Issuu on Google+

The Shamrock Film Festival See Thisweekend Page 16A

Thisweek Farmington-Lakeville February 17, 2012 VOLUME 32, NO. 51

A NEWS OPINION SPORTS

www.thisweeklive.com

Opinion/4A

Announcements/7A

Public Notices/7A

Senior Spotlight/8A

Sports/10A

Classifieds/11A

Farmington School Board considers increasing class sizes Board reviews $1.3 million in cuts

by Laura Adelmann Thisweek Newspapers

Class sizes are expected to increase in Farmington schools next year. Teachers and support staff cuts are options the Farmington School Board will consider to cover a $1.3 million general fund deficit in the 2012-13 budget. About 12 full-time equivalent teaching positions would be cut district-wide to save $629,270 under 2012-13 budget parameters presented to the School Board Feb. 13. As proposed, average class size for grades 3-5 would next year rise to 27, an increase of one pupil. Classes would increase by an average of 1.5 pupils in grades 6-8 and two pupils in high school if the

proposal were adopted. Although there may be exceptions, most middle and high school core program classrooms next year won’t exceed 27 and 29 students, respectively, Farmington Schools Finance Director Carl Colmark said. No class size changes are proposed for grades K-2, but to save another $650,000, proposed support staff cuts would affect every school. The district’s five elementary schools would be responsible to make $267,273 of the support staff cuts, the middle schools would have to cut $186,669, and $196,058 in cuts would come from high school staff. Under a proposed change, decisions for the cuts and how to allo-

cate funding for supplies (based on a new per-pupil formula of $15 for K-8 and $20 for grades 9-12) would be made by principals working together. “What we’re doing is taking more of a bottom-up approach to make decisions as opposed to topdown,” Colmark said. Farmington School Board members cited concerns about protecting class sizes, and directed that the classrooms be buffered from funding cuts as much as possible. Board Chair Tera Lee cited concerns that large class size may compromise students’ quality of education. She advocated adding more fulltime equivalent reserve positions to provide extra teachers in large class-

es. “I just don’t want to be scrambling in August, as we seem to every year, that we have a whole bunch of bubbles across the district and not an FTE to fill them,” Lee said. Options will be presented for the board to consider at its Feb. 27 meeting. Board Member Melissa Sauser emphasized the need to keep K-3 classes small. In a later interview, she said that age is particularly important because students are just learning to adapt to school. Colmark reassured board members the district will stay within its class-size policy as changes are made. Farmington residents are invited

to learn more about district finances and its plans to individualize learning at roundtable meetings set for 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Feb. 21 at North Trail Elementary, 5580 170th St., and on Feb. 23 at Dodge Middle School, 4200 208th St. W. The roundtables will kick off with Farmington Superintendent Jay Haugen serving up his homemade soup, bread and jam for the first 50 participants. Attendees will discuss district issues in small groups and with district officials; reservations are not needed to attend. Laura Adelmann is at laura.adelmann@ecm-inc.com.

Farmington City Council agrees to review new fire truck options Used equipment option nixed by Laura Adelmann Thisweek Newspapers

Photo by Aaron Vehling

The Postlewaites are participating in the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation’s Walk to Cure Diabetes at the Mall of America on Feb. 25. Both children (Charlie, left, and Jack, second from right) live with Type 1 diabetes. Their parents, Kathy and Phil, have rearranged their lives to help their children thrive despite the disease.

Kids living with diabetes Lakeville family saw their lives change

by Aaron Vehling Thisweek Newspapers

Five-year-old Jack Postlewaite and his brother, Charlie, 10, are teeming with energy, as most kids are. A particular passion of theirs is playing with their elaborate K’nex structures – taller than they are – that they have constructed in the foyer of the Lakeville home they share with their parents, Phil and Kathy. From various pieces they have scored engineering feats of complexity and locomotion that would make famed inventor Rube Goldberg proud. Add to these toys a trampoline and playground set and it seems these children are leading lives similar to others in Lakeville. But that

is not the case. Both Jack and Charlie have Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease that requires them to wear insulin pumps and their parents to be available to test their blood sugar more than a dozen times every 24 hours. Unlike Type 2, which typically results from lifestyle choices, Type 1 has been linked to genetic and environmental factors, according to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Jack was first diagnosed in 2007 at barely 16 months; Charlie in 2010. In his short life, Jack has endured more than 18,000 finger pricks to test his blood sugar levels. Thisweek visited the Postlewaite home as the family was planning for its fifth year participating in the Feb. 25 JDRF Walk to Cure Dia-

betes at the Mall of America. The event attracts about 22,000 people, raising about $2.2 million, according to JDRF. Each year they form Double Trouble, a team of friends and family, to raise money to help find a cure for the disease. The electronic insulin pumps are a vast improvement over a constant need to inject the children with syringes. Nevertheless, Kathy said, “They are not a cure.” “You just want your kids to have as normal and as healthy of a life as possible,” Phil said. Jack can test himself now, which meant that during the interview he pulled out his kit and pricked his own finger. Charlie also tests himself and is old enough to know

the signs and routines involved in maintaining his body chemistry. When something feels wrong, Charlie knows to ask for help. Diabetes, Phil said, “does not allow them to have a typical childhood.” After finishing his self-test, Jack said he wanted to share something with the newspaper. After some reluctance, he whispered to his mother. “He said he wants to live one month without diabetes,” Kathy said. Jack attends a private day care that does not have the resources to tender him with the level of attention he needs to ensure his body’s chemistry has reached an acceptable level. So Kathy checks in on See Diabetes, 5A

After a high-profile equipment failure at a fire last month, Farmington will likely be purchasing a new fire rescue engine, an estimated $500,000 expense. City Council members agreed Feb. 13 to replace the engine known for frequent breakdowns, and asked fire officials to return with costs of options the city has to buy and finance a new rescue truck. The council asked for comparison pricing to buying a new truck on its own or through a consortium for bulk pricing. Other money-saving options being researched are the costs of purchasing a demonstration model or buying new and allowing it to be used as a demonstration model for 18 months before taking possession of it. “(Council members) all agreed we need to do something,” said Farmington City Administrator David McKnight. The city’s predicament made headlines after a Jan. 20 fire when an engine was unable to pump water on flames shooting from the roof of Starr Automotive. Rescuers switched hoses to another truck already on the scene, but the incident intensified council concern of fire equipment breakdowns. Farmington Mayor Todd Larson said the council unanimously agreed to skip looking at used trucks. “We just want to have a new one to fit into the replacement schedule,” he said. “With used, we’re just buying someone else’s problems.” Laura Adelmann is at laura. adelmann@ecm-inc.com.

Thisweek and the Sun Current will become Sun Thisweek March 30 The ECM acquisition will mean a merger of competing Dakota County weeklies

Two free weekly newspapers that have competed with and complemented one another for more than 30 years are merging into a single paper. General 952-894-1111 Distribution 952-846-2070 Display Advertising 952-846-2011 Classified Advertising 952-846-2000

The first edition of the new Sun Thisweek will be delivered on Friday, March 30, to residents of Apple Valley, Burnsville, Eagan, Farmington, Lakeville and Rosemount. The name combines two familiar and respected names in Twin Cities community journalism: Sun-Current Newspapers and Thisweek Newspapers. The merged news product follows the Dec. 30 acquisition by ECM Publishers Inc., which publishes Thisweek, of Minnesota Sun Newspapers from American Community Newspapers. “For many years, residents and

businesses in Dakota County have been served by two excellent weekly newspapers – Thisweek and the Sun Current,” said Larry Werner, general manager and editor of Thisweek Newspapers and the Dakota County Tribune. “Both papers have covered the interesting and important events and people in our communities and have provided a way for businesses to reach their customers through advertising. The combined Sun Thisweek will retain the strong commitment to excellent journalism and local advertising that readers have

come to expect. The staff of Sun Thisweek will be larger than either newspaper before this merger, and the amount of news will increase. Our new, larger, redesigned paper will attempt to provide the best of the Sun Current and the best of Thisweek in Sun Thisweek.” Among the enhancements planned for the new community newspaper are expanded sports and arts coverage. The southern suburbs were home turf for both newspaper companies, which expanded alongside one another in the freedistribution newspaper market.

The area’s first free weekly, the Burnsville Current, was founded in 1975 by Burnsville resident Mary Ziegenhagen. In 1977, she was hired by the Minneapolis Star as its first female editorial writer. Her husband, David, oversaw operation of the Current as it established profitability and was able to move from the couple’s home into rented quarters on Cliff Road in Burnsville. Thisweek, a spinoff of the venerable Dakota County Tribune, was launched in 1979. The Tribune was a subscription paper that began publishing in Farmington in 1884. Thisweek began as a single edition delivered free to See Thisweek, 7A


��������

2A

February 17, 2012 THISWEEK

���� ��������

������� ���� ��

���������� ���� ���� ����� ������

�������� ���� ��

���� �������� � ����

�������� ��� ���� �� ���� ����� ����� ������� ���� ������� ��� ������ �� ��� ���� ������� �� ��������������������

���� ������

�� ���� ����� �� ���� ���� ��� ���� �� ��� ����� ���� ��������� ���� �������� ��� ��������� ��� ��������� ��� ���������� �� ��� ���� ���������� ������ ���� ������� �������� ������ ������ �� �������������

� ����� ������ ����� ���� �������� ����� �� ���������� ��� �� ��������� ������ �� �������������������� �� ��� ������� ��� ��� ���� ��� �� �������� ���� �� �������� ��� �������

��� �������

������ ����� ��� ���� �� ���������� ���������� ������� �� ��� ������� ������������ ��� ��� �������� �� ������ ������ ��� ������ ���������� �� ������� ��� ������� ��� �������� ����������� ���� � ������� ���� �� ��������� ��� ������� ������� ������� �� ��� ���������� ��� ��������� ������ ���������� �������� ������ �� ��������� ��� ������ �������� ��� ��� ���������� ������ ��� �������� �� ��� �� ���� ������ �������� ������ ����� ���� ������� ������ ���������� ��� �������������� ����� ��� ��������� ������ ���������� ����� �� ������ ���� ������� ������� ��� � �������� ������ �� ������ ��� ���� �� ������� �������� ����� ���� ����� ������� �� ������ �������� ������������ ������������� ��� ���� ������������ ��� ���� ��� ��������� ����� ��� ������� �� ���������������� ��� �� ���� ������������� �������� ���������� ���� �� �������� ������ ������ �� �������� �� �� �������� �� ����� ��� ����� ����������� �������� �� ���� ���

���� ��� ��� ��� ���� ��� ���� ��

��� ������� ������� ���� ��� �� ���� ����

�� ���� ��� � ��� ������� ���� ���� ��� �� ���� ����� ����� ������� ���� �� ��� ������ ��� �������� ��� ���� ���� ���� ����� ����� ���� �� ��� ������ ���� ���� �������� ���� �� �� �������� ���� ������ ��� ���� ������� �������� ����������� ���� ����� �� ��� ����� ��������� ���� �� �������� �� ��� ������� �� ����� ���� ����� ��� ������� ��� ���� ����������� ��� ��� � ����� ��������� ��������� ����� ����� ���� � ��������� ������� �������� ������ ���� �� ��� ������� ���� � ��������� ������� �������� ������ ���� �� ��� ������� ����

���� �� ���� ���� ����� ������ ����� ��� ���� �� ��� ���� �� ��� ������ ���� ��������� ������ �������� �������� ���� ������� �� ������������ ���� ��� ����� ��� ������ ���� �� ���� �� ���� ���� � ����� ����� ��� ��� ���� �� ���� �� ���� ������ ����� �� �� ��� ���� �����������

���� �� ���� �� ������� ����������� ��� ������ ����� ������� ���� ��������� ��������� ����������� ��� ����� ��� ��� ���������� �� ��������� �� ���� ����� ������� ������� ��� �������� � �

��� �������� �� ������ ���������� �� �������� ������������ ��� ����� ���� �� ������� ��� �������� ����������� ���������� �������� �� ��� ������� �������� ������� ����������� ������ ���� � ��������������������� ������� ������ ����������

� � � �

����� �� ����� �������

���� ������� ������� � �������

�������� ����������� ���������� �������

������� ��������� �������

��������� ���� ���� ������ ����� �������

������ ���������� � ������� ��������� ��������� ������� �������� ���������� ������� � �������

��������������� �

���� ���� �� ���� ���������� ��� ���� ���� ������� ������������� ���� �� ���� ������� �� �� ��� ���� ������� �� ������������������� ��� ����� �� ��� ������ ���� �� ��� ����� ���� ������ �� ��� ��������� ������ ������ ��������

� � �

��� ��� ���� �� ��� �� ���� �� ��� ����� ��� ��� ��� ������ �� ��� ����� �� ��� ���� ���������� ������ ���� �������������

� �

���� ������� ������ ����������� �� ������������ �������� ������ ��������� ������ ������� ��� �����

���������������������� ����������� ���� ����� ��������

��������� ���������� ����������� �� �������� ���� ��� ����� ��� ��������� �� ������� �� �� ��� ������ �������� ���� ����� �������

���� ����������� �������� ��������

������ ����������� ������� ��������

��������� �������� ������� ���������

������ ������ ����������� ����� ���� ���� ���������

��� ��������

��������� � �������� ����������� � ��������� �

������������ �

����� ����������

�������� ����������� ����������� ������� ��� ������������ ������ �������

��� ����������� ������������� ��������� ����������� ����������� ������� ���������� � ���������� ������� �������

����� � ����������� � �

����� �������� ������ �������

����� � ���������� �������� � �������

��������� ���� ���� ������ ������ ��� �������

��������� �������� �

������� ����� ��� ��������

������������� ���������� �

���� �� ����� ������������� ������� ������� ��� ��������� ��������������

������ ������ ���� ��������� ��� ���� �� ��� ���� ���������� ��� ���� ������������ ������ ���� �������������

���� �� ��������� � ������������������� � ����� ������� ������ � ������������

��������� ���������� ��

��� ��� �� �� � ��� � �� �� � ��� �� �� �� �

�����

��� ���� ��� �� ���������� �

�� �������

��� ��� �� �������

���� �����

��������� � ����� � ���

�����

���

��� ����� �� �����

���� ������ �� ���� ������ �� �

� ������ ��� ������ ��

����� ����� �� � ���

������

������

����� ���� ����� ���

������

���� ����� ��

���� �������� ���� �������� �� ���� ����� ��� ������ �� ��� ���� ������ ���

���� ���� ���������� ���

������

������

������

���� ��������� ���� ��������� ���� ���������� ������� ����� ����� ���� ���� ��� ���� ���� ��� ���� ���� ��� ����� ���� ��� ��� ����� ������ �������

������

������

������

������ � ��� �� ���� �������� �� �������� � ������� �� ������� ���������� ��������

��� ������� �� ������� ���� ������ ��� �������� ����� �����

��� ��� ����� ����� ������� �� ��������� ������ ��� ������ ������� ���� �� �� ����� ����� ���������� �� � ������������ ��� ��������� ���

������������������

��� ������ � �� ������ ���� ���� ������� ������������

������ � ��� ��������� �� ��� ���� ����� �� ��� ���� ��������

����� ��������

������������

��������������

������������


THISWEEK February 17, 2012

���� ���� ��� ��������� ���� ���� ���

3A

���������� ������ ���� ��� ������ �� ��������� ��� ����� �� ������� ������ ��������

���� ���� ��� ���� ���� ����� ���������� ����� ��� ��� ������� �� ��� ������� ��� ����� ��������

�� ����� ����������

����� ����� ����������

������������

������

���������

���� ���� ����� ������������

����� ���� ���� ������������

������������������������

Photo submitted

Steve and Marcia Kwiecinski with Wallace McKay and daughter Patricia Broback, of Lakeville, at Death Marker 12B in the Philippines, which honors the members of the 194th Tank Battalion from Brainerd, Minn. About half of the members of the battalion did not survive this World War II battle.

VFW hosts benefit presentation for Lakeville wounded vet Lakeville resident and wounded veteran 1st Lt. Darren Campion wants to spread his message of perseverance, survival and hope for wounded U.S. veterans. To do this he plans to walk the path of the Bataan Death March in the Philippines and swim across the English Channel. The Lakeville VFW is holding a pancake and sausage breakfast from 8 to noon at the Lakeville VFW in downtown Lakeville to help raise money for Campion’s mission.

