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A.I.R Journal, Semester 2,2016 Tian Lyu,732095


CONTENTS INTRODUCTION PART A: CONCEPTUALISATION A.1. A.2. A.3. A.4. A.5. A.6.

DESIGN FUTURING DESIGN COMPUTATION DESIGN COMPOSITION/GENERATION CONCLUSION LEARNING OUTCOMES APPENDIX- ALGORITHMIC SKETCHES

PART B: CRITERIA DESIGN B.1. B.2. B.3. B.4. B.5. B.6. B.7. B.8.

RESEARCH FIELD CASE STUDY 1.0 CASE STUDY 2.0 TECHNIQUE DEVELOMENT PROTOTYPES TECHINIQUE PROPOSAL LEARNING OBJECTIVES AND OUTCOMES APPENDIX- ALGORITHMIC SKETCHES

PART C: DETAILED DESIGN C.1. DESIGN CONCEPT C.2. TECTONIC ELEMENTS & PROTOTYPES C.3. FINAL DETAIL MODEL C.4. LEARNING OBJECTIVES AND OUTCOMES


HERRING ISLAND “SECRET” PAVILLION


INTRODUCTION

• My name is Tian Lyu, and I am studying Architecture within the bachelor of Environments at Melbourne university. This is my second year and second semester. • I have learned designing environment and earth studio in last two years and start my designing about architecture. I always have some “strange” ideas, for example, the picture on the right is my model of “SECRET” pavilion for Herring island. The idea is coming from filled lizard, its body have two pavilions, the lower one is for children and the higher one is for adults. The “lizard” can be climbed up and its head is a view point. This “lizard” itself is a secret as it is on the top of hill and need time to be found. I am trying to create a pavilion with interesting appearance and also make a sense of nature, to advocate protect environment and live with animals harmoniously. • I started to learn the importance of digital design when made my designing projects. The hand-making models are not as beautiful as the digital one, and cannot display the idea very detailedly. I am trying to use software to help designing currently and I bileve Grasshopper will help me a lot when making complicated designing.


CONCEPTUALISATION


Figure 2: AS AUTUMN LEAVES, BY LCD, Retrieved from: <http://www.formakers.eu/timthumb.php?w=600&h=420&src=./media/1.974.1383392095.AAL_BJDW13_FO RMAKERS_DTL4.jpg>


A. 1. DESIGN FUTURING With the increasingly population and development of technology, we human beings’ action have a great influence on the environment currently, and put ourselves in a defuturing conditions, unsustainability. However, the damage to our planet is still growing and make us in a dangerous situation. Because of this, two questions need to be considered are “How is the future being understood? And what is meant by design?”¹ Future -- In my opinion, Future represent the things which will be happened in some days, and they are far away from current lives. But Fry pointed that “we exist in the medium of time as finite beings”². Our actions make us in a dangerous situation and future could end in some days by either natural calamities or man-made misfortunes if we continue destroy the environment.

1. 2. 3. 4.

Design – We started designing thousands years ago, we created different kinds of facilities to make our live better. However, we satisfied our current requirements but haven’t consider our future, as the ecological has been damaged, some sources are unrenewable etc. What we could do to save our future currently is changing our attitude in designing³. Find a new design way which toward sustainability, and it is beneficial to build nature environment.

Thus, the following precedent projects will show how they understanding the sustainability and how to use their design to shape a better future for human beings.

Fry, Tony. Design Futuring: Sustainability, Ethics and New Practice (Oxford: Berg, 2008), pp. 1–16 Fry, T. PP.2 Fry, T. PP.3-4 Figure 3: AS AUTUMN LEAVES 2, by LCD, Retrieved from: <http://www.formakers.eu/timthumb.php?w=600&h=420&src=./media/1.974.1383392107.AAL_BJDW13_F ORMAKERS_DTL5.jpg>


1.Xiamen Dream City

• Architect: SDA/ Synthesis Design+ Architecture • Program: Mixed-use luxury retail, entertainment and residential development • Location: Xiamen, China • Year: 2011

The concept for Xiamen Dream city is to integrate the beach site with a series of buildings by imbedded this buildings into the landscape deck which formed by natural force. It challenged the traditional idea of the city waterfront. This program almost place 300,000 square meters and architects put the main programmic elements in a suitable place by considering how to activate the contour lines, the landscape itself¹.

The contours which have been reorganized form a rippling and continuous surface of undulating dunes, canyons, and valleys which define a network of public plazas, linear gardens, and winding pathways at surface level. Under the surface, several low-rised buildings embedded within the landscape are revealed by peeling away the deck².


“The dynamic and cascading effect of the openings articulate a series of protected terraces, waterfront views, and sculptural north-facing roof lights for the retail, dining, and entertainment venues at lower levels.” --- SDA

SITE PLAN

Figure 1.

This design also considered

Figure 2.

using of natural force or source to achieve suitability. Parametric design of the mixed-use, spiral, rising towers ensures optimized sunlight exposure accompanied by ideal natural ventilation. Their orientation is guided by avoiding the direction of the prevailing winds on the beach site. Unexpectedly regular, pattern of the facade encourages interpolation of green surfaces, as a more elegant response to the emerging trend of window farming³.

