Page 1

The Sounding Board Grace College Campus Paper

a br

Cele

Origins: SHE is... Matthew Weaver Courageous! Page 2 Page 3

t in g

Some Final Farewells: Senior Soundbytes Page 4

b li ca tio n

Winona Lake, IN Volume 65, Issue 11

u

P 65 Years of

No Student Is Safe During Paranoia By Lorena Oplinger

A

s of Monday, April 8, the Office of Student Involvement has officially launched Paranoia, a crosscampus, last-man-standing game of tag created for Grace students. Through Wednesday, April 17, players can participate in one of the most fun and exciting games ever played on Grace’s campus. During this week and a half, each player has a specific mission. Their primary goal is to tag an assigned target – a fellow student – by placing stickers on the target’s body, usually utilizing stealth tactics. At the same time, they need to be careful to avoid being tagged out by the student targeting them. It is vital for each player to be extremely cautious. Players are encouraged to plan and develop strategies to approach their targets and accomplish

their mission.

According to Jessica Vandenboom, student director of the Grace Intramural Program, one of the most common tactics used by some of the players is to “have their friends watch out for them and give them rides across campus.”

By Ethan Horst

T

hings To Do is a segment designed to provide students with information about locations and businesses that are accessible to a collegiate budget.

$$$- 35+

Sweetwater Sound 5501 US-30, Fort Wayne, IN 46818 - 41 minutes - 33.8mi

I

n addition to being a worldclass music emporium, with in-house and in-stock gear for every aspect of performing and recording music, Sweetwater Sound also boasts a cafe, live performances, a restaurant, classes, clinics, a recording studio, and a free arcade and game area for guests. Throughout April, there are a variety of free concerts and clinics for musicians and music lovers

of all ages and skill levels can enjoy, many for free. You can also schedule a free tour of their facilities through their concierge services. For more information and specific details, visit www.sweetwater. com. Monday–Thursday 9AM–9PM Friday 9AM–8PM Saturday 9AM–7PM Sunday 11AM–5PM Phone - (260) 422-2710

Neat Neat Neat Records 1836 S. Calhoun St, Fort Wayne, IN, 46802 - 53 minutes-40.8mi

N

eat Neat Neat Records was born in 2011 from a local’s dream of becoming the only location for any musical need or desire in Fort Wayne. They boast CDs and LPs from a variety of labels, including Secretly Canadian, Sub Pop, Matador, Fat Possum, Daptone, Discord, Revelation, Relapse, and ATO. In addition to a large catalogue of music

from other labels, Neat Neat Neat produced two records of local artists on their own label. They also offer quality stereos designed for audiophiles looking to get the most quality out of their collections. For music lovers of any budget, they buy and sell used records and equipment, along with staff to answer questions about any

ICS Student Lobby Day Page 7 WANT MORE CONTENT? Visit www.gcsbnews.com for more stories, digitized versions of past issues and other content you won't find in the regularly circulated print issues!

S

pring is one of the most beautiful seasons of the year for many students and faculty members. The season offers them the opportunity to enjoy God’s nature in His creation. Therefore, Grace College continues hosting its traditional programs each Spring to encourage current and new students to participate in different indoor and outdoor activities that have been especially designed for them.

Continued Pg.2

$$- 16 - 34

Final Issue

By Lorena Oplinger

Important guidelines need to be followed in order to prevent any misunderstandings and disqualifications. Players are

This segment will be using dollar signs to generally signify the cost for a plate or admission $- 1 - 15

2019

Grains of Grace

Paranoia was originally a game called "Assassins,” where students attacked their targets with squirt guns. Unfortunately, “with all the school shootings, the game was put to an end,” Vandenboom said. “However, we revived it last year with the new name Paranoia and with stickers instead of squirt guns.”

Things To Do

April 12

aspect of music collection or audio appreciation.

