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AWARD WINNING EDITORIAL

OCTOBER 11, 2021 VOL. 57, No. 40

INCLUDING THE HUDSON VALLEY WEEKLY SECTION

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g n i t t e b s t r e o c i p S n ' e - but b l l i w ition' p. add ery Cor ing Lott ady sett ords alre nue rec reve out it with

BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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It’s a good time to be the Connecticut Lottery Corp. That’s arguably always the case for an entity that,

for the past decade, has generated sales of at least $1 billion and, since its 1972 inception, has delivered over $10 billion to the state’s General Fund. And things keep getting better: for its fiscal year ended June 30, 2021, the CLC racked up a record $1.5 billion in total sales, up 15% from FY 2020, and transferred a best-ever $418 million to the General Fund, a 20% increase from FY20.

That 2020 was dominated by Covid was likely a significant factor, Rob Simmelkjaer, chairman of the CLC’s board of directors, told the Business Journal. “We have a number of theories that are plausible” for the record numbers, he said. “Certainly Covid-19 had an effect, although there were a number of gaming options that were not available during the pandemic. People couldn’t go

to the casinos for a couple of months while they were shut down, and even when they reopened there were still a lot of concerns about health and safety.” Professional sports leagues were also shut down for some time, Simmelkjaer continued, which may have benefited the underground wagering market but not the legitimate one. He further opined that stimulus checks and ini-

tiatives like the Paycheck Protection Program “were filling people’s pockets. They suddenly had extra money and time on their hands.” Even so, the CLC’s receipts are ahead of the record-breaking FY21 on a year-over-year basis, he said, though specific figures were not available. Simmelkjaer noted that the multi juris-

dictional Mega Millions (available in 45 states, D.C. and the U.S. Virgin Islands) and Powerball (the same, plus Puerto Rico) can also encourage more people to participate as their jackpots grow. Powerball recently paid $699.8 million to a ticket purchaser in California. “Even if we don’t have » SPORTS BETTING

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NEW JERSEY COMPANY WANTS TO DEVELOP $440M OF WAREHOUSES IN ORANGE BY PETER KATZ Pkatz@westfairinc.com

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he Hudson Valley landscape could soon be dotted with $440 million worth of new warehouses and distribution centers if plans by the RDM Group Inc. of Mahwah, New Jersey, come to fruition. “We’re focused exclusively on developing industrial » WAREHOUSES

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MAKING A

Winston E. Allen's autobiography recalls IMPACT how he desegregated Wall Street in 1962

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We don’t create gimmicks to enrich ourselves; we enrich our readers with news about where they live and work.

BY PHIL HALL Phall@westfairinc.com

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n 1962, the eyes of the world were on the American South as the civil rights movement sought to break down the Jim Crow environment that disfigured the nation through state-sanctioned segregation. But less attention was paid north of the Mason-Dixon line — in New York City, to be specific — when Winston E. Allen quietly broke down the Jim Crow residue in the financial services sector by opening Creative Investor Services as the first Black-owned broker-dealer firm on Wall Street. The 88-year-old Westport resident recalls his financial career in his newly published autobiography “I Pried Open Wall Street in 1962.” It is Allen’s third book — following his inspirationally focused “Don’t Get Mad, Get Rich” and “Live a Purposeful and Meaningful Life" — and he said he felt he was at the right point in his life to share his distinctive life story. “I felt that it was time for a good, positive story about someone who feels good about what

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Winston E. Allen. Photo by Phil Hall.

These have been our choices for businesses and nonprofits that are Making an Impact in our communities.

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• JANUARY 18: René Hue, Murmuration • JANUARY 25: Nic King, Proud Puffs • FEBRUARY 1: Judith M. Watson, Mount Vernon Neighborhood Health Center Inc. • FEBRUARY 8: Gary Bilekzikian, Guidecraft • FEBRUARY 15: Jonathan Winn, Thrown Stone Theatre Co. • FEBRUARY 22: Carlo Vona Jr., Paramount Stone Co. • MARCH 1: Peter Kempner, Kempner Properties • MARCH 8: Joshua Applestone, Applestone Meat Co. • MARCH 15: Michael Sachse, Dandelion Energy • MARCH 22: Donvil Collins, VeeKast • MARCH 29: George S. Kaufman, Kaufman Astoria Studios • APRIL 5: Jon Winkel, The Stamford Partnership • APRIL 12: Amiee Turner, Team Woofgang & Co. • APRIL 19: Ken Londoner, BioSig • APRIL 26: Jonathan Gertman, The NRP Group • MAY 3: State Sen. Billie Miller, Lt. Gov. Susan Bysiewicz, Fran Pastore, Women’s Business Development Council • MAY 10: Peter Hubbell, Apply:you & Leigh Shemitz, Soundwaters • MAY 17: Michelle Brier, Blue Path Service Dogs • MAY 24: The Grasso family, Urban Mining CT • MAY 31: Shirley Acevedo, Latino U College Access Inc. If you would like to nominate a business or nonprofit that you feel is also making an impact, please send an email to Erin Real at ereal@westfairinc.com.

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• JUNE 7: David Greenstein, TestZone • JUNE 14: Henry Welt, Abigail Lewis, Ossining Innovatives! • JUNE 21: Christos Athanasiou, Jonus Ademovic, miniMAX • JUNE 28: Martin Ginsburg ,Ginsburg Development Cos. • JULY 5: Jake Allyne, Breakthrough Fitness Co. • JULY 19: White Plains DMV • JULY 26: Fairfield University Art Museum • AUGUST 2: Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut • AUGUST 9: Jianying Hu, IBM • AUGUST 16: WSHU Public Radio • AUGUST 23: William Raveis, William Raveis Real Estate, Mortgage & Insurance • AUGUST 30: Mike Geller, Mike’s Organic Delivery • SEPTEMBER 6: Carolins M. Osorio, CP Servicios Latinos • SEPTEMBER 13: Adam Musa, Fuelco and FoodSmart • SEPTEMBER 20: Joe Carbone, WorkPlace • SEPTEMBER 27: Nicolet Gatewood, Haddad & Partners • OCTOBER 4: Rafael Pagan, Pacific House

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he did,” he said. “I had so many good things that happened over the times.” The son of Jamaican immigrants, Allen grew up in New York City’s Harlem, and joked that his childhood residence on 113th Street gave him the youthful impression that “I had Central Park all to myself.” He never witnessed the burden of segregation until 1946 when he took a train to Miami. “It was in a sealed compartment because Blacks were not even allowed to go near sleeping cars,” he said, adding that the view from the windows seemed utterly ordinary until the train reached Washington, D.C., and signs designating separate entrances and facilities for “Whites” and “Colored” suddenly began to appear. “They were consistent right down the line,” he continued. “And I said, ‘Wow, who's putting out these signs? Where do they come from?’ Coming back, I saw the same thing again and I said, ‘Okay, now we’ve got to deal with this issue.’ That was my first exposure to segregation in the United States.” Allen initially pursued a career as a high school teacher, but quickly realized it was the wrong fit for him. Intrigued by global economics, he applied for and received a Fulbright Scholarship in 1961 that enabled him to study in Paris. He observed that at a time when the Freedom Riders were being harassed and assaulted in the South for daring to integrate bus transportation, he was enjoying first-class seating across Western Europe through the Eurail system. Allen’s life took an unexpected turn while he was sitting in an outdoor café in Paris when Fran Cole, the niece of singer Nat King Cole and a friend from Harlem, spotted him. She was in the French capital studying piano at a conservatory and introduced Allen to her fiancé, Al Fogelson, who had recently taken a job as a Wall Street trader. “His first bonus was $250,000,” Allen remembered with a laugh. “I was a teacher at that time in the New York City public schools — that was the job I hadn't planned to do, I just stumbled into it because I needed a job.” Allen was eager to follow Fogelson’s path, but there was one difference: Fogelson was White and Allen was Black, and Wall Street in the early 1960s was not a progressive environment. Allen arranged to be in a trader training class at Goldman Sachs, which was unaware of his race when he made arrangements by mail and phone. “I could see the look on their faces,” Allen said, evoking the unhappy surprise of the Goldman Sachs staff when he showed up at their office. Other inquiries across Wall Street resulted in identical responses whenever he showed up, and

he decided that he had to “find a way to get to Wall Street, and the way to get in there was to become a broker-dealer.” Allen passed the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) examination and became licensed on Dec. 2, 1962. As no company would hire him based on his race, he started his own firm, Creative Investors Services, and began to hire qualified individuals who also had been shut out of financial services jobs due to discriminatory hiring practices common in that era. Although he broke down a barrier, Allen was less interested in calling attention to himself and than in diversifying the financial services talent pool. He began to hold seminars at the Americana Hotel in New York City to train people on passing the NASD examination, and also

taught classes at Fordham University. Without considering self-promotion, publicity nonetheless found him in 1972 when a New York Times reporter learned of his quiet breakthroughs — which also involved acquiring a home in an allwhite Larchmont neighborhood that was initially not eager to have him as a neighbor. The Times article was spotted by C. Peter McColough, CEO of Xerox Corp., who invited Allen to become the company’s manager of education, research and development. “Later it developed into director of this and that,” he laughed. “But basically, it was taking all of their employees for sales, service management and giving them my spiel.” Allen stayed with Xerox until

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McColough’s retirement in 1982. During his tenure with the company, he was able to continue his ownership of Creative Investor Services. Following his Xerox exit, he earned his real estate broker’s license and became involved in the ownership and management of residential properties in Manhattan and its suburban markets. In creating “I Pried Open Wall Street in 1962,” Allen admitted his life’s achievement happened without his attempt to orchestrate events. “It's not a planned story,” he said. “I can't take credit for sitting down and designing a thing. The thing that puzzled me a little bit was the fact that I was able to take opportunities that came along and maximized them. And that's what I hope people will get from my book.”

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Stamford Chamber's annual meeting features upbeat forecast from Lamont, victory lap by Martin BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN Kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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hough it featured remarks by Gov. Ned Lamont and Department of Economic and Community Development Commissioner David Lehman, the Stamford Chamber of Commerce’s 34th annual meeting was dominated by outgoing Mayor David Martin. Using the opportunity as a kind of valedictory address — he was defeated in his bid for a third term by State Rep. Caroline Simmons (D) in the city’s Democratic primary — Martin rattled off some impressive data about where Stamford is and where it is heading. “I have a hard time imagining” how either Simmons or her opponent, Bobby Valentine, could “mess this up,” he said. The mayor said that, according to data that will be released “shortly,” Stamford will have a $15 million surplus, something he said even he was surprised by. The city “should easily” generate another surplus by the end of the current year, he said. As has been widely reported, according to the latest U.S. Census Bureau figures, Stamford now has 135,470 residents and has supplanted New Haven as the state’s second-largest. Martin said the city was seeing 95% to 97% occupancy in its apartment buildings before the Covid-19 pandemic, reflecting the general trend away from congested cities like New York and Boston. “People are voting with their feet,” he said. “We are attracting what I call the future workforce,” he declared, maintaining that that cohort — roughly 20- to 40-year-olds — is not being attracted by the state at large. The city also has more restaurants now than it did before the pandemic, he said, adding that it has the lowest crime rate of any city in the Northeast. On the downside, Martin said the city has some of the oldest schools in the area, many of which are “crumbling” — something that may limit a continued influx of family-forming millennials unless something is done. “I’ve loved this job,” the mayor concluded. “It is frustrating as hell, as you go through one conflict after another. And I’ve got a couple more that I’ve got to get

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Mayor David Martin done. But I love this community. I think we have made enormous progress.” DECD’s Lehman maintained that the state has navigated the pandemic well, with the “work from anywhere” economy generating “in-migration”; “historic” investments in the likes of education, health care, small businesses and workforce development are acting to reverse the general perception that “we’re stodgy and unfriendly to business.” Real GDP has yet to return to end of 2019 levels, Lehman said, but it is now above Q1 2020; updated data is expected soon. The governor, appearing via livestream from Foxwoods — where he officially made the state’s first legal sports bet with a $50 wager for the Connecticut Sun basketball team to beat the Chicago Sky (they did) — said that sports betting and iGaming had been “sitting on our front burner here in the state for 10 years. “There were a lot of things sitting on the front burner we hadn’t taken care of,” he added. “We’ve tried to address that.” Legalizing recreational canFCBJ

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nabis was one of those things, Lamont said. “Marijuana may not be universally popular,” he said in a nod to the ongoing debate about the wisdom of such a move. But “we’re not an island,” he said, referring to similar legislation passed or pending in New York, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. “We will do it in a way that recognizes public health and safety.” He also lauded cannabis’ potential as a significant generator of revenue. Improving commuting times also remains on the governor’s agenda, as does a prudent approach to the state's record-breaking rainy day fund of $4.5 billion. “The rainy day fund burns a hole in people’s pockets, I’ll tell you that,” he quipped. Lamont said the state still has the highest Covid vacation rate, and the lowest infection rate, in the country. As of Oct. 1, according to Becker’s Hospital Review, Connecticut had the second-highest vaccination rate — 68.7% to Vermont’s 69.5% -- and its 2.6% positivity rate trailed four states and the District of Columbia.

David Lehman “I think we’ve got the right balance,” he said. “We’ve got our economy open, we’ve got our kids in school. I think we’re beginning to turn things around.” Chamber President and CEO Heather Kavanagh presented awards to Joe Cingari, a member of the Cingari family that owns and operates 10 ShopRites throughout the state (company of the year);

Laura Jordan, director of government affairs and community relations at Stamford Health (member of the year); and Fanny Ferreira, vice president and senior market manager, and Marjan Murray, executive vice president, of People’s United Bank (community excellence award). People’s United was the event’s main sponsor.


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Lottery Corp— the winning ticket, we draw significant sales from those games,” he said. “Once the jackpots get big enough, TV and radio announcers start talking about it — and that drives a lot of business.” As a result, “Obviously we root for Connecticut winners — but if we can’t have that, we root for no winners,” he quipped. As a member of the CLC board, Simmelkjaer is prohibited by law from gambling — an inevitable step to avoid conflicts-of-interest charges. Last week Mohegan Sun pulled WNBA games from its wagering options, after complaints about its owning the Connecticut Sun team, as well as the squad’s home arena, were made. With legalized sports wagering having gone into effect on Sept. 30, and iGaming expected to follow soon, the CLC is also readying itself for what Simmelkjaer says will make for “meaningful contributions to our business and to our contributions to the state.” He declined to provide an estimate on what the CLC could make from those ventures -- “We don’t like to throw numbers around” — but Rush Street Interactive, which will run its sportsbook, guarantees a minimum of $170 million for the corporation over 10 years. “Sports betting is not big enough to double our numbers or anything like that,” he declared. “But the numbers we do will be a nice addition.” Then there’s Sportech, which has been licensed to offer sports wagering at 10 offtrack betting locations, including Bobby V’s sports bars in Stamford and Windsor Locks as well as at a yet-to-be-determined location in Bridgeport. “We’ll be opening (in Bridgeport) no later than the end of the year and we expect sooner than that,” Simmelkjaer said. “There are a couple of auditoriums under consideration.” He confirmed what Sportech Venues President Ted Taylor told the Business Journal in August — that the Bridgeport location will not be at 255 Korruth St., where the company let its off-track betting lease lapse. Simmelkjaer said he was directly involved in negotiating the CLC’s deals with both Rush Street and Sportech, with the latter initially so upset at apparently being left out of the state’s sports-betting/iGaming ventures, which originally were limited to the tribes operating the Mohegan Sun and Foxwoods casinos, that it had threatened legal action. “It was simply a matter of coming to terms” with Sportech, he said. “They’re a known entity that has an existing customer base that has been betting on horses.” Part of the negotiations included releasing any legal claims against the state, he added. Rush Street, while not as well-known to the public as FanDuel — which is operating Mohegan Sun’s sportsbook — and DraftKings, doing the same at Foxwoods, “is a trusted company that will help us compete efficiently with those two behemoths,” Simmelkjaer said.

The Westport resident noted that the CLC will celebrate its 50th anniversary next year — it was created in 1971 by then-Gov. Thomas Meskill, and began selling tickets in February 1972 — with some special games in the planning stages. Simmelkjaer is also co-founder and CEO of the Norwalk startup Persona, a social video platform dedicated to interviews. As a former executive at both ESPN and NBC Sports, he said he “knows the sports-betting world pretty well.” Gov. Ned Lamont chose him to fill the vacant CLC board of directors chairman role in 2020. Membership on the board is an unpaid, volunteer role.

Rob Simmelkjaer

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Warehouses— warehousing properties,” Isaac Neuman, the real estate specialist who manages RDM’s development activities, told the Business Journal. “RDM likes raw land deals and we see opportunities to add value.” RDM, which stands for "Real Deal Management," has been active recently in putting together contracts for land purchases in Orange County and seeking development approvals from municipalities. It has plans that would bring new developments to Goshen, Wallkill, Middletown, Wawayanda and Hamptonburgh. RDM would custom-build for users or build on speculation and then offer spaces for lease. RDM isn’t the only entity interested in building warehouses and distribution centers in the county. NAI Platform, Matrix Development Group, City View Commercial, Bluewater Property Group and Weiss Realty are among those who have been active in proposing or undertaking warehouse construction in Orange. RDM has been working on plans that could create 14 warehouses totaling 4 million square feet. “We have some plans for potential additional properties that we’re still investigating,” Neuman said. “We’re always interested in finding other space that works for us. We do a lot of vetting of sites. To get to those 14 sites and 4 million square feet of development, we have to go through several sites to get the right locations.” Neuman said when the company began seeking approvals for a project on Dolsontown Road is the Wawayanda, it found that the town desire was to concentrate industrial activities in that area. Because of RDM’s and other developers' proposals, the town decided that an extensive environmental review was in order, especially in view of the heavy volume of truck traffic that was expected. “We continued to then purchase or obtain contracts to purchase other sites on both sides of Dolsontown Road," Neuman said. "We’re going to break ground next month on our first project at 1081 Dolsontown Road and then continue to develop that street to be the Wawayanda Industrial Park,” Neuman said. He said that the municipalities his firm has dealt with in Orange County have been pro-business and understand that development benefits them as well as those behind the projects. ”We’ve been happy to work with the townships that we have our developments in,” Neuman said. “Sometimes we’ll pre-lease it before we have the four walls up. I’d say 50% of our sites are taken by the time we’re in the middle of the approval stage. The other 50% are speculative.”

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Rendering of proposed RDM warehouse at 1081 Dolsontown Road, Wawayanda, N.Y. Neuman said the Covid-19 pandemic has helped drive people to use e-commerce platforms, resulting in increased online retailing and creating a need for additional warehousing and last-mile distribution centers. “RDM has been focused on industrial and was before the market started to become hot. RDM intends to stay in that market,” Neuman said. “We’re open to any development in the surrounding counties. We have an appetite right now to get into larger deals and possibly industrial parks in the future to make space available for smaller users.” Neuman said that one feature that attracted the company to Orange County was New York Stewart International Airport. RDM's attention was drawn to the airport back in May of 2019 when Kalitta Air, an air cargo service operating about 30 Boeing 747 and 767 freighters, announced it was beginning operations at Stewart instead of John F. Kennedy International. Kalitta’s decision was seen as more evidence that Orange County was growing as a warehousing and distribution mecca. Neuman also pointed to New York State Thruway, I-84 and Route 17, for which widening plans have been on the drawing boards for several years, as important trucking routes. “RDM was started about seven years ago. We have central and northern New Jersey and Pennsylvania developments going active right now and we’re looking to take on other locations and become a little more national in our growth,” Neuman said. The Hudson Valley landscape could soon be dotted with $440 million worth of new warehouses and distribution centers if plans by the RDM Group Inc. of Mahwah, New Jersey, come to fruition. “We’re focused exclusively on develWCBJ

oping industrial warehousing properties,” Isaac Neuman, the real estate specialist who manages RDM’s development activities, told the Business Journal. “RDM likes raw land deals and we see opportunities to add value.” RDM, which stands for "Real Deal Management," has been active recently in putting together contracts for land purchases in Orange County and seeking development approvals from municipalities. It has plans that would bring new developments to Goshen, Wallkill, Middletown, Wawayanda and Hamptonburgh. RDM would custom-build for users or build on speculation and then offer spaces for lease. RDM isn’t the only entity interested in building warehouses and distribution centers in the county. NAI Platform, Matrix Development Group, City View Commercial, Bluewater Property Group and Weiss Realty are among those who have been active in proposing or undertaking warehouse construction in Orange. RDM has been working on plans that could create 14 warehouses totaling 4 million square feet. “We have some plans for potential additional properties that we’re still investigating,” Neuman said. “We’re always interested in finding other space that works for us. We do a lot of vetting of sites. To get to those 14 sites and 4 million square feet of development, we have to go through several sites to get the right locations.” He said that the municipalities his firm has dealt with in Orange County have been pro-business and understand that development benefits them as well as those behind the projects. ”We’ve been happy to work with the townships that we have our develop-

ments in,” Neuman said. “Sometimes we’ll pre-lease it before we have the four walls up. I’d say 50% of our sites are taken by the time we’re in the middle of the approval stage. The other 50% are speculative.” Neuman said the Covid-19 pandemic has helped drive people to use e-commerce platforms, resulting in increased online retailing and creating a need for additional warehousing and last-mile distribution centers. “RDM has been focused on industrial and was before the market started to become hot. RDM intends to stay in that market,” Neuman said. “We’re open to any development in the surrounding counties. We have an appetite right now to get into larger deals and possibly industrial parks in the future to make space available for smaller users.” Neuman said that one feature that attracted the company to Orange County was New York Stewart International Airport. RDM's attention was drawn to the airport back in May of 2019 when Kalitta Air, an air cargo service operating about 30 Boeing 747 and 767 freighters, announced it was beginning operations at Stewart instead of John F. Kennedy International. Kalitta’s decision was seen as more evidence that Orange County was growing as a warehousing and distribution mecca. Neuman also pointed to New York State Thruway, I-84 and Route 17, for which widening plans have been on the drawing boards for several years, as important trucking routes. “RDM was started about seven years ago. We have Central and Northern New Jersey and Pennsylvania developments going active right now and we’re looking to take on other locations and become a little more national in our growth,” Neuman said.


3DX Industries chooses Bridgeport for East Coast operations hub BY PHIL HALL Phall@westfairinc.com

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DX Industries Inc., a Ferndale, Washington company focused on 3D printing applications that specializes in the additive metal manufacturing and plastic printing segments, has opened its first East Coast office at the University of Bridgeport’s Bauer Hall Innovation Center. Bridgeport was a no-brainer for Nicholas Coriano, who joined the company as vice president of East Coast operations in April. Coriano headquartered his earlier endeavor, the business startup consulting company Cervitude, in Bridgeport, and the city is the home base for two of its newest executives: Peter Divone Sr., a board member who is a chemical process engineer and currently serves as an Entrepreneur in Residence at the University of Bridgeport, and Harold Blackwell, the company’s head of mergers and acquisitions. Coriano stated that 3DX Industries is the first company to set up offices in Bauer Hall, and he is eager to have neighbors. “My goal is to recruit other companies to come and be a part of this ecosystem for additive manufacturing,” he said. “We can create another manufacturing hub back in the United States. If you look at the history of Bridgeport, there was a lot of manufac-

Nicholas Coriano. Photo by Phil Hall. turing and there are a lot of spaces here.” Coriano added that he and Divone conversed with the leadership of Goodwin College, which assumed co-ownership of the university last year with Paier College of Art, about creating an additive manufacturing degree program at the school in order to meet a growing occupational space. “There's a shortage of tradesmen and engineers,” he said. “Not engineering engineers, per se, but those who can operate these manufacturing facilities — the CNC machinist, the CAD designer, and even the welder. They can bring manufacturing

back, but there's not many of them.” 3DX Industries has been growing its businesses through the recent purchase of Specialty Metal Works LLC in Blaine, Washington, and the hiring of agronomist and inventor Anthony J. Bredberg to head a new research and development division. The company’s stock is currently traded in the over-the-counter market and Coriano is aiming to take the company to NASDAQ, with the Bridgeport office helping to expand horizons thanks to its location near the Manhattan and Greenwich investor offices.

In many ways, Coriano believes he is in the right place at the right time. He defined 3D printing as offering a solution to bring offshored manufacturing opportunities back to the U.S. while alleviating the suffocation imposed on the supply chain created by global disruptions. “I'm a big believer in onshoring,” he said. “Hopefully, this will be a model that we can run.” He also believes Bridgeport — and the Fairfield County region as a whole — is poised for a new wave of entrepreneurism and could be rediscovered as the next hub for business creativity, rather than just being the middle passage between the Northeast’s two major metropolises. “New York is already known for things and Boston is already known for things, right?” he asked. “We want to add another level where we're in-between. We want to wave a flag here and be like, ‘This is the only place that's doing that!’ We're trying to create an additive manufacturing hub and no one else is doing that — no one else has taken the lead on that. We want to stand out.” Coriano hoped to work with the university as a resource for future employees. “Once we finish our five-year plan here in the next six months, we'll have a timeline,” he said. “And we are sure that we will expand our offices here on the East Coast.”

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Concordia professor sues closed college for $765,000 in severance Friday, November 4, 2021

BY BILL HELZEL Bheltzel@westfairinc.com

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former Concordia College business professor and administrator has sued the now-closed Bronxville school for $765,000 in severance payments. William M. Salva accused Concordia of breach of contract in a complaint filed Sept. 29 in Westchester Supreme Court, for denying him severance when his employment ended on April 30. The heart of the tussle is whether Salva voluntarily resigned or was fired. He began his career at Concordia in 2005 as an associate professor of business and dean of adult education. In 2015, he was promoted to a continuing appointment, Concordia's version of tenure, which meant that he had a rolling 5-year contract that renewed every July. The college had to give a 12-month notice to terminate the contract, according to the complaint, and then the professor would be entitled to severance based on whatever time remained on his contract. In 2018, Concordia issued a termination notice, effective June 30, 2019. On his last day of employment, the complaint states, Salva would have received severance equal to four years of salary and benefits. But even as Salva was packing up his office to leave, a college official notified him that Concordia "had had a change of heart and wanted his employment to continue," the complaint states. The Middle States Commission on Higher Education had put Concordia on probation, and the college had about two years to get reaccredited. Salva's 2019 termination was rescinded, according to the complaint, and Salva was to continue teaching. He was given an administrative position for evaluating

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departmental efficiencies. The new job was to end in June 2020, but in January 2020 he was given a sixmonth appointment as interim provost, the chief academic officer. When the new provost was appointed, according to the complaint, Salva was appointed associate vice president for academic affairs, dean of the adult education program and professor of business. Last December, Concordia put him on notice that his position would end on April 30. On May 11, Iona College in New Rochelle, announced that it had bought the Concordia campus to use as a school for health sciences. When Salva asked about compensation, a college official responded, "You were not involuntarily terminated; your contract ended April 30, 2021. Accordingly, you do not qualify for the separation pay." Last June, he was named professor emeritus on a continuous appointment basis, an honorary position that comes with no compensation. Salva argues that by not implementing the original 2019 termination date, appointing him to administrative positions, continuing his status as a professor of business and awarding him emeritus status, Concordia acknowledged that he was eligible for severance payments. Salva calculates that he is entitled to $765,000: a base salary of $135,000 for five years and two months, plus a separation payment of $67,500 for 16 years of service. Concordia was part of the The Lutheran Church — Missouri Synod eight campus university system, but spokesman David L. Strand said the synod did not own or operate the college, "and thus we cannot comment on pending litigation on its behalf." Salva is represented by Scarsdale attorney Robert B. Bernstein.


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United Way of Western CT debuts Prosperi-Key platform to aid lower-income households BY PHIL HALL Phall@westfairinc.com

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n August, the United Way of Western Connecticut launched Prosperi-Key, a digital platform designed to assist struggling lower-income households who fall into the ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) demographic that are not eligible for government assistance programs but nonetheless struggle mightily to make ends meet. According to the nonprofit, the ALICE demographic account for more than 40% of households in western Connecticut and include many essential workers who kept the pandemic-era economy working, such as grocery store clerks, child care workers, and elder care workers. Last month, Prosperi-Key debuted the Healthy Savings program, which provides $10 of free fresh produce weekly to residents of the 15 Fairfield and Litchfield County towns served by United Way of Western Connecticut. According to Kim Morgan, CEO of the United Way of Western Connecticut, the program is the result of evolving considerations on how to address food insecurity. “It started off as a 50% match with a cap

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at $10 per week,” said Morgan. “This past summer, we changed that to be a flat $10 per week to make it less of an out-of-pocket cost for the ALICE population and to increase the benefit. During the early months of the pandemic, between March and June of 2020, we doubled the benefit to $20 per week because we knew people were in such dire need of food.” Morgan said the Healthy Savings program has already benefited 670 households and provided $124,000 in fresh produce since its introduction. She plans to expand it to 1,200 households within the next year, with local Stop & Shop and Walmart stores participating in the program. “Healthy Savings came about because we didn't want to keep driving people to food pantries,” Morgan said. “We didn't feel like that was the most dignified way to get food — we wanted to find something in the grocery store.” In addition to the food discounts through Healthy Savings, Prosperi-Key connects eligible residents with businesses and organizations offering housing assistance and counseling, career growth resources, child education services, programs designed for seniors and veterans, and consumer products and services ranging from internet connectivity

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The Healthy Savings program in use. to clothing for adults and children. When presenting Prosperi-Key, Morgan wanted to avoid the appearance of offering handouts to those in need. Instead, she sought to involve local businesses in providing discounted merchandise and services while encouraging program users to feel like they were getting a good deal rather than charitable contributions. “We felt like these families needed a Groupon-like experience,” she said. “And that we could build a business and nonprofit connection. We've got some local markets and diners who are supporting the community and giving special discounts, and that will grow over time as the United Way establishes relationships and the brand gets known.” Morgan stated that Prosperi-Key is designed to make the income verification

process easy and the sign-up environment user-friendly. “It eliminates that challenge that ALICE households typically have in accessing services and support because they generally work during the day when these agencies are open to work with clients,” she said. “This puts the power back into the hands of the individuals who are seeking assistance — they can access it at night on the weekends and can apply for the assistance whenever it's convenient for them and not have to take time off work to go from one agency for one type of support to a different agency for different kinds of support. It really streamlines the system and the process for this population.” Morgan is planning to expand the Prosperi-Key platform to other United Way chapters across the country. “We built this as a national platform and we're rolling it out community by community,” she said. “We’re in Buffalo, New York, and launching in the next two weeks Dayton, Ohio. We're working with the local United Way's because they are so connected in the communities with the business community and the nonprofits — we hope to be in 100 communities and have at least half a million members in the next three years.”


