Page 1

Introducing: THE NEW MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION MAGAZINE

MARYLAND STATE JUNE 2013 ISSUE #2

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE MSGA

DENNY McCARTHY Amateur Interview with Marty West page 46

WAYNE DEFRANCESCO

ALSO FEATURING:

What’s in the Bag? - page 34

JUNIOR LEAGUE GOLF

• Cattail Creek CC • Joy Bonhurst • Rules Revisited • Architectural Review

Jon Guhl - page 30

World Golf Foundation - page 40

WRONOWSKI ON THE MASTERS

Ask Allen... - page 8

In par arttn tner ersh ship sh iip p wit i h::

Phot Ph o o by Virginia Media Relations

BUILDING CHARACTER THROUGH GOLF


Steve Stricker | PGA Tour Player 913D3 | 8.5° | B1 | 166 mph Ball Speed

Jeffrey Goodman | Amateur 913D3 | 9.5° | C3 | 142 mph Ball Speed

John Cassino | Amateur 913D2 | 8.5° | C3 | 139 mph Ball Speed

Danielle Sullivan | Amateur 913D2 | 12° | B2 | 107 mph Ball Speed

Bill Haas | PGA Tour Player 913D2 | 8.5° | B2 | 171 mph Ball Speed

Phillip Jefferson | Amateur 913D3 | 8.5° | C3 | 135 mph Ball Speed

John Nesco | Amateur 913D2 | 10.5° | B2 | 149 mph Ball Speed

Rich Thurber | Amateur 913D3 | 9.5° | C3 | 152 mph Ball Speed

Scott Stallings | PGA Tour Player 913D3 | 8.5° | D1 | 175 mph Ball Speed


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BILL SMITH WELCOME 5 SHARE

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Welcome I certainly hope you enjoyed the first issue of Maryland State Golf and I welcome any comments you may have or any suggestions for what you would like to see in the Magazine, for as we indicated in the first edition…this is your Magazine. During the winter months the Maryland Handicap Program [MHP] has installed a new online handicap system known as GN21; therefore I thought this would be a good time to review some of the new features available with this online posting system. At your course you may have a touchscreen golfer posting station or you may be using a mouse, but either way you will notice the following features: • • • • • • •

Easy score posting both for total score or hole-by-hole scores Enhanced national away club directory…just click the “Away Course Search” icon and then enter course name Statewide handicap and scoring record lookup Course handicap calculator IGN guest posting Automatic multi-member score transfers Scores posted are instantly displayed

All these features are available to the individual golfer when he or she posts online away from the club. In addition, there are many new features such as Track Round Statistics for those who wish to keep track of fairways & greens in regulation, putts, etc. A calendar is available for you to log your own events, tee time reminders or appointments. Golfers can also send messages to other golfers in their club or friends in other clubs without knowing their email addresses. If you do not already have your ID and password, contact your club pro. Another great service available with this new system is receiving your handicap revision update every two weeks by email. If you would like this service contact your club pro or Matt Sloan at the MSGA office. When you wish to post a score online you can go to the MSGA website and click the icon on the right which states Post Scores Online and then provide your ID and password, or go to: www.marylandstatenetwork.org and once again provide your ID and password. The MSGA is excited to announce that a score posting and handicap app has just been released for both the iPhone and Droid mobile devices. This app will allow you to conveniently post scores, verify handicaps, search for golfer course and calculate your course handicap from your mobile device. Visit your app store today and type in MSGA for your FREE download. The MSGA and the MHP hope you enjoy the new handicap system. In closing, I thought you might enjoy a few handicap statistics. A player is expected to shoot their handicap 1 in 4 times and their average score should be 3 strokes higher. If you have a USGA Handicap Index of 11.6, for instance, it translates into a Course Handicap of 14 when you play from the middle tees one day at a course with a Course Rating of 72.1, with a Slope Rating of 135. So, although a little addition (72.1 + 14) leads you to think that you will consistently shoot around 86, in reality, your score average is normally three more strokes than that, or an 89. The USGA Handicap Research Team has determined that your best score in 20 is normally only two strokes better than your Course Handicap, or an 84; the probability of your recording an 83 twice in 20 rounds is only one in 50. For example, the odds of our example player with a Course Handicap of 14 beating it by eight strokes (-8 net) once is 1,138 to one. Put another way, the average player posts 21 scores a year. That means that to score this well, assuming the Handicap Index is correct, would take 54 years of golf to do it once! The odds of a player beating his Course Handicap by eight strokes twice, is only 14,912 to one. That’s 710 years of golf for the average player -- odds far beyond the realm of reasonableness!

Bill Smith Executive Director Maryland State Golf Association

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


6 MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE CONTENTS

Contents 8

14

22

30

34 MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

Welcome Bill Smith, Executive Director MSGA

5

Ask Allen Wronowski Wronowski on the Masters

8

Club Review Cattail Creek Country Club

16

Architectural Review Golf Course Value Goes Far Beyond the Game

22

PGA Round Up Junior League Golf

30

What’s In the Bag? Wayne DeFrancesco

34

World Golf Foundation Building Character Through Golf

40


Club Review at Cattail Creek Amateur Interview with Marty West

16 46

Meet Denny McCarthy

46

Rules Revisited

54

Those Pesky Insects and the Rules of Golf Coach’s Corner

58

56

Joy Bonhurst Publisher’s Pick

64

Introducing Ye Wocheng

68

MSGA History

66

Randal P. Reed State News

64

MSGA One-Day Schedule

74

2013 Schedule of Events

76

Patron Members Program

78

78 JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


ASK ALLEN...

WRONOWSKI ON THE MASTERS

T

his month Honorary PGA President Allen Wronowski shares with us his recent trip to Augusta, where he was officiating in one of the most memorable Masters tournaments in history.

p What makes Augusta and the Masters so special? The Masters Tournament and Augusta National Golf Club represent a rite of spring, a time of transformation and a signal that the golf season has finally arrived. It’s time to get out and enjoy playing the game. We’re excited by watching the best players perform on what is arguably the best-known golf course in the world. The Masters serves as an inspiration for us to get to a course and possibly recreate in our own game, what we have just witnessed from the game’s finest.

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

As one of the four major championships in golf, the Masters is special. It certainly is unique, being the only major that is played at the same venue every year. And for those who have earned the right to don the Green Jacket on a Sunday evening in early April, they have become part of the game’s glorious history. To me, Augusta and the Masters are all about the drama, spectacular shots and thrilling finishes we have seen over the years. As we watch the current players navigate the famous


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Every golfer dreams of standing here and teeing off at Golden Bell, hole 12 at Augusta National Pho Phot Ph otto by by Rob b Bro own wn

course that Bobby Jones made possible, we can relive so many wonderful memories and highlights of the holes we have come to know and the great moments we have experienced -- Jack Nicklaus hugging his son on No.18 after winning at age 46 in 1986; Tiger’s chip-in at 16 that somehow had just one more turn of the ball; or Fred Couples’ ball miraculously staying on the bank at the par-3 12th, helping Freddie capture his only major title.

so simply, Jim Nantz sums up the Masters. And are there ever traditions? The ceremonial starters on the first tee on Thursday morning. Tell me watching Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus and Gary Player teeing it up doesn’t give you goose bumps. The Par-3 Contest on Wednesday. The amateur qualifiers staying in the Crow’s Nest atop the clubhouse for the week. Pimento cheese sandwiches. The thrill of driving down Magnolia Lane.

“A tradition unlike any other,” my, how eloquently, and yet

A special time. A special place.

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


10 ASK ALLEN WRONOWSKI ON THE MASTERS

“There are about 90 officials who come from all parts of the world and include representatives from amateur and professional bodies.” p My memories as a Masters Official As officers of The PGA of America, we’re honored to be invited to serve on the Rules Committee for the Masters Tournament. This was my seventh year on the Rules Committee, and each year it’s something I really look forward to. There are about 90 officials who come from all parts of the world and include representatives from amateur and professional bodies. Part of the enjoyment is being able to form relationships and spend time with some of the most talented people in the game of golf. I also need to mention Masters Chairman Billy Payne and the wonderful folks at Augusta, including club members such as Fred Ridley, Buzzy Johnson and Jim Armstrong. We often talk about southern hospitality, and it is magnified at the Masters. Not only are they incredible at what they do, but make it so much fun to be part of the event. On Wednesday morning, there is a formal rules meeting where everyone is introduced, and materials are distributed and discussed. The first time I stepped “inside the ropes” with my blazer, tie and rules kit was something I will never forget. While I have followed rules at my club and in MAPGA section events, you understand that you are now working a major championship and quite honestly, it’s pretty dog gone nerve racking. Having rovers available all the time is a wonderful reassurance! I have to share this anecdote with you, as one of our PGA Past Presidents loves giving us rookies a great tip – if it appears there is going to be a ruling and it looks challenging – back up next to the biggest oak tree you can find, think bark and maybe they won’t see you and look for someone else. What a tip! So getting back to my first time as a Rules Official at the Masters -- my assignment was Hole No. 5, a par-4. It’s a hole which hardly ever has any issues, so it seemed to be a great spot to start. Well, within the first hour of play, we had

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

Billy Payne, center, Chairman of Augusta National Golf Club and the Masters Tournament, Glenn Nager, left, of the United States Golf Association and Ted Bishop, from PGA America. P ot Ph o o by Rus usty t Jarre ty arrre r ttt

something quite interesting and most unusual happen. Tom Watson had teed off and his ball came to rest in the fairway. Fred Funk then hit his tee shot, and his ball landed right on Tom’s ball and sent Tom’s ball sailing down the fairway. I went to the fairway to make sure they were aware of what had happened and to get Tom’s ball back in play. As luck would have it, Fred and I had played some golf in the MAPGA


WRONOWSKI ON THE MASTERS ASK ALLEN 11

in the 1980s, so as he was walking over the hill and spotted me, he asked about my wife and Hillendale Country Club and we had a little conversation. Seeing this, Tom also started talking to me and about cleaning his ball. So here I am in the first round of the Masters, within an hour of play starting, in the fifth fairway having a talk with Funk and Watson. As for the ruling, we had Tom drop as near as possible to where the marshals were and I thought his drive had originally stopped,

with no penalty incurred for either Tom or Fred, and Tom was allowed to clean the ball prior to the drop! That moment really helped relax me for the years ahead when I would have some rulings at Augusta, all of which have been rather easy - such as point of entry and relief from a hazard; golf balls coming to rest on patrons’ clothing or chairs’, control boxes and relief from Ground under Repair.

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


12 ASK ALLEN WRONOWSKI ON THE MASTERS

p Your thoughts on this year’s tournament The weather this year, other than the final afternoon, was spectacular - it was even pleasant in a blazer and tie! The azaleas were in bloom with the rest of the flowers and the golf course was as good as it gets. They opened the new Berckmans Place to the right of the fifth hole. It was a tough ticket to get in to see the multiple restaurants, and even replicas of three of the greens at Augusta that patrons can putt on to enhance the experience! After last year’s dramatic win by Bubba Watson, it was hard to believe that this year would be every bit as good. It’s been said the tournament really starts on the back nine on Sunday at Augusta, and this year proved that to be the case once again. The drama on the back was incredible, leading up to one of the most exciting playoffs I have ever seen. Adam Scott proved to be a wonderful champion, a great ambassador of the game and has broken the ice on an Aussie sporting the Green Jacket! I also thought Angel Cabrera incredibly gracious in defeat. There has been more than enough discussion on the rules incident with Tiger on the 15th hole on Friday. I have been asked many times on my thoughts and it was a shame it had to occur. It was handled appropriately and everyone involved did their jobs and did the/ The right The field and the event Photo by Montana Pritchard PGAthing. of America were protected by correct rulings and decisions and you just wonder if Tiger’s ball hadn’t by bad chance hit the flagstick, how he might have faired over the last 36 holes.

“Adam Scott proved to be a wonderful champion, a great ambassador of the game and has broken the ice on an Aussie sporting the Green Jacket!”

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013


WRONOWSKI ON THE MASTERS ASK ALLEN 13

Adam Scott of Australia birdies No. 18 in regulation during Round 4 of the 2013 Masters.