Figure 3.. 1. SDA, Xiamen Dream City, (SDA, 2011) <http://synthesis-dna.com/projects/xiamen-dream-city> 2. SDA 3. MARIJA BOJOVIC, Rethinking waterfront-Xiamen DreamCity by SDA, (Evolo, 2013), http://www.evolo.us/architecture/rethinking-waterfrontxiamen-dream-city-by-sda/ 4. Fig 1. Xiamen Dream city, by SDA, Retrieved from: http://synthesis-dna.com/elements/uploaded_imgs/synthesisdna_bb67653eb7ccfc58f0abcd0e18ef711b.jpg 5. Fig 2. The Tower, by SDA, Retrieved from: http://synthesisdna.com/elements/uploaded_imgs/synthesisdna_e44bc9e4f4585e020a3d8ac0d9c535e5.jpg 6. Fig 3. The Site Plan, by SDA, Retrieved from: http://www.evolo.us/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/041.jpg


Fig 1. The Front View

Fig 2. The detail of bubbles

Fig 3. The Water cube, by PTW Architects, Retrieved from: http://www.ptw.com.au/wpcontent/uploads/2012/11/Watercube-014.jpg


2. Water Cube • • • •

Architects: PTW Architects Program: Aquatics Centre for Beijing Olympic Games Location: Beijing Year: 2003

This cuboid building was built alongside Beijing National

Stadium in the Olympic Green for swimming competitions of the 2008 Summer Olympic Games¹. This Design combines the symbolism of the square in Chinese culture and the natural structure of soap bubbles translated into architectural form. This building is not only a place for competition, leisure but also tried to provide social and ecologist benefit.

“The striking Watercube structure is energy efficient by maximising natural light and capturing solar energy to heat the interior spaces as well as the pools. Water efficiency is achieved by rainwater harvesting, recycling, efficient filtration and backwash systems².” ---- PTW This building has been used 8 years since 2008, and it indicated this is a excellent design that is visually striking, energy efficient, and ecologically friendly with using state-ofthe-art technology and materials³.

1.PTW Architects, Watercube—National Swimming Centre, (PTW Architects, 2003), http://www.ptw.com.au/ptw_project/watercube-national-swimming-centre/ 2. PTW 3. PTW 4. Fig 1: The front view of Watercube, By PTW, Retrieved from: http://www.ptw.com.au/wpcontent/uploads/2012/11/Watercube-0334.jpg 5. Fig 2: The Detial of bobbles, By PTW, Retrieved from: http://www.ptw.com.au/wpcontent/uploads/2012/11/OC_Night173.jpg


A. 2. DESIGN COMPUTATION â&#x20AC;&#x153;Computational thinking is the thought processes involved in formulating problems and their solutions so that the solutions are represented in a form that can be effectively carried out by an information-processing agentš.â&#x20AC;? ----Jan Cuny, Larry Snyder, and Jeannette M. Wing Design computation refers to architects creating their ideas in a digital format by using computer softwares such as Rhino, grasshopper. This help architects produce complicated models in a convenience method. Moreover, the computer also provide more possibilities for designer in form-finding, optimization, materialization, digital analysis and fabrication. The Design Computation is a way which help us achieve better future.

1.

Jan Cuny, Larry Snyder, and Jeannette M. Wing, Demystifying Computational Thinking for Non-Computer Scientists, (work in progress, 2010), pp. 25


1. Icd & Itdk Pavilion “ A key aspect of the project was to transfer the fibrous morphology of the biological role model to fibre-reinforced composite materials, the anisotropy of which was integrated from the start into the computer-based design and simulation processes, thus leading to new tectonic possibilities in architecture. The integration of the form generation methods, the computational simulations and robotic manufacturing, specifically allowed the development of a high performance structure: the pavilion requires only a shell thickness of four millimeters of composite laminate while spanning eight meters¹. ” ---- ICD &ITDK

Fig 1. The Pavilion, by ICD, Retrieved from: https://encryptedtbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQIapGM09cauH2NpVHXEXt-Upi8V4MXfdIEs-xAEJoXhwcKK0vN

This

pavilion is a research project for the Institute for Computational Design (ICD) and the Institute of Building Structures and Structural Design (ITKE) at the University of Stuttgart in November 2012. This project presents a novel approach to fibre-composite structures in architecture, and is entirely robotically fabricated from carbon and glass fibre composites².

Because

of this, it use less formwork but maintain a large degree of geometric freedom. The transformation of functional principles of natural lightweight systems to architectural structures. Venture of programmatic forces, view vectors and pedestrian circulation has been enabled by this technique³.


D E V E L O P M E N T F O R

P A V I l I O N

Fig 2. The model making of Pavilion 1. 2. 3. 4.

ICD, ICD/ITKE RESEARCH PAVILION 2012, (ICD, 2012), http://icd.uni-stuttgart.de/?p=8807 ICD ICD Fig 2, The model making of Pavilion, by ICD, Retrieved from: http://compositesandarchitecture.com/wpcontent/uploads/2013/01/icd-itke_rp2012_19.jpg


2. Vertical Ground This “vertical ground ” project is for the organization of collage campuses. The main idea of this project is to situate the collage campus in a dense area to improve the link between students and social communities¹. This vertical ground satisfied two aspects, have less horizontal area but still have large spaces for students’ activities.