Following the breakfast will be two guest speakers: Patricia Broback of Lakeville and Wallace McKay, who will talk about their relative, Marcia Kweicinski, a female survivor of the Bataan Death March of 1942. Tickets are $8 for adults, $4 for ages 4-12 and free for children under 3. No ticket is needed to hear the guest speakers. T-shirts to support Campion are available for purchase at the VFW and online at www.RangerCampion. org. Call or text (507) 319-

8729 for more information. Campion has permanent brain injury and partial paralysis, but is determined to achieve his goals. This year marks the 70th anniversary of the Bataan Death March, which occurred in Japanese-occupied Philippines and saw the Imperial Japanese military force about 76,000 American and Filipino prisoners of war to march 60 miles sick and malnourished. It resulted in thousands of deaths. – Aaron Vehling

Education Read Aloud Night set March 1 at FES

Aloud to Your Child.” As al- 210th St. W., Lakeville. ways, there will be stories read Preliminary Actions aloud by FES staff and com- 1. a. Call to Order b. Roll Call The Farmington Elemen- munity members. c. Public Comment tary School Read Aloud Night d. Agenda Additions will be held from 6:30 to 7:30 2. EML Grievance Hearing p.m. Thursday, March 1, at the Following is the agenda for 3. Discussion school. The event will include the 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21, a. Kindergarten Programming a session led by an FES read- study session of the ISD 194 b. Long-Range Budgeting Coning specialist titled “How to School Board in the District siderations 4. Additions to Agenda Get the Most out of Reading Office Board Room, 8670 5. Adjournment

ISD 194 School Board

������ �����

Man to walk the path of the Bataan Death March

������ ����� ������������ ���� ��� ��� ������������� ����� ���������� ���� ��� ��������� ������� ������� ����� ���������� � ��������� ������� ��������� ���� ���� ���� ��� ������ ��� ��� ���� ��������

������������������

����� ������

����������

�����

�����

������

��������� ������ ��� ��� � ����

����������� ����� ��� ��� � ����

����� ����� ��� ��� � ����

����� ������� ��� ��� � ����

���

����������� �� �� ��� � ����

��� �����

���� ������� ���������� ���

���� �������� ���� �

��

����� �����

���

���� ���� ����� � ��� ���

���� �� ��� ���� ����� ���

����� �������� ����� ������� ���� � ���������� �� ����� �� ���� ���� ������ �������� ������ ��������� �������� � ��� �������� ���� ����������� � ���� ��������


Opinion 4A

February 17, 2012 THISWEEK

Guest Columnist Inspiring models of community engagement in greater Minnesota by Dane Smith Special to Thisweek Newspapers

In the lakes-and-woods landscape surrounding Grand Rapids in north central Minnesota, a wide array of community leaders have banded together with seven school districts in several counties to chart a comprehensive road map toward improved student success, beginning with stronger early childhood education and going all the way through to career preparation. In and around our farmbelt food-processing centers of Worthington and Willmar, civic activists and school officials are beginning to get national attention for their success at accepting and integrating an increasingly diverse population and improving outcomes for Latino and other nonwhite students. In the Brainerd Lakes area and on the shore of Lake Superior in Grand Marais and wider Cook County, business owners and educators have come together and found new ways to get the post-secondary credentials and job skills that the local economy needs into the hands of more local residents who can fill those jobs. These are among the many bright spots I discovered in researching and writing a recently released report, “Whole Towns Coming Together

for All Students” (available at www.growthandjustice. org/communities). The report documents promising progress by rural and greater Minnesota communities that are focused in new ways on helping all their children succeed, as they grapple with economic challenges and welcome increasing racial diversity. Getting the entire village involved in educating and preparing all the children for productive lives was a tradition for our original residents, the Native American nations. Pioneering Euro-Americans also invested heavily in universal and free education, following the Land Ordinance of 1785 dictate that a section of land in every township must be set aside for a public school. Time magazine noted, in that iconic 1973 cover story about our “State That Works,” that our superior performance on economic and quality-of-life measures could be linked to a “near-worship for education and a high civic tradition in Minnesota life.” An overwhelming multipartisan consensus exists that this tradition, this education imperative, should remain our basic formula for economic growth and vitality. The Governor’s Workforce Development Council cites a highly respected Georgetown University

study pointing to the need for more Minnesotans to complete post-secondary education to meet our economy’s workforce needs. Business and philanthropic leaders agree that improving and aligning workforce skills is a top priority. So which models work best? Any constructive interest and involvement by community leaders in education outcomes is probably helpful, but a review of what is happening in rural and greater Minnesota finds particular promise in the efforts happening in Itasca County and in St. Cloud. Both areas are developing something that can be called the Strive model, named for successful efforts in the metropolitan Cincinnati area and now under way in about a dozen other urban areas across the nation. This model happens to be in sync with the Growth & Justice education framework, Smart Investments in Minnesota’s Students, which outlines a strategy of comprehensive intervention and measurement, from the earliest years to post-secondary completion, using evidence-tested and cost-effective methods and programs. In Itasca County and elsewhere, the crucial ingredient is development of a road map that sets out specific desired measurements of success from birth to career launch. The Strive model also develops

and assigns networks of stakeholders, from parents’ groups to social service agencies to teachers and schools, to achieve the results. In Cincinnati and northern Kentucky, Strive leaders have reported progress on 40 of 54 such indicators. A multidistrict, Strive-like model is being studied for the Twin Cities metropolitan area, with initial impetus from the African-American Leadership Forum and the University of Minnesota’s College Readiness Consortium, an effort that drew high praise in a recent Star Tribune editorial. “The number of programs (focused on closing the achievement gap) speaks to the widespread community interest in the problem, but it tells us nothing about quality and effectiveness,’’ the editorial stated. “That’s why a relatively new push to better coordinate all the programs is welcome.” The incessant casting about for easy answers (such as high-stakes testing) or scapegoats (such as teachers unions) for lagging student success needs to be replaced by a more comprehensive and holistic cradle-to-career approach. And it’s hard to find a more eloquent champion of this idea than Diane Ravitch, a veteran of President George W. Bush’s No Child Left Behind initiative who has evolved toward a more progressive

outlook. In her book, “The Death and Life of the Great American School System,” Ravitch summarized the ingredients for bringing total community engagement to closing the gaps. Children who are disadvantaged by inequities “need extra resources, including preschool and medical care,” Ravitch wrote. “They need small classes, where they will get extra teacher time. … Their families need additional supports, such as coordinated social services that help them to improve their education. … While the school itself cannot do these things, it should be part of a web of public and private agencies that buttress families.” And citing the work of testing experts Ina V.S. Mullis and Michael O. Martin of Boston College, Ravitch concludes that the way forward for student success lies in “a strong curriculum; experienced teachers; effective instruction; willing students; adequate resources; and a community that values education.” Dane Smith is the president of Growth & Justice, a progressive public policy organization that promotes statewide economic growth for Minnesota through public investments in human capital and infrastructure. Columns reflect the opinion of the author.

Letters Don’t bond for liquor store move To the editor: I have been following the Farmington liquor store issue in the local media. I recently read that one consideration is to build a new store using bond money to finance its construction. I thought that the City Council was trying to avoid issuing new bonds. That is why it was considering passing a levy increase so that some of these new items could be paid for in cash. Now we are back to the old way of doing business in Farmington – by bonding our way out of situations we have created for ourselves. It makes no sense to build a new store. The city would be creating yet another vacancy in an area that just lost one of its anchor tenants (Pellicci Hardware). Hopefully this building can be leased soon to a business that draws customers to this shopping center. The city also operates the stores in such a way that they do not compete with other local business for the sale of complementary items that go with liquor. For example, the stores do not offer any snack

food items like chips, beef jerky, cheese or lottery tickets that are complementary goods to alcohol. It’s almost like selling peanut butter but no jelly. This is not a good business model if you are looking to profit from the operation of a business. So this mind-set would need to change if you want increased profits from liquor store sales. I would like to see these operations sold on the open market for the cost of the inventory and fixtures, plus a little bit of blue sky money for the clientele that will accompany the sale. As for the loss of revenue that would result I consider that to be similar to the loss of a spouse’s income in a marriage. Budgets change according to the times. I know that liquor store profits are used to fund other city operations and that the loss of these funds would create a revenue shortage that either would need to be replaced by increased taxes or by reducing services. But once again we are looking at operating a pool that was built in the early 70’s that is now facing completion from Lifetime Fitness, Cascade Bay, Apple Valley’s pool

on Johnny Cake Road and the pool at the middle school. Similar comparisons can be made concerning other operations that are funded through liquor store profits; they would need another funding source, probably the general fund at this point. But I do not see bonding for yet another building as a desirable choice either.

use your ID at the polls instead of an easily forged utility bill. Despite the claims of the League of Women Voters and their allies, there is no evidence that anyone would be unable to vote because of a Voter ID requirement. The courts have universally found that Voter ID does not create an undue burden.

Edgar Samuelson Farmington

Robert Billings Lakeville

Photo ID bill is common sense

Super rich are paying their share

To the editor: Poll after poll shows that the overwhelming majority of Minnesotans (80 percent or more) want a photo ID requirement for voters. It’s common sense to expect voters to prove their identity and residence. Nothing is better suited for those purposes than a state-issued drivers license or photo ID card. Ninety-nine percent of Minnesotans already have state-issued ID in their pockets and they generally carry it with them all the time. How many people walk around with a utility bill in their pocket? It’s common sense to

To the editor: In response to Joe Niedermayr’s Feb. 3 letter, “About Senator Thompson,” Once again the left loves its rhetoric based on emotions and not fact. Fact, the top wage earners such as Mitt Romney, who Niedermayr says “evade taxes” and “the millionaire capitalist pay very little or no taxes,” is false. According to the National Tax Payers Union, a nonpartisan group, in 2009 the top 1 percent of earners paid 37 percent of all federal income tax, while the top 10 percent of wage earners paid 71 percent of all federal taxes collected. Meanwhile, the bottom 50 percent of taxpayers pay for just 2 percent of total federal revenues. Niedermayr expounds that “the other 99 percent have been made poorer by the rich fleecing us out of our share.” Wealth is not a finite thing as collectivists would lead you to believe. Per capita, the U.S. gross domestic product increased by more than 65 percent since

�� � ������ ������� �� ����� ��� ��������� �� �������� ��� ���� ����� ����� ��� �������� �� ������� ������ ���� �� ���� ���� �����

�����������

����������

���������������

To the editor: In regard to the Minnesota Marriage Protection Amendment, the clergy are uniting and coming out in

Pat Hall Pastor, True Light Covenant Church, which has its office in Apple Valley

Thisweek Farmington Lakeville Contact us at: FARMINGTON NEWS: farmington.thisweek@ecm-inc.com LAKEVILLE NEWS: aaron.vehling@ecm-inc.com SPORTS: andy.rogers@ecm-inc.com AD SALES: ads.thisweek@ecm-inc.com PRODUCTION: graphics.thisweek@ecm-inc.com

��������������������

Amendment protects marriage

Thisweek Newspapers welcomes letters to the editor. Submitted letters must be no more than 350 words. All letters must have the author’s phone number and address for verification purposes. Anonymous letters will not be accepted. Letters reflect the opinion of the author only. Thisweek Newspapers reserves the right to edit all letters. Submission of a letter does not guarantee publication.

��������� �� ������������ ��� ������� � ������ ��� �������� ��������� ����������� � ����������� ����������� ��� ����� ���� ������ ����������

����� ��� ������� �� ��������� ����

BILL FREDERICKS Lakeville

defense of the definition of marriage. We are teaching and preaching to inform our members as to the long-term effect this decision will have in our culture. We are not allowing a few to redefine that which has existed long before the state of Minnesota. Marriage is and has always been between one man and one woman. It would simply be inappropriate to append something so different to that which is already so well defined. The Minnesota Marriage Protection Amendment was not created to disrespect any particular community or prevent others from having committed relationships. The Minnesota Marriage Protection Amendment was created to protect that which has always been defined as a relationship between one man and one woman. My appeal to our community is that we protect marriage as a vital part of our tradition and our heritage. I also appeal to those on both sides of this issue to respectfully agree to disagree on this matter yet agree to unite and protect those rights that are so near and dear to our forefathers. The Minnesota Marriage Protection Amendment is not intended to be an act of war, rather, it is simply intended to protect, treasure and cherish that which has always been.

Letters to the editor policy

������� ����� ������ ���� �������

���������� � �������� ���������� � �������� ������������

1979 – growth that translates to $26,000 per household. If all that money had gone to the richest 10th of the population, they would now hold more than 60 percent of the national income. That’s nearly twice as much as the super rich actually have. “Thompson does not want to pay any big money for the talent of teachers.” Fact, based on December 2011 Bureau of Labor Statistics, nationally public school teachers receive greater average hourly compensation in wages and benefits than any other group of state and local government workers, and receive more than twice as much in average hourly wages and benefits as workers in private industry. Thompson as do I, favor paying good teachers well, but based on merit through student performance, not on a teacher’s level of education or union tenure. If one is so opposed to our capitalistic free society and how it has helped make our country the greatest in the world, be assured many socialistic countries would love to embrace you. Instead of forcing your ideology on us, consider packing your belongings and moving to say, Greece. (How’s their ideology working out for them?)

Managing Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tad Johnson / John Gessner Publisher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julian Andersen President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marge Winkelman General Manager/Editor . . . . . . Larry Werner Farmington/District 192 Editor. Laura Adelmann Lakeville/District 194 Editor. . Aaron Vehling

Thisweekend Editor. . . . . . . . . Andrew Miller Photo Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rick Orndorf Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andy Rogers Sales Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mike Jetchick Office Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ellen Reierson

BURNSVILLE OFFICE 12190 County Road 11 Burnsville, MN 55337 952-894-1111 fax: 952-846-2010 www.thisweeklive.com Office Hours: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. M-Th, 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Friday


THISWEEK February 17, 2012

State granted federal education mandate waiver Action gives District 194 more flexibility, officials say

by Aaron Vehling Thisweek Newspapers

The Lakeville public school district will have some more flexibility with regard to student assessments. Last week President Barack Obama announced that Minnesota will be one of 10 states to have a waiver from the No Child Left Behind federal education mandate. “While we are fortunate to have experienced strong performance on accountability tests, the current NCLB system has made it more and more difficult to meet the needs of those students most in need of academic help,” said Jason Molesky, assessment and accountability coordinator for Lakeville Area Public Schools. The waiver exempts Minnesota from requiring all students to be 100 percent proficient in reading and math by 2014, but districts are not completely off the hook. Districts are still required to set targets for improving achievement among all students, according to the district. In addition, as was done Diabetes/from 1A him, ensuring his diet and play are offset by the correct amount of insulin. Charlie is a fourth-grader at Oak Hills Elementary. Kathy lauded school nurse Nancy Miller for her attentiveness and “intuition” with regard to Charlie. “I know he’s in good hands,” Kathy said. “She does a fantastic job. I know he’s safe.” Charlie visits Miller’s office about four or five times a day. Diabetes is a high-maintenance disease. “There is no vacation,” Phil said. “Managing diabetes is more of an art than it is a science.” As as stay-at-home mother, Kathy is able to keep close watch on the activities of her kids to ensure they don’t overdo it. Strenuous play or a stray treat can upset the deli-

under NCLB, districts must still develop effective teacher and principal evaluation mechanisms, reward the best performing schools while helping those that are underperforming. Another expectation is preparing students for future education and career opportunities. “The approval of this waiver will allow our district to better meet the needs of our struggling students by giving us the flexibility to spend Title I dollars for student support, rather than set it aside for federal mandates,” Molesky said. The Minnesota Department of Education implemented exams called the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments to carry out the NCLB law. Districts would need to improve on the previous year’s scores in a number of demographic categories in order to meet Adequate Yearly Progress. Lakeville has, for the bulk of the life of the law, met AYP in most demographic subgroups. Last year, all of the groups made AYP, resulting overall in students achieving

87 percent proficiency in reading and 73 percent in math. In years past, tests for those subjects are administered in grades three through eight. In high school, reading tests are given during the sophomore year and math tests are given during the junior year. Officials looked at not only how a collective body of students perform, but also how those subgroups did in certain areas. Sometimes even one subgroup of students performing poorly on tests can label an entire school or district as “needs improvement.” “The new accountability model will not only identify schools that are meeting and exceeding proficiency in reading and mathematics,” Molesky said, “but also recognize those schools in which students are making significant progress and schools in which the achievement gap is closing.” The law has been up for renewal since 2007, but federal lawmakers have not been able to agree on a plan to revamp it.

cate balance. “There’s a constant worry. Diabetes is always on your mind,” Kathy said. Some of the culinary benefits of childhood, such as pizza, candy and soda, are dangerous territory for Jack and Charlie. A spirited ball game or even tag could be enough to throw things off kilter. Blood-sugar testing occurs at points throughout the day, including at midnight and 3 a.m. This means that Kathy and Phil must work in shifts if they ever intend to get sleep, they said. JDRF estimates that about three million Americans have Type 1 diabetes. Each year more than 15,000 children are diagnosed with it. According to JDRF, there are a number of warning signs and symptoms that children will exhibit if they have Type 1: extreme thirst;

frequent urination; drowsiness and lethargy; increased appetite; sudden weight loss; sudden vision changes; sugar in the urine; fruity odor on the breath; heavy or labored breathing; and stupor or unconsciousness. To make a tax-deductible donation to Double Trouble, go to www.walk.jdrf.org. For more information about the family, watch its YouTube video at http://bit.ly/postlewaite (link shortened for accessibility). A number of families with diabetic kids attend the JDRF Walk, Kathy said. This creates an atmosphere of camaraderie. “It’s an amazing feeling,” she said. “It’s an amazing day.” Aaron Vehling is at aaron.vehling@ecm-inc.com or www. facebook.com/thisweeklive.

U.S. Rep. John Kline, RLakeville, who chairs the House Education and Workforce Committee, criticized the waivers, which are an executive order from the Obama administration. While agreeing that states should be able to opt out of the federal NCLB legislation, Kline told Minnesota Public Radio that the administration’s bypassing of Congress was “terrible overreach.” It is still early in the process to determine the full impact of the waiver on Lakeville, but Molesky is optimistic. “These changes in accountability measures will allow us to celebrate the positive things that are happening in schools,” he said, “rather than focusing solely on increasing proficiency targets.”

������ ��� �� ������ �������� ���� ����

������� ������� ���� ����� ��� ��� ����������

������������

� ������ �� ��� ������� ������ ��������

Aaron Vehling is at aaron.vehling@ecm-inc.com or www. facebook.com/thisweeklive.