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


14 ASK ALLEN WRONOWSKI ON THE MASTERS

p Looking forward to next year I cannot predict who will win the 2014 Masters but I can guarantee that 88 lucky youngsters will have the time of their lives on the Sunday before the start of the week. That’s when those who have earned their way through local and regional qualifying will compete in the National Finals of the inaugural Drive, Chip and Putt Championship. I am so proud that my organization, The PGA of America, is partnering with the Masters Tournament Foundation and the United States Golf Association, to conduct this exciting initiative for kids ages 7 to 15. There are 11 markets, including Washington, D.C., that will hold local and regional events this summer, with those 88 ultimately emerging to test their skills at Augusta National Golf Club next year on April 6th. That’s right - the Driving and Chipping Finals will be held at the fabulous practice range at Augusta National. The Putting Finals will be held on the 18th green, at Augusta. How awesome is that? I’m fortunate to serve once again as the chair of the PGA Youth Player Development Committee, so adding the Drive, Chip and Putt Championship is very exciting. I was involved last year as we developed and agreed to the concept and I cannot wait to see how it all plays out next April. I think the Drive, Chip and Putt Championship has incredible potential to help grow our game and create incredible memories. I’m also looking forward, as most of us are, to watching Tianlang Guan of China develop over this year. At age 14 and making his debut in a major championship, Tianlang made the cut at the Masters year. But what I am most impressed with is his maturity. The interviews he gave, and the poise he displayed in that environment, were incredible. Even after the slow-play penalty he incurred, he performed and presented himself admirably. It reminded me of watching Lexi Thompson when she won our Junior PGA Championship at the tender age of 12. Amazing game and incredible maturity. In closing, 2014 will be my last year on the Rules Committee for the Masters, as my term as PGA Honorary President comes to a close. It’s been an honor to serve and truly reminds me again that the journey is the reward, especially when it takes you down Magnolia Lane to the home of the Masters.

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

Tianlang Guan of China plays his fairway iron on Ntiao. 1 during Round 4 of the 2013 Masters. Phot Ph oto o by Chr h is Trotm ro otman an


WRONOWSKI ON THE MASTERS ASK ALLEN 15 SHAR SH AE AR

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If you have any comments or questions for Allen, please send them to our publisher, Marcus Bain marcus@thinksportsmedia.com Don’t miss next month’s issue when Allen gives us his behind the scenes look at the Ryder Cup. Last Year Medinah provided us with some unforgettable sporting memories and in a world exclusive, Allen takes us behind the scenes at what is arguably one of sport’s greatest ever comebacks. ALLEN WRONOWSKI DIRECTOR OF MEMBER AND PLAYER DEVELOPMENT AND HONORARY PRESIDENT OF THE PGA OF AMERICA HILLENDALE COUNTRY CLUB 13700 BLENHEIM ROAD, PHOENIX, MD 21131 TEL: 410 5928011 WWW.HILLENDALECC.COM

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


CLUB REVIEW

CATTAIL CREEK COUNTRY CLUB ENTICING YOUNG MEMBERS TO CARRY THE CLUB INTO THE FUTURE . . .

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013


CATTAIL CREEK COUNTRY CLUB CLUB REVIEW 17 SSHHHAR AREE AR

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C

attail Creek is a private country club located in Western Howard County, Maryland. The Club has a beautiful 18-hole golf course, 7 tennis courts, a full-sized pool, a baby pool, a fitness center, and a renowned restaurant. The Club has around 650 members. Cattail Creek is known for being family-friendly, having excellent junior programs, and for having a packed social calendar of events. Lynn Slupski has held the Membership Marketing Director position at Cattail since 2009. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Hotel Management from Ferris State University and a Master of Science in Hospitality Management from Baltimore International College. A Michigan native, Lynn now resides in Baltimore. In an age of ever more chaotic family schedules, those at Cattail Creek have recognized the opportunity to develop their Club as somewhere where family bonding time can take place. In this article, Lynn takes us through the steps Cattail Creek have taken to give their younger members every opportunity to foster their love of the game of golf.

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


18 CLUB REVIEW CATTAIL CREEK COUNTRY CLUB

Cattail’s golf professional staff, and Golf Committee, decided that the Club’s dedication to nurturing the next generation of golfers was significant enough to warrant its own Junior Golf Committee. In the past, a club could get away with calling its golf operation ‘family-friendly’ if it offered a few weeks of junior camp in the summer, and allowed supervised kids to play the course after 3:00 p.m. on Sundays. Those days are long gone. Clubs are evolving significantly from the old standard in order to entice young new members who will carry them into the future. Schedules are becoming increasingly busier which makes family time precious and rare. A few years ago, Cattail Creek’s Leadership Team started to notice several membership trends taking shape. Business professionals, who worked in surrounding metropolitan areas, were taking on longer commutes in exchange for moving their

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

families to rural areas that offered a simpler, quieter lifestyle. This caused the Western Howard County region, where Cattail Creek is located, to grow quickly. The Club saw its average age of membership begin to drop steadily, and currently, the average member age sits at 49 years old. Consequently, most people showing an interest in golf membership had young children and busy lifestyles. Cattail became committed to instilling a passion for golf in their member’s children. The Club’s golf staff and golf committee were cognizant that in transforming the golf culture of the Club, the caliber of golf and the experience


CATTAIL CREEK COUNTRY CLUB CLUB REVIEW 19

and integrity of the game shouldn’t suffer. To cater to this younger demographic, Cattail communicates to its members that it is not only acceptable to take advantage of their golf membership in unique ways, but that they are encouraged to do so. For some, that means playing 2 or 3 holes in the morning before work a few times a week, grabbing a coffee, and heading out. For other members, it means getting out of work, picking up one or two of their kids, heading to Cattail to play 4 or 5 holes, and then meeting the rest of the family in the clubhouse for dinner. Beginner golfers can take advantage of the Club’s USGAapproved ‘family tees.’ Two sets of family tees at different yardages can be identified by markers on the cart paths that signal the tee locations on the fairways. Special family tees score cards are also available. Junior golfers can then play alongside their parents, obtain an actual score, and feel good about their time spent on the course. This option is perfect for young golfers who are still in the early learning stages of the game and prone to frustration.

In the Club’s quest to improve, the structure of summer golf camp was a topic identified as an area for opportunity. Four weeks of golf camp targeted towards kids aged 8-12, wasn’t coming close to meeting the needs of the general membership. As part of Cattail’s transition to becoming a family-centric club and course, several additions were incorporated. ‘Girl’s Only’ clinics were established to remove the intimidation factor for young ladies interested in learning the game, but who may not be comfortable doing so in a group that includes boys. ‘Little Tykes’ clinics were established for kids who get excited seeing their parents playing, but who aren’t quite old enough for an all-day golf camp. Parents bring their young beginners to the putting green, and while watching their kids learn the basics, socialize on the outdoor patio with other parents. This summer, under the leadership of Head Golf Professional, Bob Wampler, Cattail will also aim to fill another void with the introduction of ‘Teen Camp.’ This camp is designed for the beginner junior who has gotten off to a late start taking up golf, and who will benefit greatly from formal instruction,

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


20 CLUB REVIEW CATTAIL CREEK COUNTRY CLUB

but otherwise may be embarrassed to participate in a camp angles of their game. Based on the vision of member, Scott with mostly younger kids. Segrist, Cattail also began to host its own Junior Golf Open tournament, to bring boys and girls at the competitive level Cattail’s golf professional staff, and Golf Committee, decided together, to play on Cattail’s beautifully manicured course. that the Club’s dedication to nurturing the next generation The tournament, which will be in its fourth year in 2013, has of golfers was significant enough to warrant its own Junior received rave reviews from the parents and participants. Golf Committee. Parents of junior boys and girls at all levels come together, and meet regularly to discuss the Junior Once reaching middle school, juniors may take their ‘Junior Golf Program, the aspects that are thriving and the areas Certification’ test that covers rules, course care, pace-of-play, that can still be improved upon. Additionally, a decision safety, etiquette, and dress code. Upon passing, the junior was made to hire PGM interns each summer who would be receives a bag tag identifying their achievement, and he or solely dedicated to mentoring the junior golf population. she is then permitted to play the course alone or with their An all-encompassing Junior Golf Academy has also been member friends. On any given summer day, there are 10-15 introduced for the 2013 season. The Academy is a summer- junior golfers out walking 36+ holes of golf. long program that combines ongoing private golf lessons, golf fitness lessons, after-school golf clinics, standard golf The Junior Golf Committee has also created opportunities day camp, and instruction on developing the mental for Certified Juniors to take on leadership roles within the aspect of the game. It is targeted towards juniors who have golf operation. For the first time in 2012, these dedicated some golf experience, but wish to significantly improve all juniors were invited to serve as forecaddies for the

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013


CATTAIL CREEK COUNTRY CLUB CLUB REVIEW 21 SHARE

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Gentlemen’s Invitational Tournament. They embraced the experience, were incredibly professional, and showcased their passion for the game to all of the participating members and guests. Come out to the course any weekend afternoon and you’ll see families galore. Moms, dads, boys, and girls are walking the course, laughing, and learning at their own pace. They may only have an hour together before they change and split up, dashing off to lacrosse practice and gymnastics, but that’s the beauty of this modern day club. Cattail’s junior golfers are polite, responsible, and skilled in the game. They are educated in golf rules, etiquette, safety, dress code, and course care. Furthermore, they have a true appreciation for the game and its history. They are passionate. It can be pouring down rain or 30° and snowing, but if those juniors have a day off of school, they are the ones who are out there walking 18 holes and loving every second of it.

CATTAIL CREEK COUNTRY CLUB 3600 CATTAIL CREEK DR. GLENWOOD, MD 21738 TEL: 410 4894653

FAX: 410 4895228

WWW.CATTAILCREEKCC.COM

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW

GOLF COURSE VALUE GOES FAR BEYOND THE GAME By John Sanford, ASGCA

American Society of Golf Course Architects (ASGCA) has served the golf industry since 1947

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013


GOLF COURSE VALUE GOES FAR BEYOND THE GAME ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW 23 S ARE SH

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A

golf course has value as a beautiful playing field for golf, but has additional value well beyond the game. Today, a golf course must be sustainable economically, environmentally and socially beneficial to the community. The American Society of Golf Course Architects is active in educating the public and improving the perception of golf. Golf courses benefit communities as revenue and tax sources, green space, and wildlife and plant sanctuaries. There are numerous advantages to a community that comes from the environmental, financial and social impact of a golf course. As a group that loves golf and works to create sustainable layouts for others who love the game, Sanford Golf Design has seen firsthand how golf courses truly benefit their communities. Those in the golf industry understand this, but it’s important to share this message with those who may not be familiar with the positive benefits of golf courses.

Juliette Falls Golf Course - Sanford Golf Design

Ph P hot oto ob byy Bri rian an n Wal alte terss

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


24 ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW GOLF COURSE VALUE GOES FAR BEYOND THE GAME

Juliette Falls Golf Course - Sanford Golf Design Phot Ph oto ot o by Bri rian an Wal alte te ers r

In Jupiter, Florida, Abacoa Golf Club provides important infrastructure functions for the entire community including drainage, irrigation and water treatment usage. The on-site lake system utilizes treated effluent from the local sewage treatment plant and storm drainage providing a reservoir to irrigate the golf course and surrounding Abacoa community. Overflow must mafia its way through a manmade wetland on the course that biologically filtrates the effluent before it reaches the community drainage system. This system was a joint effort by the Town of Jupiter, Abacoa Development and the golf course architect. Golfers and residents benefit from reduced water costs and premium turf conditions. In a world of Blackberry devices, Facebook pages and Twitter accounts, there is no substitute for personal interaction, the kind found every day through the game of golf. You will learn far more about someone during a single round of golf than a week’s worth of meetings in an office environment. Golf courses are a source of tremendous economic and

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

environmental value to a community, but the social benefits a golf course provides are just as valuable. Whether you are out for a round with some friends, conducting formal business in a friendly, competitive atmosphere or introducing you son or daughter to a practice range for the first time, the golf course remains a truly unique place. Furthermore, golf also provides a plethora of health benefits from being outdoors. Walking a golf course leads to better health. Anyone looking for a moderately paced, cardiovascular workout will benefit by walking 9 or 18 holes designed to work with the natural features of the land. A recent msn.com article cited additional benefits of walking, including lowering the risk of Type 2 diabetes, reducing stress, preventing heart disease and decreasing the need for medication. A course can also be used for other activities, which benefit a community, including trails for jogging and cross-country skiing or concert space. The practice range at a course is a great place to bring in a portable movie screen. A course manager or owner who invites the area’s residents for an


GOLF COURSE VALUE GOES FAR BEYOND THE GAME ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW 25 SHARE

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Juliette Falls Golf Course - Sanford Golf Design Phot Ph o o by Bri ot rian an Wal alte ters rs

Juliette Falls Golf Course - Sanford Golf Design Phot Ph otto by oto b Bri rian an n Wal a te erss

evening’s entertainment under the stars may find they will return for a lesson or round of golf. A golf course’s value is not limited to the United States. On the coast of Egypt, Sanford Golf Design is building the Hacienda Bay Resort Golf Course that includes a promenade on the perimeter of the course for resort guests to walk around and enjoy the striking landscape. The promenade moves into the golf course and leads to a promontory/ café where guests can enjoy beverages and capture magnificent views of the Mediterranean Sea. Several courses in the western US have been developed to include equestrian trails on the perimeter as well as to provide a unique interaction of activities for community residents. Other cultures have embraced alternative uses for golf courses. At the Old Course in St. Andrews, Scotland, local citizens walk their dogs and ride horses on the sacred links. Maybe it’s time for us to take a page from the book of those who began this great game.

