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DIY 10:2013 Professional Development BY Artists FOR Artists July to December 2013 Summary Report Exhausting, Exhilarating & Affirming. Participant in Kira O’Reilly’s Combating the Body We continue to see and support and receive support from, the participants from Morecambe, three of whom joined us again in Wales, and the participants themselves have formed a network of support for each other. This closeness, won in an environment of personal risk and honesty in extremely exposing situations, seems to last beyond the DIY situation and continues to do so with Probing Elvis. Nigel Barrett & Louise Mari, lead artists, Probing Elvis (Wales, 2013) and ‘When I was a little girl…’ (Morecambe, 2012) I firmly believe that each participant got something valuable from the experience and made a ‘shift’ of some sort, whether this be personal, emotional, performative, artistic… Ursula Martinez, lead artist, Don’t Wait Tables Unanticipated, our water-day spawned new work. A series of Water selfportraits, in which water makes portraits of itself. Mapping its extreme sensitivity to surrounding forces. Simone, you and Lucy and all the rest of us that day pushed this new work along. Huge thanks. Participant in Simone Kenyon and Lucy Neal’s Waterproof


And of course, this personal development is one in the same as artistic development. It was a special experience to share a space with a group of men and respond to our experiences through performance--together and on our own. This openness and honesty was of course a part of a communication that manifested itself through performance, and the blurred lines--with honesty and authenticity--between everyday communication and performance, is something that I’m trying to carry with me. On the retreat, I reconnected with a desire to make more honest and authentic performance work. Greg Wohead, participant in Peter McMaster’s Perfoming Men: A Retreat I thought it was a great model that I'd love to see used more. Such a refreshing contrast to the solitary writing of proposals and posting to some unknown and anonymous funding or commissioning person. It's a very nice idea to have some orientation and contact with other artists and possible venues before getting down to coming up with an idea. It also made me think in a general way, how productive it could be to have this group social side of things, as part of the process, even though the proposals or ideas that come out of it are basically individual. Peter Reder Participant in Joshua Sofaer’s Soho Sideshow I loved the collective feel, the sharing of meals, the effort, energy and general wonderfulness put into it by you and Andy. The fact that your flatmate and neighbours were involved was also important, it made it all real. Work on estates with living, breathing people who have their worries, stories, outlooks on life, a view of London from their kitchen window and go swimming at 7am in the lido. Ania Bas, Participant in Jordan McKenzie’s This Is The E(s)tate we’re In There were a lot of penny-dropping moments for me in the exercises and in the workshop as a process in itself, but I also feel that I was introduced to methodologies and concepts that I can employ long-term both in my artistic practice and more broadly in life. Participant in Dickie Beau’s Immaculate Perceptions @GGibson3 Please excuse my language, but what a f**king awesome weekend that was with @GETINTHEBACK @thisisliveart #DIY10 Thank you. Participant in GETINTHEBACKOFTHEVAN’s Calamity Jane


DIY 10: 2013 professional development BY artists FOR artists Contents: • DIY Project Summaries: short descriptions of the 23 DIY 10:2013 projects and DIY partners. • DIY 10:2013 Review: written by the Live Art Development Agency. • Artistsʼ and Participantsʼ Reports: information and feedback about, and creative responses to the DIY 10:2013 projects. • The original Call for Proposals: outlining the aims of the initiative, the application and selection procedure, and the management structure. The Announcement of DIY Projects is available online at: http://www.thisisliveart.co.uk/opportunities/diy-10-2013-call-for-participants This report is available to download from: www.thisisLiveArt.co.uk

Project Summaries Anja Kanngieser Tuning In Tuning Out (with Sound & Music) Saturday 7 and Sunday 8 September Conversations, tactics and practices for neurodiversity, mental health and communication Ansuman Biswas Farplayer (with The Works Performing Arts Cornwall, University College Falmouth and Sound & Music) Friday 2 to Sunday 4 August An exploration of sound in space, of chains, links and breaks, of transmission and reception, of listening and making. Barby Asante and Delaine Le Bas To Gypsyland (with Live at LICA) Friday 6 to Sunday 8 September A workshop that explores the personal and political in performative, collaborative and socially engaged practices. Dickie Beau Immaculate Perceptions (with Chelsea Theatre) Sunday 29 September and Sunday 6 October A weekend of spiritual hoovering: clearing the way for a blissful return to successful creative release. Geraldine Pilgrim No Regrets (with Colchester Arts Centre)

Sunday 22 to Sunday 29 September Do you regret not having done something you always wanted to do or wish you could undo something you regret having done? GETINTHEBACKOFTHEVAN The Deadwood Stage (with Cambridge Junction) Saturday 10 to Sunday 11 August The Live Art community musical! Gustavo Ciriaco Where the Horizon Moves (with Yorkshire Sculpture Park) Thursday 1 August to Saturday 3 August A workshop on the horizon as a source of fiction and performance, with practices and discussions. Jesse Darling Our Bodies, Our Selfies (with Abandon Normal Devices) Thursday 3 to Saturday 5 October Reclaiming Overshare for Its Revolutionary Potential: a three-day experimental groupworkshop in radical show (& no-show) & tell (& don't tell). Jordan McKenzie Look At The E(s)tate We’re In Wednesday 11 to Friday 13 September A three-day summit for artists held on a council estate in East London examining and interrogating socially engaged art practice.


Joshua Sofaer Soho Sideshow (with Artsadmin and The Soho Society) Friday 30 August AND Friday 11 October Discover more about the history and current life of Soho and develop a bespoke proposal for the area with production support. Kira O'Reilly Thinking Through the Body. Combative Manifestos Wednesday 14 to Friday 16 August Learning grappling/Brazillian jiu jitsu techniques and writing exercises to produce manifestos from, and of, our bodies. Lucky Pierre I Hate America! (I Love America) (With Platform) Saturday 24 to Sunday 25 August AND Saturday 30 November An intensive workshop to explore the joining of performance/Live Art with social practice using collaboration, technology and activism to create a community-based 12-hour event Marcia Farquhar Taking It Personally (with Norwich Arts Centre) Sunday 3 to Monday 4 November Marcia Farquhar invites you to join her for a 24 hour experience to think about how the personal can be political, how the truth can be a lie, and how stories go round and round like records. Neil Bartlett I Live Here (with The Showroom, University of Chichester) Saturday 2 November to Sunday 3 November To take a roomful of young artists through the process of devising an (auto)biographical performance – from start to finish – in the space of two days. Nigel Barrett and Louise Mari Probing Elvis (with National Theatre Wales and Chapter Arts Centre) Saturday 28 to Sunday 29 September AND Saturday 9 to Sunday 10 November In which the group reconsider our own practice by exploring the working methods and practices of Tribute Artists.

Noëmi Lakmaier Imperfect - Live September An online experiment for open minded, risktaking, female, disabled artists to explore ideas around the female disabled body and its sexuality. Not for wimps or prudes. Peter McMaster Performing Men - a Retreat (with Compass Live Art) Friday 6 to Sunday 8 September A three-day and three-night rural retreat exploring the relationship between developing authenticity as men and making contemporary performance. Richard Houguez Queering hair: A gathering of radical hairdressers (with Forest Fringe) 2 days between Monday 12 and Sunday 18th August tbc How can we as hairdressers accommodate the expression of identity? Is it all about style and aesthetic? What is it about salons that makes the hair on our necks tingle with possibility? Rosana Cade My Big Sister’s Gonna Teach Us To Lap Dance (with Fierce Festival) Friday 13 to Sunday 15 September A chance to explore various feminist discourses on lap dancing, through receiving, learning and performing a lap dance. Simone Kenyon and Lucy Neal Waterproof (with In Between Time) Saturday 31 August A day-long event to collectively explore what makes up our understandings of water. Susannah Hewlett Functional Fun! (with BUZZCUT and Imaginate) Tuesday 17th and Wednesday 18th September 2013 A workshop exploring provocations around making live art for young(er) audiences. Tim Etchells and Vlatka Horvat Slow Sunday Sunday 27 October A day of talking, cooking, eating, sharing followed by an evening of presentations, performances, more talking and sharing. Ursula Martinez Don’t Wait Tables (with Duckie) Saturday 14 and Sunday 15 September Don’t wait tables - make an act!


DIY 10 is a Live Art Development Agency initiative developed in collaboration with the following partners: Abandon Normal Devices (North West), Artsadmin (national), Buzzcut with Imaginate(Scotland), Cambridge Junction (East), Chapter Arts Centre (Wales), Chelsea Theatre (London),Colchester Arts Centre (East), Compass Live Art (Yorkshire), Duckie (London), Fierce Festival(West Midlands), Forest Fringe (Scotland), In Between Time (South West), Live at LICA (North West), National Theatre Wales (Wales), Norwich Arts Centre (East), Platform (national), The Showroom, University of Chichester (South East), Sound and Music (national), Yorkshire Sculpture Park (Yorkshire), The Works: Dance and Theatre Cornwall and University College Falmouth (South West). With additional support from Create (Ireland).


DIY 10:2013 Review Live Art Development Agency DIY was set up in response to the specific needs of artists working in Live Art, and particularly from an understanding that the development of a Live Art practice is as much about the exploration of ideas and experiences as training in skills and techniques. Since 2002, DIY has proved to be a unique and influential national initiative supporting artists to conceive and run unusual professional development projects for other artists. In 2013, DIY projects took many forms, from body combat intensives in London to sound explorations in Cornwall, an Elvis Presley pilgrimage in Porthcawl and a lapdancing weekend in Birmingham. And between them covered diverse subjects of investigation including America, selfies, masculinity, regrets, personal hauntings, Soho, Calamity Jane, cabaret turns, tribute artists, gypsy culture and much more. For the seventh time, DIY took place across the UK, with the support of 21 national DIY partners - the largest ever number of partners. Twenty-three projects were held between July and November 2013 - the largest number of DIY projects yet. After pinpointing Wales as a region with a need for more Live Art opportunities, we were able to get new Wales based partners on board: Chapter Arts Centre and National Theatre Wales, with a specific calls for proposals targeting Welsh artists. Additional partners helped further enhance the DIY experience, with Create Ireland coming on board to offer two bursaries for Irish artists to travel to take part in DIY projects and The Yard theatre hosting the closing DIY Picnic event. This pooling of expertise and resources between partners was yet again crucial to DIY始s success: sharing knowledge, facilities and resources, and turning lots of small budgets into one big one. The low-cost and high-impact nature of DIY is one of its most distinctive characteristics, and is a highly effective model for future collaboration and cooperation. DIY 10 clearly benefited the artistic and professional development of the participating artists and contributed to the skills and experiences of the artists who led the projects. Over 250 artists took part in the 23 projects. The responses from the project leaders and the participants was that DIY 10's emphasis on peer training empowers artists by allowing them to lead their own professional development; enables artists to develop creative approaches directly relevant to the needs of their practice; encourages artists to perceive their artistic output and professional development as inter-related and mutually beneficial components of a 'complete' practice; and inspires artists to take risks and think differently. As ever, the spectrum of participants in DIY was hugely varied with emerging, mid career and 驶legacy始 artists coming together to share ideas and experiences, proof that there始s a real thirst for life long artist development and much value in cross generational working. Backgrounds of participants and lead artists, like the nature of Live Art practice, were hugely varied. In a particularly eclectic year we saw projects led by acclaimed body artists, performance artists turned opera directors, alternative cabaret stars, theatre royalty and social sculptors and in turn the participants were even more diverse, creating a really exciting melting pot of influences and interests. In 2012 a survey of 60 artists was carried out to look at ways we might improve or develop the DIY model with the findings were fed into DIY 2013. The survey revealed huge respect for DIY and requested more cross disciplinary opportunities with different kinds of partner organisations and bigger budgets to realise more complicated projects. It also identified a number of artists who might lead DIYs, who were encouraged to apply in 2013, many of whom did. DIY 10 again demonstrated that artists are extremely good at conceiving and managing