������ ������������ ������ �� ������� ���� �� ���������� �� ������������ ����� ����� ����� ����� ���������� �� ����� �� ����� ������

������������

�� ����� � ��� ������ � ������� ����

������ ����������

��������

�� ��������

�������� ��� ���� ������ ��� ��������� ������������ ��� �������� �������

������ ����� ���� ��������

���

����� ����

��������������� �������� � ��������� ������ ��� ���

� ��� � �� ��� ��� ���� � ��� ������ ���� ��������� ���� ����� ����������

���� ��� ���� ������

��� ����� ������

�� �������������

����� �������

��������� ��� � ���

��� ��� ������ � ��� ��� ���� �� �� ����

���� ��� �������� �� � ����������

������� ����� ��� ����� ���� ��� ����� ������� ����� ����������� ����� ������� ���� ��� ����

����� �������� ���� ���������� �� ����� ���� ������������ ��������������������

5A

��� ��������� ������ � ������ �������������

���������� �������� �����

������������� ������� � ���������

������� ��� ����� � ���� ������� �������

�������� ���� � ������

������� ����� �������

����������������������

������������


6A

February 17, 2012 THISWEEK

Revised facilities plan scales down school projects System repairs at new high school included

by Laura Adelmann Thisweek Newspapers

A revised facilities plan proposed for Farmington schools includes improvements at the district’s oldest and newest operating schools. Most of the Facility Task Force’s revised proposal is dedicated to improvements at Farmington Elementary School, which opened in 1965. At FES, revised plans dedicate $8.176 million to projects that include expanding kindergarten rooms, remodeling the cafeteria/kitchen and loading dock improvements. Also recommended at FES are mechanical systems replacements, roof work, repair of deteriorating infrastructure and asbestos removal. District Finance Director Carl Colmark said it “would have been nice” to do everything originally proposed at the school, including adding commons spaces and special education suites, but the district does not have the money for it. “At $12 million, you’re getting at the point, I think, where you should just build an entire elementary school,” Col-

mark told the Farmington School Board at a Feb. 13 meeting. The task force recommends FES and Akin Road Elementary receive card readers for staff to use at entrances. It’s the same technology that already exists at both middle schools and the high school and is planned for all schools within three years. At Farmington High School, the district’s newest school, having opened in 2009, the plan calls for $925,000 to address facilities issues. Proposed is $600,000 to completely enclose a noisy chiller behind the high school. The equipment is supposed to run constantly, but is turned on only during school hours because neighbors complained about the noise. Jim Skelly, district communications and marketing director, said noise produced by the chiller violates state noise standards and other remedies have failed to rectify the problem. Enclosing the structure, he said, “is definitely going to calm things down.” Other improvements at

�������� ������ ������ ������ ������������� ������ ���������

������ ��������� ��� ����� ������ ���

������������ ���� ����� ������ ���������

FHS include venting science rooms and repairing heating and venting systems at the FHS recital hall. At Akin Road Elementary, projects originally proposed to cost $4.3 million have been scaled down to include some remodeling and mechanical system upgrades for $1.3 million. Remodeling science rooms at Boeckman Middle School is recommended at a cost of $397,150. Most of the proposed facilities plan is to be funded with money remaining from a bond referendum voters approved for a sixth elementary school. After the housing crash, the Farmington School Board redirected the funds to facilities needs. The School Board is expected to vote on the revised facilities plan at its Feb. 27 workshop, although Colmark said the plan only addresses a fraction of his concerns for district buildings. Colmark said deterioration in district buildings is occurring at a rate of $5 million to $6 million per year and funding resources are few. “If we’re not successful with legislation in getting some funding to address the needs in our schools, we’re going to have to consider perhaps going to the community and asking for a vote,” Colmark said. Laura Adelmann is at laura.adelmann@ecm-inc. com.

������� ���� ���������

��� �������� �������� ������ ���������

������� � ������ ��� ����� �������� �������� � ���� ������ ��������� � ������ ��� � �������

���� �������

����� �� ��������� ����� ������� ���� ������������������

������ �����

����� �� ��������� ����� ������� ���� ����������������

���� �� ��� � ���� ������������ ������� � ����� ������� � ����� � ��������� ���� � �������� � ��������� ����������� � ������� �������� � �������� � ���� ������ �������

����� �������� ��������� ���������� ����� �� ��������� ������ ����� ���� ���������������������

���� ����

���������������

�������������

Full grocery store coming to Farmington Savers Choice to become Family Fresh Market

by Laura Adelmann Thisweek Newspapers

Farmington is going to have a full-service grocery store once again. Savers Choice will be converted to Family Fresh Market and will carry a full variety of grocery items, along with fresh perishables, said Brian Numainville, public relations officer with Nash Finch, the store’s parent company. Farmington Mayor Todd Larson welcomed the news, stating that shoppers had been frustrated with the lack of choices and brand-names at the Savers Choice store. “People are saying they can start shopping for groceries in Farmington again,” Larson said. Savers Choice had primarily carried store-label products and was not consistent in the type of inventory it carried. “This change is a direct result of feedback from the community about what is

Photo by Laura Adelmann

Responding to customer preferences, Savers Choice in Farmington will be transformed into a full grocery store and will be called Family Fresh Market. important in their local grocery store and we are excited to respond to these suggestions,” Numainville said. He did not offer a timeline for the change, but said the company is still working on details of the switch and will make them public once they are finalized.

“The store will remain open and continue to serve customers throughout the transformation to Family Fresh Market,” he said. Laura Adelmann is at laura. adelmann@ecm-inc.com.

Holyoke bottleneck solution planned

Downtown Lakeville intersection could get a turn lane To achieve the expansion, the City Council recently approved the authorization of a grant application with the Dakota County Community Development Agency to purchase the vacant home on the southwest corner of the intersection, which needs to be demolished for the lane expansion plan to proceed. The property recently went into foreclosure, said Dave Olson, Lakeville’s community and economic development director. The cost to acquire and demolish the vacant property – duplex, garage and all – is $90,000. The CDA grant would provide a third of the

by Aaron Vehling Thisweek Newspapers

The city of Lakeville is pursuing the addition of a turn lane to Holyoke Avenue south of 210th Street downtown. That northbound portion of Holyoke encounters frequent bottlenecks. Whereas southbound Holyoke has two turn lanes, northbound has none. The heavy traffic load stemming from McGuire Middle School and JFK Elementary, and the problems encountered during trips, led Lakeville Public Schools to approach the city in 2010 to seek a solution, according to city documents.

cost. The city would pay the balance with either the CDA’s tax increment financing dollars or the city’s economic development fund. City Administrator Steve Mielke said at a recent work session that the city is pursuing demolition of just that neglected, foreclosed property on the corner of the intersection and is “not looking to take people’s homes.” The street improvements would most likely begin in 2013. Aaron Vehling is at aaron.vehling@ecm-inc.com or www.facebook.com/ thisweeklive.

������ �������� � ��� ���������� ��� ���� ��� �� ��� �� ������� ���� �������

���� �� ��� �

����

����������� ����� ��� ������ ���� ����� ����� ���

����� ������� ���������

����� ���������� ����� � ��������� �������� ����� �

���������� ����� �

����� ��������� � ������ ������ ����� ����� ����� ����� ������ �������� ���� ������ � ������

�������� ����� ������ ��� ��� ������� ���������� ������ ���� ������ � ������

�������� ����� �� ������� ��� ����� � ������ ����� ������� ������ ������ ��������� ������ � ���� ���� ������ � ������

���� ������������ �� ��������

�� ���� ���� ��� ��� ����� � ����� ����� �� ���� ������ �������� � �������� ���� ������� ������� � ��������� ������� ��� ��� ��������� � ��� ���� ����� ������ ��

������� ��������� �����

����� �������� ������ ����������� �� ����� ������������������������

���������� ������� ������� ������ ����������� ����� ������ ����������


THISWEEK February 17, 2012

������������� �����������

Kuhlmann Trudeau Marlan and Sharon Kuhlmann of Eagan, MN are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Elise Kathleen, to Ryan Trudeau. Ryan is the son of Paul and Ann Trudeau, Apple Valley, MN. The bride-to-be is a 2007 graduate of Eastview High School. She graduated from University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse with a degree in Recreational Therapy. She currently is employed as a Therapeutic Programs Director with Augustana Care Facility in Hastings. The future groom is a 2006 graduate of Eastview High School. He graduated from Winona State University with a degree in Management Information Systems. He currently is employed as a Software Engineer with Thomson Reuters in Eagan. The couple is planning a June 2012 wedding in Minneapolis, MN.

To submit an announcement

Happy 5th Birthday Quinn!! She’s cute and sweet, smart and caring; creative, independent, silly and daring! You are the sunshine in our lives - we love you, Mom, Dad and Dylan

���������� Robert H. Thurmes Age 37 of Hampton, MN. passed away on 2/11/12. Robbie is the son of Harry and Connie. Siblings Sandy (Joe) Wall, Jane, Lori and Mike Thurmes. Niece Kelsey Wall. Preceded in death by brother John and his grandparents. He resided at Dakota Communities in Eagan, MN. Robbie was born with special needs. Visitation was 4-7pm Tuesday 2/14/12 at White Funeral Home, 901 3rd St. Farmington, MN. Mass of Christian Burial, was held 10:30AM Wednesday, 2/15/12 at St. Mathias Catholic Church in Hampton, MN. Visitation was one hour prior to Mass at church. White Funeral Home Farmington 651-463-7374 www.whitefuneralhomes.com

��������

more than 50,000 homes in Dakota County. It was later divided into six newspapers serving individual cities: Burnsville, Eagan, Apple Valley, Rosemount, Lakeville and Farmington. Thisweek and the Tribune were owned by the Clay family of Farmington until ECM purchased the newspaper group in 1999 along with the Lakevillebased Life & Times, which was owned by Dick Sherman. The Current, by 1982, was publishing five separate newspapers for Burnsville, Eagan, Apple ValleyLakeville-Rosemount, Prior Lake and Bloomington. In 1983, Californiabased FNCO purchased Current Newspapers Inc. and combined it with other suburban newspaper companies in the Twin Cities area. The companies have changed hands several times, eventually being acquired by American Community Newspapers of Dallas, Texas. The Dakota County paper was renamed the SunCurrent to reflect one of its merger partners, Sun Newspapers. Today, Thisweek publishes the Dakota County Tribune and three editions of Thisweek: LakevilleFarmington, Burnsville-Eagan and Apple Valley-Rosemount. Thisweek’s total circulation is about 60,000. The Sun Current has been distributing a similar number of papers in two editions: Burnsville-Lakeville and Eagan-Apple Valley-Rosemount. Minnesota Sun Newspapers has a wide footprint across the metropolitan area and beyond. After the merger between Thisweek and the Sun-Current, Minnesota Sun will publish 30 newspapers and two shoppers.

����� �����

��� �� �� �

Timothy Kniefel and Jennifer Wahlstrom were happily married on September 24, 2011 in Bloomington, MN. Timothy is son of Todd and Jane Kniefel of Webster, MN. Jennifer is daughter of Roger and Karen Wahlstrom of Burnsville, MN. Couple resides in New Market, MN.

� �� ��

����� �� ��

Kniefel Wahlstrom

��� �� �����

Forms for birth, engagement, wedding, anniversary and obituaries announcements are available at our office and online at www.thisweeklive.com (click on “Announcements” and then “Send Announcement”). Com­pleted forms may be e-mailed to class. thisweek@ecm-inc.com or mailed to Thisweek Newspapers, 12190 County Road 11, Burnsville, MN 55337. If you are submitting a photograph along with your announcement, please only submit photographs for which you have the right to permit Thisweek Newspapers to use and publish. Deadline for announcements is 4 p.m. Tuesday. A fee of $50 will be charged for the first 5 inches and $10 per inch thereafter. They will run in all editions of Thisweek Newspapers. Photos may be picked up at the office within 60 days or returned by mail if a self-addressed, stamped envelope is provided.

���������

Thisweek/from 1A

����� �� ������� �� �������� �������

���� ������������ ��������� ���� ������ ������� ���� � ����� ��������� ������� ���� ������������ ������

�������� ������������� �������� � ����������� ������ ��������� ���� ����� ��������� �������������������������������

� ����� ����� ��������� ����������

���������

�������� � ���� �� ���� �� � ����� ���

������������ ������������

7A

����� ������� ����� ������

������ ������ ����� �� ���������

PUBLIC NOTICE

����� ��� ����

Annual Town Meeting and Election of Officers Notice is hereby given to the qualified voters of Credit River Township, in the County of Scott, State of Minnesota, that the Annual Election of Town Officers and Annual Meeting will be held on Tuesday, March 13, 2012. The Election will be held at the Credit River Town Hall at 18985 Meadow View Blvd. Polls will open at 7:00 am and close at 8:00 pm to elect the following town officers: Supervisor Seat A for a three (3) year term Supervisor Seat D for a three (3) year term The Annual Meeting will commence at 8:30 pm on March 13, at the Legends Club, located at 8670 Credit River Blvd., Prior Lake, MN 55372 to conduct all necessary town business as prescribed by law. If inclement weather should occur on the above scheduled date, the Annual Meeting and Election would be held on the third Tuesday in March at the above scheduled times and places. Cathy Haugh (/s) Township Clerk Credit River Township Posted February 14, 2012 at 9:00am 2909811 2/17-24/12

���� �������� ������ ���� �� ������ ������ ��������� ����� ��� ���� ������������ �� �������

�� ����� ���������� ���� �� ��� ������� ���� �� ���� ��������� ���� �����

���� ������� ���� ���������� ���� � ���� ��� ���

����� �������� ��������� �� ���

���� ���������� ���� � ���� ��� ���

��� �����

������� ������ ���������� ��������� �� ���

Today’s The Day Stop Smoking ������ ����� ��������

������

�������

��

��

���� ���������� ����������� �����

��������� � ����� ����� ���������� ��� �������� � ��� ��� ������ ��������� � �� �� � ������ ����� ����� ��� ������� �����

������������ �������� ������� ��� ����� �� ���� ������ ���� ���� � ����� ������� �������� ��������� ��������� �� ������ ��� � ������ ��� �� ������ �� ����� ��������� ������ ���������� ������ ��� ���� �������� ��� �� ������ ����� ���� �������� ������

������������ ���������

��

��������� �

������ �������� ������

� �������� ������� � ��������� ���� ����� ����

������������

���� ���� � ������

��� ������� �����

����� ������� ������ � ��� ��� �� �������� ������ ��������������� ����� ����������� ��������� � ������������� �� ���������� �� ������ ����� ��������� �� ��������� ����� ����� ����� ����������� �������� ����� ������� ���������� ���������� �� �� ���������� �����

����� ���� �������� ���� ������� ������ �� ��� ���� ������ ���� ��������� ����� �������� ������� ��� ������ �� ����� ��������� ������ ���������� ������ ��� ���� �������� ��� �� ������ ������

��� ���� �������

��� �������� ������ ������

���� �����

���� ������� ��������� � ����� ��� ����� � �� �� � ������ ����� ����� ��� ������� ����� � �������� ���� �������� � ����� ������ ����� �� ��� � ����� � ������ ���� ���� �������� �� ����� ��������� ������������� � ������� ��� ����� ������� ��������� ��� ����������� � ��� ��� ��� ����� ����� ��� ���� � ������� ��� ����� ��� ����� ��� ������ ��� ������ ������� � ����� ���������� � �������� ���� ������� ������ � �������� ���

������������ �������� ������� ��� ����� �� ���� ������ ���� ���� � ����� ������� �������� ��������� ��������� �� ������ ��� � ������ ��� �� ������ �� ����� ��������� ������ ���������� ������ ��� ���� �������� ��� �� ������ ����� ���� �������� ������

�� ���� ��������� ������� ������� � ����� � ����� � ������ � ������ � ������ � ������ � ������ �� ����

��� ���� ������� ��� ��������� ���������

� ���� ��� ������ ��� ������ ��� ������ ���

���� ������� ������ �� ��� ���� ������ ���� ��������� �� ����� ��������� ������ ���������� ������ ��� ���� ��������� �� �� ������ ������� ��� �� ������ ����� ���� ��������

������

��������� ��������� ���� ��� ����

����� ������� ����

������������

������� ������ ����� � ����

�� ���

������� �����

���������

� ����� � ����� �������� ��� �� � ������� ������������� � �������� ���� ������� ������ � �������� ��� � ������� ����� ����� ����� � ����� � ������� ������� ����������� ����� ���� �������� ���� ������� ������ �� ��� ���� ������ ���� ��������� ����� �������� ������� ��� ������ �� ����� ��������� ������ ���������� ������ ��� ���� �������� ��� �� ������ ������

������ ��������� ������ ������ ����� ������ ������ ������� ��� ���� ��� ������ ��������� ���������� ������� ���� ��� ��� ��������

���� ��� ��� ������ �������� ���������� ����� ��

� ������ �������� ������ ������ � ���� ������� ����� � ������ �� ����� �������� ����� ����� ������ � � ���������� �� ����� ��������


8A

February 17, 2012 THISWEEK

Senior Spotlight

Baby boomers: Protect your retirement nest egg StatePoint – For the more than 70 million Baby Boomers approaching retirement, the road to their financial goals has become much cloudier than for previous generations. With benefits such as Social Security and employer pensions less certain, it is up to those approaching, or at, retirement, to choose the right strategy and information sources for making responsible decisions. “Boomers are living longer and more active lives and should consider taking greater responsibility for the protection of their retirement savings so they don’t outlive their nest eggs,” says Holly Burgess, vice president of strategy and marketing communications, Liberty Mutual. “It’s important to create a safe retirement savings strategy customized to your needs.” There are several things Boomers can do to help safeguard their retirement. Plan and Protect – Focus on protecting your nest egg via conservative investments. Start by asking what “safety” means to you. Are you seeking to protect your principal from

stock market volatility or looking for protection from taxation as you grow your assets? Is your top priority planning for the unforeseen, such as funds for future medical emergencies? According to the U.S. Department of Labor, almost 20 percent of retiree income will be spent on health care. Knowing this will help you decide where to invest the portion of your nest egg you aim to safeguard. Think Conservatively – An easy rule of thumb is that you’ll need to replace 70 to 90 percent of your pre-retirement income, say the experts at the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards. Your asset allocation may change over time, the CFP Board points out. As you age you may opt to limit exposure to riskier investments like stocks by investing more conservatively. Choose Safely – For the portion of retirement savings you want to protect for near-term use, consider safer options. Many financial planners are advising older Ameri-

cans to consider conservative alternatives like Certificates of Deposit, Fixed Income Funds and Fixed Deferred Annuities. Unlike more volatile investments, Fixed Deferred Annuities protect your principal while providing the opportunity to generate regular, periodic income. These products are offered by insurance companies and pay a fixed, guaranteed interest rate for an initial period. The rate may change later but cannot drop below a guaranteed minimum. Unlike many investments, interest earned on an annuity is tax deferred. It is important to consider an insurer’s financial strength and to choose an annuity that allows you to customize it and access funds when you need them. Take Control – Mark McVeigh, senior vice president of marketing and distribution for Liberty Mutual, said people should not sacrifice control over the design and price of the product they purchase. Photo submitted People should understand any risks or sacrifices Like following a road map to reach their destination, seniors should chose their investments involved with each product. in retirement after understanding the implications of all the decisions they will make.