JOHN SANFORD, ASGCA SANFORD GOLF DESIGN 4238 WEST MAIN STREET JUPITER, FLORIDA 33458 TEL: 561 6918601 EMAIL: JOHNSANFORDGOLFDESIGN.COM WWW.SANFORDGOLFDESIGN.COM

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


The Folds of Honor Foundation is proud to recognize the thousands of golf courses across America who are making Patriot Golf Day a continued success. In addition, our mission partners donate a portion of their sales to the Foundation and allow us to provide a brighter future for the children and spouses of fallen and injured American soldiers.

To learn more about each of our partners, and how you can join them in supporting our mission, visit us at www.PatriotGolfDay.com/Partners


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PGA ROUND UP

JUNIOR LEAGUE GOLF by Jon Guhl, Executive Director of the Middle Atlantic Section PGA

Youth participants during the Junior League Golf Championship at Medinah Country Club on September 20, 2012 in Medinah, Illinois. Ph P hoto otto by b The he PGA of Am Amer erric eric icaa

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013


JUNIOR LEAGUE GOLF PGA ROUND UP 31 SHARE

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he MAPGA is proud to be on the forefront of a great new Youth Golf program that will better socialize the game for boys and girls. It’s called PGA Junior League Golf (PGA JLG).

With 2012 United States Ryder Cup Team Captain Davis Love III serving as its Official Spokesperson, PGA Junior League Golf brings juniors into the game in an exciting new way, fostering a sense of sportsmanship and teamwork typically associated with other recreational team sports. Teams consist of kids ages 9 to 13, with no previous playing experience required. Much like other recreational league sports, PGA Junior League Golf participants receive team uniforms (golf shirts) with jersey numbers. Rosters are co-ed with competitions being two-player scrambles, which reinforces the team concept and limits the pressure on any one player. Coaches can substitute players every three holes, so that all of the 10 to 14 golfers on each team can participate. Meanwhile, parents play an active role, making the program a family activity to create another generation of players to enjoy the game.

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The program is named Junior League Golf to make comparisons to Little League Baseball. Not every child will be a star golfer, but they will get a great opportunity to learn golf in a team atmosphere, where even the “right fielder” can contribute to the team. Also, PGA JLG will have a local all-star competition which leads to regionals and a national all-star championship, the Junior League Golf World Series. Just two years ago PGA Junior League Golf (PGA JLG) had its pilot year in only a few select markets: Atlanta, Tampa, Dallas, and San Diego. The goal was to see if a new team concept for aspiring young golfers could work similar to that of other little league sports, such as “Little League Baseball.” It worked well and in 2012, PGA JLG was able to expand to 22 different markets with over 120 teams and more than 1800 junior golfers. The 2012 JLG World Series was held at Cog Hill in Chicago, IL. Now Honorary President of the PGA of America Allen Wronowski said this about the 2012 season: “This was an incredible finale to a great first year, and we look forward to engaging many more young golfers next year.”

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


32 PGA ROUND UP JUNIOR LEAGUE GOLF SHARE

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First Tee Palm Beaches participants during the PGA Junior League event at Indian River Club in Vero Beach, Florida, USA on Saturday, July 21, 2012. Photo byy Mon onta t na Pri ritc tccha hard rd/T rd /The /T he PGA of Amer eric ica

This year, in 2013, PGA JLG has exploded, with more than 8,000 kids on 700 teams registered across 33 states. In the Middle Atlantic Section (Maryland, DC & Virginia), we are proud to say that there will be 71 teams in 2013, more than 1/10th of the country’s total. Leagues will take place in Baltimore, Montgomery County, DC, Richmond, Virginia Beach, Roanoke, and Northern VA. To find an area team, you can go to www.pgajrleaguegolf.com to find a team by state or name. This growth is in large part due to the diligent involvement of the members of the Middle Atlantic PGA Section and The PGA of America. PGA JLG fits right into the mission of the PGA to “promote the enjoyment and involvement of the game of golf.” After all, what better way to promote the enjoyment and involvement of golf for children than by having them play side by side with friends, in a competitive atmosphere, to get them started into a hobby for lifetime or even possibly the gateway to being on high school and college golf teams. With recruiting starting to near a close for 2013 it is amazing how the program has more than doubled the number of teams from year to year on a

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

consistent basis. Imagine where PGA JLG will be moving forward through the years with steady growth already seen in such a fast amount of time. PGA Junior League Golf looks forward to working with all new coming and previous participants for a great year of golf!

For more information about PGA JLG, please visit

www.pgajrleaguegolf.com

Jon Guhl is the Executive Director of the Middle Atlantic Section PGA and will be providing an insight on golf issues from the local PGA Section perspective.


MARYLANDSPORTS.US N EW A DDRESS & P HONE T HE WAREHOUSE AT C AMDEN YARDS 323 W. C AMDEN S TREET 4 TH F LOOR B ALTIMORE , M D 21201 410.223.4158

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34 WHAT’S IN THE BAG? WAYNE DEFRANCESCO

WHAT’S IN THE BAG?

WAYNE DEFRANCESCO WOODMONT COUNTRY CLUB

I

have been the Director of Instruction at Woodmont CC in Rockville for 8 years. I have been a PGA Member since 1993, and have had a fun and successful playing career thanks to the PGA of America. I was a First Team All-American at LSU in 1979, and played the mini-tours for 5 years afterwards. Due to multiple back surgeries I never realized my goal of playing on the PGA Tour, but I did play in one U.S. Open (1981) and in several Kemper Opens before starting my teaching career in 1987. Since becoming a member of the PGA I have played in 5 PGA Championships, won 3 Maryland State Open titles, 3 MPGA Section Championships, been Player of the Year in the Middle Atlantic 4 times, and capped off my before 50 career with a victory in the 2001 National Club Professional Championship in Bend, Oregon. After turning 50 I have played in one U.S Senior Open, 2 Senior PGAs, won 2 MAPGA Section Senior Championships and one Maryland State Senior Open. I have been playing TaylorMade clubs exclusively since 2002, so let’s check out what’s in my bag.

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013


WAYNE DEFRANCESCO WHAT’S IN THE BAG? 35 SHARE

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Why I Use... DRIVER /// TaylorMade R1 with UST Mamiya Proforce VTS shaft My new driver this year is the TaylorMade R1, which I was fitted for in Florida at the PGA Show in January. The loft is set by the shaft adjustment, and I have mine set on 9.5 degrees. I do not carry the ball a long way so I prefer a more penetrating trajectory, and the R1 gives that to me. The shaft we came up with after some testing is the UST Mamiya Proforce VTS. I love the stability and sound off the face and feel like I am hitting the ball both straighter and longer. I have stuck with a 45 inch length rather than moving to something longer. VISIT TAYLORMADEGOLF.COM

3-WOOD /// TaylorMade Rocketballz (RBZ) Tour 3 with Mitsubishi Diamana A’hina 80 gram stiff shaft My 3 wood is last year’s Rocketballz (RBZ) Tour 3. The loft is 14.5, and I hit a nice medium -flight shot that goes much farther than any 3 wood I have ever played. The club is so good that I have not switched to the new version (RBZ Stage 2), although it is a great club as well. I am not one to switch clubs often, especially the 3 wood. I used a Taylor 200 Steel 13 degree 3 wood for almost 10 years prior to switching to the Rocketballz last year. The shaft I use is a Mitsubishi Diamana A’hina 80 gram stiff. VISIT TAYLORMADEGOLF.COM

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


36 WHAT’S IN THE BAG? WAYNE DEFRANCESCO

2 HYBRID /// TaylorMade Rocketballz (RBZ) Tour 2 16.5 Degrees with Matrix Ozik Altus Rescue Hybrid shaft I started carrying a 5-Wood around 15 years ago because I found it to be much more versatile and forgiving than my old 2-iron. My current gamer is set at A1 and is 17 degrees which is a little stronger loft than your average 5-Wood. The loft on the bottom of the club is important, but more important is getting your desired trajectory and distance out of each club, and minimizing any gaps in your set. VISIT TAYLORMADEGOLF.COM

3 HYBRID /// TaylorMade Rocketballz (RBZ) Tour 2 18.5 Degrees with Matrix Ozik Altus Rescue Hybrid shaft My 3 hybrid is a companion club to my 2, the RBZ Tour 3 (18.5 degrees) with the same shaft as the 2. This is a 215-220 yd. club for me, and has replaced the old 2 iron I used to use. It is also a great club out of the rough, as I can get almost full length out of lies from which I would normally have to hit a 6 iron. VISIT TAYLORMADEGOLF.COM

WEDGES /// TaylorMade ATV 52 degree wedge and Taylor ZTP 58 degree I use the TaylorMade ATV 52 degree wedge and the Taylor ZTP 58 degree, both with Dynamic Gold Wedge shafts. I have the leading edge on both softened by grinding as I like to lean the shaft forward at impact on the vast majority of my pitch shots and don’t like anything that is prone to digging. I’m not a big fan of bounce on my wedges either and have my 58 degree ground to 6 degrees and my 52 at 8. VISIT TAYLORMADEGOLF.COM

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WAYNE DEFRANCESCO WHAT’S IN THE BAG? 37

IRON SET /// TaylorMade RocketBladez Irons I am experimenting with the new RocketBladez irons, but I have yet to find a shaft that doesn’t spin the ball too much in the wind. The problem is that my shaft of choice, Flighted Rifle 6.0 Steel is no longer manufactured, and I haven’t had any luck with the Project X line of shafts. Thus, I have kept my R9 irons in my bag, and I use the 4 iron through the pitching wedge. I set my lofts off of a 46 degree pitching wedge, and go down by 4 degrees per club until I get to the 4, which I set a degree stronger to lessen the gap between the it and my 3 hybrid. I am only 5’8” and come into impact with my hands fairly close to my body, so my lie angles are set 2 degrees flat. I have tried each new set of irons TaylorMade has come up with the last 3 years but have not switched off of this great feeling set. I am looking to try KBS shafts in my RocketBladez, but it will be a while before they are ready to test.

VISIT TAYLORMADEGOLF.COM

Phot Ph otto byy Mo on nta tana na Pri ritc tcchaard / The PGA A of Am Amer eric er icaa ic

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


38 WHAT’S IN THE BAG? WAYNE DEFRANCESCO

PUTTER/// TaylorMade Ghost Manta Prototype I use a TaylorMade Ghost Manta Prototype at 33 ½ inches, with the lie angle set at 69 degrees. I have 3 versions of this putter, small head, medium, and large, (the two smaller ones are both protos) and I finally settled on the mid-sized head. It is a simple mallet design in white with 2 parallel black alignment lines on top that give me a nice feeling of square alignment when I set it down behind the ball.

VISIT TAYLORMADEGOLF.COM

GRIPS /// Lamkin Crossline All Rubber Grips I have Lamkin Crossline all rubber grips (size 60 Round) on all my clubs. I don’t wear a glove, and through testing I have found that these give me the best overall grip and feel. I like the grips nice and thin, so I only use one wrap of tape to put them on.

VISIT LAMKINGRIPS.COM

Ball /// Vokey Spin Milled SM4 Wedges The TaylorMade Lethal ball, new for 2013, is the best ball I’ve ever played. Great feel around and on the greens, and great off the club in all conditions as well.

VISIT TAYLORMADEGOLF.COM

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013


WAYNE DEFRANCESCO WHAT’S IN THE BAG? 39 SHAR SH AREE

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SHOES /// Scotty Cameron Studio Stainless Newports I really like my Adidas AdiPure shoes for tournament play, but for teaching and everyday playing I have taken to wearing the Adidas Samba Golf shoe and the Ashworth version of the Ecco shoe. I don’t trust rubber spikes in competition, so I will continue to wear shoes with replaceable soft spikes.

VISIT ADIDASGOLF.COM

WAYNE DEFRANCESCO DIRECTOR OF INSTRUCTION AT WOODMONT CC WOODMONT COUNTRY CLUB 1201 ROCKVILLE PIKE ROCKVILLE, MD 20852 TEL: 301 4247200

FAX: 301 4247039

WWW.WAYNEDEFRANCESCO.COM WWW.WOODMONTCC.COM

P ot Ph oto o by by Mo on nta tana na Pri ritc t haard / The h PGA of Am A er eric icaa

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


40 WORLD GOLF FOUNDATION BUILDING CHARACTER THROUGH GOLF

WORLD GOLF FOUNDATION

BUILDING CHARACTER THROUGH GOLF by Steve Mona, CEO, World Golf Foundation

very month Steve will be giving us his exclusive insight into the larger national and global initiatives that are key to growing the game.