complex and often demanding professional development initiatives. The role of the host organisations in DIY 10 was to facilitate, advise and support rather than organise and control. Each DIY 10 lead artist conceived their project, submitted an application detailing their idea, prepared publicity copy, managed recruitment of participants, handled all relevant participation fees, booked all necessary venues, facilitated their training day(s), and wrote an appraisal report. Each lead artist received £1,000, which covered their fee and all direct project costs, including venue hire, travel, materials and hospitality. Two artists chose to seek a small fee from participants which further contributed to their project costs. For the first time we offered an increased award of £1400 to Kira OʼReilly for a particularly ambitious DIY in body combat. The Live Art Development Agency and its partners financed and secured additional funding for the initiative, distributed a Call for Proposals via email, selected the lead artists through an open submission process, advised lead artists about the logistical and conceptual focus of their project, publicised the 23 projects under the DIY 10 umbrella through a Call for Participants, organised a final networking event — the ʻDIY picnicʼ— for all participants, in collaboration with The Yard, and collated this summary report. DIY 10 also generated a vast quantity of films and images reflecting and documenting some of this yearʼs DIY projects. These can all be found on the DIY 11 webpage, which can be found here. DIY future: Like previous DIY programmes, DIY 10 proved to be a very successful, instrumental, and cost effective initiative. Plans are already in place for DIY 11: 2014, which will develop the success of 2013 offering even more DIY awards in collaboration with over 20 DIY partners. It will also see our first international DIY taking place in partnership with Create, Ireland Future development and refinement could include: • Access to more tailored advice and guidance for the lead artists (if and when assistance is required). • The inclusion of travel budgets to enable greater networking between project leaders and participating artists. • A higher-profile evaluation of the projects, possibly through an event and/or publication that facilitates the sharing of outcomes and discussion of best practice. • A more generous financial base that provides artists' fees commensurate with the amount of time required to initiate, manage and evaluate a project, and remuneration for the host organisations. • Increased networking opportunities for the partner organizations to build relationships. DIY 10 focused on professional development within the Live Art sector. It is clear that the principles and form of the DIY programme would successfully translate to other artform practices.


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Ansuman Biswas Farplayer (with The Works Performing Arts Cornwall, University College Falmouth and Sound & Music)

Friday 2 to Sunday 4 August An exploration of sound in space, of chains, links and breaks, of transmission and reception, of listening and making.

Ansumanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s project is reflected by a series of videos that can be found on the DIY 10 report page found here.


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No Regrets, with Colchester Arts Centre Led by Geraldine Pilgrim When I was approached by LADA with an invitation to apply for a DIY10 commission I didn’t think I had an idea, so was about to write back and sadly say no, not this time. I then heard on a radio Edith Piaf singing “ Non, Je ne regrette rien,” a song I have always loved. I have always maintained that I had no regrets in my life but then realised that actually I did and was kidding myself. There was indeed a regret I wished I could undo but did not know how I could go about it. I then imagined how wonderful it would be if I could propose a DIY 10 project that could result in the participants to have no regrets. This led me on to think about how as practitioners we use our personal experiences in our work. I once created a project – never realised- that used an intense personal emotional experience and realised- that it was more of a therapeutic outpouring of grief than an experience that had been transformed though my artistic practice into a performance that could be communicated to and experienced by an audience. I then decided to combine these two aspects to create the No Regrets DIY and selected 5 participants who I felt would benefit most from the experience due to the nature of their regret and the feasibility of their no regrets outcome within the £100 individual budget so that the 2nd part of the project- the transformation of their experience through their artistic practice could be fully developed. St Martins Church was a perfect space – a beautiful, peaceful and calm environment that lent itself to allow 6 individuals- including myself- to express very personal regrets that were only to be heard by each other. It was important that we all felt a sense of trust between us and that is why it is a challenge to explain what happened in that extra ordinary weekend. It was such a privilege to have spent that time with all of the group and their commitment and care to the DIY. It was a really emotional weekend and it has helped me a lot, acknowledging if not quite yet coming to terms with my past. I did do my No Regrets Task and it eventually resulted in a happy outcome. I want to thank LADA and my fellow No Regretters for making this possible. Geraldine Pilgrim


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THE DEADWOOD STAGE – GETINTHEBACKOFTHEVAN “The project will couple desire with distaste, stemming from our current explorations into fantasy; the role of the ’exotic’ and the co-option of cultural imagery within fantasy and desire (sexual fantasy, role play, fancy dress, games and toys) – as well as the trend/fashion for retro imagery and the fetishisation of bygone eras.”

VS

VS

“The Calamity Jane DIY was great. Working with exertion and exhaustion really stayed with me. A great mix analyzing the gender and race politics of the film and getting to sing and dance and be ridiculously silly” Katie Baird – DIY10 participant @EilidhUkulele “@garethcutter: The DIY live art musical can and DOES exist. Thanks @GETINTHEBACK #DIY10” And it's beautiful! @GGibson3 Please excuse my language, but what a f**king awesome weekend that was with @GETINTHEBACK @thisisliveart #DIY10 Thank you. “Exploring the idea of the live art community musical with GETINTHEBACKOFTHEVAN has been one of the most exciting and creatively liberating projects I've had the pleasure of being involved in” Gareth Cutter – DIY10 participant


VS

VS Cast list (which aims to record the approximate and plural iterations and evolutions) Calamity Jane: Katy Baird, Gareth Cutter, Emma Moller, Mary Osborn, Day Sheehan, Ellie Stamp Wild Bill Hickok: Rachael Clerke, Morven Mulgrew Katie Brown: Lucy Hutson, Lucy McCormick, Louise Orwin Lieutenant Danny Gilmartin: No one. That darn cheatin' son of a gun! Francis Fryer: Gareth Cutter, Grace Gibson, Dina Gordon, Vanessa Hammick, Eilidh MacAskill, Morven Mulgrew, Adelaide Adams: Grace Gibson, Dina Gordon, Vanessa Hammick, Lucy Hutson, Lucy McCormick, Emma Moller, Mary Osborn, Ellie Stamp Henry Miller: Thomas Martin, Jennifer Pick, Day Sheehan Rattlesnake: Grace Gibson, Thomas Martin Susan: Lucy Hutson, Thomas Martin Injuns: Katy Baird, Gareth Cutter, Eilidh MacAskill, Thomas Martin, Emma Moller, Louise Orwin Horse: Dina Gordon, Eilidh MacAskill, Jennifer Pick, Drunk Painter: Thomas Martin Local types: Katy Baird, Hester Chillingworth, Rachael Clerke, Gareth Cutter, Grace Gibson, Dina Gordon, Vanessa Hammick, Joe Hood, Lucy Hutson, Eilidh MacAskill, Thomas Martin, Lucy McCormick, Emma Moller, Morven Mulgrew, Louise Orwin, Mary Osborn, Jennifer Pick, Day Sheehan, Ellie Stamp Audience: Katy Baird, Hester Chillingworth, Rachael Clerke, Gareth Cutter, Grace Gibson, Dina Gordon, Vanessa Hammick, Joe Hood, Lucy Hutson, Eilidh MacAskill, Thomas Martin, Lucy McCormick, Emma Moller, Morven Mulgrew, Louise Orwin, Mary Osborn, Jennifer Pick, Day Sheehan, Ellie Stamp Direction: Hester Chillingworth Musical Direction: Joe Hood


Walking bench, a proposal by Martha King, photo by Natasha Vicars.

Where the horizon moves | workshop Gustavo CirĂ­aco


Where the horizon moves | workshop Gustavo Ciríaco This workshop was part of an open-air performance project on landscapes as a shared fictional field and site of action. It took the form of a 3-day creative workshop for performing and visual artists interested in public interventions in nature. As main aims stood initially the promotion of a vivid discussion on horizon as a theme and its history and then later the use of the specific landscape of Yorkshire Sculpture Park as common ground for the proposals of the participants. The workshop took the following stages: a) presentation of the project’s history b) introduction to the theme of the workshop c) presentation of each of the participants’s relation to the theme in their works and interests d) theoretical discussion on the history around horizon and lanscape e) production of individual dioramas in the studio, portraying the home landscape of the participants, followed by group analysis and discussion f) practice orientated visits and discussions around the park g) development and sharing of 7 different individual proposals, which were performed/experienced by all the attending participants and followed by feedback sessions I wanted to offer the participants the possibility of conceiving actions and visual interventions that interrogated and rendered visible contextual aspects of a place, using the horizon as a field of action and imagination. It was an intensive and rewarding experience with a group of interesting and critically engaged group of artists. Despite the restricted time for a longer process of try-outs and discussion sessions, the group was very good to retain information, receive feedback and pro-actively improve their proposals. It was since the beginning, a group that was supportive and curious about each other’s processes, ideas and working frame. The Yorkshire Sculpture Park offered a sublime and instigating environment for our experiences. The staff was very cool and welcoming about what we were doing and with the precious accompaniment and support of Damon Waldock, we felt welcome to be, see and imagine possible researches and partnerships. An inspiring place to be.