Monday - Saturday 11a-8p

$$-$$$ Black Canyon Restaurant

1509 W Dupont Rd, Fort Wayne, IN 46825 - 51 minutes - 39.7mi

B

lack Canyon Restaurant is an understated, upscale restaurant. It serves primarily New American fare; expect custom takes on classic salads, steaks, burgers, fish, red meat, and other basic restaurant courses. Their lunch and dinner menus vary in price and content, so be

sure to check before you go. A dish of particular note are the grilled salmon, which is richly flavored without being overpowering, while the sides, steamed broccoli and roasted cherry tomatoes, complement the main flavors perfectly. Reservations and Menu online at https://blackcanyonrestaurant.com/

$ Fort Wayne’s Famous Coney Island Coney Island 131 W Main St. Fort Wayne, IN 46802 - 52 minutes 39.3 mi

F

ort Wayne’s Famous Coney Island is a phenomenal destination for folks looking to get that mid-sized city feel of Fort Wayne without a mid-sized wallet. With over a century of history, Coney Island is just one of those staples that accent warmweathered trips with a classic, solid experience. Fort Wayne locals like Grace’s Jacob Scheele love it for the small business feel and the timeless menu-- and for the closeness to another local Fort Wayne business: Yummi Bunni Ice Cream Parlor.

Monday - Thursday: 8 am - 9 pm Friday - Saturday: 8 am - 10 pm Sunday: 9 am - 8 pm

The following is a list with the most important and well-known activities and programs scheduled for Grace students during Spring:

Annual Festival of Music Grace College, the Village at Winona Lake, Wagon Wheel Center for the Arts, and, for the very first time, Sweetwater Sound is joining them to host and sponsor the annual Festival of Music. This year, the Music Festival is planning to feature local choruses and ensembles, and encouraging new musicians to be part of this important event. According to Dr. Walter Brath, Festival of Music coordinator and Grace College director of worship arts, “‘This year’s festival includes 13 events with a great variety of musical genres … From worship music to jazz, chamber music to southern gospel, and a lot in between, we hope that everyone in the community will enjoy the festival this year.’” On Friday, April 12, 2019, Winona Lake Grace Brethren Church will held the Worship Arts Faculty Recital at 7 p.m. For more information about the 2019 Festival of Music, Cont. pg. 2


2 The Sounding Board Grains of Grace, Cont. from pg. 1

please visit www.grace.edu/ musicfestival.

Connection Days

Grace College has organized an annual Spring program called Connection Days. This program has been designed to provide the opportunity to the students to pose questions and to learn more about the culture and community of Grace. Students are welcomed to attend any of the multiple dates available. If you are interested in this event, you need to register for fall classes and then go to Grace portal to sign up for a Connection day. The next available Connection Days are: Friday, April 12, 2019 at 2 p.m. Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 8:30 a.m. Friday, June 28 at noon. Paranoia, Cont. from pg. 1

not allowed to tag their targets indoors or in/from vehicles. Also, no tags are allowed during Grace-sponsored events. Students cannot tackle their targets, tag them during work hours or while they are playing/practicing athletics.

The Joust

The Joust is one of the most well-known traditional programs organized by Grace College every Spring. The Joust is a four-day tournament. The students are divided into different teams and they have to compete against each other in different contests. Board games, Spelling Bee, wiffle ball, capture the flag, and several other games are part of this competition. dubbed “The Purge.” The hour has not been confirmed yet, but it is expected to be announced via the Paranoia message group.

Players are also going to be issued additional targets. Tagging those individuals “will add to your tag total, but will not change your personal target,” Vandenboom explained.

A Summer Preview of Winona Lake By Andrea Castillo

W

inona Lake, Grace College’s home, is full of exciting events even when the school year comes to an end. As the weather steadily grows warmer, more residents and tourists venture out to explore the Winona Lake Lancers call home. Kicking off the summer festivities on Saturday, June 22 at the Winona Lake Parks Department, the Warsaw Breakfast Optimists Club will host the 26th Annual Optimal Sprint Triathlon. While you still must qualify

to make the “premier athlete” category, watching people push themselves to their limits while enjoying a nice day at the village can be an exciting event for anyone. On June 29, Warsaw’s very own local orchestra will perform on the shores of Winona Lake at The Village at dusk. Once the sun has completely set and night settles in, fireworks will be fired into the sky for an early Fourth of July celebration. On July 18 in the Winona Lake Heritage Room, there will be an event called “The

Breath of Life Haiti Gala” from 6:00-8:30 p.m. This event is Caribbean-themed; anyone can purchase tickets online for $50 per couple. On July 27 in the Village, there will be a jazz festival for local music lovers to enjoy. At the event, there will be many food trucks as different groups and ensembles perform. With summer right around the corner, make sure to check your calendar and head back to the area with your friends to enjoy all the festivities that Winona Lake has to offer.