E

In 2012, Steve was named to Golf Inc.’s “Most Powerful People in Golf” for the 12th consecutive year and ranked above Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy and Greg Norman.

Steve Mona became the World Golf Foundation’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO) in March 2008. The First Tee is a division of the World Golf Foundation. Mona served as tournament director of the Northern California Golf Association from September 1980 to January 1982. He moved to assistant manager of press relations for the United States Golf Association from January 1982 to June 1983, at which time he became Executive Director of the Georgia State Golf Association. In November 1993, he became CEO of the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America.

World Golf Foundation develops and supports initiatives that positively impact lives through the game of golf and its traditional values. Founded in 1993, The Foundation is supported by major international golf organizations and professional Tours, and provides oversight to World Golf Hall of Fame, The First Tee, GOLF 20/20 and other industry initiatives in support of its mission.

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

For more information, visit www.worldgolffoundation.org.


BUILDING CHARACTER THROUGH GOLF WORLD GOLF FOUNDATION 41 SHARE

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS Mike Davis, Executive Director, USGA Jim Armstrong, Executive Director, The Masters Tournament Peter Dawson, Chief Executive, The R&A Tim Finchem, Commissioner, PGA TOUR George O’Grady, Chief Executive, European Tour Michael Whan, Chair, Commissioner, LPGA Steve Mona, CEO, World Golf Foundation

P oto by Monta Ph t na Pritchard / The PGA of America

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


42 WORLD GOLF FOUNDATION BUILDING CHARACTER THROUGH GOLF

A stock photo of Lauren and Nick Leslie at Youth Day during the Senior PGA Championship held at the James Stewart Golf Course in Oklahoma City, Monday, May 22, 2006. Ph hot o o by b The PGA G off Am mer eric icca

With the golf season in full swing, thousands of young people across Maryland are being exposed to the game through The First Tee. Chapters in Baltimore as well as Howard, Montgomery and Prince George’s counties provide educational programs that build character, instill life-enhancing values and promote healthy choices through the game of golf. For those who are not familiar, The First Tee is a youth development organization that provides character education and life skills through the game of golf, often reaching individuals who would otherwise not have the opportunity. Trained coaches and physical educators bring these lessons to youngsters on golf courses and in elementary schools (during P.E.). The First Tee is expanding to offer after-school programs at other youth development locations. Through after and in-school programs, The First Tee positively influences young people from all walks of life by reinforcing the organization’s “Nine Core Values” including honesty, integrity, respect, responsibility, courtesy, sportsmanship, confidence, judgment and perseverance. The positive impact on participants, their families and communities is incredible and continues to grow each year.

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

p The First Tee Chapters Heading into its 16th year, there are 189 chapters and approximately 750 programming locations spanning all 50 U.S. states and select international locations. Since 1997, The First Tee has impacted the lives of 7.6 million participants (ages five to 18). In 2011, the organization set a goal to reach an additional 10 million young people by 2017. In addition, it plans to expand golf facility program locations, increase the number of trained coaches, extend its network-wide volunteer base and increase female and minority participation. The First Tee Life Skills Experience, delivered at chapters, provides a seamless experience designed to help young people develop interpersonal skills, establish techniques for self-management, set attainable goals to reach desired dreams and create strategies to adapt, manage and overcome challenges in life beyond the golf course. The First Tee Chapters have more than 800 coaches, many of whom are PGA and LPGA professionals and volunteers who donate their time because of a strong belief in the


BUILDING CHARACTER THROUGH GOLF WORLD GOLF FOUNDATION 43

Phot Ph oto o by by The he PGA GA of Am Amer e icca

organization’s mission. The First Tee coach philosophy focuses on positive youth development through a meaningful, quality relationship between the instructor and participant. There are four building blocks to what the coaches teach. The first strives for “activity-based” experiences or doing versus telling. The next is “mastery-driven,” or seeking challenging tasks to develop new skills. The third is “empower youth” by asking young people to actively participate in the decisionmaking process. Finally, “continuous learning” fosters longterm solutions rather than short-term fixes. The First Tee coaches are well equipped through training and curriculum to inspire passionate students who want to excel in life and golf. More than 13,000 participants of The First Tee have or are playing golf at the high school level. Of those, 1,600 have pursued the game even further to the college ranks. At Chapters, participants (mostly high school age) are also exposed to unique training and competition opportunities. Next month, 25 participants from The First Tee are invited for a week-long training program at Hank Haney International Junior Golf Academy on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina.

Since 1997, The First Tee has impacted the lives of 7.6 million participants (ages 5 -18). Select individuals from across the country will receive daily instruction in full swing, short game, course management, mental preparation, fitness training and even college placement services. They will get the opportunity to work with Hank Haney, former instructor to Tiger Woods, whose students have won every major championship in professional, collegiate, amateur and junior golf. Each year, the Nature Valley First Tee Open at Pebble Beach Golf Links in California showcases the talent and character of young people who participate in chapters across the U.S. An official Champions Tour event, the event pairs one junior with a professional player and two amateurs. To be chosen, juniors are measured in golf proficiency and life skills knowledge. The participants get to compete on national television through the Golf Channel.

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


44 WORLD GOLF FOUNDATION BUILDING CHARACTER THROUGH GOLF

The First Tee booth at The Business of Golf Career Expo at the PGA Collegiate Minority Championship. Thursday, May 10, 2007. Photo by The e PGA of Am Ame erricca

p The First Tee National School Program Launched in 2004, The First Tee National School Program is reaching young people “where they are,” having expanded to 5,300 schools in 800 districts. This includes 45 schools and five districts in Maryland. This year, The First Tee National School Program plans to expand to Baltimore, Howard County and Prince George’s County. The First Tee’s goal is to deliver the character-building program to 10,000 schools by 2017. The First Tee National School Program creates an environment where young people experience the lifelong sport of golf while developing basic motor skills. The curriculum is written to align with national physical education standards established by the National Association of Sport and Physical Education. It addresses instructional time and class sizes as well as other parameters unique to elementary schools.

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

Even the physical education teachers also benefit through professional development training. They are supplied with age-appropriate information and equipment for effective implementation. In addition to The First Tee Nine Core Values, the school program teaches the “Nine Healthy Habits” that address physical, social and emotional wellness. Each lesson plan seamlessly integrates a golf motor skill, core value and healthy habit. Students learn these lessons during physical education classes, versus on the driving range.

p Real Results Many students are taking what they learn at The First Tee and contributing to their local communities. I had the distinct pleasure of spending time with Hannah Clark, an 18-year junior golfer and four-year member of The First Tee


BUILDING CHARACTER THROUGH GOLF WORLD GOLF FOUNDATION 45 SHARE

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To learn more about the First Tee visit www.thefirsttee.org

Student athletes visit The First Tee table at the Business of Golf Career EXPO held at the PGA Education Center in Port St. Lucie, Florida, USA, on Thursday, May 8, 2008.

out The First Tee. You can volunteer, provide equipment or make a donation to a chapter. Or, consider bringing The First Tee National School Program to elementary schools in your community. Each one is crucial to The First Tee’s success in brining golf and its inherent values to young people in America.

Phot Ph Phot oto o by by Mon onta tana tana n Pritchard/Th he PGA he A of Americca

To learn more about The First Tee, visit www.thefirsttee.org. The First Tee – Maryland Chapters • The First Tee of Baltimore www.thefirstteebaltimore.org (410) 616-9675 • The First Tee of Howard County www.thefirstteehowardcounty.org (410) 730-1114

First Tee participants arriving at the gates of the Westfield Junior PGA Championship on the first day of the tournament. Phot Ph o ob byy Th he e PG GA A of Am Amer erica icca

• The First Tee of Montgomery County www.thefirstteemcmd.org (240) 447-4646 • The First Tee of Prince George’s County www.thefirstteeprincegeorgescounty.org (301) 249-2040

of Washington, D.C. She served as a story-teller for National Golf Day on April 16 in her hometown. On Capitol Hill, she spoke with Congressional members about how the game has impacted her life. The response from America’s political leaders was awe-inspiring. A resident of Silver Spring, Hannah was first introduced to golf through The First Tee and plays three times a week at East Potomac Golf Course. Her success with The First Tee has turned into a family affair. Hannah’s three younger brothers are also involved in the D.C. Chapter. I was so impressed by her composure and confidence when speaking with Congressional members. Her maturity was years beyond others her age and I can only imagine the great things her future holds.

WORLD GOLF FOUNDATION 1 WORLD GOLF PLACE ST. AUGUSTINE, FL 32092 TEL: 904 940 4000 WWW.WORLDGOLFFOUNDATION.ORG WWW.WORLDGOLFHALLOFFAME.ORG WWW.THEFIRSTTEE.ORG WWW.GOLF2020.COM

Besides involving your children, there are other ways to help

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


46 AMATEUR INTERVIEW DENNY MCCARTHY

Ph hoto by by Vir irgi rg giiniia Me Medi dia Re Rela lati tion on o ns

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013


DENNY MCCARTHY AMATEUR INTERVIEW 47 S ARE SH

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AMATEUR INTERVIEW WITH MARTY WEST

MEET DENNY McCARTHY ARGYLE COUNTRY CLUB by Marty West, Nine-time Maryland Amateur Champion

T

his month’s player interview is with Denny McCarthy. I first met with Denny when he was 13 at the request of his father, Dennis, to work on his short game. At that time it was obvious that he loved the game, was committed to getting better, and confident in his ability. Since that time I have followed his golfing success and admired his ability to shoot low scores. He has the game and the opportunity to become one of the best players to come out of the Washington area in some time.

FACT FILE NAME

DENNY MCCARTHY

HOMETOWN

ROCKVILLE, MD

MEMBER CLUB

ARGYLE COUNTRY CLUB

COACH/TEACHER

BOB DOLAN & JOHN SCOTT RATTAN

HIGH SCHOOL

GEORGETOWN PREP

COLLEGE

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA

WHAT’S IN THE BAG? • NIKE VICTORY RED IRONS & WEDGES (60, 56, 52) • ADAMS HYBRIDS 19 DEGREES • NIKE VICTORY 3 WOOD AND DRIVER (9.5) • CIRCLE T SCOTTY CAMERON GOLO MALLET- 33 INCHES PUTTER

• TITLEIST PROV1X GOLF BALLS

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


48 AMATEUR INTERVIEW DENNY MCCARTHY

p Hi Denny - Thank you for taking the time to do this interview. First let me begin by asking at what age did you begin playing golf? Who introduced you to the game? Did your parents play a key role in your golf? Has any golf instructor helped your game in a significant way? I started playing golf as soon as I could walk! My grandfather, Frank McCarthy, and my father, Dennis McCarthy, were both a very big influence for me in pursuing my golf dreams. Everybody in my family has played a huge role in my golf career. I have a very large family and they are a great support system for everything I do. My parents have always told me to chase my dreams and go after what I love They have really guided me in the right direction and I would not be in the position I am today without their help. I’ve had many people help me with my game over the years, the list could go on. Bob Dolan, the head pro at Columbia Country Club, has really helped me with my swing since I was a kid and we have taken great strides in improving my ball striking and overall game. The head pro at my course, Mike Barillo from Argyle Country Club, has seen me grow up in front of his eyes, and he has always been there for me when I’ve needed him. Also, my current coaches at school, Bowen Sargent and John Scott Rattan, have really taken me under their wings in getting my game to that next level.

p Many golfers remember when they “got bitten by the golf bug.” Do you have a particular time, experience or memory of when you fell in love with the game? If I had to say there was a particular experience that really got me hooked, it would be when I watched the U.S. Junior Amateur at Columbia Country Club in 2003. I was only 10 years old, but I can remember that experience like it was yesterday. The overall atmosphere and excitement was amazing and it gave me the chills.

P ot Ph o o by b Virgi gini gi niaa Me ni Medi diaa Re Rela lati la ati tion onss on

p You had a great season in 2011 and 2012. What do you p As you look to the 2013 season, what goals have you set consider your main highlights?

for yourself?

I had a really solid year overall, but I think some of my main highlights came in the Maryland Open when I made 7 birdies in a row on the back nine, leading to a 28 and a 63 overall. I got really hot and just got in the zone and it was a really cool feeling. Some others include a second round 65 (-7) in the ACC Championship and a second place finish at the Porter Cup, where I shot -15 for 4 rounds. That was really important for me because that’s the first time I’ve really put 4 solid, complete rounds together at a big venue.