Diy particpants feedback: I found the workshop one of the warmest, most productive and inclusive I've ever participated in. It never felt like we were rushing towards an end goal and a good amount of space was given to discussion and reflection as well as exploration of the park. It was a great group of people and it felt just the right size. (â&#x20AC;Ś) The workshop has inspired a lot of new thoughts for me. I left feeling invigorated and spurred on to continue exploring what making work in parks/ landscapes could mean. Martha King The 'Where the Horizon Moves' workshop in the Sculputure Park was an intensive and enriching experience. I enjoyed the talking, walking, and experimenting, and especially how these three modes overlapped very smoothly as we explored the park and ideas on the horizon. Also, it was great to have time towards the end of the workshop for our own experiments - although I wish there had been more time for this. Overall, Gustavo was a brilliant, focused facilitator. I really appreciated his ideas, comments and ways of working with us. Thank you! Katja Nyqvist The workshop was really productive for me, helping me think again about previous work and it's starting points, and developing something new in response. The workshop gave us time and openness to explore making work in the setting, learn about each other's work, and gain insights and inspiration from Gustavo's practice. It always felt like we had plenty of time to talk and explore ideas - but still had enough structure that it built up to everyone making something new and showing it (to each other). I hope we do find opportunity to work together again as a group. Natasha Vicars

'wherethehorizonmoves' is a pertinent exploration in a time where globalization and shifting concerns over where to to be in thew world is under current debate. My Phd explores the idea of 'otherhorizon' in terms of horizon not as line but as plane and from standing in a subjective perceived horizon. The YSP project enabled e to challenge how I was to undo the ideological ideas of horizon including the masculine representations of it in art practices. Most importantly it enabled me to explore how the body can be site, agent for the horizon. This has developed my Kite project as anti-hierarchical non-permanent architecture to capture shifting horizons in sites defined by edge. Joanna Geldart


Other horizon, a proposal by Joana Geldart

higher, higher, a proposal by Hanna Sullivan


Hedge-rove, a proposal by Sheila Ghelani

diorama exercise


..........................................................................................CONTACTS

e-mails gustavociriaco@gmail.com wherethehorizonmoves@gmail.com

website

gustavociria.co


!"#$%&'()*+$!"#$,)-.()*/$ 0)1-2(3(45$!6)#*72#)$.&#$(8*$0)6&-"8(&42#9$ :&8)48(2-$ Iʼve worried a lot about how to present the ʻfindingsʼ of this workshop in a way that doesnʼt replicate some of the problems we were trying to solve, or at least address. I think I learned some things in our time together and I think others felt the same way. I could tell you what happened but itʼs hard to describe. A lot happened and nothing happened. We took over the back room of a beautiful pub and sang karaoke one time because ʻkaraoke is the opposite of facebook.ʼ We made movies of each other and we photographed each other. We photographed ourselves. We ate lunch. We drank beers. Drank coffee. There were moments of connection and disconnection, arguments or disagreements, black holes of awkwardness that opened up inside us, and by us I mean any one of us at a given time: the individual who finds [her]self suddenly experiencing a feeling of nonbelonging in the group. There were places we couldnʼt all go together. There were ways in which we tried to find one another again. I like to think we were all pretty much committed to trying. Many of the DIY Reports read like this, which is fine because there ought to be a place for unproductive research and aimless non-collaboration. Relatedly, the point is that some things cannot be, and should not be, documented or performed for an audience. But in a visual culture – and the creeping performativity of social media – weʼre all increasingly in the position of having to decide which images and which aspects of ourselves will make the cut as we curate – and create? – our lives in public. The other issue, which of course is more complex, is one of external representation: what does it mean to signify or to exist for those of us whose bodies have been documented largely through the gaze of others? For women, queer bodies, and for nonwhite people in a colonial context, there is a lot of reparation to make in order to start redressing the balance of how we have been represented. The selfie is not and has never been a self-portrait in the art-historical or conventional sense. The portrait is supposed, at best, to reveal the essence or the aura of the sitter; a self-portrait is a form of radical disclosure. The selfie seems rather to be an incantatory device, a marker in a map, a way of manifesting your existence in the world as you yourself would like to see it. We created a closed circle and safe space that was also, of course, an audience – in contrast to the various publics (from oneʼs employer to oneʼs lover to the seven circles of hell separation of facebook) we ʻperformʼ for every day. We explored the spaces in between performing (also in the sense of ʻhigh performanceʼ, i.e., being a functional human being in the world) and being. Most of this will remain intentionally undocumented. The photographs that follow juxtapose everyoneʼs ʻselfieʼ with a photograph taken by someone else in the group. Everyone took turns to photograph each other and as such there were 10 photos of each participant to choose from. We looked through them all together, on the projector. And despite not knowing one another well, it was unanimous when we agreed that ʻyeah, thatʼs the one, thatʼs totally you.ʼ The you as seen by others doesnʼt look like the me we chose to represent ourselves; this may or may not be a dichotomy. JD 2014


DIY Report – Look At The E(s)tate We Are In Look At The E(s)tate We Are In was an excellent event that brought together some really exciting and thoughtful practitioners. Covering a wide and diverse range of approaches to practice, these five selected artists represented a broad overview of the ways in which artists have chosen to engage with working in a social context. I do not wish to break confidentiality so I will not be referring to the artists by name as some of the topics we discussed and autobiography shared was of an extremely personal nature. There were many discussions that broached the subject of ethics and responsibility in relation to socially engaged art. Some of the questions posed by the group were extremely complex and invested. For example, we questioned that if one does not live within the community that the artist is working in how can any kind of intervention be more than just parachuting in and ‘doing’ social engagement without any long-term impact. What are the responsibilities of the artist when ‘representing’ the interests of the group they are working with to a wider public? This was an extremely important question to pose as one of the artists had been accused of representing the estate in Sheffield that she had been commissioned to work on in a negative way by its residents with incredibly dire and upsetting consequences for both her and a resident of the estate who later committed suicide. Also, how do we balance our own need for artistic excellence with the needs of the community that we are working within and how useful is it to keep framing these practices as ‘art’ (referencing John Jordan’s eventual abandonment of the term within his own work). The curatorship of the event was also extremely successful. For example, it was only when I came to read the applications that I realised that I had not considered the role of digital technology in this area of work. This was because one of the practitioners that I selected worked with digital technologies within her practice. I made sure that I invited The Drawing Shed (a collective who have been working on an estate in East London) to present their work mainly because they use Twitter as a tool for exploring and making work. The balance between academic presentations and practical ones worked well and nether seemed to dominate the other. Professor Nic Rideout from Queen Mary unpicked the term participation and the neo-liberal assumptions that often underpin it while Katie Beswick from Leeds University discussed representations of the estate in popular culture/press and proposed how notions of the ‘hood’ (a term borrowed from North American slang) were positive ways through which members of estates could re-frame the negative positioning of their lives by others beyond the estate. In terms of practice based presentations Barby Asanty was incredible, talking about place, identity and context as well as Michael Needham who has successfully run a company on the estate where he lives just off the Hackney Rd called Neighbourhood Watching. Having run this for seven years he has now decided to close the company and leave the estate. He was asking what exit strategies need to be put in place and what responsibilities he has to the estate residents. The overall mix complimented each other and allowed the participants to think about estates and the complexities of social engagement in expansive and subtle ways. One element of the DIY that was particularly successful was the ‘meet the neighbours’. Originally I worried that this would seem a little tokenistic as each participant would only be spending two hours with the residents that were selected by me. I attempted to ensure a good level of representation in terms of who lives on the estate, choosing Diane, a resident in her seventies who has lived on the estate for most of her life, Mumtaz, a Muslim lady with two daughters, Mark, an ex-gangster who now runs a fishing club charity and Harry, a middle class architect who has bought his own flat and involves himself in community projects and sustainability. Both the residents and the participants loved this part of the DIY. In terms of


residents, Diane in particular enjoyed it, saying that she would love to meet them again and that it had made her month talking to such lovely people! Deciding to host the event in my flat was both rewarding and exhausting. As well as the residents there would also be some of the presenters that would want to stay so I would be cooking for up to ten people each day! I have to admit that by the third day I was relieved that I no longer had to do this! It was important that it was hosted in my flat as the mechanics of conviviality, sharing, being in someone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s private space (in terms of the participants) needed to be experienced in an invested way by all parties involved. There is still much to think about and the event posed as many questions as it did answers. The Drawing Shed have invited applications from the artists involved to participate in a residency on their estate so this may mean that this DIY has a life beyond the summit meeting which is fantastic. Katie Beswick has also agreed to write a review of the summit meeting for a-n magazine and we may also be collaborating on a longer article looking at art, estates and specific audiences, but this is still in the pipeline. The books on loan from LADA were devoured and served as yet another departure point for discussions. I think that we all left this event feeling stimulated, exhausted, inspired and even more determined to keep finding new approaches to working in this area of cultural production. I have entered here a series of responses and quotes from the artists involved in the event: Ania Bas: The summit had an incredibly interesting structure. Meeting on the estate in the living room and treating your leaving space as our research base was interesting in itself. Made me think about all this talk surrounding social practises that puts hospitality at the forefront. The intensity of the summit was also great. I wish on one level it wasn't in London so I cold extract myself from 'everyday' and commitment and be solely in it, pretending the rest of my life doesn't exist (at least for three days). I enjoyed the mix of speakers and artists taking part - coming from so different angles, starting points, levels of understanding and commitment to working in a certain way in a certain place. Nic's talk was incredible. Left me gobsmacked. He wasn't selling his research, or talking about himself (as we artists tend to) but was problematising the field. He made me think. I keep quoting him to over people. He opened the area that I don't have much knowledge of and I like when it happens, you get a window into a different way of thinking. I was very tired by Friday and by Friday I felt as we are repeating ourselves, nothing new was being said, that we turned back to quick-fix answers to questions that shouldn't have quick fix solutions applied to them. I felt that we didn't use it as an opportunity to talk about structural changes that are within our reach. I loved the collective feel, the sharing of meals, the effort, energy and general wonderfulness put into it by you and Andy. The fact that your flatmate and neighbours were involved was also important, it made it all real. Work on estates with living, breathing people who have their worries, stories, outlooks on life, a view of London from their kitchen window and go swimming at 7am in the lido.