Kimball looks at the power of choice in power and in housing BY PETER KATZ Pkatz@westfairinc.com

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hen the nonprofit Groundwork Hudson Valley honors Wilson Kimball at its “Here Comes the Sun” annual gala on Oct. 14, celebrating the proliferation of solar electricity projects in Yonkers, it will be shining a spotlight not only on her but also on the Municipal Housing Authority for the City of Yonkers (MHACY) for which she serves as president and CEO. MHACY is the second-largest housing authority in New York state. In addition to Kimball, Nina Orville, executive director of Sustainable Westchester, and Gregg Wasser of G&S Investors and G&S Solar are to be honored for their contributions to bringing increased solar generating activity to the city. U.S. Rep. Jamaal Bowman (D-16th) is honorary chair of the event, which is hosted by the Robert Martin Co. Kimball told the Business Journal that she began working with Groundwork on environmental issues while she was serving as planning commissioner in Yonkers, and that she recently tapped into their expertise to help explore options for dealing with flooding at housing authority properties that resulted from the remnants of Hurricane Ida. “What we’ve found is that these hundred-year events are now 10-year events,” Kimball said. “Normally it’s about waterrise because rivers flood. Now we’re having rain events.” She said a housing authority renovation project on Western Avenue suffered a setback when a boiler room and community room were flooded. Kimball said that the housing authority is looking for ways to make its properties more environmentally friendly and allow its residents to be more in touch with nature. MHACY was quick to enroll in a Community Solar initiative launched by the city along with Sustain Westchester and Groundwork Hudson Valley to bring five solar installations to buildings owned by the Robert Martin Company in the Executive Boulevard area of the city. Yonkers residents enrolling in Community Solar are eligible to receive up to 10% off their monthly electric bills while supporting the use of clean energy. Kimball pointed out that about 200 of MHACY's tenants who pay their own electric bills will see solar savings, while those tenants whose electricity costs are included in their rent will benefit indirectly. She further indicated that the 21st century calls for new thinking on the part of housing authorities. “Let’s think outside the box,” Kimball said. “We’re really having to rethink the structure of the housing.”’ She said that many people don’t understand the lessons of the past when it comes

to the role of a housing authority. “In the '50s, '60s, '70s, when they did high-rise public housing, what you got was a lot of individuals of the same economic background sort of warehoused in these tall towers,” Kimball said. “I don’t think any of us thinks that’s ideal anymore. I think we all would prefer a mixed-income community.” Kimball noted that today, developers in Yonkers are required to include 10% affordable housing units in their market-rate projects. “That allows us to really give people an TWB Loan to Decision opportunity live with others who are not WCBJ from the same socioeconomic background 7.375” w x It’s 7.125” h eye-opening experinecessarily. a real 4-27-21 ence and it’s also a very good motivational experience and I think it’s a better way of creating communities,” Kimball said.

She also pointed out that the federal Section 8 voucher program, which allows low- and moderate-income families to pay no more than approximately 40% of their monthly income toward rent, has won acceptance from many Yonkers landlords who must comply with federal requirements -- such as annual property inspections and meeting minimum standards set by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. “We have been actively working on our Section 8 vouchers and we’re talking to the feds about getting more,” Kimball said. “President Biden’s infrastructure bill has a ton of money for Section 8 vouchers. We’re very supportive of that bill. We want to see more Section 8 vouchers in the marketplace so that we can help people get placed

in those kinds of developments.” Kimball said that the MHACY has more than 1,900 units that it owns and manages and provides more than 4,000 Section 8 vouchers and plans a three-pronged approach to carry it forward into the future. “We want to work with the market-rate developers to integrate our tenants into their structure. We want to build our own new housing that is a cut above what it used to be,” Kimball said. “We want to get more Section 8 vouchers into the smaller landlords, not just big ones like RXR or Ginsburg, but into the smaller landlords’ hands so they have a guaranteed rent and our tenants can have a choice: they can live in a high-rise or they can live in a two- or three-family. Ultimately, a Section 8 voucher is about choice and we want to promote that.”

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E-commerce effect overrated, says retail expert presents

THE 2021 ANNUAL GALA AND AWARDS CELEBRATION As Connecticut’s leading agency in strengthening and supporting the economic success of women, the Women’s Business Development Council (WBDC) is pleased to honor our clients and partners of impact from the past year at the virtual Annual Gala and Awards Celebration. Join us on October 29 as WBDC highlights successes through client stories and other speakers, and celebrates the resilience of women business owners. WBDC is proud to make a special annual recognition of leaders in Connecticut that have demonstrated influence on women in business. This year, WBDC is pleased to present an Impact Award to Michael Weinstock, Market President, CT, M&T Bank. Michael is being recognized for his achievements as a leader within the banking industry and his authentic commitment to serving a broad spectrum of people, in particular, women and underserved members of the local community. “The Women’s Business Development Council’s work to support women-owned businesses has been inspirational to all of us at M&T Bank, and to receive this recognition from them is an incredible honor,” Michael said. “M&T Bank and WBDC share a commitment to these community entrepreneurs, and this recognition highlights how powerful community, government, and corporate partnerships and resource sharing can be when tackling difficult challenges within the neighborhoods we serve. In addition, by supporting women-owned businesses, you are directly supporting financial equality, equal opportunity, and gender empowerment.” WBDC Founder and CEO Fran Pastore encourages all sponsors and guests to host small satellite viewing parties. “When you attend our Gala, you will witness and celebrate this year’s Impact Honorees and Women Rising clients and directly support the women-owned businesses we are so proud to serve.”

For tickets, sponsorships, and more information please visit: ctwbdc.org or contact akalish@ctwbdc.org. The Women’s Business Development Council educates, motivates and empowers women to achieve economic independence and self-sufficiency. From starting or growing a business to improving personal finances, the WBDC drives business success in a tangible and accessible way. Our clients exemplify what happens when ambition, education and preparation come together. For more information, visit ctwbdc.org or call 203-353-1750.

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BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN Kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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hen it comes to the so-called new normal in retail, MJP Consulting principal Michael Berne says, there is no such thing. Berne made those remarks at a recent webinar hosted by the nonprofit Connecticut Main Street Center, which advocates for developing and sustaining successful downtowns that meet the needs of residents and visitors. Berne, who touts himself as one of North America’s leading experts and futurists on urban and downtown/Main Street districts, as well as the retail industry, said that despite the “gut punch” that downtown districts and retail in general suffered during the pandemic, not all is as bad as some have opined. “Retail is the most intricate and fast-moving property type there is,” he declared. “It goes in directions that most people never would have predicted.” Simply extrapolating the future from current trends “is where we run into problems,” he added. “The reality is that always with retail but especially right now, there is so much we still do not know — or that we think or are sure we know, but where we are likely to be wrong,” Berne said. Acknowledging all the predictions of doom in spring 2020, Berne said that 18 months later, the truth began to emerge that “this was not an extinction-level event for downtown retail — far, far from it.” In contradiction to popular perception, Berne argued that the restaurant sector has not been as damaged as commonly believed. While the independent restaurant coalition had estimated that as many as 85% of those restaurants

would close, he said the reality was actually far more positive. In an average year, Berne said, U.S. restaurants generate an estimated $909 billion in revenue; in the course of 2020, they generated about $669 billion. “That’s massive,” Berne said, “but looking at it another way, 90,000 restaurants closed permanently or long term,” according to the National Restaurant Association, which had originally estimated 110,000. In an average year, he said, 50,000 restaurants close. What the NRA never reported, he said, was that 70,000 restaurants opened in 2020 — a figure that was “not bad,” given that 83,000 normally open each year. “Not good — not cataclysmic,” he concluded. In Connecticut, Berne added, the state’s restaurant association reported that 600 of 8,500 restaurants had closed permanently or long term — a 7% decrease. “That’s lower than in an average year,” he said. “And in many cities, more restaurants opened than actually closed,” including Stamford. “ That Nat iona l Rest au ra nt Association was doing a little bit of posturing and negotiating,” Berne continued. “And it worked,” with the passage of the federal Restaurant Revitalization Fund and easing of restrictions surrounding outdoor dining, to-go alcohol sales and the like. Other small businesses similarly benefited from curbside pickup, as well as from “the massive amount of government assistance,” including the Paycheck Protection Program, stimulus checks, state grants and property owners who were receptive to reduced, deferred or extended leases — in turn made possible by the banks.


Some retail categories “did even better than in a normal year,” he continued, citing the home, kitchen, garden, crafts, toys and sporting goods sectors. Berne acknowledged that “it’s not at all clear” that those sectors will continue to boom as the pandemic wanes.” He also argued against the popular notion that e-commerce exploded during the worst of Covid-19. Online market share rose just 2% in 2020, he noted, proving that there could be a ceiling to consumer demand for shopping on the internet. He further noted that e-commerce sales figures include transactions where the consumer picks up the item at the store. “I don’t know about you,” he added, “but shopping for groceries online was a wholly frustrating and unsatisfying experience.” Likewise, Berne said he suspected that the nosedive seen in sales of apparel and shoes was not so much caused by the lack of need during the work-from-home era as it was by the preference for trying such items on in person. “If retail was just about buying things we need in the most convenient way possible, it would not exist,” he declared, arguing that consumers have a “psychological need” to mix with other shoppers. “This notion that somehow e-commerce is going to be the way that we shop for everything ignores that psychology.” Berne argued that relying entirely on e-commerce also does not work for most businesses, what with the costs of shipping “to everyone’s doorstep,” customer acquisition and retention, and the “exorbitant advertising costs” on Facebook, Google and Amazon, and returns. “That’s just an unsustainable cost structure that virtually no one has been able to figure out how to make money on,” he said, noting that even Amazon showed an operating loss on e-commerce until 2019. The “only way” e-commerce works, therefore, is in conjunction with brickand-mortar stores via curbside pickup, a lower return rate — ¼ less than online, he said — and having a physical presence that can further improve the customer experience. Downtowns are well-positioned against e-commerce, Berne said, as they have been accustomed to adaptive responses, whether it be to regional malls or online behemoths. Still, he said a “new retail paradigm” could help further revitalize downtowns, with major anchor stores helping to support smaller mom-and-pops like pet supply and grooming stores, retail health care operations, boutique fitness businesses, and cannabis dispensaries. Lowering barriers to entry, cultivating permanent tenants and providing a “sense of constant discovery” for visitors can also help downtowns “build back better,” Berne said.

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HUDSON VALLEY Orange County’s Black Dirt region eyes hemp production - but does business model make sense?

Black Dirt region, Pine Island. Photos by Kathy Roberts.

BY KATHY ROBERTS

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s New York attempts to legislate the growing, cultivation, production and distribution of cannabis, some farmers in the Black Dirt region have shied away from planting another formerly forbidden product: hemp. Chris Pawelski, a fourth-generation farmer in Pine Island, says some of his Black Dirt cohorts bought into promises of a high return on hemp. “It’s been hit and miss, and for most in this area, it was a miss,” said Pawelski. Those who jumped on the hemp bandwagon in 2019 soon realized spending an average of $12,500 an acre to

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grow the product was not tenable. 2019 was also the last year Pawelski planted onions, the crop his farm has relied on for decades. “The price the wholesale market was willing to pay literally was cut by more than half — it went from $28 for a 50-lb. bag to $12,” he said. “I had to dump nearly 25% of my crop. I lost $150,000 that year. Then Covid hit.” Pawelski’s still farming, but these days he’s focused on “farm-to-table” crops: lettuce, tomatoes, beets, kale, cucumbers, sweet corn and a variety of herbs on part of the family’s 90-acre farm. The remainder of his Black Dirt land is rented out to other farmers. WCBJ

Along with his wife Eve, Pawelski started a new business: The Ornery Onion, a nod to the Black Dirt region that has sustained the family since Pawelski’s great-grandfather immigrated from Poland to Pine Island in 1903. “We both enjoy the marketing and merchandising and we’re seeing the fruits of our labors as we grow a different customer base,” said Pawelski with a wry smile. The Black Dirt farmer has been a staunch grassroots public policy advocate and farming spokesperson in Albany and Washington, D.C. “Our small and mid-sized farmers are struggling,” he said. “The North American Free Trade

Agreement (NAFTA) hasn’t worked out for us. “Just as an example,” he continued, “Canadian crops from Ontario are selling down in Miami, but crops from Pine Island are only making it to provinces on Ontario’s perimeter. It’s expensive and tedious to file a trade complaint because you can only list one item — i.e., onions — even if it’s not just onion prices that are affected. “It’s a convoluted process that has cost at least one grower I know over $1 million — and he lost,” he added. “I haven’t met a farmer yet that can afford to lose money.” » BLACK DIRT

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HUDSON VALLEY Barns Art Center moves in at iPark 84 in East Fishkill BY BRIDGET MCCUSKER bmccusker@westfairinc.com

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eal estate developer National Resources is rapidly making changes to its many local properties -and iPark 84, located at the former IBM East Campus in East Fishkill, is no exception. Last year, the company began looking for proposals for ideas for a new visitor center or space to tie the campus together; its selection, the Barns Art Center, may even cement the iPark campus as a cultural destination. Tara Dalbow, gallery director and curator, was the one who proposed the arts center in the first place, envisioning a site where visitors can connect with nature and the rich history of agriculture in the Hudson Valley. She wanted to emphasize local production, especially amid the local Hudson Valley food and beverage producers that call iPark 84 home. “On the campus, they have maybe 10 to 15 local producers or manufacturers, food producers, or beverage producers that have their production on the campus," Dalbow said. "There's Sloop Brewing, there's More Good beverages — there's all these different kinds of brands. And then they had this desire to build out something in this new construction, a 3,200-square-foot space. "So I pitched them the idea of the Barns, of this art center at the nexus of food, farming, ecology and sustainability, because it centered ... some synthesis between what else was going on at the campus.” The campus is located on what was formerly farmland before IBM developed it into a microchip plant, bringing the land use full circle. Dalbow, a California native who lived in New York City for eight years, was introduced to the Hudson Valley area when she began graduate school at Sarah Lawrence College. “There was just a lot of energy here and a lot of possibilities for people to be able to do unbelievable things,” she said. “There's a lot of constraints in New York City for how big you can build something and how scalable you can make anything. I was drawn to the fact that there were so many people here doing really interesting things in new ways and not being afraid to push past whatever parameters you would maybe have in New York City.” Dalbow is now a Hudson Valley resident herself, living in Beacon. A fiction writer, this is her first time curating for a gallery or being involved in work related to visual arts. Her preparation for opening the Barns involved dozens of interviews with individuals in the arts and arts education around the Hudson Valley, to figure out what was needed and to figure out how to balance a local focus

with the inclusion of art from around the world. "There's such a robust cultural landscape here already," she said. "So how did we do something that wasn't already being done? I landed on the Barnes as it is now, and I carried it through the first show from 30 different artists throughout the world. There's a healthy amount of them are regional on purpose, but we also wanted to introduce new perspectives as well.” The grand opening of the space was held on Aug. 27, at which around 250 attendees were able to explore the art center's inaugural exhibition, "Tasting Menu," which "engages all five senses to explore food as meaning, metaphor, and material." “For the opening, it was just flooded with support from regional art institutions, which I was so grateful for," Dalbow said. "It really showed me the strength of this community and how willing they are to celebrate and champion new ideas." The Barns is now nearing its next big event, the Harvest Festival, which will take place Oct. 9 and 10 and feature the premiere of "Lost Arts," an immersive film experience produced by the art center and Northguild, a production company based in Kingston. The film, which features 10 farmers from around the Hudson Valley, is a celebration of the art and culture surrounding the area's agriculture and an exploration of how the methods and wisdom of resource cultivation

from the past can inform the future of innovation and sustainability for farming and other modern challenges. Featured farmers include Jack Algiere from Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture; Ben and Melany Dobson from Hudson Hemp; and Ken Greene from the Hudson Valley Seed Co., among others; some of them will lead workshops and activities at the Harvest Festival. The other feature to be unveiled at the festival is the installation "Of Furrows & Lands in Harps" from the internationally renowned artist collective Futurefarmers. It is a largescale, interactive architectural structure and a public program that will unfold over three years. For now, Dalbow is hoping to attract interest for the new art focus in the Hudson Valley, but she hopes to expand the reach of the Barns even more in the future, to take full advantage of the space — some of which is still occupied by materials from IBM. She envisions studios, space for artist residencies and summer camps and education programs for youth and adults from the community and beyond. There are even plans to host an art show from a local high school. According to Dalbow, a food hall is also in the works at the National Resources campus, which will further draw visitors to iPark, along with the existing Sloop Brewing Co. and corporate offices, in addition to the Michelson iPark film studios that are currentFCBJ

ly being expanded there. “I think that we're hoping to be a destination for both the local and regional community, as well as people coming up, say, from the city for a weekend away," Dalbow said. "The exciting part, I think, is that it's kind of mixed up here — like food and farming and an art center. People can come to the brewery, (then) they can then walk into a space celebrating art and maybe they wouldn't have already thought to seek out that experience on their own. So I'm really excited about this bringing together different people that are drawn to the campus itself for different reasons." The Barns Art Center, according to Dalbow, can give visitors important new perspectives not only on the structure of food systems and the current and historical farming practices of the Hudson Valley region, but it may also provide insight on what it means to be part of a community. "Food systems are at the heart of any community," she said. "And the reason I think we are experiencing so much turmoil in our current social setup is that we've completely disconnected ourselves from our food system. I think returning to having a locally centric approach to how we think about eating and how we think about staying alive and nurturing ourselves and each other is important." The Barns Art Center is open on Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. WCBJ

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HUDSON VALLEY

GOOD THINGS

This year’s honorees include Ryan Arciero, Judelson, Giordano & Siegel CPAs; Jessica Clary-Dubik, New York Air National Guard; Tara Connell, Communication Station; Zachary Constantine, Young Democrats of Orange County; Darrigan DeMattos, Garnett Health Foundation, New York Dance Center; Conor Eckert, Town of Montgomery Industrial Development Agency (IDA); Vicki Hoffman, J. Hoffman Insurance; William Ibberson, Acquisitions Marketing; Michael Kelly, Liberty Street Bistro, Newburgh Flour Shop; Eve Lincoln, Esq., Children’s Rights Society, Women’s Bar Association of Orange & Sullivan Counties; Rebecca Baldwin Mantello, Jacobowits & Gubits, LLP, Women’s Bar Association of Orange & Sullivan Counties; Maj. Robert McDonald – New York Air National Guard; Kelsey McDonough, Orange County Sheriff's Office; Nichole Moretto, Walden Savings Bank; Vinny Oppedisano, M&T Bank, Cancer Resource Center of the Hudson Valley, American Heart Association; Randi Picarello, Business Council of Greater Montgomery, Eat This Bakery; Damali Robinson, NYP Hudson Valley Hospital, Junior League of Orange County; Andrew J. Romulo, Printeks Construction Documentation Services, A Day in the Life Photos; Frank Snyder, San Miguel Academy of Newburgh; Dr. Christine Stathes, PT, MOTIVATE Physical Therapy; Melissa Stevens, Warwick Fire Department; Maggie Sutter, Hospice of Orange & Sullivan Counties, Inc.; Michael Ventre, Orange County Department of Health, Town of Minisink. Congratulations to all!

Orange County’s Rising Stars honored

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he Junior League of Orange County recently celebrated 23 people who work, live or play in the county at its 14th annual Rising Stars event, held at The Barn at Villa Venezia in Middletown recently. Rising Stars recognizes those between the ages of 21-40 who have demonstrated outstanding leadership skills in their community from all sectors of business. The individu-

als selected have helped their organizations thrive, whether by directly addressing new realities brought on by the pandemic or finding creative solutions for continued success. This year’s honorees deserve to be recognized for excelling in their professional and volunteer service. “The Junior League is proud to be one of the founding organizations and continu-

ing host of Orange County’s Rising Stars,” said Rachel Losee, President of the Junior League of Orange County, New York, Inc. “It gives us an opportunity to shine a spotlight on up-and-coming young leaders and honor them with this great recognition.” “With so much uncertainty and divisiveness in our world, it was a joy to get together and celebrate the positivity and

amazing accomplishments these 23 honorees bring into our community,” stated Barbara DeStafeno, 2021 Orange County’s Rising Stars Chairwoman. “I hope the momentum of this Rising Stars event will inspire everyone in attendance to keep doing good and making Orange County, New York the desired location to live in the Hudson Valley.”

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FOCUS ON

THE MARIJUANA AND CBD MARKETS

Lighting up: New Canaan entrepreneur adding e-tail to cannabis research website

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BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN Kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

“ MCCARTHY FINGAR LLP

CANNABIS LAW GROUP McCarthy Fingar LLP is an AV preeminent® rated law firm that has been serving clients in Westchester County, the Hudson Valley and the New York City area for more than 75 years. The firm has recently become the go to legal resource for clients looking to participate From left, Doug Trokie, Jim Landau and Dan Pozin in the newly legalized cannabis industry in New York. Due to cannabis being prohibited on a federal level, there are significant and complex hurdles which businesses will encounter when entering the industry. Our cannabis lawyers have been heavily involved in the creation of the Marihuana Taxation and Regulation Act (MRTA) and are familiar with local, state and federal laws, staying on top of the ever-evolving industry. We help our clients understand what laws apply to their situation and ensure they stay compliant with all rules and regulations. The firm is currently being retained by entities looking to obtain licenses in this newly legalized industry and can help with entity formation, creation of organizational documents, tax advice and any other legal questions clients may have.

It’s like we’re going from being Wikipedia to being Amazon.” So says Harry DeMott, a New Canaan resident and entrepreneur whose company Proper expects to segue from being a research-based firm on what is available in the marketplace to being a fullon e-commerce site. Launched in 2017 as aproperhigh.com, the site thus far has focused on “being the single best place to research branded cannabis products, whether it’s something you smoke, transdermal patches, gummies, etc.,” DeMott said. “We have more information about branded products than anyone else, so we can deliver trusted data about THC percentage, etc. so consumers can make the most informed decision on what should work best for them.” One example: Pride Rainbow cannabis-infused gummies, whose “rainbow sherbet” flavor is ranked 153rd out of 338 edibles specifically designed to set a “relaxed mood.” The review says potency is medium, and that it’s good for a mood boost, going to a show, and treating aches and pains. It is available only in California. More detailed reports, product specs, and user reviews are also available.

This month the business will pivot to “being for research and discovery and to buy,” DeMott said. The idea is to provide customers with a “budtender” that can direct the cannabis connoisseur not only in the right direction to find what they’re looking for, but also how to acquire it. “It’s like a sommelier in a restaurant,” he said. “Someone may come in saying there are six great wines he’d like to try, but none of them are in the restaurant’s cellar. So he’ll try to get them to try something that most closely resembles what they’re looking for.” The only boundary, DeMott said, is one’s geographic location. While 19 states and the District of Columbia have fully legalized recreational marijuana — and a number of others have decriminalized it and/or appear on their way to legalizing it — several others still consider it a misdemeanor or, for repeat offenders, a felony. Penalties in those jurisdictions can still be severe. And it is still considered illegal at the federal level, meaning that just because it’s legal in Connecticut does not mean you can freely travel by car or airplane to Texas, where it is not, without facing potential criminal charges. The same holds true for traveling between weed-friendly states — Connecticut and Massachusetts, for example — as interstate highways are under federal jurisdiction.

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With those caveats in mind, however, Proper is well-positioned to benefit brands and consumers alike, DeMott said. The company can show competitive prices in a given area to help optimize the transaction. As is often the case with Amazon, Proper does not sell direct to consumers, but rather points them in the direction of the appropriate brands. Proper then gets a percentage of the resulting deal. Serial entrepreneur A serial entrepreneur — in addition to being executive chairman and CEO of Proper, he has founded and served in the c-suite of a number of investment management firms — DeMott said he entered the cannabis/CBD business from a securities analyst perspective. “I’m one of those guys who never even tried it until I was 50,” he said. “I looked at it as an industry that has all the hallmarks of exciting growth, if you could find the right ‘in.’” That led to the research-and-data end, before the legalization of recreational weed began to gain seemingly unstoppable momentum. As for how big Connecticut’s cannabis market could be — some estimates have put it at $250 million in sales during its first year and over $725 million by the end of 2025 — DeMott noted that Colorado, which legalized it in 2012, racked up $187 million in sales in January alone. Being surrounded by Massachusetts, which legalized it in 2016, and New York, which like Connecticut expects to see retail sales begin in earnest next year, will probably have an adverse effect on this state’s sales, he said; he opined that “it could turn into a billion-dollar market ultimately” but added that that “is years away.” He also questions the opinion shared by Gov. Ned Lamont and many pro-legalization lawmakers that legalizing recreational marijuana will in effect wipe out the black market. “For people who haven’t been trying it, yes,” he said. “But if they wind up taxing the hell out of it, that will make it too expensive for consumers, who will go to the black market.” Longtime users, he added, “already feel comfortable there — they have longstanding relationships, trust who they’re getting it from, they’re happy with the product and it costs a third of legalized weed. That’s why I hope they keep taxes low, and illegal enforcement high.” As the law is currently written, the retail sale of recreational marijuana in Connecticut includes the state’s usual 6.35% sales tax, a 3% sales tax for the municipality in which the sale occurs, and a tax based on THC content that will cost roughly 10 to 15% of the sale price. “In total,” according to the state government’s website, “the tax rate is expected to be approximately 20% of the retail price of cannabis, in line with the tax rates in Massachusetts.”

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Black Dirt—

As founder and executive director of Farmroot, Pawelski credits Sens. Charles Schumer (D) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D) for their continuing support of New York’s agricultural industry. The current battle in D.C. to get the $3.5 trillion reconciliation bill passed has Pawelski watching closely, since a portion of it includes debt forgiveness for farmers whose gross income is less than $300,000. “It would be a godsend for our small and medium-sized farms,” he said. “More than 60,000 of them would benefit.” Previous legislation that was tailored specifically to help Black-owned farms has been tangled in litigation, since farmers of other colors felt it was discriminatory. Pawelski, who taught at his alma mater, the University of Iowa, and locally at Orange Community College, would like to get back in the classroom. “With my desire to teach, along with sharing what I know in terms of policy development and implementation, I’ve developed some potential courses that could benefit students who are focused on that aspect of our industry,” he said. “I’ve gotten several speaking engagements but I’d love to share what I’ve learned with Ag students. They’re our future.”

Pine Island onion farmer Chris Pawelski has turned his attention to farm-to-table veggies and herbs while keeping his eye on the prize: parity for small and midsized farms.

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CONNECTING PASSIONS. CREATING FUTURES. Life-changing degree programs, professional development opportunities, and world-class cultural events in the heart of southern Westchester.

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Good Things NATIONAL WRITER AND ACTIVIST TO SPEAK Trinity Spiritual Center, located in the historic seaside district of Southport, Connecticut, will host an exclusive, in-person and livestream event with writer, activist and speaker on men’s issues, Mark Greene, on Sunday, Oct. 24 at 3 p.m. Greene will address how our emotionally stoic “man box” culture of masculinity is deeply isolating for men, destroying  relationships and causing an epidemic of violence, sexual assault, anxiety, depression, substance abuse and suicide among men. The author of “The Little #MeToo Book for Men” Greene has spent over a decade deconstructing binary-riddled dialogues around manhood and masculinity. He consults on masculinity, relational practices and inclusion for organizations worldwide. The event will feature a conversation between Greene and Mark Grayson, founding director of Trinity Spiritual Cen-

ter. The two men will lay out the basic framework of “Man Box” culture and the ways in which it’s deeply conditioned into boys and men from infancy. Their discussion will be followed by a Q&A with the audience. This event is the first in a series of three thought-provoking conversations over the next year. While there is no charge for participation in either event, registration is required. “We are pleased to welcome Mark Greene to our community and eagerly await his and Mark Grayson’s ideas as to how we can reframe our thinking and behaviors so that men and women experience greater sense of well-being and deeper connection in their lives,” Peggy Hodgkins, rector at Trinity Episcopal Church said. To register visit https://tsc_markgreene.eventbrite.com and for questions call 203-255-0454.