“orienting a campus vertically allows for more programmatic flexibility and opportunities for dynamic interaction²” ---- George Kontalonis

On the right is the design processes for this vertical ground in computer software. The computational thinking provide more opportunities for this building.

1. 2. 3.

Evolo, Vertical Gronud, (evolo, 2012), http://www.evolo.us/competition/vertical-ground/ Evolo Fig 1. The vertical ground and processes, by George Kontalonis, Jared Ramsdell, Nassim EsHaghi, Rana Zureikat, Retrieved from: http://www.evolo.us/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/19Vertical-Ground-2-600x300.jpg


A.3. DESIGN COMPOSITION & GENERATION

“The processing of information and interaction between elements which constitute a specific environment; it provides a framework for negotiating and influence the interrelation of datasets of information, with the capacity to generate complex order, form and structure¹.” ---- Sean Ahlquist and Achim Menge

1. Sean Ahlquist, Achim Menge, Computational Design Thinking, (AD, 2011), PP 35.


1. Beijing National Stadium • • • •

Architects: Herzog & De Meuron Program: Stadium for Beijing Olympic Games Location: Beijing Year: 2004

This project has geometrically clear-cut and rational overall configuration of lines, they evaporates the closer one comes, finally separating into huge separate components. The components look like a chaotic thicket of supports, beams and stairs, almost like an artificial “Bird Nest¹”. This kind of algorithmic thinking has become increasingly relevant as architects have developed methods of generative design and evolutionary simulation to deal with the increasingly complex demands of their designs. Herzog and de Meuron created an incredibly intricate composition through the aggregation and variation of relatively simple architectural elements².

1. Herzog & de Meuron, Beijing National Stadium, (Herzog & de Meuron, 2017), https://www.herzogdemeuron.com/index/projects/complete-works/226-250/226-national-stadium.html 2. Libertecture, algorithmic boogie – beijing olympic stadium case study, (Architecture technology and liberty, 2009), https://libertecture.wordpress.com/2014/01/28/algorithmic-boogie-beijing-olympic-stadium-case-study-gsapp-adr3. Fig 1. The Bird Nest, By Libertecture, (2009), Retrieved from: https://libertecture.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/m photo-3.jpg?w=800&h=533 4. Fig 2. The Model Processes, By Libertecture, (2009), Retrieved from: https://libertecture.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/how-to-do-the-algorithmic-boogie.jpg?w=800&h=800


Fig 2. Model Processes

Fig 1. The Bird Nest


Sand Babel is a group of ecological structures designed as tourist attractions and scientific research facilities for the desert. This Project consist of two parts, The first part which above ground has several independent structures for a desert community while the second part is partially underground and partially above ground connecting several buildings and creating a multi-functional tube network systemยน.

Fig 1. The section

Fig 2. The Sand Babel, by evolo, (2014), Retrieved from: http://www.evolo.us/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/0656-1-600


2. Fig 3. The Head of Sand Babel

“The main portion of each

Fig 4. The body of Sand Babel

building is constructed with sand, sintered through a solarpowered 3D printer. The top structures are based on the natural phenomena called Tornadoes and Mushroom Rocks, which is very common in deserts. It utilizes a spiral skeleton structure, which is tall, straight and with strong tension, to meet the requirements of residential, sightseeing and scientific research facilities². ” ----- Qiu Song

1. Qiu Song, Kang Pengfei, Bai Ying, Ren Nuoya, Guo Shen, Sand Babel: Solar-powered 3D Printing Tower, (Evolo, 2014), http://www.evolo.us/competition/sand-babel-solarpowered-3d-printed-tower/ 2. Qiu Song 3.Fig 1,2,3,4, The detail of Sand Bbel, (2014), Retrieved from:http://www.evolo.us/wpcontent/uploads/2014/03/0656-2-600x300.jpg

Fig 5. The foot of Sand Babel


â&#x20AC;&#x153;Computational designers construct 3-D models and create design tools, but their expertise goes beyond these tasks. They generate and explore architectural spaces and concepts through the writing and modifying of algorithms that relate to element placement, element configuration, and the relationships between elements.šâ&#x20AC;? ---- Peters Brady

A.4. Conclusion The part A learning let me understand what kind of year we are living in. The planet is in a dangerous situation and how could we solve the problems? In my opinion, we need to change our attitude of design and try to shape a better future through green and sustainable architecture. It is a challenge for revolutionary but also an opportunity to achieve better lives.

It also provide a new method in designing, computational design. We could find the convince of digital design and the large opportunity it provide for designer. More dramatic outcomes will be produced by architects with computational design.

By considering the environment and ecosystems in Merri Creek, I would like to design a building which have biometric elements and fix it with the nature harmoniously by using the idea of generation.