My goals always remain the same going into every tournament, which are to win every tournament and to make no mental errors. There are a lot of things in golf that you can’t control, but the one thing you can control are your actions and attitude. If I had to point out one main goal for this year, it would be to make the Walker Cup team. After I played on the Junior Ryder Cup team in 2010, I really appreciated the fact of playing for my country. It was the coolest feeling, and I knew I wanted to work hard to get back to representing my country.

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013


DENNY MCCARTHY AMATEUR INTERVIEW 49

“If I had to point out one main goal for this year, it would be to make the Walker Cup team. After I played on the Junior Ryder Cup team in 2010, I really appreciated the fact of playing for my country.”

p Tell me about your tournament plans for 2013 and what p What do you consider is the strength of your game? events are you particularly excited about playing in? Do you Is there any aspect of your game which you are going to plan to try to qualify for any national championships this concentrate on improving in 2013? year? I am planning on playing in the U.S. Open at Merion. I haven’t had much success in the previous years, but I’m very optimistic about my chances this year. As for the rest of my schedule, I am playing in the Sunnehanna Amateur, Northeast Amateur, Porter Cup, U.S. Amateur, as well as the Maryland Amateur and Maryland Open.

The strength of my game is scrambling and putting. There are always going to be days when you don’t play your best game and on those days you just have to find a way to dig deep and get it in the hole. The aspect that I really need to improve on is being precise in my wedge game and hitting my numbers with wedges.

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


50 AMATEUR INTERVIEW DENNY MCCARTHY

p How much time do you dedicate a week for practice? How many rounds of golf during the golf season do you think you average in a week? Do you enjoy practice and if you had the choice, would you rather play or practice? I’d say I practice about 20 hours a week, and on average I probably play 3 rounds a week. I love practicing, but I would much rather play because I think that’s the best way of practicing for me. I like to go out on the course, drop a few balls in different places, and hit different types of shots to get my imagination flowing.

p Have you played in the Maryland Amateur Championship before and if so, what is your best finish? I’ve only played in the Maryland Amateur a few times and I believe my best finish came at Chevy Chase when I was defeated in the quarter final round of match play.

p Can you remember the first time you participated in the Maryland Amateur? What were your thoughts on the Championship and the level of competition? I can’t remember my first Maryland Amateur, but I know the level of competition is always great. It’s the best of the best amateurs in the state and everybody is eager to be crowned champion.

p What is your favorite memory or story from your victory in the 2010 Maryland Open? The 8-iron I hit on the final hole to 2 feet to close it out is a memory I will never forget. There was a huge crowd surrounding the green and the roar was amazing so I knew it had to be really close.

p What golf tournament that you have played in did you most enjoy and why? I don’t think anything can beat the U.S. Amateur. Going back there is just a great feeling because it means you are one of the best amateurs in the world and competing with the highest level of competition. The Porter Cup is a close second because everybody knows each other there and the atmosphere is just very fun and relaxing. It’s different than most tournaments I’ve played in.

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DENNY MCCARTHY AMATEUR INTERVIEW 51

p What is your favorite course that you have played and why did you enjoy it so much? My favorite course is Praia del Ray in Portugal. I have been to Portugal 5 times with my parents and my grandparents, who are originally from Portugal. It’s the most beautiful course. The views are unbelievable, the course always plays tough and windy, and the whole back nine is right on the Atlantic Ocean. If you ever go to Portugal, I highly recommend playing it!

p Competitive golf can be very stressful, especially when you are in the heat of competition with a chance to win. Are there any specific things you do to try to cope with the pressure when you are competing? I think people overlook breathing when they are in the heat of battle, but I find it really important to take deep breaths and breathe slowly in pressure situations. Also, staying in the moment is a key thing for me. I try not to worry about the consequences or results, but rather going through the process of what you’re doing is key and the results will take care of themselves.

p Do you have someone that you use as a sounding board to talk about your success with or how you could improve your game? We are very fortunate here at Virginia because we have a great resource in Dr Bob Rotella, a sports psychologist who works with a lot of big names at the collegiate and pro level in numerous sports. He is great to talk to about problems you’re having on and off the golf course. Over the last few years, he has played a huge role in improving the mental side of my game.

p If you were given the opportunity this year to play on any two courses in the world, what courses would you choose and why?

Ph Phot hoto o by Vir irgi gini niaa Me Medi d a Re di Rela laati tion onss

I was fortunate enough to play Pine Valley last summer and I fell in love with the place. All of the holes are so cool and so different, so I’d say that would be one. The other would be Augusta National. I’ve never played there, but I follow the Masters very closely every year and there is always so much excitement. It just looks so pure with not a bad blade of grass on the property. Hopefully I will get to play there in the near future in the Masters because that’s always been a dream of mine.

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


52 AMATEUR INTERVIEW DENNY MCCARTHY

Ph hot oto o by Vir i gi gini niaa Me M dia Relati tions

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013


DENNY MCCARTHY AMATEUR INTERVIEW 53 SHARE

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p Golfers are known for being superstitious. Do you have any superstitions that you are willing to share with us?

“Denny has the game and the opportunity to become one of the best players to come out of the Washington area in some time“ – Marty West

p If you were given the opportunity to play in a “dream

I have two, marking my ball heads up and making three 3-footers in a row on the putting green right before I tee off.

p Having a balanced life is something every one of us is conscious of in this day and age. Outside of golf, how do you spend your time and what other activities do you try to partake in? I enjoy spending time with my family and friends. I really like to kick back, and enjoy having fun with my friends. As far as other activities, I have played basketball as long as I’ve played golf so I really like shooting around whenever I get the chance. Watch out though, if you challenge me to a game of horse, you better be ready to shoot three pointers.

foursome” with people from the past or present connected p What is the best advice regarding golf that you have ever with the game of golf, who would they be and why? received? I would play with my dad, my grandfather who passed away a few years back, and Jack Nicklaus. Nicklaus was the greatest player and putter who has ever lived and a great inspirational figure. I would want my dad and grandfather to join me because they taught me so much about the game I love and I will never forget what they have done for me.

Some of the best advice I have received is that it doesn’t matter how anything looks, if it feels good and you are confident, the sky is the limit. There are no trophies given for perfect swings or perfect shots. Also, being committed to every shot is key. Being fully committed and trusting yourself will go a long way. Finally, play to play great.

p Do you now have a consistent exercise program and if so, what does it entail? We have team workouts here that are very helpful because they emphasize core and upper body. Individually, I have developed a series of stretches that focuses on upper body mobility and flexibility. Being flexible is a key component with what I’m trying to accomplish in my golf swing.

If you are a Maryland amateur golfer and would like to be featured, please contact our publisher, Marcus Bain marcus@thinksportsmedia.com

p You are currently in college. Where are you attending school and what is your major? Are you considering playing golf as a professional? What will be the major factors that will help you make that decision? I am a psychology major at the University of Virginia. It has always been a goal and a dream of mine to play golf professionally. I will take a good look at my game and give myself an honest assessment at the end of my 4 years here.

Every month Maryland’s most celebrated amateur golfer, Marty West III, will be interviewing one of the state’s current high ranking amateurs.

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


54 RULES REVISITED THOSE PESKY INSECTS AND THE RULES OF GOLF

RULES REVISITED

THOSE PESKY INSECTS AND THE RULES OF GOLF by Randal P. Reed, Director of Rules and Competitions of the Maryland State Golf Association

P ot Ph oto o by Mon onta tana ta na Priitc tcha h rd ha d / The PGA of Am mer eric icca

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

H

ow do you deal with a bug that chooses to use your golf ball as a resting place? A prominent example of the problem occurred at the 1988 PGA Championship at Oak Tree Golf Club in Edmond, Oklahoma. Eventual winner Jeff Sluman faced such a dilemma near the end of his fourth round. Generally the way to proceed under the Rules depends on the part of the golf course where an incident occurs. Sluman’s ball was on the “collar” of the 11th putting green, thus in Rules terminology, the ball lay “through the green.” [Definition: “Through the green” is the whole area of the golf course except: (a) The teeing ground and putting green of the hole being played and (b) All hazards on the course.] Sluman was in the heat of battle near the lead when a tiny bug was creeping across the ball.


THOSE PESKY INSECTS AND THE RULES OF GOLF RULES REVISITED 55 SHAR SH AREE

PGA Rules chairman Ken Lindsay was able to see via television that Sluman was not certain how to proceed. Concerned that Sluman might lift and ball in order to remove the bug, Lindsay attempted to get an official to Sluman’s location. The anticipated action by Sluman would have cost him a penalty stroke under Rule 18-2a(i), which prohibits lifting or moving a ball except when a specific Rule provides authority. However, before an official could reach the scene, Sluman putted the ball as it lay, giving the bug a sudden and unexpected free ride. At least there was no penalty. An insect occupies a somewhat unusual and occasionally awkward position in the Rules of golf. It meets the definition of “loose impediment,” partly because it is specifically listed in that definition, which states in part that “Loose Impediment are natural objects, including: stones, leaves, twigs, branches and the like, dung, and worms, insects and the like, and the casts and heaps made by them, provided they are not fixed or growing, solidly embedded or adhering to the ball.” On the other hand, since an insect is not adhering to the ball, it may be picked or blown off. In this sense, an insect is sometimes different from a natural object such as cut grass that can adhere to a ball and thus not be a loose impediment. It is worthwhile to consult Index page I67 at the back of the Decisions on the Rules of Golf to explore many interesting insect cases. The Rules are less restrictive with regard to loose impediments on the putting green, where a loose impediment may be removed at any time – Rule 18-2a. If, during the removal of a loose impediment, the ball moves, the player is exempt from penalty as long as the movement of the ball is “directly attributable” to the removal of the loose impediment. See Rule 23-1 and, for clarification of the meaning of “directly attributable,” Decision 20-1/15. In a hazard, a loose impediment may not be touched or moved. Under Rule 13-4, the penalty for breach is two strokes. At the same time, under Rule 12-1b, if a player’s ball is believed to be covered by loose impediments in a hazard so that he cannot find or identify the ball, then he may touch or move the loose impediments in order to find or identify the ball. If the ball is found or identified as his, the player must replace the loose impediments.

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However, in a change of the Rules in 2012, “if the ball is moved during the touching or moving of loose impediments while searching for or identifying the ball, Rule 18-2a applies.” The player would incur a one stroke penalty and be required to replace the ball unless he decided to proceed under another applicable Rule, such a taking relief from a water hazard. On the other hand, “if the ball is moved during the replacement of the loose impediments, there is no penalty and the ball must be replaced.” In an even more famous Rules incident from an earlier era, Lloyd Mangrum was penalized two strokes during his 1950 play-off with Ben Hogan and George Fazio at Merion. On the putting green of the 16th hole, trailing Hogan by only one stroke, Mangrum addressed his ball and then picked it up and blew off an insect. The penalty for touching a ball in play was assessed by the legendary Ike Granger, then Chairman of the Rules of Golf Committee of the USGA and eventually a USGA Committee Member for more than 50 years. At that time even cleaning the ball on the putting green was not allowed. Furthermore, if you touched a loose impediment on the green and the ball moved, there would be a one stroke penalty. Interesting, at the time George Fazio was the head golf professional at Woodmont Country Club. After the Open at Merion, Fazio resigned his Woodmont position to pursue full-time Tour activity.

Randal P. Reed, Director of Rules and Competitions MSGA, Executive Director of the Washington Metropolitan Golf Association and Executive Director of the Middle Atlantic Golf Association. Every month Randal will be taking us through golf’s most challenging rules.

If you have any questions about the Rules of Golf, please contact our publisher, Marcus Bain marcus@thinksportsmedia.com

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


56 COACH’S CORNER JOY BONHURST

COACH’S CORNER

JOY BONHURST CLUBGOLF PERFORMANCE CENTER AND BLUE MASH GOLF COURSE Interviewed by Marcus Bain

I

n the second MSGA Coaches Corner interview, we caught up with Joy Bonhurst one of Maryland’s most celebrated coaches to ask her about her thoughts on teaching, playing and everything in between.