NATIONAL ‘TOP 40 UNDER 40’ Recently, attorney Andrew L. Boughrum of Sobo & Sobo, a personal injury law firm based in Middletown in the Hudson Valley and New York City, was elected by The National Trial Lawyers to be a member of its “Top 40 Under 40” organization. This honor is held by the most successful lawyers in the United States and acknowledges each attorney’s exceptional skill, experience and success. “I am honored to have been nominated and selected for membership in the prestigious National Trial Lawyers Top 40 Under 40,” said Boughrum. “I am grateful to be a part of the Sobo & Sobo team, which champions honor, integrity

and leadership and emphasizes a focused, client-driven approach to litigation.”      Selection for membership of the Top 40 Under 40 for New York state is based on a thorough process, which includes peer nominations combined with third-party research. The few attorneys who are selected demonstrate values, knowledge and skills that lead to advancements in their practiced field of law and set an example of excellence for other lawyers within their field. Established in Middletown in 1969, Sobo & Sobo has for more than 50 years been representing accident victims throughout the New York and tri-state area.

PARTNERSHIP BRINGS HURRICANE RELIEF TO FAMILIES The remnants of Hurricane Ida barreled through Westchester County in late August. At least five county residents died in the severe flooding and extensive property damage was experienced in its wake. The combination of a global pandemic and two tropical storms have devastated families across the county. That’s why the Westchester County Board of Legislators, Andrus Children’s Center and Yonkers YMCA came together to provide relief to families. With $15,000 secured by County Legislator Ruth Walter (District 15), Andrus and the Yonkers Family YMCA distributed $750 grants to 20 families impacted by the storm. The funds are part of the Board of Legislators’ special one-time allocation for community-based, nonprofit organizations aiding those affected by Hurricane Ida.

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Since the pandemic onset, Andrus has provided nearly $270,000 in food, technology and other relief to families. Board Chairman Ben Boykin said, “Ida produced so much devastation for so many in Westchester. The Board of Legislators is gratified to use these previously unallocated funds to help local nonprofit organizations provide much-needed aid….” Andrus nurtures social and emotional well-being in children, families and communities by delivering a broad range of vital services and by providing research, training and innovative program models that promote the standard of excellence for professional performance in and beyond its service community. The nonprofit reaches almost 4,500 children and families each year from the New York metropolitan area. FCBJ

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NYS SENATOR DELIVERS CHECK TO THE ARC ROCKLAND

Elijah Reichlin-Melnick, left, and Carmine Marchionda.

State Senator Elijah Reichlin-Melnick (D-Rockland/Westchester) said, “The Arc of Rockland fights for people who are too often overlooked and under resourced and they have been helping improve the quality of life for people in the intellectual and developmental disability community for decades,” as he presented a check for $40,000 to the organization at its recent 26th annual “Taste of Rockland” fundraiser. The funding, which the senator secured in the 2021-22 state budget, will support the creation of a paved patio space for use by individuals with developmental and intellectual dis-

abilities attending the Day Habilitation programs at The Arc’s new Valley Cottage facility. The area will have seating and a space for individuals to garden “When I went to Albany for my first legislative session and budget battle this year, I knew I had to deliver for organizations like The Arc, which provide so much for some of our most vulnerable community members,” Reichlin-Melnick said. The Arc Rockland CEO Carmine Marchionda said, “…Senator Elijah Reichlin-Melnick met with The Arc team and quickly offered his assistance in making the outdoor patio a reality….”

First elected in November of 2020, Reichlin-Melnick has served as state senator for Clarkstown, Orangetown, Ramapo and Ossining for just nine months. The Arc Rockland was founded by a small group of dedicated parents in 1954, as the first nonprofit organization of its kind in Rockland County. Today, The Arc Rockland provides supports and services to nearly 800 individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and is a key resource for information and referral regarding supports and services throughout the county, state and country.

RIVERKEEPER WELCOMES NEXT PRESIDENT Tracy Brown, a seasoned leader dedicated to restoring and protecting regional water resources, was recently welcomed as Riverkeeper’s next president and Hudson Riverkeeper. Brown, who will assume both roles Nov. 1, will be the first woman to lead Riverkeeper in its half-century mission to restore the Hudson and its tributaries and to safeguard drinking water for millions of New Yorkers. “…I’m very concerned about the toll our changing climate is having on our ecosystems and quality of life. In my new role, I plan to lean into this moment of more widespread climate-crisis awareness to mobilize the energy of the wider Riverkeeper community, to join our fight for clean renewable energy and sustainable, nature-based infrastructure,”  said Brown who comes to Riverkeeper from Save the Sound, an environmental advocacy group dedicated to protecting the land, air and water of Long Island Sound. She established

Save the Sound’s New York office and currently serves as regional director of water protection. Prior to joining Save the Sound, Brown worked at Riverkeeper for seven years. She was instrumental in developing Riverkeeper’s water-quality monitoring programs between 2009 and 2014, and its communications efforts between 2007 and 2009. Among other achievements, she was a leader of the campaign that resulted in the enactment of New York’s Sewage Pollution Right to Know Law in 2013. A resident of Sleepy Hollow, New York, Brown is a co-founder of the Peabody Preserve Outdoor Classroom, a nature perserve for hands-on outdoor education for the students of the Tarrytown Public Schools. She is also co-chair of the Water Committee on the Westchester County Climate Crisis Task Force and a volunteer water-quality monitor for Riverkeeper since 2014. “Our board and staff are thrilled to

Tracy Brown

welcome Tracy back to Riverkeeper,” said Ernest Tollerson, Riverkeeper’s board chair. “Her experience across so many domains – from advocacy campaigns to water quality monitoring to strategic communications to fundraising – means that she is perfectly positioned to guide us in the 21st century. We could not have asked for a more passionate, dedicated and skilled advocate for the Hudson, its tributaries, ecosystems and communities….”.”


TOP WORKPLACE AND LEADERSHIP WINNER Reynolds + Rowella, a leading certified public accounting and business advisory firm in Fairfield County, has been awarded a Top Workplaces 2021 honor by Hearst Connecticut Top Workplaces for the sixth year in a row. Scott Crane, Reynolds + Rowella managing partner, has been awarded Hearst Connecticut Top Leadership. “We’re proud to receive the Hearst Media Top Workplace award for the sixth year in a row and honored to receive the Top Leadership award. The best award by far is the knowledge that we’re providing value to our clients and creating a great workplace where our team can thrive,” said Crane. Hearst Connecticut Top Workplaces list is based solely on employee feedback gathered through a third-party survey administered by employee engagement technology partner Energage LLC. The anonymous survey uniquely measures 15 culture drivers that are critical to the success of any organization, including alignment, execution and connection, just to name a few. “During this very challenging time, Top Workplaces and Top Leadership has proven to be a beacon of light for organizations, as well as a sign of resiliency and strong business performance,” said Eric Rubino, Energage CEO. “When you give your employees a voice, you come together to navigate challenges and shape your path forward. Top Workplaces and Top Leadership draw on real-time insights into what works best for their organization, so they can make informed decisions that have a positive impact on their people and their business.” Reynolds + Rowella is a regional accounting and consulting firm known for its team approach to financial problem solving. The firm has offices at 90 Grove St., Ridgefield, and 51 Locust Ave., New Canaan.

$275K RAISED FOR SENIOR CARE

Dr. Colleen Melnyk

NEW PRESIDENT AT URSULINE SCHOOL

From left: Anthony Nardozzi, Rosemary McLaughlin, Rita Mabli and Jim Staudt.

More than 165 friends, donors, community and business leaders attended United Hebrew of New Rochelle’s 35th annual Golf Tournament and Grand Reception Sept. 13 at the Westchester Country Club where long-standing golf

chairman and board member Tony Nardozzi was honored for his leadership, dedication and commitment to United Hebrew’s mission. The event included an elite 18-hole golf tournament, a $50,000 shoot-out contest

for closest-to-the-pin winners and a gourmet lunch. Festivities concluded with a cocktail hour. The event raised $275,000 for the care of residents of United Hebrew’s campus in New Rochelle. 

LAW FIRM WITH SUPER LAWYERS AND RISING STARS

Dr. Colleen Melnyk was recently installed as the new president of The Ursuline School in New Rochelle, an all-girls Catholic college preparatory school entering its 125th year.  An educator in the Mamaroneck and New Rochelle school districts since 1990, she was most recently principal of the Murray Avenue School in Larchmont.  In addition to her practical experience as a school administrator, Melnyk’s doctoral research, focusing  on the improvement of teaching practices through professional development, enhances her capabilities at Ursuline where professional development is a cornerstone of the school’s educational philosophy. Melnyk succeeds Eileen Davidson who held various roles over 38 years at the school and became the school’s first lay president in 2012. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree, a Master of Science degree and an Ed.D. in educational leadership, each from Fordham University. She was a core member of the Carnegie Foundation’s iLead Initiative from 2017-2020 to further the capacities of higher education institutions to help local K-12 partners to enact systematic  improvement efforts within their organizations.  

CONNECT WITH westfair communications

From left: Samantha A. Lyons, Sara E. Meyers, Anthony J. Enea, Lauren C. Enea and Stella King.

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

The law firm of Enea, Scanlan & Sirignano LLP, located in White Plains and Somers, New York, has had two members and three associates recognized in the 2021 New York Metro edition of “Super Lawyers.” Members Anthony J. Enea and Sara E. Meyers have been selected by their peers as Super Lawyers in the practice area of estate and

probate. Samantha A. Lyons, senior associate; Lauren C. Enea, associate; and Stella King, associate; have been named Rising Stars. 2021 marks the 15th consecutive year Anthony J. Enea has been included in the Super Lawyers list, and the ninth time he has been honored as a “Top 25” attorney in Westchester County. He is

president of the Westchester County Bar Foundation and past chair of the Elder Law and Special Needs Section of the New York State Bar Association. His practice areas include wills, trusts and estates, elder law; Medicaid asset protection planning; Medicaid applications (home care and nursing home) and special needs planning. FCBJ

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Good Things PROJECT ALLIANCE

In response to the Westchester County Police Reform & Reimagining Task Force report to the Governor, Westchester County recently announced its Project Alliance, which is a five-prong approach developed by Westchester County Executive George Latimer with the departments of Community Mental Health, Public Safety, Emergency Services and Social Services to address the needs of Westchester County residents with behavioral health challenges. Latimer  said: “I applaud” our departments “for recognizing that changes in how we approach mental health, in all facets of our community, need to happen and need to happen quickly.  This is a bold step and an innovative approach, to better address behavioral health emergencies when they develop. Project Alliance will make this county safer by better addressing the root issue.” Westchester County Police Reform and Reimagining Task Force Co-Chair Mayo Bartlett  said, “While all of the Task Force recommendations are important, addressing police interaction with people who suffer from mental illness is invaluable. I am encouraged by the commitment to have a comprehensive response to mental illness by coordinating multiple disciplines. In my estimation, it will focus on treatment and will reduce the number of incidents that lead to unnecessary law enforcement interaction with people who may need assistance due to a mental health crisis. The initiative will also increase the training that members of law enforcement will receive with respect to how to respond to people who are experiencing a mental health crisis, as well as how 911 calls are screened by dispatchers, helping to ensure that appropriate services are requested.  The effort will ultimately lead to the countywide availability of trained mobile mental health units comprised of mental health professionals and members of law enforcement to address a potential mental health crisis.”

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

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PEEKSKILL’S CHIEF OF POLICE Patrol Lieut. Leo Dylewski has been selected to succeed Chief Don Halmy as the next chief of police for the city of Peekskill Police Department. Appointed by the city manager and approved by the mayor and Common Council at the Sept. 27 Common Council meeting, Dylewski looks forward to continuing to serve the citizens of Peekskill as he has for more than two decades. Dylewski said, “…I look forward to continuing to keep our community safe and it is my intention to continue working on and implementing the recommendations on police reform, which Chief Halmy has started.” Dylewski has more than 21 years of law enforcement experience. He attended the Westchester County Police Academy and worked for the New York City Department of Environmental Police before starting his career with the city of Peekskill Police Department in August 2000. In 2004, he became a D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) officer and in 2005, became a trained juvenile officer working with the Community Policing Unit. In 2014, after being promoted to sergeant, Dylewski became a part of the department’s youth and community programs by coordinating the city’s D.A.R.E. and G.R.E.A.T. (Gang Resistance Education and Training) programs. In 2017, as

Maria Clinton

WCC PROFESSOR WINS EMMY AWARD

Leo Dylewski. Photo courtesy Leo Dylewski.

newly promoted lieutenant, Dylewski helped oversee the implementation of the D.A.R.E. program for the town of Cortlandt. He then took over command of the Patrol Division in 2019, which is known by many as the backbone of the police department. Dylewski has served as president of

both the State of New York Police Juvenile Officers Association and the Westchester County Youth Officer’s Association and continues to sit on their boards. He earned a bachelor’s degree from SUNY Empire State College in 2013 and a master’s degree in public administration from Marist College in 2016.

HOSPITAL EXECS TO LEAD GO RED FOR WOMEN® The American Heart Association (AHA), the world’s leading nonprofit organization focused on heart and brain health for all, recently announced that White Plains Hospital will help lead the Go Red movement in Westchester County, which formally kicked off on World Heart Day, Sept. 29. Dawn French, senior vice president for marketing, communication and community relations at the hospital and Jennifer Bello, R.N., senior director of nursing, will serve as co-chairs. In her role at White Plains Hospital, French is responsible for overseeing the brand and public reputation of the hospital and she provides counsel that helps the organization prioritize strategies. Bello, in her role, is responsible for overseeing the inpatient clinical operations for critical care, step down/ progressive care, hemodialysis and respiratory care units. She has been with White Plans Hospital for 20 years and holds a master’s degree from Hunter College as an adult and geriatric nurse FCBJ

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Jennifer Bello, R.N.

Dawn French

practitioner as well as a National Certification as an Advanced Nurse Executive. Go Red for Women is a year-round movement that ensures all women are aware of their risk of heart disease and stroke, helps women take charge of their health, engages more women in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) and research and addresses inequities in access and quality

of care. “Imagine three women in your life. Did you know that one of them is likely to die from heart disease? Cardiovascular diseases remain the No. 1 killer around the world, taking the lives of 1 in 3 women. One life is too many, especially when we know that much of heart disease and stroke is preventable and treatable,” Bello said.

Maria Clinton, adjunct professor of film at Westchester Community College (WCC) in Valhalla, New York, won Outstanding Short Documentary at the 42nd annual News and Documentary Emmy Awards for the film she co-directed titled “The Love Bugs,” a story of two entomologists, Lois and Charlie O’Brien, who share their love of bugs and of each other. Clinton came upon a National Public Radio article of the O’Brien story and their estimated $10 million gift to Arizona State University, that included their massive bug collection of 1.25 million specimens. After gaining the O’Brien permission to film their story, production took roughly two years to complete the film. The film premiered in May 2019, touring several film festivals in the United States, which opened opportunities for international screenings. American Film Showcase selected the “Love Bugs” to use in its film diplomacy program that connects embassies throughout the world through film. This Emmy Award is one of the many awards that the film has received. “It is phenomenal to win an Emmy amongst so many talented filmmakers and incredible films,” said Clinton. “… Thank you to Lois and Charlie O’Brien for allowing us to share their story and their 1.25 million specimens. I am really excited that their legacy can continue on and that news is being spread about their monumental contribution to the field of entomology. Their work is also opening the door to discuss the effects of climate change and its impact on insects, an important element of our ecosystem.” The film can be streamed courtesy of the PBS YouTube channel. Westchester Community College provides more than 31,000 full-time and part-time students with an education taught by award-winning faculty at one of the lowest tuition rates in New York State. 


NUVANCE HEALTH HOSPITALS EARN NATIONAL RECOGNITION Nuvance Health’s Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Norwalk Hospital, Danbury Hospital and its New Milford campus have received American Heart Association Quality Achievement Awards for implementing specific quality-improvement measures to treat patients who suffer severe heart attacks and for their commitment to managing heart-failure patients. Both Danbury Hospital and Vassar Brothers Medical Center earned the 2021 Mission: Lifeline®  Gold Plus STEMI Receiving Center Achievement Award and Norwalk Hospital the 2021 Mission: Lifeline®  Gold STEMI Receiving Center Achievement Award.  Every year, more than 250,000 people experience an elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), the deadliest type of heart attack, caused by a blockage of blood flow to the heart that requires timely treatment. To prevent death, it’s critical to restore blood flow as quickly as possible, either by mechanically opening the blocked vessel or by providing clot-busting medication.  Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Danbury Hospital and Norwalk Hospital earned the awards by meeting specific criteria and standards of performance for quick and appropriate treatment through emergency procedures to re-establish blood flow to blocked arteries in heart attack patients coming into the hospital directly or by transfer from another facility. Danbury Hospital and its New Milford campus also received American Heart Association Get with the Guidelines awards. Danbury Hospital earned the Heart Failure Gold Plus with Honor Roll and New Milford received the Heart Failure Silver Plus with Honor Roll. Both facilities also received the Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll.  “Research has shown that hospitals adhering to clinical measures through the American Heart Association’s quality-improvement programs often see fewer readmissions and lower mortality rates,” said Dr. Lee Schwamm, national chairperson of the American Heart Association’s Quality Oversight Committee and executive vice chair of neurology, director of acute stroke services at Massachusetts General Hospital.

CEREMONY HONORS RESIDENTS WHO PERISHED ON SAME DAY DURING WORLD WAR I

Louis P. Gallo

WELLS FARGO EXEC JOINS FEEDING WESTCHESTER BOARD

From left: Orange County Executive Steven M. Neuhaus, Deputy County Clerk Kelly Eskew, Chief Clerk Yvonne Marse and County Historian Johanna Porr-Yaun.

Orange County Executive Steven M. Neuhaus and the county’s Veterans Service Agency (VSA) hosted a ceremony Wednesday, Sept. 29 to honor the 40 county residents who died more than 100 years ago on the same day during World War I. The 40 Orange County residents served in Companies E and L of the 107th Regiment of the 27th Division and were killed in action during the Battle of the Hindenburg Line in northern France. “The Battle of the Hindenburg Line is one of the most famous engagements that

occurred during World War I,” Neuhaus said. “We will never forget the sacrifices that these 40 soldiers made in defense of the freedoms we all enjoy every day in America and here in Orange County.” After an intense, 56-hour-long attack, Allied forces breached the Hindenburg Line, the last line of German defenses, on Sept. 29, 1918. The Hindenburg Line was a heavily fortified zone running several miles behind the active front between the north coast of France and Belgium. By September 1918, the Hindenburg Line

consisted of six defensive lines approximately 6,000 yards deep, equipped with lengths of barbed wire, concrete emplacements and firing positions. Breaking through the Hindenburg Line helped the U.S. and its allies win World War I, which ended Nov. 11, 1918. “Sept. 29, 1918, serves as one of the darkest days of our county’s history due to the loss of so many soldiers who made the ultimate sacrifice on the same day,” said Christian Farrell, Orange County VSA director.

IN-PERSON AND VIRTUAL SCRIPT-IN-HAND PLAY READING AT PLAYHOUSE Westport Country Playhouse will present a script-in-hand play reading of “Mrs. Mannerly,” a comedy about a young boy and his manners teacher, before a live audience Oct. 11, at 7 p.m and then on film for on-demand streaming at home, from Wednesday, Oct. 13 through Sunday, Oct. 17. “Mrs. Mannerly” will feature playhouse favorites Mark Shanahan and Anne Keefe in the roles of student and teacher, respectively. Written by Jeffrey Hatcher and directed by Shanahan, curator of the series, running time is approximately 90 minutes with no intermission. Set in 1967, “Mrs. Mannerly” is a nostalgic and laugh-filled tale about an unlikely friendship between a young boy and his demanding, yet remarkable, manners teacher, who taught him important life lessons far beyond which fork to use at dinner and the value of a handwritten thank you note. Tickets to attend the reading in per-

Mark Shanahan and Anne Keefe

son are $20. Patrons must be masked and fully vaccinated with an FDA-authorized vaccine to attend an indoor performance and must show proof of vaccination with their valid ticket to enter. For updates on Covid-19 health and safety protocols at the Playhouse, visit https://www.westportplayhouse.org/visit/covid19safety/. Tickets for on-demand streaming are

$20 individual and $80 household. Each purchase entitles the ticket buyer to one individual link. To purchase tickets, visit westportplayhouse.org, call 203-227-4177 or email boxoffice@westportplayhouse.org. Founded in 1931, Westport Country Playhouse is celebrating its 90th anniversary year. FCBJ

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Louis P. Gallo of Eastchester, a commercial banking market executive at Wells Fargo & Co., has joined the Board of Directors of Feeding Westchester in Elmsford. With a team of eight bankers and serving as a company spokesperson on commercial banking matters in his markets, Gallo oversees companies with annual sales ranging from $5 million to $2 billion with operations throughout the Hudson Valley and Bronx regions. During his nearly 20-year banking career, Gallo has held board-level positions with the 504 Company, Metro-Long Island Loan Committee and The Tuckahoe Youth Association. “As we continue to see an incredibly increased need for food across the county, we are excited to welcome Lou, who has long shared in our commitment to nourish our neighbors in the fight against hunger,” said Karen C. Erren, president and CEO of Feeding Westchester. A consistent local and national advocate and supporter, Wells Fargo has a long-standing relationship with Feeding America®, the largest domestic hunger-relief organization in the country and its network of 200-member food banks, which includes Feeding Westchester. Prior to Covid-19, Feeding Westchester’s network of 225 community partners and meal programs served between 125,000 to 150,000 individuals each month. During the height of the pandemic, however, that number more than doubled, and currently in 2021 the organization is still serving nearly 225,000 individuals each month on average.

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Good Things VEGETABLES ARE POWERFUL MEDICINE

J&G ATTORNEY RECOGNIZED AS RISING STAR

From left: Kelly A. Pressler, Michele L. Babcock, Rebecca B. Mantello, Kara M. Nelson, and Gary M. Schuster, all members of Jacobowitz and Gubits LLP.

Rebecca B. Mantello, a resident of Wallkill, and senior counsel with the Jacobowitz and Gubits LLP (J&G) in Walden, was selected as a 2021 Orange County Rising Star by the Junior League of Orange County, New York Inc. She was presented with her award Sept. 30 at the Orange County Rising Stars event at The Barn at Villa Venezia in Middletown, New York. An active member and former president of the Women’s Bar Association of Orange and Sullivan Counties, which

awarded her the Outstanding New Lawyer Award in 2012, Mantello serves as the recording secretary for the Wallkill Volunteer Ambulance Corp Board of Directors, and also served as a member of the Police Reform Committee for the town of Shawangunk. Orange County Rising Stars recognizes men and women, between the ages of 21 and 41, who have demonstrated outstanding leadership skills in their community.

MULTIPLE APPOINTMENTS FOR DOCTOR Tracey A. Milligan, M.D., has been named chair of the Department of Neurology at New York Medical College (NYMC) School of Medicine and the director of neurology for Westchester Medical Center, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital and MidHudson Regional Hospital, each of which are members of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth). Milligan comes to the Hudson Valley from Boston, where she served as an associate professor at Harvard Medical School and distinguished clinician and vice chair for education in the Department of Neurology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She specializes in epilepsy and served as director of the first seizure clinic in the Edward B. Bromfield Epilepsy Program. She also served as the co-director of the Mass General Brigham Neurology Fellowship Program and received the Bernard Lown Award for excellence in teaching at Harvard Medical School. Renee Garrick, M.D., chief medical officer, WMCHealth and vice dean of the NYMC School of Medicine, said “Dr. Milligan is a recognized expert in epilepsy and related seizure disorder and her work will help enhance the services offered by Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital’s nationally accredited Level 4 Epilepsy Center….” During her 21 years at Harvard  Medical School  and  Brigham and Women’s

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Northern Westchester Hospital staff in the Wellness Garden. Photo by John Vecchiolla.

As science increasingly recognizes the role diet plays in prevention and good health, physicians and nutritionists are encouraging patients to make vegetables a significant portion of their daily intake. However, many people do not realize the specific health benefits of different vegetables and are unsure of how to prepare and use them in their diets. “Vegetables are powerful medicine,” said Amy Rosenfeld, MS, RD, CDN, community outreach program manager at Northern Westchester Hospital. “Vegetables contain fiber and nutrients that help reduce the risk for and improve many

chronic disease states such as heart disease. It’s critical that we educate patients about the benefits of fruits and vegetables and show them practical ways to incorporate produce into their diet. It’s especially important to provide help to patients who face food insecurity.” “ At Northern Westchester, a Wellness Garden has been created, which serves as a sanctuary for hospital staff, who plant, weed and harvest the garden on a voluntary basis. Garden work helps team members to destress outside, learn new skills and during the pandemic, it allows them to enjoy time outside with colleagues,” said

Rosenfeld. “We want people to understand that vegetables are not only important for your health, but are also delicious, enjoyable and easy to prepare,” she said. To learn more about how vegetables can help reduce disease and easy ways to incorporate vegetables into your diet, register for “Cooking for Reducing Disease Risk,” hosted by the Center for Healthy Living.  Two free programs are available: cooking to reduce cancer risk: https://cook2reducecancerrisk.eventbrite.com  and cooking to reduce diabetes risk: https://cook2reducediabetesrisk.eventbrite.com.

VIRTUAL 1930S TEA TALK ON ART AND FASHION

Tracey A. Milligan, M.D.,

Hospital, Milligan developed several innovative programs, including the Neurology Volunteerism Program at the Indian Health Service. She is the recipient of the Barbara J. McNeil Faculty Award for Exceptional Institutional Service, the highest award at Harvard Medical School for institutional service. She earned her bachelor’s degree in communication disorders at the University of New Mexico, a master’s degree in speech-language pathology at Emerson College and her medical degree at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine,  before completing a neurology residency at Massachusetts General and Brigham and Women’s Hospitals and a clinical neurophysiology/epilepsy fellowship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. FCBJ

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The Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum (LMMM), located at 295 West Ave. in Norwalk will host a virtual “Glamour & Style 1930s Tea” on Sunday, Nov. 7 at 2 p.m. Chaired by LMMM Trustee Gail Candlin, the talk titled “Daring and Provocative: Art, Fashion & American Glamour in the 1930s” by Professor Justine De Young will be followed by a silent auction. De Young’s talk will explore the many vibrant connections between art, fashion and American glamour in the 1930s. It will showcase Elsa Schiaparelli’s daring designs of the 30s and her creative and shocking collaborations with Surrealist artists like Salvador Dalí.  Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor, was perhaps Schiaparelli’s most important client and purchased many items from her Summer 1937 collection for her marriage trousseau, making a sensation when photographed by Cecil Beaton for the pages of American “Vogue.”  Schiaparelli also designed for Hollywood and De Young will consider how Hollywood film stars like Katharine Hepburn, Joan Crawford, Jean Harlow and Clark Gable influenced fashion and American life.

Jean Harlow

Presently at the Fashion Institute of Technology, De Young previously taught art and fashion history at Harvard University, Wellesley College, Lesley University and Northwestern University. She has published many essays, lectures widely and has held fellowships at the Met’s Costume Institute, the Museum of Fine Arts Boston and North-

western University’s Block Museum of Art. LMMM is a National Historic Landmark. For more information on schedules, tour tickets and programs visit lockwoodmathewsmansion.com, email info@lockwoodmathewsmansion.com, or call 203838-9799. Tickets are $20 for members and $25 for nonmembers and available online.


HONORING SIGNIFICANT LOCAL VOLUNTEERS

NATIONWIDE CAMPAIGN AT BRIDGEPORT’S KENNEDY CENTER

National Disability Employment Awareness Month, an annual campaign that takes place each October for the purpose of educating the public about disability-employment issues and celebrating the many and varied contributions of America’s workers with disabilities has been embraced by The Kennedy Center in Trumbull, captured with its theme: “America’s Recovery: Powered by Inclusion.” The history of this Awareness Month traces back to 1945 when Congress enacted a law declaring the first week in October each year “National Employ the Physically Handicapped Week.” In 1962, the word “physically” was removed to acknowledge the employment needs and contributions of individuals with all types of disabilities. In 1988, Congress expanded the week to a month and changed the name to National Disability Employment Awareness Month. “Our national recovery from the pandemic cannot be completed without the inclusion of all Americans, in particular

people with disabilities,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Marty Walsh. “Their contributions have historically been vital to our nation’s success and are more important today than ever. We must build an economy that fully includes the talent and drive of those with disabilities.” Kennedy Center President and CEO Rick Sebastian said, “…The Kennedy Center supports more than 700 individuals who make important contributions to their employers and communities every day.” 2021 marks the 70th anniversary of the Kennedy Center, which has remained steadfast in its mission of serving and creating opportunity for persons with disabilities through its Adult and Community Services, Workforce Development and Social Enterprise divisions. Today, The Kennedy Center provides services, support and employment to more than 2,000 individuals annually in more than 110 communities throughout Connecticut and the state of New York.

UPSCALE DINING IN DOWNTOWN WHITE PLAINS Louis and Kylie Cappelli and restauranteur Constantine “Dino” Kolitsas recently celebrated the opening of their new restaurant, Greca Mediterranean Kitchen + Bar featuring rustic and reimagined Greek cuisine in the heart of White Plains.  Located at 189 Main St. and Renaissance Square (the former Mediterraneo), Greca’s management team is led by Kolitsas,  who opened the first Greca Mediterranean Kitchen + Bar in Litchfield County, Connecticut, in 2019. Joining him are Executive Chef Kosta Ndreu who honed his craft at a number of fabled New York Greek restaurants, including Ethos, Trata and Kyma; General Manager Rachel Cosgrove, who served as the assistant general manager and event coordinator at BLT Steak; and legendary New York City barman Frankie Rodriguez, who was behind the city’s cocktail renaissance as bar manager of the famous Death & Co in the East Village. 