A.5. Learning Outcome

I have gain much more knowledge about

I could improve my past design

architecture computing. All my models are made by hands and the details drawing are hand drawing as well for my past projects. But I can use grasshopper to create complex shapes and that develop my designing opportunities . Computational design is not only about convenient but also provide more possibilities for designers.

in a better way to achieve design futuring. There are too many functions in grasshopper and that makes it difficult, but it is also the amazing and interesting place for grasshopper. I believe I could have better design with grasshopper in the future

1. Peters, Brady. Computation Works: The Building of Algorithmic Thought, ďź&#x2C6;Architectural Designďź&#x152; 2013), 83, 2, pp. 08-15


A.6. Appendixâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Algorithmic Sketch

I have use an array of cubes to create a maze in the firs sketch and create a ball with several surfaces. You can see the arrangement of boxes and the direction of lines on the surface of ball. These are very simple generation in a simple shape.

BOX MAZE

BALL


Reference • AS AUTUMN LEAVES, by LCD, Retrieved from: http://www.formakers.eu/timthumb.php?w=600&h=420&src=./media/1.974.1383392095.AAL_B JDW13_FORMAKERS_DTL4.jpg • AS AUTUMN LEAVES 2, by LCD, Retrieved from: <http://www.formakers.eu/timthumb.php?w=600&h=420&src=./media/1.974.1383392107.AAL_ BJDW13_FORMAKERS_DTL5.jpg> • Evolo, Vertical Gronud, (evolo, 2012), http://www.evolo.us/competition/vertical-ground/ • Fry, Tony. Design Futuring: Sustainability, Ethics and New Practice (Oxford: Berg, 2008), pp. 1–16 • • Herzog & de Meuron, Beijing National Stadium, (Herzog & de Meuron, 2017), https://www.herzogdemeuron.com/index/projects/complete-works/226-250/226-nationalstadium.html • ICD, ICD/ITKE RESEARCH PAVILION 2012, (ICD, 2012), http://icd.uni-stuttgart.de/?p=8807 • Jan Cuny, Larry Snyder, and Jeannette M. Wing, Demystifying Computational Thinking for NonComputer Scientists, (work in progress, 2010), pp. 25 • Libertecture, algorithmic boogie – beijing olympic stadium case study, (Architecture technology and liberty, 2009), https://libertecture.wordpress.com/2014/01/28/algorithmic-boogie-beijingolympic-stadium-case-study-gsapp-adr-i-13/ • MARIJA BOJOVIC, Rethinking waterfront-Xiamen DreamCity by SDA, (Evolo, 2013), http://www.evolo.us/architecture/rethinking-waterfront-xiamen-dream-city-by-sda/ • Peters, Brady. Computation Works: The Building of Algorithmic Thought, (Architectural Design, 2013), 83, 2, pp. 08-15 • PTW Architects, Watercube—National Swimming Centre, (PTW Architects, 2003), http://www.ptw.com.au/ptw_project/watercube-national-swimming-centre/ • Qiu Song, Kang Pengfei, Bai Ying, Ren Nuoya, Guo Shen, Sand Babel: Solar-powered 3D Printing Tower, (Evolo, 2014), http://www.evolo.us/competition/sand-babel-solar-powered-3d-printedtower/ • • SDA, Xiamen Dream City, (SDA, 2011) • http://synthesis-dna.com/projects/xiamen-dream-city • Sean Ahlquist, Achim Menge, Computational Design Thinking, (AD, 2011), PP 35.


Reference • The Bird Nest, By Libertecture, (2009), Retrieved from: https://libertecture.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/model-photo-3.jpg?w=800&h=533 • The detail of Sand Bbel, (2014), Retrieved from:http://www.evolo.us/wpcontent/uploads/2014/03/0656-2-600x300.jpg • • The Detial of bobbles, By PTW, Retrieved from: http://www.ptw.com.au/wpcontent/uploads/2012/11/OC_Night173.jpg • • The front view of Watercube, By PTW, Retrieved from: http://www.ptw.com.au/wpcontent/uploads/2012/11/Watercube-0334.jpg

• The model making of Pavilion, by ICD, Retrieved from: http://compositesandarchitecture.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/icd-itke_rp2012_19.jpg • The Model Processes, By Libertecture, (2009), Retrieved from: https://libertecture.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/how-to-do-the-algorithmicboogie.jpg?w=800&h=800 • The Pavilion, by ICD, Retrieved from: https://encryptedtbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQIapGM09cauH2NpVHXEXt-Upi8V4MXfdIEsxAEJoXhwcKK0vN • • The Sand Babel, by evolo, (2014), Retrieved from: http://www.evolo.us/wpcontent/uploads/2014/03/0656-1-600x300.jpg • The Site Plan, by SDA, Retrieved from: http://www.evolo.us/wpcontent/uploads/2013/01/041.jpg • The Tower, by SDA, Retrieved from: http://synthesisdna.com/elements/uploaded_imgs/synthesis-dna_e44bc9e4f4585e020a3d8ac0d9c535e5.jpg • The vertical ground and processes, by George Kontalonis, Jared Ramsdell, Nassim Es-Haghi, Rana Zureikat, Retrieved from: http://www.evolo.us/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/19Vertical-Ground-2-600x300.jpg • • The Water cube, by PTW Architects, Retrieved from: http://www.ptw.com.au/wpcontent/uploads/2012/11/Watercube-014.jpg • Xiamen Dream city, by SDA, Retrieved from: http://synthesisdna.com/elements/uploaded_imgs/synthesis-dna_bb67653eb7ccfc58f0abcd0e18ef711b.jpg


