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JANUARY 2012

Celebrating Eye Month Insert Inside

2012

Cale

ndar

What to Expect in

2012

2012 Calendar Inaugural calendar showcasing local artists

Gavin:

Strong at Heart

First Person with Jacqueline Smith

January 2012

Overcoming

Fitness Obstacles Thrive Magazine for Better Living

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1


Rehabilitation Hospital

of Jennings

DIAgNOSeS THAT we TReAT

• Brain Injury

• Hip Fractures

• Strokes

• Osteoarthritis/DJD

• Amputations

• Neurological Disorders

• Burns

• Spinal Cord Injury

• Major Multiple Trauma

• Congenital Deformities

• Rheumatoid Arthritis

• Systemic Vasculidities

• Joint Replacements

Others who can benefit from inpatient rehabilitation are postoperative patients, accident victims and cancer patients. 24 Hour Nursing Care • Physical Therapy • Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy • Nutritional Counseling and Monitoring Case Management Call for a free assessment today. One Hospital Drive, Ste. 101 • Jennings, LA 70546 • Phone: (337) 821-5353 • Fax: (337) 821-5355 or 5366 jenningsrehab@yahoo.com • www.jenningsrehab.com 2 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

January 2012


Annette’s story “GiGi’s has it all. It’s not a fashion show. . . It’s just a great place to work out.

January 2012

“I joined GiGi’s when it first opened, but only began with personal training in early 2011. In less than a year, I went from 151 to 135 lbs. without trying. Also, my body fat dropped from 33% to 27% and I feel so much better. At 66, I can outdo my training partner who is in her 30s. I have no pains and I’m not on meds. My life and outlook has tremendously changed since coming to GiGi’s. I tell everyone that GiGi’s has a homey and friendly atmosphere with more classes and the best instructors like CynDee, my personal favorite. CynDee has shown me the correct way to workout and doesn’t push me to do more than she thinks I can handle. Thanks CynDee and thank you GiGi’s. I’ll see you at the gym.” Annette

4429 Nelson Road | Lake Charles | 474-6601

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Contents 22

6

52

In This Issue

Cover Story

Home & Family 6 Let Go of Your Inner Pack Rat

44 Trends for 2012

10 Why It’s a Good Time to Buy 12 HOME SHOW 2012

22

Year of the Girl: 100 Years of Girl Scouts

Money & Career 24 Background Checks: Not Just for Employers 27 Find a Pro to Bank on Your Biz 28 Dealing with the Office Bully

Places & Faces 32 Pacemaker Picks up Beat for 7-Year-Old 36 A Family Business: The Holliers

Mind & Body 48 Moss Bluff Resident Overcomes Fitness Obstacles 50 Four Ways to Change Your Life 52 Gym Fitiquette

Style & Beauty 62 Boldly Go Red 68 New Ways to Look at Your Soul Food 72 Mardi Gras 2012

Regular Features

29 Business Buzz 40 First Person: with Jacqueline Smith 42 Who’s News 55 Solutions for Life 60 By the Numbers New 66 70

Ready to Wear

Community Contributors 71 Best Impressions 74 Happenings 75 The Last Word

62

A New Year Means New Growth for We are so excited about our growth over the past year and can’t thank our readers and advertisers enough for helping us Thrive! We have even bigger plans for 2012 and you’ll notice the first of these changes in this issue. From our new, glossy cover to new feature sections designed around specific areas of interest to the very first Thrive calendar – you’ll see the difference. One thing that will never change is our focus on providing readers with the information they need to live a full, happy and balanced life. We’ll continue working to improve each issue and would love to hear your feedback. Please visit our Facebook page (ThriveSWLA) and let us know what you think about each issue.

Don’t just live, thrive!

Editors and Publishers

Kristy Armand Christine Fisher

Creative Director/Layout

Barbara VanGossen

Assistant Editor

Erin Kelly

Business Manager

Katie McDaniel

Assistant Designers

Shonda Manuel/Kris Roy

Scan the QR Code to link to our online reader survey!

Advertising Sales 337.310.2099 ads@thriveswla.com Emily Porche Britney Glaser

Thrive is designed for people focused on living a happy, healthy life, one that is balanced, full of energy and contentment. Thrive readers want to make the most of every day and be successful in all areas of their lives – family, health, home and career. 4 www.thriveswla.com

Submissions edit@thriveswla.com Submitted articles and photos are welcome. Thrive assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials and does not guarantee any submissions.

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January 2012


{ SPINE } An intricate structure requiring expert care.

The spine is one of the body’s most complex networks. Delicate nerve endings enter and exit the spinal cord through spaces in the 24 vertebrae that are held together by a system of muscles, tendons and ligaments in the back. When these nerves become irritated or damaged,

Clark Gunderson, MD Board certified orthopedic surgeon

the pain can be unbearable and you don’t want just anyone to repair the damage. Proper

diagnosis

by

board

certified

specialists,

conservative treatment and, if necessary, expert surgical techniques are essential to proper care.

Gregory Rubino, MD Board certified neurosurgeon

If you have medical issues related to the spine, Dr. Clark Gunderson, an orthopedic surgeon, and Dr. Gregory Rubino, a neurosurgeon, are spine treatment experts.

Call 1-800-494-LCMH (5264) or click www.lcmh.com/spine to schedule a consultation.

January 2012

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Home & Family

Organized for Life

Cure Your Inner Pack Rat

One person’s trash may be another person’s treasures, but our homes can only hold so much.

6 www.thriveswla.com

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January 2012


According to Samantha Hebert of Tailored Living, living an organized life relieves stress and saves time. In this hustle-and-bustle world, few people have time to search for misplaced items and the anxiety that often ensues makes the task even more frustrating and constraining. “Why not spend your time doing the things you love rather than searching for things you’ve misplaced?” Hebert said. “An organized space helps reduce stress. Not only will you be able to find your belongings quickly, you’ll eliminate clutter and allow your mind to relax. If there’s something that needs attention, it’ll be identified faster in a tidy area.” Clutter accumulates quickly and seemingly easily, according to Hebert. Many times we aren’t even sure why we’ve held on to some of the items in our drawers, bureaus, garages or closets. As a representative with Tailored Living, Hebert’s job is to help homeowners assess their belongings and determine which items need new “homes” and which items can be incorporated into a truly usable space. She refers to the organizing process as eliminating the glitches and insists that efficiency will follow. According to Hebert, the average three-bedroom home has more than 350,000 items; research indicates that ridding excess clutter would eliminate 40 percent of the housework in an average home. She provided the following tips for clutter-weary homeowners who want to get ahead on spring cleaning: • If you haven’t worn it in a year, get rid of it. “I’m not sure I agree with that statement totally, but it’s still a good guideline to follow,” she said. • Get some inexpensive plastic boxes and neatly store all your items that are not in display or not used daily. You can get small ones in the dollar

January 2012

stores to organize your CDs, use them in your pantry or cupboards, store odd and ends, letters, papers – you name it. • Don’t go through the clutter and rearrange disorganized items – throw away unused items! • Everything in its place - Once you have everything decluttered and organized, get everyone to keep everything in its place. • If you have a small home, you may have to go through this process about once a year. “Decluttering and organizing can give you a sense of control and achievement,” she said. “If you can get control over this part of your life, maybe taking control of the big things won’t be so hard.”

Before

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After

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Home & Family

Tiling Trends The impact of your home’s tiling doesn’t just affect the way it looks, it can also affect your housekeeping load and your home’s resale value, according to Olivier Grosset of Artisan Tiling. “While carpet is still the most affordable way to cover your flooring needs, it still has to be replaced if there is any damage, such as water from a flood, major stains or after a few years of natural use,” Grosset said. “A lot of people have now decided to go the extra mile by installing ceramic tile in living rooms and bedrooms where the carpet used to be king for years.” Choosing ceramic tile instead of carpet gives the home a polished look, while also avoiding the potential necessity to replace or consistently clean worn or damaged carpet. More sophisticated and efficient flooring trends have also spread to the other rooms in the house, according to Grosset. “The evolution of floor coverings in the last 50 years has changed not only on the installation side of it, but also by the unlimited selections of products,” Grosset said. Here’s a few examples: • Shower walls from small tile 4”x4” to bigger tile 12”x12” or bigger. “The bigger the tile, the less grout line, which makes it easier to clean,” he said. • More neutral colors. This is better for resale value; more buyers will be able to relate to your home if it’s not overly personal. • More people are replacing their tubs with more accessible walk-in showers. Grosset said he has also been custom-building walk-in showers with features such as hideaway nooks for shampoo and other necessities. “Today, more and more pebble rocks are being used on shower floors,” he said. “This not only to gives it a unique look, it is also therapeutic for the bottom of your feet – it’s like a foot massage while showering.” • Glass tile and tumble marble with murals by the stove are still very popular and will probably stay the number one choice for backsplash. Marble or granite are being used for fireplaces and will be for years to come. • Some kitchen floors are now outfitted with bricks. “This is only possible if your slab is recessed during the construction of your new house. Today, if you would like to remodel your existing kitchen floor and try to achieve the same look as a real brick floor, there is a possibility to install brick pavers,” he said.

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January 2012


Lake Arthur Named Best Town to Raise Children Lake Arthur, a small town of about 3,000 residents located in Jeff Davis Parish, just 34 miles east of Lake Charles, has ranked among the best places to raise children in Louisiana, according to Bloomberg Businessweek’s national survey. Bloomberg Businessweek, a weekly business magazine, evaluated 4,168 locations with populations between 1,000 and 50,000 people and a crime index of less than 10 percent above the national average. In addition, they took into consideration factors such as: median family income, job growth, unemployment, ethnic diversity and school test scores. The national survey discovered that Lake Arthur, which was ranked second to last the previous year, had a median family income of $53,537—20 percent above the state’s median. Furthermore, it had an average math score of 88 and an average reading score of 87.5. Both of these scores are approximately 20 points higher than the state’s average. Within the past year nearly a dozen new businesses have opened in Lake Arthur, including a bank, waterfront restaurant, bakery-café, art studio, ice cream parlor and several small retail shops downtown. The town has also remodeled and revamped its beach area by importing nearly 1,500 tons of clean, white sand from the Lake Arthur Photo by: Greg Holland Ouiska Chitto.

Tiling the Swiss Way

Glass Tile Ceramic tile Granite tile Marble

Slate Custom Shower Countertop and

Backsplash Fireplaces Brick Pavers Stone work

Call (337) 540-4918

Residential and commercial • Licensed and Insured Serving SWLA for over 10 years • Olivier Grosset, Owner

www.tilingtheswissway.com Check us out on Facebook!

Your life. Organized.

Free In-Home Consultation | Come see us at the Home Show! January 14 & 15.

337.564.0322 | tailoredliving.com/lakecharles

January 2012

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Home & Family

Home Improvement Guide The first month of the year fills our minds with new ideas, innovative plans and forward-thinking prospects. For many, these projects fall under one roof -- that of the family home. As your brain ticks with homeimprovement thoughts to make 2012 a cozy, comfortable and incredible year within the walls of your humble abode, find out why it’s a good time to buy; how windows and lights can affect the mood of your home; the importance of hiring a licensed contractor and easy ways you can go green.

Why Now is the ‘Right Time’ to Buy a New Home Buying a new home can be an exciting and overwhelming experience. It may be difficult to know when to hold—and when to buy. However, if you dream of owning your own home, now may be the best time to take the plunge. “Many potential home buyers typically wait for interest rates and housing prices to fall, but with the effects of the recession, the rates and prices are at an all-time low, and financial analysts are not expecting any more significant declines,” says Stephen Benoit, assistant vice president and assistant manager at City Savings Bank’s Sulphur branch. City Savings Bank’s “mortgage experts” explain five real estate trends that suggest now is the best time to look into buying your dream home: Lowest housing prices in years “It’s not clear when the housing market will hit bottom, but housing prices are at the lowest they have been for many years and could start rising soon,” says Trevor Cooley, assistant vice president and assistant manager of City Savings Bank’s Main Office in DeRidder.

10 www.thriveswla.com

Interest rates near a 50-year low “Interest rates are closing in at a 50-year low,” says Matt Parker, assistant vice president and assistant manger of City Savings Bank’s Leesville branch. “Even though mortgage rates can vary from day to day, 30-year mortgage rates at this level can be very attractive to first-time homebuyers or empty-nesters who are looking to downsize.” Interest rates are expected to rise “Mortgage interest rates are expected to rise as the economy gains momentum, so the current rates will not last for long,” says Benoit. “Even a half percentage increase could increase your monthly payment by hundreds of dollars.” Adjustable mortgage rates are at record lows “Adjustable mortgage rates—also known as ARMs—have also decreased, but the rates could increase over the life of the mortgage,” says Cooley. “The increase by the end of the mortgage could be substantial. However, for new buyers who have enough income to meet the payments, this may be the best way to buy a new home.”

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January 2012


Lenders are offering incentives “Some lenders, including City Savings Bank, are offering competitive rates and special incentives to home buyers, such as no money down programs,� says Parker. City Savings Bank will have a booth at the 2012 Home Show. For more information on the 2012 Home Show, visit the Home Builders Association of SWLA website: www.hbaswla.org.

Real Wood Fur niture, Finished Your Way!

Custom Availability

BARE WOOD

F U R N I T U R E 4913 Common Street Lake Charles, LA

474-5678

www.barewoodfurniture.info January 2012

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Home & Family | Home Improvement Guide

Kick off a Fabulous New Year for your Home at the

2012 Home Show

As you’re putting away favorite decorations and smiling at the memories of another Christmas gone by, it may be easy to embrace that old tried and true phrase “home is where the heart is.” So, why not kick off the New Year with some new ideas—whether small or large—to revive and enhance your home? Have you been yearning to do some redecorating? Or are you dreaming of a remodeling project? Maybe you’re just curious or looking for new ideas for your home. Did you know that you can get all of your building, remodeling, furnishing and design questions answered all in one place at the 2012 Southwest Louisiana Home Show? The Home Builders Association (HBA) of Southwest Louisiana will hold its 21st Annual Home Show Jan. 14–15, at the Lake Charles Civic Center. The show will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14, and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15. Admission is $5 per person. Children 10 and under get in free when accompanied by an adult.

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January 2012


2012 HOME SHOW / LC Center Louisiana Home Builders Association ofCivic Southwest 14-15 2012 JANUARY Coliseum HS.doc08 2008 2012 Home Show Exhibition Hall Sponsored by the Home Builders Association of SWLA

Dining Tables No Booth

106

105

Bulldog Pepper Jelly Cafe

LC American Press

103

102 BBB

Toups Const.

1 2

32

C&C Audio

31

Louisiana Propane Dealers

City Savings Bank

Williams Wood

Discount Bedding

3 4

Terminex

5

30

29

Genset

28

Lake Arthur Butane

GenSet

Lake Arthur Butane

GenSet

Gen Set

Gen Set

8

25

6

27

7

Center Point

26

La Mortgage

33

66

Joseph’s Electric

Holiday Travel

34

65

BMC Sales & Service

Creative Door

35

64

Stine Lumber

Creative Door

36

63

Stine Lumber

Goodyear Audio

37

62

Stine Lumber

Coburn’s of LC

38

61

Stine Lumber

Signs Now

39

60

J&J Ext.

LaMaison

40

59

La. Mortgage

A Door Works

100

Tax Assessor

99

Coffee Beanery

67

Dining Tables No booth

98

Energy Shield Insulators

Garage Solutions

Flavin Realty

Garage Solutions

68

97

69

96

CSE Credit Union

Open

CSE Credit Union

Open

70

95

71

94 Open

72

93 Open

USS Orlick Museum Coldwell Banker

73

92

First Federal Insurance

Permanent Painting Of Acadiana

A Door Works

K&K Water

74

91

9

Sears Comercial Sales

10

90

K&K Water

24

Superior Window

Acme Brick

11

Tub Docteur

12

Century 21 Bessette

13

Moss Bluff Floors

14

Moss Bluff Floors

15

Apex 16

Kitchen Craft

23

Superior Window

22

Superior Window

21

Concrete Homes

20

Jeff Davis Bank

41

58

Superior Window

Budget Blinds

42

57

Superior Window

Budget Blinds

43

56

Superior Window

Tailored Living

44

55

Allstate Insurance

Tailored Living

45

54

Scentsy Wickless Candles

West Builders

53

19

46

Chief Purificatio n

A&A Installatio n

Vac Central

Chief Purificatio n

A&A Installation

Sylvan Systems

18

47

52

75

89

Budget Blinds

National Wastewater

76

88

Open

Open

77

87

Open

Open

78

86

Open

Open

79

85

Open

Open

80 Open

Open

84

81

83

Jambalaya Magazine

Wilkinson Tree Farms

17

82

Kitchen Craft

Wilkinson Tree Farms

FIRE EXIT

FIRE EXIT

48

17.5

Open

Knot Wood

49

Absolute Gutters

LOADING

50

Hixon’s Pest Control

51

Dupont Sewer

Date: 12/22/11 Lifeshare Blood Drive

January 2012

101 CPPJ

Entrance from Exhibition Hall

Rhino Shield

“The Home Show is a must-attend event if you are planning on redecorating or remodeling your home, building a new house, or even if you are just curious about the latest in interior and exterior improvements,” says Buddy Kohnke of Sears Commercial Sales, the 2012 Home Show chairman. Your plans will take shape as you walk through the show, percolating with ideas for new home improvement projects. Whether you are interested in interior or exterior improvements, this event will have what you need to get your ideas brewing. The Home Show will feature more than 160 exhibitor booths displaying products, services and exclusive offers. The event will also showcase the latest samples in flooring, appliances, countertops, plumbing fixtures and more. Each booth will be staffed by experts who will be ready to help you realize the pieces needed to put together the home of your dreams. “The Home Show is a great place to meet the local designers, craftsmen, builders and developers who can help you make your dreams become a reality,” says Don Veronie of Heritage Builders, 2012 president of the HBA of Southwest Louisiana. Want to ring in the New Year with a home improvement project? Learn more about the 2012 Home Show by visiting the HBA of Southwest Louisiana’s website, www.hbaswla.org.