The winner will either be the last person standing or the player with the most tags made before the end of the game. Last year’s winner was Stephen Halstead, a member of the basketball team and now a college graduate. For more information, please contact the Office of Student Involvement or Jessica Vandenboom at vandenja@ grace.edu

However, the Office of Student Involvement has decided to add a little bit of excitement to the game this year. Players now have the opportunity, for only one hour, to tag their targets in indoor places. This rule has been

Origins: Matthew Weaver By Alaister McFarren

O

f Grace’s many students, one of the most low-key but highly involved is Matthew Weaver. A sports business major from Noblesville, Ind., Weaver is highly involved on campus. In his time at Grace, he has been able to experience a little bit of everything and learn valuable lessons along the way. “Originally, I planned to go to Pensacola College to play soccer,” said Weaver. “Then, when I found out that they didn’t plan to have a soccer program for four years, I decided to come to Grace and play JV soccer. The minute I decided to come here, though, Pensacola called and said they were planning to start the soccer program ahead of time. In hindsight, it was definitely God telling me to come here, and I’m very thankful for that.” Once he arrived, Weaver played JV soccer for two years and became involved with both GIP and the ultimate Frisbee team. “Both are great,” said

Weaver. “Both programs forced me to meet new people. Once freshman year is done, it’s easy to only know the upperclassmen. GIP and Frisbee let me meet just about everyone on campus in a really cool setting. Sports may bring out the worst in people, but you also get to see some of the best.” He continued on to say that the two positions taught him what it looks like to be a real leader. On top of getting actively involved on campus and becoming a leader, Weaver has also learned a lot at Grace, both from God and from his peers. “Empathy has been the biggest thing I’ve learned,” Weaver said. “Before I came here, I didn’t know the difference between empathy and sympathy. Now, I feel like I know how to go through a struggle with someone. I can ‘weep with those who weep and mourn with those who mourn.’” Weaver said that his favorite part of Grace was “not the community – because that’s what everyone says – but the people. People don’t come to

In his years at Grace, Matthew Weaver learned two main things: that empathy is important, and that it is actually possible to drown a lobster. Grace because of the night life or the facilities; they come here because of the people they meet and the sincerity they exude.”

a friend tried to prank his roommate with a live lobster.

“The guy at the store said it would stay alive long enough for the prank if we left it in Weaver has created some front of the refrigerator,” said unforgettable memories at Weaver with a smile. “We Grace. In addition to winning tried, but he looked kind of the Joust ultimate frisbee sick, so we thought we’d be event twice, his favorite nice and put him in some memory comes from his water. We thought we were freshman year when he and brilliant at first; it perked up

immediately, but then a few minutes later it just keeled over and died! Turns out, we forgot lobsters are saltwater creatures; essentially, we did the impossible and drowned a lobster. But it was okay; we put it in our friend’s bed anyway.”