Criteria Design


4

5


B.1. Research Field -- Geometry “Geometry is the fundamental science of forms and their order. Geometric figures, forms and transformations build the material of architectural design¹. “ ------ Cornelie Leopold

As the fundamental science of forms and

Another fundamental notion in the

their order geometry contributes to the process of composition and designing in architecture. Composition in architecture starts with elements and their relations. Geometry is able to make a contribution to this process by dealing with geometric figures and forms as elements as well as proportions, angles and transformations as relations between them². In the history of architecture geometric rules based on the ideas of proportions and symmetries formed fixed tools for architectural design.

history of architecture is the concept of symmetry closely connected with the idea of harmony. Symmetry operations are concerned with motions of figures and shapes. The process of symmetry transformations can be expressed in a clear way by the operations of folding and cutting. Folding gets more and more important for creating processes in architecture4.

Proportions were analyzed in nature and found as general aesthetic categories across nature and art. Therefore proportions such as the golden section were seen as the power to create harmony in architecture as well as in art and music. The notion of harmony is seen as a fundamental principle of composition in history of architecture. Composition is based on harmony and order as aesthetic categories³.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

In contemporary architecture there are no fixed rules about design concepts. But there are still relations to geometric space concepts. There is a need of new geometric background for architectural design. The architectural space develop more opportunities by considering the freeform curves and surfaces, differential geometry, mesh processing, digital reconstruction and optimization of shapes5. The central concept of geometry architecture is still harmony.

Cornelie Leopold, GEOMETRY CONCEPTS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, (SALVADOR, 2010) , pp 35 Cornelie Leopold, pp 36 Cornelie Leopold, pp 37 Cornelie Leopold, pp 37 H. Pottmann, A. Asperl, M. Hofer and A. Kilian, Architectural Geometry. (Bentley Institute, 2007), pp 25


B.1.1 Green Void Location: Sydney, Australia; Stuttgart, Germany Architecture: Mak Max; Peter Murphy; TOKO Year: 2008

Green Void was a digital design, derived

The shape of the installation was not explicitly

from nature, realized in lightweight fabric, using the latest digital fabrication and engineering techniques, to create more with less. The installation was comprised of 3000cubic meters of space enclosed within a minimal surface area of 300 square meters and used only 40 kg of lightweight materialš.

designed but was the result of the most efficient connection of different boundaries in three-dimensional space, found in nature in cells, crystals and soap bubbles. LAVA determined the connection points within the space and the rest was a mathematical formula with a minimal surface. The concept was achieved with a flexible material that follows the forces of gravity, tension and growth, similar to a spider web or a coral reef².


Fig. 1.The Green Void

Fig. 2. Section of Green Void

Green Void is a typical example in geometric architecture which use free-forming shape to active and connect the space in the building. It provide an idea of rebuild the architectural space by adding harmonious shapes. 1. LAVA, Green Void, (LAVA,2010), http://www.l-a-v-a.net/projects/green-void/ 2. LAVA 3. Fig 1. The Green Void, By LAVA, Retrieved from:http://www.l-a-v-a.net/assets/Uploads/GreenVoid300dpiChrisBosse11-15.jpg 4. Fig 2. Section of Green Void, By Lava, Retrieved from: http://www.l-a-v-a.net/assets/Uploads/floorplan-andsection.jpg


B.2 Case Study 1.0 SG2012 GRIDSHELL

Fig 1. The GridShell Location: Smartgeometry 2012, RPI, Troy, NY Size: 11m x 7m x 4m Material: Straight Wood Lath Workshop: Gridshell Digital Tectonics Workshop Instructors: Mark Cabrinha, Andrew Kudless, David Shook

This 4-day workshop at SmartGeometry 2012 focused on the design and construction of a wooden gridshell using only straight wood members bent along geodesic lines on a relaxed surface. Using parametric tools, the design was developed and analyzed to minimize material waste while maximizing its architectural presence in the space. In addition, a feedback loop was designed between the parametric geometric model and a structural model allowing for a smooth workflow that integrated geometry, structures, and material performanceยน. This project could be use as the foundation to explore divide spaces by using geometric patterns. 1. MATSYS, SG2012 GRIDSHELL, (MASTYS, 2012), http://matsysdesign.com/category/projects/sg2012-gridshell/ 2. Fig.1. The Gridshell, Retrieved from: http://matsysdesign.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/IMG_9422590x393.jpg 3. Fig.2. Digital drawings of Gridshell, Retrieved from: http://matsysdesign.com/wpcontent/uploads/2012/04/sg2012_Elevation_Front-01-01-590x372.png


Fig 2. Digital drawings of GridShell


Species 1

Species 2


Species 3

Species 4


Species 5

Species 6


B.2.2 Selection Criteria Functionality- How can it be used? what kind of person can use it? Harmony- Can it fit with the surrounding area? Constructability- Which kind of material can be used and how long it need to be constructed? Fuctionality:80% Harmony: 60% Constructability: 80% This could be constructed as a pavilion which have 2 spaces, one inside and one outside. It could be constructed by timber or steel. It could be placed in an open area to provide shading for people who want to have a rest.

