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GROWING A LEGACY How Maranatha is fortifying a strong educational tradition in India. By Dustin Comm Photos by Tom Lloyd

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n the northeast of India lies one of the very first Seventh-day Adventist schools ever opened in the country. Located in the state of Jharkhand (meaning “bushland”), the Khunti Adventist School has a quiet, rural setting but a booming enrollment. More than 1,300 students attend the school which opened in 1937. The campus started with humble beginnings–the Adventist families in the community constructed a mud hut classroom with a thatched roof and hand-dug a water well. However, the campus has grown from a single building to today’s sprawling 37-acre campus, with classrooms for elementary and high school students, dormitories, a cafeteria, and staff housing. Although it is a Christian school in a majority Hindu region, the Khunti school has come to be regarded with distinction. The people here live in villages and lead simple lives, earning humble wages through a trade, like tailoring or pottery-making. As one of the only English-speaking schools in the area, families are eager for their children to attend Khunti, where they also learn about Jesus and the Bible. Student Arzoo Warsi comes from a Muslim family but has attended the Khunti school where she learns about Christianity. “I learned many things about Christ,” says Warsi. “I learned how to read the Bible. I learned how to pray to God in every situation—not only in need, but in every situation when I am happy or sad. I carry one Bible always with me, and in morning and before going to bed, I read it, and I pray to God. Whenever I’m alone—I feel

“I learned how to read the Bible. I learned how to pray to God in every situation.”

Profile for Maranatha Volunteers International

The Volunteer Spring 2019  

The Volunteer is the official publication of Maranatha Volunteers International.

The Volunteer Spring 2019  

The Volunteer is the official publication of Maranatha Volunteers International.