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013


JOY BONHURST COACH’S CORNER 57 SHARE

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FACT FILE NAME

JOY BONHURST

MEMBER CLUB(S)/ FACILITIES WHERE YOU TEACH

CLUBGOLF PERFORMANCE CENTER AND BLUE MASH GOLF COURSE

PGA PROFESSIONAL SINCE I STARTED MY CAREER IN THE GOLF BUSINESS IN 1990. I BECAME A PGA CLASS A MEMBER (1995) AND LPGA CLASS A MEMBER (1994)

ACHIEVEMENTS • MIDDLE ATLANTIC PROFESSIONAL GOLF ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA CLASS A MEMBER • LADIES GOLF ASSOCIATION TEACHING & CLUB PROFESSIONAL CLASS A MEMBER • LEVEL 1 TPI CGI – CERTIFIED LEVEL 1 • K-VEST TPI 3D - CERTIFIED LEVEL 1 • K-VEST TPI 3D - CERTIFIED LEVEL 2 • CERTIFIED CLUB FITTER CALLAWAY GOLF • LPGA T & CP NORTHEAST SECTION AS TEACHER OF THE YEAR IN 2004, 2009 • “GOLF FOR WOMEN MAGAZINE” AS A TOP 50 GOLF INSTRUCTOR IN 2000 AND 2005 • “GOLF DIGEST PRESENTS BEST TEACHERS IN YOUR STATE AS RANKED BY THEIR PEERS 2007-2012” ALSO RANKED # 2 IN THE STATE OF MARYLAND • 2010, FOR THE FIRST TIME, GOLF DIGEST RANKED THE 50 BEST WOMEN TEACHERS IN AMERICA, AS VOTED BY THEIR PEERS • LPGA T & CP NORTHEAST SECTION EDUCATION COORDINATOR SINCE 2005 • 2008 WON THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC PGA WOMEN’S SECTION CHAMPION • 2008 AND 2009 MIDDLE ATLANTIC PGA WOMEN’S PLAYER OF THE YEAR • 2008 CAREER LOW SCORE OF 64 CHEVY CHASE CLUB. • 2012 WON THE PGA WINTER CHAMPIONSHIPS WOMEN’S STROKE PLAY CHAMPIONSHIP

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


58 COACH’S CORNER JOY BONHURST

p Firstly, thank you the taking the time to do this interview with the Maryland State Golf Association. Let’s begin with asking you; what first drew you to the great game of golf? Can you describe when and how you fell in love with the game? My mother was an avid golfer and 34 years ago, my mom introduced me to the game of golf by taking me to a schoolyard where we would hit and shag our own golf balls. After shagging our own golf balls too many times, I finally figured out a way to make our practice sessions a lot more fun and efficient. I trained my dog, Pepper, (a beautiful golden retriever) to shag the golf balls for us! As I reflect back on my introduction to golf and on those days with my mother and Pepper, I realize that those days were some of the happiest days of my life and really why I fell in love with the game of golf.

p What age were you and what bought you to decide to pursue a career as a PGA professional? After graduating from Methodist, I pursued my ultimate dream at that time, to play professional golf. At the age of 22, I began my quest, playing on the Futures Tour. After six months of playing and traveling, I realized my biggest contribution to the game would be in the area of teaching. Becoming a LPGA and PGA member was paramount. My passion for teaching this game grows everyday!

p Who were your inspirations as a young professional? Did this person(s) serve as a mentor to you and if so, how did he influence your professional development? Troy Beck PGA/LPGA, Holly Anderson PGA, Bailey Scheurer SEC Registered Financial Advisor, and Pressie Hoffman. Troy, Holly, Bailey, and Pressie not only served as incredible inspirations and mentors as I began my professional career but they also continue to be incredible resources to me today professionally and personally. As my closest friends today, Troy, Holly, Bailey, and Pressie influenced my professional development because not only are they each incredibly successful in their professional careers as well as their personal lives, but they also each possess the unique quality of being the type of friends that want to help you become the most successful professional you can be regardless of your field.

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

p Who were your biggest influences as a teacher? I have been influenced by so many great teaching professionals. I love to learn how to teach this game and am constantly learning through seminars, teaching and coaching summits, and observing other professionals.

p In your opinion, what skills and abilities are necessary to be a successful teacher and coach? A successful teacher and/or coach is able to identify how each student best learns (through seeing, hearing or doing). They must be a good communicator, problem solver, a cheerleader and an advocator for their students. They must motivate and be passionate about the game.


JOY BONHURST COACH’S CORNER 59

p I am sure many people out there think that as a PGA Professional you get to play round after round, week in and week out. Set the record straight and tell us how many rounds on average you get to play per week? Rarely, if ever, does a PGA Professional have the opportunity to play round after round, week in and week out. My rounds are seasonal and fall into 3 categories: my competitive rounds and I play approximately 20 tournament rounds: my playing lessons are usually 9 holes and I average about 30 playing lessons annually. In a playing lesson, I might demonstrate different shots etc. or just watch how the students manage their game, but I don’t actually play. Additionally, I play a handful of rounds with friends.

“My passion for teaching this game grows everyday!” p Can you tell us a little about your playing career and whether your professional responsibilities allow you to still participate in competitive play? Fortunately, I have a very full lesson schedule, which occupies much of my time on a daily basis. My professional responsibilities do not give me the flexibility to play or participate in competitive play as much as I would like to but whenever I can find the time to play competitively I very much enjoy it and my competitive experiences helps augment my teaching and coaching.

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


60 COACH’S CORNER JOY BONHURST

To be better students, I emphasize that the student should always have a positive attitude and work on only one thing at a time and to practice.

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013


JOY BONHURST COACH’S CORNER 61

p When you first begin working with someone, what are

Joy is on the Callaway Golf Professional Staff Member Program

the things you focus on first and foremost? When I first start working with someone, I ask about his or her golf history, whether they have taken lessons in the past, what they currently have been working on, and what they want to concentrate on. I then ask if they have any physical limitations. Finally, I determine how they best learn.

p What percentage of your day is spent teaching and approximately how many lessons do you conduct annually?

p What advice would you offer to golfers to help them be better students when they take lessons?

I average about 4 - 5 lessons day.

p Do you derive greater personal gratification from playing a fine round of golf or seeing one of your pupil’s golf games really begin to improve? I think both are equally gratifying.

p What initiatives are you and your club doing to bring more players to the sport? My club participates in the PGA/LPGA Play Golf America. Additionally, we offer many golf clinics, golf fitness, and different golf programs.

To be better students, I emphasize that the student should always have a positive attitude and work on only one thing at a time and to practice.

p What advice would you offer to golfers to assist them in making their practice sessions be more productive? Does this change after someone takes a lesson? I always suggest to practice with a purpose. Every shot counts, with a target and distance in mind.

p When all of us what golf on television or go watch a

professional tournament in person, what should we look for p At what age would you recommend parents introducing to help us with our games? their children to golf and what advice would you offer parents If my students are working on a specific area of their game, I for getting their youngsters to enjoy the game. I have had students as young as 3 years old. Depending upon the child, any age is appropriate as long as the child is eager to learn to play. There are many different programs to introduce the game: Parent/Children Clinics, Rising Pros, Summer Golf Camps, Individual Lessons and Group Lessons. The most important piece of advice is to create a fun learning atmosphere.

often suggest they watch how the professionals approach that part of their game. Students can also learn from watching the professional’s pre shot routine, course management, and practice routine before they go to the first tee etc.…

p What suggestions would you offer us for how we can better prepare ourselves to play better before we go out to play?

p Can you describe your teaching philosophy and how you go about working with your pupils? Regardless of my student’s age or level of experience, I want to understand what the student’s goals are and their physical limitations. I want to mange expectations, agree on a game plan and what we can achieve with our time together. At Clubgolf Performance Center, we offer a series of diagnostic evaluations, which determine the student’s specific golf and fitness program.

Depending on how much time you have before your tee time: only 5 minutes make sure your body is warmed up (couple of exercises and stretches); 1 hour before tee time (10 minute warm up routine) (25 minutes of putting, chipping and pitching); (15 minutes full swing play the distance of par 3’s and a couple of drivers) and (10 minutes personal and get to tee)

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


62 COACH’S CORNERJOY BONHURST SHARE

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“The importance of the short game cannot be overstated.”

p Your craft is constantly evolving due to the technological improvements of the game. What technologies are you utilizing to enhance your teaching methods? I utilize the K-Vest and Trackman Systems. The K-Vest 3D system measures the kinetic sequence of the body during the golf swing. The Trackman 3D System captures club and ball data during the golf swing. Evolving technology is invaluable.

p Many golf instructors say that one of the most important skills golfers must develop to become better players is to become effective pitchers of the golf ball. What advice would you offer us to get better at this critical element of the game? Clearly, the importance of the short game cannot be overstated. It is crucial that as a teacher I incorporate this as warranted.

p Many instructors use drills to assist their students. Are you a big believer in drills and do you have any favorite drills that have helped your pupils? I am a big believer in swing drills and exercises. I often utilize swing aids and training aids.

p What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges that a PGA Professional faces in modern day golf? The biggest challenge for the PGA and LPGA Professional is keeping up with all the new technologies with the everchanging technological world.

p If one of your members walked in your shoes for a day, what aspect of your job would surprise them the most?

JOY BONHURST CLUBGOLF PERFORMANCE CENTER 9811 WASHINGTONIAN BLVD GAITHERSBURG MD 20878 TEL: 301 5191920 WWW.CLUBGOLFMD.COM BLUE MASH GOLF COURSE 5821 OLNEY LAYTONSVILLE ROAD GAITHERSBURG MD 20882 TEL: 301 6701966

The physical demands of the job, standing and being outside throughout the different seasons of the year.

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

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W H O S E RV E D, have sacriďŹ ced by serving the families they leave behind.

OUR THANKS IS This is our mission. This is your call to duty. Become A Wingman.

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64 THE PUBLISHER’S PICK YE HAVEN’T SEEN ANYTHING YET!

THE PUBLISHER’S PICK Well if you think you saw it all at the Master’s last month when Guan Tianlang took the tournament by storm . . . you haven’t! Meet Ye Wocheng, the twelve-year old Chinese golf sensation who has just become the youngest ever player to qualify for the European Tour. Ye practiced in the northern city of Tianjin, where he took part in the European and OneAsia Tour event last week. The schoolboy from China’s Guangdong province started playing the sport at the age of four and received professional training from the age of nine. Having shot to fame last month when he qualified for the tour, Ye has his sights right at the top of world golf. Ye’s participation will see him better the mark of his compatriot Tianlang, now 14, who competed last year as a 13-year-old. When asked about Tianlang, he said that the two got on well together off the course but it was clear that on the course, Ye wants to come out on top.

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

“In 2010, I went to America to participate in some teenager golf competitions and I got good rankings. I found I was talented at golf. From then on, I had a goal that I would become a top golfer, like Tiger Woods.” Communist China only built its first golf course in 1984, which is quite remarkable considering how far the sport has come in such a short span of time. Now they boast thousands of courses and countless young players hoping to repeat Ye and Guan’s success. Click on the video to watch Ye in action…

If you would like a free digital monthly subscription to the magazine, simply send us an email to info@thinksportsmedia.com


MARCUS BAIN THANK YOU 65 SHARE

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Thank You First Maryland, then the World! I wanted to take the opportunity to thank you all for your fantastic feedback from last month’s launch issue. When we decided to create this publication our aim was to champion regional golf to the community and also to showcase what this great state and the Mid-Atlantic has to offer and boy, did that happen . . . Our first issue was seen and read in over 20 countries worldwide including the UK, Canada, the Caribbean, Brazil, Argentina, India, China, Australia, South Africa, Malaysia, Germany, Switzerland, Sweden, France, Spain and even in Mongolia!

Contact me directly: marcus@thinksportsmedia.com

VIEW MEDIA KIT AT MSGA.ORG

In partnership with:

As we track all our reader numbers electronically, we were able to clearly see that we to date have had over 30,000 unique readers which is a great start. Now I’m calling for support a little closer to home. If we can get all our clubs to simply send the URL link of the magazine out to their memberships and players via your email newsletters, I’m confident that not only will our golfers like what they see, we can also look to take our numbers up to hit the 50,000 reader mark! So come on all you marketing gurus, general managers, golf pros, your state needs you!





I do hope you enjoy our current issue and as always please feel free to get in contact with me directly if you have anything you would like us to feature or bring to our attention. Best wishes and happy golfing,

Marcus Bain Publishing Director, Maryland State Golf Magazine and Executive Director, Think Sports Media

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


66 MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION HISTORY

FOUNDING OF THE MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION by Randal P. Reed, Director of Rules and Competitions of the Maryland State Golf Association

T

he Maryland State Golf Association functions as the primary voice of the United States Golf Association in Maryland and fulfills its constitutional mandate by promoting the best interests and true spirit of the game of golf as embodied in its ancient and honorable traditions; sponsoring and conducting state championship tournaments as well as USGA qualifying rounds each year; educating and informing Maryland golfers about changes in the Rules of Golf; providing course rating and handicap services to member clubs; fostering respect for the game of golf as well as its rules; and awarding scholarships. The following article was compiled and written by Randal P. Reed, MSGA Director of Rules & Competitions and describes the circumstances surrounding the founding of the MSGA.