“Our vision was to bring an upscale Greek restaurant to White Plains that would fill a void for the type of dining that is both comfortable, but offers creative, high-quality cuisine,’’ said Louis Cappelli, managing member of the Cappelli Organization. “Almost every Sunday, Louis and I go to premier Greek restaurants in Manhattan, and in Greca we have found the perfect addition to the White Plains dining scene, even surpassing those New York City restaurants,” said Kylie Cappelli. Westchester County Executive George Latimer, who attended the opening, said “… While the food, atmosphere and hospitality will be outstanding, more importantly this restaurant shows that Westchester County is on its way back. Covid-19 hit us hard, especially those in the service industry, but each new restaurant opening brings new life, new economic development and new opportunities for employment….”

Photos by Jen Donalley.

As the new Neighbor to Neighbor building at 248 E. Putnam Ave. in Greenwich is being built, its members continue to honor the outstanding, committed people who had the vision and were the major forces in getting Neighbor to Neighbor where it is today. Their generosity, strength and perseverance are being celebrated.   The “Fill the Build” campaign invites the entire  community to help people in need by filling the interior space and contributing toward purchasing shelf-stable food, chairs, tables and shelves. Cochairs Lori Jackson and John Cooper, both experienced community fundraising volunteers and committed supporters of Neighbor to Neighbor, say “…A donation in any amount is most welcome. We want

everyone in Greenwich to feel like a part of this neighborhood project.” For a period of 10 months, the Center for Public Good students and families relieved the hard-working Neighbor to Neighbor volunteers on Monday each week and took over the grocery shopping, packing, tagging, pickups and deliveries to 75 households. The groceries and deliveries are especially helpful to low-income older adults, who had not been able to go to grocery stores in the early days of the pandemic and continue to be isolated, often living alone. Over the course of the pandemic, there has been an unprecedented increase in need for access to nutritious food, even as the pandemic slowly eases.

Hunger and food insecurity affect many people in Greenwich: 20%-plus of residents lack the income needed to cover basic necessities and 28% of Greenwich Public School students qualify for free or subsidized lunches. Experiencing food insecurity at a young age can have lasting effects on children’s development, health and well-being, especially if families have to choose between food and medical care. Neighbor to Neighbor staff and volunteers have been providing food assistance to approximately 500 Greenwich family households each week, working in a temporary space at the North Greenwich Congregational Church while their new building is under construction.

ROCKLAND HONORS JUSTICE MARSHALL Rockland County recently unveiled its monument to Thurgood Marshall, who worked in Rockland to integrate the Hillburn school system in the 1940s and effectively ended segregation in its elementary school system. He later argued the historic Brown v. Board of Education Case in front of the Supreme Court, which he would later be appointed to by President Lyndon Johnson. “This monument has been many years in the making and pays tribute to a man who played a direct role in the course of Rockland County and American history. After founding the NAACP Legal Defense Fund in 1940, Marshall fought tirelessly to end ‘separate but equal’ structures for white and black people across our country,” said County Executive Ed Day. The inscription surrounding the monument reads, “In recognizing the humanity of our fellow beings, we pay ourselves the highest tribute.”

Retired Rockland Judge Bill Nelson, left, and County Executive Ed Day unveil statue and tribute to Thurgood Marshall.

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Good Things NEIGHBORHOOD FARM GRAND OPENING Poughkeepsie Farm Project (PFP) hosted Harvest Fest on Saturday, Oct. 2, to celebrate the grand opening of Pershing Avenue Neighborhood Farm, a new quarter-acre urban farm taking root in the heart of Poughkeepsie. The fest was a culmination of a communitywide partnership with PFP, Ecological Citizens Project (ECP), Nubian Directions, Glynwood Foundation, Poughkeepsie Alliance, Community Changemakers, New City Parks, Scenic Hudson, Pershing Parknership and the city of Poughkeepsie to create a community-led food resource and skill-building hub for children and families that lack easy access to fresh produce and after-school programming. Scenic Hudson took the first step in supporting and building healthy lifestyles for city children and families by spearheading the construction  of the Pershing Avenue Neighborhood Farm last fall. This spring,  YouthBuild Americorps Program

of Nubian Directions II Inc., built the farm’s tool shed and garden plots with help from PFP and Scenic Hudson. To date, garden beds have been filled by local residents or community organizations that provide work or services within Poughkeepsie. Scenic Hudson and Glynwood have provided financial support to ensure the success of the Pershing Avenue Neighborhood Farm. PFP has grown its impact substantially since it began in 1999 with three acres of revived farmland leased from Vassar College and 70 CSA shareholders. Twenty years later, the organization has grown to support 500 CSA shareholders that take home 80% of the 90 tons of certified naturally grown produce harvested each year from PFP’s 15-acre urban farm. The other 20% is distributed through PFP’s Food Share program, which aims to address hunger, increase local food access, and create a healthier community.

INSIGHT INTO THE NUMBER OF HOMELESS CHILDREN IN WESTCHESTER The Westchester Children’s Association (WCA) in White Plains has launched an important new Dashboard — Westchester County Child and Youth Homelessness Dashboard (WCCYHD) — that brings to light key data on the scope and scale of children and youth across Westchester who are experiencing homelessness. The interactive online database available on the WCA website, presents homelessness data for public school children broken down by school district, race, housing situation and age and shows the percentages of Westchester children and families receiving county support services. The intuitive and easy-to-use Dashboard was developed under the guidance of Limarie Cabrera, WCA director of data, operations and finance, in collaboration with other staff members and with support from partners in the WCA Child and Youth Homelessness Workgroup, the Westchester County Department of Social Services (DSS) and the Westchester Continuum of Care Partnership to End Homelessness. This Dashboard has the power to answer questions with information that was previously difficult to find while at the same time raising questions about different interpretations and applications of homelessness criteria among districts, government entities and organizations. Although Westchester is considered an affluent county, thousands of resident children and youth experience homelessness every year and too many of them cannot access the support services

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they need. Being homeless can have significant negative consequences for children, including developmental delays, learning and educational challenges, as well as risk to their physical, mental and emotional health. Children and youth experiencing homelessness live in complex, unstable and frequently changing situations. Many live in doubled or tripled-up housing sometimes with people they know, but often with strangers. “Westchester cannot fully meet the needs of its homeless children and youth without capturing an accurate count of this population,” said Allison Lake, WCA executive director. “We wanted to develop a tool that would clearly tell the story of the inequities through data and visualization and give parents, school districts, elected officials and other interested stakeholders an easy way to access and understand this important information. This Dashboard gives a visual picture of students that might actually be hidden in the numbers. It’s an important part of the story and should open up a dialogue to get at the real numbers and ensure that all children are getting the services they need if they are economically disadvantaged and/or homeless,” said Lake. The Westchester Children’s Association is a multi-issue, child-advocacy nonprofit that works to ensure that every child in Westchester is healthy, safe and prepared for life’s challenges. Since 1914, WCA has been among the leading independent voices for Westchester’s children.

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HCC’S FIRST CONVOCATION AND RITE OF PASSAGE CEREMONY

From left: keynote speaker Terron Jones, HCC Foundation President Bruce Murray and HCC CEO Dr. Dwayne Smith.

Housatonic Community College (HCC) in Bridgeport marked the beginning of the academic school year with its first-ever Convocation and Rite of Passage Ceremony. The gathering, which took place on the college’s downtown Bridgeport campus courtyard, allowed students to affirm their commitment to their educational journeys. “Today we are delighted to acknowledge our scholars and celebrate their commitment to the future and the realization of their highest goals and ideals through the pursuit of higher education,” said Dr. Dwayne Smith, CEO of Housaton-

HCC Student Senate Vice President Kellie Taylor receives her pledge pin from HCC CEO Dr. Dwayne Smith.

ic Community College. The inaugural event brought together the entire Housatonic community to celebrate its heritage and legacy, and also marked an opportunity for HCC staff and faculty to reconfirm its commitment to helping students reach their highest potential. “Today, as an academic community, we demonstrate and recognize our commitment to encourage and support student success,” said Dr. Thomas Coley, Connecticut State Colleges and Universities regional president shoreline-west region. 

HCC Dean of Students Kim McGinnis, Ed.D., said the 54-year history of the college and today’s scholars have joined “nearly 450,000 students who have chosen Housatonic Community College to build the educational basis that would provide a better life for themselves and their families.” The keynote address was given by Terron Jones, who serves as public information officer for the city of Bridgeport. Jones discussed the value of “doing something you have to do when you don’t feel like doing it,” and “if you don’t have discipline in life, life will discipline you.”

BOYS & GIRLS CLUB VIRTUAL GALA HONOREES The View Host Sunny Hostin, along with area business and community leaders and the 2021/2022 Youth of the Year will be honored at the annual Fall Benefit Gala of the Boys & Girls Club of Mount Vernon, to be held virtually, Wednesday, Oct. 20. “We would like to thank our community and our Board, led by event co-chairs Laura R. Lavan and Joe Roberto, for their continued support in offering educational programs and experiences for our kids to enjoy here at the Club,” said Mel Campos, CEO. “We are so very grateful to our sponsors and supporters for their unwavering commitment to our mission, as we continue to build great futures for our youth,” said Dr. Traci Alexander, director of development, Boys & Girls Club of Mount Vernon. The Boys & Girls Club of Mount Vernon offers after-school programs for more than 1,400 youth in the Mount Vernon community to help them learn and grow in a safe, fun, educational environment and to enable them, es-

Sunny Hostin

pecially those who need the most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens. To register for this event visit bg-

cmvny.org/fundraising-events/ or for more information contact Hospitality Resource Group at 914-761-7111 or email events@HRGinc.net. 


BOMA HALL OF HONOR DINNER

CABRINI OF WESTCHESTER RECEIVES GRANT

BLOCK PARTY ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

With more than 1,000 people in attendance, Clover Heating & Cooling kicked off its 35th anniversary celebration on Sept. 18 at the JP Doyle block party in Sleepy Hollow where owner Anthony Marmo, presented a check for $3,500 to Sister Susan Gardella of the Religious of the Sacred Heart of Mary (RSHM) Life Center, which was founded in 1995 to deliver a wide variety of programs to toddlers and seniors from the immigrant community and beyond. Sleepy Hollow Mayor Ken Wray named Sept. 18 Anthony Marmo Day and presented him with a certificate from New York State Assemblymember Thomas Abinanti who spoke of Marmo’s dedication and commitment to the community. Marmo also received certificates from Westchester County Executive George Latimer and county Legislators Alfreda Williams and Catherine Borgia. Marmo and his staff also donated dozens of backpacks for local students to various nonprofits, and In November, he and his staff will donate 35 turkeys for Thanksgiving to WestCOP, a private, not-for-profit, multipurpose social services organization that for more than 50 years has operated community programs to combat poverty and help the low-income and at-risk populations in the Hudson Valley region to achieve greater self-sufficiency. A licensed plumbing, heating and air conditioning specialist, Clover founder Marmo has broadened his expertise through extensive training to become an industry leader in environmentally friendly, geothermal, aerothermal and solar thermal heating and cooling systems. A “Green Home” Professional he holds certifications of expertise from the Building performance Institute, the National Comfort Institute and North American Technician Excellence Inc.

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

Seated from left: Marino De La Cruz, Richard Neale of ABM, Joseph Genzano of Alfred Weissman Real Estate, Mike Nevins of Cushman & Wakefield and Joe Mannino of White Plains Hospital. Standing from left: Greg Berger of Robert Martin Company, Bill Bassett of Cushman & Wakefield, Al Gutierrez of JLL Stamford, Chris Laird and Jairo Patino.

More than 100 members of Westchester’s commercial real estate industry were on hand Sept. 21 for the 29th annual Hall of Honor Awards Dinner of the Building Owners and Managers Association of Westchester (BOMA) held at Sleepy Hollow Hotel & Conference Center in Tarrytown. This year’s Hall of Honor Award, which is given to those who support and encourage economic growth in Westchester County, was presented to Robert Martin Company and White Plains Hospital. Honoree Robert Martin Company is a fully integrated real estate company with a proven track record of successfully acquiring, developing and managing investment properties. Led by CEO Tim Jones and President Greg Berger, the company has been a leader in real estate investment, development and management for over 60 years. Today, the company and partners

hold a portfolio that includes millions of square feet of office, retail, industrial and residential properties as well as developable land. Joe Mannino, vice president, facilities management and construction at White Plains Hospital, a member of the Montefiore Health System and honoree, accepted the award on behalf of the hospital. The hospital’s  Flanzer Emergency Department is the busiest in Westchester County. This year’s Best of BOMA Award winners were: • The Gateway Building, Back of House Award. • Serendipity Labs, Tenant Award. • UPS Distribution Center, Deal of the Year Award. • Richard Neale of ABM, Engineer of the Year Award. Unsung Hero Awards were presented to:

• Marino De La Cruz – 50 South Buckhout, Irvington. • Chris Laird – 100 Main Street, White Plains, The Galleria. • Jairo Patino – 4 W. Red Oak Lane, White Plains. • Raul Martinez - 560/580 White Plains Road, Tarrytown. BOMA Westchester is the county’s leading professional organization dedicated to meeting the needs of building owners, property managers and allied professionals and tradespeople. It is an affiliate of BOMA International – the oldest and largest association of the office building industry, with more than 100 federated associations in the United States and around the world. The 17,000-plus members of BOMA International own or manage more than 9 billion square feet of commercial properties in North America and abroad.

The implementation of the “give me a break” respite program at Cabrini of Westchester in Dobbs Ferry was funded by a $30,000 grant from the Field Hall Foundation. The program allows Cabrini to designate two respite rooms to care for low-income seniors living in the community who are in need of care and whose primary caregiver is in desperate need of a break. These seniors do not qualify for Medicaid but cannot afford to pay privately for respite care. Once admitted to respite, the older person will receive 24-hour care for a maximum of one week, with exceptions for urgent needs. They will receive all of the services provided to every nursing home resident. In addition to seniors who are physically and medically in need of care, the “give me a break” respite program will also accept seniors suffering from dementia or Alzheimer’s disease as well as those who may be undocumented. Respite care allows the caregiver time to take care of him/herself, get refreshed and then be better able to care for his/her loved one in a more relaxed, nurturing and supportive way. Patricia Krasnausky, president and CEO, said “We look forward to assisting all those who are eligible to receive the very best care, while their caregivers have the peace of mind that they are leaving their loved ones in the capable hands of our dedicated and hardworking employees.” Cabrini of westchester is a not-for-profit ministry sponsored by the missionary sisters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and is dedicated to caring for people of all faiths through programs and services, which promote independence, dignity and well-being.

FAMILY FOUNDATION HELPS LOCAL YOUTH The DiMatteo Family Charitable Foundation in Shelton has once again stepped up to the challenge of helping nonprofits with a $30,000 donation to serve children and teenagers. The Boys & Girls Club of the Lower Naugatuck Valley and Adam’s House and the Tony DiMatteo Scholarship Fund, each in Shelton, received a $10,000 donation. Funded primarily from the proceeds of the DiMatteo Family Charitable Foundation Golf Tournament, the foundation – launched as a tribute to company founder Anthony “Tony” DiMatteo – has donated $460,000 to nearly 20 charities over the past 16 years.   “The mission of our Family Foundation in conjunction with our Golf Tournament is to provide funding to organizations that are dedicated to research, education and finding a cure for diseases that have touched

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From left: Robert and Loretta Lesko of Shelton, John Esposito of Middlebury, John Schaible of Milford, Shaye Roscoe of Shelton, Julie Coyle Davis of Stratford, John DiMatteo of Bethany, Allison Wysota of Milford, Rosemarie Esposito of Shelton and Arlene Greco of Naugatuck.

the lives of our friends, families, clients and staff,” said Rosemarie Esposito of Shelton. Insurance products and tax-planning

services are offered through DiMatteo Group Financial Services located at 79 Bridgeport Ave.; call 203-924-4811. FCBJ

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Good Things DRONE OPPORTUNITIES KEYNOTED AT SYMPOSIUM

ENTA’S CLINICAL AFFILIATION IN NEW JERSEY ENT and Allergy Associates LLP (ENTA), headquartered in Tarrytown, recently signed an agreement to form a clinical affiliation with Cooperman Barnabas Medical Center (CBMC), formerly Saint Barnabas Medical Center, New Jersey’s oldest nonsectarian hospital. “We are thrilled to affiliate and collaborate with ENT Allergy Associates. ENTA is recognized throughout the region as a leader providing outstanding care to their patients,” said Richard L. Davis, president and CEO, Cooperman Barnabas Medical Center.   This affiliation offers New Jersey residents access to enhanced otolaryngology

and allergy health care services across a wide variety of specialties and sub-specialties, provided by the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School (NJMS) Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery Faculty. ENTA plans to integrate its NextGen Electronic Health Records system with Rutgers NJMS to create a single-button protocol that will help quickly and efficiently coordinate care between physicians and facilities. To learn more about the benefits of ENT and Allergy Associates or to conveniently find an ENTA doctor and book an appointment at the nearest New York or New Jersey location, visit  entandallergy.com  or call 1-855-ENTA-DOC.

HR DIRECTOR NAMED AT ENTA Jason Boltax has been named senior director of human resources (HR) and partner retirement benefits at ENT and Allergy Associates LLP (ENTA) in Tarrytown, reporting to ENTA’s Chief Legal Officer Aviah Cohen Pierson. Boltax will lead the HR team in providing guidance for workforce-related matters to more than 1,200 employees. He will collaborate with senior management to deliver strategic HR services and implement employee centric initiatives that will continue to enhance the company’s culture, maximize talent and retain its diverse workforce.     Most recently, Boltax served as HR executive vice president at Rubenstein, a strategic communications and reputation management firm. Previously, he held positions at PaineWebber (now UBS), PricewaterhouseCoopers and consulted clients in media, financial services, technology, health care, higher education and nonprofit industries. In addition, he worked with The Alternative Board, a global business advisory firm. Boltax was also the head of The HR Alliance, a professional development and

Jason Boltax

networking association, which he founded in 2007. Boltax earned his Master of Arts degree from Columbia University and his Bachelor of Arts degree from Queens College of the City University of New York. ENTA CEO Robert Glazer said, “Human Resources is a challenging area that requires a level-headed approach paired with an insightful organizational discipline. Jason’s drive and passion to enhance the workplace environment — while looking to educate, engage and inspire employees — make him an ideal candidate….”

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More than 225 business leaders learned about limitless opportunities in the drone industry at the annual meeting of ManufactureCT on Sept. 28 at Anthony’s Ocean View in New Haven, Connecticut. As the state’s most prominent nonprofit manufacturing association,  ManufactureCT  provides professional development, resources and information, advocacy and outreach, networking and ongoing  support to a diversity of manufacturers and  related industries operating in the area. Keynote speaker Barry Alexander, founder and CEO of Aquiline Drones in Hartford, inspired the group by explaining his company’s new decentralizing manufacturing system – the Aquiline Agile Manufacturing Pod, or AMP, a portable, high-tech workstation that can be installed in homes, businesses, even the military battlefield, to address the growing demand for drone services. Additionally, Alexander shared how he constructed Connecticut’s only drone manufacturing plant during the pandemic, explained the necessity of hiring local talent in partnership with Capital Workforce Partners and CTHires, as well as the importance of producing American-made UAVs for state and national security.  “Barry’s message was a powerful call to action for our state manufacturing in-

Barry Alexander, founder and CEO of Aquiline Drones, addresses more than 225 top leaders at the ManufactureCT annual meeting.

dustry to move into the high-tech sector,” said Scott. “His incredible story of triumph over adversity captivated every manufacturing, political and business leader in the room.” Attendees were also able to see Aquiline Drones’ popular Spartacus Max UAV up close on display. The commercial drone fulfills a variety of tasks for the manufacturing industry,  such as asset inspection, plant maintenance and employee surveillance. 

Earlier this year, Aquiline Drones was heralded as a shining example of Connecticut’s economic growth by Gov. Ned Lamont as  the first Black-owned, Madein-the-USA drone manufacturing and assembly plant in Connecticut.  Formed in 1913, ManufactureCT changed its name in 2020 from New Haven Manufacturers Association because it now attracts members from across the state representing diverse verticals within Connecticut’s manufacturing sector.

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See Africa as only an insider can Bring your camera and learn how to capture some amazing moments. 10-DAY KENYA SAFARI, NOVEMBER 2021 africaphototours.com FCBJ

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Facts & Figures

westchester county

U.S. BANKRUPTCY COURT White Plains & Poughkeepsie Local business cases, Sept. 29 Oct. 5 Woodstock Landscaping & Excavating, West Hurley, New York vs. ROC Funding Group, Staten Island, et al, 21-9023CGM: Adversary proceeding in Woodstock Chapter 11 (21-35565). Attorney: Robert S. Lewis. 2192 Texas Parkway Partners, Yonkers, re. Houston shopping center, 21-22563-SHL: Chapter 11, assets and liabilities from $1 million to $10 million. Attorney: J. Ted Donovan.

U.S. DISTRICT COURT, White Plains Local business cases, Sept. 29 Oct. 5 Michael Miller vs. Chrystal Run Health Care Physicians, Middletown, et al, 21-cv-8114-VB: Defamation, demand $10 million. Attorney: Gunilla Perez-Faringer. Gricelda Andrade vs. KARP Scarsdale doing business as The Ambassador Scarsdale, White Plains, 21-cv-8188-PMH: Employment discrimination. Attorney: Jon A. Stockman. Travelers Casualty Insurance Co., Hartford, Connecticut vs. Blizzard Busters Snowplowing Corp., Scarsdale, et al, 21-cv8220: Insurance, declaratory relief, Attorney: Amy C. Gross.

Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Larry Miles c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

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OCTOBER 11, 2021

 

DEEDS

Above $1 million   24JR Holdings LLC, Seattle, Washington. Seller: Fi&G LLC, Seattle, Washington. Property: 24 June Road, North Salem. Amount: $5.3 million. Filed Sept. 29.

Barbera, Gino and Allison Barbera, Roscoe. Seller: Old Mill River LLC, Katonah. Property: 84 Old Mill River Road, Pound Ridge. Amount: $11 million. Filed Sept. 29. Epstein, Mark E. and Karen S. Epstein, Larchmont. Seller: 830 Pirates LLC, Mamaroneck. Property: 830 Pirates Cove, Mamaroneck. Amount: $3.8 million. Filed Sept. 29.

ON THE RECORD

281-283 Sleepy Hollow LLC, Tarrytown. Seller: Klas Realty LLC, Blauvelt. Property: 281 N. Broadway, Mount Pleasant. Amount: $998,000. Filed Sept. 27. 434 Palisades LLC, Bronx. Seller: Widilin Araujo, Yonkers. Property: 434 Palisades Ave., Yonkers. Amount: $885,000. Filed Sept. 28. 10411 214 St Partners LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Eun Kerr, Mount Vernon. Property: 433 Nuber Ave., Mount Vernon. Amount: $310,000. Filed Sept. 27. Agatha Investments Management LLC, Key Biscayne, Florida. Seller: Miguel A. Morales and Barbara A. Baltera, South Salem. Property: 104 Oak Ridge Drive, Lewisboro. Amount: $490,000. Filed Sept. 28.

LL Re Holdings LLC, White Plains. Seller: U.S. Bank National Association, Mount Laurel, New Jersey. Property: 47 W. Stevens Ave., Mount Pleasant. Amount: $431,550. Filed Sept. 27. Nationstar Mortgage LLC, Coppell, Texas. Seller: Nicholas Barone Esq., White Plains. Property: 68 North Road, Greenburgh. Amount: $360,000. Filed Sept. 27.

Point Drive LLC, Yonkers. Seller: Irene Naar, Hartsdale. Property: 200 High Point Drive, Greenburgh. Amount: $410,000. Filed Sept. 30.

Mandala, Vivian, Yonkers. $32,507.18 in favor of Precision Concrete Structures Inc., West Hurle, New York. Filed Sept. 27. Moro, Robert, Ossining. $11,556.16 in favor of Bethel Springvale Nursing Home Inc., Croton-on-Hudson. Filed Sept. 27.

GKA Holdings LLC, Bronx. Seller: 425 Sprain Road LLC, Yonkers. Property: 425 Sprain Road, Yonkers. Amount: $504,000. Filed Sept. 27.

O’Donnell, Patrick, Ridgefield, Connecticut. Seller: LL Parcel E LLC, Washington, Pennsylvania. Property: 218 Legend Drive, Mount Pleasant. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed Sept. 28.

Celaj, Elisa and Susan Celaj, Yonkers. Seller: 49 Cliff Street LLC, Carmel. Property: 67 Lockwood Road, Cortlandt. Amount: $680,000. Filed Sept. 29.

UTC North Broadway LLC, Corona. Seller: Lyn A. Galgano, Sleepy Hallow. Property: 343 N. Broadway, Mount Pleasant. Amount: $240,000. Filed Sept. 29.

Chevalier, Rey and Ruth Chevalier, Bronx. Seller: Instant Cash Holdings LLC, Farmingdale. Property: 129 Bellevue Place, Yonkers. Amount: $519,120. Filed Sept. 27.

Wacker, Jeanna and Ankan Patel, New York City. Seller: Grateful Homes LLC, Bedford. Property: 129 Black Brook Road, Bedford. Amount: $1.8 million. Filed Sept. 27.

Elledias, Evelio and Carmen Elledias, Bedford. Seller: Five D’s Realty Enterprises L.P., Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Property: 40 Grove St., Mount Kisco. Amount: $565,000. Filed Oct. 1.

WMNY Real Estate Corp., Scarsdale. Seller: Janine Fennick, Northport. Property: 294 Healy Ave., Greenburgh. Amount: $725,000. Filed Sept. 27.

Sagamore 6 Partners LLC, Larchmont. Seller: Landcaster Gate Inc., Harrison. Property: 111 Sagamore Road, Eastchester. Amount: $5.1 million. Filed Sept. 27.

Below $1 million

9 Century Ridge Road LLC, Yonkers. Seller: Jill Kremer, Purchase. Property: 9 Century Ridge Road, Harrison. Amount: $999,999. Filed Sept. 29. 103 Union Avenue LLC, Mount Vernon. Seller: Phyllis M. Melillo, New Rochelle. Property: 103 Union Ave., New Rochelle. Amount: $900,000. Filed Sept. 28. 179 Chatterton LLC, Yorktown Heights. Seller: James Manganello and William Duff, Valhalla. Property: 179 Chatterton Ave., White Plains. Amount: $875,000. Filed Sept. 29.

FCBJ

WCBJ

Garcia, Cesar and Fortino Garcia, Yonkers. Seller: Warburton Avenue Properties LLC, New York City. Property: 222 Edwards Place, Yonkers. Amount: $635,000. Filed Sept. 28. Garfield Street Equities LLC, Yonkers. Seller: Joanne C. Kubasek, Barefoot Bay, Florida. Property: 4 Garfield St., Yonkers. Amount: $450,000. Filed Sept. 30. Gordon-Taylor, Nadine, Peekskill. Seller: 111 Spring Street Partners LLC, Buchanan. Property: 111 Spring St., Peekskill. Amount: $475,000. Filed Sept. 30. Hamamsy, Aly El and Anne Patricia Cameron, Millbrook. Seller: Rogers 28 LLC, Bronxville. Property: 28 Avon Road, Eastchester. Amount: $4.3 million. Filed Sept. 29.

Goodman, Mark S. and Esther E. Goodman, Miami, Florida. $85,868.53 in favor of Conyers Farm Corp., Vernon, Connecticut. Hudson, Christopher, Mount Vernon. $2,748.50 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed Sept. 29.

Guardhill21 LLC, New York City. Seller: 654 Guardhill LLC, New York City. Property: 654 Guard Hill Road, Bedford. Amount: $3.2 million. Filed Sept. 28.

RFMCH Huguenot Property Owner II LLC, White Plains. Seller: RFMCH Huguenot Property Owner LLC, White Plains. Property: 327 Huguenot, New Rochelle. Amount: $9.5 million. Filed Sept. 30.

Garnicia, Katherine C., Tarrytown. $1,937.51 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed Sept. 29.

Parra, Martha and Luis Montoya, New Rochelle. Seller: PSM Associates Inc., White Plains. Property: 15 Westview Ave., Rye. Amount: $600,000. Filed Sept. 30.

Three Pine Hill LLC, New York City. Seller: Robert William Watson and Susan Ellen Watson, Ardsley. Property: 24 Larchmont St., Greenburgh. Amount: $641,000. Filed Sept. 27.

Overlook Partners LLC, Rye. Seller: Timothy G. Mueller and Young L. Kim, Rye. Property: 84 Overlook Place, Rye. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed Sept. 28.

Funk, Alex. S., Tarrytown. $3,095.29 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed Sept. 29.

Zhang, Benjamin He and Yuexin Liu, Los Angeles, California. Seller: 182 Church LLC, Bronx. Property: 182 Church St., White Plains. Amount: $800,000. Filed Sept. 27.

JUDGMENTS

   Aguero, Alfred, White Plains. $2,429.53 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed Sept. 29. Barnes, Lisa E., Thornwood. $7,328.56 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed Sept. 29. Bosch, Aida D., Yonkers. $1,951.02 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed Sept. 29. Callejas, Marta, Mount Vernon. $15,519.60 in favor of American Express National Bank, Sandy, Utah. Filed Sept. 27. Chapman, Diana, Yonkers. $19,758.35 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed Sept. 29.