Louise Brodie: I was initially apprehensive about attending Jordan's DIY. I don't consider myself to be someone who sits comfortably within an academic dialogue. Upon arrival at Jordan's flat I was immediately set at ease. His choice to frame the 3 days as a summit and host it in his own flat couldn't have worked better. It set a precedent for the convivial nature of the 3 days and spoke volumes of Jordan's own artistic practice. The structure of the 3 days was fantastically varied and for me offered a great dynamic to the discussion and dialogue that insued. I was inspried but each new encounter and encouraged by the diversity of people. The 3 days really opened me up to a new community of practitioners and bodies of work. Jordan held and hosted the group with an honest and authentic energy which I think allowed a lovely openness to exist between us all. I have been left with much to think about, talk about and read. I'm incredibly excited about how this 3 day encounter with impact upon my own artistic and teaching practice. Jonathan Grieve: My thoughts about the diy summit were unexpected to say the least. My position was slightly different compared to the other participants in that I had a history of work in the community and that I currently lived in social housing but was not currently engaged in delivering artwork in that context. I thought the structure of three days was really well planned and thought through, and that the academics and artist who visited were absolutely the right people to be there. The 3 days made me reflect on the work I do and have done, something I haven't had the privilege to do in many years. And it was amazing hear about the kind of work that other artists are doing. However my feelings toward this kind of work is ambivalent. I feel that there is a tendency to use artists as a cheap way of a community selling itself and trying shrug off a bad image or reinforce a positive image. I have a feeling that the legacy of neo liberalism is that somehow the function of art is to be an extension of a local councils marketing department. In some of the accounts of the work that people have done there was an element of avoiding difficult issues that come up instead preferring to just something 'nice' instead. Having said that I was impressed with your approach with lupa, where you had succeeded in putting performance art in amongst the everyday world of your council estate without compromise, allowing people to make up their own minds whether they liked it or not or whether they wanted to participate. I think this is a testament to your personality and ability to talk anyone and everyone, meeting Diane was the proof really, her descriptions of the work made me realize that what people find inspirational about art is that they see other people willing to express themselves and this somehow gives them courage to do it themselves. However, I found myself wondering what kind of art I would want to participate in on my council estate in Hornsey, rather than having a project for other people to participate in. I also felt that people's needs on an estate are to do with dealing with isolation and meeting each other and consequently doing things together. Although art can help with that it isn't a primary function of art to make that happen. All in all I found the 3 days very interesting and that it caused me to re-think my attitudes to art in this context. And I had no idea that so much of this kind of work was being done. Haringey needs some. Anna Bosworth: LADA & The Estate that we're living in symposium / gathering / conference / meeting of minds was a chance for me to reflect as a practitioner on the nuances and issues thrown up when working (for me as a digital theatre practitioner) with young people who live in and around Estates in inner city London. As a freelancer, I often work on my own within a participatory session and don't necessarily get to reflect on learning that occurs during projects, particularly in difficult sessions. A recent project I undertook involved the presentation of an Estate through a piece of theatre and then the subsequent writing of a new


piece of work by the participants, about the Estate. It was interesting to reflect on this with the other members of Jordan's symposium and unpick parts of the project. The blend of speakers and the process of inhabiting Jordan's Estate in Bethnal Green provoked lively debate and discussion across the 3 days. It was interesting to compare ideas and thoughts from members of the local council, housing association, academics and artists alike and I felt like Jordan provided a balanced yet provocative blend of speakers. My absolute favourite part was spending an afternoon with one of the local residents who took me on a personal tour of Bethnal Green and introduced me to her family. This part for me, really opened up a space for reflection upon what stereotypes exist around Estates and their inhabitants, and in particular, how I view different parts of the city as a whole. This micro to macro reflection continued for me particularly in the delivery of Katie's PhD paper, which focused on SPID and applied theatre practices in particular. Her references to the 'fetishization' of Estates within culture particularly resonated with me across some of my own practice particularly in London and Harlem (NYC) where I have worked in 'hood' settings with 'hood' kids. It was great to meet and network with Katie and hear about her practice. Although personally, some of the Live Art references were a little vague / foreign to me (my own background in academia is very digitally theatre orientates so some of the art references were a little lost on me) I really enjoyed sharing practice cross sector and learning + engaging with other professionals in this setting. Jordan was an amazing host and I hope I can now call him a friend. I will encourage more of my friends to participate with any events from LADA as it was a fantastic experience. Thank you!


Soho Sideshow Artsadmin and The Soho Society Joshua SOFAER with Stacy MAKISHI George CHAKRAVARTHI Nigel BARRETT and Louise MARI Peter REDER Susannah HEWLETT hosted by The Soho Society supported by Manick Govinda, Artsadmin Soho Sideshow was an opportunity to discover more about the history and current life in Soho and to develop a bespoke proposal for the area with production support. 6 midcareer artists working under the umbrella of Live Art spent a day visiting places and meeting people. They formed proposals which were then presented to key stake holders. The visit on Friday 30th August included: • an introduction to The Soho Society • lunch at the oldest Chinese restaurant in Soho • visit to China Town and the Chinese Community Centre • information about Event Licensing • a visit to The Academy Club • a visit to The House of St Barnabas • information about Planning Law • meeting with the Vicar of Soho • a historical tour of Soho, ‘Vintage 1950s’ and ‘Roots of the Swinging Sixties’ The proposals were presented on Friday 11th October and included: • Stacy Makishi’s binaural tour from St. Anne’s to the Chapel of the House of St. Barnabas • George Chakravarthi’s cover version of ‘Lola’ by the Kinks with a community music video • Peter Reder’s one-to-one tours of Soho by local residents • Susannah Hewlett’s ‘Soho Soap Opera’ and ‘Sex workers in Soho’ • Nigel Barrett and Louise Mari’s immersive intergenerational Tudor masque through the streets of Soho • Joshua Sofaer’s ‘Banner Gallery’ on flagpoles of Soho, and ‘Little Museum’ in unused business windows It is hoped and imagined that these proposals will lead to productive working relationships between these artists and Soho.

‘[A] brilliant project. It has been really revelatory and we've met some wonderful people.’ Nigel Barrett and Louise Mari ‘This DIY project was filled with the most inspirational and generous artists. There were many opportunities to cross-fertilize ideas, exchange thoughts and share inspiration. As a facilitator, Joshua is a consummate professional who is also warm, generous, experienced and insightful. We were spoon-fed research, inspiration, networks, production support and even a 9 course Chinese dinner! I am confident that many of our


proposals will blossom to fruition in Soho. The Soho Sideshow did everything it could to help our projects get through the door.’ Stacy Makishi ‘I am unaware of a similar project in the past that involved the Soho Society, so yours was a very interesting, unexpected way to have us engage not only with the process of selection and commission but also with contemporary media. To have practical experience of the commissioning process was quite new. I'd be delighted if any of the projects happened. Just to have such events happening in the neighbourhood would be lots of fun.’ David Gleeson, Soho Society ‘I thought it was a great model that I'd love to see used more. Such a refreshing contrast to the solitary writing of proposals and posting to some unknown and anonymous funding or commissioning person. It's a very nice idea to have some orientation and contact with other artists and possible venues before getting down to coming up with an idea. It also made me think in a general way, how productive it could be to have this group social side of things, as part of the process, even though the proposals or ideas that come out of it are basically individual.’ Peter Reder ‘A brilliantly planned creative experience with developmental time for ideas as well as a more than handy introduction to the Soho Society (and beyond) in order that these projects may actually be realised in the future. Personally it provoked a wealth of ideas in me - and at this stage I'd be excited to pursue the realisation of any of them.’ Susannah Hewlett ‘…it's been fun for me to have been part of the project, especially as more people in the Soho Society were drawn in. There's been a sense of enthusiasm in the office and when the topic arises at Exec meetings. I'm sure that will continue as things begin to happen. It's a good way to bring people together, cutting across the usual lines. And for the Soho Society it's good to have a part in something that's (for us at least) fun, rather than a problem (or routine).’ Bob O’Dell, Soho Society ‘…impeccably organised, educational and inspirational. It was great to meet the other artists and the various organisations, societies and patrons of Soho. The historical tour of Soho was particularly interesting and inspirational in navigating my proposal. I am now better informed about the past and present history of Soho, have been enabled to conceive a new piece of work, and have eaten in the oldest Chinese restaurant in Soho!’ George Chakravarthi ‘I thought it was a brilliant DIY project. I thoroughly enjoyed sharing time with the well chosen group of mid-career artists on the reconnaissance trip to Soho, to discover aspects that I hadn't known about the area, to meet the passionate and committed members of the Soho Society. The event certainly inspired some wonderfully good proposals from the participating artists. The presentations by the artists of their proposed idea for making work was diverse, unusual, unique and in all cases imbued with humour, warmth and joy. I really hope that they will all be realised and I am more than happy to continue advising them to encourage further development and realisation.’ Manick Govinda, Artsadmin


COMBATIVE MANIFESTOS – THINKING THROUGH THE BODY Led by Kira O’Reilly Attendance The call had a good response, I was happily surprised. From the applications 14 were selected. One had to withdraw due to other commitments and another could only come along as an observer on the final day due to a previous injury. Interestingly far more women applied, normally grappling is dominated by men. The majority was London based but someone else came from Bristol and Brighton, some one came from Italy, another from Ireland. I had some knowledge of practice and previous connection with some but by no means all, so it was a delightful unfolding, meeting and engaging with some new practitioners. I was also concerned to draw on a range or experiences and background, allowing some overlap of association (eg three people who had been on Jamie Lewis Hadley’s Breaking Kayfabe DIY in 2011) to input as well as people coming from entirely other backgrounds. Each and ever participant was 100% on board every second, in a challenging and demanding environment. I was astonished and thrilled with their gutsy engagement and meeting with ideas and activities. The success of the workshop was really the willingness of the group to be so open, willing and generous. Space Using one of the studio spaces at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) worked well to a large extent. It was a fairly corporate looking room, normally used for seminars but it was large enough for our number and purposes. It lacked ventilation and the florescence lights were not fabulous but the gym I had in mind would of not been much better. I hired mats from James Duncalf, our grappling instructor, which covered almost the entire space so that we occupied them for all grappling, writing, reading and discussion activities. I felt that it was exciting and valuable to position grappling practices within this type of academic space and to consider what it produced, just as interesting as if we had been producing texts, readings and writings on the mats of the gym. Instruction: The ethos drew on some key inspirations and principles: Safety and boundaries: Annie Sprinkle’s “don’t do anything you don’t want to do” Goat Island’s democratizing of material ownership, i.e. anything that is generated in the workshop is owned by everyone, any of the methods that I introduce are for anyone to take on and make their own. Naljorpa Chhi’med Kunzang: a Buddhist teacher who first brought me into direct combat with fighting and writing. In my facilitation of the workshop I wanted to keep things safe and on track with a certain amount of formal structure and discipline but in such a way that responded and supported the groups own suggestions and emerging ideas. This seemed to work, including the group suggesting developments that I was considering but didn’t want to impose on them. We learnt grabbling techniques with James for about three hours a day, normally in two sections, on the last day in one. He also stayed with us for a lot longer and was very generous with his time, energy and input into other areas, for example we did a circuit that involved martial arts conditioning exercise and writing exercises so that the writing was embedded within strenuous physicality. This developed into sparring/ writing sessions so that the two activities could interpenetrate. On the final afternoon, the conclusions phase was mostly dedicated to quick experiments and trial with