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Our tournament schedule now consists of some 30 state tournaments as well as USGA qualifiers

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


68 MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION HISTORY

One hundred thirty-three years old, 123 years in the same location, the Elkridge Club is rich in golfing history. Phot Ph hoto otto byy Flo o oyd yd Lan a kf kfor kfor ord IIIII III

p THE FIRST FOURTEEN CLUBS The Maryland State Golf Association was founded during a meeting at the Emerson Hotel in Baltimore on March 8, 1921. The founding clubs, which were said to represent 8,000 state golfers, were as follows: • Baltimore Country Club • Hagerstown Country Club • Maryland Country Club • Cumberland Country Club • Rolling Road Golf Club • Tome Golf Club • Green Spring Valley Hunt Club • Sherwood Forest Golf Club • Suburban Club • Naval Academy Golf Club • Elkridge Hunt Club • Talbot Country Club • Public Parks Golf Association • Monterey Country Club

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

The Public Parks Golf Association was comprised of golfers at Clifton Park in Baltimore City. This Association had been organized during meetings in January, 1921 with William F. Smith becoming the first president. Located near Antietam Creek and in the general area of the current Hagerstown Municipal Golf Course, the nine-hole Hagerstown Country Club operated from 1908 – 1928, closing about four years after the opening of Fountain Head Country Club on the other side of town. Tome Golf Club was a prep school golf club in Port Deposit. The school overlooked the Susquehanna River and later moved to Northeast. Maryland Country Club, founded in the early 1900s near the Suburban Club, eventually met its demise during the Great Depression. The Washington Area clubs – Chevy Chase, Columbia, Bannockburn and Kirkside – declined to join the association because of their involvement with the Middle Atlantic Golf Association and District of Columbia Golf Association and also due to impending obligations to assist with the national open championship at Columbia Country Club.


HISTORY MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION 69

p CAPITAL EXPANSION As an aside, nine Washington Area clubs did join the MSGA in the early 1930s: Chevy Chase, Columbia, Burning Tree, Bannockburn, Indian Spring, Manor, Beaver Dam, Congressional and Kenwood. Bannockburn, originally located near Chevy Chase Circle (Connecticut Avenue and East-West Highway) moved to the Glen Echo area around 1910 and then was sold for residential development in 1946. Kirkside continued as the successor club to Bannockburn at the Chevy Chase Circle location. Indian Spring, which would later move to Layhill Road north of Georgia Avenue, was then located near the Four Corners area of Colesville Road and New Hampshire Avenue. Indian Spring closed in December, 2005. Beaver Dam in Landover later became Prince Georges Country Club and then, shortly after a move to Mitchellville in the early 1980s, was renamed the Country Club at Woodmore. Monterey Country Club, less than one mile from the Mason-Dixon Line in Blue Ridge Summit, Pennsylvania, is a particularly interest case of a founding member club. Monterey had one of the oldest golf courses in the country. Located approximately eight miles from Camp David and built prior to 1885, the club featured a wide range of recreational and dining facilities that were popular among Washington area visitors. In addition to golf, the sports of tennis and swimming were featured. Over the years, visitors included Presidents Wilson, Coolidge and Eisenhower. The eventual Duchess of Windsor, Wallace Simpson, was born directly across the road from the first green in Square Cottage. After the Battle of Gettysburg, the Army of Northern Virginia retreated through a swampy area that eventually became the site of Monterey Country Club.

p OUR EARLY LEADERS The first officers of the Maryland State Golf Association were M. Tyson Ellicott, Baltimore Country Club, president; A.E. Marshall, Maryland Country Club, first vice-president; R. Marsden Smith, Rolling Road Golf Club, second vicepresident; and Claude C. Madison, secretary-treasurer. Lieutenant F.L. Janeway of the Naval Academy Golf Club reportedly joined this group as the fifth member of the Executive Committee. Originally, the 1921 Amateur Championship was scheduled for Rolling Road Golf Club and the Open Championship

at Baltimore Country Club. Later the Open was moved to Rolling Road and the Women’s Championship was established and scheduled for Elkridge. At first there was discussion of a Baltimore City Championship to be conducted by the new state golf association. However, this initiative was soon undertaken by the Public Parks Golf Association at Clifton Park.

p ORIGIN OF THE STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION Based on Baltimore Sun reporting by Claude C. Madison, among the spurs to the formation of the Maryland State Golf Association was the exhibition match between Harry Vardon, Ted Ray and B. Warren Corkran at Baltimore Country Club during the summer of 1920. The year of 1920 marked Vardon’s last trip to the United States while Ray captured his sole U.S. Open Championship at the Inverness Club in August, 1920, where he edged Vardon, Leo Diegel and Jock Hutchinson by one stroke, with the 50-year old Vardon going six over par in the last six holes. The temporary chairman of the Maryland players who called for a state golf association was R.E. Hanson. Hanson sent the invitations for the organization meeting that was held at the Emerson Hotel. In the March 9, 1921 Baltimore Sun, Claude Madison reported that “R.E. Hanson, who fostered and originated the idea of a State golf association, was lauded in a resolution unanimously adopted, which expressed appreciation of his efforts to advance the game in Maryland. Hanson recently removed to New York.” Golf developments in Maryland even attracted the interest of Grantland Rice, the foremost sportswriter of the era. In a letter to Claude Madison, Rice offered the following remarks: “The movement to form a State golf association should be supported by every golfer in Maryland. Golf is now on the way to an even-greater boom and the golf courses and players of Maryland occupy too high a place to remain outside the fold. The fact that the national open championship is to be held at Columbia Country Club will bring additional attention to Maryland golf. There is no question that a State association can do a lot for the game, and at the same time the players get a lot of keen competition out of the organization.” Interestingly, there was spirited competition for the hosting of the first championships. Representatives of Maryland Country Club, Rolling Road Golf Club and the Suburban Club were quite expressive in promoting their clubs.

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


70 MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION HISTORY

Baltimore Country Club is widely recognized as one of the top 50 country clubs in the nation

R. Marsden Smith, green committee chairman at Rolling Road Golf Club weighed in: “We think we can show the golfers of the State something unique in golf construction. Our course is adequate in every respect for entertaining the championship. The only possible objection would be the misapprehension that we might not be ready due to improvements in the greens. By the middle of June when the tournament probably will be held, Rolling Road will be in tip-top condition.” Not to be outdone, A.E. Marshall, who chaired the Maryland Country Club golf committee, claimed that his club “is the logical course to entertain the championship. We have lengthened our course to championship distance. We are centrally located and we want the event.” The president of the Suburban Club, A.F. Weinberg, upped the stakes with the following pronouncement: “We have the greatest golf course in Maryland and, as this is to be a real championship contest, let’s play it on a real course.” (Claude Madison further noted Mr. Weinberg’s view that while the other two clubs have very decent courses, they “could not hold a candle to Suburban.”)

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

William F. Stone, representing Sherwood Forest, offered his club as a site for the 1925 Maryland Amateur. In the early 1920s Sherwood Forest was being developed by William F. Cochran as a private retreat on the Severn River. Cochran also offered a sterling silver cup for a club team competition during the Maryland Amateur.

p THE PRESENT Today, some 92 years later, the Maryland State Golf Association represents some 125 member clubs, and provides course rating and handicap services to 160 clubs and courses in Maryland. The MSGA is directed by a 15 member Board of Directors who represent various member clubs and has a staff of four . Our tournament schedule now consists of some 30 state tournaments as well as USGA qualifiers.

For additional information about the MSGA and its member services please visit our web site at www.msga.org or call (410) 653-5300.


PROGRAMS & SERVICES MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION 71 SHARE

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MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION

PROGRAMS & SERVICES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Conduct 19 Men’s State Championships Conduct 11 Women’s State Championships Conduct USGA Qualifiers for both men and women Conduct local collegiate competitions Conduct one day Play Day net events Along with the MAPGA provide handicap and club tournament software services and maintenance of those services Provide course and slope rating for men and women’s tees free Scholarships for member club employees and/or children, and junior golfers who are involved in the game Junior Girls’ Scholarship Program Sponsor the Emmet Gary Turf Scholarships at the University of Maryland Conduct Rules of Golf and Handicap Seminars Monitor and lobby state legislation impacting golf and the turf grass industries Maintain web site (www.msga.org) for the benefit of all Maryland golfers. Provide amateur reinstatement services Promote the game Publish e-newsletters to inform members of current news within the organization Hole-in-One Club exclusively for members of member clubs Golf Patron Program (discount golf program for MD golfers) Honor the Player of the Year and the Senior Player of the Year Promote state wide charity tournaments on web site’s Charity Corner

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


72 MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION OFFICERS AND STAFF

MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION

OFFICERS & STAFF 2013 Board of Directors

COMING SOON

PRESIDENT Jerry Duffy CC at Woodmore jeduffy@thebancorp.com (410) 721-2555

VICE PRESIDENT Richard Collins Baltimore CC rcollins@stpaulsschool.org 410-252-1494

VICE PRESIDENT Stanard Klinefelter Elkridge CC sklinefelter@brownadvisory.com 410-537-5402

VICE PRESIDENT David “Moose” Brown Rolling Road GC moose@advpack.com 410-358-9444

COMING SOON

VICE PRESIDENT Jan Miller Baltimore CC jmiller@rcmd.com 410-339-5872

VICE PRESIDENT Brian Fitzgerald Chevy Chase Club bfitzgerald@equuspartners.com 703-391-1482

VICE PRESIDENT Paul Dillon Congressional CC ped529@comcast.net 301-518-5567

SECRETARY Robert Sherwood Columbia CC jrssenior@msn.com 443-534-5118

DIRECTOR AT LARGE William Matton US Naval Academy GC billmatton@verizon.net 410-956-4815

DIRECTOR AT LARGE Marilyn Snight U.S. Naval Academy GC Srpeanut1@comcast.net 410-266-5321


2013 MSGA Staff EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR William Smith Hillendale CC bsmith@msga.org 410-653-5300

VICE PRESIDENT Thomas Whelan Manor CC twhelan@ryancom.com 410-712-0888

VICE PRESIDENT John Barse Columbia CC Jack@barse.org 301-229-6031

VICE PRESIDENT Alexander Martin Green Spring Valley HC abmartin1@aol.com 443-310-2445

TREASURER John Pauliny Hillendale CC johnpauliny@comcast.net 410-252-9107

DIRECTOR AT LARGE Joan McGinnis Holly Hills CC joanmcginnis3@gmail.com 301-644-2738

DIRECTOR OF RULES AND COMPETITIONS Randal Reed Four Streams GC rreed@msga.org 410-653-5300

DIRECTOR OF HANDICAP & MEMBER SERVICES Matt Sloan msloan@msga.org 410-653-5300

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Kim Daniels kdaniels@msga.org 410-653-5300

Maryland State Golf Association 1777 Reisterstown Rd, Ste. 145 Baltimore, MD 21208 www.msga.org

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


74 STATE NEWS MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION ONEDAY SCHEDULE SHARE

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STATE NEWS

MSGA ONEDAY SCHEDULE The Maryland State Golf Association is striving to conduct competitive playing opportunities for the “everyday golfer”. These One-Day events (Play-Days) are open to men and women of all ages. The format is Four-Ball Stroke Play and prizes will be awarded to top finishers gross and net.

Norbeck Country Club

p ONE-DAY EVENTS

p CLUB TEAM STROKE PLAY

Friday, April 19th Towson Golf & Country Club

Monday, Sept. 30th Country Club at Woodmore

Club Team Stroke Play venue and date will be determined shortly. Contact your golf professional about forming a team.

Tuesday, May 21st Hillendale Country Club

Thursday, Oct. 17th Suburban Club

Thank you for your attention and as always we appreciate your continued support of the Maryland State Golf Association and golf in Maryland!