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Mike D Bono Century 21

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LOADING OUTSIDE BOOTHS:

Dunham Price Silverleaf Resorts Louisiana Concrete Angelle Concrete RSC Rental Equipment Port Aggregates

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Home & Family | Home Improvement Guide

What is Your Window Solution? Choose Great Design and Energy Savings

When it comes to windows, choosing the right designs for your windows and window treatments will not only enhance the look of your home, but also can have a significant impact on your utility bills. Over 40 percent of the heat and air conditioning that escapes in a home does so through the windows “Upgrading to ‘new’ or ‘replacement’ modern windows will not only add to your home’s curb appeal, but the newer windows will reduce your energy bills by doing a better job of keeping the cool or warm air in,” says Jerry Guillory of Superior Window. The term “replacement window” refers to when an older window is removed and replaced without disturbing the trim. A new window is when the current size or shape of the window opening is altered.

14 www.thriveswla.com

Window treatments are also more than design; many blinds and curtains also enhance energy efficiency. “Curtains, drapes, shutters, blinds and other window treatments not only have the potential to dramatically impact the design of any room, but they also can add extra layers of insulation to your windows,” says Phyllis White of Budget Blinds. “Adding the right window treatments can create a more comfortable environment, both aesthetically and temperature-wise, while helping to decrease your energy bills.” Superior Window and Budget Blinds will have booths at the 2012 Home Show. For more information, visit the Home Builders of SWLA’s website at www.hbaswla.org.

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January 2012


Lights, Camera - Action Enjoy the Movie Theater Experience at Home

Design Within Reach

Tired of the same old movie nights at home with lackluster sound? Imagine if you could transform your living room into a home movie theater. No, it’s not an episode of the Jetsons or MTV Cribs. It can be your reality. It’s time to enter the revolution in home theater systems. “The right speakers can transform your living room into the ultimate home theater experience,” says Roger LeBlanc of C&C Audio-Video-Appliance. “A speaker system is not one-size-fits-all. The right arrangement will work with your room’s natural acoustics, and you can also build on your system as your needs change.” LeBlanc advises starting with the basic home speaker system to set your audio revolution into motion: Three front speakers (left, right and center) For many rooms it is best to get a pair of bookshelf speakers, combined with a center channel speaker. It will work best if each speaker is from the same series.

The

Surrounds The surround speakers bring the sound together. Satellite speakers work well, as well as in-wall or in-ceiling speakers.

Decorative Center Kelty Design Studio

Subwoofer This is the booming bass of the system, the finishing touch that gives all the thrills of being in the movie theater. You will be able to feel the noise, whether it’s a rumbling earthquake or thundering jet plane. C&C Audio-Video-Appliance will have a booth at the 2012 Home Show. For more information, visit the Home Builders of SWLA’s website at www.hbaswla.org.

Whether you need a complete makeover or a fresh look, let Pat Kelty and her exceptional design team transform your house into a home.

Home & business interior design Custom drapes & bedding made in-house Wallpaper • Fabrics Flooring • Fine Furniture Visit our showroom today! Interior Design & Fine Furniture

337.494.3913

decorative.center@yahoo.com 400 West Hale Street • Lake Charles January 2012

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Home & Family | Home Improvement Guide

Why It’s Important to Choose a Licensed Contractor Every year homeowners throughout the United States lose an estimated $25 million because of working with unlicensed contractors. Your home is your largest investment. You protect it from fires, inclement weather and wear and tear, but it’s also important to be protective of your home when choosing a contractor. “It’s crucial to choose a licensed contractor, whether you’re building a home, remodeling or just making small improvements,” says Don Veronie of Heritage Builders, president of Home Builders Association of Southwest Louisiana. “Licensed contractors take their trade seriously and are accountable to a state agency. This assures you that they are experts in their field, and that they won’t use substandard materials or skip out on a job.” Sometimes an unlicensed contractor may offer a lower quote to entice a homeowner, but be wary. They may be taking shortcuts or reusing old materials while charging for new materials. And we have all heard home remodeling horror stories of unlicensed contractors disappearing before the job is done. The problems do not end there. Many unlicensed contractors do not carry insurance (a requirement for licensed contractors). Hiring a contractor without insurance can have enormous financial implications for the homeowner. What if something goes wrong during construction or a worker is injured? When the contractor is not properly insured, it becomes the homeowner’s responsibility. Are you building a new home or remodeling? Visit the Home Builders Association of SWLA’s website: www.hbaswla.org to learn more about the Home Show and how to find a local licensed contractor to work on your home.

MPC

Mike Porche’ Construction, Inc.

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Thrive Magazine for Better Living

January 2012


Mood

Set the

Lighting can transform the tone of any room

Many of us don’t think about lighting until it’s time to replace a bulb or endure a power failure, but it can be the key element to setting the mood, tone and feel of each room in your home. “A room’s lighting is more than just a device to chase away the shadows,” says Danny Lanza of Joseph’s Electrical Center “The ‘right’ or effective lighting can transform any space and make most rooms multifunctional.” If you are remodeling, looking to make some changes or are building a new home, now is the time to explore the best lighting solution for each room. “There are many different types or layers of lighting,” says Lanza. “Lighting is all about matching the potential uses for each room with the lighting that will illuminate and set the mood for the room’s function.” Most rooms need general lighting. This is your base, and it can be a chandelier, ceiling fixture or fan, but the right lighting enhancements, such as lamps, track lighting or dimmer switches can work with the general lights to highlight a room’s features and artwork, and change the tone or feel of the room. Effective lighting can also make a room appear larger. Joseph’s Electrical Center will have a booth at the 2012 Home Show. For more information, visit www.hbaswla.org.

K i m tAs si n mAKes mortgAge LoAns As eAsy As A, B, C. Finding the right mortgage loan may seem like a complicated task, but not when you turn to a professional like Kim Tassin. Kim walks her customers through the process

Advising them on the most appropriate options with Benefits that stand the test of time, while taking them through the Closing with the care and attention every homebuyer deserves. With nearly 30 years of banking experience, Kim Tassin will make your home buying experience as pleasant and as simple as A, B, C. Merchants & Farmers Bank offers a variety of mortgage types, including FHA, VA, Rural

Development, 30-Year Conventional, and 15-Year Conventional. Call Kim at 477-3638 to begin your mortgage loan process today.

4091 nelson road Lake Charles, LA 70605 January 2012

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Kim tAssin 337.477.3638 www.thriveswla.com

17


Home & Family

GeauxGreen According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the world population is expanding at a mind-boggling rate. It is estimated that the population will swell to over 9 billion by 2050. That means that if the world’s natural resources were evenly distributed, people in 2050 would only have 25 percent of the resources per capita compared to those in 1950. The world has a fixed amount of natural resources - some of which are already depleted. So as population growth greatly strains our finite resources, there are fewer resources available. We save for college educations, living luxuries and weddings, but what about saving for clean air, water, fuel sources and soil for future generations? Here are 10 easy steps from the World Watch Institute that you and your family can take to green up your life and help save the planet. 1. Set your thermostat a few degrees lower in the winter and a few degrees higher in the summer to save on heating and cooling costs. Additionally, using a ceiling fan to cool off a room or house will consume as little energy as a 60-watt bulb, which is about 98 percent less energy than most central air conditioners. 2. Install compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) when your older incandescent bulbs burn out. The CFL light bulbs use 2/3 less energy than traditional incandescent light bulbs and last 10 times longer. Making this switch will save you money and energy. 3. Unplug appliances when you’re not using them, or use a “smart” power strip that senses when appliances are off and cuts their energy use. 4. Wash clothes in cold water whenever possible. As much as 85 percent of the energy used to machine-wash clothes goes to heating the water. Additionally, take shorter showers to reduce water use and install a low-flow showerhead. This is inexpensive and will lower your water and heating bills. 5. Plant drought-tolerant native plants in your garden. Many plants need minimal watering. Find out which occur naturally in your area. 6. Clean your driveway or sidewalk with a broom instead of hosing it down with water. You’ll save at least 80 gallons of water every time. 7. Use a water filter to purify tap water instead of buying bottled water. Not only is bottled water expensive, but it generates large amounts of container waste. Use a reusable water bottle, preferably aluminum rather than plastic, with you when traveling or at work. 8. Keep your cell phones, computers, and other electronics as long as possible. Donate or recycle them responsibly when the time comes. E-waste contains mercury and other toxics and is a growing environmental problem. 9. Make your own cleaning supplies. These are very effective, non-toxic cleaning products. All you need are a few simple ingredients like baking soda, vinegar, lemon, and soap. Making your own cleaning products saves money, time, and packaging, and preserves in-door air quality. 10. When going to the store, consider bagging your own groceries in cloth, reusable bags. Many stores sell reusable bags or offer them free-of-charge. If you decide to use plastic bags though, please remember to recycle them.

Old world craftsmanship New world design

Fireplaces - Firepits - Kitchens - Floors - Patios - Waterfalls Stone is our passion. Let us bring your project to life!

Paul Thompson (337) 255-7844 - Jay Barkley (337) 540-5473

www.firesidestonellc.com 18 www.thriveswla.com

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January 2012


We Have the Keys You Need When looking for a new address, there are questions around every corner. CENTURY 21 Bessette Realty has the answers whether you’re buying or selling. We’ve won numerous awards for customer service, sales excellence and community involvement, but we know the most important reward is earning your trust through superior service. To search at your leisure, visit century21-bessette.com for current listings, financing options, and chat live with one of our Realtors®. We’ll guide you through the process and help you find just the right key for your future.

474-2185 | century21-bessette.com | live chat January 2012

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(A Breakdown of Braille)

By Erin Kelly

In the mid-19th Century, a blind teenager named Louis Braille, determined to educate himself using as many senses as possible, transformed six raised dots into a new form a global communication. His efforts, which were not truly recognized until after his death, have made it possible for the visually impaired to enhance their quality of life through literacy; today, Braille is used in virtually every country in the world and unique symbols have been developed to identify punctuation, math, music and other symbols needed to be viably literature.

Institution for Blind Youth in Paris. Braille, one of the students, was fascinated by the soldier’s invention, called “night writing,” which was a code of 12 raised dots that let soldiers share confidential information on the battlefield without having to speak. Although the code proved too difficult for soldiers, the idea of a tactile form of communication stayed with Braille, who eventually molded night writing into his own invention. He whittled the 12 dots to six and continued to build on the concept; in 1829, he published the world’s first book in Braille. He was only 15. According to the NFB, the usefulness of Braille in modern society is met with some skepticism – the same was true in 1837, around the time that Braille incorporated symbols for math and music. Braille wasn’t taught at the Royal Institution until after its inventor died and didn’t reach widespread usage until the late 1860s. ed by literacy, a concept develop The use of Braille increased through the 1900s. January celebrates Braille Today, the vast majority of visually Louis Braille in the 1800s. According to the National Federation for the impaired children in America attend schools Blind, many blind people were routinely taught where there is no Braille instructor. to read and write Braille from an early age by the 1960s. Unfortunately, the “It’s tough to find VI-certified teachers. There are five or six times more momentum of this new form of communication lost steam almost as quickly as hearing-impaired students than visually impaired, so it can be difficult to find it had gained it – by the 1980s, the NFB reported that the literacy rate among teachers who are certified to teach Braille,” said Simpson, who notes that at the blind was around 10 percent. Increased emphasis on teaching children LSVI, all teachers are VI-certified and also undergo training in the functions of with limited vision to read print instead of Braille; lack of standardized teaching the eye and vision. methods; increased technology, which was considered by some to be an According to Simpson, there has also been a recent push in the modern adequate replacement for Braille; and lack of understanding about its benefits education system to keep students in mainstream classes close to home. “There were a few reasons cited by the NFB for the decline in Braille literacy. The have been changes in education in general. We’ve gone back to the belief that decline has dropped to such an alarming rate that the organization has made it children need to be educated in the least restricted environment possible in a a priority to increase literacy levels among the visually impaired. place that’s close to home. For a visually-impaired child, that could mean they The Louisiana School for the Visually Impaired in Baton Rouge is among don’t have access to Braille education.” those who continue to advocate for Braille literacy. According to LSVI Director The LSVI operates a residency program for students who live outside the Bobby Simpson, Braille is just as important in the life of a visually impaired child Baton Rouge area. Braille is one of the key components of the curriculum. “It as print is to the sighted. truly enhances the education of a VI child. They learn Braille just as quickly as a “What is literacy? Generally, literacy is the ability to read, write and do math. sighted child learns print,” Simpson said. “Among the VI population nationwide, Currently, Braille is the only method for the blind child to be literate,” said the unemployment rate is about 85 percent. That is a huge hold that we need Simpson, who taught math and science at LSVI before moving to his current to overcome, so at LSVI, we start them out in the seventh or eighth grade asking position. them what they want to be when they grow up so we can put them on a track. Louis Braille, who was blinded at the age of three after he accidentally Braille literacy is part of that.” injured himself with one of his father’s sharp tools, invented this new form According to Simpson, becoming proficient in Braille greatly increases a of communication after a soldier visited a group of students at the Royal student’s chances of enrolling and succeeding in college and finding a job.

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There is a significant relationship between Braille literacy and academic success, higher income, employment and independence, according to the NFB. Although some argue that Braille is no longer necessary because of technological advances, the NFB notes that Braille is currently the only method of communication that offers complete command of the written language for blind people. One of the most common questions people have about Braille has little to do with literacy, however. The American Federation for the Blind notes that people often ask if it would be easier to use raised print alphabet letters instead of Louis Braille’s infamous six-dot system. According to the AFB, raised print letters were tried in the early 1800s, but it was discovered that such letters were too difficult to interpret through touch. January is National Braille Literacy Month. For more information, visit the American Federation for the Blind at www.afb.org or the National Federation of the Blind at www.nfb.org. For information on the Louisiana School for the Visually Impaired in Baton Rouge, visit www.lsvi.org.

(Be kind to others.)

Success. Andy Dressler Weight Loss Surgery Success

“I lost over 100 pounds and gained my health.” Are you 100 pounds or more overweight? The Surgical Weight Loss Program at Women & Children’s Hospital (WCH) can help you find hope and discover a whole new – and healthier – you. Join Dr. Chung for a FREE informational seminar to discuss four surgical weight loss options available at WCH. To make a reservation, call 475-4760 or visit Women-Childrens.com/bariatrics. Wednesday, January 11 • 6 p.m. Keith Chung, M.D. Board Certified in General Surgery Women & Children’s Hospital First Floor Classroom • 4200 Nelson Road Seating is limited, so register today. Feel free to bring a guest or support person.

Independent Member of the Medical Staff at Women & Children’s Hospital

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12/15/11 4:24 PM


Year of the

Girl

Simple steps can mean big savings. At Entergy, we’re working hard to keep your bill as low as possible. You can help lower your bill, too, by taking time to make simple changes like these that will save you money all year long. • Set your thermostate to 78 degrees in the summer and 68 degrees in the winter • Seal air leaks around doors, windows and attic entrances • Insulate your water heater • Wash clothes in cold water • Take a quick shower instead of a bath • Use energy-efficient light bulbs For more helpful ideas, visit us online at entergylouisiana.com/savemoney today. Helping you save money on your bill. That’s the Power of People.

A message from Entergy Gulf States Louisiana, L.L.C. ©2011 Entergy Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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by Erin Kelly

Girl Scouts isn’t just about cookies,

camping and crafts, according to communications director Erin Turner of Girl Scouts of Louisiana. From Daisies to Ambassadors, today’s Girl Scouts are learning to be leaders in every room they enter. This all-girl organization, which began in 1912 with a troop of less than twenty girls in Savannah, Georgia, has grown to more than 100 councils and 3 million members. More than 11,000 of those are served by Girl Scouts of Louisiana. “Girl Scouts have come so far. It started with Juliette Gordon Low and eighteen girls, trying to make a difference, and now there are millions of Girl Scouts worldwide,” said Turner, an active Girl Scout from kindergarten through high school. “The Girl Scouts teach you to make the most of what you have. It teaches you to be persistent and brave and stand up for what you believe in. I took all of that with me.” As the woman’s role in society has evolved, so has the organization, according to Turner. Girl Scouts not only learn how to go camping and sell cookies, they also learn about technology, science, engineering, leadership, diversity, potential career paths and community service. The Girl Scouts has a long history of producing skilled women leaders – according to the organization, 80 percent of women business owners were once Scouts, in addition to 67 percent of female members of the House of Representatives and 69 percent of female U.S. Senators. Virtually every female astronaut who has flown in space was also a Girl Scout. January 2012


There are myriad of life skills to be learned as well, according to Troop Leader Lisa Leuber, whose sevenyear-old daughter Kaitlin is a Brownie. Leubner said the Girl Scouts learn how to interact positively with each other and with adults. They also set personal goals, not only for fundraising but for community service as well. Girl Scouts nationwide will focus on community service as a top priority as the organization celebrates its 100th anniversary this year. In 2012, Girl Scouts of Louisiana and nationwide are striving to reach a goal of 100 community service hours in honor of the centennial. “Girls get to discover their values and the world around them, connect with their peers and take action to improve their community,” Turner said. Civic involvement is one of the cornerstones of the Girl Scouts, according to Turner. The ability to bond with friends and adults while doing something positive for the community – all while building leadership and self-confidence – is what makes Girl Scouts a unique and cherished organization, she said. Kaitlin, who attends Bishop Noland Episcopal Day School, said her troop recently donated items to the Faith and Friends Food Pantry, collected shoes for a Soles4Souls fundraiser and participated in Coats for Kids. Selling cookies is one of her favorite activities, however. Last go-round, she sold more than 700 boxes. She’s determined that Thin Mints are the most beloved of flavors. “I love Girl Scout cookies,” she said. “But if I ate one of them right now, I’d probably lose a tooth because one of them is loose.” Kaitlin also revealed one of her secret selling tactics: She reminds buyers that they can buy several boxes if they want, “because the cookies freeze really well.” Troop 2632 recently collected items for a food drive benefitting Faith & Friends Food Pantry.

January 2012

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Money & Career

Background Checks Aren’t Just for Employers by Haley Armand

The advanced technology of today’s world allows for employers to perform lengthy, in-depth background checks on potential employees without having to hire an investigator – or possibly even leave their computer. But, potential employees aren’t the only ones who should be looked at under a microscope. Job candidates should research their future employer, too. Career advisors say it’s important for job candidates to look into the background of prospective employers before they make a commitment and accept a position. Doing some research ahead of time will prevent you from wasting time during a job search by interviewing with a company who wouldn’t be a good fit for your career plans or who may not deliver on the promises they make to prospective employees. In addition, this type of research will also help prepare you to ask the right questions and leave a great impression at the interview.