Fuctionality:60% Harmony: 80% Constructability: 80% This could be constructed in the central open space of a commercial building to rebuild the architectural space and provide more possibility by lighting and make the space more interesting. It could be built by fabric or plastic.

Fuctionality:80% Harmony: 80% Constructability: 80% This could be constructed as a pavilion in open space. The changing of shadings could provide more geometric sense. It could be constructed by plastic. Fuctionality:80% Harmony: 80% Constructability: 60% This could be constructed along a path to divide the open space and also provide shading with the circular shape. It could be constructed by timber or plastic.


B.2.3 Speculation Through this form-found process, I have found more possibilities for designing. The strange shape which make by changing existing parameters, input geometries and component options let me have deeper knowledge about architectural geometry and also it is a good attempt for the further process. In this process, I was trying to explore the connection between space and geometric architectural. The architectural have its ow life and could be affected with wind or voice. This make the architecture more interesting and can have better interaction with surrounding.


B.3.1 Case Study 2.0 Location: Beijing Architect: Shao Weiping Year: 2012

BEIJING PHOENIX CENTER

Fig.1. Phoenix Center

Phoenix International Media Center is a multipurpose and comprehensive architecture with functions of television programming, offices and business. It is located in Chaoyang District at the southwest corner of Beijing Chaoyang Park in Beijing has a land area of 18,000 square meters with a total construction area of over 65,000 square meters. The building's sculptural shape originates from the "Mobius Strip" and establishes a harmony relationship with the turning road alignment, the street corner, and Chaoyang Parkš.

To create an ecological envelope to embrace independent program spaces within it as a building- in building concept, and many shared public spaces are generated between the two. In the east and west shared spaces, there are continuous steps, landscape platforms, elevated sky walks and long escalators which make the building filled with energetic and dynamic atmosphere².

1. Phoenix Satellite TV, Beijing Phoenix Center, 2012, http://phtv.ifeng.com/english/bpc.shtml 2. Phoenix Satellite TV 3. Fig.1. Phoenix Center, Phoenix Satellite TV, Retrieved from: http://p1.ifengimg.com/a/2016_24/ae870b1c6d10ee8.jpg


B.3.2 Reverse-engineer Mobius Strip The Beijing Phoenix Center is base on the structure of Mobius Strip, this strip is a surface with one continuous side formed by joining the ends of a rectangle after twisting one end through 180°.


B.3.3 Record Process

1. Draw a circle to ensure the central line, draw prep frames along the central line.

2. Draw ellipse which based on the prep frames.


3. Draw another ellipses and rotate them to have angle with the original ellipses.

4. Merge 2 geometries and loft them.


5. Draw several XY planes and intercept them with the surface which create by loft. Use the boundary edge curves to create planar surface.

6. Use Diagrid structure to draw the surface of Phoenix Center.


B.3.4 Final Outcome

Similarities: 1. Both Structures are based on Mobius Strip. 2. All the surface is smooth, there is no 90°corner in the structure.

Differences: 1. I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t draw the shelter in the central of structure. 2. The angle of rotation of ellipses are different from the phonies center. The bridge which allow people get in are not a large degree.

I will use the idea of continuous for further designing and thinking about change the shape or joints to make it more interesting.


B.3.5 Diagram Pi number

Circle

Range

Prep Frames

number

number Ellipse

number

Item 0 Item Pi -12 3 number

Series

Construct Point

XY Plane


Rotate

number number

Merge

Diagrid

Loft Pipe number

Rotate Surface

Section

Boundary surface Extrude

0.1

Unit Z


B.4 Technique Development


B.4.2 Selection Criteria Functionality- How can it be used? what kind of person can use it? Harmony- Can it fit with the surrounding area? Constructability- Which kind of material can be used and how long it need to be constructed? Fuctionality:60% Harmony: 80% Constructability: 80% This could be constructed as a path way which have 2 spaces, one inside and one outside. It could be constructed by timber and placed in an open space.

Fuctionality:80% Harmony: 80% Constructability: 60% This could be constructed as a pavilion to allow people have rest inside. This could be constructed by timber or steel and place in an central of open space. It can be a good place for party.

Functionality: 60% Harmony: 80% Constructability: 80% This could be constructed to lead the path in an open space. It could be constructed by plastic or steel. It have a sense of maze so may be a good play space for children.

Functionality: 80% Harmony: 60% Constructability: 60% This could be constructed as panel pavilion, use for large party or ceremony. It should be constructed by Steel and glass.


B.5 Prototypes Prototype 1 For the first porotype, I am trying to make a triangular pavilion. I used plastic sticks as the frame and wires to represent the geometric surface. A circular plastic board is putting on the top to fix the three sticks.

Testing: Triangle is the stablest structure but the plastic sticks are too weak and easy to bend. The stretching could happen in horizontal direction as there is no connection in the front of this structure. The light could go through space between wires and create interesting shadings on the ground.


Prototype 2 For the second porotype, I am trying to make a sculpture by three timber sticks, two circular plastic boards and wires to represent the geometric surface of this structure. The model is just a single part of the whole project. I want to make a series of this kind of sculpture with different scale to lead a path in the open space.