Seniors Hayes Community and Senior Center, 14603 Hayes Road, Apple Valley, MN 55124; (952) 953-2300; e-mail: parks@ c i . ap p l e - va l l e y. m n . u s ; Web site: www.ci.applev a l l e y. u s / P a r k s / P r o grams_and _Activities/ Seniors/main.html Burnsville Senior Center at Diamondhead Edu-

cation Center, 296 W. Burnsville Pkwy., Burnsville, MN; (952) 707-4120; Web site www.communityed191.org then click on Burnsville Senior Center Farmington Community Senior Center, 325 Oak Street, Farmington, MN 55024; (651) 463-4828, Web site: www. ci.farmington.mn.us/

P&R_seniors.htm Eagan Senior Center, Eagan Community Center, 1501 Central Pkwy., Eagan, MN 55121; (651) 675-5500; Web site www. ci.eagan.mn.us go to Parks and Recreation and 55 Plus and Seniors Hastings Area Senior Center, Westview Center, 213 Ramsey St., Hastings,

��� ����� �������� ����� �� ��� �������� �� ��� ����� ���� ����� ���������� ��� ��� ������� ���� � ���� �� ��� ��� ����� ������ �������

��� �������� ���� ��� ������ ��� � ��� ����� �������

� ���

� �� �� ��������� ��� �� ����� ��� ��� ������ ���� ���� ���������

������� ����� ��� ������ ������� ����� ���� ��� ��������� ������� �� ��� ���� �������� ������ ���� ��� ������� ����� ��� ���� ������� ��� ���� ������� ���� ��� ���� �� ����������� ����� ����� ��� ���� ��� ������� ��� ���������� ���� ������ ������ ���� ������� ��� ������ ��� �� ����� ���� ��� ���� ���� �� ��� ������ ���� ���� ����������� �� ����� ������ �������� �� ��� ���� ���� �� ������� �������� ��������� ���������� ������������ ��� ��������� ���� ��������� ���� ��� ������ �� ������������� ���� �� ����� ������ �������� ���� ���������� ��� ������ ������� ��� �������

�������� ��� �������� ��� �������� ����� ���� ���� �������� �� ������� �� ���� �� ���� ���� ����� ����� �� ������ �������� �������� �������� ��� ������������� ��� �������� ��� �� �� ���������� �� ���� ������������ ���� ������ ��� ���� �� ������� �������� ������ ���� ������ �� ���� ���������� ����� �������� ������ �� ��� ��������� � ���������������� ��������� ���� �������� ����� ���������� �� ����� ���� ��� ���� �������� ����� �� ������� ���� ��� �� ��� ������� ���� �������� �������� ���� �� ���� �� ��� ���� ������� ������� ���������� �� ��� ������ ��� ��������� �� ��������� ����� ����� ���������� �� ��� ������� ��� ����� �� �� ��������� �� ���� ���� ��� �� ��������� �������� ������� �� ���� ������ ��� �� ���� ������������ ��������� ���� ������ ������ ��� ������ ��������� �� ��������� ���� ����� ��� ���������� ������ ���������� ���� ���� ���������� ���� ������� �� ��������� �������������� ��� ���� ��������� �� ��� ��� ������� �������� �� ���� ��� ��� ��������� �� ������� �� ������ ��� ��������� ���������� ��������� �������� ��� ����� ��� �������� ����������� ������� ������

����� �������������������� �� ���� �� �� �������� ���� ���� �������������

�������������� ��������� ����������

������

������ ������ � ������� � �� � � �� ��������� � �� � ��� ������� � �������� ����� ��� ������� �� ������ ���� � ��������

����������

��������

������

MN 55033; (651) 4380750 Inver Grove Heights Seniors, Veterans Memorial and the Grove Community Center, 8055 Barbara Ave., Inver Grove Heights, MN 55077; (651) 450-2469 Lakeville Senior Center, 20732 Holt Ave., Lakeville, MN 55044;

(952) 985-4622; Web site: www.ci.lakeville.mn.us/ go to Parks and Recreation and Seniors Rosemount Area Seniors Do Drop Inn, Rosemount Community Center, 13855 South Robert Trail, Rosemount, MN 55068; (651) 3226000; Web site http:// ci.rosemount.mn.us go to

Parks and Recreation and Seniors Senior Adult Services, ISD 196 Community Education, 14011 Pilot Knob Road, Apple Valley, MN 55124; (952) 423-7663 Thompson Park Activity Center, 1200 Stassen Lane, West St. Paul, MN 55118; (651) 552-4150

����� ���� �� ���� ��������� ���� ����� �� �������������� � ���� ������ �� ������ ��������� ������������ ���������� ������������ �������� ��� �������� ���� ������ � ���������� �������� ���� ��� ��� ���������� ������ ���� ���� ��������� � ��������� �� ��� ���� � ����� ���� �������� �� �� ���� � ��� ����� ���������� ���� ������������ ���� �������� ����� �������� ��� � ������������� ������� ������ ������ ����� �������� ���� � ����� ��������� ����������� ���������� ���� �������� �� � ��������� �������� ���������� ��� ��� ��������� ����� �� ���� � ��������� ����������� ��� ����������� ����� ���� ��� ��� ��� � ����������� ���������� ���� ��� �������� ���� ������� �������� ���� �������� ��������� � ����������� �������� ���������� �� ������ ��� �� ���� ����� �� �������� � ������� ����� ��� ������� �� ����������� ���� �������� ���� �� ���������� ��� ����������� ������ �� ��� ������ ������ ��� ���������� �� �������� �������� ��� ������� ������������ �������� ���� �� ��� � ���� ����� �� ������� ������������ ��� ������

����� ����� ����� ���� ����������� �� �� ��� �� ������ �� ������� �� � ����� ����� �����

� ����� ����� �� ���� ����

������ ��������� ���

�����������������������������

������� �� ����������� ����������� ������� ��� ��� ���� ����� ��

���������� ������ ������ �� ��� ����� �� ���������� �� ����������� ���������� ����� ���� �� ���������� ���� ������

� � � � ������� ����� � ������� ������� � ��������� � ���������� � �� ����������� �����

���� ��� ������� ��� ���� ����� ����� ��

����� �������� ������� ���������� �� ����� �� �������� � ���� ���� ������������ ��� ������ ��������������������


THISWEEK February 17, 2012

Senior Spotlight

9A

Study finds majority of Minnesotans financially unprepared for long-term care needs

A new poll, conducted on behalf of the Long-Term Care Imperative, reveals a new reality: a majority of Minnesotans (52 percent) have no plan for how they will pay for their long-term health care needs. While individuals are not prepared, there is a strong feeling that the state should be, according to a release from the Long-Term Care Imperative, which is a legislative collaboration between Aging Services of Minnesota and Care Providers of Minnesota, the state’s two long-term care trade associations. According to the poll of likely voters, 52 percent of Minnesotans believe access to long-term care is a right of all Minnesotans. A majority also believe the state should provide assistance to ensure personal

finances are not a barrier to accessing the care necessary to age with dignity. The lack of preparedness is likely not linked to lack of awareness. More than half (57 percent) of Minnesotans report they are or have been caregivers to aging loved ones – a number that increases dramatically to 69 percent of women over age 50. “These numbers are striking in the reality they depict. Minnesotans act as caregivers for loved ones while they are financially unprepared for their own long-term care needs,” said Gayle Kvenvold, president and CEO of Aging Services of Minnesota. “We face a looming economic crisis as our population ages. Now is the time to advance real solutions that will protect access and quality of care for all Minnesota se-

niors and their families.” Four of out of five people, age 65 and older, will need long-term care in their future, with an average cost of $48,000 per year and rising. Results from the poll show that most Minnesotans have little or no savings and are ill-prepared to pay for the true cost of their own care. Less than one-fifth of Minnesotans have long-term care insurance, and most of those who do have insurance or a plan of some kind say it will only cover the basics and not much more. This enormous financial burden forces three-quarters of Minnesota seniors to rely on the state to assist with paying for their care and places a growing financial burden on the state and its long-term care programs.

“These poll results show Minnesotans believe that access to quality long-term care is a right, not a privilege,” Patti Cullen, president and CEO of Care Providers of Minnesota, said. “We must protect Minnesotans’ right to dignified care by ensuring that both individuals and the state are prepared for tomorrow’s seniors.” Sixty-four percent of those polled said they are willing to pay more in taxes to improve services. Additional poll findings include: • 57 percent of Minnesota’s voters are currently, or have in the past been caregivers The poll found that Minnesotans support many different reform options to improve quality and access to care. • 75 percent support a

proposal to allow individuals to cash in life insurance in order to pay for long-term care. • 73 percent support policies that would encourage companies to offer longterm care insurance. • 85 percent support increasing funding for inhome and community based care to make it easier for seniors to stay independent longer. • 77 percent support increasing funding for nursing homes to improve overall quality. Poll findings confirm that Minnesotans need better tools and incentives to plan and pay for their own longterm care, according to the release. As the state’s population ages and baby boomers retire, Imperative officials say it will not be possible for

taxpayer dollars to fund care for three quarters of the elderly, as is the case today. Investing in a robust menu of options for seniors — ranging from occasional in-home services to assisted living to nursing home — benefits both consumers and the state, they say. Higher quality services delivered in more efficient ways will improve outcomes for seniors and save valuable taxpayer dollars, according to Imperative officials. A random sample of 600 registered voters was polled in the telephone survey conducted by Momentum Analysis, over a three-day period in November 2011. This sample size yields results accurate to ±4.0 percent to all registered voters in the state.

Tips for men to stay healthy as they age StatePoint – With age comes wisdom. Unfortunately, it also comes with an increased threat of developing certain health problems. Prostate cancer and other diseases affect a disproportionately large amount of American men. According to the Prostate Cancer Foundation, more than 16 million men are affected by the disease globally, and American men represent nearly 2.5 million of that figure. Given these statistics, American men should be especially vigilant about their health. With a few lifestyle tweaks and attitude adjustments, older men can stay healthy as they age.

Eat right If you’ve eaten a particular way your whole life, you might find it difficult to change. But cutting out the junk in favor of fruits, vegetables and whole grains is well worth the effort. Not only will you look and feel better, certain foods have even been proven to reduce your risk of developing diseases like prostate cancer, coronary heart disease and diabetes. Opt for fish over red meat. Evidence from several studies suggests that fish can help protect against prostate cancer because it contains “good fat,” particularly omega-3 fatty acids. Choose olive oil over margarine. While monounsaturated fat found in olive oil is beneficial to health, trans-fatty acids contained in margarine contribute to clogged arteries, high cholesterol and an increased risk

of stroke and heart attack. Get checked A free nutrition guide and While it’s always importasty recipes are available at tant to be open with your www.pcf.org/nutrition. physician about your health and your family’s health hisStay active tory, starting at age 40 it be A sedentary lifestyle comes crucial. The older you contributes to your risk of are, the more likely you are obesity, heart disease and to be diagnosed with proscancer. You don’t need to tate cancer and other disbecome a marathon run- eases. ner, however, to experience More than 65 percent of benefits from a more active all prostate cancers are diaglifestyle. Start with what you nosed in men over the age of can handle, like a 20-minute 65, according to PCF. walk once a day. Your doctor can help you If you have bad joints, determine your risk of deconsider a low-impact activ- veloping various diseases, ity like swimming. and make recommendations accordingly. Regular doc-

��� ��������� ��������� ��� ����������� ������

� ������ ���� ������ � �������� ���� � ����� ������������ � ������������� � ������� � �������� � ���� �������� � ����������� � ���������� ��������� � ������� � ������ ���� � ���� ��������� �������� � ���� ������� ����������

������� ��� �������� � �������� ���� ������ ��� ����������� ���� �� �����

������������

�����������������������

�� ���� ����� ��� ��������� ���� ����������� ������� �� ����� ����������

���� ����� ���� ������� ������ ���� � ����� ��� �����

���� ������� ������������ ������� ��� ������� ������� �� ������� ����� �������� ��� ��� ������ ���� ���� ����������� �� ����� ���������� ������� �� �� ����� ���� ����� ��� ������ �������� �������� �� ����������� ���� ��� ������ ��������� ��������� ��������

������������������� ������������ �������������������

������������ ���� �� ����� ��� ����������� �� �����

���� ���� ������� ������ ���� ��������� ����� �� ������������� ����� ��� ��������� � ���� �������� ���� ����

tor’s visits are also an important component of early diagnosis. While these tests may not be fun, they can save your life. If you have a history of prostate cancer in your family, consider a yearly rectal examination and a ProstateSpecific Antigen test starting in your 40s, or even earlier if your doctor recommends it. Broader awareness and understanding of the health risks associated with aging can save lives. So don’t shy away from talking to your Photo submitted friends and family about Older men should consider adding exercise to their daily your health, and theirs. activities and be sure to have regular prostate cancer screenings.


Sports 10A

February 17, 2012 THISWEEK

Standings South Suburban Boys Basketball

Team Conference Overall W L W Lakeville North 12 1 20 Eastview 12 1 20 Apple Valley 10 3 17 Eagan 8 5 12 Prior Lake 7 6 11 B Kennedy 5 8 8 Rosemount 4 9 10 Lakeville South 4 9 9 B Jefferson 2 11 5 Burnsville 1 12 1

L 1 1 4 9 10 13 11 12 15 19

Friday, Feb 17 • Lakeville South at Bloomington Jefferson, 7:15 p.m. • Lakeville North at Burnsville, 7:15 p.m. Tuesday, Feb 21 • Lakeville North at Bloomington Jefferson, 7:15 p.m. • Bloomington Kennedy at Lakeville South, 7:15 p.m. Friday, Feb 24 • Eastview at Lakeville South, 7:15 p.m. • Apple Valley at Lakeville North, 7:15 p.m. Tuesday, Feb 28 • Lakeville South at Eagan, 7:15 p.m. • Rosemount at Lakeville North, 7:15 p.m.

Panther wrestlers have high expectations for section meet Lakeville North makes drastic improvements in 2012 by Andy Rogers Thisweek Newspapers

The Lakeville North wrestling team has already had a season to remember. The Panthers are a contender for one of the top spots with the No. 3 seed at the Section 2AAA meet at Farmington this weekend. Lakeville North’s toughest competitors come from the southwestern suburbs. Prior Lake, who has qualified for state for three times in the past six years, is one of the favorites, along with Shakopee. Both programs are ranked in the

top 10 in Class AAA. Prior Lake edged out Lakeville North in December 38-32 and Shakopee defeated the Panthers 44-33. Last season the Panthers lost by 40-plus points to both Prior Lake and Shakopee, so the gap is closing. “This year both matches went down to heavyweight,” Panther co-head coach Paul Donner said. “We hope to take the next step at sections and be on the winning side against both teams. We will have tough teams to get through prior to Shakopee

or Prior Lake.” Much has happened since the Panthers wrestled both Shakopee and Prior Lake. Cole Duckworth was lost for the season with an injury, but a few other wrestlers have since regained their health. “We are hoping to put our best lineup against both teams,” Donner said. “We feel we can compete. We have improved. With our best performance, good health, and a little luck, we believe we can win sections. That’s our goal.”

No team from Lakeville has ever qualified for state as a team. The Panthers have wrestled well in tournaments in 2012. Lakeville North won its own Panther Duals on Feb. 3, defeating Monticello 49-24 for first place. North also won the Farmington Tiger Duals on Jan. 7, finished third at the Richfield/ Edina Invite on Jan. 14 and second at the South St. Paul Invitational Jan. 28. “I am most pleased with how hard the wrestlers have worked in the offseason and during the current sea-

son,” Donner said. “Some of our wrestlers have gone from single-digit winners to pushing 30 wins this season. That is what coaches find most gratifying.” The Panthers have about six wrestlers approaching 30 wins. If the Panthers fall short as a team, there’s always the individual meet Feb. 24-25 in Shakopee. The Panthers have a number of favorites including Collin Degrammont at 106 pounds and Anton Kalista at 160. Kalista was sixth at state See Panthers, 11A

Girls Basketball Team Conference Overall W L W B Kennedy 13 2 18 Eastview 13 2 18 Lakeville North 11 4 15 Prior Lake 9 6 12 Apple Valley 7 8 12 B Jefferson 7 8 9 Burnsville 4 11 9 Lakeville South 4 11 9 Eagan 4 11 7 Rosemount 3 12 8

L 4 5 8 11 11 14 14 14 16 15

Friday, Feb 17 • Bloomington Jefferson at Lakeville South, 7:15 p.m. • Burnsville at Lakeville North, 7:15 p.m. Tuesday, Feb 21 • Lakeville South at Bloomington Kennedy, 7:15 p.m. • Bloomington Jefferson at Lakeville North, 7:15 p.m. Thursday, Feb 23 • Lakeville South at Eastview, 7:15 p.m. Friday, Feb 24 • Lakeville North at Apple Valley, 7:15 p.m.

Boys Hockey Team Conference Overall W L T W L T Eagan 14 0 1 20 2 1 Burnsville 10 3 1 14 8 1 Lakeville South 11 4 0 15 8 0 Prior Lake 7 6 0 14 9 0 Apple Valley 7 6 2 10 11 2 B Jefferson 6 7 2 6 14 3 Lakeville North 6 8 0 11 12 0 Eastview 3 10 0 9 13 1 Rosemount 1 14 0 4 19 0 B Kennedy 0 7 0 5 18 0 Saturday, Feb 18 • Lakeville South at Burnsville, 3 p.m. • Lakeville North Bloomington Jefferson, 3 p.m.

Photo submitted by Mary Klans

The Lakeville North competition cheer team competes at nationals in Florida.

Girls Hockey

Wednesday, Feb. 8 • Lakeville North 13, Rochester Century 1 • Lakeville South 5, Owatonna 0 Satuday, Feb. 11 • Lakeville North 7, KassonMantorville 1 • Lakeville South 4, Rochester Mayo 0 Thursday, Feb. 16 • Lakeville North vs. Lakeville South Thursday, Feb. 23 • Lakeville South/Lakeville North winner at Class AA state tournament, Xcel Energy Center, St. Paul

Missota

Boys Basketball Team Conference Overall W L W L Chanhassen 8 1 16 5 New Prague 7 2 15 6 Chaska 7 3 13 9 Holy Angels 4 4 10 8 Shakopee 4 6 8 14 Farmington 3 5 7 13 Red Wing 3 6 8 13 Northfield 0 9 5 15 Tuesday, Feb. 21 • Farmington at Chaska, 7:30 p.m.