3 The Sounding Board

SHE is... Series: “What Does It Mean to Be Courageous?” By Lorena Oplinger

W

hat does it mean to be courageous?” was the theme of the most recent “She Is…” meeting on Saturday, March 30. Hosted by the Students Affairs Office, the “She Is…” program is a Grace College initiative organized with the goal of empowering female students and helping them discover the God’s purpose for them. Vicepresident of Administration and Compliance Carrie Yocum and Assistant Director of Admissions Alessa Tracy served as the speakers for the event. Both Yocum and Tracy spoke about what it takes to be a courageous woman in the workplace. After sharing their personal experiences and how they transformed their most difficult challenges into opportunities, both speakers agreed with the fact that being courageous is a matter of choice. “We can be both fearful and courageous,” Yocum stated. Yocum began her speech by providing information about her background, sharing about her experience as the only female senior administrator in the administration department. Though she started her professional Grace career as a professor, she was soon promoted to Senior Administrator. She told the students that she never felt like she had to muster courage for her job; situations arose where she was merely required to have it. “I am not worry about having my feelings hurt,” Yocum said. “I just do it!” According to Yocum, one of the biggest challenges for females in the workplace feeling like they cannot speak up or do the things they want to do because they are afraid of being rejected, misunderstood or alone. “I think we have the courage, but sometimes we have to choose it.” She stated. On the other hand, Tracy began her discourse by requesting the students’ participation. She invited her audience to think of two words that best describe them professionally. “Accountable,” “organized” and “teamoriented” were some of the responses provided by the students. Tracy also shared with the students a lesson she learned when she was young. She had

"

According to Tracy, “women leaders are good at uniting people with a common goal… but you need to ignore the stigma that society wants women to be and be yourself.”

"

always been an overachiever; as an adolescent, she wanted to be the best of the best. However, she discovered that her friends didn’t like that quality about her.

Carrie Yocum shares about what it means to be a courageous woman in a professional setting

“I didn’t feel very likable,” she said, “so, I started internalizing the feedback I received from my peers.” And as a result, she became someone that God did not call her to be and she didn’t feel good about it. Eventually, Tracy learned that “being ambitious and driven is a quality that is culturally encouraged for men but culturally discouraged for women.” According to Tracy, “women leaders are good at uniting people with a common goal. … but you need to ignore the stigma that society wants women to be and be yourself.” The Students Affair Department will host the last event for “She Is…” on Monday, April 15, 2019 at 9 p.m. in the McClain Auditorium. The main theme will be “She Is Spiritual.” For more information about this program, contact Kierstyn Worthem at wortheka@grace. edu or Meredith Cowman at cowmanmp@grace.edu

Alessa Tracy shares advice she learned about being courageous when she was young.


4 The Sounding Board

Senior Soundbytes By Ethan Horst

W

e asked Grace College students in their last year what advice they would give themselves on Welcome Weekend of their freshman year of college. These are

their responses. If you’re a graduating senior and have a piece of advice you would like to share, send it, along with a picture of yourself, to horste1@grace.edu.

Austin Bradtmueller

T

rust in God’s plan and God’s timing because it’s all gonna turn out pretty great. It’s gonna be hard but you're going to make great friends and experience some amazing things. Also, stay away from almond milk, it’s just water trying to be milk!

Taylor “Second Year Senior” Chitwood

D

on’t sweat the petty stuff and don’t pet the sweaty stuff.

Emily Keyser

D

on't be afraid to get involved. Trust God wholeheartedly. Take advantage of living so close to all your friends.

Brendan Hamilton N ever break two laws at once, that's how you get caught.

Kelsey Saunders I would get to my 8 a.m. classes in the old Science Center at 7:20 a.m. I sat in the dark by myself until the professor got there because I really wanted to show that I was ‘punctual’. I would tell freshman Kelsey, “Don’t do that.”

Brendan, as he does, balances his youth and physical proficiency with a goofy smile

Niya Fallace E

njoy the social relationships at Grace and to not be caught up in homework.”


5 The Sounding Board

Event Management Counseling Center to Host Team Hosts Nerf “Express Yourself” Event Gun Tournament G O By Andrea Castillo

By Andrea Castillo

ne of Grace College’s event management teams, supervised by Professor Erica Elliot of the business department, hosted a Nerf Gun Tournament on Saturday, March 30, from 2-4 p.m. The proceeds from the event went to support Fellowship Missions, a homeless shelter located in Warsaw. In order to raise money and increase awareness for Fellowship Missions, students Caleb Ware, Natalee Cross, Zoey Crane and Rachel Starrett worked together to construct a Nerf gun tournament inside of McClain, utilizing the entire building.