Testing: The timber is stronger than the plastic sticks. It is not easy to collapse by horizontal or vertical forces. But the bottom of this structure is not flat, so it is not steady. The circular plastic board on the top create great shading when the light is in approraite angle.


B.6 Technique Proposal

Fig.1.Site Plan

1. Fig 1. Site Plan, By KTA, Architectural Drawing of Sacred Heart Courtyard.


Site: Abbotsford Convent Sacred Heart Client: Abottsford convent in collaboration with Shadow Electric Program: Mixed mode event space including outdoor cinema, music stage, food and beverage offering + high level pedestrian bridge. Heritage: The building, known as Sacred Heart or ‘the home’, was enclosed by a courtyard that was not visible beyond the surrounding large gates and locate at Abbotsford. It was constructed in 1963 and has been listed as a heritage in 2005. The styles of the building is Gothic Revival Style. Even though the building is a very historic site, there are some modern events hold in this place by shadow electric¹.

Fig.2. Ironing Room

Shadow Electric: The event space utilises an outdoor cinema, facilities for hosting a music performance (indoor, outdoor, both), food and beverage offerings and all ancillary spaces (BOH, waiting rooms, storage, etc). These uses can occur at any time of day and should allow for 24hour use. Fig.3. Outdoor Cinema 1. Abbotsford Convent ,Sacred Heart, http://abbotsfordconvent.com.au/about/history/buildings/sacred-heart 2. Fig 2, Ironing Room, By Abbotsford Convent, Retrieved from http://abbotsfordconvent.com.au/cache/image.f699a49f5828a5d854f8e071bb4ae1ac 3. Fig 3. Outdoor Cinema, By Abbotsford Convent, Retrieved from http://abbotsfordconvent.com.au/cache/image.fea8f93624a590e4c346149d56b7ebc8


Design Proposal: A half closed pavilion in the Sacred Heart Courtyard. It can have good ventilation and provide shadows in the hot summer day and for the music stage the light go through the gap transfer more interesting and can excited the audience.


B.7 Learning Outcomes Objective 1: The digital technology help us explore more possibilities in designing. Sometimes, unbelievable outcome will give surprise for me. It help me a lot in designing. Objective 2: Possibilities is the most precious benefit taken by digital designing. Small changes, for example, change the number, the shape of a curve will cause a huge difference in the outcome project. Especially in this part study, I have explore a lot of possibilities in the technical development. Object 3: Most of the work need to be down by ourselves in this part study. When using the grasshopper, I am more skilled than before and could find more parametric modeling by myself. Object 4: The relationship between architectural and air for me is how to use and reshape the spaces to make it have better aesthetic appeal, to achieve designing future.

Objective 5: I am able to use grasshopper to create a case for proposals now. I think the structure which I make will become more and more beautiful, interesting in the final project. Objective 6: I can use grasshopper to help me have better understanding of the precedent projects. Object 7: It is my first time to use algorithm to design. This help me face a new world. I have got much better understanding about computational geometry, data structure and programming than before. But there is still a lot of things I need to learn. Object 8: I can create some simple definition by myself and learned a lot from the online tutorial. And the grasshopper online forum also help me a lot when I have questions. I think I could make it better in the future.


B.8 Algorithmic Sketches


Reference Abbotsford Convent ,Sacred Heart, http://abbotsfordconvent.com.au/about/history/buildings/sacred-heart Cornelie Leopold, GEOMETRY CONCEPTS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, (SALVADOR, 2010) , pp 35 Digital drawings of Gridshell, Retrieved from: http://matsysdesign.com/wpcontent/uploads/2012/04/sg2012_Elevation_Front-01-01-590x372.png

H. Pottmann, A. Asperl, M. Hofer and A. Kilian, Architectural Geometry. (Bentley Institute, 2007), pp 25 Ironing Room, By Abbotsford Convent, Retrieved from http://abbotsfordconvent.com.au/cache/image.f699a49f5828a5d854f8e071bb4ae1ac LAVA, Green Void, (LAVA,2010), http://www.l-a-v-a.net/projects/green-void/ MATSYS, SG2012 GRIDSHELL, (MASTYS, 2012), http://matsysdesign.com/category/projects/sg2012-gridshell/ Outdoor Cinema, By Abbotsford Convent, Retrieved from http://abbotsfordconvent.com.au/cache/image.fea8f93624a590e4c346149d56b7ebc8 Phoenix Center, Phoenix Satellite TV, Retrieved from: http://p1.ifengimg.com/a/2016_24/ae870b1c6d10ee8.jpg Phoenix Satellite TV, Beijing Phoenix Center, 2012, http://phtv.ifeng.com/english/bpc.shtml Section of Green Void, By Lava, Retrieved from: http://www.l-a-va.net/assets/Uploads/floorplan-and-section.jpg Site Plan, By KTA, Architectural Drawing of Sacred Heart Courtyard. The Green Void, By LAVA, Retrieved from:http://www.l-a-va.net/assets/Uploads/GreenVoid300dpiChris-Bosse11-15.jpg The Gridshell, Retrieved from: http://matsysdesign.com/wpcontent/uploads/2012/04/IMG_9422-590x393.jpg


Design Concept


B.6.0 Design Concept

Fig1.Mobuius loop

For the inspiration, it is coming from Mobius strip. This strip is a surface with one continuous side formed by joining the ends of a rectangle after twisting one end through 180°. So it only have one side and one boundary. It give me an idea to link two different scenes by one structure.