Girls Basketball Team Conference Overall W L W L Chanhassen 11 0 20 3 New Prague 8 3 16 7 Red Wing 6 5 16 7 Shakopee 6 5 13 9 Chaska 6 5 9 14 Farmington 4 7 6 16 Northfield 3 8 12 11 Holy Angels 0 11 5 18 Tuesday, Feb. 21 • Chaskat at Farmington, 7:30 p.m.

Boys Hockey Team Conference Overall W L T W L T Chanhassen 11 1 1 18 4 1 Holy Angels 10 2 2 10 12 2 New Prague 10 3 0 13 10 1 Red Wing 6 5 1 10 12 1 Northfield 5 7 1 12 10 1 Farmington 4 8 1 7 14 2 Shakopee 2 11 0 4 19 1 Chaska 1 12 0 4 20 0 Tuesday, Feb. 21 • Section 1AA hockey Thursday, Feb. 24 • Section 1AA hockey

Girls Hockey Wednesday, Feb. 8 • Kasson Mantorville 3, Farmington 0

North cheer squad brings home silver medal from nationals Girls attain highest finish in school history at Disney World in Orlando, Fla.

by Andy Rogers Thisweek Newspapers

The Lakeville North competition cheer team proved it can pull off a stunt with the best in the nation last week. The girls finished second at the National High School Cheerleading Championship at Disney World in Orlando, Fla., in the small non-tumbling category behind a team from Clarksville, Tenn. It

was the best finish ever for Lakeville North. Last year, North participated in the medium tumbling division at nationals, but just missed the cut in the semifinals. To get to state the team had to qualify, but they missed the cut in the Minnesota round. “We got it in Wisconsin,” head coach Susan Link said. “Things turned around for us. These girls

are pretty dedicated. We had some adversity, but we ended up winning state, too.” It was the fifth-straight year the North cheer team won a state title, but nationals was a whole other beast. “We’ve set a strong president in Minnesota,” Link said. “It’s pretty remarkable. Usually the South dominates.” After missing the cut for

Lake-liners line up for state jazz Lakeville North finishes second in section

Andy Rogers Thisweek Newspapers

The Lakeville North dance team is jazzed up to perform at the state meet this weekend. Senior captains Karlee Herbers, Maggie Richard, Stef Sherry and Savannah Windhorn led a young Lake-liners dance team to second in the jazz competition in Section 1-3A on Feb. 11 at Bloomington Kennedy. The girls will perform at the Class 3A state meet on Friday at the Target Center in Minneapolis. Their performance titled “Catch Her If You Can,” featuring the Prince song “Chelsea Rodgers,” put them right behind one of the state’s powerhouse programs, Eastview, in the section. Just qualifying for state is an achievement – North is one of just 12 Class 3A

programs to qualify. The girls didn’t get there on their own. “We really do have the best fans out there,” head coach Monica Fredrickson said. “They played a huge role in helping us have a great performance at sections. We get the opportunity to spend the next week together in practice and we get the chance to compete against the best teams in the state.” The goal during the preliminaries is to qualify for the finals on Friday evening, meaning they have to break into the top six. The girls qualified for the state tournament for jazz in 2008, 2010 and 2011. Last year they had their highest finish yet, placing in seventh. “The (seniors) have done everything in their power to get this very young team to work hard and put in the

effort needed to be a state qualifying team,” Fredrickson said. “This year’s team has had to overcome some obstacles that we have not had to face in a long time. We had a hard loss in the middle of December that we had to overcome and this team has come back fighting. They never once stopped believing in themselves or this team. “They were back at practice the next day, practicing twice as hard to prove to everyone that they did not deserve to be placed where they were.” The girls are scheduled to perform at approximately 2:50 p.m. on Friday at the Target Center. With a topsix score the girls would perform in the finals beginning at 7 p.m. Andy Rogers is at andy.rogers@ecm-inc.com.

the finals in 2011, the girls had a goal of making the finals this time around. “We set the bar high,” Link said. “It’s a really unique, clean style that seems aesthetically pleasing.” The girls started prepping for the chance to go to nationals in the summer. It’s not so much a hobby as it is a healthy obsession that could open doors in the future.

“Many of the girls plan on cheering in college,” Link said. “The University of Minnesota has one of the best teams in the nation. We have five girls there now between Lakeville North and South. These girls have been doing this since seventh grade.” Andy Rogers is at andy.rogers@ecm-inc.com.

Briefs Lakeville South High School spring sports night set March 12 The Lakeville South athletic department will host its annual spring sports information night at 7 p.m. on March 12 for student athletes and their parents in the school auditorium. Spring registration will run from 6-8 p.m. in Administrative Services. Contact activities director Neil Strader at (952) 2323321 with questions.

Nadia Lorencz breaks Farmington school record in floor exercise Farmington’s Nadia Lorencz broke the school scoring record in the floor exercise in the Missota Conference championships last weekend. She scored a 9.8, breaking Lynn Gramentz’s record from 1991. The Tigers placed third overall with a score of 140.95 behind Northfield and New Prague.

Alyssa Goehner named PrepVolleyball national sophomore of the year Lakeville North’s Alyssa Goehner has been named PrepVolleyball 2011 National Sophomore Player of the Year. She was also named a 2011 Prep Volleyball High School All-American, 2011 ESPN Minnesota Gatorade Player of the Year runner-up and made the 2011 Volleyball Magazine High School All-American Team 2.


Kloos still picking up points in bunches Lakeville South senior and Mr. Hockey finalist leads Class AA in scoring again by Mike Shaughnessy Thisweek Newspapers

Justin Kloos has the statistics. He has the scholarship in his back pocket. Next month, he might be named the state’s Mr. Hockey. But he really would like to play in the state tournament before his high school hockey career ends. Kloos, the leading scorer in Class AA last season and again this year, has never had a chance to perform on that stage. For Kloos and his Lakeville South teammates, the state tournament can be a sore subject. The last two years the Cougars were heavily favored going into the Section 1AA championship game but lost to Lakeville North, their neighboring rival. South is 15-8 after defeating Lakeville North 4-2 and Apple Valley 3-0 in South Suburban Conference games last week. The Cougars were ranked 13th in Class AA. “This is going to be my third try at it,” Kloos, a senior center, said of the Cougars’ state tournament bid. “Right now we’re playing well in our D-zone, and that’s going to be important in the playoffs.

“We’re bummed that we’ve lost four or five games by one goal to top-10 teams. That’s been a little frustrating. But we know if we can get to the state tournament we can play with those teams.” Lakeville North is 11-12, but the Panthers figure to be contenders in the Section 1AA playoffs that start next week. The Lakeville teams split two regular-season games, with each winning on the other’s home ice. Rochester Century, 16-51 in its first 22 games, also could be in the mix in the section. But Century has lost non-conference games to both Lakeville schools. Kloos had a goal and two assists in each of South’s victories last week. Through 23 games he had 75 points (31 goals, 44 assists). He has had six five-point games this season and could still surpass the 90 points he scored in 2010-11 if the Cougars go on a deep playoff run. Kloos scored 55 points as a sophomore, skating with Alex Harvey and Kyle Osterberg on what became known as the “Penguin Line.” Osterberg left after that season to join the U.S. National Team Development

Program, but Kloos and Harvey have remained together. Harvey has 53 points (23 goals, 30 assists) this season. Sophomore Patrick Lauderdale skates with Kloos and Harvey and has 30 points on 15 goals and 15 assists. Last week Kloos was one of three South Suburban Conference players (Eagan’s Michael Zajac and Will Merchant were the others) named finalists for the Mr. Hockey award. In addition to being a dangerous scorer, Kloos has long been lauded for his hockey I.Q. and playmaking skills. That type of player generally loves it when he has more room to work, so it’s not a surprise that Kloos signed with a college team that plays on a big sheet of ice. He plans to play at the University of Minnesota, which has its home games on the extra-wide Mariucci Arena rink. “I love the big ice. I think it benefits all the little guys like me,” said Kloos, who’s 5-foot-9, 170 pounds. Once the Gophers offered him a scholarship, that pretty much ended the recruitment process. He ver-

bally committed to Minnesota in April 2011. “Everybody says they’re looking for the best fit,” Kloos said. “But I knew if the Gophers gave me a chance I’d choose them.” Still to be decided is if he will join the Gophers next season or play a year of Junior A hockey first. Kloos said he’s open to either possibility. First, however, is the section tournament and another possible showdown with Lakeville North. Lakeville South coach Kurt Weber said it can be tough for his team to play Lakeville North because the emotion of the rivalry can detract from the players’ focus. He said he thought that was the case in the Cougars’ Feb. 9 victory at North. “I didn’t think we played well,” Weber said. “But we found a way to win the game anyway, and that’s important.” When the Cougars and Panthers play, “it doesn’t seem to matter what the records are,” Kloos said. “It’s who makes plays at the right time – and who gets breaks.”

THISWEEK �������� February ��� 17, ���� 2012 ��������

Panthers/from 10A last season and won his 100th match in late January. Lucas Westrich, who won his 75th career match as a freshman on Feb. 9, also has a good chance to qualify individually. At 145 pounds, he’s ranked No. 8. His main competition appears to be Ethan Loosbruck from Chaska and Chase Monger of Eden Prairie. Colton Pasvogel (132), Aaron Baker (182) and Aaron Almedina (220) also have outstanding chances to make it to state, according to Donner. “They will be happy only with a state berth,” Donner said. “That is their goal and that is what they want. We have others that may pull some upsets and possibly surprise some opponents.“

Lakeville South The Cougars don’t have as high of a seed, but that doesn’t mean Lakeville South will be shut out at state. Tom Petersen is not only the favorite to win the section title, but he’s ranked No. 1 in the state at 195 pounds. His brother Zane Petersen won a state title last season, a first for anyone in Lakeville. Scott Bode of Shakopee looks to be Tom Petersen’s main competitor for the section title. Tom Petersen finished

11A ���

sixth at state last season, but everyone he lost to at state has since graduated. Scott Bode of Shakopee appears to be his toughest obstacle to win a section title. He’s defeated other ranked wrestlers such as Apple Valley’s Paul Cheney and Bode already.

Farmington Illness has stunted the Farmington wrestling team’s prospects this season. The Tigers have rarely competed at full strength. As the host of the team competition, the Tigers hope to get healthy by this weekend. Last season the boys came in with the eighth seed and lost in the first round to top-seeded Prior Lake. Taylor Venz is hoping to get a high seed individually. His biggest competitor looks to be Degrammont from North. The two met at the Lakeville North Duals last week with Degrammont winning 5-3. A few Tigers know how hard it is to even place in the section meet. At the individual meet last year Jacob Gabbard (sixth at 112), Kyle Benjamin (fourth at 103), Matt Rustad (sixth at 119), Bret Hoffman (sixth at 275) found themselves in the top six. The top two move on to state. Andy Rogers is at andy.rogers@ecm-inc.com.

����������� ������ �������������������������� � ������ ������������ � ���� ������������ �� ������� ����� ��� ��� ��� ���������� � ��������������������

�������������

Organizational Notices

Abraham Low Self-Help Systems (Recovery, Int'l)

��������� ������������ ������ � ������ ������ �� ������ ����������� ������ ����� �������� ������ ���� ����������� ������ ������ ��������� �������� ������ ����� ���� ������ ���� ������ �� ���� ���������� ��������� ��������������

Dona: 612-824-5773 www. LowSelfHelp Systems.org

Organizational Notices

Organizational Notices

��������� ����� ����������� ������������

Farmington AA Closed Mixed Meetings Mon, Wed, Thurs at 8 PM Open Meeting 2nd Sat.

Burnsville Lakeville

A Vision for You-AA Thursdays 7:30 PM A closed, mixed meeting at

Alanon Mtgs Thurs at 8pm

Grace United Methodist Church

All meetings at: Rambling River Center 325 Oak Street

East Frontage Road of 35W across from Buck Hill - Burnsville

Questions? Call Mike W. at 952-240-1262 www.aa.org

���� �������� ��������� ���� ���

����������� ������������

Organizational Notices ������ ���� ��� ����������� ������������

South Suburban Alanon ������� ����������

Ebenezer Ridges Care Center

����� ��������� ����� ����������� �� ����� ������ ���������� ����������� ��� ���� ����������� Contact Scott

Organizational Notices If you want to drink that’s your business...

If you want to STOP that’s ours. Call

Organizational Notices ����� �������� � ��������

����������� ������������ ����������������

Organizational Notices �� ��� �������� � ����������� ����������� ������������ ����������������

EAGAN/BURNSVILLE/SAVAGE AA

Alcoholics Anonymous

3600 Kennebec Drive (2nd Floor) Eagan, MN (Off of Hwy 13)

Minneapolis: 952-922-0880 St. Paul: 651-227-5502

• Sundays 6:30pm (Men’s) & 8pm (Mixed) • Mondays 6:30pm & 8pm (Mixed) • Tuesdays 6:30pm & 8pm (Mixed) •Wednesdays Noon (Mixed) & 8pm (Mixed) • Thursdays 6:30pm Alanon & 8pm (Mixed) • Friday 6:30 (Mixed) & 8pm (Mixed) • Saturdays 8pm (Open) Speaker Meeting

Find a meeting:

www.aastpaul.org www.aaminneapolis.org

612-759-5407

�� ���� ���� ����

612-701-5345

����������� ������������

or Marty

�������� �� ��������� �� � �� �� ���� ���� �� �� �������� �������

Meeting Schedule

Questions? 651-253-9163

Apts & Condos ��� ���� ������ ��������� ��� �� ���� ��������� �� ������� �� ��� ���� ������� ��� ����� ����� �� ������� �� ��������� ���� ���������� ���������� �� ��������� ������ ����� �� ����� ������ ����� ����� ���� ��������� �������� ���� ������ �� �������� ������� �� �� ���������� �� ���� ��� ���� ����� ������� ���������� �� ����������� ������ �������� ������ �������� �������� ����� ��� ��� �� �� ���� ��� ���� ������� �� ����� �������� ���� �������� ������ ��� ������ �������� ������� �� �������� ����� ���

Apts & Condos ����� ������ Palomino East Apts u � ������� ���� u & 2BR, 2BA! Avl. Now! Free Cable, W/D. $99 Deposit.

952-686-0800

���������� � ��� ���� �� �������� ���� ����� �� ���� �������� �� ����� ����� ������������

Houses For Rent

TH, Dbls Duplexes

Modular/ Mfg For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

��� ���� ������ ��������� ��� �� ���� ��������� �� ������� �� ��� ���� ������� ��� ����� ����� �� ������� �� ��������� ���� ���������� ���������� �� ��������� ������ ����� �� ����� ������ ����� ����� ���� ��������� �������� ���� ���� �� �������� ������� �� �� ���������� �� ���� ��� ���� ����� ������� ���������� �� ����������� ������ �������� ������ �������� �������� ����� ��� ��� �� �� ���� ��� ���� ������� �� ����� �������� ���� �������� ������ ��� ������ �������� ������� �� �������� ����� ���

�� � ��� � �� �� ������� ����� � ������ ���� �� �������� 612-968-7487 So. Metro 2 BR, ��� ��� ��� �� ��� �� ������� ����� �� ���� ��$875. 507-450-5868

� � � � � � � � �������� ������� ��� ������� ���� ���� ��� ������� ������� ��� 612-581-3833

� � � � � � � � � � ������� ���� ����� ������� ������� ���� ���� ��� ����� ��������� ��� ������������

We will help you!

Lakeville: Manufactured Home!

Classifieds 952-846-2000

952-435-7979

����� ������ ��� �������� ���� ��������� ���� ��� ����� ��� ����� ������ ����� $410 ���� ��������� ���� ��� ����� ����� ������ ��� ����������� ��� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ����� ������ ��� ����������� ��� ���� ������ ����� �� �� ��������� �� ��� ������������ ���� ������ ����� �� �� ��������� ��

��� ���� ��� ������� ��� ������ �������� ���� ��� ��������� ������ ����� �� ���� ��������� ��� ������ ���� �� �� ����� ����������� ������ �� �������� �� ����������� ���� ���� ��� ��������� �� ��������������� ��� ��������� ��������� ������ ��� ��� ������� �������� �� ���������������

� � � � � � ����� ���� ��� ������ ��� �� ���� ���� � �� ������ 952-412-5168 ���������� � �� ��� ��� ���� �������� ���� � ������ NO PETS. ��������� ���� ����� ���� 952-944-7983

RENTS START AT 1BR $685

$250 OFF FIRST MONTHS RENT

Rosewood Manor

14599 Cimarron Ave

Rosemount

651-423-2299 � �������� ��������

Houses For Rent Lakeville: Starting $800 per month 2 BR, Manufactured Home! No shared walls! Call Tanya 952-435-7979 W/D Hookups!

Burnsville: Rambush Estates Gorgeous 2 BR, 2 BA, + Den all 1 floor living! Mobile Home! Washer/Dryer in home. Includes heat + electric! Fireplace too!