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January 2012


Here are some suggestions from Mary Kay Eason, indicator of organizational leadership. Additionally, try to find out who held your desired job previously. Instructor and Coordinator of Support Services in the College of Business at McNeese State University, Having an understanding of why they left and where they went will help you to know what is for conducting your own background check on a expected of you and what you can expect. potential employer. “Many people are not in a position to be too First, you should always look at the financial choosy about accepting a job these days, and stability of the company. Eason suggests that’s certainly understandable. But by doing conducting online research, searching local news your homework, you’ll have a clearer picture of sources and asking former or current employees. the employer and what to expect. In addition, Eason added that speaking to former or current you should interview every time you get the employees can also help you to gauge the opportunity,” says Eason. “You may just come company’s culture and whether or not it is a good across an offer you can’t refuse, plus the more you fit for you. “If you aren’t comfortable with an area of interview, the more you become comfortable and the company and their performance or philosophy, it’s better to find out before, rather than after you’ve confident with the process. Don’t wait until it’s your dream job and risk blowing the interview. This can accepted a position and possibly rearranged your prevent future disappointment and allow you to life for a career move that doesn’t match your enter the interview with clear expectations and goals.” confidence,” says Eason. She adds that if you have Secondly, the way a company treats its questions, don’t be afraid to ask them. “In fact, most employees can be a good indicator of whether job interviewers view intelligent, well-thought out you want to work there or not. You want to questions as an indication of your capabilities and work for an employer that offers professional interest in the company. Asking the right questions development and career advancement will not only help to calm your anxiety, but show opportunities. According to Eason a good way those hiring you that you’ve done your homework to research this is through how the company and understand the company.” approaches problem solving. “Do they take a Eason also advises to not be afraid to accept a job short-term or a long-term approach? Do they grow that is not exactly what you are looking for, but it their business by controlling the bottom line or offers growth potential with a good company. You by investing in their human resources? If possible, have to start somewhere, and employment gaps on ask current employees and also search online your resume should be avoided if at all possible. articles and the company website to get a feel for this. Try to find out what challenges the company Financial resolutions top the list each year. has had over the years Make 2012 the year you care for your family financially. and how they have approached and solved them. If you know who your direct supervisor would be, you can also search their background to see what other people say about them.” Lastly, you should track layoffs and career progression. “The biggest fear most people have once they take on a new job is a layoff,” Eason said. “Although that risk can’t be entirely prevented, it’s good to understand a company’s track record.” Find out Sit down with one of our friendly how many employees associates for a financial discussion. have been with the company five years, 10 years or longer. Does the employer have a “promote Eric Dupre* Roland Terrell** Rhea Shields*** from within policy? This 625 West College St., Lake Charles, LA 337-474-4025 is a big positive because *Registered representative--Securian Financial Services, Inc., Securities Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC. it supports career growth **Registered Representative and investment Advisor Representative--Securian Financial Services, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC, A registered Investment Advisor. and potential. Longevity ***Rhea Shields is not a registered representative of and does not provide products or services through Securian Financial Services, Inc. Terrell & Associates is independently owned and operated. of employees is a good DOFU 1/2012 #428864 January 2012

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Money & Career Are you one of “those people” who drop in a cute wallpaper background for your email messages, use hot pink for your subject line, or substitute a cute font for your signature? You should stop. Immediately. Or you’ll never be taken seriously in the workplace.

email

Professionalism

by Haley Armand

Why? According to experts at CareerBuilder, your digital documents are a reflection of you and how you want to be perceived in the workplace. If you want your communication to be taken seriously, it should be simple, identifying and not cluttered with abbreviations, side comments, or emoticons, trendy fonts and colors. The goal is to convey your message as it was intended and leave your audience not only understanding it, but feeling confident in you. Here are a few tips to help unclutter and professionalize your communications to ensure that the presentation of your digital documents doesn’t overshadow your content. Typed items do give an impression; therefore a writer needs to be aware and sensitive to all possible interpretations. According to CareerBuilder, choosing hard-to-read, wild, excessively large or small, a non-traditional color for text and a bold background color or wallpaper usually comes off as unprofessional. Additionally, putting things in all caps in an email is the same as yelling at someone in person—DON’T DO IT. • Using abbreviations, side comments and emoticons may be the “norm” for text messages, tweets and Facebook posts, but they are most definitely frowned upon in the workplace. Demonstrate your knowledge of capitalization, spelling and punctuation—don’t make your messages look like graffiti. • Keep your signature line clean and uncluttered, including just the necessary information. Avoid the temptation of adding a parting thought of the day or inspirational quote on workplace email. These have nothing to do with professional communication and while it may seem like a personal touch, you run the risk of offending someone who may not like the message or the source of the quote. It’s also an unneeded distraction from the email subject. • If you are job hunting, your email creates the first impression of you from the moment it hits the inbox, and this includes your email address. If your email address is funguy@ partycity.com, don’t use it. Create a job search email address that is simple and identifying for the workplace. It is also a good idea to refrain from using your current employer’s email address during a job search. CareerBuilder noted that this may give recruiters the perception that you’re using company time, instead of personal time, to job hunt – not a plus in making a good impression. Regarding job search email content, short and sweet is best. Your goal is clarity. And don’t ruin your message by adding a flashy signature and a countless list of contact options. Just focus on sharing the primary number and physical address where someone can contact you directly, in addition to your email. • Most importantly, you should always proofread important digital documents for appearance just as you would for spelling and grammar to catch mistakes and make the appropriate adjustments. In the modern workplace, email content should be treated the way typed letters and memos were treated just a few short decades ago – a reflection of your competence and professionalism.

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January 2012


Choosing the Right Banker for Your Business

by Kristy Armand

If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a community to grow a business. The small business world is not for the faint of heart – the recipe for success typically requires a team of support that extends far beyond the entrepreneur and includes investors, partners, customers, and, of course, financial professionals. “If you’re an entrepreneur looking to establish a relationship with a financial institution, don’t underestimate the importance of finding the appropriate institution for your needs. Even though all banks are made of bricks are mortar, the internal foundations aren’t identical across the board,” explains Mike Harmison, president and CEO with Lakeside Bank. If you have a small community business, you will probably want to find a bank which markets to entrepreneurs such as yourself. Find an institution that is proud to serve as lenders to small and mid-sized local businesses. It’s also important to get referrals. “When doing virtually any kind of business, getting referrals from people you trust is a good idea. Ask other small business owners about their banking experiences. Just because someone else owns a small business doesn’t necessarily mean that they want the same things from their banker, but talking to them will certainly help you figure out if their banker has what you’re looking for,” says Harmison. “Accountants, attorneys, trade associations and vendors can also serve as good referral resources, in addition to your business peers.” Don’t be afraid to shop around to various financial institutions to find a good fit, Harmison said. You’re the one with the growing business, so your interests should take precedence. So, what makes a good banker for a budding business? Someone you are comfortable talking to, and someone you can trust. In the lending business, honesty is key, according to Harmison. “And that is true on both sides of the relationship. You and the bank are partners. You are both keenly interested in the success of the business. You will have to commit to being completely open with each other about the ups and downs of your company. You need a banker who makes it easy and comfortable for you to share information.” “It’s also beneficial to have a representative who believes in your business and truly wants you to succeed,” says Harmison. “When you have someone who is giving you objective, honest support, it can make all the difference in the world. It also helps develop a relationship of trust.” “And after you choose a bank, be sure to get to know other people around the lending institution, in addition to your primary financial professional. You want to make sure you’re not only comfortable with your representative, but also the bank in general. You may want to use them for other financial needs,” Harmison says. For more information on business loans, call Lakeside at (337) 474-3766.

January 2012

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Money & Career

vs

We Will Beat Your Auto Loan Rate by

Standing Up to the

Office Bully by Kristy Armand

*Annual Percentage Rate (APR) is determined by length of the loan and credit history. All loans subject to approval. Must meet membership eligibility. Promotion ends January 30, 2012. Proof of existing rate must be presented before loan closing. Minimum rate matched is 2.00% APR. Excludes credit cards, mortgage, signature and RV loans. $10 gift cards from WalMart, Target, Starbucks, Best Buy, iTunes, and Raising Canes. Not eligible for gift card if rate is declined. 28 www.thriveswla.com

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January 2012


Bullying

has been in the focus of national media attention this year as the result of several highly publicized cases of school bullying. Unfortunately, bullying doesn’t always stop with the end of childhood. Those young bullies often grow into adult bullies who may be working in the cubicle next to yours. One in four companies has experienced workplace bullying in the past year, according to recent research from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and survey results from the Employment Law Alliance has found that in the United States alone, over 50 million people have experienced bullying at work. According to Chauntelle LeJeune, MA, LMFT, LPC, Therapist with Solutions EAP (Employee Assistance Program), workplace bullying is any negative behavior that demonstrates a lack of regard for other workers. “This behavior is a form of harassment that can range from teasing and gossip to manipulation and abusive language. In many cases, the situation goes unnoticed by superiors or unreported. In some cases, employees don’t realize that the way they are being treated is actually bullying. If a coworker dumps his work on you every day, calls you an irritating or demeaning nickname he knows you don’t like, excludes you from office gatherings, neglects to give you messages or information you need to do your job successfully, then you’re being bullied.” She says employees who are bullied often choose to suffer in silence, ignoring the problem, hoping it will go away. “In worst-case scenarios, they may tough it out until they have an opportunity to change jobs or just quit with no notice because they dread coming to work every day. In this case, the bully wins and the company pays the price through the loss of productivity and good employees.” Equal numbers of men and women become bullies in the workplace, and this type of adult bullying is different from school bullying in one critical say. “It’s the strong, not the weak, who are targeted,” says LeJeune. “Office bullies usually go after co-workers who are talented and well-liked in an effort to intimidate or drive out anyone they see as a threat to their position or their social standing in the workplace.” If you are the victim of a workplace bully, LeJeune says how you respond may depend on the type of bullying behavior and how it is affecting your job. “Bullies like to get a reaction and to know that their behavior bothers you, so ignoring it may eliminate the behavior in some cases, particularly if you are new to the office. However, don’t feel like you have to tough it out, regardless of how minor it is. The best way to defeat a bully is with strength and confidence. Learn how to say no and assert yourself politely but firmly. Don’t be afraid to acknowledge the behavior, but leave direct confrontation to your superior, especially if the bullying involves intimidation or threats. Document the behavior and report it to your superior. It is their job to handle these types of situations. Be clear and direct in your communication about the bullying. If you don’t get a response from them, or if the bully is your superior, then bring your documentation to the human resources department. ” Companies can and should take steps to ensure that they are not providing an environment where bullying is allowed to exist. “Bullying may not be illegal, but every company should have policies in place to deal with bullying and harassment. Supervisors should monitor their office environment for signs of bullying and address any instances they notice as well as any that are reported.” Solutions EAP offers a wide variety of workshops addressing dealing with conflict in the workplace. For more information, call Solutions at (337) 310-2822 or visit www. solutions-eap.org.

All you need to know to stay in the know! Jennings Hospital Achieves Critical Benchmark Jennings American Legion Hospital achieved the critical benchmark of meaningful use regarding the implementation of electronic medical records. They are one of the first hospitals in the state to reach this marker. As part of the economic stimulus package enacted by Congress in 2009, incentives were offered through Medicare and Medicaid to hospitals and physicians to adopt electronic health records. Meaningful use refers to certain parameters that must be met by 2014 to qualify for stimulus funds. The implementation of electronic medical records is designed to provide better care for the patient, eliminating written orders to avoid confusion or error, and enabling health records to be quickly sent to another physician or hospital, if a patient is transferred for care.

OBG-1 Offers Additional Website Features A patient portal option is now available on the website of OBG-1, a local obstetric and gynecology office with locations in Lake Charles and Sulphur . The secure feature allows patients the convenience of scheduling appointments, requesting prescription refills and getting answers to clinical questions, among other options. Patients can call the OBG-1 office at 312-1000 to set up their account within the patient portal. The website also has information about a variety of women’s health issues, including menopause facts, a healthy weight calculator, pregnancy timeline, a due date calculator and much more.

Calcasieu Medical Reserve Corps and Red Cross Join Resources The Calcasieu Medical Reserve Corps and the Southwest Louisiana Chapter of the American Red Cross have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding to collaborate resources. The Calcasieu Medical Reserve Corps is designed to assist the parish by building a team of healthcare professionals who will activate and augment the existing medical response during a man-made or natural disaster, as well as address community needs on a daily basis. The Memorandum of Understanding recognizes the parallels and distinctions so that both organizations can serve their respective missions and the citizens of the community with skill, compassion and efficacy.

L’Auberge Casino Resort Opens New Addition to The Shops of L’Auberge

L’Auberge Casino Resort recently announced the opening of Legends Memorabilia, the sixth addition to The Shops of L’Auberge. Legends opens at 10 a.m. daily and offers a variety of sports, music and presidential memorabilia perfect for any collection. Pictured are Keith W. Henson, L’Auberge Vice President and General Manager, L’Auberge Management Team and Members of the SWLA Alliance.

January 2012

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Money & Career

Louisiana Well-Positioned for Future Growth The Louisiana Economic Development recently released a report detailing selected economic highlights in 2011. According to LED Secretary Stephen Moret, Louisiana’s economy has “outperformed the South and the U.S. by any reasonable measure.” He noted that the state’s job performance has been better than that of nearly every other Southern state since January 2008 and employment levels have grown faster than the South and the nation since the end of the national recession. “Louisiana again produced a record year for business development, securing a variety of significant business development wins in both traditional industries and Louisiana’s new target industry sectors, such as digital media and alternative energy,” Moret said. “In 2011, LED secured game-changing projects that include Fortune 500 CenturyLink’s headquarters expansion in Monroe, (including) multibilliondollar expansions announced by Cheniere Energy and Sasol Ltd. in Southwest Louisiana.” According to Moret, Louisiana is “well-positioned” to secure a large share of new business investment projects in the U.S. and it is anticipated that the state economy will experience significant job growth from projects announced in 2008 and subsequent years. In 2011, Louisiana launched projects that are projected to create more than 20,500 new direct and indirect jobs and $18 billion in new capital investment, Moret said. Friendly service from your He added: “In the home town pharmacy. year ahead, LED will pursue targeted initiatives to enhance Louisiana’s economic competitiveness; retain Louisiana’s existing economic driver firms; support Louisiana’s small businesses; cultivate • Citywide Delivery Service attractive development • Drive-Thru Pick-Up Window sites; and recruit new • E-Mail and Call in RX Service growth industries to Louisiana.”

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Pharmacy #2

601 S. Pine Street • DeRidder, LA 70634 • (337) 463-7442 www.thriftyway.com • tw2@thriftyway.com 30 www.thriveswla.com

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We’re miles ahead, not miles away.

600 S. Pine Street DeRidder, LA 337-462-7100 www.beauregard.org January 2012


sponsored by

Time to Roll up the Sleeves by Britney Glaser

The holiday season always brings with it a unifying sense of gratitude and a chance to give to those who really need a helping hand. The sad truth, though, is that many of the people in these communities are in need throughout the year – not just when Christmas trees go up and down. There is a new charge for Beauregard Parish businesses in 2012: roll up your sleeves and give back! Local charities like the free volunteerrun Agape Clinic, God’s Food Box, Big Brothers Big Sisters and the Council on Aging need community support 365 days a year to serve. The Beauregard Chamber of Commerce is leading this initiative for the new year and encouraging its 200+ businesses to hit the ground running now! From moms and pops to big corporations, the hope is that each person can make small efforts that will add up to a big difference. “Taking Care of Your Own” is the Beauregard Chamber’s trend for 2012 - and one they hope to see encompass every person and charity with an outstretched hand.

92nd Annual Beauregard Chamber of Commerce Banquet: January 27th at Fair Expo Building

January 2012

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Places & Faces Our area is rich with interesting people and places. It is a region

with stories to tell -- from children who have changed the lives of those around them to longtime residents who have become familiar faces in the community. With Places & Faces, Thrive seeks to tell these stories and celebrate the local residents who make our region unique.

Gavin Picks Up a

Beat

by Erin Kelly

Gavin Leday

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January 2012


B

usy four-year-olds can get their heart rates up to 130 beats per minute as they run, jump, explore, climb, play and go through all the daily activities that are common in the life of a pre-kindergartener. Three years ago, Gavin Leday of Gillis was just such a four-yearold: A curious boy who liked to move around. There was a singular and importance difference, however. His heart rate often lingered in the 40s, even at his most active. At two years old, he was diagnosed with third-degree artrioventricular heart block, a potentially fatal condition in which the electrical signals of the heart don’t work properly. Although no immediate intervention was needed, they had to visit the cardiologist weekly to ensure that Gavin’s heart was adequately servicing the rest of his body. “They discovered the heart block after a routine check-up. There didn’t seem to be anything wrong with him, so I was in shock,” his mother said. Cardiologists instructed his parents, Crystal and Frank, to monitor the toddler’s behavior for anything unusual, such as excessive drowsiness, shortness of breath or changes in skin color. “I almost didn’t want him to move at all when we came home.” For a while, all was well. “When he was four years old, he went in for his November check-up and everything was fine. Then he passed out at school. It was nine o’clock on December 3rd,” Crystal said. Crystal, who works at Gavin’s school, said her classroom PA system and cell phone buzzed frantically. “I knew right away it was Gavin. I took off running to the office and the nurse is holding him in her arms. He was just starting to come to, but he wasn’t alert. I felt helpless.” The cardiologist was notified immediately; after a prompt examination, the Ledays were told that Gavin needed a pacemaker as soon as possible. AV heart block varies in its severity. For Gavin, who had a third-degree condition, the situation was precarious. Eight days later they were in New Orleans for the surgery. “There was no decision to be made. The doctor basically said, ‘You’re going to New Orleans and Gavin is having surgery.’ No question.”

When It’s Your Kid, It’s Your Choice. Make the right one.

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Places & Faces | Gavin Picks Up a Beat Healthy hearts have natural pacemakers that allow the heart to beat at regular intervals. An artificial pacemaker is a small battery-operated device that helps the heart beat in a regular rhythm through a generator and wires, according to the American Heart Association. Pacemakers are implanted under the skin through a small incision and the generator is connected to the heart through tiny wires. The impulses from the generator are timed to flow at regular intervals, just as the heart’s natural pacemaker would. On the morning of surgery, Gavin pulled on his red and blue puppy pajamas and went to the hospital. “I wasn’t scared,” says Gavin, now seven. “I remember I had to get a blue thing put on me and then I got my heart fixed and it was time to go home. It all happened while I was asleep.” Crystal watched her four-year-old son get wheeled away around nine o’clock in the morning. She didn’t see him again until the afternoon. Gavin admits he “felt weird” when he woke up, but pretty soon he was ready to get back in the swing of things, especially now that he had a battery connected to his heart. When he got back to school, he proudly showed off his scar and told his fellow classmates what it was like to have a heart battery.