1. Fig1. Mobius loop, by Pinterest, Retrieved from http://psnt.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/mobius31.jpg


Precedent BEIJING PHOENIX CENTER

Fig.2. Phoenix Center

Phoenix International Media Center is

People cannot walk on the vertical

a multipurpose and comprehensive architecture with functions of television programming, offices and business. The building's sculptural shape originates from the "Mobius Strip" and establishes a harmony relationship with the environment.

surface, the phoenix center provide an idea to make the Mobius strip become a tridimensional structure and can allow people walk in the internal space and create more possibility.

1. Fig.2. Phoenix Center, by Phoenix TV, Retrieved from http://www.bjchy.gov.cn/UserFiles/Image/dadd.jpg


B.6.1 Design development

STEP 1. Draw a central line of model, adjust it to fit with the environment.

STEP 2. Draw ellipses flow the central line, set the number of ellipses as 500.

STEP 3. Draw another ellipses and rotate them to allow it have angle with the original ellipses..


STEP 4. Merge two geometries and loft them.

STEP 5. Use diagrid structure to create surface through lunchbox.


B.6.1 Design proposal To design a channel connect the multifunction spaces and the heritage building. This Channel is designed The channel have 2 floors, height based on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mobius stripâ&#x20AC;?, locate in the central of Sacred Heart, divide the space to have its own function in each area and also link each area by the channel. The channel also connect to the heritage building around the courtyard in four places on higher floors. So it become a bridge between the heritage buildings. It could provide a interesting journey for visitors to walk from courtyard to channel to buildings.

of each level is between 2.5meters to 3meters. It have 3 entrance on the ground to allow people walk in the internal of channel, 4 entrances on the second floor to connect with the heritage buildings. Some part of channel have distance from ground and formed an entrance for people to get in the central space formed by channel.


The channel form 2 spaces inside and the closed space with roof is for cinema and another open space is for music stage. Half space of music in under the channel, it not only provide a shading/covering but also provide a different view for audience when they join the music.


B.6.1 Design Details

16.58m

46.32m

10.48m

1. SITE PLAN


A

A

2. SECTION AA The channel have 2 floors, as the short radius of ellipse is 2.5meters and long radius is 3meters. So the highest height in each level is 3 meters and lowest height is 2.5meters.


B

B

3. SECTION BB


4. NORTH ELEVATION


+11.5m +9.2m +7.9m

5. EAST ELEVATION


6. GROUND FLOOR PLAN

7. ROOF PLAN


FILM AREA: 65.39m²

MUSIC AREA: 16.05m² OPEN AREA + 48.31m² SHADING AREA


DAY

NIGHT


B.6.2 Technique elements & pr

The channel is a architecture constructed by large framing system using node join. The surface of channel is connected together by steel rods and steel nodes. Structural joint members for a space frame system with a node joint having threaded apertures, structural strut members with threaded end sections, and a connecting member.

PROTOTYPE 1


ototypes

PROTOTYPE 2


B.6.2 Technique elements & pr

PROTOTYPE 1


ototypes

PROTOTYPE 2

PROTYTPE CREATE BY 3DPRINT USING POWDER


B.6.3 Final Detail model To clarify the interior space and connecting detail of the model, I select a part of the structure which include all components to illustrate the detail. And the model will be produced by using 3Dprint.


SELECT PART


B.6.3 Final Detail model

1. PARTLY MODEL

The structure is constructed by steel nodes and steel rods, glass panels are installed between steel rods. Slab platform with 200mm thickness divide the structure into 2 floors. The glass panel could allow people enjoy the film or music performance in the channel. The spaces in channel can be used in different functions, for example, small shops or restaurants could be opened here.


GLASS PANEL STEEL NODE

STEEL ROD

2. SECTION DRAWING

SLAB PLATFORM


B.6.3 Final Detail model


B.6.3 Final Detail model


FINAL MODEL CREATE BY 3DPRINT USING POWDER


B.6.4 Learning objectives and

There is not doubt that studio air

Parametric design is really a challenge for me,

provide a new idea about design for me. Drawing is not only some sketches by hand, model making is not only some boards, rods etc. connected by glue as well. The digital model could help people understand the project better and also give designers more feedback than just drawing by imagination. I chosen to use 3Dprint to produce my project, it is very easy as machines help you produced it and avoid some troubles which may happen in hand making process. Machines make work easier and could help people achieve better life.

but I also learned a lot through this semester. For the future designing, I could designed more interesting project by using designing softwares such as grasshopper. . I have got much better understanding about computational geometry, data structure and programming than before.

There is one thing very regretful is that I missed some healthy problems this semester, that effect my final project. Some drawing are not very well and may not express clear. But I have learned a lot from this subject and will learn more from online tutorials, I believe I could have better project in the future.


outcomes


Lyu tian 732095 finaljournal