructors and other University employees should follow the same procedure as described above. The director of each academic center will serve as the President’s designee to determine and communicate any exceptions when there is a snow emergency of Level 1 or 2 for the county where the academic center is located. Tif in University classes that are taught on a community college campus will be cancelled if the commu‐ nity college cancels its classes.

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Volume 22 Issue 22

March 4, 2014

PART-TIME HELP WANTED Art Photographer in Findlay is looking for petite female athletes (I.E. dancers or gymnasts). If you are a ballet dancer, pointe work REQUIRED.

Call after 6 PM: 419-722-2469

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Dragon News (March 4, 2014)  

Read the latest news and browse the calendar of events from the campus of Tiffin University in this week's issue of Dragon News!

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