According to Ware, the team had to be very creative to pull the event off. Flipping tables and chairs to use as obstacles, they used as many resources

as possible to construct a complex field of play for the tournament. This was no easy task; every classroom was built differently, featuring themes such as prisons and military bases. Roughly 20 people signed up to play play a variety of Nerfcentric game modes, namely capture the flag and last man standing.

During capture the flag, both teams were armed and sent out to capture the enemy’s flag while simultaneously guarding their own. The tournament ended with a round of “Last Man Standing,” an all-out battle royalestyle game of every man for himself. After a few hours of simulated warfare, the last three participants standing won an Amazon gift card on top of their bragging rights.

race College’s Counseling Center has announced that they will be hosting weekly events called “Express Yourself.” These events will allow students to de-stress as the school year ends.

Although lots of stress may surface while thinking about post-graduation plans, finals or moving back in with your family for the summer, the counseling center aims to teach students how to focus on healthy ways to cope with their stress and anxieties. Ideally, teaching these healthy coping methods will help students overcome depression and unhealthy habits. Olivia Fisher, a Grace counselor, says, “We want to create a safe space where students can learn how to cope with stress and support one another.” The Counseling Center aims to use creativity to help fight students’ worries, using multiple different mediums of art as coping mechanisms. On April 2,

the mediums used included drawing with markers, crayons and pencils.

Students can use these gatherings to meet, relax and unload, focusing on nothing other than the craft in front of them. Fisher added that one of the goals of “Express Yourself ” is to teach students how to cope with all different types of stress. Students can take this knowledge home with them and apply it to non-campusrelated stress as well. Students are also welcome to come to not only alleviate their stress but to support their friends as they do the same. On April 9, the event will focus on music; future events could potentially focus on pottery or yoga. The Counseling Center strongly recommends “Express Yourself ” to all available students; there are only three sessions left. Students are welcome to RSVP through the Counseling Center’s email at HealthCenter@grace.edu

Grace Names Patrick As Next Men’s Soccer Coach Staff Report

G

race College is pleased to announce the hiring of Aaron Patrick as the next head coach for the men’s soccer team. Patrick will be the 14th head coach in the 53-year history of the program. He comes to the lancers from Goshen College,

where he coached for five seasons.

The Grimsby, England, native helped the Maple Leafs reach the Crossroads League semifinals in 2017 with a 12-6-2 record, and Goshen was also the CL tournament runner-up in 2014. Patrick also led Goshen to academic success in the

classroom. The Maple Leafs have achieved NAIA Scholar Team status in each of the past four seasons, topping 3.30 GPA as a team every year. “I would like to thank Grace President Dr. Bill Katip and Chad Briscoe for allowing me the opportunity to lead the men’s soccer program at Grace. I look forward to building on

the culture that Coach Hotchkin has created in the program. Grace has a great tradition and soccer history, and I look forward to being a part of that history moving forward,” Patrick said. “I am excited to build new relationships with the current players, recruits, staff and the aluni. My family and I look forward to being a part of the Grace College community and

investing in the lives of the players in the program for years to come.” Patrick takes the helm of one of the most successful programs in NAIA history. Grace has racked up 502 all-time wins, seventhmost among NAIA institutions. The Lancers won 15 games in 2018, the most in program history since 1983.


6 The Sounding Board

Eye On Missions Don’t Leave Deaf Ministry to the Non-Profits W By Lyndsey Koh hen it comes to ministry, it’s easy for Christians to leave the outreach to pastors and nonprofits. When it comes to the deaf community, the sign language barrier can be pretty daunting — enough to turn away would-be sharers of the Gospel.

JR Bucklew, President of Deaf Bible Society, says they (nonprofits) can’t do ministry alone. They and the rest of the deaf community need more Christians to step up, build relationships with deaf people and represent Jesus to them. “Over the years, statistics have shown us that more than 98 percent of deaf people around the world have never been

engaged with the Gospel. The same statistics have generally been shared about the deaf community here in the US, saying that that around 98 percent don’t really know the Gospel message,” Bucklew explains.