952-890-8440

�������� ������� ��� ������ ����� ������ ����������

������������ ������������

��� ���� ��� ������� ��� ������ �������� ���� ��� ��������� ������ ����� �� ���� ��������� ��� ������ ���� �� �� ����� ����������� ������ �� �������� �� ����������� ���� ���� ��� ��������� �� ��������������� ��� ��������� ��������� ������ ��� ��� ������� �������� �� ���������������

TH, Dbls Duplexes

Roommates/ Rooms For Rent

���������� �� � �� ��� �������� ������ �� ��������� ���� ����� ������ Barb 952-890-1780 ����� ������� ������� ������� �������� ���������� ������ ����� ���� ��� ���� ��� ��� ���� ���� ������� �� ������������� ����� ������� ������� ��������� ���� ���� �� �� ���� ������������ ��������� � ����� ��� �� ������ ����� ���� ��� �������� 952-469-3732

������� ��� ����� ����� �� ������� �� ��������� ���� ���������� ���������� �� ��������� ������ ����� �� ����� ������ ����� ����� ���� ��������� �������� ���� ���� �� �������� ������� �� �� ���������� �� ���� ��� ���� ����� ������� ���������� �� ����������� ������ �������� ������ �������� �������� ����� ��� ��� �� �� ���� ��� ���� ������� �� ����� �������� ���� �������� ������ ��� ������ �������� ������� �� �������� ����� ��� ���� ��������� ���� ��� ����� ����� ������ ��� ����������� ��� ���� ������ ����� �� �� ��������� �� ��� ���� ��� ������� ��� ������ �������� ���� ��� ��������� ������ ����� �� ���� ��������� ��� ������ ���� �� �� ����� ����������� ������ �� �������� �� ����������� ���� ���� ��� ��������� �� ��������������� ��� ��������� ��������� ������ ��� ��� ������� �������� �� ���������������

2 BR, 1 BA.

Commercial For Rent ��������� ����� � ������ ��� ������������ �� � ������� � � ����� ����� ������� �� ���� ��� ���� ��� ���� ������� ��� ���� ������������� ���� ��� ������� ���� ���������� ����� ��������� � ������ ���� ����� ���� 952-955-9118

���� ����� �� �������� ��� ���� ���

��� �������� �� � �� ���������

�������� �� ���� ��������� �� �������� ���������� ��� ����� ������ ������� ����� ������� � �������� �� ������ ��� �� � ���� ��������� � ���� �� ��� ��� ��� ���� � ����� ��� �� ��� ���� ���������� ���� � �� ������ ��� ���� ����� ���������� ����������� ��� ����� ��� �������� � ������ ���� ��� ���� ����� ���� ��� ������������ ��� ��� ���� ����� �� �� ������� � �� � ����� � ���� � ��������� � �� � ����� ������ � �� � ���������� � �� � ��������� � ���� � ����������

��������� ������� ����� ����� ���� �� ����� ���� ����� ���� �� ��� �� ���� ��� ������ ��������� ����������� ���� ���� Don 952-898-2777

�� �� ����� ���� ������� ����� ������� ��� ���� ������� ��� ������ ���� ���� �������� ����� � ����� 651-437-8627 ��� �� �� ����� ��� ��� ��� ���� ������ ��������� ��� ���� ���� ���� ������ ��� �� ���� ��������� �� ������ ���� ��� ��� � ������ � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �� ����� 612-790-5043

For Sale $5000

����������� ������������

������� � ���� ������

������� ��������� ����������� ��� ������ �� ������� �� ������� �� ��� ������ ������ ������ ����� �� ������� �� ���� ���� ��� ��� ��� ������� ��������� ���� �� ������ ���� �������� ���� ��� ���� �� ��� ����� ��� ����� �������

� � � � � � � ����� ���������������������������������������������������������� �������� ��������������������������������������������������������

�� ������

����� ���������������������������� ������ ���������� ���� ������������ ����� ������ ����� ��� ��� �� ���������� ������������������������������

���� ���� ������� ���

�������� ����������� ����� ��� ��� ��� ����������� �� ����� ������ ������������ � ���� ������������ � ������ ��������������������������

����������� ������������ � ������������ ������������ � ������� ������������


���������� ���

�������� ��� ���� ��������

������� ������ �������� �� ��������������������

Work From Home

Full-Time

� � � � � � � � � � � � � � ���� ����� ������ �������� ������ �� ���� ������� ���� ������� ������� ��������� ��������� ������� ��� ����� ������ � ����� ���� ������ ��������� ���� �� ������ ��� �������� ������ ��� ����� �������� ��� �� � ������� ��� � � �������� ����� ������ �� ������ ���������� �� ������ ����� ������ ��� ����� ������ ��� ���������������������� Advertising Disclaimer ������� �� ��� ������ �� ����� ��� ��� ���� ��� ������ �� ��� ������ �� ��������� ��� �� �� ���� ��� �� ������� ������ ������ ��� ��� ��������� ����������� ���� �� ������ ���� ������� �� ������ �������� �������� ���� ���������� �� ��� ���

Full-Time

OSTERTAG CEMENT, INC.

��� ��������� �������� ����� ��� �������� ����� ������ ��� �������� ��������� ���� ���� ����� ������� ������� ����� �� ������ 14551 Judicial Rd. Suite 140, Burnsville 952-681-2053

����� � ��� �������� ���� ��� �������

������

���� �� ��������� ���� � ����� ��� � ���� ������� ������� �� ���� ������ ���� ������ ��� ���� ������ �� �������� ����� ��� ��������

���������� ��������� �� �������������� ����

���� ���������� ����� �������� �� ����� ���� ����� ������������ ������ ����������������������� ���� ������������

Automotive Sales Luther Burnsville VW

�������� ����������� �� ���� ��� ������� ������� �� ���������� �� ��� �������� �� ��� ������� ��� ����������� ����������� ��� ���� �� ���� ����� ������ �� ��� ���� ������ ��� ���� ����� �� ��� ��� �������� �� ��� ������� �� ��� ���� �� ��� ������ ������� �� ���� �� ���� ��������� �� ��� ��� ���� ��� �� ���� �������� ��� ��� ��� ����������� ��� ������� ���� �� ���� ��� ������ ���������� �� ��� �� ��� ������� ������� ������ ������� ���� ���� �� ��� ������ ���� ��� ����� ��� ������ ��� ������� �� ���� �� ��� ����� ����� ��� �� ��� ����� ��� ���� ������� ����� ��� ���� ���� �� ����������� �� ���� ���� ��� ������� ���� ���� ��������� �� �� ���������� ��� �������� ��������� �������� ������� ���� ��� ����� ���� ����� ���������� ��������� ����� ���� � ���� ������� �������

Call Tom Walsh at 952-892-9400 �� ������ �� ����������� ������ �� lutherauto.com ��� ����� ����������

���� ���� ������� ��������

VTI Security �� ������� � Full Time Systems Engineer. �� �� ����������� �������� ����������� �� ��� ������� ��� � ���� ��������� ���������� ���������� ��� ��� ����������� ����� ������������� ���� �������� ����������� ������ �� ������ �������� ����� ��� �������� �������� ������� ��������� ��������� ������������ �������� ��������� ���� ����� ������� �������������� ���� � �� ���������� ���������� �� ��� ������� Submit resume and salary requirements to:

VTI Security

401 Travelers Trail Burnsville, MN 55337 vti@vtisecurity.com No Phone Calls Please - EOE

Full-Time

PCA Full Time/Part Time $11/hr Call William ������������ ��� ������� ����� ����� ����������� ��������� ��������� ���� ���� ����� ����������� ���������� �� � ������������� ����� �������� ���������� ���� ���� ������������� ��� ��� �� � ����� ���� �� ��������� ������ ������� ��������� ����� ������ ������ ���� ������ ���� ������ ������������ �� ������� ������� �� ��� ���� �������� �� ������ ���� ���� ����� �������� �� ����� ������� ����� ����� �� ���������� �� ������� ���� ���� �� � ����������� ���� ���� �� ��� ������� ����� �������� ���� ������ ������ ��� ������ ��������� ��� � ���� 952-997-7305 kathyleaon@hotmail.com ������� ������ ���������� ��� ������� ������� ��� ��� ��������� ������� ����� ��� ��������� ���������� �� � ���� ���� ���� ������� ��������� ������ ����� ��� ��� �� ��� ���� ������� ����� ��� ��������� ��������� ������ ��� �������� ��� �������� �� ���������� ���� ����������� ������� ��������� ������ ��������� ��� �������� ������� ������ ��� �������� ��� ��� ����� ����� ������ � ����������� ��� �������� �������� ����� ������ �� ������� ��������������������

Production Support Specialist

������� ���������� ��������� ������ ������� ���� �������� �� ���� ���� ����� ���� ������� �� � ������ ������������� ������ ������������ ���������� ��������� ���� �� ���� �� ���� ��������� ���� ���� ������ �� ���� � ������ ������� ���� ������ ��� ���� ���� ����� ������� ��������� �� ������ �� ��������� ����� ������ ������� ����� ����� �������� ��� ��� ��� �� ������ �������� ���������� �� ��������� ���� ��������� ����� ������� ���������� ���� ���� ����� �� ���������� ���� �����������

����� ������ �� www. medimedia.com/ careers.aspx

������ ������� ����� ������ ���� �� � ������� ���� ������� ������ ������� ���� ������������� �� ���������� �� ���� �������� �� ������ ����� ������� ������ ��� ��� ����� ������� ���� ���� ������� ���������� �� ��� � ������������ ��������� ����������� ����� ������� �� �� ���� ��� ��������� ����� � ������ �����

����� ������ ���� ��� �� �������� ������ ����������� �� � ������ ������� �� ��� ����� ������� �� ���� ��� ��������� ��� ���� ��������� ��� ������ ����� ����� ��� ��� �������� ������� �� �������� �� ������������� �������� ����������� �� � ������ �������� ��� ���� �� ��������� �� �������� ������ ������������� ���� ��� ���������� ������ ��� ���������� ���������������� ������� ��������� ���������� ��� ��������� �� ������ ����� ��� ������� �������� ���� ��������� �������� ������ ���������� �� ������ ���������� ����� ��� ���� ��� ������������ ����� �� � ������ �� ��� ����� �������� ���������� ��������������� � ���������� ������ �� ��������� ������� �� ������� ������ � �� ����� �� ���������� �� �������� �� ����� �������� �������� � �� ����� �� ���������� �������� ������ ���������� �� ��� ������� �� ��������� ��������� � �������� ������������� �� �������� ��� ����� �������� ������� �������� ��� ��������� ����� ������ ��� ������������������������� ������������ ������ ��� ���������

������

����� ������ ���� � ����� �������� �������� � ���������� �� ���������� �������������� � ���� ������������

Full-Time or Part-Time

���� �� ���� �����

��������� �� ������� ���� ���� �� ������� ��� ���� ������ �� ����� ������� ��� ������ ���������� ���� ���� ��� ��� ��� ����������� ��� ������� � ���� ��������� ��������� ������������� �� ����� �� �������� �� �������� ������������

������ ���� �� ���� ��� ����������� ������������

����� ��������� ������� ������� ��� �������������� ���������� �� � ������������ ������ ���� ��� ���� �� �������� ��������� ��� ��������� ��������������� �������� ���� ��������� ��� �������� �� ��� ����� ����������� �������������� ����� ��������� ������� ��� ��������� �������� ������� �� ������� ������ ��� ������������ ���������� ��� ���������� �������� ����������� ��� ������� ��� ������ ����� ������ Required qualifications: � ��������� �������� ������ �� ���� �� ����������� �� ��������� � ������ ���������� ��� ������ ��������� ���� � ����������� ������ ���� �� � ���������� �� ������� ������� �� ����� ��� ���� ����� ��� ������� ����������� ��� ������ ���������� �� ����� ��� ����� �� ����������� ������� ������ ���������� �� ����� ����������� ������ Office Location: � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ������� ��������� Area of Responsibility: ������� ������� ��� ����� ������ �������� Office Location: ��� ����� �������� ��������� ������� ��������� Area of Responsibility: ������� ������� ���������� ������� ��� ������ �������� Office Location: ����������� �������� ��������� ������� ��������� Area of Responsibility: ����������� �������� ������� ������� ������� ���������� ���� ��� �������� ����� ���� Application Deadline: March 7, 2012; positions will remain open until filled. To learn more about these positions and to apply, visit http://www1.extension.umn.edu/about/ employment/ or call 612-624-3717. Equal Opportunity Educator and Employer

������� ������ � ������ ���������� �������

We get read! Classifieds 952-846-2000

Part-Time

952-469-5221

��� ������� ����� ����� ����� �� � �� ������

� ��� ������ � ������������������ ��������� � �������� �������� ���� � ���� �������� � ������ ���

��������� �� �� �� � ���� ����� �� ������ ���

����� �� �� ����������� ������������

������ ����� �� ������� ��� �������� ����� ���������� ���� ��������

����� ����� ���� �� ��� ���� ����� �� ������� ���� ��� ������� ����� ���� ��������� ������� ���������������� ��� ��������� ������� �� ��� �������� ��� ��������� ���� �� � ���������� ��� ��� ������������ ��������� ���� �� �

���������� � ������������ ����� ������ ����� � ������������ ����� ������ � ������������ ������ � ������������ �� � �� ������ ��������� �������� ��� �� ���� � ����������

�������� ��� ����������� ������ �� �������������� �� ���� � �������� �� ���� �����������

���� ������ ������� ���� ����� ��� ������ ����������� ��� � �������� �������������� ���������� ��������������

���� �������� ����� ������ �� ���� ���� �� ���� �� ����� ����� �� ������ ������ �������������� ��������� ������ ��� ������� ������ ���� ���� ��������� �� ����� ������� ������ ������ ���� �������������� WANTED TO BUY ��������� ��� �� ��� ���� ��� ���� ������ ��������� ���������� ��������������������� �� �������������� ������� �������� ���� ������� ��� ����������� ����� ����� �� �� ������� �������� ����� �������� �������� �������������� �������������������������� ����� �� �������� �������� ��� ����� ��� ��� ��� ���������� ���� ������� �� ���� ��� ����� ������� ��� ����� Reader Advisory: The National Trade Association we belong to has purchased the above classifieds. Determining the value of their service or product is advised by this publication. In order to avoid misunderstandings, some advertisers do not offer employment but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the client your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it is illegal to request any money before delivering its service. All funds are based in US dollars. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada.

To place an ad just call...

Classifieds 952-846-2000

��� ��� ��� � ����� �� ���������� �� ������ ���� ��� ��������� ��������������� �� ���������� �� ���������� ����� ���� ������� ��� � ����� �������� ��� � ������������ ��������� ��� ������ ���� ������ � ������ �� ���� ���� ����� ����� ������ ��� ����������������� ������������� ����������������� ����������

Regency Home HealthCare

�� ������� ���� ��������� ��� ���������� ���� ������� ��� ����� ����� �� ���� ��� ������� �� ��� ������� ������� �������� ������ ���� �� ���� �� �� ������� �������� �������� �� ��� ���������������� ������ ��� ��������� ����� ����������� ��� ��� ������ ������ ���� �� �������������� ���� ����� ��������� �� ������� ��������� ������� ������� ��� ������������� ������� �� ���������� ������ ������ ������ ����������� ��

www.regencyhhc.com or fax resume attn: Kerry @ 651-488-4656. EOE

��������� ��� ������� �� ����� ���� ������� ��� ��������� �� ����������� ���������� ���������

�������� �������� � ���������� ��������� ��������� �� ��� ������������� ���� ������ ������� �� ����������� ������� �� ������ ����� �������������� �� �������� �� ��� ����� �� �������� ������� ���������

���������� �������� ���������� ������ ����� ����� ������� ������ ����� ��������� �������������� ���������� �� �� �� �� ������ � ��������� ���������

�� ������������������ ���������� ������ ����� ������� �� ������� ���� ��� �� ����� �� �������� ������� ������������� ������� �������� ���������� ���������

������ ����� ������������������������� ��� ������� ������� ��� �� �������� �� ������ ������������ ��������� �������� � ������� �� �� ����� ����������� ��������

Part-Time

Part-Time

����������������

REAL ESTATE ������� ����������� ����������� ���� ������� ���������� ����������� ��� ���� �������� ���� ��� ������������

���� ��� ����� ��� ���� �� ������ ���� ������� ���� �� ������ ������� ������ ��������������

Full-Time or Part-Time

Use your Visa, Discover or Master Card 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

EDUCATION ������ ���� ������ �� ���� �� � ��� ������ ����� ����� �������� ������������������� ���������������������

������ ������� ������ ���� ����� ��������� ������ ����� ��������� �������� ��� ��������� ����������� ���� ����� ���������� ��������� ��� �� ���������� ���� ������������ ���������������������

��� � ������� ������ ���������� ��������� ����� �� ������� ������� �� ��� ���� ������� �������� ��� ����� �������� ����� ����������� ��

��������� �������� � �������� ��� ����� ����������� �������� ���������� �� ��������� ��������� ������ ��� ����� ����������� ����� ���� ���������

���� ������� ������ ���������� ����� ���������� ���� ������������������ ���� ������������ ���� ������ ��� �������� ���� ��� �������� ��������������

MISCELLANEOUS ���� �� ��� ������� � ����� ��� ����� �� �������� ������� ��� �������� �������� ��������� ��� �� ��������� � ��� ��������� ����������� ���� ��� �������������

��� ������ ����� ������� � �� �����

�������� ����������� � �������� ������������ ����� �� ������������������������ �� ����� ��������� ������� ���� ����� ���� ����� ������ ��������� ���� ����� ������ ���

Part-Time

Full-Time or Part-Time

If interested please call

�������� ������������������

AUTOS WANTED ��� ���� ��� ����� ��� ���������� ������� �� ���� ���� ��� ������� ������ ��������������

HEALTH & FITNESS ��� ��� ������ ��� ���� ��� ���� ����������������� ��� �� �������� ������� ��� �������� ��������� ��� ��� ��� ���� ��������� ���� ����� ��������

����������� ������������

��� ����� ����� ���������� �� ������ ��� ������������� �������� ���������� ����� ������� �������� ����� ��������� ������� �������� ���������� ��� ��������� ���� �������� �� ������� ���� ���� �� �� ��� �� ������

MISCELLANEOUS ��� ��� ������ ��� ���� ��� ���� ����������������� ��� �� �������� ������� ��� �������� ��������� ��� ��� ��� ���� �������� ���� ����� ��������

��������� ������ ������ ���������� ��� ����� ���� ��������� ������� ����������� ����� ����� �������� �������������� ��������������������������

��������� �����

���� �� ����� ����� � ����������

ADOPTION ��������� ����������� ��������� ��� ������ ���� �������� ����������� ������ �������� ����� ������ ��� ���� ���� ���������� ������������� ���� �������������

EMPLOYMENT ������� ��������� ���� �� �� ���� ������ ��� ���� �� ���� ������ ���� ��� ��������������

Full-Time or Part-Time

Apt. Caretaker Couple Wanted-PT

Live on site at Apple Valley apt complex. Duties include cleaning, snow removal, assisting manager. Will train. Must have excellent work history/ references, and qualify for apartment. Full bkground check. Call between 9am-3pm M-F only for details & phone interview.

952-431-6456

�� ���� ������

Work with children and adults in the South Metro area.