performance ideas, again strongly requested by the group, with my trying to encourage them to not talk too much but to simply do, so that people could leap in, maximize having a ready audience to feedback and nurture the ideas. Some beautiful texts were produced individually and collectively. Considerable research on manifestos was presented formally and informally which in turn fed into a shared learning and forming. This idea of ‘working with the body’ can sometimes seem like a hackneyed and unquestioned trope in performance circles and academia, so many concepts and experiences of ‘Body’ and ‘body, it can sound somewhat meaningless, flat and not really urgent, imperative or vital. Additionally different models produce many learnings, knowledges and indeed many bodies, it’s always multiple, complex and often subtle. It seemed that the shared experience of this workshop was a concrete method to approach some of these questions. Limits were definitely met, new experiences engaged with and knowledges encountered. Budget The budget worked out very well. All costs were adequately covered. The in kind support from QMUL was invaluable in realising this as was the mat hire which was inexpensive thanks to James. Length of workshop 3 days, 10 – 5 with an hour break for lunch. From my point of view, for a first experiment with this kind of workshop 3 days was an optimum amount of time. Also the budget would not of been adequate for anything longer without compromising costs. Some of the feedback from the group has been that they wish it had been longer, which is encouraging and promising but I am not convinced that many could of sustained the physical demands of the workshop for a longer duration. Feedback Good There was lots of very positive feedback given verbally from everyone, which I was delighted with. 9 out of 13 completed feedback forms that were also overwhelmingly positive. There was a lot of excitement and pleasure at being given challenging, moderately tough physical demands and rising to them at the same time as writing and looking at manifesto forms was being also woven in. Not so good Injury: Over all a very helpful learning curve for me. I write this as I nurse a wrestling injury. When involved in martial arts on an ongoing basis, injury and recovering from it becomes part of the landscape, albeit a frustrating aspect, however it is an altogether different situation during a three day arts workshop when expectations are knowledges are varied and not adjusted to this. There were some participants with considerable dance and other body discipline practices. I wrongly assumed a greater proficiency and awareness of how to keep ones body safe. I was wrong. One dancer misunderstood how to take care of her head and neck in a grappling context and came away with a bad headache and pain that lasted several days try to and caused her distress. I learnt about this from her feedback form and phoned her immediately to check in with her and discuss it. She was fine but rightly wanted to let me know. It was extremely helpful and her willingness to highlight it and talk helped me identify some blind spots and gave me


some ideas about how to avoid this or at least further militate against this in the future. 1. Marital arts are a risk activity, establish expectations from the beginning. Injury happened and can be minimised. 2. Have a form that people sign acknowledging this. This brings the message home and is a common convention in horse riding. 3. Have an injury report procedure and discuss with a group how when one is hurt one often doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to bother or worry anyone. Understandable but perhaps something to try and ignore. 4. Reinforce these ideas when learning wrestling, break falls etc. James instruction was impeccable in all of these areas, he carefully taught break falls, which is how you fall safely, BUT I think I could have perhaps had a pause to discuss safety and a reminder to folks not to go at 100%. Over all there was nothing too serious and certainly nothing that seemed to require any medical attention, I did check in with people continually so I appreciated it when one other person mentioned an upper back/neck problem and managed her involvement accordingly, stepping in and out as needed. From knowing about it I was able to monitor it and she seemed fine. Over all a very helpful learning curve for me. I write this as I nurse a wrestling injury. When involved in martial arts on an ongoing basis, injury and recovering from it becomes part of the landscape, albeit frustrating, however it is an altogether different situation during a three day arts workshop when expectations are knowledges are varied and not adjusted to this.

CONCLUSIONS: I am absolutely thrilled that the feedback has been so positive, that people so obviously has such a productive and enjoyable time. I found this really validating, to make the transition from harbouring a passion, a questions and an obsession within my own private practice to opening it up with a bunch of questions to a larger, keen and willing group and to find a positive and affirming proof of concept. It encourages me to find ways and means to continue and to develop this line of investigation and I have ideas for several intertwining tiers of how to do so. I am very happy that some of the participants are already developing their own artistic ideas from starting points the discovered during the workshop and am interested in seeing how these evolve. They are very different from my own ideas, rushing to be presented/cooked where as I take a longer, more process based, emergent view. This suggests to me that longer workshops could be really valuable, and also perhaps another format, including sessions spaced out over weeks and even months would be interesting. I can imagine a group who regularly take conventional grappling training but who also meet in unconventional grappling scenarios to experiment with ideas towards development. Attendance was made possible by this being a funded venture and so made freely available. It is doubtful that a great many of the participants could of otherwise done it. I am entirely delighted that I took the plunge and the risk to submit and realize this within a DIY context. Thanks to Live Art Development Agency for approaching and encouraging me to apply, I not sure that I would of otherwise. The workshop was exactly what I imagine a DIY could or should be, skills sharing, empowering


development creating all kinds of artistic autonomies, alliances and new, ribald life forms. Quotes from the feedback forms: “Excellent in general. I found the entire three days stimulating, challenging, scary, fun, transformative (now I know I'm a little fighter!!) physically and mentally toning, well organised, inclusive of everyone (especially me being the oldest and not the fittest!) creative, good humoured and friendly.” “I did enjoy the feeling that words are coming out from tip of pen in my had out of nowhere.” “Grapple bodies and Grab words…..” “. . . learning things like the choke hold do make you feel a little more empowered when in intimidating situations.” “An incredible experience to work in a variety of physical and mental states to achieve a significant understanding of use of the body and manifestos in art.” “Exhausting, Exhilarating & Affirming.” “, it was a great experience between theory and practice, with a beautiful collaborative way.” “I found useful the concept of relation of bodies during fight, where one is always searching for the other and vice versa, they are in conflict and they need each other at the same time.” “Writing under exhaustion, thinking under exhaustion, teaching your body new ways of interacting with one another.” “I was about precision, repetition, awareness of your body and your mind and the ones of others.” “I loved the combination of activities, the vigour with which we were encouraged to do everything. The juxtaposition between conversation, ideas, and writing was in good ratio with the physical work we were doing. I got a huge amount out of it – partly in affirming some ideas I had, partly in introducing me to a whole new world of MA which I never would have encountered, and also for sparking new insight, inspiration, conversation etc. I found the whole group dynamic was extremely supportive and cohesive.” “I think it's a great way of opening up practices and dialogue between artists, and a wonderful opportunity to have a small look into someone else's line of enquiry. I would definitely apply to some more next time round.”


DIY10 - FINAL REPORT LUCKY PIERRE

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Workshop Website Event Website Lucky Pierre Website

DIY10 WORKSHOP SUMMARY- Saturday 24 to Sunday 25 August from 10:00 to 17:00 Everyone hates America. Everyone loves America. Or everyone both loves and hates America. America has caused wars, economic destruction, and environmental disaster. America has preserved democracy, generously given to others, elected a black president, come to the aid of Britain. In this project, we will create a forum for non-American presenters to research and dissect, explore, discuss, protest, celebrate, and/or argue about America. With the American project as our subject matter - and using tools developed by Lucky Pierre the core workshop group will research, discuss, and problematize the use of aesthetic techniques, activism, protest, and training/education to address complex issues through hybrid forms. We will explore ideas of collaboration, authorship, ownership, and moving from research to action – while using technology for organizing, outreach and distribution. This collaborative project will include readings, presentations, and on-line meetings and prompts throughout the summer leading to the London workshop in August. WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS


Samantha Comelli (London) Alastair Flindall (Birmingham) Gary Gardiner (Glasgow) Lola Godoy (London) Alisa Leimane (London) Laura McDermott (Birmingham) Anni Movsisyan (London) Laura Rosemary Murphy (Bristol) Sophie Nathan (London) Ian Nulty (Glasgow) Albert Smith (Birmingham) EVENT SUMMARY Ownership means acquiring, maintaining, and wielding power (the power to define, select, include, and exclude). What are the sources of American ownership? What is the history of American power? How is that power exercised today? I Hate America! (I Love America): Who Owns Myth, Pop, Money, Race, and Terror in the Land of the Free? is a six-month collaboration and conversation between artists in the UK and the US - culminating on November 30, 2013 in concurrent daylong events in London and Chicago. Through presentations, conversation and video, the 10-hour event features artists, activists, scholars, and volunteers who will research, dissect, explore, discuss, protest, celebrate, and argue about the United States. UK and US events will take place simultaneously on Saturday, November 30, 2013 at the Glass Factory in London (from 1:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.) and Defibrillator Gallery in Chicago (from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.). I Hate America! (I Love America): Who Owns Myth, Pop, Money, Race, and Terror in the Land of the Free? is supported by DIY 10: 2013, a Live Art Development Agency initiative in collaboration with Platform. Additional funding for the project provided by the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, New York. The work is produced by Lucky Pierre and is created, organized and realized with 31 collaborating UK and US artists. Community may or may not be built, but action will be attempted through discussions between former empire and shaky empire. EVENTS ON NOVEMBER 30, 2013 1- Live Presentations: A 10-hour live event in London with 20 presentations responding to the question: “Who owns myth, pop, race, money, and terror in the Land of the Free?” Each presentation will respond to one of the topics in the form of an “historical re-enactment.” The presentations may be performance, film, music, or lecture; however the presenter chooses to interpret topic and form. Presenters will be members of the core group of UK and US artists, and invited guest presenters. 2 - Conversation between Chicago and London: A live 10-hour conversation will take place between volunteers in Chicago and London responding to “Who owns myth, pop, race, money, and terror in the Land of the Free?” The video-conferenced conversation will be broadcast live on the Internet. 3 - Video Channel: 10 hours of video programming relating to the question “Who owns myth,


pop, race, money, or terror in the land of the free?â&#x20AC;? The program will include curated film and video as well as found material from YouTube. The program will presented at both the London and Chicago venues (single channel video projection) while simultaneously being broadcast online. PARTICIPANTS: Holly Abney! Catalina Acosta-Carrizosa! Hiba Ali! Teresa Albor! Jen Blair! Robin Cline! Samantha Comelli! Cupola Bobber! Alex Eisenberg! Lucy Ellinson! Everything is Terrible! Soren Evinson! Alastair Flindall! Richard Fox! Melinda Fries! Lola Godoy! Craig Paul Green! Travis Hale! Mairin Hartt! Aaron Henderson! David Isaacson! Chuck Jones! Kevin Kaempf! Nancy Klehm! David Kodeski! Jeff Kowalkowski! Felicia Lang! Alisa Leimane Heather Lindahl Lora Lode! James Marriott

Laura McDermott! Linda Garcia Merchant Robert Metrick Jason McInnes Ross Middleton! Harun Morrison! Anni Movsisyan! Emily Mulenga! Laura Rosemary Murphy! Sophie Nathan! Matthew Nicholas! M Ryan Noble! Ian Nulty! Chloe Perkis Chris Schoen Antonis Sideras Albert Smith! Kate Spence Randy Stearns Laura Stempel! N'Tanya' Davina Stewart! Alison Stokes! Piers Storey! Bill Talsma! Michael Thomas! Edward Thomas-Herrera! Fereshteh Toosi! Jane Trowell! Don Washington! Emmit X. Wright Mary Zerkel


Marcia Farquhar Taking It Personally (with Norwich Arts Centre) Sunday 3 to Monday 4 November Marcia Farquhar invites you to join her for a 24 hour experience to think about how the personal can be political, how the truth can be a lie, and how stories go round and round like records.

Marciaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s project is represented by a film made by Reynir Hutber that can be found on the DIY 10 report page here.


Neil Bartlett I Live Here (with The Showroom, University of Chichester) Saturday 2 November to Sunday 3 November To take a roomful of young artists through the process of devising an (auto)biographical performance â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from start to finish â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in the space of two days.


Participant responses: I found the time constraint of having a public performance after 16 hours of making both nerve-racking and exciting. It was refreshing to make decisions quickly and to not obsess too much over the details by just letting things present themselves naturally in this fast moving process. Setting myself artificially short deadlines and presenting stuff to an audience is something I think that could be beneficial to my practice, which sometimes moves (painfully) slowly. I had worked with the idea of putting my words directly into another performers mouth a bit before, but the weekend really expanded my sense of what was achievable as a performer that has primarily worked solo. The process of using a chorus to articulate a unified ‘I’ and at other time distort it, changed my thinking. David Sheppeard

I’ve always been a bit cautious of making autobiographical performance. I worried that my own life might not be interesting for an audience, or might seem self-indulgent. This opinion has shifted over the weekend, however, through the realization that autobiographical performance is as much about its audience as it is about the performer. This shift in thinking was initiated by something Neil talked about. It was the idea that we almost always go to a performance hoping to see something of ourselves. For example, we won’t go to see Macbeth and be affected by how much we liked watching Macbeth’s story. Instead, we’ll go and be most engaged when we’re able to say about the performance, “that’s me! I’ve felt that!” We love it when someone else’s story articulates something about ourselves that we might not have known. This is why autobiographical performance can be particularly potent: the performer is speaking from real experience; making their connection with the audience and their experiences all the more direct. Anonymous

I’ve always found autobiography a difficult place to start, so it was great to step out of my comfort zone and confront some things about myself – including the how awkward I felt about myself at 13. After the first day, I was really motivated to start writing my own autobiographical show. Allan Taylor

As an artist who tends to avoid apparent autobiographical content in devising and presenting work, I saw how through working with other people, Neil managed to tell his story through our words and our experiences, therefore, not telling his story at all. What seemed like quite a personal experience actually became a shared experience, where each performer and the audience had their own narrative to focus on, their story. Thinking into my practice, where I have the task of creating a solo performance, I am now keen to try some of Neil’s devising techniques, to generate material that may or may not be autobiographical. I am very humbled to have worked with Neil and feel like his wisdom and strength as an artist and a person will resonate within me. Anthony Pothecary


DIY 10 Report Probing Elvis Nigel Barrett and Louise Mari Supported by LADA, NTW and Chapter Arts Centre. In which the group reconsider our own practice by exploring the working methods and practices of Tribute Artists.


Project Dates : 27th-29th Sept / 8th -10th November 2013 Location : 10th Anniversary Elvis Festival, Porthcawl, Wales. / Chapter Arts Centre, Cardiff. Participants : Part 1 : Nicki Hobday, Amelia Stubbersfield, Greg Wohead, Haitch Plewis, Ellie Stamp, Eleanor Fogg, Laura Hemming-Lowe, Sara Davies, Sarah Punshon, Daniel Bye, Beth Richards, Matt Boyle, Racheal Clerke. Part 2 : Nicki Hobday, Amelia Stubbersfield, Greg Wohead, Haitch Plewis, Ellie Stamp, Eleanor Fogg, Sara Davies, Sarah Punshon, Daniel Bye, Beth Richards, Racheal Clerke, Siobhan Grice, Daniel Evans, Robert Minhinnik. Budget : Travel for reconnaissance trip £150 Travel Porthcawl and Cardiff: £220 Fee for Nigel and Louise : £100 Fee for Juan Lazano for workshop : £100 Hire of workspaces for 2 days in YMCA in Wales : £150 Accommodation : £280 = £1000


The Project :

Every year, for one weekend only, the small seaside town of Porthcawl, in South Wales, is invaded by 30,000 people, who come for the world's largest Elvis Presley Festival and Tribute Artist competition. It's the same amount of people that attend the Latitude Festival. It is 3 days of adoration, hagiography, and joyful tribute that is fuelled by alcoholic consumption on an industrial scale and fancy dress.


We took 13 artists for the weekend there. They applied for very different reasons : to find a lost brother, to explore family mental heath issues, confused identity, to think about their home town, to meet up with fiends who they met on our DIY9 trip to Morecambe, to push forward ideas which seemed related to the workshop, curiosity. The idea was to immerse them in the hysteria of the weekend, to study the practice and discipline of the Tribute Artists and to use this as an opportunity to gain a new perspective on their own practice, to make friends, share ideas and have fun. The artists would use the atmosphere of the whole town, the event, the people and the Tributes themselves to create a new piece of work or idea. Six weeks later the group would meet up again for an intensive weekend working to show their discoveries at the Experimentica Festival of Live Art in Cardiff. Everything we hoped would happen happened and lots of brilliant things we never even anticipated happened. The festival itself was, for most of us, the weirdest weekend of our lives. Part 1 The Elvis Festival


In the first stage the group was asked to arrive on the Friday evening or Saturday morning and just wander the town and take it all in. When we proposed the idea for the DIY we had not anticipated that the whole town would be booked up a year in advance, so we put a call out to locals who very generously put us up. Three of us stayed with Nigelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mum and dad, all the girls with a local beach artist, Siobhan, and the boys stayed with local nurse, Andrea. The pubs and nighclubs were open from 9am and every venue has a PA and a queue of Elvis Tribute Artists waiting to show their talents ( or, more commonly, not) The main events take place in the Official Festival in the Grand Pavilion, on the seafront, and then the more alternative and hedonistic aspects take place towards the funfair in the east of the town. We had made contact with the festival organiser on a reconnaissance trip earlier in the month and he very generously got us in to all add on events in the Pavillion and after parties for free. Our artists embedded themselves excellently well in the Saturday mornings festivities and it took quite a while to round them up and get them to the room in the local YMCA in the high street we had hired

The purpose of the 2pm meeting was get to know each other, share our interests and reasons for wanting to come on the workshop. This went very well probably helped by the fact that before we got them around the table they had all had a few pints, a singalong and a bag of chips,


in the spirit of the weekend. After a couple of hours discussion, the rest of the day was spent simply watching people paying tribute to Elvis. -An important distinction that we learned from Darren (Graceland) Jones, who won first prize in the best Welsh Elvis category, is that no one there is an impersonator, they are Tribute Artists because " You cannot impersonate perfection. You can only pay tribute " The night culminated in attending The Elvies. This is the official competition, the Oscars of the festival. There are categories in Best Movie, Vegas, Female, GI ,Welsh, 68 Special and Best Festival Elvis. All of our participants sang and danced and fell in love with Gordon Elvis from Malta who won Best Vegas Elvis. Then we got invited to the after party. The Elvis Tribute Artist after party. Everyone there had sideburns. It couldn't have been better.


On Sunday morning we met up again at the Pavillion to witness all the different Elvis's all on stage at the same time performing gospel songs around a grand piano. Elvis church. Then at 2pm the weekend culminated in a workshop with Juan Lazano, a highly skilled musician and tribute artist from Merthyr Tydfil. He has won pretty much every Elvis category at some point in his career. We were joined by Andrea and Siobhan our beautiful hosts and their children. Everyone loved it. How can you not love a two hour workshop on how to be Elvis Presley from a tribute artist at the top of their game. Juan talked for an hour about why he loves Elvis, how he works, what he thinks is important, the difference between him and other ETAs, what he brings of himself to the act, the danger of getting lost in your tribute. Then he led a workshop taking us through Elvisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; evolving physicality from the wide stance hip thrusting of his early years, his fidgeting, his leading left side, the bow, the twist, the clicks, to the closed stance minimal movements of the later Vegas years. It was a revelation.


So that was Porthcawl. everyone left very excited, hungover and full of chips and ideas.


The Second Part : Experimentica

Six weeks later we met up on the Saturday morning at Chapter in Cardiff The staff and other artists at Experimentica could not have been more welcoming and hospitable or more helpful The participants came ready with a notâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;fully-formed idea of a piece of work they wanted to make and we had 36 hours before we opened the Stwdio in Chapter to an audience. We started by biting the bullet and showing what we had. Then we all helped each other to be ready, adding an outside eye, making costume, directing each other, rehearsing, learning songs. Richard, one of the invigilators from the gallery, played the guitar for Amelia, we all learnt a dance to perform as part of Gregâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s idea, Sarah ran the tech with the amazing technicians who fell over backwards to help us. We got there, just. it was an incredible 36 hours of eyebleeding creativity that resulted in a two and half hour long show/sharing. We filled the Stwudio with tables and chairs and candles. We had an Elvis hairstyling salon, film, Hamlet, Freddie Mercury, Madonna and Lou Reed tributes, poetry, dancing, singing, some inspired comparing, autobiography and some gags. It was great. Our favourite part of the night was the contributions from the local people we had collected along the way - Siobhan the beach artist showed an amazing


film of her work, Daniel Evans, who we met in a hotel in Porthcawl and is writing his PhD on Porthcawl, class and the Elvis Festival, put his written speech in his pocket and spoke eloquently and insightfully, contextualising the whole evening beautifully. The evening ended when Robert Minhinnick, the award winning local poet who we met on the beach, read his forty minute searing poetic paean to the Elvis festival to the astonishment of all.


What we all got out of Probing Elvis This DIY was very different from our DIY in Morecambe last year in that this time the stimuli were all very external. It was not an inward journey but very much an outward one. It was about immersing yourself in a (for most) very unfamiliar culture, an extreme environment, facing new skill challenges and working hard and fast. And yet the results for us and lessons learnt have seemed similarly impressive and profound. For Nigel and I, I think the friendships we have made have been the lasting benefit of the DIY projects. We continue to see and support and receive support from, the participants from Morecambe, three of whom joined us again in Wales, and the participants themselves have formed a network of support for each other. This closeness, won in an environment of personal risk and honesty in extremely exposing situations, seems to last beyond the DIY situation and continues to do so with Probing Elvis. Already invitations to join each other in seeing each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work are flying around and offers of collaboration and places to stay and things to do together have been coming thick and fast since we left Porthcawl in September. Professionally Nigel and I were able to explore a new idea about producing a version of Hamlet where all the characters are played by Elvis at different times in his life, which we would not have been able to do otherwise. As a direct result of this we now have a meeting with John McGrath of National Theatre Wales to see how we might take the idea further. We have all made brilliant contacts with the amazing people at Chapter, which


will hopefully lead to further collaborations in the future. This has been another amazing opportunity to push ourselves as artists and enter new and unfamiliar worlds, which we would never have the chance to do otherwise. We would like to thank you again wholeheartedly for continuing to run the DIY scheme, which is fast establishing itself as the highlight of our year.