“Then they gave me a poster for my wall. It says, ‘It’s a bird. It’s a plane. No, it’s Super Gavin,’” he said. Today, Gavin’s heartbeat can’t go any lower than eighty, thanks to the regularity of the pacemaker. He can still run, jump, race and play, as long as he avoids contact sports. “I love to ride my scooter and play tag,” he says. According to the American Heart Association, there are about 3 million people worldwide with pacemakers. About 100,000 are implanted in the U.S. each year. Most patients who receive pacemakers are aged 60 or older.

Gavin and his mother, Crystal. Gavin was an honored guest at the AHA’s recent Heart Walk event.

Gavin’s pacemaker doesn’t prevent him from being active.

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January 2012


January 2012

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Places & Faces

It Runs in the Family by Brett Downer

Jerry Hollier

For Local Business, Success Started at Home Family gatherings at the Hollier home in Carlyss are lively affairs that embrace three generations. They could also constitute a quorum for a corporate meeting. Novus Auto Glass repairs and replaces automotive glass in Southwest Louisiana. The local “corporation” is the Hollier family -- the kind of local businesspeople who are as likely to chat with you about their kids as their product lines. The founder is Jerry Hollier, who’s as hardworking in business -- ranking in the top 10 nationally in Novus sales volume for each of the past 10 years -- as he is easygoing in conversation. His wife, Vera, radiates energy in both business and civic affairs. Their children -- three daughters -- all have business-related careers that reflect family ties. The Hollier family has worked together for nearly three decades. Over the years, life and work have often meant the same thing. “You know, it’s funny -- I measure the business by the age of our girls,” Vera said. “They were 3, 5 and 7 when we first opened.” That was 28 years ago. The Hollier daughters grew up in the business -- literally. “When we were first getting started, there wasn’t money for day care,” Jerry said. That put everyone under the same roof around the clock. “We were open six days a week, 12 hours a day,” Vera said. “So the girls took their naps in the business. And they had their play area in the back of the business. Sometimes, when they would get rowdy with each other” -- she 36 www.thriveswla.com

laughed out loud at the recollection -- “I’d have to tell my customer, ‘Um, excuse me juuuust a minute,’ and then go on back there and referee.” As the girls grew up, all three worked in the business. “And look at them now,” said Vera. Their firstborn, Jessica, is now the manager of their Sulphur main office. Middle daughter Leslie manages the Lake Charles location. Their youngest daughter, Jennifer, has a business-related career, too; she’s a personal banker for Chase Bank in DeQuincy. How does a family manage to spend every waking moment together in life and work? “You need to have a lot of patience,” said Vera. “You need to be able to get along for that many hours -- for a long time -- with each other.” Asked separately, Jerry said the same thing. “You need to have patience,” he said. “Patience.” “I have people tell me, “Ohhhh, I could never be in business with my husband,’“ Vera said. “But Jerry and I have a good balance. I can be strong when he can’t, and he can be strong when I can’t. It’s just a matter of the right partner. There are times where we don’t even necessarily have to say anything, and we understand. It’s not always easy when you’re together 24/7. It can have its ups and downs. But we make it work. We are a good balance.”

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Lifelong Entrepreneuriship As a kid, Jerry Hollier grew up in a family business. His parents ran Hollier’s Exxon and Grocery, a popular mom-and-pop store at the corner of Ruth and Cypress streets in Sulphur. “I started working there myself when I was 8 or 9, just doing little odd jobs,” he said. “I would sort the Coke bottles that were returned, back in the days when there was a deposit. I think it was a two-cents-a-bottle credit. I’d sort them so the bottler could pick them up.” Jerry might’ve been just a grade-schooler, but the value of the transaction registered with him. So, at an age when most youngsters would bicycle right by stray soda bottles around Sulphur, he’d stop and pick them up. “That’s how I got my extra money,” he said. “It you could find five bottles, you’d get 10 cents. That was enough for a Coke and a candy bar. Of course that was, what, 50 years ago.” Today, he’s still working in glass, so to speak -- and those childhood flashes of entrepreneurship have bloomed into an enterprise of national ranking.

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Places & Faces | It Runs in the Family “From the first day we got married, I heard a thousand ideas from Jerry on how to go into business,” said Vera Hollier, his wife of 38 years. “And he did it.” After college and a half-dozen years at PPG, Jerry took their savings -$5,000 -- and, at age 30, opened his first Novus franchise in 1984 in West Point Shopping Center. The business moved to its current location on 1590 Maplewood Drive in 1995. The Holliers added a Lake Charles store in 2002. Today, the Holliers’ glass menagerie consists of Jerry, Vera, two daughters and five other employees; they straddle both sides of the river and serve a five-parish area. Their services beyond glass include state inspections, wiper blades, lamp bulb replacements and power window repairs. Jerry shuttles between both locations, supervising and troubleshooting. Vera’s typical workday is spent at the Sulphur office, where she processes the billings. Both are still hands-on, and both indicate that it’s all still worth it. “The biggest reward is helping people, serving them -- to help them through things, and make them feel confident that they can get through it,” Vera said. “I’ll have a widow come in who doesn’t know how to get a car inspected, because her husband always did it. And we’ll take care of her. That’s what I love most -- helping people out, not just making a living.” Why should people do business with family-owned operations? “Because we treat you like family -- like you want to be treated,” Vera said. “We have wonderful products that we would use ourselves. We’re here whenever you need us. We live here, we’ve raised our family here. When you’re a local merchant, your reputation is everything. I don’t want anyone to say they were done wrong by us.” Any enterprise, successful or not, comes with challenges. Asked to explain, Jerry said, “I guess the biggest challenge is being tied down so much. It’s pretty demanding, being here all the time -- it was especially at the beginning. Vera and I have other people here to help now, but being self-

Vera Hollier

employed is so demanding -- the decision-making, the paperwork, the book work, the accounting.” Nevertheless, “knowing that you’ve had a successful business, and one that you’ve started from scratch, is what’s most rewarding about it,” he said.

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Rodeo Medicine Men As the February date for the 73rd Annual Southwest District Livestock Show & Rodeo approaches, fans anticipate another thrilling show. Part of the allure of this event, and the reason for its staying power of 73 years, is that rodeo is truly a dangerous business. In fact, it is considered America’s original extreme sport. This dangerous nature is a draw for fans, and an adrenaline rush for the competitors. But injury is a real possibility, that’s why the Justin Sportsmedicine Team and the Justin Cowboy Crisis Fund are always on the scene to lend a helping hand. These two Justin Boot Company partners provide exceptional assistance to cowboys, both physically and financially. The Justin Sportsmedicine Team is a group of highly experienced physicians, orthopedists, trauma specialists, massage therapists, and athletic trainers who assist injured cowboys when they are down. The team travels to more than 100 Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association rodeos annually, including the Southwest District Livestock Show & Rodeo here in Lake Charles. The Justin Sportsmedicine Team’s mobility adds to its uniqueness; one of three 40-foot trailers is hauled to outdoor events, and medical travel kits are used for indoor rodeos, which hold the necessary equipment and supplies needed for the treatment of injured athletes. The team is dedicated to getting each cowboy back on his feet and into the competition as quickly and safely as possible. The Justin Cowboy Crisis Fund assists injured rodeo athletes, helping cowboys with the everyday living expenses that can pile up when they are unable to compete. Although medical expenses are often covered by health plans or accident insurance, the daily costs of life, both for the cowboy and his family, can become a financial burden. Catch the Justin Sportsmedicine team in action at the 73rd Annual SWD Livestock Show & Rodeo, offering four live, action packed performances from February 2-4 at Burton Coliseum in Lake Charles. This year’s rodeo will feature lasers, pyrotechnics, fast paced Buddy-Barrel Pickup, and the return of the legendary rodeo clown, Lecile Harris, plus all of the rodeo events fans have come to expect, including the bull riding. For tickets or more information about the event, please visit www.southwestdistrictlivestockshowandrodeo. com or call 802-4879. For more information on the Justin Sportsmedicine Team or to make a donation to the Justin Cowboy Crisis Fund, visit the new JustinBoots. com and click on partners.

January 2012

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Places & Faces

As

a young girl, Jacqueline Smith lined up all her stuffed animals and dolls and pretended to be their teacher. Even though she didn’t come from a family of educators, she believed she was born to be a teacher. Smith was fortunate to be the student of several inspiring teachers through elementary, middle and high school, which further reinforced her dream of being an educator herself. She wanted to stand in front of a classroom, but not just as an espouser of information; she wanted to inspire children in the same way that she’d been inspired throughout her life. Her contributions as an educator now span more than thirty years. Throughout that time she has made such an impact on the Calcasieu Parish school system that the Louisiana Department of Education named her 2012 Elementary School Principal of the Year for the state of Louisiana. This peer-nominated honor is given to administrators who demonstrate collaborative leadership by involving teachers, staff, parents, students and community members in the needs of their school; models continuous professional growth; teaches, coaches and assists others in a mission toward student learning; improves teaching and learning by implementing innovative programs geared toward student achievement; demonstrates vast knowledge of learning, teaching and research; establishes and maintains a positive school climate; interacts professionally and positively with others; and inspires others to high performance. Thrive met with Smith, principal of A.A. Nelson Elementary, to discuss her career as an educator and her values and beliefs related to state education.

first person

First Person is a monthly Q&A that features compelling people who excel in their chosen endeavors. Ideas for future Q&As? Email edit@thriveswla.com.

photo by Jason Hardesty

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with Jacqueline Smith Thrive Magazine for Better Living

by Erin Kelly

January 2012


What compelled you to become an educator? Many factors played a role in my decision to become an educator. First and foremost, it was my dream as a child to become a teacher. I believe I was born with the “teacher gene,” even though my mother was a registered nurse and my dad was a marshal. I have fond memories of lining up my stuffed animals and dolls and playing school for hours. In addition, I had very amazing and inspiring teachers throughout my educational experience. I can still name every one of my elementary school teachers. My high school teachers and college professors were also influential. During my first year of college I confirmed my early belief that being an educator was my life-long goal. Another reason I chose education is because of my love for children. I believe that my career in teaching helped guide many children toward a path of successful education. Being a principal has allowed me to have an even greater impact on countless students. What is your daily goal as an educator? Each day, I strive to provide a positive environment for teachers and students that is conducive to learning. Every day presents challenges and adversity, but overall, everyone is in it for the same reason: giving students the resources to become successful life-long learners. It is an amazing feeling to possess a job that is really not like a job at all. It is a passion combined with love. How many people actually work at a job that they really love? What are some of the biggest challenges when shifting from the classroom to the front office? The challenge from the classroom to the office was the realization that the picture was much larger. It is not just the four walls and twenty-five students to educate. It is an entire school building and 700 students to teach. Managing an entire building and staff keeps the job interesting. My style with this challenge is shared leadership. Every person is important and all voices are heard.

January 2012

In your opinion, what are the greatest challenges that educators face today, specifically in Louisiana? One challenge educators face today is meeting the needs of every student every day. In Louisiana, these needs will vary on the educational level as our state shifts from what is currently being taught to a more rigorous curriculum. Many parents involved in their child’s education are familiar with GLE’s , better known as Grade Level Expectations. Beginning next year, grade levels will begin to transition into a different curriculum, known as Common Core Standards. This will be a challenge for teachers since the new curriculum and assessments will be aligned with 47 other states. The skills that students are learning in Louisiana are the same skills in ELA and math across most of the nation. Teachers will have a list of what skills are taught and should be mastered at any specific level. Core standards, for now, will focus on reading, math, writing, speaking, and listening. Kindergarten and first grade teachers face an immediate challenge since these grade levels will implement this curriculum next year. Each year thereafter, other grades are transitioning and by 201415, all grades will be taught and assessed using this new educational design. This will close the gap and improve our students’ skills in these core areas, thus closing the gap between what Louisiana students can do in comparison with the other states in our nation. Act 54, which is the new value added evaluation system, will link student performance with teacher evaluations. These are only a few challenges facing educators. What have been some of the proudest moments of your career? Receiving this award, Louisiana Elementary Principal of the Year, is definitely in the top ten list, but there are several moments that rank at the top! I will not forget the second grade child who introduced himself to me on the first day of school and said, “Hi, my name is DeMarlon, and I can’t read.” I certainly did not expect that introduction. I assured him that day that I would teach him not only how to read, but many other things, as well. Every day when I called DeMarlon to the reading table, he would cry. I asked him why he was crying. He said, “I can’t read.” After much hard work and practice, the crying soon stopped. Then, after about six weeks, I called a group to the reading table. I heard a student crying very loudly. It was DeMarlon. Again, I asked him why he was crying. He replied, with tears streaming down his face, “I wanted to go to the reading table to read!” I remember turning around with tears running down my face! Thankfully, I have a vast amount of very rewarding and fond memories of being a teacher and principal. Other moments include Parish Outstanding Student Teacher of the Year and Runner Up for Teacher of the Year. This latest award is icing on the cake.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

There is something special and unique about each stage of a child’s life. What are some of the unique characteristics of the elementary school experience? The elementary experiences for a child are amazing when you realize that children in Pre K may begin school as early as 3 years 11 months and leave this level of education at somewhere in the range of age 11. This is the age when a vast area of growth occurs, both physically and mentally. They are just little babies when school starts and when they graduate from the elementary level, they are truly independent, amazing young people. Nothing is so rewarding as watching them grow up right before our eyes. Most of them cannot tie their shoes or snap their pants when school starts. By the fifth grade, some students could be dropped off in the middle of New York, and they could survive! When you think about this level, they spend more time at the elementary level than they do at middle, high school, and even college! Every year is a unique experience for an elementary child, and they learn to read!

Louisiana is often chided for having a poor education system. What are your thoughts on this reputation? What do you think our system needs to reach its full potential? I have never met a principal who did not want to have a great school. I can only speak of Calcasieu Parish when I say that we have some excellent schools. Education is always changing, as it should. Louisiana is definitely on the right track for improvement since we are now partnering with 47 other states in the country to provide the best education for our students. This change of what we teach and how we teach will repair the educational processes in our schools. We are also fortunate to have a wonderful group of knowledgeable leaders at the central office, including Louisiana State Superintendent of the Year, Wayne Savoy. We are headed in the right direction.

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Places & Faces

Movers and Shakers in Southwest News? You tell us! Send press releases to Louisiana... Who’s edit@thriveswla.com with the subject line “Who’s News.”

welcomes Chip Arnold of Entergy, Mark Hanudel of R&H Quality Refractory Service, Lauren and Phil de Albuquerque of The Jambalaya News and Randy Davis of Lake Charles Toyota.

Miller Joins Women & Children’s Dennis Miller, M.D., has joined the medical staff of Women & Children’s Hospital. Dr. Miller specializes in family medicine. Born and raised in Lake Charles, Dr. Miller received his bachelor’s Dennis Miller, MD degree in biological sciences from McNeese State University and earned his medical degree from the American University of the Caribbean, Netherlands Antilles. He completed his residency in Franklin Square Hospital in Baltimore.

New Board Announced for Family & Youth

Gunderson Serves on Louisiana Workforce Commission Board Clark Gunderson, MD, an orthopaedic surgeon on staff at Lake Charles Memorial Hospital, recently served on the Louisiana Workforce Commission’s committee Clark Gunderson, MD for back injury guidelines. As one of only two orthopaedic physicians in the state to serve on the committee, Dr. Gunderson was given the task of developing guidelines and treatment protocol for Louisiana workers who develop back and spinal injuries while on the job. Dr. Gunderson is board certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, and has been practicing in Lake Charles for the last 33 years. He graduated from Baylor College of Medicine before completing his internship and residency at Charity Hospital in New Orleans through the LSU School of Medicine.

Pourciau Joins Center for Orthopaedics Kerry Andersen

Buddy Hamic

Leslie Harless

Mollie Broussard

Kerry Andersen, regional director of community & public affairs for Pinnacle Entertainment, will serve as chair of the Family & Youth Board of Directors. Leslie Harless, vice president/marketing director of First Federal Bank of Louisiana, has been named vice-chair, while Buddy Hamic of the Calcasieu Parish Sheriff’s Office serves as secretary and Mollie Broussard of McElroy, Quirk & Birch serves as Treasurer. Family & Youth Board of Directors also 42 www.thriveswla.com

Center for Orthopaedics has announced the addition of foot and ankle specialist Kalieb Pourciau, DPM, to their medical staff. Dr. Pourciau joins Dr. Tyson Green in the foot and ankle division of the Kalieb Pourciau, DPM group and brings the total number of doctors on staff to 11. Originally from Maringouin, Dr. Pourciau earned his undergraduate degree in microbiology from Louisiana State University before earning a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine Degree from Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He then completed a three-year residency in foot and ankle surgery at John Peter Smith Hospital in Ft. Worth, Texas. Dr. Pourciau has been in practice at Acadian Foot and Ankle Center in Eunice, Louisiana, for the past three years. He specializes in foot surgery, diabetic foot care, bunions, podiatric sports medicine, custom orthotics, hammertoes, heel pain, children’s podiatry, arthritis, and sprains and fractures of the lower extremities. Thrive Magazine for Better Living

Allemond Named Marketing Director at TravelHost Mark Allemond has been appointed marketing and sales director for TravelHost South Louisiana Publication Group. Allemond was instrumental in Mark Allemond developing McGee’s Landing in Henderson, serving originally as marketing director and eventually as general manager. Following a 15-year role with McGee’s, Allemond served as Main Street Manager for the City of St. Martinsville, marketing the city’s historic downtown as a business and cultural center, engaging in a range of economic development initiatives. He has served on the board of LTPA and has served as field representative for the Plantation and Cajun Country regions.

Henson Appointed to CVB Board Keith W. Henson, vice president and general manager of L’Auberge, has been named to the Southwest Louisiana Convention and Visitors Bureau Board of Directors. Henson was nominated Keith W. Henson for the position by the Southwest Louisiana Lodging Association and was officially appointed by the Calcasieu Parish Police Jury. His three-year term will begin January 1, 2012. He will be one of 11 members of the Bureau’s Board of Directors, all of whom were appointed by various members of the hospitality community.