�������� ���� ����

952-898-4911 or email

kris@

superiorhomecare.org

����� ���� ��� ���� ����������� ������������

��������� ��� ������� �� ����� ���� ������� ��� ��������� �� ����������� ���������� ���������

����� ���� ������������ ����� ����� ������� ��� ������ �������� � ���������������

������ ����� ���� ������ ������� �� ���������� ��������� ����������� ��� ������������ ����������� ��� ��������� ������� ��������� �� ���������������������� ����������� ���������� ������ ����� ������������������������� ��� ������� ������� ��� �� �������� �� ������ ������������ ��������� �������� � ������� �� �� ����� ����������� ��������

Thomas Allen Inc.

Program Counselor or LPN Burnsville

PC: Tue, Wed, Fri ������� ������� � �� ����� LPN: Mon, Tue, Fri �������� ����� ���� ��� ������� ������ � ��� ����� ������������� ����������� ����� �������� ���� ������� ��� ����� ������ ����� �������� ��������������� ������� Contact: Jodyv@ thomasalleninc.com

www.thomasalleninc.com AA/EOE

��� ����� ���� ����� ��� ���� �����

�������� ���������� ������������

����������� ������������ � ������������ ������������ � ������� ������������


�������� �������� ��� ����

����������� Parts & Services

Parts & Services

Parts & Services

$ WANTED JUNK CARS $ Viking Auto Salvage (651)460-6166

����� ���� ��� ���� �� ��� ���������������� ����������� ������������

�� ��� �� � ��� � �������� �������� ������ � ������� ������������ ���� ��� ���� � ��������� ������������������� �����

������

���������� ������� ��� ���� �� �����

������

�������� ������� ���� � ����� �� ���� ����� ���� �� �� ������� �� ��� ������ �� ��� ����� ����� ���� ��� ��� ����������

������������

��������������������������

Junkers & Repairables

More if Saleable ���� ��������� ������

www.crosstownauto.net

612-861-3020 651-645-7715

Drywall

Apple Valley / Rosemount The Bridges Child Care Center & Preschool ������ �� ����� Fall Programs Preschool: 2 1/2-5 yr olds, 2 days $112/mo. or 3 days $135/mo, 9:30-11:30AM Childcare� ���� ������� ���� ������ � ������ ���� �������� ������ ��������� ������ ������� ��� ������� ��� ��������� ��� ��������� ������� �� ���� ����� ����� ���� � ������� ����� �������� 651-423-2527

���������� �������� ���������� ������ ������ ���� ������ ��� ������ � ������������ Misty 952-953-3933 ����������� ����� �� ��� ���� �� ����� ��� � ����� ���� MVES. 651-463-4918 ���������� ��� ������� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ����� ��� ���� � � ��� ��� ���� ����� ����� ���� � ���� ����� �� ��� ���� Call Kelly 651-460-4226 � � Daycare Design ������� �� ��� ����� ������ �� ����� 952-432-8885 ���� �� �� ������ ��� ��� �������� ���� ���� �������� ��� ����� 651-357-0220

Vehicles

Sporting Goods

Misc. Wanted �������� ���� ������ ������� ���� �� �� ���� ���� ��� �� ������������

Waste Control We Haul Rubbish � � ���� ���� �� ���� ��������� ���� �� ��� 952-894-7470

�� ��������� ������ � ���� ��� � ������ � ����� �� ��� ������ ����� ���������� Shannon 612-716-0590 952-212-7426 ��� ������� �������� ���� ��� ����� ���� �� �������� ����� � ����� ������������ ���� ��� • �������� 651-324-4725 ����������� � ����� ����� ������������ PearsonDrywall.com �� ��� ������� ������� ������� �������� �� ��� ���� ������� 952-200-6303 ����� ����� � ����� ���� �������� ������� ���� Vicky 612-272-3639 ���� ���� ��� ���� ����� ���� ������������ ���� Glen Rautio 612-210-3112 �������� ����� �������� ��� ������ 952-469-2232 ����� ����� ��������� �������� �������� �� ��� ����

Flooring & Tile

���� �������� ��������� �� ��� ����������

Classes

���������� ��������� ������� �������� ��� ����� ������� ������� ������� �������� ����� ������ �� ������������ �� ����� ����������������������

����

��

���

��� ���� ����������� ��������������������

Roofing & Siding

��� ������� �������

���������������������������

����������� ������������

Electrical & Plumbing ������� �������� • Gen. Help + Lic. Elec. • Low By-the-hour Rates 651-815-2316 ��� �������� ��������� ������� � �� ��� ������� � ������ 952-492-2440 ��� ������� ���� �������� ������������ ��������� ��� ����� ��� ������ ���� ����� 952-758-7585 ����������� www.teamelectricmn.com

10% off w/this ad

������ ������� ��� ����� ���� ������� �������� ��� ��������� ���� ������������

Daymar Construction Remodeling

� ������ �������� ��������

������� �������� �������

���� ���������� ���� ���� �� �������������� ����� ���� ���������������

������������

651-303-9602

952-985-5477

www.daymarconst.com

Lic. BC017447

������� ����������� ��� ��������� ����

�������� ����������������� ���������� �����������

������������ MATT DIEHL CONSTRUCTION Basement Finishing Decks, Remodeling (651) 260-1044

www.mattthebuilder.com ��� ������ �����������

Free estimates, no job too big or too small! �� ���������� ������� � �������� ������������

���� ����������� ��� ����� �� ������� ���� �������� ���� ���� ��� �������� �� ���� � ����� �������� ��� ����������� �� ����� ��������� ��� �� ����� � ������������ ������� ������� ������� ��� �� ����� �� ����� ��� �������� �� (651) 284-5069 or www.dli.mn.gov

�������� ������������ ���� ��������

������������

��������� ����� ����� ����� ���������� ���������� ������ ����� ������������

������������������������

��������� ������ ���������� ������ ������ ���������� ���� �� ����� �� ����������

������������

������� � �������� ���������

Living Spaces Plus

Decks & Outdoor Structures New, Replace, Repair Home Repairs-Inside & Out 952-738-1260/952-905-0963 Member BBB ��� ��������

Benson Residential Services

������� ������� �� ������� �������� ��� ���� ����� ������� ���� �� ���� ������� �������� ���� 952-457-9419 ���� ���������� �������� ��� www.bensonresidential.com Don’s Handyman Service ���������� ������� �� �� �� ���� 952-882-0257 Jerry's Remodeling & Handyman Services, LLC ����������� ������� ���� �������� ������ ��������� ������������� ����� ������������� � �����

952-447-3587

����� ��� �������� ���������� ������� ���������� ������������ ���������� �������� ��� �������� �������� � ������ ��� � ��� ���� �� ��������� ���� �������� �������� 952-380-6202

u �������� u ��������� u ����� ����� ��������� u ������� ������� u ��������� ������� ������ ������������� ����������� � ������ ��������� �� ������� ������� �� ��� ���������

651-261-7621

���������������� ������ ����������� ������������

� ������� � ������ � �������

������������

���� ����� ��� ���� ���� ����������� ������� ������ ������

��������������������

���� ���������

������� ���� ������� � ��������� ������������ ���

�� ����� ���� ��������� ������ ��������� ����� ��� �������� �������

���������������������

������������

Last Hope Pet Adoption Apple Valley Petco 11-3pm Every Saturday! Cats, Kittens, Dogs & Pups!

��������� ����� ����������� ������������

��� ������ ���� www.last-hope.org �� ���� ����� �� ������������� �� ��� ��� ��� ��� �� ��� ���� �� ��� ����� ������ ����� ����� �������� ���� ���������

Last Hope, Inc. (651) 463-8747

Last Hope Inc.

Box 114 Farmington, MN 55024 Beverly 651-463-8739

����� ���� ���� ������ ����� �� ��� ����� ������ ���������� ������������

������ ����������� ��� �������� ���������� �������� � �������� ��� ���� ���� �� ���� ��� ������������ ���� ������������

HOME TUNE-UP

Fix It•Replace It•Upgrade It ��� ���� ������� ���� �� ����� ����������

Ron 612-221-9480 �������� � �������

������ ���� ��������� � ���� ������� ��� ���� ���������� �������� ��� ���� �������� 612-644-1153 Dakota Home Improvement Basements, Kitchens, Bathrooms, Tile, Flooring, Decks & Repairs. 952-270-1895

��� ��� ����� ���� �������� ���������� �� ������ �� ��������������������

���������������������� ������ ��������������� �� ����� ���������� ������������ � ������������������������

��������� ��������� �������� �������� �� ���������� �� ���������� �� �� �����

����������� ������������

���� � ������� ������

Adopt or donate to your animal rescue:

��� ������������������ �������� � ����������� �� ��� ����������� �� �������� ������������ �� �����������������������

������ ���� �� ���� ���

������ �� � ����� ������ ��������� ��� ���� ��� ������� ���� ���� �� ����� �� �� ����� ���� �� ��� ���� ��� ��� ������ ������ ����� �� ����� �� �� �� ��� ��� ������ ��� ������� �� �� ����� �� ������ ��� ����� �� ���� � ����� �� ��� ���� �� ����� �� ����� ������ �� � ����� ��� ��� ������� ���� ���������� �� �� ���� �� � ���� ������� ���� � ����� �� �������� �������� ��� �� �����

Miscellaneous ������� ����������� ��� ������� ������ � ��� ����� ����� �������� ���� 24 Hr Emergency Plumbing ���� ������������ ���� ���� 4 - 30 Yd Dumpsters ����� ������������

Landscaping Lawn/Tree Care Absolute Tree Service

������� ������ ����� ���� ����� ������ 651-338-5881 absolutetreeservicemn.com

NORTHWAY TREE SERV. ������������� ����� ����� ����� ����� ��������� ������ Terry 952 461-3618

�������� � ���������� Painting ��������� ����������������� �������� ���� ���� ���������� ����

������� ���������� ��� 952-447-3587

����� �������� ���������� ����� ������ �� � ���� 612-270-4900

Dave’s Painting & Wallpapering LLC

Int/Ext, Res/Comm. Free est, 29 yrs exp. Will meet or beat any price. Refs/Ins. 952-469-6800 BBB Member

���� ��������� � ������� ���� �������� � �������� ������������������

“George’s Painting”

������������

*Int/Clean, Quality Work!* ������ �� 651-829-1776

������� ��������

������������

�������� �������� � ������� 952-607-1009/ 612-636-9501

• Ben’s Painting •

Will meet or beat prices! Int/Ext, Drywall Repair Paint/Stain/Ceilings �� ������ ��������������

952-432-2605

����������� ������ ��� ���� ������� ���� �� ����� ������ ���� ������� ��������� ���� �� ��� ���� ����� ������������

REACH NEARLY 1 MILLION HOUSEHOLDS! �� ��� ���� � �������� �������� �� �������� ���� ����� �� ������ �� �������� � ������� ���������� ���������� ���������� ��� ��������� ���������� ������� ���� ����� ��� �� ����� ����� ��������� ��������� ������� ��� �������������� ��� ���� ������ ������ ���������� � �������� ���������� �� ���� ���� ����������� �� ��������� ���������� ������� �� ������������� ������

��� � �������� � �������� �������� � ��������� � ������� � ���� �������� � ����� ����� ������ ������ � ���� ������ � ������� � ���������� ����� ������� � ���� ��������� ���� ��� ��� ��� ���� ������ � ������� � ��� �������� �� �������� ���������

MISCELLANEOUS: MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW! ��������� ������� ����� ����� �������� ���������� ��������� ���� ��� ��� ������� ���� ��� ��� ��� ��� ���� ���� ���� ����� ������������ ������

APPLE & FRUIT TREES low as $15. ����� ����� � �������� ���������� ���� ����� ��� �������� ��������� ������� ����� ��� �� ������������ �� ����� ���� TO INVESTIGATE OTHER ADVERTISING ���� ������������� ����������������� OPPORTUNITIES ���� ���������� �� ��������� ������ � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ������������������� ������ DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/month HEALTH: Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. ��� �������� �������� ���� ����� �������� ���� ������� ��� ���� ������� �� �� �� �� ���� ���� �� ��� ���� ���������� ������ ���� ����� ������������ ��� ������ ��� ���� ����� ������������ ��� ���� ��������� ������

���� ��������

� ������������� ���� ��������� � ������� �������� � ����� ����� ���������� � ������� � ����� � ���� ������ � ����� �������� ��������� ������� ���������

������ ����� ���� ��� � ��� ���� ������ �� ���� ��������� ������ �������� ����� ����� ������������ ������� ���� All Free! He found a HOME!

��������

Michael DeWitt Remodeling

•Additions •Garages & Decks •Basement Finishing

plateaudrivewoodshop.com

���� � ������� � ������� � � �� ��� ������ ������ ��� �������� ����� ���� ����� ��������� ���� ��� ����� ����� ����

Business Professionals

���� ����������� PLATEAU DRIVE WOODSHOP LLC ������ ������ ����� ���� ���������������� �������� ����� ��������

���� ��������

Misc. For Sale

������ ��� ����� ��� ��� �� ���� ����� �� ��� ����� ��� �� ������� ����������� ����� ������������ COURT RESOURCES- SAVE! ������� ���� ������ ����� ��������������� ����� �������������� ��� start ����� ������ ���� ���������� ������������� � � � � � � � � � � � � � ������������ ������ ���� ��������� ���� ���� ��� ��� �� ��� ���� ���������� ���� ��� ���� ����� �� ��� ������ ���� ���������� ����� ��� � ��� ���� ��� ��� �� ���� ������ ������������������ � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ���� � ���� ���� � � ������������ ����� ���� 952-469-2232

Cleaning

Carpet • Vinyl • Laminate Pre-fin. Hardwood Floors ������������� � ������ ������ � ���������� Free Est. 651-285-5066

WHIRLPOOL ��� ������ �������������� ������ ������ ��������� ���������� � � � � � WHIRLPOOL ����������� ��������� ���������� ������ ������ ����� 952-423-3705 ��������� ��� ������ ���� ��� ���� ���� ���� 651-208-1884

�������� ��������

Child & Adult Care

������� ������

Household

$$ $200 - $7500 $$

���

���� �� ������� ����� �������� ���� ��� � ������� ����� � ��� ����� ���� ��� ������������� ���� ������������ ������

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. ��� �� ��� �������� ����� ���� ����������� �� ����� �� �������� ���� ������ VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg!! �� ����� ������� ���������� ������ ���� �������� � ���� ��� ���� ���� �� ���� ������������ � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �������� ��������� ���� ����������� ��� ��� ������������ ������ ���� ���� ���� �������������� ������ ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFERERS ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare. with Medicare. ��� ���� ���� �������� ��� � ���� ������� ����� ��� �������� ���� �������� �� �� ����� ���� ���� ������� �������� �� �� ����� ���� ���� ���� ��������� ���� �� ���� ������� ��� ���� ���� ��������� ���� �� ���� ���� ����� ������ � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ������������ ������ ������������ ������ AUTO: DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT GENERAL HELP WANTED: PAID IN ADVANCE! ���� ����� ������ TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. ���� � ������� ��������� ���� ����� ���� ���� ��� ��������� ��� ����������� ���� ������� ������ ������ �� ����������� �� ���������� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ��������� ����� �������������� �������� ������������ ������ ����������� ����� �� ��� ����� CASH FOR CARS: ��� ����������� ������� MISCELLANEOUS: ������� �� ���� ��� ������ ����� �� ���� Ever Consider a Reverse Mortgage? �� �� ���� ��� ����������� ���� ��� ������� ����� �� ����� ���� ���� �� ���� ���� � ������ �������������� ������ �������� ���� ����� ���� � ���������� ���� ��� ��� ���� ���� ���� ���� ��� ������������ ������

����� ���� �� �� ��� ����������� ������������

�������� ����������

����������� ������������ � ������������ ������������ � ������� ������������


14A

February 17, 2012 THISWEEK

Police: Traffic-blocking man was on drugs Farmington man faces felony for possessing a drug used to treat opiate addiction

by Laura Adelmann Thisweek Newspapers

A 29-year-old Farmington man smoked marijuana and took other drugs before standing in the middle of Highway 3 yelling and blocking traffic on Nov. 25, according to a criminal complaint filed last week. Jesse Uriah Gallagher is charged with fifth-degree controlled substance crime, a felony, for possession of Suboxone, a drug

used to treat opiate addiction. According to the complaint, motorists alerted police to the situation, and when officers located Gallagher he was agitated and kept screaming at them. Police reported that after calming him down and handcuffing him, a search turned up a small pink pill in Gallagher’s pocket. Gallagher allegedly said he had taken Suboxone and the antidepressant

Celexa, and had smoked some marijuana. He also told them he had gotten the Suboxone from his “home boy,” and that he didn’t have a prescription for it, according to the complaint. The charge carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Laura Adelmann is at laura. adelmann@ecm-inc.com.

Farmington man allegedly robbed, head-butted friend by Laura Adelmann Thisweek Newspapers

An 18-year-old Farmington man is charged with felony robbery and fifthdegree assault for allegedly head-butting his friend and stealing money from his wallet on Feb. 6. According to a Dakota County criminal complaint, Alexander Eldon Olsen hid in the bathroom of a house knowing the victim, identified as Z.M., would be coming to the residence.

When Z.M. was in the bedroom, Olsen allegedly ran out, threw Z.M. on the bed, straddled his waist, held his arms at the wrist, and demanded money. He head-butted Z.M. twice in the forehead and once on his mouth, rolled him over and took $70 from his wallet as he held him by the neck, police say. Z.M. allegedly ran out of the room and downstairs, and Olsen threw the wallet down the stairs at him and told him to leave,

������� ����� ������ ��� ����� ������� ��� �� �������� ���������� � �������� ���������� � ���������� ��������� ������� � ��������� �� ����������� ������ � �������� �������� �� ���� ������� � ������� ��� ��� ����������� ����� ������� ������� ����� ��� � ���������� �� ����� ������������ � ��������������������� � ��������������������

Super blogger

the complaint states. Z.M. called 911; Farmington police observed Z.M. had a large bump on his forehead, a bloody nose and chipped, bloodied teeth, the complaint states. Olsen allegedly told police he was mad at Z.M. because he had used his credit card without his permission. Police said Olsen told them he knew Z.M. was going to be at the residence, so he went there and waited for him. The complaint adds that Olsen allegedly admitted taking cash from Z.M.’s wallet after head-butting Z.M. twice.