"Probing Elvis was an inspiring couple of weekends in Wales spent watching, listening, experiencing, imitating, responding, making, developing, shaking, pointing, singing, dancing, collaborating and performing. A group of suspicious minds, some conversations, and a lot of action. I had a wonderful time" Xx nicki

Lovely seeing you all again. Stay in touch with all your performances. You know where we are if you're passing by this way. Wishing you every success and happiness and all your creative pursuits. Much love. Siobhan, Rose and Yinka Xxx Yep, great weekend guys. Had a great time and really enjoyed how supportive, focused, creative and lovely everyone was. And loved the night of performance . My mum and dad loved it too. Amelia Thank you all for a wonderful weekend. So nice getting to know you all better. Ellie xxx It was so good to meet you all – if you’re ever in Devon or Cornwall let me know, and if you need a squishy sofa to stay on in the area it’s yours! Hope to keep in touch, let me know about your upcoming performances etc. Hope to see you in the not too far distant future Beth x What Beth said! Total privilege to meet you all and get to work with you and see your work. Please do let's keep each other posted on shows / scratches / stuff... lots of love Sarah xx I just wanted to say what an extraordinarily powerful experience the whole thing was for me. As a theatre director who mainly directs "proper plays", and also does soap on telly, and for various reasons including the death of my mother ended up spending very little of the last three years making work and quite a lot producing the work of others, I've been suffering from a bad dose of imposter


syndrome. You could even call it a crisis. I'm not an artist, I'm not creative, blah blah blah. Boring to tell to people, but very real for me. To have two people whom I enormously respect let me join this project on equal terms with proper artists, and give me stuff to do, and brilliant people to do it with - pairing me up with Nicki in that Hamlet scene, generously letting us play with such a wonderful idea; letting me play with my ideas and other people's, supporting us all so wonderfully, making our ideas better, getting me to act, dance and sing on stage in front of an audience - in front of John bleedin' McGrath no less - that's been amazing. I'm still processing it all. But I am so so grateful for that opportunity. And tell LADA I definitely learned a hell of a lot. About how to create a kind of work I don't often get to make enormously useful to have glimpses into so many different people's making processes - but also what I'm capable of personally. I'm not going to claim that it cured me of my imposter syndrome, but it was definitely a shot in the arm. Anyway. It was a wonderful amazing project to be part of, and I'm so very grateful for the opportunity, and your generous support and kindness and amazing backing singing and EVERYTHING. And please tell LADA I'm enormously grateful to them, too

Sarah x


DIY 10 - IMPERFECT - LIVE Noëmi Lakmaier EVALUATION Imperfect – live was an online professional development project conceived specifically to give disabled, female live artists a space to experiment with ideas around the female disabled body and its sexuality. Original Intents and Aims -

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To select 8 – 12 female, disabled live artists via an open call, with myself as lead artist. To create a private password protected online space (trough a combination of tumblr and Ustream) were we could experiment with and explore ideas in a supportive non-judgmental context. To do this intensely over the period of one month, with each artists making contributions at least once a week To decide together which material we shared (if any) could be made public and shared with a wider audience.

How the project actually progressed and developed Open Call – artist selection I put out an open call via, twitter, facebook, Live Art mailing list, a-n as well as the mailing lists of various Live Art and/or disability focused organisations e.g.: Artsadmin, Live Arts Development Agency, Shape, DASH, Arts and Disability Ireland etc., as well as through my own mailing list. While I had been aware that as I was looking for a very narrow group of people (female, disabled live artists interested in addressing femininity and sexuality) I wouldn’t be inundated by applications, I was surprised that I was receiving hardly any expressions of interests at all. Instead I started receiving a number of threats on twitter, via email and one by phone (which was particularly disturbing as my mobile number had not been on any of the open calls) All threats were accusing me of recruiting vulnerable adults for sexual exploitations.


While this was worrying it was also interesting, and indicative of the wider population’s view on disability and sexuality, which is something that was later on discussed in our online discussions. In the end I received four applications (I accepted all of them) and invited two additional people to participate directly. Participants were from the UK, USA and Iran. The Online Space This turned out a little trickier than I had initially thought, as it was very important to all women involved that the space and all that was discussed or shown on it would be totally private and password protected. I had originally intended to set up a tumblr and in bed Ustream content into it. I could however not find a way of making a tumblr totally secure, which lead to my decision to work directly on Ustream instead. The Project Itself – Sharing and Discussions While all participating artists were fully committed to the project, it soon became apparent that the intended rigorous structure of making a minimum of one active contribution a week and contribute to discussion of other people’s work, was not realistic in real life, due to people’s other commitments ect. Consequently we loosened the structure to enable people to make contributions whenever they want and have time to, thus excepting that the project was likely to run for longer than a month, but in a less intense way. Communications also ended up stretching beyond the dedicated ustream space. In fact the project stretched way beyond one month and is in fact still ongoing to some extent. There have been quiet periods where nobody contributed anything, alternating with periods of intense activity, consisting of anything from Ustream posts to postcards to emails. Privacy and Public Sharing


We all agreed that all content we shared would be totally confidential until the project is totally finished. At that point we would decide which parts (if any) we are all happy to be made public. As the project is still ongoing content is still confidential and no decision has been made yet if and when any parts of it will be made public. Outcomes -

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7 female, disabled live artists from three different countries where able to ‘meet’ and to intimately get to know each other and each others’ work. The project turned into a valuable and (at the moment) ongoing opportunity for a tight peer group to discuss work and ideas in a secure and non-judgmental space. New work has been developed as part of this project, and as far as I am aware versions of this work have already been shown publically. The project holds potential to become an ongoing professional development group that may work together again in the future also on other project on- as well as offline.

Conclusion DIY as been a unique and invaluable opportunity for open exploration, without pressure for definite and provable outcomes. This afforded Imperfect live the confidentially it needed to work and also allowed the project to flow and develop in unexpected ways and to grow into what it needed to be. Without DIY some of the artists would not have the opportunity to share their work with others the way they could with Imperfect live.


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What happened on the retreat?! ! Peter, Paul, Peter, Greg, Ian, Gary, Adam, Will and Mark met one another.! ! They walked around in silence in the rain.! ! They created spaces.! Spaces to hear each other. Spaces to hear themselves. Spaces to hear here.! ! After the sunrise they did some cleaning and went home,! and the memories are holding my hands. Will Dickie!


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DIY 10 Waterproof Led by Simone Kenyon and Lucy Neal The River Avon, Saltford 31 August 2013 st

This DIY 10 was a one- day event that gathered participants to a natural place of water near Bristol. We stayed in a location to experience a body of water in a variety of ways and as a collective, attempt to consider what the third thing that makes up this element could be. The day involved walking, paddling, swimming, reflection, action, open questions, food, warmth and being in your bathing suit. Together with a group of 18 people including those working as artists, activists, doctors, environmental and conservation workers, writers and producers. Participants were a mixture of regional/Bristol based whilst others travelled from afar as Cornwall, Devon and London. We physically explored and discussed throughout the day how water can and does inform a creative and philosophical starting point for creative action. As facilitators of the event we were interested in initiating a spacious framing for action, thought and conversation about art and the art of resilience, ecology, activism, access and the political act of swimming and bathing. This was not a wild swimming adventure excursion, but a chance to reflect upon, discuss and physically submerge ourselves through explorations of this element and natural condition. Thoughts on the The Third Thing Water is H2O, hydrogen two parts, oxygen one, but there is also a third thing, that makes it water And nobody knows what that is. D.H Lawrence, The Third Thing

Participant’s thoughts on application to the event Water softens my edges, The 'third thing' is my physical body. Perhaps the thing that makes what is, is, is always a third thing (third mind, third person, the third things is always held 'in question'). The 'Third Thing' is why people are drawn to it and feel they have to see it every so often. Water is powerful and its power is impossible to explain. Water's 'Third Thing' is the memories it endlessly carries: passing through so many bodies and places something must remain; there must be a space somewhere in that sticky polar molecule for more than the purely chemical to dissolve and reside. When I get out of the water after a long hard swim I feel like I am still floating, almost high – maybe that is also memory, of a different state of consciousness, of being truly free. Is it possible that the third element is memory? The third thing that makes up water could be consciousness…Water is able to absolve memory, constantly moving forward/backward, shape shifting, circulating through everything on the planet outside the terrestrial constraints and values we live by. How we regard the ocean/water and our relationship to it can potentially tell us a lot about how we regard the land. ‘Nobody knows’, but how about everybody? Between us and water, there’s something that isn't 'knowledge', I think, but more like recognition. Like a face you know but can’t place. Limitations like this show us who we are. We can be fully aware and alert but simply at the limits of our capacity, where we’ll never be able to say. Even when we name water and name its parts, move in it, consume it, confine it, force it through industries and imagine we understand, water still lives beyond the threshold of knowledge. Water shows us that this is where we live.


The Day Dialogue, Swimming, Mindfulness, Aesthetic openness, Water -active meditation and working with water, exercises, storytelling, play, exercises, openness to the enquiry and in schedule, hosting, finding your inner fish.

The Meeting The Crossing The Sharing (meditation, food, stories) The Making Crossing Back Departure The Memory

Participantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thoughts since we met by the River For me, water's 'third thing' has not changed since our day together. I've thought long and hard about it and it is still the memories it must carry between its hydrogen bonds and molecules. People placed stones and wishes in the water I was carrying around Herefordshire and it felt precious: I felt responsible for it. As soon as a wish had been made, I carried it differently. Unanticipated, our water-day spawned new work. A series of Water self-portraits, in which water makes portraits of itself. Mapping its extreme sensitivity to surrounding forces. Simone, you and Lucy and all the rest of us that day pushed this new work along. Huge thanks.