Gamborg Elected President of Medical Staff Brian Gamborg, MD, family medicine physician, was recently elected president of West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital’s medical staff. As president, Gamborg Brian Gamborg, MD will work to ensure the quality and efficiency of clinical services and performance within the hospital. In his term, Gamborg will serve as chairman of the Medical January 2012


Executive Committee and organized general medical staff, and will actively participate on the Board of Commissioners of West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital. He currently serves as the Chairman of the hospital’s Emergency Room Committee.

City Savings Bank Announces Promotions

Stephen Benoit

Matt Parker

Mickey Atkinson

Trevor Cooley

Carrie Carter

Karen Hatch

City Savings Bank has announced the promotions of Stephen Benoit, Matt Parker Mickey Atkinson, Trevor Cooley, Carrie Carter and Karen Hatch. Benoit has been promoted from lending officer to assistant vice president and assistant manager at the City Savings Bank’s Sulphur Branch, located at 1520 Maplewood Dr. Parker has been promoted from lending officer to assistant vice president and assistant manager of City Savings Bank Leesville Branch. Atkinson has been promoted from lending officer to assistant vice president at City Savings Bank’s Countryside Branch in DeRidder. Cooley has been promoted from lending officer to assistant vice president and assistant manager of City Savings Bank’s Main Office in DeRidder. Carter has been promoted from customer service representative to lending officer and assistant manager of City Savings Bank’s Moss Bluff Branch, and Hatch has been promoted from merchant services representative to lending officer and assistant manager of City Savings Bank’s DeQuincy Branch. January 2012

Benoit Receives Professional Designation Aleta Benoit, medical staff coordinator at West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital, has received the nationally recognized designation of Certified Professional in Medical Aleta Benoit Services Management awarded by the Certification Commission of National Association Medical Staff Services. She currently holds certification as a certified provider credentialing specialist through NAMSS. Medical services professionals serve to make certain the credentials of all practitioners who are caring for patients are correct and have been verified. Medical services professionals are experts in provider credentialing and privileging, medical staff organization, accreditation and regulatory compliance, and provider relations in the diverse healthcare industry. A resident of Moss Bluff, Benoit received this designation after passing a comprehensive exam. She has been employed at West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital for 13 years.

Guillory Joins Center for Orthopaedics David P. Guillory RN, MSN, CFNP, has joined the medical staff of Center for Orthopaedics where he will be part of the clinical support team for orthopaedic surgeon Dr. John Noble, Jr. Originally David P. Guillory, RN from Lake Charles, Guillory received his Bachelor of Science in Nursing and a Master of Science in Nursing, specializing in Family Nurse Practice from McNeese State University. Guillory has over 17 years of experience in the medical field, 13 of which have been in the specialty of orthopaedics. He has worked as both a registered nurse and as a nurse practitioner in private practice and hospital settings throughout Southwest Louisiana.

Glover Joins L’Auberge Chad Glover has been hired to the newly created position of director of Vibe for L’Auberge Casino Resort. In his new role, Glover will look for innovative ways to run a unique beverage Chad Glover department that guarantees a superior level of guest satisfaction. He will also play an instrumental role in utilizing property music, lights and sound to create a hip, entertaining vibe and memorable moments for Thrive Magazine for Better Living

L’Auberge guests. Glover brings to L’Auberge more than 16 years of management experience in the casino, restaurant and entertainment industries. Most recently, he worked as the general manager of Diablo’s Cantina for The Light Group in Las Vegas. Glover worked previously for L’Auberge as part of the resort’s key pre-opening team. Beginning in 2004 he served as Senior Director of Food and Beverage overseeing nine competitive food outlets and the property’s casino beverage department.

Stickney Named Urgent Care Manager Jodi Stickney, RN, has been named The Clinic Urgent Care manager. Stickney will coordinate and manage all aspects of patient care and dayto-day operations at both Urgent Care Center Jodi Stickney, Rn locations in Lake Charles and in Moss Bluff. Stickney, a Lake Charles resident, studied at ICCC College, Drake University and the University of Iowa. She has spent over 19 years in the nursing field. Much of her experience has been in the critical and emergency care areas. She also holds board certification in vascular access.

Imperial Calcasieu Medical Group Welcomes Yoko Broussard, MD Imperial Calcasieu Medical Group, a private, physician owned, multispecialty partnership comprised of more than 50 local medical providers, Yang-Tze Yoko Broussard, MD is pleased to welcome Yang-Tze Yoko Broussard, M.D. Dr. Broussard, a board certified physician specializing in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, has practiced medicine in the Lake Area since 1998. She provides medical care from birth to the elderly. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in Premedicine from McNeese State University, and earned her Medical Degree, and completed a combined internship/residency in internal medicine and pediatrics, at Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans. Dr. Yoko Broussard’s office is located at 711 Dr. Michael DeBakey Drive, Suite 400, in Lake Charles. To make an appointment, call (337) 439-2200.

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Time for 2012

What to Expect in the Year Ahead by Erin Kelly

Ring-a-ding-ding. You survived another year and considering the state of global affairs since Y2K, that’s no small feat. Today, 2012 looms ahead of you, full of opportunity and promise. Only time will tell where you’ll be sitting on this day in 2013, but if you want to know what you can expect over the next twelve months, you’re in the right place. Life has no guarantees, of course, and sometimes people and trends can be just as fickle as their fads, yet at the beginning of every year, researchers and marketers come together to announce their predictions of where the masses will lead as we trudge toward the next new year. During the last quarter of 2011, Euro RSCG Worldwide released its largestever trend digest. As one of the world’s leading trend-spotters, this tome of information is designed to anticipate the shifts in attitudes, beliefs and values of the American people. The path has yet to be paved, but as you peer down the horizon of the upcoming 365 days, here’s a peek of some of the things you might see:

Digitized Workdays Over the past decade, technology has become more sophisticated and offices have responded in kind. Gone are the buzzing FAX machines of yesterday and the traditional 9-to-5 job with an hour lunch sandwiched somewhere in the middle. In this day and age – for many occupations, anyway – work can be done at any time and from anywhere. This year marks the beginning of an era in which time management takes a shift under the weight of growing digitization. Being able to work at any time with the touch of a button is certain to spark evolution in the methods of traditional business. Bob Miller, executive director of the Lafayettebased Opportunity Machine, a small business accelerator and incubator designed to facilitate growth of technology start-ups, said the integration of iPads and other tablets into the modern workforce will lead the way toward even more innovative ways of office communication and processes. “With tablets, individuals are able to better utilize traditional office-related software and truly use the web in a mobile way, opening the door for any number of mobile application improvements to the workforce,” Miller said. “Instead of taking notes at meetings and then returning to the office to retype them, they get distributed before you leave the meeting room. Sales calls have near real-time data flowing to the operations support systems, allowing visualization of data that was impossible just a year or two ago. Services like Square Up make mobile point of sale easy for companies to implement. These are all precursors to the larger-scale efficiencies that will be realized as tablets find their way into company processes.” According to Miller, mobile platforms are beginning to drive business decisions. “In my opinion, tablets and smart phones have been the biggest influencer on people’s work habits over the 44 www.thriveswla.com

past five years. From smart phones to tablets, new technologies continue to be developed at a rapid pace. Having your data available while you’re on the go will continue to change the average workday in various ways. Instead of sitting in your office typing a note, you’ll dictate the note to your tablet or phone and fire it off immediately. Texting is overtaking email on short messages. Mobile platforms are overtaking desktops in some cases. All of this will continue to evolve.”

Not-so-Empty Nests The blah job market will take a toll on many recent college graduates, sending them back home to their parents until they can find a job. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, an increasing number of recent college grads are finding themselves back at home before they’re independent in the workforce. As of the last quarter of 2011, just 74 percent of Americans ages 25 to 34 were working and more than 14 percent were living with their parents, an increase of about 3 percent in just a couple years. Among young men, that number increases to 19 percent. As college-age-kids return home to parents, parents will also go home to children – there’s expected to be an increase of aging moms and dads who will choose to live with their sons or daughters instead of the senior center.

Do-It-Yourself Diagnosis Wellness is expected to be a hot-button topic this year. Many people will struggle with health conditions related to obesity or excess weight, such as cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases, and will scour the Internet for solutions to their woes. The Internet’s increasingly easy access to medical information will make it simple for people to research ways they can make themselves feel better in exclusion of – or addition to – pharmaceuticals and supplements. This form of self-diagnosis could result in more home remedies and alternative treatments. “Self-diagnosis has increasingly become an issue of concern as the Internet continues to build on a wealth of information. While Internet research can be effective and useful for some patients, particularly those who have received an adequate, professional diagnosis from a physician and want to learn more information or find support for their condition, there are many dangers that come along with using the Web to find an answer for your symptoms,” said Todd Peavy, M.D., Family Medicine Physician with Imperial Calcasieu Medical Group. “The vast majority of people out there don’t enjoy trips the doctor, so the temptation to Google symptoms and diagnose yourself – then prescribe self-inflicted treatment – is understandable. Unfortunately, self-diagnosis

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January 2012


can be dangerous because symptoms of one condition usually mimic those of another. Physicians are trained to understand the function of the entire patient and take many things into account before giving a diagnosis, such as medical history, blood work results and lifestyle habits. These are things that you can only get from a health care professional. The computer may tell you that your chest pains are the result of indigestion, when it could be the result of something far more serious, or vice versa. When you self-diagnoses and selftreat something that requires genuine medical care, you take a gamble with your health and it can ultimately cost you more in the long run.”

Reality Turn-Offs Over the past ten years, scripted shows have slinked in the shadows of realitybased programs, but tired consumers will be looking for more innovative ways to escape as the millennium marches on. Euro RSCG Worldwide predicts that television fans will eagerly embrace the next generation of scripted comedies, many of which will focus on the function (or, more likely, dysfunction) of American families. The downward trend of reality TV has already begun. In fall 2011, such shows accounted for one-fifth of programming hours on the major networks, according to Nielsen Media Research. This is a sharp decline compared to the 2006-07 season, when the five major networks aired 43 regularly scheduled reality programs, nine of which were ranked in the top 18 among viewers. That season, reality TV took a 26-percent slice of the viewing pie.

Online Education As the costs of higher education compete with struggling personal finances in the home, more institutions have offered alternative methods of learning, primarily in the form of online education. This form of instruction has also catered to the growing population of baby boomers who are out of work, as well as other non-traditional students who want a mid-life career change. This trend is expected to continue through 2012, with more programs being offered by online programs at state universities, private institutions and all-digital universities.

January 2012

McNeese State University has increased its offerings of online courses and programs over the past five years, according to Dr. Helen Ware, director of electronic learning. More than 5,000 McNeese students now take at least one online course. “Today’s students at McNeese are dramatically different from the students who attended the university several years ago. Many students today work full-time and attend school full-time. Online learning allows these students, whether they are full-time students or just want to take a course or two, to have more flexibility with their work and school schedules that online courses provide,” said Dr. Ware. “Primarily, we find that online learning works better with more mature students; however, more students are arriving at McNeese with high school credits that they have earned online, so they already have the understanding and the motivation in taking online courses.” McNeese’s Office of Electronic Learning now offers several online degree programs through the Center for Adult Learning in Louisiana (CALL). “All of these programs lead to bachelor’s degrees that can be obtained completely online, primarily through eight-week courses designed to be less stressful for an adult with a full-time job and a family.” At Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, another CALL institution, students have the opportunity to pursue 29 accredited online degree programs, ranging from an associate’s degree in business administration to a master’s degree in art. In addition to McNeese, LSU-E and Northwestern, three other institutions also participate in the CALL program – the University of Louisiana-Monroe, Southeastern and Bossier Parish Community College.

Pleasure from Privacy Social media sites – particularly Facebook – have made “privacy” a modernday buzzword. Status updates, likes, friend requests and check-ins have made our lives an open book, but as 2012 moves along, we may find that we miss the privacy of being disconnected. Social media sites aren’t the only ones to blame for information overload, however. Easy access to constant information through digital media can easily become overwhelming, so large groups of over-technologized Americans may seek a retreat to the peaceful and quieter days that existed before the world rested at our fingertips. Continued on p46

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Fitness Trends

Trends for 2012 Top 5 Girl Names 2012

by Erica McCreedy

After being in business for over 35 years, GiGi Kaufman has seen it all in the fitness world. With this perspective, Kaufman is able to fuel her successful and locally owned GiGi’s Fitness Centers with a strong understanding in upcoming fitness trends as well as knowledge of which trends work and which are passing fads. With the constant barrage of workout crazes and as-seen-on-TV products, it’s easy to get lost in a whirlwind of fitness programs that promise to resolve our holiday-induced overindulgences. Kaufman offers a careful eye in enlightening Southwest Louisiana on the New Year’s fitness trends that will put both the body and mind into a better state of being. Kaufman noted that there has been a sharp increase in the drive to spread wellness awareness in communities. “Employers are experiencing the benefits of wellness programs and are recognizing the correlation between lower medical and insurance costs and healthier employees,” she said. In 2012 this trend will continue as health initiatives ensure that employees across all industries are encouraged to practice healthy habits in order to lessen the burden of unhealthy lifestyles on the economy and on the employees themselves.

Low-Impact Aerobic Classes It’s no secret that people of all ages have the aerobic class fever, and classes like Zumba and Boot Camp that focus on low-impact aerobic exercises are becoming more and more popular. In the past aerobic classes involved high-impact activities, but today’s low-impact aerobics take the pressure off joints and appeal to a wider audience. GiGi’s is taking this trend one step further with its new program, Sh’Bam, which combines dance with low-impact aerobics and is targeted at all ages. Sh’Bam focuses on highenergy movements that keep the body in constant motion while making workouts less of a chore and more of an engaging and fun activity. With our society focusing more and more on fitness and wellness programs, there has been an increased demand for highly trained and education fitness professionals that bring a new level of knowledge and expertise to the average workout. These professionals dissect each program practically down to its basic chemistry and provide an insider’s approach to judging the best workout for each individual.

Back to Basics Perhaps the biggest trend for 2012 will be a movement towards stripping away the highly technical and over-stressed fitness programs and focusing more on the basics of strength training and exercise. “So many exercise programs are recycled forms of the program before. We are seeing more and more fitness centers like GiGi’s focus on simpler programs that provide proven results,” Kaufman said. Kaufman’s holistic approach to fitness nurtures workouts and programs that encourage a healthy body as well as a healthy mind – “It’s about being well upstairs.”

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Top 5 Boy Names 2012 1. Alexander 2. Owen 3. Conner 4. Benjamin 5. Gavin Source: Parenting Magazine

Wellness Education

Increase in Educated Fitness Professionals

1. Ann 2. Betty 3. Haddie 4. Olivia 5. Kate

Top 5 Technology Trends 2012 1. Voice Command 2. Tablets 3. Peer-to-Peer Gaming 4. App Stores 5. Cloud Concepts Source: Technology News World and Network World

Top 5 Social Media Trends 2012 1. Branding Social media has always been successful in connecting businesses to consumers, but it will now also be geared towards connecting businesses to businesses. Businesses should be paying closer attention to blog postings, tweets and Facebook posts in order to ensure they have a recognizable brand surrounding them that is to their liking. 2. Relevant and Measurable Influence Social Media influence will play a large role in an individual’s daily life choices, as well as business’ social media activity. 3. Social Television Technology devices including: smartphones, tablets, laptops, television sets and computers, will come together to offer the public more sociable and sharable television experiences with direct streaming we can enjoy whenever we want. 4. Search Engines Search results from search engines will be specifically geared for each person. Each person’s search results will vary in regards to their social network on their social networking sites, making results more relevant and personal for each individual. 5. Sharing Facebook sharing will become automatic. When a person is watching a YouTube video or reading a blog post for example, instead of having to press “like” or “share” it will automatically be posted to their Facebook via open graph sharing. Source: About Web Trends (webtrends.about.com) and Huffington Post

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2011 In Review New York Times Bestsellers • The Help, by Kathryn Stockett • Steve Jobs, by Walter Isaacson • Heaven is for Real, by Todd Burpo

Top Billboard Chart Hits • • • • •

Rolling in the Deep, Adele Give Me Everything, Pittbull Pumped Up Kicks, Foster the People Super Bass, Nicki Minaj Just a Kiss, Lady Antebellum

Top Grossing Movies • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2, $381 million • Transformers: Dark of the Moon, $352 million • The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1, $266 million • The Hangover Part II, $254 million • Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, $241 million • Fast Five, $209 million • Cars 2, $191 million • Thor, $181 million • Rise of the Planet of the Apes, $176 million • Captain America: The First Avenger, $176 million

Top Ten Players in the NFL, according to the NFL Network

Most Common Celebrities Searched Online, according to Dogpile

• • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

Tom Brady Peyton Manning Adrian Peterson Ray Lewis Ed Reed Troy Polamalu Andre Johnson Darrelle Revis Drew Brees Julius Peppers

Top News Stories, according to the Associated Press • • • • • • • • •

Osama Bin Laden’s death Japan Arab Spring Protests U.S. economy Penn State Scandal Gadhafi killed Fiscal showdowns in Congress Occupy Wall Street protests The shooting of Gabrielle Giffords

Kim Kardashian Justin Bieber Megan Fox Lady Gaga Katy Perry Charlie Sheen Selena Gomez Emma Watson Mila Kunis Adele

Most Common Social Networks Accessed Via Search, according to Dogpile • • • • • • • • •

Facebook YouTube eBay Craigslist TMZ Drudge Report Match.com Pogo Style

Step Past Foot Pain

W

hen you consider that the average person takes between 8000 and 10,000 steps every day, it’s no wonder that foot pain is a common complaint. Foot pain may be caused by many different conditions or injuries, and if not properly diagnosed and treated, can lead to debilitating pain.

Attendees can register to win a pair of custom orthotics valued at over $400.

Learn more about the causes of foot pain from foot and ankle specialists, Dr. Tyson Green and Dr. Kalieb Pourciau, at “Put your Feet First,” a free community seminar at Center for Orthopaedics in Lake Charles. Dr. Green and Dr. Pourciau will discuss the most common causes of foot problems, including heel pain, bunions, arch pain, calluses, hammer toes, and more, along with prevention strategies and the latest treatment options.

Excellence In Motion Step Past Foot Pain Seminar Thursday, January 26, 5:30pm Center for Orthopaedics 1747 Imperial Blvd., Lake Charles

Tyson Green, DPM foot and ankle specialist

January 2012

(just off Nelson, 1/2 mile south of Country Club Rd.) Refreshments will be served.