Roberts, Neville R., Elmsford. $1,418.73 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed Sept. 29. Stephens, Brandon D., Yonkers. $5,538.21 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed Sept. 29. Wharton, Kimberly A., Yorktown Heights. $4,743.83 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed Sept. 29.

LIS PENDENS The following filings indicate a legal action has been initiated, the outcome of which may affect the title to the property listed.    D’Agostino, Frank as trustee. Filed by The Bank of New York Melon Company National Association. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $544,185 affecting property located at 872 Commerce St., Thornwood. Filed Sept. 27. Mahone, Mary Carole, as owner. Filed by Bayview Loan Services LLC. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $280,000 affecting property located at 26 Amber Drive, Croton-on-Hudson. Filed Sept. 28. May, Ross A., as owner. Filed by Longbridge Financial LLC. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $544,185 affecting property located at 1 Cortland Ave., New Rochelle. Filed Sept. 27.

Piro, Christopher M., as owner. Filed by HSBC Bank U.S.A. National Association. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $514,000 affecting property located at 196 Lincoln Ave., Eastchester. Filed Sept. 27. Quizhpi, Diego, as owner. Filed by Paper Profits LLC. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $175,000 affecting property located at 2 Croton Dam Road, Ossining. Filed Sept. 27. Vergara, John J. and Joann M. Vergara, as owners. Filed by Citibank National Association. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $365,500 affecting property located at 75 Greentree Drive, Scarsdale. Filed Sept. 27. Wagner, David and Lisa Wagner, as owners. Filed by The Bank of New York Melon Company National Association. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $548,500 affecting property located at 70 Howard Ave., Eastchester. Filed Sept. 30.

MECHANIC’S LIENS

622 VCA LLC, Yonkers. $5,002.70 in favor of Heat Inc., New Hyde Park. Property: 622 Van Cortlandt Park Ave., Yonkers. Filed Sept. 30.    AVR Realty Co. LLC, Rye. $6,944.41 in favor of York International Corp., Norman Oklahoma. Property: 451 Boston Post Road, Port Chester. Filed Sept. 29. Conn, Steven, Ossining. $75,000 in favor of A J Construction of New York LLC, White Plains. Property: 73 Ganung Drive, Ossining. Filed Sept. 29. Greco, David L., Ossining. $7,250 in favor of Ceramic Tile, Croton-on-Hudson. Property: 9 Aspinwall Road, Briarcliff Manor. Filed by Sept. 27. Pleasantville Lofts LLC, Mount Pleasant. $3,557,871.63 in favor of DiPetro Construction Corp., Bedford. Property: in Pleasantville. Filed Sept. 30.  

NEW BUSINESSES

  This newspaper is not responsible for typographical errors contained in the original filings.    

PARTNERSHIPS Benjamin Investments, 5 Benjamin Court, Ardsley 10502, c/o Arthur Weingarten, Jason Weingarten and Derek Weingarten. Filed Sept 28.


Facts & Figures Edson Avenue Funding Associates, 133 Parkway Road, Bronxville 10708, c/o Julia B. Houlihan and Andreas E. Jenina. Filed Sept. 27.

Merre Hardwood Floors, 38 Overlook St., Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Adriano A. Gomes. Filed Sept. 29.

OT Contracting, 65 Bayview Ave., New Rochelle 10805, c/o Omar A. Valencia and Teodoro Valencia. Filed Sept. 28.

Mighty Tee Entertainment, 1 Glenwood Ave., Yonkers 10701, c/o Anthony Hernandez. Filed Sept. 28.

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIPS

Anthony Avenue Funding Associates, 133 Parkway Road, Bronxville 10708, c/o The Mathew Engel 2012 Trust. Filed Sept. 27. Bonnie-Crest Daycare, 208 Quaker Ridge Road, New Rochelle 10804, c/ol Nipun De Silva. Filed Sept. 29. C Molina Painting & Carpentry, 22 Wicker St., Yonkers 10701, c/o Cesar O Molina Nunez. Filed Oct. 1. Camp America & Associates, 353 Mundy Lane, Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Lester Campbell, Mount Vernon. Filed Oct. 11. Champs Hauling, 163 Hudson Ave., Peekskill 10566, c/o Anthony Charm Jones Jr. Filed Sept. 30. Croton Taxi & Airport Service, 40 Harrison St., Croton-on-Hudson 10520, c/o Karl Frnak. Filed Sept. 29. Dog Day Walks, 1465 Midland Ave., Unit 3C, Bronxville 10708, c/o Michael Astin. Filed Sept. 27. Francine Tesler, 46 Longfellow St., Hartsdale 10530, c/o Francine Tesler. Filed Sept. 28. Hair Affair By Nicole, 443 Tarrytown Road, Suite 103, White Plains 10607. Filed Sept 29. Haven Financial Solutions, 339 Tarrytown Road, No.102, Elmsford 10523, c/o Gillian K. Mullings. Filed Sept. 28. Ivana Denniston Designs, 20 Parkview Court, White Plains 10603, c/o Ivana Denniston. Filed Oct. 1. JMJ Balloon Garlands, P.O. Box 182, Tuckahoe 10707, c/o Alecia Lakeisha Compass. Filed Oct. 1. Letting Go, 415 Highridge Court, Peekskill 10566, c/o Christina Fischer. Filed Oct. 1. Marbella Fences, 61 White Oak St., Apt. 2B, New Rochelle 10801, c/o Mark L. LaBella. Filed Sept. 30.

Mogul Protection Agency, 1 City Place, 2606, White Plains 10601, c/o David. L. Lewis. Filed Sept. 29. MS Enterprise, P.O. Box 902, Sleepy Hollow 10591, c/o Martha Sendon. Filed Sept. 29. Powell Notary, 434 Simpson Place, Peekskill 10566, c/o Tasheka Sashagaye Powell. Filed Sept. 27. Quality Line Plus, 321 Saw Mill River Road, Yonkers 10701, c/o Anibal Rosado. Filed Sept. 29. Recreations By Rachel, 3119 Wharton Drive, Yorktown 10598, c/o Rachel Amarosa. Filed Sept. 29. SB Car Service, 36 Hamilton Ave., Ossining 10562, c/o Sean Barrett. Filed Sept. 27. Studio B, 34 Gaby Lane, New Rochelle 10804, c/o Bethany Bevilacqua. Filed Sept. 30. Westchester Region Antique Automobile Club of America, 1301 Mamaroneck Ave., White Plains 10605, c/o Ecan L. Delman. Filed Sept. 30.

PATENTS Automated test input generation for integration testing of microservice-based web applications. Patent no. 11,138,096 issued to Shriram Rajagopalan, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Bias identification in social network posts. Patent no. 11,138,239 issued to Munish Goyal, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Delivery platform verification and management. Patent no. 11,138,548 issued to Anthony Cocuzza, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Differential gene set enrichment analysis in genome-wide mutational data. Patent no. 11,139,046 issued to Chaya Levovitz, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Estimation of node processing capacity for order fulfillment. Patent no. 11,138,552 issued to Lei Cao, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

FinFET based ZRAM with convex channel region. Patent no. 11,139,299 issued to Ravikumar Ramachandran, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Hybrid gate stack integration for stacked vertical transport field-effect transistors. Patent no. 11,139,215 issued to Tenko Yamashita, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Initializing a data structure for use in predicting table of contents pointer values. Patent no. 11,138,127 issued to Michael Gschwind, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Method and system for real-time offer optimization. Patent no. 11,138,624 issued to Kaitlin Triano, et al. Assigned to Mastercard, Purchase. Ranking and updating machine learning models based on data inputs at edge nodes. Patent no. 11,138,520 issued to Raghu Ganti, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Set table of contents (TOC) register instruction. Patent no. 11,138,113 issued to Michael Gschwind, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. System, method and apparatus for cognitive oral health management. Patent no. 11,139,076 issued to Ebony Adams, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Systems and methods for use in binding internet of devices with identities associated with users. Patent no. 11,140,156 issued to Sandeep Malhotra, et al. Assigned to Mastercard, Purchase. Vertical fin-type bipolar junction transistor with selfaligned base contact. Patent no. 11,139,380 issued to Choonghyun Lee, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

HUDSON VALLEY

   

BUILDING LOANS

Above $1 million Community Based Services Holding Company Inc., North Salem. Seller: National Fire Sprinkler Association Inc., Linthicum Heights, Maryland. Property: 40 Jon Barrett Road, Patterson. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed Sept. 28.

Klein, Morris, as owner. Lender: TD Bank National Association. Property: 62 W. Gate Road, Suffern. Amount: $2.4 million. Filed Sept. 28. Patterson Food Mart LLC, New Paltz. Seller: TMMD Properties LLC, Clarence. Property: 3081 Route 22, Patterson. Amount: $5.6 million. Filed Sept. 28.   RTN Properties LLC, as owner. Lender: Walden Savings Bank. Property: Route 211 and Goshen Turnpike, Wallkill. Amount: $1.5 million. Filed Sept. 28.   Yaniv, Daniel, as owner. Lender: TD Bank National Association. Property: 27 Powder Horn Drive, Suffern. Amount: $1.8 million. Filed Oct. 1.  

Below $1 million

Bambrick Builders Inc., as owner. Lender: TEG Fed Credit Union. Property: 1 Commerce St., Poughkeepsie. Amount: $250,000. Filed Sept. 29.   Elite Homes Development Group Corp., as owner. Lender: Normandy Corporations. Property: 34 Nicole Way, Mahopac. Amount: $350,000. Filed Sept. 27.   Hoffman, Sarah W. and Michael J. Hoffman, as owners. Lender: Mahopac Bank. Property: in Rhinebeck. Amount: $700,000. Filed Sept. 27.   Lesnett, Georgie Martell, as owner. Lender: Homestead Funding Corp. Property: in Wappingers Falls. Amount: $301,133. Filed Sept. 27.   Mayberry, Timothy and Danielle Temerra Mayberry, as owners. Lender: Walden Savings Bank. Property: in Crawford. Amount: $595,000. Filed Sept. 29.   MBH Kerestier Realty LLC, as owner. Lender: M&T Bank. Property: 3 Kerestier Court, Unit S003, Monroe. Amount: $840,000. Filed Sept. 27.   Melo, Ariel and Juan Leyghton, Carmel. Seller: CBSD Enterprises LLC, Valley Stream. Property: 96 E. Croton Drive, Carmel. Amount: $485,000. Filed Oct. 1.   Roys, Kevin and Lisa Roys, as owners. Lender: Rhinebeck Bank. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $325,000. Filed Sept. 27.   Thorn, Donald and Gabriel Thorn, Mahopac. Seller: Oakwood Rock LLC, Carmel. Property: 11 Jessup Court, Carmel. Amount: $265,000. Filed Sept. 29.  

Welby Properties LLC, Katonah. Seller: Barbara J. Rickard, Brewster. Property: 505 Appletree Lane, Brewster. Amount: $235,000. Filed Sept. 29.

DEEDS Above $1 million     14 South Street LLC, New York City. Seller: John Vincent, Rhinebeck. Property: in Rhinebeck. Amount: $6.6 million. Filed Sept. 29.   1053 Main Street Corp., Fishkill. Seller: Fishkill Crystal Properties LLC, Yonkers. Property: in Fishkill. Amount: $1.4 million. Filed Sept. 28.   Pine Bush Properties LLC, Wallkill. Seller: The N Group LLC, Pompton Plains, New Jersey. Property: in Wallkill. Amount: $7 million. Filed Sept. 27.     Stein, Benjamin, Brooklyn. Seller: Remsen Gardens LLC, Airmont. Property: 20 Stein Circle, Ramapo. Amount: $1.2 million. Filed Sept. 30.   Stone Silo Farm LLC, Goshen. Seller: Barbara Jean Ehrhardt, Goshen. Property: 23 Kipp Road, Hamptonburgh. Amount: $1.8 million. Filed Sept. 27.  

Below $1 million

3 COPNY LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: 16 Franklin Street Poughkeepsie Corp., Bronx. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $240,000. Filed Sept. 28.   6 Townline LLC, Monsey. Seller: Nejman Family Trust, Nanuet. Property: 6 Townline Road, Clarkstown. Amount: $900,000. Filed Oct. 1.   11 Kingsville LLC, Linden, New Jersey. Seller: Joseph Lefkowitz, Brooklyn. Property: 11 Kingsville Drive, Blooming Grove. Amount: $475,000. Filed Sept. 27.   65 Main LLC, Monsey. Seller: 1 and 4 Realty Corp., Pearl River. Property: 65 S. Main St., Orangetown. Amount: $1 million. Filed Oct. 1.   133 Woodstock LLC, Millbrook. Seller: Chatillon Realty Corporations, Millbrook. Property: in Washington. Amount: $368,000. Filed Sept. 29.   239 All Angels LLC, Wappingers Falls. Seller: Manufacturers and Traders Trust Co., Getzville. Property: 32 South Terrace, Fishkill. Amount: $165,000. Filed Sept. 28.  

FCBJ

WCBJ

360 Main Street Partners LLC, North Merrick. Seller: 360 Main LLC, Poughkeepsie. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $735,000. Filed Sept. 28.     AL Twal LLC, Wappingers Falls. Seller: Mary L. Aronow, Poughkeepsie. Amount: $303,000. Filed Sept. 28.   All Seasons Chimney Design LLC, New Windsor. Seller: Jennifer Steinberg, Wallkill. Property: in Windsor. Amount: $205,000. Filed Sept. 28.   Arlington Capital Investors LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Dr. David Hansen, Hudson. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $287,000. Filed Oct. 1.   Barger Properties LLC, Marlboro. Seller: Nancy A. Helms, Newburgh. Property: 28 Noel Drive, in Newburgh. Amount: $177,500. Filed Sept. 27.   Buchinger, Eric, Spring Valley. Seller: Eljor Properties LLC, Nyack. Property: 77‑79 Linden Ave., Middletown. Amount: $179,000. Filed Sept. 27.   Deutsche Bank National Trust, Mount Laurel, New Jersey. Seller: Kyle W. Barnett, Poughkeepsie. Property: in Fishkill. Amount: $464,500. Filed Oct. 1.   Dimassa, Ashley and Stephen M. Dimassa, Staten Island. Seller: New Gen Construction Inc., Campbell Hall. Property: 291 County Highway 1, Warwick. Amount: $589,000. Filed Sept. 27.   Guaillas, Lauro and Rosario Del Cisne Quizhpe, Middletown. Seller: Charles Tran Property LLC, Washingtonville. Property: 840 Route 211, Wallkill. Amount: $165,000. Filed Sept. 27.   Hafiz, Kamran and Safia Ali, Poughkeepsie. Seller: ABD Stratford LLC, Poughkeepsie. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $448,500. Filed Sept. 27.     Joseph, Shelley, Middletown. Seller: Newburgh New York properties LLC, Monroe. Property: 43 Brewster Drive, Middletown. Amount: $303,850. Filed Sept. 27.   JTGT LLC, Maybrook. Seller: Roland E. Hinterneder, Maybrook. Property: 209 Highland Ave., Maybrook. Amount: $180,000. Filed Sept. 27.   Lafayette Developers LLC, Monsey. Seller: Nancy Ellen Cloonan, Plymouth, Massachusetts. Property: 61 S. Airmont Road, Airmont. Amount: $300,000. Filed Sept. 30.  

OCTOBER 11, 2021

33


Facts & Figures Lewis, Tracy Ann, Bronx. Seller: Ionic Properties LLC, Lackawaxen, Pennsylvania. Property: 38 Morris Ave., Newburgh. Amount: $220,000. Filed Sept. 27. LexiGrace LLC, Petersburg. Seller: Denise Colin, Spring Valley. Property: 186 and 188 N. Main St., Spring Valley. Amount: $710,000. Filed Sept. 27.   Li, Zhongmin and Lingyan Wu, Middletown. Seller: LRE Associates LLC, Goshen. Property: 4 Prospect Ave. and 29 High St., Goshen. Amount: $268,000. Filed Sept. 27.   Longman, John and William F. Ross, Tivoli. Seller: Axburg LLC, Red Hook. Property: in Red Hook. Amount: $995,000. Filed Sept. 29.   Magliaro, Bryan and Amanda Magliaro, New York City. Seller: RTT Associates LLC, Warwick. Property: 90 Onderdonk Road, Warwick. Amount: $599,000. Filed Sept. 27.   Mahoney, Michael and Kimberly Mahoney, New City. Seller: Estates 2000 LTD, Spring Valley. Property: 14 Rosewood Court, Clarkstown. Amount: $940,150. Filed Oct. 1.   McHolder, Xavier and Zita McHolder, Newburgh. Seller: Ionic Properties LLC, Lackawaxen, Pennsylvania. Property: 36 Morris Ave., Newburgh. Amount: $208,500. Filed Sept. 27.   North Street Capital III LLC, Newburgh. Seller: Kiriakoula Giakoumidis, New Windsor. Property: 368 and 366 Liberty St., Newburgh. Amount: $380,000. Filed Sept. 27.   Ponte, Ryan Gilbert and Carly Maria Ponte, New Windsor. Seller: Peacedale Properties Inc., Cornwall-on-Hudson. Amount: $322,000. Filed Sept. 27.   Ramirez, Jailene, Goshen. Seller: Eljor Properties LLC, Nyack. Property: 19 Harrison St., Middletown. Amount: $265,000. Filed Sept. 28.   Robinovich, Chana Ruchel, Brooklyn. Seller: 32 Blauvelt Road LLC, Monsey. Property: 32 Blauvelt Road, Unit 201, Spring Valley. Amount: $800,000. Filed Oct. 1.  

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OCTOBER 11, 2021

Roof Over Your Head LLC, LaGrangeville. Seller: Lancelot F. Achilli, Newburgh. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $375,000. Filed Oct. 1. Shovlin, Brendan P., Bronx. Seller: Harness Estates LLC, Nesconset. Property: 8 Cane Court, Goshen. Amount: $439,900. Filed Sept. 27.   Sjar Realty LLC, Montgomery. Seller: Carmen Nemeth, West Nyack. Property: 7 Northern Ave., Montgomery. Amount: $318,000. Filed Sept. 27.   Spitzer, Raizy and David Spitzer, Spring Valley. Seller: D Park Avenue LLC, Brooklyn. Property: 14 Park St., Unit 111, Spring Valley. Amount: $440,000. Filed Oct. 1.   Village of Monroe, Monroe. Seller: JAB Meritage LTD, Monroe. Property: 34 Lakeview Drive, Monroe. Amount: $837,000. Filed Sept. 27.          Weinberger, Shloma, Chester. Seller: 11 Ruzhin Holdings LLC, Monroe. Property: 11 Ruzhin Road, Unit 302, Palm Tree. Amount: $700,000. Filed Sept. 28.   YMRH Realty LLC, Union City, New Jersey. Seller: Margaret R. Smith Esq., New City. Property: 27 E. Willow Tree Road, Wesley Hills. Amount: $832,000. Filed Oct. 1.  

JUDGMENTS

Fiorisi, David E., Brewster. $1,918.98 in favor of Second Round SUB LLC, Austin, Texas. Filed Sept. 29.   Graham, Jennifer M., Mahopac. $1,826.50 in favor of Absolute Resolutions Investments LLC, Bloomington, Minnesota. Filed Sept. 28.   Harter, David, Mahopac. $1,447.82 in favor of Midland Credit Management Inc., San Diego, California. Filed Sept. 27.   McLean, Jamie, Carmel. $31,500 in favor of Putnam County Probation department, Carmel. Filed Sept. 27.    

FCBJ

WCBJ

Narcise, Angelo, Carmel. $18,994.69 in favor of Goldman Sachs Bank U.S.A., New York City. Filed Sept. 28. Otero, Mathew, Putnam Valley. $2,301.94 in favor of Midland Credit Management Inc., San Diego, California. Filed Sept. 29.   Paganelli, Desarae M., Lake Peekskill. $3,534.70 in favor of Midland Credit Management Inc., San Diego, California. Filed Sept. 27.   Rosario, Digna, Carmel. $4,939.50 in favor of Citibank National Association, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Filed Sept. 30.   Sula, Andy, Carmel. $3,610.01 in favor of American Express National Bank. Sandy, Utah. Filed Sept. 28.   Torres, Melvin, Patterson. $3,004.10 in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla. Filed Sept. 30.   Wilson, David, Carmel. $1,810.85 in favor of Capital One Bank U.S.A. National Association, Richmond, Virginia. Filed Sept. 30.  

MECHANIC’S LIENS

Accardi, Rudloph and Rita Accardi, as owners. $15,000 in favor of ALLT Excavating & Construction. Property: in Hyde Park. Filed Sept. 27.

NEW BUSINESSES

This paper is not responsible for typographical errors contained in the original filings.   

PARTNERSHIPS

           Barefoot Adventures, 15 MaCalpin Ave., Mahopac 10541, c/o Tarah Oubina and Sean Dore. Filed Sept. 28.   Friends of Spencer’s Corners Burying Ground Inc., 84 N. Center St., Millerton, c/o Claire Wynne Goodman, Ralph Damian Fedele, Alice Quinn, Laurie Kerr, Peter G. Bucholz and James Campbell. Filed Sept. 30.  

K&B Cleaning Services, 191 Liberty St., Newburgh 12550, c/o Luis Orlando Ramos Espinoza and Luis Ramos. Filed Sept. 29. La Escondida Groceries & Deli, 256 N. Main St., Monroe 10950, c/o Irma Yolanda Diaz and Marlen Yaritza Castillo Alvarado Mendoza. Filed Sept. 28.   LAV Investment, 337 N. Main St., Suite 2C, New City 10956, c/o Valentine Ndukwe and Lucas Omotosho. Filed Sept. 29.   Sash Enterprise, 655 Saddle River Road, Chestnut Ridge 10952, c/o Savannah Danielle Denda and Joshua Jose Oquendo. Filed Sept. 29.   Tiny Transistor, 2 Iron Forge Road, Warwick 10990, c/o James Frazee and Jennifer Toro. Filed Sept. 29.    

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIPS

Bear Contracting, 67 S. Midland Ave., Nyack 10960, Marcie Leon-Doyle. Filed Oct. 1.   Bnc Beauty, 1581 Route 202, Pomona 10970, c/o Brenda Zappier. Filed Sept. 27.   Boxes In The Attic, 35 S. Main St., Unit 869, Pearl River 10965, c/o Kyriakos Lazaridis. Filed Sept. 27.   Caridad Transportation, 51 Leroy Place, Newburgh 12550, c/o Michael M. Becerril. Filed Sept. 28.   Cassandra Bernard Guinen, 111 Kenney Court, Newburgh 12550, c/o Cassandra Bernard. Filed Sept. 27.   Continental Taxi, 130 Route 59, Spring Valley 10977, c/o Edgar Mauricio Campoverde Vuele. Filed Sept. 28.   Cottage Boutique, 27 Westwood Drive, Walden 12586, c/o Jessica Janet Perea. Filed Sept. 27.   Courtney Harness Attorney at Law P.C., 30 Pleasant Hill Road, Hopewell Junction, c/o Courtney Maurine Harness. Filed Oct. 1.   D Auto Transportation Corp., 3569 Route 52, Stormville, c/o Vladimer Gogritchian. Filed Oct. 1.  

Edith’s Kitchen, 20 Youmans Drive, Spring Valley 10977, c/o Tiffany Hall. Filed Sept. 29. FDW Music Corp., 74 Hilltop Road, Rhinebeck, c/o Paul C. Rapp. Filed Oct. 1.   Harness Courtney Attorney at Law P.C., 30 Pleasant Hill Road, Hopewell Junction, c/o Courtney Maurine Harness. Filed Oct. 1.   Health Keys 4 U, 120 Ryerson Road, New Hampton 10958, c/o Donna Lee E. Peterkin. Filed Sept. 28.   Herrera General Construction, 9 Arlington Place, Second Floor, Newburgh 12550, c/o Jose Nectally Herrera Rivera. Filed Oct. 1.   J&Js Gutter Cleaning, 2 Branch Lane, No. 2, Newburgh 12550, c/o John Vinculado. Filed Sept. 30.   Jbelle’s Body Boutique, 329 Windsor Highway, New Windsor 12515, c/o Jenna Elizabeth Lobdell. Filed Sept. 29.   Joanna Taxi, 130 Route 59, Spring Valley 10977, c/o Joanna C. Moreno Cordova. Filed Sept. 28.   K Cleaning Services Painting, 413 Rakov Road, Maybrook 12543, c/o Luis Orlando Ramos Espinoza. Filed Sept. 29.   La Blanquita, 135 Waterloo Road, Westtown 10998, c/o Michelle I Youmans. Filed Sept. 29.   Lakeside Pool Services, 7 Robyn Drive, Monroe 10950, c/o Kenneth J. Obyrne. Filed Sept. 28.   Lunge Fit, 3 Pathway, Montgomery 12549, c/o Elise King. Filed Sept. 29.   Nelson Enrique Landscaping, 306 High Ave., Apt. 1N, Nyack 10960, c/o Nelson E. Martinez Martinez. Filed Sept. 29.   Newburgh Fish & Chips, 8 Liberty St., Newburgh 12550, c/o Eunice K. David. Filed Sept. 27.   Number One Rooter, 3 Colony Way, Newburgh 12550, c/o Hamdi Ramusevic. Filed Sept. 28.  

Osorio Car Service, 185 W. Clarkstown Road, New City 10956, c/o Miguel Angel Osorio Fuentes. Filed Sept. 27. OVI Fitness, 134 Lake Shore Drive, Pine Bush 12566, c/o Marcel Kalil Tucker. Filed Sept. 29.   Premier Cleaning & Remodeling of New York, 74 Fullerton Ave., Newburgh 12550, c/o Yomaira Yoselin Brito Santana. Filed Sept. 29.   Randy Cheung Acupuncture, 90 Lorilard Road, Tuxedo Park 10987, c/o Randy S. Cheung. Filed Sept. 27.   Rave Tesar Music, 64 Mountainside Road, Warwick 10990, c/o David Paul Tesar. Filed Sept. 29.   RC Construction, 6B Reiher Road, Monroe 10950, c/o Samuel Ruano Vargas. Filed Sept. 28.   Reese Island, 11 Washington Terrace, Newburgh 12550, c/o Willie Brandon Reese. Filed Sept. 29.   RTS-Investigations, 177 Ledge Road, Middletown 10940, c/o Bernard J. Rivers. Filed Sept. 20.   Tap Tap Taxi, 49A Robert Pitt Drive, Monsey 10952, c/o Pierre M. Adelson. Filed Sept. 29.   Wagner The Painter, 9 E. Main St., Apt. 1F, c/o Washingtonville 10992, c/o Wagner Luiz Dearaujo. Filed Sept. 30.   Wilson Painting, 14 Block Alley, Monroe 10950, c/o Wilson Alexander Castro Hernandez. Filed Sept. 28.

Notice is hereby given that the Annual Meeting of Members of Consumer Reports will be held at 5pm on October 20, 2021 via video conference; members can register online at CR.org. A ballot for the annual election of Directors of Consumer Reports has been distributed to members via the email address associated with their membership; members are invited to submit their ballots electronically in accordance with the instructions provided. Completed ballots must be received by Consumer Reports no later than October 12, 2021, at 11:59 p.m.


Facts & Figures BUILDING PERMITS Commercial Cebulski Construction Inc., Norwalk, contractor for St. Peters Evangelical. Renovate bathroom in church at 208 Newtown Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $80,000. Filed Aug. 27. City of Norwalk, contractor for the city of Norwalk. Renovate technology wing at Strawberry Hill Avenue, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $112,000. Filed Aug. 27. Pavarini Northeast Construction Company LLC, Stamford, contractor for 600 Washington Acquisitions LLC. Demolish area of fifth floor, convert an existing pantry on seventh floor to a mail/ copy room at 600 Washington Blvd., Stamford. Estimated cost: $140,000. Filed Aug. 16. Pavarini Northeast Construction Company LLC, Stamford, contractor for First Stamford Place LLC. Perform interior alterations to existing tenant space on fourth floor at 151 Greenwich Ave., Unit 100, Stamford. Estimated cost: $85,000. Filed Aug. 25. Pavarini Northeast Construction Company LLC, Stamford, contractor for Stamford Media Village LLC. Construct interior of a suite for office use with offices, open areas, a pantry and restroom at 390 Ludlow St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $785,000. Filed Aug. 24. Petretti & Associates LLC, New York, New York, contractor for Metro Center LLC. Perform interior renovation/expansion on the fifth floor of Metro Center. Unit 501 is expanding into unit 503 at 429 Washington Blvd., Stamford. Estimated cost: $911,000. Filed Aug. 12.

Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to:

ON THE RECORD

Progas LLC, Greenwich, contractor for A&F High Ridge LLC. Perform alterations for lawyers’ offices, resealing all windows on all three floors at 111 High Ridge Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $30,000. Filed Aug. 12.

Tribus LLC, Stamford, contractor for HRC 201 II LLC. Construct additional classrooms, including HVAC distribution, electrical, drywall at 201 High Ridge Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $150,150. Filed Aug. 19.

Ram Building Group LLC, Trumbull, contractor for Canal Street Partners LLC. Perform interior fit-out at 850 Canal St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $75,000. Filed Aug. 3.

Tribus LLC, Stamford, contractor for Atlantic Street Heritage Associates LLC. Replace roof and existing ceiling, ductwork and lighting as required at 184 Atlantic St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $500,000. Filed Aug. 13.