The American Sign Language New Testament is the only completed New Testament in the world in a sign language. Deaf ministries hope to have a full American Sign Language Bible translated and available for distribution by 2020. Still, there is not a full Bible translation in any sign language. “It’s really hard to create a Bible study without a Bible,” Bucklew says. “It’s really

In Tajikistan, Christians are Government Targets By Katey Hearth ressure continues to build on Christians in Tajikistan.

P

In the latest oppressive encounter, Tajik officials burned more than 5,000 Christian calendars. They also told parents not to bring kids of under 10 years of age to “religious meetings” – a broad category that could include church services. Dr. David Curry of Open Doors USA tells us, “The incident you’re referring to…that’s a signal to us that Tajikistan may be going in a more radical direction. Certainly, we’ve seen a lot of that.” “A lot of really difficult things are happening in Central Asia, and Tajikistan that are – in a way – turning into a very radical agenda,” said Curry Tajikistan sits at number 29 on Open Doors’ World Watch List. The list describes 50 countries where it’s extremely difficult or nearly impossible to live out the Christian faith. In Tajikistan, pressure comes mostly from the government, but to some extent also the wider Muslim society. “Awareness is key; that’s why we’re talking here, obviously, because people don’t know a lot of the things that are happening in Tajikistan,” Curry says. “They’re not aware of the limitations on Christians. They don’t know that governments are

using laws to make sure that Christians can’t share their faith with their children.” Along with the incident described earlier, Tajik Christians spoke with Institute of War and Peace Reporting (IWPR) about the oppression and uncertainty they encounter daily. On its website, Open Doors USA describes how Christian persecution is escalating throughout Central Asia. Along with meeting the immediate needs of persecuted Christians, Open Doors continues to support the local church in Tajikistan and other central Asian nations. “No matter where you live,” Curry says, “there are a couple of easy ways you can help persecuted Christians in Tajikistan. Share these powerful stories on social media so that the Christian Church wakes up to the things that are going on in the world. Then, let them pray.” Pray that governmental pressure would lessen, and Tajikistan would become more open to Christianity. Pray for church leaders who are faced with the stress and anxiety of raids and arrests. Ask God to give them courage, wisdom and discernment as they serve the Body of Christ.

hard to create discipleship materials without a Bible. It’s hard to plant churches on the Word of God without the Word of God. The Bible is the centerpiece of all ministry work we do. I think a lot of the challenges we have when it comes to engaging with deaf communities come from a lack of access to Scripture that the deaf can engage with.” The efforts of ministries like Deaf Bible Society have made outreach to Deaf individuals more possible today. Deaf missions continue to develop more and more sign language Scripture translations and discipleship tools. That’s where the Body of

Christ comes in.

“The local Church has been tasked with Scripture engagement — meaning to make disciples, to plant churches, [and] to do this work in their community,” said Bucklew. “It isn’t my place or the Deaf Bible Society’s place to come in and bypass the Church. What we’re here to do is to say, ‘How can we equip you and give you the tools and resources you need to do better ministry?’” Bucklew lists a few ideas for you to start engaging the deaf in your area.

Christ would use to make His name great among Deaf communities.” Bucklew concluded by saying, “You have the ability to do so many things to not only bring the hope of the Gospel to a Deaf person who has never seen it, but to provide a local Deaf ministry or Deaf congregation with tools, with resources, with prayer support, with ideas and with community support so they can do ministry well.”

“Go online,” he said. “Use these tools, like Deaf Church Where so you can actually begin your process of going, of being hands and feet that

In Tajikistan, Christians are Government Targets By Beth Stolicker nternational Media Ministries, based in Madrid, Spain, is dedicated to training Christians across the globe to use media to tell their stories and share the Gospel. The mission: to get Jesus on every screen.

I

“Right now, our niche is to create dramas, whether that’s a micro-drama of two-minutes for social media or a full drama that’s going to be broadcast on a satellite channel,” says Denise Godwin, President of International Media Ministries. Currently, IMM has projects in the works which tell the story of the early Church. Godwin says it is important to share these stories because the early Church shaped how we cope with persecution today, how we love one another and how we cope with outside stresses.

partnerships involve translation, product development and follow-up work. However, each one of these partnerships has the goal of ensuring that the national church can use the final works for conversations which lead to Christ. Through its training, IMM teaches people how to create stories with the tools available to them, like a mobile device. IMM also teaches Christians how to engage with and develop their media outreach by sharing their stories with their people. However, sharing a video on social media is not enough. That is why IMM does strategy training to empower national Christians to strategically use media to share Christ.