Call 721-2903 or email abooth@centerforortho.com to registered. Thrive Magazine for Better Living

Kalieb Pourciau, DPM foot and ankle specialist

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Mind & Body

photos by Shonda Manuel

Overcoming Obstacles on the Fitness

Journey

When most of us try to get motivated to exercise, it’s usually to get rid of the spare tire around the belly or to look better in jeans. Losing our ability to walk isn’t usually a concern, but for Matt Sherer of Moss Bluff, it is. At 28 years old, he’s faced some pretty serious health concerns. He knows his workout regime could mean the ability to keep walking. Or not.

by Christine Fisher

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January 2012


About three years ago, he began having pain in his left leg. He was diagnosed with giant cell tumor on his knee. This tumor was non-cancerous but aggressive; the risk of getting it is literally one in a million. These tumors occur spontaneously. There is no family history and they aren’t a result of trauma. The night before he was to have surgery to remove it, the bone in his leg shattered; probably due to the tumor weakening the bone. “The pain was beyond intense,” he explained. “I was admitted for emergency surgery. The slightest of movement caused extreme pain. It was unbearable.” Surgeons removed four inches of the femur, or thigh bone, at the knee joint, a 10-inch rod was inserted in his femur and a four-inch rod in his tibia, or shinbone. He had severe bouts of pain in his leg. By now, he was a proud father of two boys and tussling on the floor should have been an everyday occurrence. “I couldn’t play with my boys like I wanted to. If they bumped my leg, it would cause severe pain. They were too young to understand, but the pain was extreme. This was the lowest point in my life. I needed the pain to stop but no one seemed to understand what was wrong. It was extremely frustrating. I hope I never feel that kind of pain again,” Matt said. “My wife did all she could to help me, but this was bigger than both of us.” Finally, Matt seemed to have a breakthrough when his doctor discovered the rod in his leg wasn’t working properly. After further tests, they concluded it had become loose and was digging into his bone. A critical factor was likely the extra weight he gained while being manager at a fast-food restaurant after high school. “I gained 85 pounds in six months while working there; the free food was hard to pass up for a young guy on a budget,” he said. “I’ve always been interested in physical fitness and my degree is in Health and Human Performance from McNeese, but I battled with my weight all through college. Now, after this surgery, I learned the rods weren’t able to support me as they should. It was a combination of several circumstances: from the manufacturing of the rod to the way it was inserted; but at least I knew I could control the weight. I finally had something within my power to make me feel better,” he said. Additional surgeries resulted in a more stable rod being used and orders to lose weight. He weighed 275 pounds at this point. Today, he weighs 225 and his goal is 200. He works out at Dynamic Dimensions in Moss Bluff five days a week for two hours a day.

“I was told, ‘Lose the weight or don’t walk again.’ That’s some pretty serious motivation,” Matt said. Because his left leg only has a five-degree bend, he and trainer at Dynamic Dimensions, Carroll Patin, have made modifications to come up with ways for him to use the cardio equipment. For example, with the seated rowing machine, he rests his left leg on a piece of thick paper to glide along the floor as his right leg bends and straightens. “We’ve come up with several adjustments like that to allow me to use as much of the equipment as possible,” he said. His trainer said Matt’s determination is amazing. “I’ve met very few people who have to deal with what he faces, and yet, he’s here like clockwork. It’s difficult for those of us without physical limitations. He’s challenged and yet he still shows up, doing everything he can to stay in shape,” Carroll said. The pool is the one area of the gym where limitations don’t matter for Matt. “I can swim and kick pretty much like everyone else,” Matt explained. “I can’t bend my left leg to kick as much as other people can, but it doesn’t slow me down. Having access to the pool was the main reason why I chose this gym. That, and the childcare. Knowing that I can bring my boys with me and they’re right down the hall while I’m working out makes it a whole lot easier for me to stay with my routine.” Carroll said making modifications, like he did with Matt, is all in a day’s work. “My job is to eliminate the mystery of the machines, the exercises - anything that can discourage someone. I’m here to help them on their journey toward being fit and healthy. Getting a new member familiar with an exercise routine that works for them, making sure they are doing the moves correctly, and being there to motivate and hold them accountable is what we do. The exerciser holds the key, we’re just here to make sure they have everything they need to use it,” said Carroll. For more information, visit www.wcch.com/DynamicDimensions, or call the Moss Bluff location at 855-7708 or Sulphur at 527-5459.

W.hat W.omen W.ant We have the information you want at one convenient location: obg-1.com. Practical and timely information on women’s health from physician experts you know and trust. • • • •

Menopause Facts Healthy Weight Calculator Pregnancy Timeline Due Date Calculator plus much more!

NEW! Patient Portal • Schedule appointments • Request prescription refills • Receive timely answers to clinical questions IT’S SECURE, CONVENIENT AND FAST. IT’S WHAT WOMEN WANT.

Physicians: Nurse Practitioners: Ben Darby, MD Tammy Gillett, APRN, NP Scott Bergstedt, MD Marilyn Watson, APRN, NP Certified Nurse Midwives: Bonnie Leger, CNM Allison Hansen, CNM

312-1000 • Lake Charles: 1890 W. Gauthier Road, Suite 110 January 2012

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Mind & Body

4 Keys

to Making a Change by Christine Fisher

Creating a change can seem impossible. Going against the current way of thinking or standing up to something that seems bigger than yourself is difficult, but thanks to recent examples of big companies changing course because of public opinion, we know it can be done. It’s easy to think one person can’t create change, and that’s true to some extent. But one person can create the initiative for change. As more people join the cause, the momentum increases and the change begins. “You have more power than you think,” said Vidushi Babber, MD, success coach with PRNCoach. “You don’t have to step aside, bury your emotions or look the other way when you have a better idea. It’s empowering to take control and explore new ways.” Consider a few recent examples of David vs. Goliath: Remember the GAP logo debacle? The powers that be of the California-based clothing line decided to change its logo, only to be met with a firestorm from its followers on Facebook and Twitter. The backlash was intense; enough to make the company’s owners go back to the original logo. It was all because enough people voiced their opinion. The Netflix/Qwikster fumble made the headlines recently. The on-demand and streaming video giant divided their DVD and streaming content into two companies and increased their pricing. People quickly dropped their Netflix accounts and used social media sites to protest the change. The Netflix execs just as quickly dropped the ill-fated Qwikster idea and the price increase. Bank of America abandoned plans to charge a $5 per month fee for debit cards after a nationwide backlash from consumers. Other big banks including Citigroup, U.S. Bancorp, JP Morgan Chase and Wells Fargo either reversed their plans to charge a similar fee or rejected the idea all together after the public outcry. “It’s easy to feel powerless,; to think that you can’t be a voice of change, but you can,” Dr. Babber said. She said change often happens after some kind of wake-up call. It could be a cancellation notice from the electric company that propels you to finally organize your finances; it could be a diagnosis of high cholesterol or a mild heart attack that kick-starts your exercise and healthy eating plan. On the other hand, wake-up calls can be positive, such as receiving encouragement from your boss who sees your potential; it mobilizes you to sign up for advanced classes so you can finally get that certification, that degree, or the training you need to move higher in the company. “It can affect only you, or it can affect a nation. The human potential for change is bigger than we understand,”

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explained Dr. Babber. “Sometimes, a change is made for us, as it was in the case of the Bank of America fees, or the change for Netflix customers. If we don’t like it, we can let them know. Move your business elsewhere and voice your opinion.” If you decide to initiate a change, Dr. Babber shares techniques to help you follow through.

Make a decision. Here’s where the wake-up call comes in. If weight loss is the issue, and you don’t like the way you look or feel, you have to decide if you’re going to do something about it or if you’re going to ignore it. That decision is the critical point.

Be accountable. Let someone else know of your decision. “It could be a casual conversation, but speaking your intention can have a powerful effect,” Dr. Babber said. “That’s why coaching someone for success can make a tremendous difference. A success coach provides encouragement and accountability over the period of time when behaviors become habits.”

Celebrate the milestones. Enjoy the success during the process. If you’re standing up to a big company, such as the case with Netflix/ Qwikster, join others in the movement on Facebook and Twitter. As the number of followers grows, take a moment to recognize the power of people with a common purpose. The growth of a grassroots movement is inspiring. If you’re embarking on a personal challenge, recognize the small successes you achieve along the way. Did you finish the 2-mile walk? Did you fulfill your promise to your friend instead of brushing it aside?

Stay positive. Anytime you take a stand in a public way, stay on message and don’t get personal. “Obviously, you’ll want to be sure your actions and words are not derogatory to the company. You can voice your opinion in a respectful way,” reminded Dr. Babber. Anytime you’re going against the current, it will be difficult. If you have a setback, don’t quit. Get back up and keep moving forward.

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January 2012


Kick off the

New Year with a new

Smile! “ You have more power than you think. It’s empowering to take control and explore new ways.”

teeth whitening implants extractions crown & bridge root canals dentures cosmetic dentistry fillings dental emergencies

- Vidushi Babber, MD, Success Coach

Michelle Swift, DDS michelleswiftdds.com

Accepting New Patients Call for an appointment (337) 478 - 2960 1333 Oak Park Boulevard Lake Charles, LA Office Hours: M-F 8am-5pm January 2012

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Mind & Body

Exercise

Good Manners

Are you a grunter, an invader, a stinker, a talker, a hog, a dripper or a dropper? If so, it’s time for a training session in “fitiquette.”

by Kristy Armand

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January 2012


With New Year’s fitness resolutions in full swing, gyms are more crowded than at any other time of the year. That makes following basic guidelines for courtesy during your workout more important than ever. We asked personal trainer Shelby Hodges with LA Fitness in Lake Charles for some basic guidelines for polite and considerate behavior when working out in a fitness center.

Share. Don’t monopolize the equipment. Just as every child is taught to share their toys, the same rules apply to gym equipment. Before you get on a machine, it’s polite to check with people standing around to make sure they weren’t planning on using that machine next. While resting between sets, don’t remain on the machine, especially if there’s a line to use it. Let others rotate into your sets. If there are often limits posted for how long you can use a machine in a health club, follow those rules, particularly during busy times of day. You can always come back to a specific station later.

Don’t drop weights. If you drop your weights after you’re finished completing an exercise, the sound and vibration can cause other people to lose focus, so return weights gently to the starting position. This is not only considerate of those around you, but will also decrease the risk of injury to yourself or others. In addition, it will prevent damage to the equipment.

Pick up after yourself. When you’ve finished using equipment such as dumbbells, mats, stability balls and even magazines, put them back where they belong so others can find them easily.

Wipe down equipment. Your goal may be working up a sweat, but the person who comes after you does not need to see – or touch – the evidence. Bring a workout towel to put

down on the seat, bench or mat you use. Be sure to clean up after yourself when you are done by wiping down the equipment with your towel or sanitary wipes if the gym provides them. Be sure to wipe the handles, the seat, the back and any other area you’ve touched.

Be odor-conscious. It may seem too simple to mention, but be sure to put on deodorant before you work out. At the other end of the odor spectrum, don’t load up on heavy perfumes or colognes either. Some scents can be offensive, distracting or trigger allergies in others.

Don’t invade someone’s private space. Gyms can get crowded, particularly during peak workout times. You may feel cramped, but be aware of others who are facing the same limitations and don’t intrude into their space. If you don’t have the space to do what you want to do, improvise and pick another exercise, or wait patiently. In group fitness classes, the goal should be to allow two feet between you and the person next to you.

Be quiet. Many people like to focus during their workouts, which can be difficult to do if the person on the machine beside them has their headphones blaring or is carrying on a loud conversation. Keep your voice and your music low. Don’t talk on your cell phone while at the gym – this is distracting to everyone around you. “It’s easy to get in your own zone when you’re in the middle of your workout routine, but it’s important to remember that you are sharing equipment and space with others, so manners matter,” Hodges says. For more information about fitness programs, call LA Fitness at 478-8686 or visit www.swla-lafitness.com.

Learning that you have breast cancer can be overwhelming, but advances are being made to provide for a better quality of life after the diagnosis. A targeted approach to determine if the cancer has spread, known as a sentinel lymph node biopsy, is available locally and performed routinely at West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital. It removes 1 – 3 lymph nodes, rather than 10 – 20, to help physicians determine if cancer cells have spread to lymph nodes located under the arm. Keeping the majority of lymph nodes helps: • D ecrease the risk of developing lymphedema, a life-long condition resulting in pain and swelling under the arm. • D ecrease the possibility of needing post-operative physical therapy to regain and maintain arm strength and flexibility. Dr. Stephen Castleberry, general surgeon with Sulphur Surgical Clinic and medical staff member of West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital, has brought this innovative procedure to breast cancer patients in Southwest Louisiana. Dr. Castleberry received training in this specialized procedure at Scott and White Medical Center/Texas A&M Health Sciences Center in Temple, Texas. The latest technology. The most advanced treatment options. Both are available at West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital.

701 Cypress Street, Sulphur

wcch.com

January 2012

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Mind & Body

When is a Sore Throat Serious? by Kristy Armand

Sore throats go with winter like sunburn goes with summer. Fortunately, this common ailment is usually more of a nuisance that a serious cause for concern. According to family medicine physician Amanda LaComb, MD, a member of the medical staff at Jennings American Legion Hospital, many things can cause a sore throat, including infections with viruses or bacteria, or sinus drainage, colds, allergies, and irritants such as smoke. “Self-care remedies are often the best medicine for many sore throats because sore throats are often caused by viruses. Viral infections don’t respond to antibiotics—only bacterial infections do.” She says a sore throat can signal other serious illnesses in rare cases, including mononucleosis. “You should always call a doctor if a sore throat is severe or lasts longer than a week. If you have a sore throat and a fever, but you just feel mildly ill, you should visit your doctor within the next day or two. If you have a sore throat with a high fever, if you have problems breathing or swallowing, or if you feel very faint, see your doctor right away.” If you develop a sore throat, Dr. LaComb says it will take several days for you to feel better, regardless of the cause. You can do several things to help your symptoms: • Drink lots of water or fruit juice. Don’t drink caffeinated beverages (coffee, tea, colas or other sodas). • Use cough drops or throat sprays. • Soft cold foods, such as ice cream and popsicles, often are easier to eat. • Get plenty of rest. • Humidify your bedroom. • Gargle with warm salt water. • Take over-the-counter pain relievers—but don’t give aspirin to children because it can cause Reye’s syndrome. • If you have a cold with sinus drainage, you may use over-the-counter medicines, like Sudafed or Actifed for relief. Dr. LaComb explains that antibiotics are usually prescribed only for patients who might have “strep throat,” an infection caused by a bacteria called Streptococcus. A patient with strep throat might have a sore throat with fever that starts suddenly, without a cough or cold symptoms. Strep throat is very common in children from 5 to 12 years of age. The exam might show a red throat, with pus on the tonsils and swollen neck glands. If you have these signs, the doctor may do other tests to see if you need an antibiotic. Children get strep throat more often than adults do. Symptoms of strep throat may also include a severe sore throat, fever, swollen glands, and vomiting. Sometimes symptoms change during the course of an illness. If your symptoms get worse after several days, or if you experience any of the following symptoms, Dr. LaComb advises seeing a doctor right way: • Fever that does not go away in five days • Throat pain that gets so bad you can’t swallow • Inability to open your mouth wide • A fainting feeling when you stand up • Any other signs or symptoms that concern you

Start a New Year of Peaceful Nights & Productive Days

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!

Solutions for Life

from Solutions Employee Assistance Program by Keri Forbess-McCorquodale, MS, LPC, LMFT, CEAP

2012 – The Goal is Setting Good Goals! So, what is on your goal list for this year? You do have a list, don’t you? You don’t?! Don’t feel bad, I haven’t made my list yet either. Since we are about to embark on developing our resolutions, let’s talk about how to set yourself up for success. There are good goals and bad goals. Bad goals are goals that are unrealistic and/or overwhelming. Good goals are meaningful and achievable within the context of your life. Here are some tips: • Presence instead of absence. Good goals are all about what will be happening. Write your goals in terms of the presence of an activity instead of the absence. So, “I will not eat sweets” is a bad goal. Anytime you tell yourself not to do something, it seems like it’s all you can think about. Remember your parents telling you not to run/yell/be so loud? After that, it was all you wanted to do. Following that logic, “I will not eat sweets,” becomes “I will eat fruit when I crave something sweet.” • Measureable. How will you know the level of your success? Can you see the results? “I will cut back on smoking,” is a bad goal. What does “cut back” mean? I’ll bet it’s going to depend on the day. Seems very namby-pamby to me. Commit! “I will smoke only 5 cigarettes a day,” is measureable and decreases your wiggle room.

great that time. Pull yourself back together and get ready for the next time. You’re going to beat this thing, I just know it!” You need to acknowledge every step – even the very small steps. Once I was working with someone who was trying to lose weight (which I immediately reframed as “getting healthy”). She came in very frustrated with herself because she had not started working out after our last appointment as she had planned. She said she got dressed in her work-out clothes but couldn’t make herself go. I congratulated her, saying, “You weren’t even seriously thinking about working out before. Now, you not only thought about it, but you got dressed to do it. You’re closer than ever!” Imagine her surprise when I focused on what she’d done, rather than on what she hadn’t – and guess who worked out by the next session? As we embark on our new year, and our new goals, I wish you measureable, realistic and manageable experiences! Happy 2012!

New Year’s Resolution:

• Realistic. As you are setting your own goals, keep in mind the healthy changes you can make for the long term. Working out seven days a week doesn’t do much good if it lasts only one week! • Plan. How will you head toward your goal? What will you do when you crave that cigarette or that sweet? You need a plan. Are you going to take a walk? Are you going to chew a piece of gum? Decide ahead of time so when you are tempted, you already know how to handle the situation. • Manageable. You’ve decided you need to lose 100 pounds, have you? Well, let’s get to it. What? It’s been 6 weeks and all you’ve lost is 10 pounds? Forget it; it’s not worth all that work for 10 measly pounds. Wait – the problem here is not losing only 10 pounds. The problem is that you set a BAD GOAL. That goal was too overwhelming. Go back to basics and make it manageable. • Feedback. Giving yourself feedback along the way is very important, but be careful about what you tell yourself. Being too harsh or critical about one stumble could easily lead to several days “off the wagon.” What would you tell someone you loved and cared for if they messed up? Would you call them “stupid,” “disgusting,” or “loser?” No, you wouldn’t. So, don’t talk to yourself that way either. What you should tell that loved one (and yourself) is: “OK, so you didn’t do so

Melvin “Jay”Marque, MD Owner and Medical Director

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Mind & Body

Partial Replacement Provides Complete Mobility by Kristy Armand

After years of pain and several surgeries, Donald Pitre knew it was finally time for a more permanent surgical solution for the arthritis in his knee. The pain in his left knee, caused by years of playing basketball in his youth followed by years of working on his feet, was unrelenting and limited his activities. He knew he needed a new knee, but he worried about the outcome. The 46-year-old aircraft mechanic wasn’t ready to undergo a total knee replacement.