Wednesday, July 17th Norbeck Country Club

www.msga.org MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013


“I would like to deny all allegations by Bob Hope that during my last game of golf, I hit an eagle, a birdie, an elk and a moose.�

Gerald Ford

If you have a golf story or memory you would like to share with us please contact our publisher at marcus@thinksportsmedia.com


76 STATE NEWS 2013 SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION

2013 SCHEDULE OF EVENTS TOURNAMENT Team Championship Pro-Amateur Women’s Team Championship Two-Man Team

DATE April 6-13-14-20-21-27 Thurs., April 25 April 27 - May 19 Tues., April 30

CLUB Various Clubs Suburban Various Clubs Hillendale

Tues., May 7

Argyle

Tues., May 7

Sparrows Point

Wed., May 15

White Plains

Senior Two-Man Team

Tues., May 28

Turf Valley

Women’s Mid-Amateur Championship

Wed. - Thurs., June 5 - 6

Hog Neck

Amateur Championship

Thurs. - Sun., June 6 - 9

Woodmore

Junior Girl’s Championship

Tues. - Wed., June 18 - 19

Hunt Valley

Junior Boy’s Championship

Mon. - Tues., June 24 - 25

Fountain Head

Junior Girls Poindexter Cup

Fri. - Sun., July 5 - 7

Amateur/Open Pre-Qualifying

Maryland Open Championship

Mon. - Wed., July 8 - 10

Indian Creek (VA) CC of Maryland

4 Lady Invitational

Mon., July 15

Talbot

Amateur Public Links Championship

Thurs., July 18

Clustered Spires

Women’s Amateur Championship

Mon. - Thurs., July 22 - 25

Elkridge

Father-Son Championship

Thurs., July 25

University of Maryland

Mid-Atlantic Junior Invitational

Thurs., July 25

Edgewood (WV)

Junior Girls Mid-Atlantic Challenge Mixed Two Ball

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

Fri. – Sun., July 26 - 28 Mon., July 29

CC of North Carolina (NC) Piney Branch


2013 SCHEDULE OF EVENTS STATE NEWS 77 SHARE

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EMICH HOUSE 1777 REISTERSTOWN RD, SUITE 145 BALTIMORE, MD 21208 www.msga.org

TOURNAMENT

DATE

CLUB

Women’s Senior Amateur Championship

Mon. - Tues., August 12 - 13

Andrews AFB

Mid-Amateur Championship

Mon. - Tues., August 12 - 13

Baltimore CC

Sat., August 24

Chevy Chase

BW Junior Team Matches Mid-Two Woman Team Championship

Wed., September 4

Bretton Woods

BW Team Matches

Sat., September 7

Elkridge

Senior Team Championship Senior Amateur Championship

September 8-15-21-22-28 Wed. - Thurs., September 11 - 12

Various Clubs Manor

Two Woman Team Championship

Mon., September 16

Naval Academy

Past Presidents

Tues., September 24

Rolling Road

Senior Team Challenge Match

Wed., October 2

Elkridge

Charity Tournament

Mon., October 7

Argyle

Women’s Open Championship

Tues. - Wed., October 15 - 16

Argyle

Senior Open

Tues. - Wed., October 15 - 16

Worthington Manor

2013 USGA Qualifying Events TOURNAMENT

DATE

CLUB

US Open Local

Tues., May 14

Lake Presidential

US APL

Wed., June 5

Clustered Spires

US Amateur

Tues., July 23

Hunt Valley

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


78 MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION PATRON MEMBERS PROGRAM

2013 Participating Golf Facilities Maryland and DC Golf Facilities, County (82) The Bay Club Golf Course East, Worcester The Bay Club Golf Course West, Worcester Bay Hills Golf Club, Anne Arundel Beaver Creek Country Club, Washington Bel Air Golf Center, Harford Blue Heron Golf Course, Queen Anne’s Bulle Rock, Harford (GOLD) Carroll Park Golf Course, Baltimore Chesapeake Bay Golf Club at North East, Cecil Chesapeake Bay Golf Club at Rising Sun, Cecil Chesapeake Hills Golf Club, Calvert Clearview at Horn’s Point Golf Club, Dorchester Clifton Park Golf Course, Baltimore Clustered Spires Golf Club, Frederick Compass Pointe Golf Courses, Anne Arundel Cross Creek Golf Club, Prince George’s Cumberland Country Club, Baltimore Deer Run Golf Club, Worcester East Potomac Golf Course, Washington DC Eisenhower Golf Course, Anne Arundel Elkton Golf & Batting Center, Cecil Enterprise Golf Course, Prince George’s Fairway Hills Golf Club, Howard Forest Park Golf Course, Baltimore Furnace Bay Golf Club, Cecil Geneva Farm Golf Course, Harford Glenn Dale Golf Club, Prince George’s GlenRiddle Golf Club - Man O’War Course, Worcester (SILVER) Great Hope Golf Course, Somerset Green Hill Yacht & Country Club, Wicomico Harbourtowne Golf Resort, Talbot Hog Neck Golf Course, Talbot Hollow Creek Golf Club, Frederick Horse Bridge Golf Club, Wicomico Lake Presidential, Prince George’s (GOLD/SILVER) Langston Golf Course, Washington DC Laurel Golf Center, Prince George’s Lighthouse Sound, Worcester The Links at Challedon, Carroll M & M Golf Academy, Frederick Maple Run Golf Club, Frederick Maplehurst Country Club, Allegany

Marlton Golf Club, Prince George’s Maryland National Golf Club, Frederick McDaniel College Golf Club, Carroll Montgomery Village Golf Club, Montgomery Mount Pleasant Golf Course, Baltimore Mountain Branch, Harford Musket Ridge Golf Club, Frederick (SILVER) Nassawango Country Club, Worcester Nutters Crossing, Wicomico Oakland Golf Club, Garrett Ocean City Golf Club Newport Bay Course, Worcester Ocean City Golf Club Seaside Course, Worcester Ocean Pines Golf & Country Club, Worcester Ocean Resorts WWCC Golf Club, Worcester Olney Golf Park, Montgomery P.B. Dye Golf Course, Frederick Pasadena Golf Center, Anne Arundel Patuxent Greens Golf Club, Prince George’s Pine Ridge Golf Course, Baltimore Queenstown Harbor - Lakes Course, Queen Anne’s Queenstown Harbor - River Course, Queen Anne’s Red Gate Golf Course, Montgomery Renditions Golf Course, Anne Arundel River House Golf, Talbot River Marsh Golf Club, Dorchester River Run Golf Club, Worcester Rock Creek Golf Course, Washington DC Rocky Gap Lodge & Golf Resort, Allegany Ruggles Golf Course, Harford Rum Pointe Seaside Golf Links, Worcester Swan Point Yacht & Country Club, Charles Twin Shields Golf Club, Calvert University of Maryland Golf Course, Prince George’s Wakefield Valley, Carroll West Winds Golf Club, Frederick Westminster Island Green, Carroll Westminster National Golf Course, Carroll Wetlands Golf Club, Harford Whiskey Creek, Frederick (GOLD) White Plains Golf Course, Charles Worthington Manor Golf Club, Frederick

The Maryland State Golf Association presents its

2013 MSGA Patron Member Program

Delaware Golf Facilities, County (25) Back Creek Golf Club, New Castle Bayside Resort Golf Club, Sussex (GOLD) Baywood Greens Golf Club, Sussex Bear Trap Dunes Golf Club, Sussex (SILVER) Deerfield, New Castle Delcastle Golf Club, New Castle Dover Par 3 & Driving Range, Kent Ed Oliver Golf Club, New Castle Frog Hollow Golf & Swim Club, New Castle Garrisons Lake Golf Club, Kent Heritage Shores Club, Sussex Hooper’s Landing Golf Course, Sussex Midway Par 3, Sussex

Newark Country Club, New Castle Odessa National Golf Club, New Castle The Peninsula Golf & Country Club , Sussex Rock Manor, New Castle The Rookery North, Sussex The Rookery South, Sussex Salt Pond Golf Club, Sussex Stenger’s Shamrock Farms Par 3, Sussex Sussex Pines Country Club, Sussex Tritapoe Academy of Golf, Sussex White Clay Creek Country Club at Delaware Park, New Castle (SILVER) Wild Quail Golf & Country Club, Kent

Plus: 171

Facilities in Pennsylvania 53 Facilities in New Jersey 14 Facilities in Northern Virginia 1 Bonus Facility in North Carolina

Visit www.msga.org for details on all offers.

MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE | JUNE 2013

NEW!

Officially Partnered with the Victory Golf Pass!

Play the best courses in the Mid-Atlantic!


PATRON MEMBERS PROGRAM MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION 79 SHARE

MSGA Patron Member Privileges Patron Level: Victory $50, eClub $85* Patron Couple: Victory $100, eClub $150* Receive a 2013 Victory Golf Pass entitling you to special deals at over 300 of the finest golf facilities in the region. The membership includes: MSGA Patron Member bag tag; Victory Golf Pass with information on all the courses; and subscription to the MSGA e-newsletter. Patron Couples receive all the amenities listed above, plus an additional Victory Golf Pass and MSGA bag tag.

Junior: Victory $30, eClub $40* Junior Members age 18 and under receive all the benefits of Patron Members. Student Members under age 17 must be accompanied by an adult when using the Victory Pass.

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MSGA Patron Member Program In partnership with

Membership Level P Junior (up to age 18): P Patron: P Patron Couple: P Silver: P Silver Couple: P Gold:

Victory Only P $30 P $50 P $100 P $150 P $200 P $500*

with eClub P $40* P $85* P $150* P $185* P $250* included

*includes eClub membership with USGA handicap service and eligibility for MSGA tournaments and Play Days Name ______________________________________________________ (First / Middle Initial / Last) Please Print

Spouse’s First Name______________________________________________

Silver: Victory $150, eClub $185* Silver Couple: Victory $200, eClub $250* Receive all Patron Member privileges, plus special certificates to play Musket Ridge, Lake Presidential, Glen Riddle, Bear Trap Dunes, and White Clay Creek in Wilmington, DE, including complimentary greens fees for a fee which includes cart. All Silver Members will also receive a special Silver Member gift, signifying your commitment to supporting golf in Maryland. Silver Couples receive additional certificates, plus an additional bag tag and Victory Golf Pass.

Gold: $500, includes eClub* Receive all of the Patron and Silver Member privileges, plus three additional Victory Golf Passes (four in all), which are a great gift idea or for entertaining friends and clients. Also included is Bulle Rock’s “Bulle’s Best” certificate, Whiskey Creek’s “Pure Golf olf ” certificate, and the Lake Presidential and Bayside Resort certificates for a complimentary greens fee on each course. Gold Members also receive a special Gold Member gift and special recognition on the MSGA web site.

Address_____________________________________________________ City ______________________________ State______ Zip __________ Daytime Phone # _______________________________________________ Email Address _________________________________________________ Club Type: P Private P Public P Golf League P None Club Name ___________________________________________________

P This is a gift. Please email a printable gift certificate to me at _____________________________________________________

Method of Payment Register online at www.msga.org (or by fax or mail) P Visa P MasterCard P Check Name on Card _________________________________________________ Credit Card No._________________________________________________ Expiration Date __________________________ Security Code____________ (Last three digits on back of card)

Signature____________________________________________________ Checks should be made payable to the Maryland State Golf Association. Please allow 20 days for delivery. Only one membership per person. Membership privileges may be suspended if the terms on the program are violated. If you have any questions, call the MSGA at (410) 653-5300 or visit our web site at www.msga.org. There will be a $35 charge for returned checks and a fee of $25 to replace a lost Victory Golf Pass.

Mail your completed application to: Maryland State Golf Association Suite 145, Commercentre East 1777 Reisterstown Road Baltimore, MD 21208

Or fax your completed application to: (410) 653-8810 * The eClub membership includes USGA Handicap service and tournament eligibility for MSGA tournaments and play days.

Or sign up online at www.msga.org

JUNE 2013 | MARYLAND STATE GOLF MAGAZINE


MARYLAND STATE

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE MSGA

THE 2013

BLACKBOOK DIRECTORY Coming soon


If you would like to list your company, organization or venue with us please send us an email info@thinksportsmedia.com VIEW MEDIA KIT AT MSGA.ORG


Maryland State Golf Magazine ‘Advisory Board members and contributors’ Allen Wronowski, 37th President of the PGA of America (2010-2012) and Honorary President of the PGA of America (2012-2014) - Contributing national and special features writer Steve Mona CEO, World Golf Foundation (WGF) Contributing national and special features writer

PRODUCED FOR THE MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION BY

Jon Guhl, Executive Director, Middle Atlantic PGA (MAPGA) ‘MAPGA Focus’ editorial feature writer Rick Robbins, President, American Society of Golf Course Architects (ASGCA) ‘Architectural Review’ editorial

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William Smith, Executive Director, Maryland State Golf Association (MSGA) MSGA editorial Randal P. Reed, Executive Director, Middle Atlantic Golf Association (MAGA) and the Washington Metropolitan Golf Association (WMGA)‘Rules Revisited’ feature lead Marty West III, Nine-time Maryland Amateur Champion, Five-time Mid Atlantic Amateur Champion, Two-time Walker Cup ‘The Amateur Interview’ columnist

Executive Publisher Marcus Bain marcus@thinksportsmedia.com

David Norman, Past President, International Association of Golf Administrators and Past Executive Director of the Virginia State Golf Association (VSGA) Commercial Sales and Sponsorship Director

Managing Editor Camilla Bowry camilla@thinksportsmedia.com

David Partridge, Five Time VSGA Player of the Year, Middle Atlantic Golf Association Amateur Champion, and Three-time Mid-Amateur Champion Sales and Sponsorship Manager

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MSGA ISSUE 2  

The official magazine of the Maryland State Golf Association

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