The DIY10 project with Simone and Lucy was a wonderful experience for me. The process of organizing, running and participating in the event was extremely positive and harmonious. The event itself offered a space for discussion, collaboration, reflection and adventure. The experience of swimming together was a deeply moving and a personal highlight of the year. The day of swimming, jumping and being together reminded me of something really important- that we can be serious about things we care about without needing to act seriously. Future Thoughts and Action Playing For Time- Making Art As If The World Mattered, a book written collectively by 60 artists and authored by Lucy Neal (to be published in 2014) will include the experience of Waterproof. Supported by the Arts Council of England, Transition Network and the Arvon Foundation, Playing for Time looks at the foundational role artist’s play in re-imagining a viable future of the planet. Notes towards instructions for organizing a Waterproof day, to include: Preparations for The Day Expeditions to locate a Body of Water- easy to access on both bank sides, near public transport/beautiful, tranquility v toilets etc. Selection Process of participants that offer a wide range of interests to the theme of water. Schedule 8-8.45 Arrival, boats, mats, food, cool bags, cakes, teas. 8.45 Move to island meeting point near the Lock and Weir. 9.9.30 Welcome: check needs/toilets/H & S/Head up breaststroke/buddy for day/change/summoned by flute/bell 9.30: The Crossing PASSAGE Intention of day 10-10.15 Gather on picnic mats/check in/Intentions/Shape of Day and Our intentions 11. -11.20 Attention to Water – meditation 11.20-12.00 Field: How might we know this place? Explore space on their own. How are we drawn in? Keep eye on buddy 12.00-12.30 Discussion about this river, activism, knowledge of thing and place. 12.30 -1.30 LUNCH. Film throughout: One thing I know about water/ One thing I don’t know about water. 1.30-2.30 With buddy-action and witness. Divide time. 2.30-3.15 Nuts and chocolates and re gathering. Not pushing to produce. Someone sang! ‘The River is flowing, growing, down to the sea’. Finding your Inner fish- visualization and relaxation. 3.15-3.30 Thanks and One Thing I will take Away SK/LN speak last. 3.30: Farewell and Passage Back Across 4pm/END! Process and Materials People (6), First Aider, Transport, Bag Looker After, Photographer, Cars, Kayaks, Food, Sunshine, Toilets, Mats and Rugs, Rope swing, Protection from Sun/Cold/Water and Wind. Photographer: Paul Blakemore


DIY Report: Functional Fun

Susannah Hewlett with Buzzcut, Imaginate and LADA

A workshop for 8 artists which sought to explore provocations around making live art for younger audiences. I was surprised to be asked to take on the opportunity of devising a DIY which would explore live art and younger audiences - initially scrutinising my own practise, it's relevance to younger people, my own interest in this and more importantly my knowledge of this. It was a challenge certainly. Lots of interesting explorations and conversations were to be had over the next few months and luckily as is the way of the DIYs, it is a journey you all make together as a group. I wasn't the leader imparting truths – rather a spirit guide of sorts (be it one from a Smiffy's joke shop). I knew some things and the rest we discovered together - (ie I knew where to buy the cheapest best quality whoopee cushions online - they knew more about 'theatre' and it's relevance to youth education). How it worked: A call out was made and artists and theatre makers were selected through application to see shows at Edinburgh Festival and then spend 2 days at a thinking and doing workshop with me in Glasgow. I chose 4 shows in Edinburgh which we saw together. The shows were selected as a spectrum of work appropriate for or having been made specifically for younger audiences which would form the basis for our discussions in the practical workshops. The Edinburgh Festival shows were: Daydream – by Inne Goris and Dominique Pauwels / LOD, Titus By Jan Sobrie – this new English version by Oliver Emanuel, l'Après-midi d'un Foehn - Version 1 by Non Nova, Credible Likeable Superstar Rolemodel by Bryony Kimmings. We watched the shows, laughed, cried and sighed but held out tongues, saving up the discussions until we met again in Glasgow over 2 days in September. Workshop Day 1 at Pearce Institute, Govan I am always keen to break down the constructs we work within (and of course add my own impeccable taste to such occasions) - so created a kid's party atmosphere to welcome the participants into the rather large, grand room we found ourselves in; balloons, streamers, decorations and a whoopee cushion on everyone's chair as an ice breaker. Once you've farted in front of a group of strangers there's nothing left to feel embarrassed about.

Everyone donned a party a hat and we introduced ourselves revealing our hopes for the workshop. I then gave a presentation of my work followed by an quick evacuation of the participants for an early lunch so as not to ruin the arrival of a surprise guest. After lunch the participants were invited to sit on the floor and enjoy a hour long show by hired children's entertainer Magic Muddles. I had been in discussion with Gary from Magic Muddles leading up to the event – and was really grateful that he was up for the quite peculiar experimental challenge of doing his show for a small group of adults. I was interested in exposing our discomfort as adults, as well as the possibility of analysing his show for the creative venture that it was. It was a really funny and strange experience with participation being a big part of it. Magic, mess, pantomime style chanting and balloon making culminated in a conga line leading up to hugs with a life size Sponge Bob Square Pants - inside which Gary's more than relieved assistant hid behind Spongebob's toothy smile.

Unnerved and excited we returned to the individual presentations which carried on for the rest of the afternoon. The day ended with an E Number Banquet enjoyed by all. Workshop Day 2 Day 2 encompassed mostly talking interspersed with short breaks to disco dance and play some games. We spent the first part of the day discussing the Edinburgh shows and a myriad of topics that sprung from these conversations. The question of What is live art? was battered about and shaped by some themes I instigated: The Body – public space and private parts. Functional Fun – humour, meaning and purpose. Joining in and Acting up - participation and collaboration and Tactics and Tic-tacs - deployment of language and allusion in voicing political messages. (Subsequently I put together a document to share with references to the artists and the topics we discussed). It was brilliant that the diversity of the group meant that the conversation flowed endlessly and we could have happily spent much more time together. We played some games I devised to stimulate conversation – a version of Pass the Parcel with written provocations within each layer and another game designed to make you question the boundaries around making shows for young audiences. Suggestions for Topic, Age group & Location were mixed up and then re-selected to show possible new shows. Some of my favourites are in the pictures below:


Some feedback from the day from participants :“Functional Fun was a fantastic and supportive platform to discuss, debate and explore our individual ideas and concerns about the children's theatre sector. It was a playful approach to questioning our own practice, and witnessing others at work - opening our eyes to what is currently being made, and the potential network and collaboration opportunities available in Scotland. I had a magical weekend, full of fun, frivolity and fake farts!” “I would have liked some physical /workshop exploration of ideas and to take advantage of all the experience of different participants to try out ways of making 'live art' and I think that would be an excellent Part 2 follow up to this workshop!” Participants were: Claire Willouby, Emma Nutland, Greg Sinclair, Heather Marshall, Louise Mari, Maria Giergiel, Sarah Hopfinger, Skye Renolds. Functional Fun Part 2 is definitely something I am considering. Until then........The End.


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Ursula Martinez Don’t wait tables with Duckie DIY report My DIY workshop was born from from a very simple and positive impetus. One day, whilst in the LADA office, Lois mentioned that they had recently put a call out/survey to artists asking them who they would like to see carry out a DIY workshop. My name had come up in a number of responses. The obvious thing to do with this information was to propose a DIY workshop! I thought about what elements of my work I could bring to a workshop. I came up with a few ideas such as the power of nudity on stage, and the use of self/autobiography in performance. The ideas were all good, and I may do them one day. But then I had a better idea. It is common knowledge that most live artists struggle to make a decent living and often have to take on paid work that is not only unfulfilling, but also undermines their art, by taking time and energy away from their practice. I realised that one of the successes of my career as an artists/performer/theatre practitioner (whatever you want to call it), has been my ability to earn money and make a decent living. This has come about primarily through my cross-over performance work into commercial entertainment, which could most simply be described as ‘cabaret’. I decided that the most useful workshop I could do would be to help live artists to create a cabaret act from which they could potentially earn money, thereby improving their lives in some way. And so, Don’t Wait Tables – Make an Act! was born. Myself and Dicky chose the participants independently and we melded our individual choices together. I gave the participants some preparation homework. I wanted them all to come in with a starting point, a potential seed from which to develop an act. This could be a track/pop song/piece of music, a prop, a visual idea, a desire to do something on stage that they’d never done before. This preparation turned out to be extremely useful as it immediately gave everyone something to share and talk about from the start. I won’t give a detailed blow by blow account of what we did, but basically, on the first day we watched some videos of a selection of different cabaret work. We talked about what made these pieces good and successful. Each participant then shared with the group their ideas/interests/starting point. At the end of the first day each participant was given a bit of homework, either some practical prep or something to think about for the following day. The next day we all got up and presented something to the group and talked about it a bit afterwards


The workshop participants all had varying degrees of experience as performers and naturally their ‘success’ in making an act was also varied . A couple of people were nearly there already. Others had great ideas that just needed work/practice/rehearsing to make them ready. Some of the participants had never experienced performing without a ‘forth wall’ or being open and honest in front of an audience and were simply exploring this for the first time. I firmly believe that each participant got something valuable from the experience and made a ‘shift’ of some sort, whether this be personal, emotional, performative, artistic etc. I would even include in this the one participant who didn’t come back the second day. This was more than I had bargained for and a really satisfying result. I can honestly say that it was one of the most rewarding things I have done in a long time. At the end of the session we went to another space to talk about follow up support. I have offered all of the participants my feedback on any recorded material of gigs/rehearsals etc. as well as practical, tangible advice on how and where to get gigs. The participants have also started a facebook page/support group. We all went to the pub after and had a great social. Dicky’s support in the room, technically, administratively and ‘time-keepingly’ was invaluable. The space at Soho Theatre was perfect for our needs. I believe 10 participants instead of 12 would have been the perfect number, as we were a little stretched for time. Here are some responses from the workshopees. Thanks so much for the weekend. It has got my juices flowing again and it's been good to revisit morning pages too. I know I can be a quiet bird but I really enjoyed working with such a lovely group. Hooray for us and thanks again! Don’t wait tables was a brilliant workshop. It has been massively useful for my practice. Giving me an enormous amount of inspiration and the chance to push my personal boundaries in a supportive environment. I’m really pleased I had the chance to do it.


Thank you so much for your inspiration and support through the workshop. I am really happy to have taken part. It opened up a whole new avenue of work I am interested in making, that I had never considered before. Now it all seems very possible. And what really exceeded my expectations, was the suggestion of post workshop support by you and dicky. Generally workshop leaders are not that bothered about what happens after. I appreciate that as you said this serves you guys as well, but it is still something I found special. I also wanted to thank you and dicky for the selection of the group who were warm open and supportive in a way a group of near strangers rarely are. I saw great potential in everyone and am really keen to see their work develop. I hope we can keep regular contact and continue to be a sounding board for each other's ideas. This was the first Cabaret workshop I have been involved in. It was incredibly useful in learning the 'triggers' that inspire an act and what can grow from the smallest seed into a filly developed idea which is the starting point to creating an act. I was lucky to already have a solid idea, however I had no idea how to move forward into the creating stage. I got invaluable feedback and the opportunity to experiment in front of people in a safe, unpressurised environment. Most inspiring & game changing weekend workshop for me playing with cabaret ideas with the incredibly talented, hilarious & insightful Ursula Martinez & Duckie producer Dicky Eton. Am in love with all my fellow participants & can't wait to cheer them on again 'in a theatre near you' quite soon! One last thing. I think it was Aaron who had the brilliant idea that I should set myself the same challenge as the workshop participants. I embraced the idea and also came into the workshop with a track and a visual image which I shared with the group. It was a great way of putting us all on an equal level and blurring the student/teacher boundary, which in this context I found very useful. I also may have a great new act in the making!



DIY 10 Report