Donald Pitre

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“The pain was constant, but I was worried having a total knee replacement at my age,” Pitre said. “I was worried I still might not be able to do all the things I needed to do. I also wondered how long it would last. I was very happy when Dr. Drez, who had been my doctor for years, told me he had a new option he felt was the perfect fit for me. At the time, I just didn’t realize he meant the part about the ‘perfect fit’ literally.” Dr. David Drez, Jr., is an orthopaedic surgeon with Center for Orthopaedics. Knee surgery is his specialty and he says although partial knee replacements have been available for some time, new technology from ConforMIS, Inc., has become his preference for patients suffering from some arthritic problems of the knee. The reason? Custom fit technology that provides patient-specific knee implants. “27 million people in the United States have osteoarthritis in their knee,” says Dr. Drez. “This disease changes the internal anatomy of the knee in a variety of ways, but it doesn’t change it identically in every person. That’s why using standard replacement parts helps, but it requires us to customize the patient’s anatomy to fit the implant, resulting in bone loss. What works better is creating a customized implant that is made to conform to a patient’s unique anatomy, which results in a much more natural fit.”

ConforMIS implants are developed using a unique computer modeling system and software to extract an individual’s information from digital CT images. This information is then used to create patient-specific instrumentation and implants precisely sized and shaped to match the 3D topography of the patient’s knee anatomy. Dr. Drez says the customization provides multiple benefits, including a lessinvasive procedure, decreased surgical time, shorter hospital stay (typically one day instead of three or more), less post-operative pain, faster recovery, more natural movement and longer lifespan of the implant. Five months after his surgery, Pitre couldn’t be more pleased with his results. “I was back on my feet in no time, and my knee was pain-free for the first time in about 20 years,” he says. “It’s also very reassuring to know that the implant in my knee was personalized just for me. You can’t ask for much more than that. I feel like I have my life back!” Dr. Drez says the ConforMIS implant is not an option for everyone. “Ideal candidates are those in their 40s and 50s, who’ve had prior knee scopes and have no cartilage left, but are not ready for a full knee replacement. “ For more information about knee arthritis and treatment options, call Center for Orthopaedics at (337) 721-7236.

United We’re Stronger

This year, PPG-Lake Charles raised a total of $269,550 for the United Way of Southwest Louisiana campaign. This surpassed our ambitious goal of $225,000, and greatly exceeded last year’s total of $241,468. We are so proud of our PPG salaried employees, union membership and retiree groups. It is their commitment to helping those in need that enables PPG to continue our long-term tradition of generously giving back to our community through programs like the United Way.

t We Do.

ha Live United. It’s W January 2012

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Mind & Body

Eye Health is in Focus in January

In an effort to draw attention to the importance of eye care, The Eye Clinic and KPLC TV are observing Eye Care Month in January, and are encouraging individuals to make eye health a priority for themselves and their families. Americans are living longer than ever before, and as people age, their risk of developing vision threatening diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy increases. According to statistics from the National Eye Institute, an estimated 80 million Americans have a potentially blinding eye disease. By 2030, the number of blind and visually impaired people in the United States is expected to double if regular eye exams don’t become a routine part of preventive care. “It is extremely important to have your eyes checked on a regular basis,” says ophthalmologist Alan Lacoste, MD. “Many of the most common forms of eye disease can be successfully diagnosed and treated when detected in the early stages. If not caught in time, these diseases can lead to vision loss and blindness. In addition, signs of other health problems, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, can often be detected during dilated eye exams.”

The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends a complete medical eye examination for healthy adults at least once between age 19 and 29; at least twice between age 30 and 39; and every two to four years between age 40 and 64. Younger children, senior citizens, diabetics and people with high risk factors for eye disease should require more frequent exams. KPLC news programming will feature news segments highlighting important information on eye health and vision problems throughout the month, and The Eye Clinic is offering free vision, cataract and glaucoma screenings, 20% savings on custom LASIK at the Laser Center and 20% savings on the peel and polish treatment package at the Aesthetic Center. The group has also launched a new eye health educational component called Eyemaginations on their website this month. This program provides medical animations and simulations for a wide variety of eye conditions and treatments. Complete details about all eye month activities is available online at www.theeyeclinic.net. Appointments for free screenings can be scheduled by calling each office directly, or 1-800-826-5223. The Eye Clinic offices are located in Lake Charles, Moss Bluff, Sulphur, DeRidder and Jennings.

Dr. Yoko Broussard Joins Imperial Calcasieu Medical Group I

mperial Calcasieu Medical Group, a private, physician owned, multi-specialty partnership comprised of more than 50 local medical providers; is pleased to welcome Yang-Tze Yoko Broussard, M.D. Dr. Broussard earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pre-medicine from McNeese State University in Lake Charles. She earned her Medical Degree, and completed a combined internship residency in internal medicine and pediatrics from Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans. She is board certified in both internal medicine and pediatrics. Dr. Broussard has been practicing medicine in Lake Charles since 1998 and provides excellent medical care from birth to the elderly. Dr. Broussard’s office is located at 711 Dr. Michael DeBakey Dr., Ste 400, in Lake Charles. (337) 439-2200

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Salute to Fort Polk

Fort Polk has been a proud fixture in Southwest Louisiana since its establishment in 1941. All 198,000 acres

are located in Vernon Parish, where tremendous transformation is taking place with more than $300 million in new construction and renovation projects underway to ensure the continuance of its missions as a Combat Training Center, Power Projection Platform and a Modern Installation that supports soldiers and their families. Fort Polk began as a basic combat training center for soldiers during the World War II Louisiana Maneuvers. It closed after the Korean War and it wasn’t until the 1961 Berlin Crisis that Fort Polk reactivated and became a more permanent training center. The post became one of the Army’s most modern installations in 1974 when the 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized) became its major tenant. Today, Fort Polk is the home of the Joint Readiness Training Center, which • Personal Savings was established here in 1993 when it relocated from Arkansas. The JRTC is • Student Savings for College focused on improving unit readiness by providing highly realistic, stressful, • IRA’s joint and combined arms training across the full spectrum of conflict—current • Certificates of Deposit and future. JRTC scenarios allow complete integration of the military services. They replicate unique situations and challenges a unit might face, including insurgents and terrorists, news media coverage and non-governmental You can achieve those big dreams. organizations. Immediate feedback is given on each element that encourages Call or stop by today to take the first step. interaction and discussion of unit strengths and weaknesses. This intense, thorough training is helping support the war on terrorism. Fort Polk is also the home of the Warrior Brigade, which contains several combat units.

we finance

GOALS!

Job Fair for Army Veterans The Southwest Louisiana Economic Development Alliance will host two job fairs for Army veterans returning home from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq who need jobs in the private sector. The first will be held from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday, January 10, at the Warrior Community Center, 1321 Corps Road, Building 352, in Ft. Polk. The second will be from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursday, January 26, at the Alexandria England Airpark Army Processing Facility at 1804 Oliver Drive. For more information, call 531-1594.

January 2012

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by Emily Porche’

January 2012

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Style & Beauty

Hello, Red!

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January 2012


For some, red lipstick is hard to pull off. Red-lipstick hopefuls fear that wearing the boldest of colors will make them look like a clown or the Joker from Batman. Luckily, those aren’t your only options. When worn well, red lipstick complements an overall look with confidence, boldness, beauty and sensuality. GlamCheck, an online clearinghouse of fashion and style information, shared a few secrets on how to wear it well:

Red Lipstick + Skin Color Those with fair skin should stay away from pale pinks, which can make the tone appear even paler. If you have red undertones, orangey tints can work well. The most ideal skin tone for red lipstick is wheat or dusky shades, which complement most reds, ranging from fuchsia and burgundy to maroon and cheery red. The only shade that might need to be avoided is orangey tints, which can be too much of a stark contrast. Kim Kardashian is a good example of someone with a dusky, wheat-based skin tone. Women with darker skin should opt for reds with brownish hints and avoid tones that are too light. Other colors that work well against darker skin are true reds and pinks, such as fuchsia.

Red Lipstick + Application If you have thin lips, stick to lighter shades. Lip liner keeps color inside the lines of your lips, but depending on the look you want to go for, you may not want to apply red lipstick with red lip liner. If that’s the case, choose a translucent color for your liner. It’s best to apply lipstick with a brush to avoid over-application and excess. If you don’t have a lipstick brush, try dabbing it on your lips. When you’re done with application, blot on a tissue. You can then apply a gloss if you want a wet look, or a toned-down shade of bronze if you feel like the color is too bold.

Red Lipstick + Eyes and Cheek When wearing red lipstick, one of the worst things you can do is apply too much eye make-up or blush because the completed overall look could come off as clown-ish. You don’t want to appear overdone. Instead, opt for downplayed, nude eye make-up using neutral eyeliner. Choose peach or light beige blush.

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Style & Beauty

Saving Face: Winter Skin Care by Kristy Armand

ViSiT ouR booTh, #39, aT ThE SWLa homE ShoW, JaNuaRy 14 – 15 aT ThE CiViC CENTER.

(We’ll take care of the bugs) We all know that anytime is the right time for a party, whether it’s a cochon de lait or a fais-do-do, and that the only good bug is the one in the crawfish pot. Trust J&J Exterminating to keep your home and business protected from unwanted bugs. We’re the largest Louisianabased pest control business; we know common and native Louisiana pests and how to eliminate them. Get the Shield, cher, and pass a good time.

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Winter is the season for sniffles, sneezing, sore throats – and dry skin. So when you reach for the cold medicine, don’t forget about the moisturizer, says Tana Garcia, skin care consultant with the Aesthetic Center at The Eye Clinic. “Winter takes a toll on your skin. Dry air and wind can deplete moisture from the skin, causing cracking, chapping, and irritation. Indoor heat adds to the problem. And even though it’s not hot and the sun may not be shining brightly, your skin is still vulnerable to damage from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. Many people don’t think about this, and they forget about protecting their skin from the sun in cooler weather.” Garcia says you can take action to minimize winter skin problems. “The first rule of skin protection is to keep it moisturized and hydrated. Drink plenty of water and add a thin layer of moisturizer to slow the dehydration rate of the skin.” She offers the following additional tips to help you keep your skin as healthy as possible throughout the winter months: • Eat a healthy, balanced diet - vitamins and minerals have an important part to play in renewing skin cells and keeping skin healthy. • Cover your face as much as possible when going out in cold, windy weather. • Use moisturizer on your face and lip balm on your lips before and after going out in the cold. • Continue to apply sunscreen to your face. UV waves from the winter sun can damage your skin, leading to premature aging. • You may need to cut back on certain skin products, such as alpha-hydroxy acids, as they may aggravate dry, irritated skin. • Avoid long, hot showers which drain the skin of its natural oils. Instead, take a short, warm shower and moisturize your body while your skin is still damp. • Humidify indoor air if possible.

January 2012

Garcia also recommends treatments such as facials, chemical peels or microdermabrasion as great ways to keep your skin in good condition throughout the winter. “The products you use at home are also very important. Cleansers, moisturizers and products used to treat specific issues are key to achieving the desired results,” adds Garcia. The Aesthetic Center offers a comprehensive range of skin care treatment, cosmetic injections and facial cosmetic surgery options under the direction of specialist Dr. Mark Crawford. For more information, call (337) 310-1070 or visit www.facehealth.net.

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Style & Beauty

Toss Out the Old

Ready Wear to

The best way to begin the New Year is with confidence. Find your confidence in knowing that what you are wearing looks the best it possibly can. So, please, stop with the hoarding! Most of us have this little problem that our clothes ‘mean something’ to us. We can remember where we bought it or what we did the first time we wore it. It may have looked spectacular that day and many days since then, but it can’t last forever. Look at that article of clothing as just that, an article of clothing. If it has been in your closet for 10 years, don’t reminisce with the clothes; instead, analyze it. Check for stains and holes. Is the fabric pilling in the chest and arm area? Is the neck stretched out or is the bottom of the pant leg fraying? If there is something wrong with the item, then it is time to move on. You have gotten your money’s worth out of it and it is time to refresh your wardrobe with a replacement item. Take a step back and review the quality of what you’re wearing. Replace essential pieces as you can and take a confident step into the New Year knowing that you look great!

Whitney Manns is the owner of WM Wardrobe Consulting. For more information, visit WMwardrobeconsulting.com

Males, Manis and Pedis Eighty-nine %

of men surveyed by Global Information Inc. say that good grooming and general presentation are essential to their professional success, with 53 percent of them utilizing articles and programs in print and broadcast media to find out about new products and grooming practices. Although the numbers of men headed for the spa has increased in recent years – the International Spa Association says that 31 percent of the spa-going population is male – only 4 percent say that haircuts, manicures, pedicures and exfoliation are regular parts of their grooming approach. Still, they don’t shirk at spa gifts. According to a survey by Shopzilla, men say massage and spa treatments are their most preferred Valentine’s Day gift, followed by a romantic dinner. Research also indicates that men who frequent the spa tend to be fairly well-todo, with 57 percent of them having an income of $100,000 or higher.

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Returning to the Shopping Wonderland Tips on effective and efficient gift returns

Knowing what to buy someone can be a tricky undertaking when doing your holiday shopping. And sometimes you don’t always get the right thing. But surprisingly, a recent survey conducted by Kelton Research found that nearly one-third of adult consumers don’t carefully read return and exchange policies when making a purchase in a store or retail outlet. “It is unfortunate that many don’t take a few minutes to read return and exchange policies before buying,” said Carmen Million, president and CEO, Better Business Bureau of Southwest Louisiana. “People too often assume they can return purchases when in reality they cannot. Not every retailer has the same policy and some even implement separate policies around special sales and holidays.” While reading the return policy is one of the most important things a savvy holiday shopper can do, BBB has additional advice to help make gift returns as easy as possible:

Retur n

• Most stores have a return policy, but the policies often vary in one way or another. Some offer full refunds; others offer only store credit, or exchanges and it’s important to understand the specific policy for the store.

• Always ask for a gift receipt and enclose it with the present. At the very least, make sure you leave the price tag on with the price cut off. • Understand what the return policies are for on-sale and clearance items, which may be different than merchandise sold at full price. • Don’t remove electronics or similar products from their boxes before wrapping as the original packaging may be required for a return. Many merchants charge as much as a 15 percent restocking or “open box” fee for returns of electronics products or large-ticket items. • Some retailers have different return policies depending on whether you shopped online or in a store, so look for return policies when buying online or from catalogs. Sometimes merchandise can be returned to a store; otherwise, you may be charged a shipping fee to return or exchange an item. • Health regulations, which can prohibit the return of hats and intimate apparel, may apply. • You don’t have to brave the crowds the day after opening gifts, but don’t wait too long to return the item. Many stores now have a limited time frame from the date of purchase in which you can make a return. • If you are a regular customer, or have a store credit account, mention that fact as you discuss your return options. Merchants are usually willing to accommodate loyal customers. For more advice, go to www.bbb.org.

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New Ways to Look at Your Soul

Food by Erin Kelly

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Like most southerners from country towns, Rhonda Peters grew up on soul food. When she was in seventh grade her mother took her into the kitchen and taught her everything she knew, from cutting whole chickens to frying it in the pan. In eighth grade, Rhonda cooked a full Thanksgiving meal – turkey, dressing, dessert and everything in between. Her pecan pie and creamcheese pound cakes won blue ribbons in Washington Parish, where she participated in 4-H with a focus on public speaking, sewing and cooking. For a self-professed sweets fiend and chronic home cook, ingredients like eggs, wheat and dairy were essentials – or so Rhonda thought, until she had a lifechanging office visit with a doctor in 2005. Ten years earlier Rhonda, then just 23, was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis after sporadic bouts of painful swelling in her hands. At first the symptoms were occasional; eventually, however, the pain worsened and the condition – coupled with a 1994 diagnosis of thyroid disease – adversely affected her quality of life. “I was in so much pain. My hands swelled to triple their size and they would just throb and throb. When it flared up, I had to stay in because I couldn’t even grasp the steering wheel to drive. I could barely unbutton my pants to go to the bathroom,” Rhonda said. She started taking prescription medications, but worried about the longterm side effects. “I was young and I knew I wanted to have kids one day. I didn’t want to keep taking drugs because I didn’t know what affect it was having on my body.” By 2005, Rhonda was desperate for a non-medicinal solution to her painful condition. When a doctor suggested that she change her diet, she readily obliged and buried herself in research on antiinflammatory foods. Inflammatory foods are not only known to aggravate rheumatoid arthritis conditions, they can also contribute to complications related to cardiovascular disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. Inflammation occurs when chemicals from the body’s white blood cells are released to protect us from bacteria, viruses and other foreign substances. This process is designed to protect us; however, if chemicals are released inappropriately – when there are no foreign substances to fight off, for example – it can weaken our immune systems because the body responds as if January 2012


normal tissues are abnormal. Inflammatory foods include, but are not limited to, dairy, wheat, sugar, fast food, eggs, preservatives, most processed foods and many starches, such as potatoes. Research conducted at Harvard Medical School found that diets rich in anti-inflammatory foods can reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke and complications due to autoimmune disorders. With this new knowledge and a determination to overcome her symptoms without medicine, Rhonda began the process of phasing inflammatory foods from her diet. In less than a month, her symptoms subsided. “For me, the hardest part was getting rid of the wheat. I’m a big sweets person. I love desserts. So that was difficult. Butter, milk, eggs and wheat are at the heart of baking,” Rhonda said. Still, she didn’t want to sacrifice the foods she loved, so instead of pushing aside the pies, she learned how to make her own. “I was a physics major, so I looked at it as a lab project. I thought about all the ingredients in the foods I loved and asked myself, ‘What purpose does this ingredient serve in this dish? What are the eggs doing for this recipe?’” She then went about the process of replacing the unwanted ingredients with healthier, anti-inflammatory options that could still do the job and create a tasty meal. She did the same for appetizers and entrees, including the traditional soul food dishes that her mama taught her how to make. She eventually had welltested recipes for dishes like French toast, gumbo, red beans and cornbread – all made without dairy, soy, eggs or wheat. The result, in addition to a table-full of healthy and nourishing meals, was So, What Can I Eat Now?, a cookbook for those who need to watch their diets because of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, food allergies or other conditions. “Even if you don’t have a condition where you have to watch your diet, if you follow recipes like these, you can prevent them,” Rhonda said. “You have to want a lifestyle change. You have to want to be healthier.” You also have to want to cook, Rhonda noted. Her recipes are all made from scratch.