Renew Construction LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Muthu Subramanian Sharada. Strip existing roof and re-roof at 25 Linden HTS, No. 25, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $24,098. Filed Aug. 27. Rick’s Main Roofing Ltd., Norwalk, contractor for Second Fairlawn Condominium Inc. Remove layers of asphalt shingles and restore roofing system at Fairlawn condominium Courtland Avenue, Unit 294, Stamford. Estimated cost: $70,880. Filed Aug. 10. Shanghai and Ba Trading Company LTD, Norwalk, contractor for Shanghai and Ba Trading Company Ltd. Build superstructure for residential unit and commercial office at 96 East Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $1,345,500. Filed Aug. 30. Structural Preservation Systems LLC, Cheshire, contractor for BLT Management LLC as agent for Marriott International Inc. Perform concrete repairs at N/A Star Point, Stamford. Estimated cost: $350,439. Filed Aug. 27. Templar Construction LLC, Mount Kisco, New York, contractor for BLT, 333 Ludlow LLC c/o Blt Management LLC. Perform replacement alterations at Star Point, Stamford. Estimated cost: $121,200. Filed Aug. 13. Thomas Grace Construction Inc., Stillwater, Minnesota, contractor for Target Corp. Perform replacement alterations at 21 Broad St., Unit Ut 1, Stamford. Estimated cost: $9,200. Filed Aug. 31. Transcend Wireless LLC, Mahwah, New Jersey, contractor for 1266 Main Street Stamford LLC. Perform modifications to existing T-Mobile cell site at 1266 E. Main St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $20,000. Filed Aug. 24.

Turner Construction Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, contractor for Harbor Drive Acquisitions LLC. Perform replacement alterations at 208 Harbor Drive, Unit Ut1, Stamford. Estimated cost: $380,000. Filed Aug. 10. Turner Construction Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, contractor for 600 Washington Acquisitions LLC. Perform replacement alterations at 600 Washington Blvd., Stamford. Estimated cost: $1,600,000. Filed Aug. 9. Turner Construction Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, contractor for Harbor Drive Acquisitions LLC. Replace existing terrace window wall at three locations. Remove existing skylight and replace. Repair roof as applicable. Provide slab opening between 4th and 5th floor at 208 Harbor Drive, Unit Ut1, Stamford. Estimated cost: $2,000,000. Filed Aug. 17. Wood, Richard C., Stamford, contractor for Strand/Brc Group LLC c/o Blt Management LLC. Construct a private rooftop pool at 900 Pacific St., Unit P3, Stamford. Estimated cost: $300,000. Filed Aug. 30.

Residential A.W. Construction LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Frederic Purse. Install generator at 147 Chestnut Hill Road, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $20,000. Filed Aug. 30. Boyian, Thomas and Rosemarie Boyian, Norwalk, contractor for Thomas Boyian. Construct bathroom in basement at 10 Alrowood Drive, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $7,000. Filed Aug. 31. Butler, Peter and Lora Butler, Norwalk, contractor for Peter Butler and Lora Butler. Install new roof, windows and siding at 2 Honeysuckle Drive, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $24,000. Filed Aug. 31.

Ceci John Estate, Norwalk, contractor for Ceci John Estate. Renovate bathroom at 20 Edlie Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $10,000. Filed Aug. 27. Dioses, Carlos and Susan Dioses, Norwalk, contractor for Carlos Dioses. Screen a deck addition at 1 Olmstead Place, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $6,500. Filed Aug. 30. Gady Contracting GC Inc., Norwalk, contractor for Brian T. Gallagher. Construct masonry retaining wall at 43 Surrey Drive, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $5,000. Filed Aug. 31. Holzner, Louis, Norwalk, contractor for Philip Dement. Install a generator at 48 Glen Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $12,201. Filed Aug. 30. The Home Depot USA Inc., Norwalk, contractor for Douglas A. Smith. Remove 17 existing windows and replace at 12 Oakwood Cottage, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $15,550. Filed Aug. 31. Home Solutions by Chris Smith LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Richard and Wendy Bernero. Renovate kitchen, laundry room and full bathroom at 25 Harborview Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $63,642. Filed Aug. 30. Petrucci, Dave, Norwalk, contractor for Yew Street Partners LLC. Construct two and one-half story single-family residence with two-car garage, walk-out basement, rear deck and four bedrooms at Brierwood Road, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $20,000. Filed Aug. 27. Power Home Remodeling Group LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Gabor and Joan Peterdi. Remove existing deck and replace at 108 Highland Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $26,321. Filed Aug. 30. Power Home Remodeling Group LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Qadir Ishfaq. Remove 20 existing windows and replace at 34 Adams Ave., Unit A, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $19,353. Filed Aug. 30. Rex Roofing Company of Stamford Inc., Stamford, contractor for Antonio Forte. Replace roof shingles at 5 Coopers Pond Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $17,000. Filed Aug. 19.

fairfield county

Rex Roofing Company of Stamford Inc., Stamford, contractor for Antonio Forte. Replace existing siding at 5 Coopers Pond Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $24,000. Filed Aug. 18. Rex Roofing Company of Stamford Inc., Stamford, contractor for Antonio Forte. Replace windows, front door and one slider door at 5 Coopers Pond Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $19,000. Filed Aug. 30. Ruffolo, Ronnie, Waterbury, contractor for Matthew and Ann Nardi. Remove partition walls to make open floor plan, install one bay window and two French doors at 63 Hannahs Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $25,000. Filed Aug. 17. Sabotic, Emil, Stamford, contractor for Gerhard and Barbara Gnaedig. Relocate interior stairs, add windows and perform minor electrical, plumbing and HVAC work at 77 Soundview Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $45,000. Filed Aug. 6. Silverline Restoration Inc., Farmington, contractor for Jill M. Mailhot. Repair section of roof with Timberline shingles, ridge vent and ridge cap at 26 Dale Place, Stamford. Estimated cost: $8,430. Filed Aug. 24. Solimine Contracting LLC, Danbury, contractor for Jonathan Crowe and Alejandra Pulido. Install a new bathroom in the basement of existing house at 75 Hastings Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $12,500. Filed Aug. 4. Starlight Construction Inc., Bridgeport, contractor for Dwayne Duncan. Demolish existing bathroom and kitchen, reframe damaged walls, install new insulation, sheetrock, tile bathroom and install new kitchen cabinets, re-wire bathroom and affected rooms and put new plumbing in bathroom and kitchen, repair and replace drywall, replace insulation where exposed and paint interior of house where affected at 131 Bridge St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $35,000. Filed Aug. 3. Starlight Construction Inc., Bridgeport, contractor for Dwayne Duncan. Remove asphalt roof shingles on garage and replace with architectural at 131 Bridge St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $2,500. Filed Aug. 19.

Sunrun Installation Services Inc., San Francisco, California, contractor for Andres Grajales and Judith Pazmino. Install rooftop solar panels at 163 Knox Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $14,040. Filed Aug. 2. Sunrun Installation Services Inc., San Francisco, California, contractor for Christopher P. and Jennifer M. Hsu. Install roof-mounted solar panels at 139 Knickerbocker Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $7,160. Filed Aug. 20. Superior Alterations and Design LLC, Stamford, contractor for Vincent A. and Donna L. Fusco. Build deck, and install fencing at 517 W. Hill Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $5,000. Filed Aug. 17. Synergy Home Improvement and Landscape LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Michael S. Fetterer and Randi L. Steiner. Construct new porch with open deck at rear of 4 Brierwood Road, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $77,950. Filed Aug. 30. T&R Construction LLC, Stratford, contractor for Milton Hallas. Remodel kitchen, add new bathroom to first floor and replace flooring at 1 Shore Road, Unit 14, Stamford. Estimated cost: $80,000. Filed Aug. 4. Tesla Energy Operations Inc., Fremont, California, contractor for Vitali and Iryna Kuzmych. Install roof-mounted solar panels and energy storage systems at 93 Ledge Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $8,629. Filed Aug. 9. Tesla Energy Operations Inc., Fremont, California, contractor for Jacalyn and James Pruitt. Install Tesla solar roof as overlay and Tesla energy storage system at 270 Pepper Ridge Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $27,333. Filed Aug. 12. Tomas, Anthony C., Norwalk, contractor for Tomas Carmelo. Change the current use of the space at 471 Glenbrook Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $N/A. Filed Aug. 6. Total Transformation LLC, Stamford, contractor for Irene E. and James R. Huerta Renovate kitchen, replace floor; new electrical and insulation to exterior wall; drywall and painting work at 4 Nash Place, Stamford. Estimated cost: $32,000. Filed Aug. 18.

Larry Miles c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

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Facts & Figures Trinity Solar Inc., Cheshire, contractor for Christian Restrepo. Install roof-mounted solar panels at 146 Fourth St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $24,000. Filed Aug. 13. Vinylume Inc., Stamford, contractor for Suzanne Cheruk. Install new vinyl siding to entire house with applicable accessories and under alignments at 24 Klondike Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $15,500. Filed Aug. 27. Vivint Solar Developer LLC, Lehi, Utah, contractor for Sean M. James and Jean M. Mondesir-James. Install roof-mounted solar panels at 86 Snow Crystal Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $11,968. Filed Aug. 9. Vivint Solar Developer LLC, Lehi, Utah, contractor for Nicholas J. Didelot. Install roof-mounted solar panels at 96 White Birch Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $13,056. Filed Aug. 2. Wallach, Michael S., Stamford, contractor for Anzelmo Graziosi and Maria Violi-Graziosi. Construct indoor pool at 447 Westover Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $50,000. Filed Aug. 12. William, Hamilla S., Norwalk, contractor for Jesse James and Gwendol George. Strip roof and repair rafters, gutters and leaders at 4 Shorefront Park, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $12,500. Filed Aug. 30. Zakhar, Theodore, Norwalk, contractor for Teresa J. and Richard J. Hatfield. Remove existing and re-roof 38 Bennett St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $11,810. Filed Aug. 12.

COURT CASES Bridgeport Superior Court McWillis, Alexandra, Stratford. Filed by Capital One Bank NA, Richmond, Virginia. Plaintiff’s attorney: London & London, Newington. Action: The plaintiff is a banking association, which issued a credit account to defendant who agreed to make payments for goods and services. The defendant failed to make payments. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $2,500, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-216108829-S. Filed Aug. 10.

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Morici Motor Sports LLC, et al, Clifton, New Jersey. Filed by Louis Procaccini, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Richard H Raphael, Westport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-21-6108986-S. Filed Aug. 18. Perfect Construction LLC, et al, Stamford. Filed by Romeo McKenzie, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Becker & Zowine Law Offices, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff was lawfully on the premises controlled by the defendants when he was struck by roofing materials. As a result, the plaintiff suffered injuries and damages. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-21-6109171-S. Filed Aug. 24. Walmart Stores East LP, et al, East Hartford. Filed by Tammy Roseboro, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Miller Rosnick D’Amico August & Butler PC, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff was shopping at the premises controlled, owned and maintained by the defendants when a large frame fell off one of the displays, hitting plaintiff who suffered injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-21-6108551-S. Filed July 27.

Danbury Superior Court Barreto, Rogue Lovinda, et al, Danbury. Filed by Patricia Short, Watertown. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ventura Law, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBDCV-21-6040308-S. Filed Aug. 16.

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Debes, Abbi Danielle, et al, New Milford. Filed by Elizabeth Maloon Terhaar, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ventura Law, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBDCV-21-6040276-S. Filed Aug. 11. Fritz-Snyder, Janice, Ridgefield. Filed by Nicholas Springer, Paterson, New Jersey. Plaintiff’s attorney: FLB Law, Westport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBDCV-21-6040255-S. Filed Aug. 9. Mead, Michael, New Fairfield. Filed by Kimberly Olgee, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Allingham Readyoff & Henry LLC, New Milford. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-21-6040249-S. Filed Aug. 9.

Stamford Superior Court King Point Ventures LLC d.b.a. Dunkin Donuts, Greenwich. Filed by Thomas Pikula, Yorktown Heights, New York. Plaintiff’s attorney: Perkins & Associates, Woodbridge. Action: The plaintiff was lawfully on the defendant’s premises when an altercation broke out among several employees. Despite not engaging in the incident, the plaintiff allegedly was pushed against the tables and chairs and landed on the floor, causing him to suffer injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-216052062-S. Filed June 2.

Kratter, Mark M., et al, Norwalk. Filed by Miriam Roth, Westport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Stephen James Curley, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff suffered legal malpractice by the defendant. The defendant failed to advise the plaintiff about the defendant’s lack of experience prosecuting construction disputes so plaintiff terminated her relationship with the defendant and she had to withdraw the claims in the arbitration and paid an arbitration award. As a result, the plaintiff suffered damages. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-21-6052519-S. Filed July 6. Public Storage Statutory Trust, East Hartford. Filed by Christopher Onthank, Wilton. Plaintiff’s attorney: BBB attorneys LLC, Stratford. Action: The plaintiff was a business invitee on the premises owned and controlled by the defendant and was operating the garage door to his storage unit using a provided control. While the plaintiff was exiting the storage unit, the door became loose and began to fall suddenly onto the plaintiff and his car. As a result, the plaintiff suffered injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-21-6052333-S. Filed June 23. Spoto, Joseph, Stamford. Filed by Loreto M. Buzzeo, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Curtis Brinckerhoff & Barrett, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FSTCV-21-6052640-S. Filed June 13.

DEEDS Commercial 1 Sweet Briar LLC, Greenwich. Seller: Stacy Stefanowicz, Stamford. Property: 1 Sweet Briar Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Aug. 25.

89 Eunice Avenue LLC, Fairfield. Seller: Sean Bosken and Lisa Bosken, Tierra Verde, Florida. Property: 89 Eunice Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $1,220,000. Filed Aug. 24. Angler’s Garage LLC, Riverside. Seller: Peter Meindl and Sarah Meindl, Riverside. Property: 27 Leeward Lane, Riverside. Amount: $4,725,000. Filed Aug. 23. Burrell, Mark, et al, Fairfield. Seller: 18 Plum Street Properties LLC, Fairfield. Property: 165 Somerset Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $850,000. Filed Aug. 23. Holzman, Dara E., Hoboken, New Jersey. Seller: JERF5 LLC, Norwalk. Property: 217 Bridge St., Unit F5, Stamford. Amount: $379,000. Filed Aug. 16. Lopes Goncalves, Mark, Norwalk. Seller: Elad LLC, Fairfield. Property: 680 Kings Highway East, Fairfield. Amount: $345,000. Filed Aug. 26. Migliardi, Lisa Pugliese and Matthew John Migliardi, Greenwich. Seller: Buena Vista Greenwich LLC, Greenwich. Property: 43 Buena Vista Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Aug. 24. O’Shea, Joseph, White Plains, New York. Seller: 31 Marks Road LLC, Riverside. Property: 31 Marks Road, Old Greenwich. Amount: $1,458,000. Filed Aug. 27. Song, Won-Min, Mamaroneck, New York. Seller: J&S Renovations LLC, Trumbull. Property: 192 Fairland Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $535,000. Filed Aug. 23. Stamford Chalet LLC, Stamford. Seller: Jill W. Winger and Peggy S. Watson, Stamford. Property: 98 East Lane, Stamford. Amount: $930,000. Filed Aug. 20. Tamayo Salazar, Juan J. and Bibiana L. Perez, Greenwich. Seller: S2 Enterprises LLC, Greenwich. Property: 494 Den Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Aug. 23. Walters, Kelly A., Stamford. Seller: K29 LLC, Stamford. Property: 1 Valley Road, Unit 102, Stamford. Amount: $232,500. Filed Aug. 17.

Residential Adelman, Steven B., Stamford. Seller: Rafael Ceron and Aline Danieli, Plantation, Florida. Property: 85 Franklin St., Unit 12, Stamford. Amount: $433,000. Filed Aug. 17. Adler, Spencer T., New York, New York. Seller: Larry Adler, New York, New York. Property: 7 Upland Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Aug. 25. Bennett, Emily and Zachary Wright, Stamford. Seller: Srikanth Ramakrishnan and Jayshree Srikanth, Belle Mead, New Jersey. Property: 624 Hope St., Unit F, Stamford. Amount: $535,000. Filed Aug. 16. Beristain, Jorge M. and Lena Andreou, Riverside. Seller: Jorge M. Beristain, Riverside. Property: 22 Wescott St., Riverside. Amount: $N/A. Filed Aug. 27. Berkley, Stephen and Alexandra Berkley, Cos Cob. Seller: Darran Baird and Cynthia Baird, Greenwich. Property: 42 Birchwood Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Aug. 26. Bogardus, Joseph F., Fairfield. Seller: Joseph Bogardus, Fairfield. Property: Unit 2E, Stone Ridge Condominium, Fairfield. Amount: $100. Filed Aug. 23. Casarrubias Adame, Jose Juan and Lilia Marcela del Razo Martinez, Stamford. Seller: Michael O’Rourke Jr. and Victoria O’Rourke, Fairfield. Property: 158 Redding Road, Fairfield. Amount: $1,104,000. Filed Aug. 27. Castellana, Joseph and Linda Castellana, Greenwich. Seller: John Timothy Morris and Barbara M. Morris, Greenwich. Property: 15 Tomahawk Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Aug. 23. Chew Jr., Robert Ridgely and Meghan Chew, Cos Cob. Seller: Douglas McFaddin and Susan McFaddin, Greenwich. Property: 22 Cottontail Road, Cos Cob. Amount: $10. Filed Aug. 27. Ciccarelli, Rosanna and Alan C. Ruiz Castillo, Fairfield. Seller: Daniel Miller, Stamford. Property: Lot 10, Map 2794, Stevenson Road, Fairfield. Amount: $550,000. Filed Aug. 24.


Facts & Figures Coster, James J. and Jennifer Coster, Hobe Sound, Florida. Seller: Jeffrey M. Farber and Donna M. Farber, Stamford. Property: 78 Emery Drive, Stamford. Amount: $2,300,000. Filed Aug. 16.

Grandolfo, Anthony and Angela Grandolfo, Fairfield. Seller: Michael J. Anderson and Sarah E. Anderson, Fairfield. Property: 165 Hubbell Lane, Fairfield. Amount: $2,250,000. Filed Aug. 25.

Cox, Kerry and Christopher Cox, Riverside. Seller: Francisco Tobias Marin and Maria Jose Moresco, Miami Dade, Florida. Property: 24 Terrace Ave., Riverside. Amount: $10. Filed Aug. 27.

Gurian, Craig and Lori Gurian, New York, New York. Seller: Michael Dunne, Stamford. Property: 153 Blackberry Drive, Stamford. Amount: $1,180,000. Filed Aug. 18.

O’Rourke Jr., Michael F. and Victoria O’Rourke, Fairfield. Seller: Richard R. Freedman and Trisha A. Murphy, Fairfield. Property: 50 Whites Hill Lane, Fairfield. Amount: $1,310,000. Filed Aug. 25.

Hoang, Hoa Tri, Monroe. Seller: Satish Itty and Gineesha Abraham, Fairfield. Property: 121 Warren Ave., Unit 1, Fairfield. Amount: $443,000. Filed Aug. 26.

Park, Bo S. Greenwich. Seller: Junichiro Sonoda and Mihoko Sonoda, Greenwich. Property: 7 Wyngate Road, Greenwich. Amount: $2,117,087. Filed Aug. 25.

Hwang, Ula, Rye, New York. Seller: John W. Lloyd and Barbara G. Lloyd, Fairfield. Property: 130 Sasco Hill Terrace, Fairfield. Amount: $1,170,000. Filed Aug. 26.

Perez, Aaron, Larchmont, New York. Seller: Evangelos Bakes and Olga Bakes, Stamford. Property: 112 Belltown Road, Stamford. Amount: $650,000. Filed Aug. 17.

Kapodistrias, Evangelos A., Stamford. Seller: Elizabeth P. Lefebvre, Stamford. Property: Unit D3, Forest Grove Condominium, Stamford. Amount: $245,000. Filed Aug. 20.

Presta, Luciana M. and Luigi Presta, Greenwich. Seller: Robert Manavola, Rye Brook, New York. Property: 21 Guilford Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Aug. 23.

Crowley-Piscitell, Weston. Seller: Ladonna L. Steiner and Mark A. Goldsmith, Fairfield. Property: 33 Michaela Circle, Fairfield. Amount: $880,000. Filed Aug. 24. Del Bello, John N. and Holly M. Del Bello, Fairfield. Seller: Leonard R. Tatore and Mary Milligan, Fairfield. Property: 23 Chandlers Lane North, Unit 10, Fairfield. Amount: $810,000. Filed Aug. 23. DiLascia, Katherine A., Greenwich. Seller: Joseph D. Watson and Hilary H. Watson, Greenwich. Property: 1 Winding Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $4,750,000. Filed Aug. 24. El Chami, Joseph C. and Angela M. Martino, Greenwich. Seller: Yvonne Hyland, Greenwich. Property: 61 Orchard Place, Unit A, Greenwich. Amount: $1,375,000. Filed Aug. 25. Fagan, Daniel, Stamford. Seller: Susan A. Carlson, Southport. Property: 56 Juniper Lane, Southport. Amount: $720,000. Filed Aug. 27. Fahy, Jesse William and Allison Helen Russow, New York, New York. Seller: Terence Brady and Jennifer A. Brady, Fairfield. Property: 1225 Holland Hill Road, Fairfield. Amount: $776,000. Filed Aug. 24. Fleischman, Lee and Elizabeth Julich Fleischman, Stamford. Seller: Ron Michael Tiktin and Julie Freedman Tuktin, Ridgefield. Property: 48 Briarwood Lane, Stamford. Amount: $710,000. Filed Aug. 18. Graf, Elizabeth C. and Christine A. Graf, Greenwich. Seller: Francois-Xavier Rouffiac and Estelle Creteur Rouffiac, Greenwich. Property: 1 Brookside Park, Greenwich. Amount: $4,173,000. Filed Aug. 24.

Kosky, Curtis and Laura Kosky, Stamford. Seller: John J. Hogan and Virginia F. Hogan, Fairfield. Property: 401 Lakeview Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $620,000. Filed Aug. 25. Krumiech, Shane J., Stamford. Seller: Michelle B. Capuano, Stamford. Property: 136 Crystal Lake Road, Stamford. Amount: $716,500. Filed Aug. 19. Liu, Hongbo and Lanbo Zou, Stamford. Seller: Lillian Mary Intrieri, Stamford. Property: 99 Westover Lane, Stamford. Amount: $718,575. Filed Aug. 20. Llamas, William Maren, Stamford. Seller: Peter J. Kokenos, Easton. Property: 455 Hope St., Unit 3G, Stamford. Amount: $414,000. Filed Aug. 18. Moffat, Scott Kenneth and Jill Lauren Berlin, Fairfield. Seller: Ophir Sahar, Fairfield. Property: 792 Sturges Highway, Fairfield. Amount: $1,950,000. Filed Aug. 26. Morholt, Eric and Brittany Kelly, Stamford. Seller: Robert O. Heroux II and Beth E. Heroux, Stamford. Property: 202 Soundview Ave., Unit 29, Stamford. Amount: $431,000. Filed Aug. 16.

Nardi, Lawrence and Laura D. Nardi, Stamford. Seller: Theodore J. Coppola, Stamford. Property: 95 Pine Tree Drive, Stamford. Amount: $575,000. Filed Aug. 20.

Raghunath, Sudha, Stamford. Seller: Brett Cotler, Bradley Beach, New Jersey. Property: 100 Strickland Road, Unit 1, Greenwich. Amount: $677,500. Filed Aug. 26. Roelke, Dana, Stamford. Seller: Aleksander Zajac and Irena Zajac, Stamford. Property: 14 Lewis Road, Stamford. Amount: $800,000. Filed Aug. 17. So, Andrew and Abigail Sprague, Old Greenwich. Seller: Carey Jon Penswick, Naples, Florida. Property: 17 Park Ave., Old Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Aug. 24. Tawney, Mark and Miyuki Tawney, Greenwich. Seller: Liwen Yaacoby and Elimelech Yaacoby, Greenwich. Property: 6 Glen Court, Greenwich. Amount: $2,500,000. Filed Aug. 25. Tumzghi, Daniel and Aida Habtezion, Greenwich. Seller: George Butler, Greenwich. Property: 21 Tomney Road, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Aug. 26. Uddin, Burkhan and Farjana Akter, Stamford. Seller: Ann K. Baldwin, Stamford. Property: 57 Bonner St., Stamford. Amount: $635,000. Filed Aug. 19.

Vertucci Sr., Alan and Danguole Vertucci, Southport. Seller: 1093 Pequot LLC, New York, New York. Property: 1093 Pequot Ave., Southport. Amount: $10,900,000. Filed Aug. 25. Welford, Stephen and Vilma Mathiesen, Torrington. Seller: Michael Stanton, Stamford. Property: 59 Courtland Ave., Unit 2L, Stamford. Amount: $175,000. Filed Aug. 19. Yorke, Jonathan and Jillian Yorke, Fairfield. Seller: Frank J. Smith, Fairfield. Property: 701 Mill Plain Road, Fairfield. Amount: $845,000. Filed Aug. 27.

JUDGMENTS Heinen, Christopher P., Stamford. $3,377, in favor of Bank of America NA, Charlotte, North Carolina, by Rubin & Rothman LLC, Islandia, New York. Property: 191 Thunder Hill Drive, Stamford. Filed Sept. 1. Lajqi, Afrim, Stamford. $10,438, in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla, New York, by Tobin & Marohn, Meriden. Property: 1 Flora Place, Stamford. Filed Sept. 20. McDonald, Paul, Stamford. $5,108, in favor of Elavon Inc., Knoxville, Tennessee, by Jacobs & Rozich LLC, New Haven. Property: 33 Indian Rock Road, Stamford. Filed Sept. 17.

LIENS Federal Tax Liens Filed Augustine, Carol A. and Andrew A. Augustine, 43 High St., Greenwich. $992, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 18. Barrientos Pacheco, Marlon F., 14 Harvard Ave., Stamford. $3,923, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 31. Bauer, Paula and John Schreiber, 4 Grove Lane, Greenwich. $6,506, civil proceeding tax. Filed Sept. 1.

DeRosa, John A., 7 Truman Cottage, Norwalk. $48,305, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 31. Durkin, Sheila M., 445 Hunting Ridge Road, Stamford. $412,835, civil proceeding tax. Filed Sept. 9. Genovese, Michele, 13 Morgan Ave., Greenwich. $162, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 13. JRL Properties LLC, 200 Railroad Ave., Greenwich. $839, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 12. McCabe, Susan M., 53B William St., Greenwich. $2,363, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 23. McLaughlin, Melanie D., 17 Tyler Road, Apt. 1101, Fairfield. $1,365,212, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 23. Middleberg, Hans A., 83 Havemeyer Place, Greenwich. $479, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 16. Rattner, Donald and Gabrielle Rattner, 11 Ferncliff Road, Cos Cob. $485, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 23. Silkovic, Amor Amo, 51 Byram Road, Greenwich. $2,307, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 23. Toohey, Philip J., 32 Meadowcroft Lane, Greenwich. $69,740, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 23. Valencia, Jorge A., 1892 High Ridge Road, Stamford. $14,910, civil proceeding tax. Filed Sep. 1.

MECHANIC’S LIENS DP6 LLC, et al, Stamford. Filed by Robertson-Ceco II Corp., by Colleen Kirk. Property: 1351 Washington Blvd., Stamford. Amount: $37,387. Filed Aug. 13. LMV II 885 Washington Holdings LP, Miami, Florida. Filed by United Rentals Inc, by Charles Zawistowski. Property: 885 Washington Blvd., Stamford. Amount: $7,077. Filed Sept. 1.

LIS PENDENS Arenas, Francisco, et al, Stamford. Filed by Ackerly & Ward, Stamford, for Bedford Park Association Inc. Property: Unit 1B, Bedford Park Condominium. Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Sept. 7. Barouch, Linda M., Fairfield. Filed by Costello, Brennan, DeVidas, Sasso and Sinclair PC, Fairfield, for Benjamin L. Barouch. Property: Lot 19, Map 1186, Lilalyn Drive, Fairfield. Action: foreclose defendant’s mortgage. Filed Sept. 3. Barton Properties Connecticut LLC, et al, Stamford. Filed by Gfeller Laurie LLP, West Hartford, for Connecticut Community Bank NA. Property: 77 W. Broad St., Stamford. Action: foreclose defendant’s mortgage. Filed Aug. 24 Boho, Stanislawa, et al, Stamford. Filed by Glass & Braus LLC, Fairfield, for ABS Loan Trust VI. Property: 57 Deleo Drive, Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Sept. 8. Gen 3 Trust, et al, Stamford. Filed by Frankel & Berg, Norwalk, for Grove Court Condominium Association Inc. Property: 101 Grove St., Unit 20, Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 30. Leath, Steven M., et al, Stamford. Filed by Ackerly & Ward, Stamford, for Brighton Court Association Inc. Property: Unit 1716, Brighton Court Association Inc. Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 30. Lepre, Gene, et al, Stamford. Filed by Bendett & McHugh PC, Farmington, for First County Bank. Property: 59 Courtland Ave., Unit 3F, Stamford. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Aug. 31. Rushdi, Abdullah, et al, Fairfield. Filed by McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce LLC, Hartford, for Lakeview Loan Servicing LLC. Property: 228 Grasmere Ave., Fairfield. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Sept. 7. Shlomo, Naftaly and Jodi Shlomo, Fairfield. Filed by Earle Giovanniello, New Haven, for Alfredo Rivera. Property: 11 Ginger Circle, Fairfield. Action: foreclose defendants’ mortgage. Filed Sept. 27.

Dara LLC, 25 Woods Ave., Greenwich. $182, civil proceeding tax. Filed Aug. 12.