Farmington Schools superintendent starts blog

by Laura Adelmann Thisweek Newspapers

Farmington Schools Superintendent Jay Haugen appears to be making good on his promise to improve communication in the district. Last week, the 52-yearold district chief broke out a blog, “Jay Haugen’s News and Views.” Available by clicking a link on the Farmington Schools website, www.farmington.k12.mn.us, Haugen’s blog offers video commentary about the future of education, and so far he’s posted a video of a sixthgrade concert at Farming-

Laura Adelmann is at laura. adelmann@ecm-inc.com.

��������� ���� ���� ��� ����� ������ ����� ������� ��� ���������

������ �� ������� ��������� �������

A Progressive Christian Community

������ ������� ���� � ����� ��

����� ����� ������ �� � ��������� ���� �� ��������� ����� ���� ������

������������ ������������������

Sunday Worship Hour 10:30 AM Adult Education 9:30 AM (Children’s Education during Worship)

������� ���� �� �������� � ������� �� ������������ ���� ��� ������ ���� �� ����� ������� ��� ���������� �� ���� ������ ��������������� ��������������� ��������������� ���������������

��������������� ��������������� ��������������� ���������������

������� ���� ���� ������ ������� ������� �� ������ ���� ��� �������� ������� ����� ������ ������� �������� ��� ����� ��� ���� ���� ������ ��������� �� ����� ������������ �����

��� ����������

����������������������������

spiritofjoymn.com

Not Your Usual Church

Family of Christ Lutheran Church ELCA

ton High School. In an interview, Haugen said he decided to put a blog together so he could reach more people. “I spend a lot of time in schools and see a lot of young families,” Haugen said. “We’re just not reaching them if we don’t do stuff like that.” Haugen is no stranger to technology. Since about 2006, he has produced blogs and podcasts as a communication tool when he led other school districts. Although the messages will be his own, keeping up the blog, posting video, announcements and links will be a team effort shared with the District Communications and Marketing Coordinator Jim Skelly and Haugen’s executive assistant Lori Jensen. Haugen’s first message emphasized the idea that education must be transformed to develop students who are able to compete and lead in a technologically advanced world. He reviewed his oft-mentioned call for customizing

������������

������������

����

������������

����

������������

������������ ����������������������

����

Education for all 9:40am

������ ������ ������������ ������� ���� ���� ���������� � ������� ����� ��� ���� ���� ���� � ����� ��� ��� ����� ��� �������� ��������� ������ ����� ���� ������

������������

East of 1-35 on 185th Lakeville Pastor Lon Larson 952-435-5757 www.familyofchrist.com

Weekend Mass Times Saturdays at 5:00 pm Sundays at:

7:30, 9:00, 11 am & 5:30 pm

Reconciliation Saturdays

8:30-9:30am & 3:30-4:30 pm

www.allsaintschurch.com

�������������������

Cross of Christ Community Church

��� ����� � ��� ���� ��������� � ��������

“A place to discover God just as you are”

In Downtown Lakeville on the corner of Holyoke and 210th Street Ph: 952-469-3113 www. crossofchristchurch.org Sunday Morning Schedule

Worship Service: 10:30AM Education: 9:30AM Nursery Available

Wednesday Eve 6:30 PM

���� ����� ���� ����

���� ������� � ���

Nursery available

8748 210th St. West

Laura Adelmann is at laura. adelmann@ecm-inc.com.

� ��� ��� ������ �������� �

����� ��� �������� �� ��� ���

8:30am & 10:45am

19795 Holyoke Avenue Lakeville, Minnesota 952-469-4481

education so each student has opportunities to achieve based on their individual abilities. In the next video, he mentioned providing students with electronic devices so they can have constant access to educational materials. In the future, Haugen said, he may include clips from school board meetings, share links to books he’s reading or offer comments about timely, controversial topics that may arise. “I think any time there’s a hot topic, it’s good to make a personal connection,” Haugen said. Because the blog is going to reflect future issues as they come, Haugen said he couldn’t predict everything that will be covered. “It’s hard to say what direction a blog will go,” Haugen said. “I want it to be a rich one-stop place for information … kind of an ongoing record of what the superintendent does.”

����������� �� ��� ���� ��� �� ����� ���� ���������

Sunday Worship

All Saints Catholic Church

Photo by Laura Adelmann

Farmington Schools Superintendent Jay Haugen

�������� ���� ��� ������� ���� ���� ������� ���� ����� ������� ����������� ����� ����� ���� ���� ����� ����� ������ ��� ����� ������������ ������� ������ �������� ������ �� ��� ����� � ���� �����

����� ������ � ���������� � �����

���� ��� ��� �� ��

YOUTH REVOLUTION

�������������������

Down, But Not Out Surrendering Control 9:30a Contemporary 10:30a Blended Nursery/Children/Youth 9:30am & 10:30a

17671 Glacier Way

SE Corner of Cedar & Dodd, Lakeville

952.469.PRAY (7729) www.crossroadschurch.org

��� ��� ������� ����� ����� ����

������ ���� ������� ����

������������ ���������� �� ��� �������� �������� � ���������� ������

������� �����

���� � ����� ��

��������� ���� ���� ��

������ ����� �������

��� ��������� �������� ���� ��� ������� �� ���� � ���� ���� ������� �� ���� ��������� ���� ���������� �� ����� ���� ������ �� ���� ���� ����������� �������� ������ �� ������� �������������

�� ��������� ���� ������ ���� �� �� ������������ �������� �� ������ �� ������ ��� ��������

���� ���� ��� �� ����� ���� ���� ��� ����� ��� ��� �� ��� ������������

��� ��� ���� ���������� � ������������

��������� ������ ����������

��� ����

��� �������� ���������� ���� ���� �� � ����� ��� ��� ������� �� ��� �� ���� ��� ��� ���� ������� ����� ��� ��� �������� ����� �� ���� ������ ��� ������ ��� ������� ������ �� �������� ���� ��� ����� ������ ������� ��������

������������

����������������������� ��� �������� �������� � �� �� ����������� ���� ������

�� ������� ����� �� ������ ����� �� ���� ���� ������ �� ����� �� ����� ��� ����

����� ������

�����

��������

���������

����������

����� ����

��������

������������

������������

������������

������������

������������

������������

������������

��� ��� �������� ����� � ���� ���� �������� �� ����� ��� ���� ��������


THISWEEK February 17, 2012

Farmington Briefs Storytime set at Farmington Library The Farmington Library, 508 Third St., will offer Storytime for All Ages from 10:30 to 11 a.m. Friday, Feb. 24. The program consists of stories and activities for mixed age groups. Call (651) 438-0250

for more information.

KCs host spaghetti dinner & bingo The Farmington Knights of Columbus Council 2400 will host a spaghetti dinner and an evening of bingo Saturday, Feb. 25, beginning at 5:30

15A

p.m. at the Church of St. Michael, 22120 Denmark Ave., Farmington. Cost will be $7.50 for adults, $5 for children ages 6-12, with a maximum of $25 for families. Children 5 and under will be free. Proceeds will be used for charitable and service projects sponsored by the KCs.

Lakeville Briefs Author teaches kids about organ transplants

Community ed classes offered

Local author Stacey Waibel will talk about organ transplants and read from her new book, “Rudy O’Tooty,” from 7 to 8 p.m. Monday, March 5, at the Heritage Library, 20085 Heritage Drive, Lakeville. Michelle Greubele, illustrator of the series, will also appear. For more information, visit www.dakotacounty.us/ library or call (651) 450-2918.

Feb. 28 and 29. • Swim Lessons, all levels, Monday and Wednes Sign up for the follow- day evening lessons start ing classes at www.Lakev- Feb. 22. illeAreaCommunityEd.net • Karate, age 7 to adult, or call (952) 232-2150 for lessons start Feb. 28. more information. • Tex Mex, adults, 6 to • Cool Knex: Racers, 9:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 27. grades 2-5, 12:30 to 3:30 • Carbs: Simply Comp.m., Saturday, Feb. 25. plex, adults, 6 to 8 p.m. • Math Facts the Easy Way, grades 2-5, 6:30 to Wednesday, Feb. 29. 7:45 p.m. Monday and • Mother and Daughter Yoga, mother with daughTuesday, Feb. 27 and 28. ter age 12 and older, 6:30 to • Raising Savvy Money Managers, ages 10-14 with 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Feb. 28 a parent, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. through March 27. Tuesday and Wednesday,

Crops Day offers expert advice Farmers and other agricultural professionals can learn about the latest crop nutrient and irrigation management strategies at the sixth annual Crops Day scheduled from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, March 6, at Dakota Electric Association, 4300 220th St. W., Farmington. Dr. Tom Scherer, guest speaker from North Da-

kota State University, will discuss irrigation scheduling to optimize water use and crop yield. Nitrogen, sulfur and potassium management in corn will be the topic presented by Drs. Dan Kaiser and John Lamb from the University of Minnesota. Mike Plutowski, from Dakota Electric Association, will share information about energy

conservation programs that are offered to producers. Lunch and a trade show will follow the morning program. Pre-registration is requested by March 1 for this free event. To pre-register or for more information, contact Phyllis Bongard at (651) 480-7757 or bonga028@ umn.edu.

������ ������� ����� �� �������� ������ �� ���� �������� ���������������� �� ��� ��� �� ���� ��� ����� ����� ��� ���������������� ��������� �� �������� �� ����� ���� ������ ������� ���� ������ ��� ���������� �� ���� ������� ���� �� ����� ����� �� ���� ���� �� ����� �� ������ �������� ������ ��� ���� ���� �����

���� ��� ���� �� �������� ���� ������ ���� � ��������� ��������� ���� ����� �� ����� ���������

�� ��� ���� ����� �������� ������ ���������� �� ����� ����� �������� ���������������������

Two county organizations receive grants Two Dakota County organizations are among the 59 recipients of Minnesota Historical and Cultural Heritage Grants for fiscal year 2012.

The Dakota County Historical Society received a $33,172 grant for “Going Digital: Converting DCHS Oral History and Film Collection to Digital Files.”

The Minnesota Genealogical Society received an $11,000 grant for microfilm reader/scanners.

� ������ �� ��� ������ ��������� ������ �� ����� ���������� ������ ��������� ����� ��� �������� �� ��� ����

���� �������� �����

������������

�� ����� ����� �� ���� �� ������� �� ����� ��� �� ���������

������������������������ ������ ����� ��� �������� ��� �� �����

������� ����

��������

��������

���� ������ ������� ��� ������ ������� ����� ���� �������� ������ ����� ��� ���� �����

���� ��� ���� ���� ��� ���

���� ���� ��������������������������������������������� ����� ����� �������������������������������� ������� ���� ���� ���������������������������������������� ������� �������������������������������������������������� ������� ������ ���� ����������������������������������� �������

������

��� ���� ��� ��� �� �� �� ��� ��� ����

����� ���

��� �� ������� �

��

������� ����� ��������� ��� ������ ���� ��� ���� ���� ��� ���

���� ���� ��������������������������������������������� ����� ����� �������������������������������� ������� ���� ���� ���������������������������������������� ������� �������������������������������������������������� ������� ������ ���� ����������������������������������� �������

������

��� ���� ��� ��� �� �� �� ��� ��� ����

����� ���

�� ��� �� ������� �

�� ������� ��� ������

� �� ������� � �� � � � ��� � ���������� � �������� ���� � ��� ���� ����� ���� ������

��� ��� ����� ���� �������� ���� ����������

���� ����� ������� ��� ���� ����� ������� ���� ������� ��� ��������

���� ���� ��������������� ������� ������ ����������������������������� ������ ���� ��������������������

�������

��������

��������

���� ���� ��������������� ������� ������ ����������������������������� ������ ���� �������������������� ������� ����������������������������

�������

���� ���� ��������������� ������� ������ ����������������������������� ������ ���� ��������������������

�������

� ��� ������� �� ������� �������� ���� ��� �������� ���� � ��� ��� �� �������� ������ ����� ��� ����� ����� ������ ������� ������� ���� ��� � �������� ��������

����� �� �� ��� ��� �� ��������������

������ ���� ������������������������������������� ��� ������������������������������������������ ������� ������ �������� ������ ������������������� ����� ������� �� ����� ����� �������������� �������

���� ���� ��������������������������������������������� ��� ������������������������������������������ ������� ������ �������� ������ ������������������� �����

���� ���

������

� �������

���� ���

���� ��� ������

���� ��� �������

���� ���� ��������������������������������������������� ��� ������������������������������������������ ������� ������ �������� ������ ������������������� �����

���� ���� ��������������������������������������������� ��� ������������������������������������������ ������� ������ �������� ������ ������������������� ����� ������� �� ����� ����� ����������������� �����

�������

���� ���

��������

�������

��������

���� ���

��

���

��� ��������� ������� �� ���� ������ ��� �� ���� �������� ���� ����������� �����

������������

������ ������� �������

������� ���� �����

��������� ������� ��� ���������� ���� ��� ������� �����

���� ��� �����

���� ��� ������

�������

��� ������ � �� ������ ���� ���� �������� ������������

������� ���� ������� ���� ����� ��������

��������

��������� ��� ����� ���� ��� ���� ������� ���������� ��� ����� �� ��� ��������� ������ ������������


16A

February 17, 2012 THISWEEK

Thisweekend WolfGang opens Coffee Concerts

Photo submitted

Photo submitted

Arthouse fare is fine, but know that the Shamrock Film Festival accepts submissions in all genres. Pistol-packing, tough-jawed action-adventure films – such as “The Underground” (above) – are always welcome.

Calling all filmmakers

The WolfGang, seven Twin Cities musicians who specialize in baroque and classical music, will open the fifth season of Chamber Music Coffee Concerts at the Lakeville Area Arts Center. Tickets for the 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19, event are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and students, and are available at the arts center, 20965 Holyoke Ave., or by calling (952) 985-4640. The Coffee Concerts are held in a casual cabaret setting with complimentary Caribou coffee and refreshments; the series continues March 18 with a performance by The Vecchione/Erdahl Duo, featuring Rolf Erdahl (bass) and Carrie Vecchione (oboe), the Apple Valley husband-and-wife team who’ve organized the concerts.

Rosemount’s Shamrock Film Festival accepting entries until Feb. 27 by Andrew Miller Thisweek Newspapers

If you’ve ever dreamed of dressing your friends up like zombies and filming the ensuing mock apocalyptic carnage, the time is now. Short films of all stripes are now being accepted for the Rosemount Area Arts Council’s fourth annual Shamrock Film Festival. This year’s festival, set for March 10 at the Steeple Center in Rosemount, includes categories for amateur and professional films, local and foreign films, and movies by youths 15 and under. There will also be a People’s Choice award handed

out, along with a Best of Rosemount award provided there are at least five entries from Rosemount residents. Prizes for winning films include money, movie tickets and filmmaker memberships. The judging will be done by local filmmaking professionals, and the judges will be present at the Best of Show ceremony to give feedback on their top choices and present the awards. The festival has been gathering momentum since its inception in 2008 when it was held at the Rosemount Community Center as part of the annual Rosemount Leprechaun Days

celebration. Last year’s event saw the festival’s first foreign film entry, a Canadian short titled “My Father Joe,” as well as a presentation by Jason Davis of “On the Road” fame, who showed snippets from his documentary-style work. “Entries were longer and the quality of the films was even better last year,” said festival chair Beth Adams. “We had such a nice variety of ages and films from Minnesota it proved that this is an art form that is appreciated by many.” New this year will be one or two screening nights at the Robert Trail Library prior to the festival, Ad-

ams said. The screening nights will be a mix of top films from the last three years, along with sneak peeks of official selections for this year’s event. The deadline for entries to this year’s festival is Feb. 27, with a $30 submission fee for short films (10-44 minutes) and a $25 fee for short shorts (under 10 minutes). Information about film submissions and tickets for the festival can be found at www.shamrockfilmfest. com. Andrew Miller is at andrew. miller@ecm-inc.com.

Velvet Tones celebrate spring Photo submitted

Velvet Tones, a senior adult community chorus, will present its annual Spring Festival of Music at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 4, at Eastview High School, 6200 W. 140th St., Apple Valley. The Westview Elementary Da Capo choir and the Dragonfly ensemble will also perform. Twin Cities broadcast journalist Stan Turner will serve as master of ceremonies. The free performance will include American Sign Language interpreters. For more information, call (952) 432-1081, visit www.velvettones.org or email Velvettones@gmail.com.

Dance auditions for “Wizard of Oz – The Ballet” will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26, at Ballet Royale Minnesota, 16233 Kenyon Ave., Suite 100, Lakeville. Intermediate and advanced modern dancers age 14 and older can audition. A mandatory parent meeting for dancers under 18 will be held following the audition. Performances will be May 11-13 at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center. No pre-registration is required. For more information, contact info@TwinCitiesBallet.org or (952) 452-3163.

U.S. Navy Band presents free concert The U.S. Navy Band will present a free concert at 7 p.m. on March 19 at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave., Burnsville. This special performance is part of the band’s national tour. It performs frequently at the White House and the U.S. Capitol building, and

has participated in 21 presidential inaugurals. The concert is free, but tickets are required. Tickets are available for pick up in person at the box office be-

������� ���� ��� ������ ����

������ ���� ���������� ���� ������ ���� ��������� �� �� �� � ��

������� ��������� ��������

���� ���� ����� ���� �� ��� ������� �� ����� �������������� � ������������

����� � ��� ��� �������� � � ��� ������ ������ ������ � ����� ������ ��� �������

��� ������� ������ ������� ��� ����� �������� �� �������������������

�� ���� �� ��������� ��������� � ���������� ��� ��������������� ���������� �������

theater and arts briefs Dance auditions for ‘Wizard of Oz’ ballet

�������� ��������

�������� ��������

ginning at 11 a.m. Friday, Feb. 17. Tickets are limited to four per person and are based on availability. Box office hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Tuesday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Call (952) 895-4680 for more information.

����������������������������

�������������������

���� �������� ������� ����� ��� ���� ���� �� �������� ������� ��� ��������� ���� ������� ��� �� �������� �� ������ �� ��� ���������� ���������� ���� ������ ��� ������ ��������� ���� ���� �� �� ��� ����� �� � ������� ��� ������� ������ �� ��������

��������� ���

��������

��� ����� ������ �������������� ��������� ��� ��������


Thisweek Newspapers Farmington and Lakeville