Although many of the low-fat and low-calorie recipes include things like chicken and beef, Rhonda said she has also phased meat out of her daily diet. She has also phased out the complications of her rheumatoid arthritis. “I haven’t taken any medication since I changed my diet in 2005,” she said. For information on how to order So What Can I Eat Now?, visit rhondascooking.com.

Russell Castille - Sulphur, Mike Carr - Main Office, Lynn Calles - McNeese

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As a community bank we want to see our customers and community thrive. By keeping your money local, you help small businesses compete and succeed, which makes a real difference in the lives of your neighbors and the future of our community. So join us in our support of neighborhood businesses, and help keep southwest Louisiana growing strong.

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Community Contributor$ Entergy to Abraham’s Tent

Entergy’s Chip Arnould presents Pearl Cole of Abraham’s Tent with a $3,000 donation.

L’Auberge to Ethel Precht HOPE L’Auberge Casino Resort has supported the Ethel Precht HOPE Breast Cancer 3K since its inception in 2004. As a Pearl Sponsor of the walk, L’Auberge had one of the largest teams in attendance and donated $5,300 to the Ethel Precht Breast Cancer Foundation to aid local survivors in purchasing wigs and prosthetics. Pictured from left are: Crystal Miller Briscoe, L’Auberge Public Relations & Communications Manager and Board Member; Ethel Precht, Founder; and Keith W. Henson, L’Auberge Vice President and General Manager.

Westlake Chemical to McNeese Westlake Chemical Corp. has donated $5,000 to the McNeese State University College of Engineering and Engineering Technology through the McNeese Foundation for the college’s engineering endowment campaign. From left are: Richard H. Reid, vice president for university advancement and executive vice president of the Foundation, Wayne Ahrens, plant manager at Westlake Chemical, Dr. Nikos Kiritsis, dean of the college, and Joe Andrepont, senior community affairs representative/facility security officer at Westlake Chemical.

Gray Plantation to McNeese

L’Auberge Casino Resort recently sponsored the People’s Advocate 3rd Annual Preventing Family Violence Workshop: Breaking the Cycle. The workshop was held at McNeese State University and raised awareness of domestic, child and animal abuse in our community. Pictured from left are: Beth Zilbert, Executive Director; Keith W. Henson, L’Auberge Vice President and General Manager; and Kerry Andersen, Pinnacle Entertainment Regional Director of Community & Public Affairs.

Sempra to KIDS Can As part of the Sempra Employee Giving Network – Louisiana Council, Cameron LNG employees recently designated contributions totaling $750.00 to KIDS Can of Southwest Louisiana. Pictured are, from left, Kerry Andersen, Vice Chair (Kids Can of SWLA), Lana Hicks, President of Louisiana SEGN Council (Cameron LNG employee) Andrew Vanchiere, Chair (Kids Can of SWLA)

L’Auberge to Susan G. Komen for the Cure Throughout the month of October, Yoplait’s Save a Lid to Save Lives promotion called for yogurt consumers to mail in their pink Yoplait lids and in turn Yoplait would donate 10 cents from each lid to the Susan G. Komen for the Cure foundation. Mary Langley, a dining room attendant, personally reached out to team members, soliciting their help for this deserving cause, ultimately collecting and washing more than 3,000 lids.

McDonald’s to McNeese

Gray Plantation has donated $8,211.93 to the McNeese Alumni Association as part of a community partnership program that allowed McNeese alumni to join the Clubs of Graywood with a 50 percent reduction in the initiation fee. The fee was then donated back to the alumni association by Graywood. Stephanie Clark, left, assistant director of alumni affairs, accepts the donation from Kyle Clawson, Graywood general manager.

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L’Auberge to the People’s Advocate

McDonald’s of Southwest Louisiana and the McNeese Athletic Foundation recently hosted the fourth annual McDonald’s-McNeese Pancake Breakfast to benefit the McDonald’s of Southwest Louisiana Athletic Scholarship. All proceeds from the event were contributed to the McDonald’s of Southwest Louisiana Athletic Scholarship. In addition to the breakfast, McDonald’s of Southwest Louisiana annually donates $5,000 to the scholarship fund. Pam McGough of the McNeese Athletic Foundation accepts a scholarship donation from Doug Gehrig, owner and operator McDonald’s of Southwest Louisiana.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

January 2012


Best Impressions

by Rose Klein

Modern Day Manners & Everyday Etiquette Q: Re-gifting is not a bad thing. I know this, but what do you do when an item you regifted comes back to you? I re-gifted to a co-worker and the next year, she gave it back to me. I don’t think she did it on purpose; she was just re-gifting. A: I have always feared doing this. I try to tag things so I don’t make that mistake, but if you truly think it was unintentional, then it is funny; if it was intentional, then, well, was that mean or simply sending a message?

Either way, I think it is a bit like the White Elephant game and after so many times (her giving it back to you means it was given three times), it needs to be retired and donated to a non-profit for resale.

Q: I invited a couple over to watch the LSU-Arkansas game. About two weeks in advance I asked her and she said she needed to check with her husband. I then saw him and he said he needed to check with his wife. So, now they are checking with each other and then no response and they didn’t show for the game. What am I to think? A: Aside from being impolite, I would not read too much into this. Sadly, particularly around the holidays, people get busy and don’t follow through with invitations. They probably said they’d try and you took that to mean they’d show or give you a more conclusive answer. If it really bugs you, then don’t invite them again.

Our New Doctor is Putting His Best Foot Forward in Southwest Louisiana Center for Orthopaedics is proud to announce the addition of foot and ankle specialist Kalieb Pourciau, DPM, to our medical staff. Dr. Pourciau joins Dr. Tyson Green in the foot and ankle division of our group. Originally from Maringouin, Louisiana, Dr. Pourciau earned his undergraduate degree in Microbiology from Louisiana State University before earning a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine Degree from Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He then completed a three-year residency in foot and ankle surgery at John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, Texas. Dr. Pourciau has been in practice at Acadian Foot and Ankle Center in Eunice, Louisiana, for the past three years. Dr. Pourciau will be seeing patients at all locations of Center for Orthopaedics in Lake Charles, Sulphur and DeRidder. Call (337) 721-7236 to schedule an appointment.

Dr. Pourciau specializes in: • Diabetic Foot Care • Foot Surgery • Bunions • Podiatric Sports Medicine

January 2012

• Custom Orthotics • Hammertoes • Heel Pain

• Children’s Podiatry • Arthritis • Sprain

Excellence In Motion (337) 721-7236 • www.centerforortho.com

Lake Charles • Sulphur • DeRidder Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

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mardi gras 2012

*Denotes that the event is occurring at the Lake Charles Civic Center



*Twelfth Night
 Friday, January 6, 7 p.m.
 An enchanting evening with the 2011 royal
courts of more than 50 krewes making their
last glittering promenade, ushering in the 2012
season. Luxurious door prizes, music and
dancing! Tickets are $5 in advance, or $6 at
the door. Children 5 and under are admitted
for free.

 *Queens’ Pageant
 Saturday, January 14, Times Vary
 Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for children
12 and under.
 *COMMUNITY DANCE
 Thursday, January 26, 6:30—8 p.m.
 Free Mardi Gras dance presented by the City
of Lake Charles and Community Inclusion.

 ANNUAL MARDI GRAS RUN
 Saturday, February 4, 7 a.m.— Until,
 Gueydan
Annual run sponsored by Le Krewe de la
Originals et Les Enfants and the Duck Festival
Association features an early morning chicken
run, lunch, live music, an auction and a dance.
Parade begins at 3 p.m. Dance starts at 5 p.m.

 VINTON MARDI GRAS CELEBRATION
 Saturday, February 11, 2 p.m.
 Downtown Vinton. Parade ends at City Hall.



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*KREWE OF THE GOLDEN YEARS
 Monday, February 13, 9 a.m.—2 p.m.
 Senior citizens who have passed down Mardi
Gras traditions celebrate the season with
food and a Mardi Gras ball. Free to seniors
60 and up.

 MERCHANTS’ PARADE
 Friday, February 17, 7 p.m.
 Downtown-Midtown Lake Charles

 CARLYSS MARDI GRAS TRAIL RIDE Saturday, February 18, 8:30 a.m.
 Begins and ends at West Cal Arena in Sulphur.
 Line up at 6 a.m. Admission fee for trail riders
is $5.

 Krewe of Omega Parade
 Saturday, February 18, 2 p.m.
 Downtown Lake Charles

 *Zydeco Dance
 Saturday, February 18, 3—5 p.m.
 Live bands playing Mambo and Zydeco.

 *Krewe of Barkus Parade
 Saturday, February 18, 3 p.m.
 Fantastically disguised canines parade in
full Mardi Gras attire, all vying for the title of
“Mystical Dog.” Entry fee applies.



Krewe of Cosmos Presentation
 Saturday, February 18, 6:30 p.m.
 The Krewe of Cosmos presents their royal
court in style at the Sulphur High School
Auditorium with skits, songs and more.

 *Krewe of Illusions
 Saturday, February 18, 7:30 p.m.
 Celebrate Mardi Gras with the 23rd annual
presentation of the Krewe of Illusions. Tickets
are $30 orchestra, formal attire required. $18
balcony reserved seating and $15 standard
balcony seating, casual attire.

 *Taste de la Louisiane
 Sunday, February 19, 11 a.m.—2 p.m.
 Pots and pots of all-you-can-eat traditional
Louisiana cuisine for a $7 admission fee.



*Lighted Boat Parade
 Sunday, February 19, 7:30 p.m.
 Be dazzled by the glowing boat parade on
shimmering Lake Charles.

 *Royal Gala
Monday February 20, 7 p.m.
 The Cinderella moment of the season features
the 2012 courts of more than 50 krewes with
kings, queens, royal dukes and duchesses,
captains, courtesans and jesters. Tickets are
$5 in advance, or $6 at the door. Children 5
and under are admitted for free.

 Iowa Chicken Run
 Tuesday, February 21, 10 a.m.
 The chicken run starts and ends at KC Hall
and runs west down 90. Finishes with lunch
and live music.



*Children’s Day
 Sunday, February 19, noon—3 p.m.
 Old-time Louisiana culture, arts and crafts,
Mardi Gras music and magic. An education
station complete with safety and health
information.



Krewe of Charlie Sioux Parade
Block Party
 Tuesday, February 21, Noon
 Downtown Lake Charles, Corner of Broad and
Ryan. Sioux City, Lake Charles’ sister city, will
hold a block party, complete with food, drinks,
music and children’s activities.



Children’s Parade
 Sunday, February 19, 3 p.m.
 Downtown Lake Charles. A purple, green and
gold parade for the young and young at heart.



Motorcycles, Hot Rods &
Classics Parade
 Tuesday, February 21, 1 p.m.
Downtown-Midtown Lake Charles



Thrive Magazine for Better Living

January 2012


Krewe of Krewes’ Parade
 Tuesday, February 21, 5:30 p.m.
 Downtown-Midtown Lake Charles. Hundreds
of elaborate krewe floats, costumes, beads
and more wind through the city in the
culmination of the Fat Tuesday celebration. World Famous Cajun Extravaganza and Gumbo Cook-Off February 18, 2012, 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. Lake Charles Civic Center Locals and visitors will enjoy

the Cajun Extravaganza Gumbo Cook-off that attracts thousands to its hot contest for the best chicken and sausage or wild game gumbo. You will not want to miss this taste-from-every-pot event or the hot Southern and Cajun music that comes along with it. Admission is $5 and children 5 and under are admitted free.

Make a statement this Mardi Gras season

Be Bold. Be

Kevan Hall

the Belle of the Ball!

Lourdes Chavez

We know Mardi Gras!

We’ve been serving krewes since 1963.

Rina diMontella

Mardi Gras/ Ball Favors Sparkling Jewelry Engraveables Glassware

Mardi Gras Gowns Sizes 0–Plus Complete your look with our Starfire Jewelry Collection

1025 Ryan St. Lake Charles M–F 9:30–5:30 (337) 433-3637

www.navarras.com

312 Pujo Street 4 337-433-5855 4 perfectfitlc.com 4 M–F 10am–4:30pm January 2012

A Lake Charles tradition since 1962

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

Jewelry & Gifts

www.thriveswla.com

73


NAMI SWLA (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Care & Share Support Group Meets at 6:00 PM third Tuesday of each month in the NAMI SWLA Office (United Way Building 715 Ryan St. Ste. 203, second floor). Please use the parking lot and rear entrance to the building that faces Bilbo St. between Broad and Division Streets. Ryan Street entrance will be locked; call the NAMI SWLA office for any assistance at 433-0219.

Mark Your Calendar!

Stark Foundation - On Display:

Art of Africa: Objects from the Collection of Warren Robbins The City of Lake Charles will host a new traveling exhibition, Art of Africa: Objects from the Collection of Warren Robbins, through March 10 in the 1911 Historic City Hall Arts & Cultural Center, 1001 Ryan Street. The exhibit highlights the private collection of the founder and former director of the National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution. Art of Africa presents more than 60 objects including sculpture, textiles, beaded clothing and jewelry, which broadly represent the creativity and diversity of artistic expression of nearly 30 cultures of sub-Saharan Africa. The textiles and body ornaments in this exhibition, once worn by royalty and titled men and women, functioned as symbols of power and authority during special rituals and ceremonies. Often worn for rites of passage, these ornaments later signified social and marital status. Whether for personal or ceremonial use, body ornaments, tools, weapons and household objects in many African cultures are believed to contain the spiritual essence of their owners. Accompanied by music and photographs, the exhibition will illustrate the broader cultural context in which these art forms were created and used. Art of Africa is of interest for any curriculum from social studies to art. An educational activity booklet will be provided for field trips. In the gallery, students will find African masks and headdresses; learn about royalty and symbolic garments, and uncover some interesting facts about African families and ancestors. In the guide, they learn new words, facts about the artworks and participate in fun activities. They can begin the activities while visiting the exhibition and complete the activities in the back of the guidebook in the classroom. Historic City Hall is open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free, but donations are accepted

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On display through February 25, 2012 – Exhibit; Medieval Manuscripts: From the Stark Collections. Stark Museum of Art – 409.886.2787(ARTS). On display through February 25, 2012 – Exhibit; Exotic Beauty: Birds of John Gould. Stark Museum of Art – 409.886.2787(ARTS). For more information, visit www.starkmuseum.org.

Foot Pain and Treatment are the Topics of Upcoming Seminar Foot and ankle specialists Dr. Tyson Green and Dr. Kalieb Pourciau with Center for Orthopaedics are teaming up to discuss the most common causes of foot pain. They will be the speakers at “Step Past Foot Pain,” a free community seminar on January 26 at 5:30 pm. The doctors will discuss the most common causes of foot problems, including heel pain, bunions, arch pain, calluses, hammer toes, and more, along with prevention strategies and the latest treatment options. Seminar attendees can register to win a pair of custom orthotics valued at over $400. The seminar will take place Center for Orthopaedics in Lake Charles, located at 1747 Imperial Blvd. Seating is limited and pre-registration is requested. Refreshments will be served. Call 721-2903 or email abooth@centerforortho.com to pre-register.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

January 2012


The importance of family is measured every day in a small community like ours. At Jennings American Legion Hospital, the daily health of your family isn’t just your priority – it’s ours, too. You may have to travel for some things, but quality healthcare isn’t one of them. With Jennings American Legion Hospital, the healing touch for your family is right here at home. Make an appointment today and meet our team of family physicians.

Pictured from L to R: Johnny Segura, MD • Christopher Achee, MD • Michael Benoit, MD • Mark Clawson, MD Young Kang, MD • Amanda LaComb, MD • Richard McGregor, MD • James McNally, MD

1634 Elton Rd. • 616-7000 • www.jalh.com

Meet Giles. He’s a stuffy fellow with gray hair and no-nonsense attitude. Like most of the finest butlers in town, he wears a black jacket, black slacks and bowtie. He yawns a lot. Giles is fantastically lazy. Imaginary butlers can be that way. Not many people have butlers living with them, much less imaginary ones, but Giles has been hanging out in my house for a while. He manifested himself one afternoon when a tired, young single mother (me) was sprawled out in exhaustion on the bed next to her spirited four-year-old daughter, who had various reasonable demands that she was too young and small to fulfill on her own. That day we laid side-by-side – me, exhausted; she, mimicking me – and she asked if she could have juice and a snack. I said, hang on, I’ll ring Giles. I pushed an imaginary button and said, “Giles, please bring us some snacks and drinks. I’m too tired to get up.” My daughter was quiet for a few moments as we both stared at the ceiling. Finally she asked: “Mom, who’s Giles?” “Our imaginary butler,” I explained. She stared at the ceiling for a while longer, considering this. Then she asked if Giles could bring this or that and I said of course, he’s an imaginary butler, he has to bring anything we want. So she pushed the imaginary button and we made even more requests of Giles, from the practical to the ridiculous. Then we waited. After a while I finally sighed and said, “Giles is being lazy. I guess I’ll have to do it.” After that, Giles became an ongoing joke in the house – we would ring him to do our laundry, bring us food or clean our rooms and then we would January 2012

lament at how lazy and useless he was before completing the tasks ourselves. My daughter is fourteen now. Giles has been resting quietly somewhere in the background of our memories for a few years, but the other day she asked about him and together we wondered what he’s been up to this whole time. I had almost forgotten about him. That’s what happens to the imagination sometimes. Years go by and you forget. You get older. Things don’t seem as imaginative anymore. Instead of seeing the shape of a dog or rabbit in the clouds, you just see the coming storm. Imagination is something left behind in childhood – a lost element that had its time and place back then, but is juvenile and silly once you pass a certain age. I’m not sure what that certain age is, but I hope I never pass it. Better yet: I hope I haven’t passed it already.

The Last Word by Erin K e

lly

May your year be filled with creativity and imagination.

Email Erin at edit@thriveswla.com.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

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Thrive Magazine for Better Living

January 2012

Thrive January 2012 Issue  

January 2012 issue of Thrive Magazine

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