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Facts & Figures Welter, Wendy E., Fairfield. Filed by Roger B. Calistro, Fairfield, for Unifund Corp. Property: 70 Rockview Road, Fairfield. Action: foreclose defendant’s mortgage. Filed Sept. 28.

Coleman, Leonard J. and Jaime L. Coleman, Fairfield, by Donald E. Wetmore. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA, 101 N. Phillips Ave., Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Property: 470 Rock Ridge Road, Fairfield. Amount: $469,527. Filed Aug. 16.

Haspel, Leesa N. and Christopher E. Hernandez, Fairfield, byN/A. Lender: Guaranteed Rate Inc., 3940 N. Ravenswood, Chicago, Illinois. Property: 1701 Fence Row Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $1,280,000. Filed Aug. 17.

MORTGAGES

Coller, Stephen A. and Debbie P. Coller, Stamford, by Jeffrey G. Lane. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 1111 Polaris Pkwy., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 5 Meredith Lane, Stamford. Amount: $413,500. Filed Aug. 16.

Hellman, Adam and Hollen S. Hellman, Riverside, by Wilma Vitale. Lender: Webster Bank NA, 145 Bank St., Waterbury. Property: 27 Meadow Road, Greenwich. Amount: $250,000. Filed Aug. 18.

Ahmadzadeh, Ali and Alejandra Aguilar-Gomez, Greenwich, by David K. Rose. Lender: US Bank National Association, 4801 Frederica St., Owensboro, Kentucky. Property: 7 Shelter Drive, Cos Cob. Amount: $1,620,000. Filed Aug. 17. Allen, Catherine M. and Kenneth G. Allen, Fairfield, by Gotrell McLellan. Lender: TD Bank NA, 2035 Limestone Road, Wilmington, Delaware. Property: 67 Oakwood Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $163,844. Filed Aug. 18. Aloe, Rocco F. and Lorin H. Aloe, Fairfield, by Tamara L. Peterson. Lender: Guaranteed Rate Inc., 1800 W. Larchmont Ave., Chicago, Illinois. Property: 2743 Easton Turnpike, Fairfield. Amount: $387,000. Filed Aug. 18. Bell, Loren and Clayton Lande, Stamford, by Cynthia M. Salemme Riccio. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 162 Dunn Ave., Stamford. Amount: $290,500. Filed Aug. 18. Berger-Buzzeo, Robin and Jamie Buzzeo, Stamford, by Jeffrey G. Lane. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 473 Sawmill Road, Stamford. Amount: $396,980. Filed Aug. 18. Brand, Jeffrey P., Stamford, by Jeffrey G. Lane. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 1111 Polaris Pkwy., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 118 Surrey Road, Stamford. Amount: $245,234. Filed Aug. 16.

Corsello, Evan R. and Dania T. Corsello, Stamford, by Jeffrey G. Lane. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 306 Pepper Ridge Road, Stamford. Amount: $509,000. Filed Aug. 17. De Blasio, Richard and Liliana De Blasio, Greenwich, by Scott Rogalski. Lender: US Bank National Association, 425 Walnut St., Cincinnati, Ohio. Property: 115 Halstead Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $80,000. Filed Aug. 13. DeSantis, Michael A. and Elizabeth C. DeSantis, Stamford, by Dorian Arbelaez. Lender: Rocket Mortgage LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 10 Mead St., Apt. 8, Stamford. Amount: $271,875. Filed Aug. 13. Franco, Georgina, Stamford, by David H. Dworski. Lender: PHH Mortgage Corp., 1 Mortgage Way, Mount Laurel, New Jersey. Property: 220 Courtland Ave., Stamford. Amount: $336,000. Filed Aug. 13. Gutmann, Charlotte A. and Andrew J. Turchin, Greenwich, by Eileen M. Pate. Lender: Citibank NA, 1000 Technology Drive, O’Fallon, Missouri. Property: 105 Hamilton Ave., No.12, Greenwich. Amount: $600,000. Filed Aug. 18.

Jakubowicz, Jonathan, Greenwich, by Descera Daigle. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA, 101 N. Phillips Ave., Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Property: 665 River Road, Cos Cob. Amount: $2,474,500. Filed Aug. 16. Lynch, Krishna L. and Christopher M. Lynch, Fairfield, by Douglas Seltzer. Lender: Interfirst Mortgage Co., 9525 W. Bryn Mawr Ave., Suite 400, Rosemont, Illinois. Property: 114 Edge Hill Road, Fairfield. Amount: $479,000. Filed Aug. 16. Neilon, Geeta, Greenwich, by William Zorzy. Lender: Better Mortgage Corp., 175 Greenwich St., 59th floor, New York, New York. Property: 1 Fitch Lane, Riverside. Amount: $293,000. Filed Aug. 16. Passeck, Jennifer, Fairfield, by Scott Rogalski. Lender: Citibank NA, 1000 Technology Drive, O’Fallon, Missouri. Property: 137 Towne House Road, Fairfield. Amount: $548,250. Filed Aug. 17. Pendkar, Avinash and Camilla Pedersen, Greenwich, by Benjamin McEachin. Lender: UNMB Home Loans Inc., 3601 Hempstead Turnpike, Suite 300, Levittown New York. Property: 45 Old Kings Highway, Old Greenwich. Amount: $526,000. Filed Aug. 17.

Perez, Aaron, Stamford, by Timothy Deakin. Lender: Quicken Loans LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 112 Belltown Road, Stamford. Amount: $552,500. Filed Aug. 17. Sappern, Matthew and Rianne Sappern, Fairfield, by Dorian Arbelaez. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 1111 Polaris Pkwy., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 11 Norcliff Lane, Fairfield. Amount: $500,000. Filed Aug. 13. Signorini, Shannon, Greenwich, by Marianne C. Cirillo. Lender: CrossCountry Mortgage LLC, 6850 Miller Road, Brecksville, Ohio. Property: 41 Westview Place, Riverside. Amount: $1,099,000. Filed Aug. 13. Tavolacci, Francis P., Fairfield, by Patrick Q. Mitchell. Lender: Embrace Home Loans Inc, 25 Enterprise Center, Middletown, Rhode Island. Property: 72 Stoneleigh Road, Fairfield. Amount: $538,800. Filed Aug. 13.

NEW BUSINESSES Angeltips Spa, 1990 W. Main St., Stamford 06902, c/o Lily Li. Filed Aug. 27. Cherrybaey, 511 W. Main St., Apt. 9, Stamford 06902, c/o Sandra Dee Francis. Filed Aug. 30. Coldwell Banker Commercial Realty, 1086 Long Ridge Road, Stamford 06903, c/o New England LLC. Filed Aug. 31. Coldwell Banker, 6 Landmark Square, Fourth floor, Stamford 06901, c/o New England LLC. Filed Aug. 31.

E.G. Landscaping Service, 22 Whitmore Lane, Stamford 06902, c/o Edio Gonzalez. Filed Aug. 27.

Silver Touch Limousine, 53 William St., Unit A, Stamford 06902, c/o Jorge Ulloa. Filed Aug. 31.

Kimon & Co Consulting, 26 Strawberry Hill Ave., Suite 7, Stamford 06902, c/o Audrey Kimon. Filed Aug. 23.

Stamford Ford Lincoln Df & Ju Inc., 212 Magee Ave., Stamford 06902, c/o Dominic Franchella. Filed Aug. 30.

Krepak, Michelle, 571 Roxbury Road, Stamford 06902, c/o Michelle Krepak. Filed Aug. 30.

Stand Out Advisory, 120 Emery Drive East, Stamford 06902, c/o Kosseim Advisory LLC. Filed Aug. 27.

Ninja Bubble Tea LLC, 225 Summer St., Stamford 06901, c/o Soomee Suh. Filed Aug. 23. Room For Paws Pet Resort Best, 72 Camp Ave., Stamford 06907, c/o Mitchell Kaufman. Filed Aug. 27. Roxy’s Food Truck, 5 Loughran Ave., Stamford 06902, c/o Roxy’s Food Truck LLC. Filed Aug. 25.

Taco Deli LLC, 2540 Summer St., Stamford 06905, c/o Noe Perez Lemus. Filed Aug. 26.

PATENTS Network data management and data security. Patent no. 11,138,599 issued to Taylor Young, et al. Assigned to Synchrony, Stamford.

Vice President, Client Report and Warehouse Engineering (Greenwich, CT): Develop and support critical Client Reporting applications and enhancements. Implement new application functionalities, analyze and translate user requirements into technical specifications based on desired functionalities, and enhance system architectures for both new and existing Information Technology (IT) systems. Lead projects through the software development lifecycle. Work with object oriented programming and programming principles; Java; C#; SQL; MS SQL Server; and Transact-SQL. Req’s Bachelor’s degr plus 8 yrs exp. Mail resume to: AQR Capital Management, LLC, ATTN: S. Rao, 2 Greenwich Plaza, Greenwich, CT 06830. Must Ref: AL7AQR. AQR is an Equal Opportunity Employer. EEO/VET/DISABILITY Associate (Citadel Americas LLC – Greenwich, CT); Mult pos avail: Conduct differentiated, bottom-up fundamental fin res & analysis of companies, bus models & industries. F/T. Reqs a Bach degree (or foreign equiv) in Fin, Econ, Engin, CS or a rel field. Edu, train, or exp must include the follow’g: perform’g sell-side equity res, invstmnt banking, or invstmnt mngmnt; maintain’g detailed income statement models & relevant market data spreadsheets in MS Excel or sim; build’g, assess’g & manipulat’g models & communicat’g them to internal mngmnt & cross-functional stakeholders; analyz’g info in SEC docs, earn’gs transcripts & sell side res reports; conduct’g res projects that examine industry growth & competitive dynamics, includ’g regulatory & tax dvlpmnts; &, conduct’g meet’gs & phone calls to communicate with senior management of comp under coverage. Resumes: Citadel Americas LLC, Attn: ER/LE, 131 S Dearborn St, 27th Fl, Chicago, IL 60603. Job ID: 5752974.

Associate, Market Risk (Greenwich, CT). Prepare and review client risk reports and other communications containing risk information. Coordinate review processes, furnish detailed escalation instructions, and coordinate internal communications to ensure the timely delivery of client risk reports. Provide risk expertise and guidance on regulatory filings to internal clients and service providers. Work with risk reporting or product control, as well as risk exposures, duration, volatility, and option Greeks. Utilize SQL and improve financial analytics or monitoring tools. Calculate Value at Risk (VaR) and conduct stress tests. Req’s Bachelor’s degr plus 1 yrs exp. Mail resume to: AQR Capital Management, LLC, ATTN: S. Rao, 2 Greenwich Plaza, Greenwich, CT 06830. Must Ref: D040. AQR is an Equal Opportunity Employer. EEO/VET/DISABILITY

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LEGAL NOTICES Notice of formation of 155 West SOZAN Properties LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York SSNY on 02/04/2020.Office located in Westchester. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC. 646 Van Cortlandt Park Ave Purpose: Any lawful purpose. #62941 A PLAYce 2 Learn LLC Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State on August 25, 2021. Office located in WESTCHESTER COUNTY. Secy. Of State designated as agent upon which process may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail a copy of any process against it served upon him/her to: 4 Northridge Rd. Cortlandt Manor, NY 10567 (the LLCís primary business location). LLC may engage in any lawful act or activity for which a limited liability company may be formed. #62942 The Catchy Games LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 8/9/2021. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 329 Saint John Ave., Yonkers, NY 10704. General Purpose #62943 C & S Gizzo Realty 9 Oak Street LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 8/11/2021. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Gaetano A. Gizszo, 173 Underhill Ave., West Harrison, NY 10604. General Purpose #62944

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: St. Clair Development Managers, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on June 29, 2021. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to c/o MacQuesten Companies, 438 Fifth Avenue, Suite 100, Pelham, NY 10803. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62948 Notice of Formation of Nuttin But Luv, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 8/30/21. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Nuttin But Luv LLC, 472 Gramatan Ave., 2B, Mt Vernon, NY 10552. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62949 Notice Of Formation Of Limited Liability Company;. LLC. Name: FOCUS REI LLC. Articles Of Organization were filed with the Secretary Of State New York. (SSNY) on 6/14/21. Office Location: Westchester County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC. 128 Pelhamdale Avenue 2nd fl Mount Vernon New York 10553, Principal business location of the LLC. Purpose: any lawful business activity #62950 Notice of formation of 8 VICTORIA LANE LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/10/2021. Office location in Westchester County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC to the LLC at 168 Dunwoodie Street, Yonkers, NY 10704, Purpose: any lawful purpose or activity. #62951

Notice of Formation of EAW Enterprises LLC Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 9/7/21. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 522 Stellar Ave, Pelham NY 10803. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62953 Notice of Formation of GET LIT CANDLES LLC, a domestic, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 09/08/2021. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 57 ROOSEVELT DR, BEDFORD HILLS, NY 10507. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. #62954 Notice of formation of Panoply Properties, LLC, a domestic LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/9/2021. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Panoply Properties, LLC 4024 Avenue U - 2nd. Fl. Brooklyn NY 11234. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. #62957 Notice of Formation of HJC Consulting, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on May 27, 2021. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 163 Old Colony Road, Hartsdale, NY 10430. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62958

1st Step Pros LLC. Art. Of org. Filed with the Nevada Secretary of State on 11/17/2020. Office: Clark County. NSS Designated as registered agent of 1st Step Pros LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NSS shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 980 Broadway #322, Thornwood, NY,10594. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Cert. of authority to conduct business in NYS Filed with NYSDS on 6/10/2021. Office: Albany county, NY 12231-0001. #62959 Augie’s Stone Restoration LLC. Filed 5/5/21 Off ice:†Westchester†Co. †SSNY†designated as agent for process & shall mail to:†7 Heritage Hills - B, Somers, NY 10589†Purpose:†All lawful #62961 Notice of Formation of GDR Films, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 9/3/21. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Greg Di Roma, 1314 Washington St, Cortlandt Manor, NY 10567. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62963 Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: 45 Harrison LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on September 16, 2021. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to c/o Macquesten Development, LLC, 438 Fifth Avenue, Suite 100, Pelham, New York 10803. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62964

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: 45 Harrison Managers LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on September 16, 2021. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to c/o MacQuesten Development, LLC, 438 Fifth Avenue, Suite 100, Pelham, New York 10803. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62965 Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: RDC Cortland Holdings LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on September 13, 2021. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to RDC Cortland Holdings LLC, 1055 Saw Mill River Road, Suite 204, Ardsley, New York 10502. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62966 Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: RDC Cortland Holdings Manager LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on September 13, 2021. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to RDC Cortland Holdings Manager LLC, 1055 Saw Mill River Road, Suite 204, Ardsley, New York 10502. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62967

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Notice of formation of Blossom Belles, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/13/21. Offc. Westchester Cty. SSNY desg. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 177A E Main Street, New Rochelle, NY 10801. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62970 Dr. Guglielmi Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery PLLC, Art. of Org. filed with SSNY on 9/9/21, duration Perpetual. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to The PLLC, 82 Lakeshore Dr., Eastchester, NY 10907. Purpose: To practice the profession of Dentistry. #62973 Ludensol Detailing LLC. Filed 7/28/21 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 714 Saw Mill River Rd, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 Purpose: All lawful #62974 Notice of Formation of Marin R Food Distribution LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 9/22/21. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 35 Hillandale Ave, White Plains, NY 10603. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62975 Notice of Formation of Ashley Alice Beauty, LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 6/14/21. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 226 Sherman Ave., Hawthorne, NY 10532. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62979

WCBJ

NewMark Focus Solutions LLC Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State on October 1, 2021. Office located in WESTCHESTER COUNTY. Secy. Of State designated as agent upon which process may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail a copy of any process against it served upon him/her to: 3080 Weston Lane Yorktown Hts., NY 10598 (the LLCís primary business location). LLC may engage in any lawful act or activity for which a limited liability company may be formed. #62982 NAF LINDEN LLC. Filed 10/1/2020. Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 1274 49TH STREET, 14, BROOKLYN, NY 11219. Purpose: General. #62983 Model Elevator LLC. Filed 7/13/21 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 56 Sagamore Rd, Suite 2B, Bronxville, NY 10708 Purpose: All lawful #62984 1011 & 1013 Adee Avenue LLC. Filed 3/18/21 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 35 Overhill Rd, New Rochelle, NY 10804 Purpose: All lawful #62985 Cathy Migden Real Estate LLC. Filed 8/19/21 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 21 Croton Lake Rd, Unit 23, Katonah, NY 10536 Purpose: All lawful #62986

OCTOBER 11, 2021

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R : / E SI T ENDe.com G TT lin 1/ E R A ron 202 i O a T stf suite we c

2021

JOIN US FOR A VIRTUAL EVENT! Thursday, October 14 • 5 p.m.

CONGRATULATIONS TO THIS YEAR'S HONOREES: JENNIFER ANGELUCCI

JAMES KUDLA

CEO & President Paws Crossed Animal Rescue

President Tarrytech Computer Consultants

ANTHONY COSTELLO

BROTHER THOMAS LETO

MICHAEL J. FOSINA, FACHE

RITA MABLI

Executive Vice President & COO Westchester Medical Center Health Network

CEO & President Iona Prep

President NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital

CEO & President United Hebrew of New Rochelle

CHRISTOPHER B. FISHER

MARTIN MORGADO

Managing Partner Cuddy and Feder LLP

CEO & President Savings Bank of Danbury

FRANK GAUDIO

BILL TOMMINS

CEO & President First Bank of Greenwich

President Bank of America

SAM GAULT

CATHERINE WYNKOOP

President Gault Family Companies

President WestFair Rides

JOSEPH GUARRACINO

Executive Vice President Chief Administrative Officer & CFO White Plains Hospital PRESENTED BY:

PLATNUM SPONSOR:

WestfairOnline GOLD SPONSOR:

SILVER SPONSOR:

BRONZE SPONSOR:

SUPPORTER:


2021

VIRTUAL EVENT Thursday, October 14 • 5 p.m. PRESENTED BY:


CONGRATULATIONS RITA MABLI President/CEO United Hebrew of New Rochelle

You are a trailblazer in the world of eldercare! Thank you for your exceptional leadership of our senior care campus over the past 40 years.

Jennifer Tan Chief Nursing Officer United Hebrew of New Rochelle

Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation • Willow Towers Assisted Living • Willow Gardens Memory Care Certified Home Health Agency • Meadow Lane and Soundview Senior Apartments

www.uhgc.org 914-632-2804 S2


Westfair Communications created the C-Suite Awards to celebrate outstanding leaders who create innovative ideas that propel progress and success in their organizations. Tonight, we know you will be inspired by this group of the most accomplished Westchester and Fairfield-basved business leaders.

PLATINUM SPONSOR:

GOLD SPONSORS:

SILVER SPONSORS:

BRONZE SPONSORS:

SUPPORTERS:

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CONGRATULATIONS

BROTHER LETO INVEST. INSPIRE. IGNITE.

We salute Iona Preparatory President Brother Thomas R. Leto, Ed.D. on being named a 2021 C-Suite Award Winner by Westfair Communications.

#IONAMAN

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Iona Preparatory Lower School 173 Stratton Road New Rochelle, NY 10804 (914) 633-7744

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C-SUITE AWARDS 2021 | WINNERS

JENNIFER ANGELUCCI

ANTHONY COSTELLO

CHRISTOPHER FISHER

CEO AND PRESIDENT PAWS CROSSED ANIMAL RESCUE

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT AND COO WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER HEALTH NETWORK

MANAGING PARTNER CUDDY & FEDER LLP

Jennifer Angelucci graduated from John Jay College of Criminal Justice with a bachelor’s degree in forensic psychology. She began an internship with an animal rescue in 2013 where she met Tremble, a senior dog that would forever change the course of her life. She soon discovered that animal rescue and advocacy were her “higher purpose” and in two short years she went from intern to shelter manager. When the previous rescue left Westchester, Angelucci was the person that “opened another door” and forged ahead to create Paws Crossed. She was the one that spearheaded the restoration of a dormant property and brought a rescue operation back to Westchester. Her business plan has enabled Paws Crossed to rescue more than 4,000 animals since its inception, while creating all sorts of beneficial programs for our community. Her love of animals and “all-in” business sense have made her a positive and productive president and CEO.

Anthony E. Costello has been an employee of Westchester Medical Center (WMC) for the past 26 years. During that time, he has progressively grown into various leadership positions and now serves as executive vice president and chief operating officer for Westchester Medical Center, MidHudson Regional Hospital and Health Alliance Hospitals. His breadth of responsibilities covers both clinical and nonclinical operations, amounting to an annual operating budget over $600 million. He is responsible for professional and ancillary services for the entire network physician enterprise, with more than 700 advanced practice providers and 63 practice locations. His unwavering commitment to the organization is complemented by equally remarkable leadership skills viewing adversity as a welcome challenge. Through Costello’s leadership, systems and processes have been developed throughout the network to increase efficiency and accomplish the strategic vision of the CEO and board of directors. He provided the framework for hospital operations to expeditiously respond to the Covid-19 pandemic deploying, in collaboration with New York state, four vaccine locations throughout the Hudson Valley, as well as in the 11 hospitals throughout the WMC network. To date, WMCHealth has administered more than 620,000 vaccines across the region. Costello’s professional accomplishments in the WMCHealth community are complemented by his work in his personal community. In his home in Rockland County, he serves as a board member of the Elite Nation Baseball Club and New City Little League and has helped to create a scholarship fund for children who cannot afford to participate. Costello holds a bachelor of science degree from the New York Institute of Technology, and an MBA from Columbia Southern University is imminent. Costello is a member of the American College of Healthcare Executives and the American Society of Healthcare Engineering Management Association. He will be sitting for the Board of Governors exam in early 2022 to obtain his Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives (FACHE) credential. He lives in Rockland County with his wife and three children.

As managing partner at Cuddy & Feder LLP, Christopher B. Fisher is chairman of the firm’s telecommunications group and a past chairman of the firm’s land use, zoning and development group, two of the largest infrastructure practices in New York and Connecticut. He has also been on the firm’s management committee and served as the firm’s marketing partner. A founding board member of the New York State Wireless Association, Fisher served as president from 2012-2018. He is a member of the Wireless Infrastructure Association’s Innovation and Technology Council and chaired a working group focusing on municipal government relations and small cell policy. Fisher is a tireless advocate for digital connectivity across the region. He serves on the Executive Board of the Westchester County Association (WCA) and co-authored its post-pandemic Working Group’s 2020 report. As chair of the organization’s Digital Connectivity Committee and as a community leader, he leads efforts to drive economic development and broadband access and adoption as part of nationally recognized projects such as the Y-Zone in Yonkers. Fisher has appeared on City & State’s Telecommunications Power 50 list and is routinely recognized as a U.S. Best Attorney and Super Lawyer in New York. He has been honored on several occasions for his work within the community, including the Distinguished Service Award from the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University and the Leadership Award from WCA.


White Plains Hospital congratulates our esteemed colleague for being recognized as a Westchester & Fairfield County Business Journal C-Suite honoree

Joseph Guarracino Executive Vice President, Chief Administrative Officer & Chief Financial Officer

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C-SUITE AWARDS 2021 | WINNERS

MICHAEL J. FOSINA

FRANK GAUDIO

SAM GAULT

PRESIDENT NEWYORK-PRESBYTERIAN LAWRENCE HOSPITAL

PRESIDENT AND CEO FIRST BANK OF GREENWICH

PRESIDENT GAULT FAMILY COMPANIES

Michael J. Fosina, is president of NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital in Bronxville, and senior vice president at NewYork-Presbyterian in New York. He has served in his current role since 2015. Before that, he served as senior vice president and chief operating officer of NewYork-Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital from 2013 to 2015; vice president and executive director of NewYork-Presbyterian Allen Hospital from 2000 to 2013; and director of integration and accreditation from 1998 to March 2000 for the newly merged NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. From 1990 to 1998, Fosina served at the former New York Hospital—Cornell Medical Center in New York in roles of increasing scope and responsibility. From 1985 to 1990, he worked at the former Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in New York. He also serves as immediate past chairman of the American College of Healthcare Executives, an international professional society of more than 48,000 executives who lead hospitals, health care systems and other health care organizations. ACHE is the preeminent professional society for health care executives dedicated to improving health. Board certified in health care management as a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Fosina served as the ACHE Regent for New York—Metropolitan New York from 2013 to 2016. He has also served on numerous ACHE committees. In addition to his service to ACHE, Fosina is an advisory board member for the University of Delaware College of Health Sciences; a board member for LiveOn NY (Council of Senior Centers). He also is an active fellow in the New York Academy of Medicine, and he was a health and aging policy fellow from 2011 to 2013, and a congressional fellow from 2011 to 2012. Fosina earned his master’s degree in public health from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, and a bachelor of science degree from the University of Delaware. A lifelong resident of New Rochelle, Fosina and his family have been active in community service for many years.

Frank Gaudio is the president and CEO of the First Bank of Greenwich. He came to The First Bank of Greenwich in January 2011 as senior vice president/director of business development. Following his promotion to executive vice president in 2015, Gaudio earned his current position as president and CEO. From working retail in his family's business to time as an accountant, he went on to a career in residential lending and commercial lending, further developing people skills and building on an already impressive business acumen. Gaudio enjoyed tenures as senior vice president of lending and many other executive positions with prominent banks. He holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Iona College. Throughout the retail, accounting, marketing and banking industries, he has acquired a unique blend of experiences and developed a variety of skills in different areas, which have formed and enhanced his abilities in business development. Innovation, relationship-building and team creation have become the trademarks upon which he has built his career. A prime example would be his formation of three advisory boards consisting of approximately 450 people representing the three distinct communities served by The First Bank of Greenwich. The opinions, suggestions and concerns of the advisory boards provided the foundation upon which new processes and procedures were built, addressing the community’s specific consumer and commercial banking needs. Starting with $40 million in assets, this personalized approach has increased assets to $540 million. Business development has become Gaudio’s passion. He continues to build and support a team of consummate professionals who share his passion by building strong relationships and deep community ties. His enthusiasm for building the right team to achieve targeted success and his ability to implement innovative strategies are manifest in the ongoing growth and continued success of the First Bank of Greenwich.

Sam Gault represents the fifth generation to lead the company that bears his name. He serves as president of Westport, Connecticut-based Gault Family Companies. Recognized as one of the region’s most storied businesses, Gault Family Companies currently operates three business divisions in the area: Energy & Homes Solutions, Stone & Landscape Supplies and Properties & Development. Founded in 1863, the company is the oldest business in Westport and the oldest familyowned and -operated energy provider in Fairfield County. Over its 158-year history, the company has built a reputation among homeowners and the trade, for its impeccable service and dependability in everything it does. Gault prides itself on being an "energy partner" to its Energy & Home Solutions customers and focuses on educating and serving the wide-ranging energy needs of homeowners throughout Fairfield County. The company’s Stone & Landscape Supplies division has been a core competency of the business for nearly 100 years and today includes trade and consumer showrooms in Westport and Bethel. The company showcases its stone heritage and expertise across its many real estate developments, including Saugatuck Center, an award-winning transit-oriented development on Westport’s Riverside Avenue and the crown jewel of its real estate portfolio. Gault graduated from Lynchburg College in 1985 with a bachelor’s degree in business administration. A seasoned executive who believes strongly in giving back to the communities and the industries he serves, Gault is a board member of the Connecticut Energy Marketers Association and the New England Fuel Institute and an active member of the World Presidents Organization. He is a past chairman of the Board of the Westport Chamber of Commerce, and a past board member of the Westport Weston Family Y, where he presently serves on the Board of Trustees. Sam, his wife, Nancy, and their children Jillian and Ben, reside in Westport and enjoy spending their weekends skiing, biking and golfing with friends and family.

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2021

CONGRATULATIONS Martin G. Morgado CEO & President, Savings Bank of Danbury for your continued leadership of an outstanding organization.


C-SUITE AWARDS 2021 | WINNERS

JOSEPH GUARRACINO

BROTHER THOMAS R. LETO

JAMES KUDLA

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER AND CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER WHITE PLAINS HOSPITAL

PRESIDENT IONA PREPARATORY SCHOOL

PRESIDENT TARRYTECH COMPUTER CONSULTANTS

In his administrative roles at White Plains Hospital, Joseph Guarracino is responsible for all financial operations, including revenue, patient accounts and accounts payable. He came to the hospital in 2016 with more than 25 years of experience in management and oversight of financial operations of health care institutions. He joined White Plains Hospital from the Brooklyn Hospital Center, where he served as senior vice president and chief financial officer. Prior to that, he was CFO for three hospitals in Putnam and Dutchess counties that were part of the Health Quest system. Guarracino has also held senior-level positions at Saint Vincent Catholic Medical Centers of New York and St. Barnabas Community Health Plan. He began his career in the health care audit division at Ernst & Young LLC. He has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Iona College and a master’s degree in business administration with a focus in health care management from American Intercontinental University. He also serves as an adjunct professor in the department of finance at the Hagan School of Business at Iona College, teaching a graduate class in health care finance management.

Brother Thomas R. Leto, Ed.D., is in his 12th year as president of Iona Preparatory School in New Rochelle, New York, the longest tenure of a more than 40year career in educational leadership that includes presidencies and principalships at Essex Catholic in New Jersey, All Hallows in New York and Bishop Hendricken in Rhode Island, where he established the Options Program for students with mild to moderate developmental disabilities – the first such program in the country at a single-sex school. Since arriving at Iona Preparatory, Brother Leto has facilitated the reunion of the former Iona Grammar with the high school for a complete prekindergarten through 12th grade educational experience, and has presided over the institution’s centennial celebration. The latter includes the successful completion of a $10 million capital campaign that has resulted in the recent completion of the Devlin Library & Center for Excellence at the Lower School, replete with makerspace and storytelling areas; an imminent groundbreaking of a 21,000-foot expansion to the Paul Verni Fine Arts Center at the Upper School that will include a 406-seat auditorium, scene shop, art gallery and additional classroom space. An adjunct educational leadership management and policy professor at Seton Hall University, Brother Leto has also served on the executive committee of the National Catholic Education Association and the Board of Directors for the Greater Hudson Council of the Boy Scouts of America.

James Kudla is the general manager of the Westchester Branch of CompassMSP, an award-winning managed service provider (MSP) with offices throughout New England, the Mid-Atlantic, Florida and the Midwest. Kudla is trained technically, having earned a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering from Binghamton University. He started his career as a systems engineer for General Motors and played a significant role in designing the HVAC system for GM’s first electric car, the EV1. After gaining experience at GM, he transitioned to the IT world and worked with a video assistant referee (VAR) in New York City, installing and supporting networks for Fortune 500 companies. While in this role, Kudla earned his Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) and Cisco Certified Networking Associate (CCNA) certifications. He continued his career as a network and systems engineer at several DOT.com companies and earned his CCNP (Cisco Certified Network Personnel) accreditation while designing, installing and supporting large-scale data centers. Kudla owned and operated Tarrytech Computer Consultants located in Westchester County for almost 20 years until it was acquired by CompassMSP in June 2021. As part of CompassMSP, Kudla Is dedicated to helping clients in the construction, financial, health care and legal fields, among others, to realize a competitive advantage by harnessing the power of technology to reach their business goals.

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Anthony Costello Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer Westchester Medical Center Health Network

WMCHealth congratulates the 2021 C-Suite Award recipients, including our own Anthony Costello.

WMCHealth.org


C-SUITE AWARDS 2021 | WINNERS

RITA MABLI

MARTIN MORGADO

BILL TOMMINS

CEO AND PRESIDENT UNITED HEBREW OF NEW ROCHELLE

CEO AND PRESIDENT SAVINGS BANK OF DANBURY

PRESIDENT BANK OF AMERICA

Rita Mabli’s exceptional service to Westchester’s seniors spans 40 years. During that time, she built assistedliving, memory care and affordable living facilities and added rehabilitation, long-term care and home care services to the United Hebrew campus. She rebranded the organization as a vibrant campus of comprehensive care to support seniors through all stages of aging and has received numerous awards for her work. Mabli has led United Hebrew through a rapid period of growth and transformation. After being hired as United Hebrew’s human resources director in 1976, she earned her nursing home administrator’s license and became the organization’s first woman administrator. She was named CEO in 1994 and added the role of president in 2007. She holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Iona College.

Martin G. Morgado is president and CEO of Savings Bank of Danbury (SBD), a position he has held since 2016. He first joined the bank in 2001 and served it in numerous roles prior to his current one, including head of retail lending, executive vice president and chief operations officer. He played a key role in launching the bank’s highly successful Mortgage Banking Division. As CEO, he has guided the bank through times of significant growth, as it expanded to 15 locations and is now planning further expansion. Under his tenure, the bank achieved the milestone of having more than $1 billion in assets. He guided the institution through its 170th anniversary in 2019, part of which included funding the restoration of the historic Ives Home in Danbury. Under his watch, the bank’s SBD Foundation has contributed more than $2 million to over 100 deserving area not-for-profits.

As president, Bill Tommins, with 35 years of experience in the banking industry, is Bank of America’s leader for southern Connecticut. He connects businesses, families and individuals to the banking and investment teams that will help improve their financial lives. He also leads the work to deploy Bank of America’s resources across the market and the region to address social and economic concerns and build strong communities. In addition to serving as president, Tommins is the market executive for global commercial banking in the southern New England/Westchester region for Bank of America, working to improve the financial lives of midsized companies in the region by delivering the full breadth of Bank of America solutions. Prior to his role as market executive, Tommins served as sales performance executive for commercial banking, including middle-market banking, health care and institutions and government banking. Previously, he held positions of increasing responsibility in Bank of America’s predecessor commercial banking units. Prior to joining Bank of America, Tommins worked for Manufacturers Hanover in New York and Bell Atlantic Corp. in Richmond, Virginia. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics from Washington and Lee University and an MBA in finance from Fordham University, and is a National Association of Securities Dealers Registered Principal. Active in the community, he has served on boards of numerous civic and business organizations and currently serves on the board of Catholic Charities of Fairfield County and the Connecticut Business and Industry Association.

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NewYork-Presbyterian proudly congratulates Michael J. Fosina, FACHE President, NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital

For his outstanding achievement in being recognized as a 2021 C-Suite Awards Honoree.

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C-SUITE AWARDS 2021 | WINNERS

HVAC Services • Building Management Systems • Energy Solutions

CATHERINE WYNKOOP PRESIDENT WESTFAIR RIDES

Catherine Wynkoop is a trailblazer in mobility and aging-in-place initiatives. For the past 15 years, she has created organizations, programs and services, which have collectively served the needs of thousands of older adults and the visually impaired in the region, including the Westchester-Fairfield Aging in Place Coalition, Active Living Over Fifty (ALOFT) and The Boxwood Alliance. In 2011, she founded WestFair Rides, a collaborative nonprofit organization providing medical transportation services to older adults and adults with vision impairment. WestFair Rides is now celebrating its 10th anniversary and has provided information, referrals and nearly 17,000 rides to medical, dental and cancer treatment appointments for individuals who might have otherwise foregone critical medical care.

Congratulations to the 2021 C-Suite Award Winners for your leadership and outstanding organizations We make buildings HEALTHIER, SAFER, SMARTER

Air Conditioning & Heating Systems, Indoor Air Quality, Heat Pumps, Boilers, Chillers & Cooling Towers, VAV & Ventilation, Energy Recovery, Building Management Systems, Dehumidification Systems, Lighting Retrofits & Upgrades

AtlanticWestchester.com info@atlanticwestchester.com

914.666.2268

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GILDA BONANNO Your communication and presentation skills can determine how you and your company are viewed in the marketplace and the media (social and traditional) by investors, customers and competitors. According to executive presentation skills expert Gilda Bonanno, it’s not enough to know your company’s numbers or products, you also need to know how to create a strategic message and communicate it effectively to others. Bonanno serves as a trusted advisor to executives and entrepreneurs to accelerate the development of their communication and presentation skills. Since 2006, she has worked with leading organizations on four continents, from Chicago to Shanghai and Rio to Rome, including Travelers, Praxair, Assa Abloy, Chase and Yale University. As the pandemic hit, Bonanno saw an immediate increase in clients wanting her help to transition their teams from merely surviving in a virtual world to thriving. In addition to the regular pressures of high-stakes presentations, they now had the additional concerns of communicating virtually. “The first calls I received,” Bonanno says, “were from an executive whose team had to now pitch new business virtually and the CEO of a publicly traded company who had to record an award acceptance

Expert Speaking, Consulting & Workshops Focused on Powerful Presentation, Communication & Leadership Skills

Confidence. Influence. Success.

speech for an event that was now virtual.” Bonanno was already comfortable with virtual presenting, having been doing webinars since 2008 and recording instructional videos for her YouTube channel, which have been viewed over 2 million times. She also earned the Certified Virtual Presenter designation. To download her Virtual Presentations Cheat Sheet for Leaders, visit her website www.gildabonanno.com/virtualpresentationscheatsheet

www.gildabonanno.com | 203.979.5117 | gilda@gildabonanno.com

Proudly providing legal services since 1971.

Westchester 445 Hamilton Avenue 14th Floor White Plains, NY 10601 New York City 270 Madison Avenue Suite 801 New York, NY 10016 Hudson Valley 300 Westage Business Center Fishkill, NY 12524 Connecticut 733 Summer Street Stamford, CT 06901

T 914 761 1300 F 914 761 5372 cuddyfeder.com

Congratulations to our esteemed colleague and managing partner, Christopher B. Fisher and the other distinguished 2021 C-Suite honorees Ingenuity, thoughtfulness and insight have been the hallmarks of our law firm for 50 years. Our attorneys help local, regional, national and multi-national clients alike identify and implement nuanced solutions to complex legal challenges in the following key practice areas: Corporate Law; Energy & Environmental Law; Finance; Land Use, Zoning & Development; Litigation; Non-Profit Organizations; Real Estate Law; Telecommunications; Cannabis Law; and Trusts, Estates & Elder Law. S14


C-SUITE AWARDS 2021 | JUDGES

GILDA BONANNO

CHARLES “CHUCK” FIRLOTTE

GILDA BONANNO is a professional speaker, consultant and facilitator who serves as a trusted advisor to executives and entrepreneurs to transform their communication, presentation and leadership skills. Since 2006, she has run her own business and worked with leading organizations across four continents, from Chicago to Shanghai and Rio to Rome, including Travelers, Henkel, Society for Marketing Professional Services, JPMorgan Chase and Yale University. She has delivered thousands of in-person programs and is also a Certified Virtual Presenter. Her YouTube channel has received over 1.5 million views and her digital newsletter has reached subscribers in more than 45 countries since 2008. Bonnano has a proven track record of partnering for results with people in a variety of industries and at all organizational levels, from C-level executives to sales teams to frontline managers. She collaborates with them to deliver: Engaging and interactive keynote speeches, breakout sessions and presentations about communication, leadership, motivation and networking; customized oneon-one coaching, mentoring and consulting in executive communication and presentation skills; and facilitation of high-energy, results-focused programs. She is a certified project management professional (PMP) and holds a master’s degree from Fordham University and an Advanced Business Certificate in Management from the University of Connecticut School of Business. Bonanno is also past president of the Connecticut chapter of the National Speakers Association and the Southern Connecticut chapter of the Association for Talent Development. To download Gilda’s Virtual Presentations Cheat Sheet for Leaders, visit her at https://www.gildabonanno.com/ virtualpresentationscheatsheet.

CHARLES “CHUCK” FIRLOTTE is chair of the Board of Directors of NB Power, the public energy utility serving the Province of New Brunswick, and principal of Laurent Maxime Consulting, a firm specializing in corporate management consulting, capital projects advisement and operational optimization programs. He began his career as director of labor relations and human resources for Combustion Engineering Canada in Ottawa, Ontario. His leadership impact improves performance of organizations in the United States, Canada and the Caribbean. As steward of an asset portfolio that includes nuclear power generation in Canada and smaller utility operations in the Turks and Caicos Islands, Firlotte uses a rigorous management approach and a leadership style focused on emerging leaders within the organizations he serves and in the greater community. He served as president and CEO of Aquarion Company, a water utility that serves customers in Connecticut, Massachusetts and New Hampshire, from 2003 through 2019. His leadership and drive to implement continuous improvement initiatives fueled Aquarion’s performance, enabling it to become the seventh-largest investor-owned water utility in the United States and the best Connecticut utility overall for customer service as rated by the state’s Public Utilities Regulatory Authority. During his tenure, the company led the sector in employee productivity and was recognized as a “Best Place to Work in Connecticut.” His leadership approach was developed through successive and wide-ranging assignments beginning in human resources management and labor relations in his native Canada. Prior to his promotion to the top job at Aquarion, he served as the managing director of the water business for the Kelda Group, which serves approximately 5 million customers in the north of England. Firlotte serves on the Board of the HAB Group of Companies, a property and investment management firm in Turks and Caicos, and he is a trustee of Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Connecticut. A graduate of the Harvard Business School Advanced Management Program, he holds a master’s degree from the University of Ottawa and a bachelor’s degree from St. Thomas University in New Brunswick. He has dual citizenship in Canada and the United States.

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BUD HAMMER BUD HAMMER is the president and general manager of Atlantic Westchester Inc., an award-winning, family-owned commercial and industrial HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) business located in Bedford Hills, New York. The company offers a variety of HVAC solutions for businesses, institutions and government facilities across the New York metro area and assists clients with proactive maintenance, remediation and installation services based on their unique facility needs. Over the years, Hammer and his team have received several awards and recognitions, including being inducted into The Business Council of Westchester Hall of Fame in 2018. He was recently elected the new chairperson of the Board of Directors for United Way of Westchester and Putnam.


Stepping up when it matters most Last year, we committed $1.25 billion over five years to build on our long-standing work in support of driving racial equality and economic opportunity. To date, we’ve directly funded or invested nearly $400 million of this commitment, in addition to other ways we continue to make an impact in our communities. Our actions include: •

$36 million to 21 Minority Deposit Institutions (MDIs) and Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) banks that support minority-owned businesses. This is in addition to our approximately $100 million in deposits to MDIs and our existing $1.8 billion CDFI portfolio.

$300 million to 100 equity funds to provide capital to diverse entrepreneurs and small business owners

$10 million grant to fund the Center for Black Entrepreneurship (CBE), in partnership with Spelman and Morehouse colleges

$25 million to 21 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs) and community colleges in support of job skilling and placement

Establishing new partnerships and coalitions focused on building skills and creating job opportunities for people of color

$60 million to increase access to capital and career opportunities for Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) affordable housing developers

33 million+ masks, more than 272,000 bottles of hand sanitizer and 8 million gloves to communities in need

$1.35 million in grants to support mental health initiatives for young people of color

$25 million founding partnership in the Smithsonian’s new initiative on race, Our Shared Future: Reckoning with Our Racial Past

These are just some examples of how we’re working with community partners, business leaders, experts and academics across the public and private sectors to continue to drive progress. At Bank of America, we call this a nice start.

Bill Tommins President, Bank of America Southern Connecticut

What would you like the power to do?® Go to bankofamerica.com/southernconnecticut to learn more. Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender

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© 2021 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved.


C-SUITE AWARDS 2021

PRESENTED BY

WESTFAIR COMMUNICATIONS INC. A privately held firm based in White Plains, publishes tabloid- sized business newspapers online: the Westchester County Business Journal and the Fairfield County (Connecticut) Business Journal; WAG magazine, a glossy monthly publication judged to be the “Best Magazine in New York State” for the past five years; and News @ Noon, industryspecific newsletters. The Business Journals are more than 60 years old and are the only weekly countywide business newspapers. They were founded by former Westchester resident David Moore, a grandson of celebrated New York publisher Joseph Pulitzer, and John Smith, a former Wall Street Journal editor. In keeping with its founders’ principles, the newspapers focus only on the local business community with news and information that are helpful to businesspeople and profiles on entrepreneurs and professionals, which are inspirational to the readers. The papers have gained credibility and respect in the region for their information, integrity, relevance and usefulness to readers. WAG, a lifestyle magazine with unique upscale content, has become a popular and successful must-read for the savvy residents of Westchester and Fairfield counties. The company also sponsors interactive programs for its readers, some of which are joint-ventured with other businesses or community organizations. These programs cover a variety of subjects and take different forms, including seminars, expos, conferences, roundtable discussions and debates. For more information, visit westfaironline.com, wagmag.com or call 914-694-3600.

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CONGRATULATIONS

Skilled Burke Therapists and State-of-the-Art Equipment Set Us Apart. Welcome to United Hebrew, the most comprehensive senior care campus in Westchester County. Here you’ll find innovative and high-tech solutions for your loved one’s needs, along with a compassionate and highly-trained staff, nationally recognized for quality care. Westchester’s first choice for short-term rehab and senior care. Take a Tour Today.

uhgc.org 914-632-2804


C-SUITE AWARDS 2021

PLATINUM SPONSOR

Seniors enjoy life to the fullest at United Hebrew of New Rochelle. Our comprehensive array of services offer support through all the stages of aging and allows seniors to age in place successfully. At United Hebrew we meet their evolving health care and social needs in a positive, uplifting environment. Seniors live on a gracious, vibrant, campus, that is nonsectarian. We offer: • • • • • •

Long-term skilled nursing; Short-term rehabilitation staffed by Burke Rehabilitation therapists; Independent senior living; Assisted living; Memory care for those with Alzheimer’s and related dementias; and Home health care.

United Hebrew residents benefit from innovative and high-tech care solutions provided by compassionate and highly trained staff nationally recognized for quality. Campus amenities include: • Maintenance-free living on 7.5 acres overlooking Long Island Sound. • Cutting-edge short-term rehabilitation and therapy services to help recover from illness or injury. • Daily activities to meet therapeutic and social, cultural and recreation needs, from music and art therapy to history lectures, exercise classes, cooking demonstrations and arts and crafts. • Annual traditions such as summer barbecues, Grandparents Day, holiday celebrations, birthdays, and more. • Excellent medical care, enabling extra health care needs to be met with a full spectrum of clinical support. United Hebrew has an amazing staff, with one of the lowest staff turnover rates in New York state. This means our residents enjoy unparalleled consistency of care. Over the past 100 years, United Hebrew has become a model for providing expert and compassionate senior care throughout the metropolitan area. Our campus community is a home, where all residents are treated with kindness, dignity and respect.

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On behalf of President Seamus Carey, Ph.D., and our over 50,000-strong alumni network, Iona College is proud to see our graduates recognized by the Westchester & Fairfield County Business Journals with the 2021 C-Suite Awards! Congratulations to all of tonight’s honorees and especially to our own

Frank J. Gaudio ’78 Joseph J. Guarracino ’89 Thomas R. Leto, CFC, ’74 Rita C. Mabli ’74, ’76MBA Thank you for sharing your leadership and Gael pride in our communities!

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C-SUITE AWARDS 2021

GOLD SPONSORS

White Plains Hospital is a proud member of the Montefiore Health System, serving as its tertiary hub of advanced care in the Hudson Valley. White Plains Hospital is a 292-bed not-forprofit health care organization with the primary mission of providing exceptional acute and preventive medical care to all people who live in, work in or visit Westchester County and its surrounding areas. It’s Centers of Excellence include the Center for Cancer Care, The William & Sylvia Silberstein Neonatal & Maternity Center and The Ruth and Jerome A. Siegel Stroke Center. White Plains Hospital performs lifesaving emergency and elective advanced cardiac procedures in its Joan and Alan Herfort, M.D., Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory and Marie Promuto Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory. It has 27 outpatient medical facilities across Westchester, including advanced services at the new Center for Advanced Medicine & Surgery and multispecialty practices in Armonk, New Rochelle, Somers and Yorktown Heights. It also has Scarsdale Medical Group locations in Harrison and Scarsdale. White Plains Hospital has received Magnet® designation from the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and has been awarded the Outstanding Patient Experience Award from Healthgrades® eight times. It is the only Hospital in Westchester to receive the “A” Safety Grade from the Leapfrog Group five years in a row (Spring 2019 to Spring 2021), and has been named Best Regional Hospital by U.S. News & World Report for three consecutive years (20192021). http://www.wphospital.org.

For more than 100 years, Iona Preparatory has been the premier, all-boys, PK-12 Catholic school in Westchester County. Rooted in the Catholic tradition, we develop young men into dedicated leaders who strive for spiritual, intellectual, and physical excellence. Our exceptional academics and college preparatory program empower students to become leaders in the workplace, in their communities and in the world. For students seeking to develop academic abilities, deepen faith, cultivate character, and make lifelong connections, we invite you to discover the Iona Prep difference. Iona Preparatory Lower School offers a well-rounded program that promotes the harmonious growth of the whole person, fosters higher-order thinking, and prepares students prekindergarten through eighth grade for lifelong learning. That learning continues at Iona Preparatory Upper School, which is home to the Superior Talent Enrichment Program that has been expanded to include science, as well as the humanities; a rigorous three-year Science Research Program; and is now the fifth Westchester secondary school to offer the AP Capstone Diploma, along with 17 AP courses. It is education for higher expectations, and there is no better investment you can make in your son’s future success than an Iona Preparatory education. Graduates have earned more than $130 million in academic, merit-based scholarships over the past five years—more than $24 million alone by the Class of 2021—to schools such as Boston College, Duke, Johns Hopkins, RPI, Virginia and Wake Forest. Iona Prep is the two-time defending LoHud Tom Whelan Private School of the Year, winning a combined eight division, league, city or state titles in 2020-2021. Our 30 athletic teams across 15 sports rise to the highest level of competition in the Catholic High School Athletic Association. More than 50 student-run clubs and activities allow students to explore new interests and step outside of their comfort zones. Open Houses: Sunday, Oct. 17, 12-3 p.m. and Thursday, Oct. 21, 6-8 p.m. (Grades 9-12); Wednesday, Oct. 20, 4:30-7:30 p.m. (Grades 6-7); and Saturday, Nov. 6, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. (PK-4-Grade 5). www.IonaPrep.org

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YOU

FIRST. ENERGY & HOME SOLUTIONS

PROPERTIES & DEVELOPMENT

STONE & LANDSCAPE SUPPLIES

GAULTFAMILYCO.COM

OPEN HOUSES Grades 9 -12 Sun, Oct. 17, 12 – 3 pm Thu, Oct. 21, 6 – 8 pm Grades 6 -7 Wed, Oct. 20, 4:30 – 7:30 pm PK- 4 – Grade 5 Sat, Nov. 6, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

IS YOUR SON IONA PREPARED? W E I N V I T E YO U R S O N TO J O I N I N O U R T R A D I T I O N INVEST

INSPIRE

IGNITE

in personal growth.

others through leadership opportunities.

a legacy of professional success.

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SCHEDULE A TOUR TODAY.

IONAPREP.ORG/OPENHOUSE Iona Preparatory Upper School 255 Wilmot Road New Rochelle, NY 10804 (914) 600-6154 Iona Preparatory Lower School 173 Stratton Road New Rochelle, NY 10804 (914) 633-7744

   @IonaPrep  in/IonaPrep  IonaPreparatory


C-SUITE AWARDS 2021

SILVER SPONSORS

Headquartered in Valhalla, NY, the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth) is a 1,700bed healthcare system comprised of 10 hospitals on eight campuses, spanning 6,200 square miles in the Hudson Valley. WMCHealth has a workforce of more than 12,000 and has nearly 3,000 attending physicians who care for more than 381,000 patients annually. Approximately 600 of our providers are employed in one of our two medical groups, which make up WMCHealth Physicians. The network includes Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers, and a Level II trauma center; a dedicated burn center; the region’s only advanced care children’s hospital, an academic medical center; a new, high-tech and patient-first ambulatory care facility; several community hospitals; dozens of specialized institutes and centers, including Comprehensive and Primary Stroke Centers; skilled nursing and assisted-living facilities; homecare services and one of the largest mental health systems in New York State, along with a growing telemedicine program that connects Hudson Valley residents with immediate, life-saving care.

Savings Bank of Danbury is a full-service community bank with a proud history and a bright future. Although the Bank has grown significantly since 1849 when it conducted business from one room in the historic Ives Home in Danbury, it remains true to its core value of “people serving people” which makes it such a trusted name throughout the region. With headquarters at 220 Main Street, Danbury, Savings Bank of Danbury serves customers throughout Fairfield County and beyond. Today the Bank’s footprint extends to 15 branch offices in Bethel, Brookfield, Danbury, New Fairfield, New Milford, Newtown, Southbury, Stamford, and Waterbury. Stamford Mortgage Company, a division of Savings Bank of Danbury, has an office in Stamford. This year, the Bank will celebrate the opening of a new location in Norwalk, as it expands into lower Fairfield County. Savings Bank of Danbury provides a full line of deposit, savings and lending products for individuals and businesses, and is a Small Business Administration (SBA) approved lender. The Bank’s participation in the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) brought much-needed funding relief to hundreds of area businesses and non-profit organizations throughout 2020 and 2021. In addition, the Bank supports area communities and agencies through its Savings Bank of Danbury (SBD) Foundation which has donated more than $2.25 million to area organizations since 2004. Martin G. Morgado serves as President and Chief Executive Officer. To learn more visit: http://sbdanbury.com.

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Established in 1909, NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital, located in Bronxville, New York, serves residents of Westchester County and the Bronx. It is part of NewYork-Presbyterian’s healthcare system, which includes ten hospital campuses across the Greater New York area. NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is ranked No. 1 in New York and No. 7 in the nation by U.S. News and World Report. NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital is a 288-bed acute-care facility that provides emergency care to approximately 35,000 individuals and delivers nearly 1,400 babies each year. The hospital features state-of-the-art cardiac services including two cardiac catheterization laboratories, eight operating rooms for a wide range of surgical procedures, and radiation oncology, surgical oncology, and medical oncology all under one roof. Additional support and care is provided to the community through NewYork-Presbyterian Medical Group Westchester, a multispecialty physician practice with extended hours and offices in convenient locations offering patients seamless access to leading experts from ColumbiaDoctors, the faculty practice of Columbia University Irving Medical Center, and Lawrence Community Health Services, which provides home care, hospice, and bereavement services to adults and children. For more information, visit www.nyp.org/ lawrence or call 914-787-1000.


C-SUITE AWARDS 2021

BRONZE SPONSORS

Proudly serves clients in real estate; public and private finance (including tax-exempt and taxable bond financing); litigation; land use, zoning & development; telecommunications; energy & environmental; cannabis law; non-profit organizations; and trusts, estates & elder law. For 50 years, we have established ourselves as the leading law firm serving a vast region that includes Westchester, New York City, Connecticut and the Hudson River Valley. Our foundation is local, and we enjoy enduring relationships with leaders, institutions and decisionmakers in the communities we serve.

Atlantic Westchester, Inc., is an award-winning, family-owned commercial and industrial HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) business located in Bedford Hills, NY. Atlantic Westchester offers a variety of HVAC services for businesses, institutions and government facilities across the NY metro area. Since 1961, we have catered to clients providing proactive maintenance, remediation, installation and energy efficient solutions based on their unique facility needs. The company received green business certification in December 2015 and is a proud sponsor of the Green Business Partnership program, which educates and encourages businesses in Westchester County to become more environmentally friendly. Atlantic Westchester was the first HVAC company in the area to achieve this certification. Over the years, the Atlantic Westchester team has received several awards and recognitions, including: Business Council of Westchester’s “Hall of Fame Award;” Westfair Communications’ “Family-Owned Business Award;” Westfair Communications’ “Milli Award;” Westfair Communications’ “C-Suite Award;” Town of Bedford Conservation Board’s “Green Award; ACHR The News’ “40 Under 40;” and “Outstanding Achievement in Transportation Award” from the Green Business Partnership program.

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C-SUITE AWARDS 2021

SUPPORTERS

Gilda Bonanno is a professional speaker, consultant and facilitator who serves as a trusted advisor to executives and entrepreneurs to transform their communication, presentation and leadership skills. Since 2006, she has run her own business and worked with leading organizations on four continents, from Chicago to Shanghai and Rio to Rome, including Travelers, Henkel, Society for Marketing Professional Services, JPMorgan Chase and Yale University. Gilda has delivered thousands of in-person programs and is also a Certified Virtual Presenter. Her YouTube channel has received over 1.5 million views and her digital newsletter has reached subscribers in more than 45 countries since 2008.

At Bank of America, we’re guided by a common purpose to help make financial lives better, through the power of every connection. We’re delivering on this through responsible growth with a focus on our environmental, social and governance (ESG) leadership. ESG is embedded across our eight lines of business and reflects how we help fuel the global economy, build trust and credibility, and represent a company that people want to work for, invest in and do business with. It’s demonstrated in the inclusive and supportive workplace we create for our employees, the responsible products and services we offer our clients, and the impact we make around the world in helping local economies thrive. An important part of this work is forming strong partnerships with nonprofits and advocacy groups to bring together our collective networks and expertise to achieve greater impact. We’re partnering with local leaders and organizations to address critical needs, and to advance racial equality and economic opportunity. We’re collaborating with companies and working with skill-building partners to help people succeed in today’s and tomorrow’s economy. And we’re continuing to invest in benefits and resources for our employees who are working in support of each other, our clients, and our communities. To drive progress, we’ve committed to invest $1.25 billion over five years to advance racial equality and economic opportunity, building on work we’ve had underway for many years. Our actions will help address critical issues and long-term gaps, including skills and job readiness, medical capacity and access, small business support, and affordable housing.

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Millennial & Gen Z

AWARDS 2021

CELEBRATING A GENERATION Millennials represent half of the workforce and it’s predicted that by 2025, Gen Z will make up about 27% of the workforce in the world. Many individuals from this generation are coming of age and establishing their place in society. The awards celebrate this new era in the workforce and recognize some individuals who are leaving their footprints in the technology and business communities of Westchester and Fairfield counties.

NOV. 18 • AT THE GREENWICH HYATT 1800 EAST PUTNAM AVE, OLD GREENWICH Keep an eye out for the winners!

REGISTER HERE: westfaironline.com/2021millennialgenz/ • $35 ticket PROGRAM: • 5:30 - 6:15 pm: Cocktail hour

Cocktails • Buffet Style food • Networking

• 6:20 - 7:30 pm: Awards ceremony Rooting for the young emerging professional leaders in our region!

• 7:30 - 8 pm: Closing Dessert, coffee and tea

ATTENDANCE: Tickets are $35 per person. Upon recommendations of our health professionals, attendees must be fully vaccinated for Covid-19 in order to attend this event. Thank you in advance for your understanding.

• 8:30 - 9:30 pm: Afterparty

Join us for drink specials at Towne Parlor, 112 Bedford St, Stamford, CT For information and sponsorships, contact: Fatime Muriqi at fmuriqi@westfairinc.com. PRESENTED BY:

BRONZE SPONSOR:

SUPPORTER:

Profile for Wag Magazine

The Business Journals - Week of October 11  

The Business Journals - Week of October 11  

Profile for thewagmag

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