“It seems there’s a developing global culture of video-oriented people. What we’ve found, though, is that story draws people together “All of that is really more than reporting. We developed in those first all kind of check in on the centuries. What we’re news, but we want to sink finding is it still resonates into a story. Thus, training today, depending on what people to tell stories in a part of the world you’re clear way, in a strategic looking at and the news way, is really important and headlines that you’re seeing,” seems to have a really big Godwin says. draw for people,” Godwin says. IMM has a video library with works in 70 languages. Plus, this training is not a The organization one-and-done deal. Instead, intentionally partners it leads to long-term impact. with other organizations Godwin says IMM’s founder and satellite channels to recently shared some reach people in those 70 inspiring stories. In the languages. Some of these

early 1980s, some people came to IMM for media and television training. Today, these same people work with national television in Iceland. Another story Godwin remembered is about a national church IMM trained. This national church eventually grew to have its own radio station and TV channel. Today, it is run by locals. These stories are exactly what IMM works towards—Christians who are empowered to use media to share the Gospel in their cultures. “We’re not involved at all anymore, but it’s empowering people to communicate with their own people. That’s a marvelous tool to give to someone to have in their own culture,” Godwin says.


7 The Sounding Board

ICI Student Lobby Day By Lorena Oplinger

O

n Tuesday, April 9, a group of Grace students and faculty members were invited to attend the biennial Student Lobby Day at the Indiana State House in Indianapolis, Ind. This event was planned and hosted by the Independent College of Indiana (ICI). Kearstin Criswell, director of student involvement, and Dr. Jared Burkholder, chair of the department of history and political science, were the faculty members who accompanied six students on this field trip to the State House. The students and staff members met at Grace and departed from Indiana Hall at 7:45 a.m. Upon their arrival at the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center, ICI Executive Assistant for Administration, Linda Meador, and Executive Assistant to the President, Kelly Smith, were greeting, welcoming, and guiding the attendees. “Lobbying is about state grants,” Meador stated. “It started in 2005, takes place every two years during the budget year, and the budget for this year will be completed by April 29, 2019,” Meador informed everyone. David Wantz, president and CEO of the Independent Colleges of Indiana, shook hands with some of the attendees and welcomed Grace students to the State House. According to Wantz, the State House is the “temple of democracy.” Then, Wantz addressed the entire audience in the auditorium. He provided a brief summary of his job as an ICI president and explained what lobbying really is and why it is important for state senators and representatives. According to Wantz, ICI is the seventh largest employer in Indiana, that has produced 30 percent of its graduates. ICI represents 30 private, nonprofit colleges and universities in Indiana. Therefore, he recognized the importance of helping students with financial assistance. Senators and representatives also recognized that it is “valuable to the State of Indiana to offer student grants,” Wantz affirmed. “Helping folks in Indiana to move forward” is their main goal. One of the guest speakers invited to this events was Legistlative Intern Director, Tyler Murrell. “What goes on in the State House benefits

everybody in Indiana,” he said. During this field trip, Grace students had the opportunity to meet and talk to Brennan Murray, a political science and history graduate from Grace College, and current Legislator Intern of Sen. Justin Busch and Sen. Jim Buck. According to Murray, “53 percent of the budget goes to education.” And for this reason, senators and representatives “spend most of their time working on issue related to it.” Some of the students had the opportunity to meet and speak with Rep. David A. Wolkins, from Warsaw, Indiana. Rep. Wolkins was familiar with Grace College; he remembers attending of Coach K’s games a few years ago. For Rep. Wolkins, “Helping people is my favorite part of my job.” Rep. Wolkins has been working on the Legal Act. The purpose of the act is to make information more available and accessible online. He also talked to the students about the Water Sewage Plant Project in Warsaw. He knows that it has been an important issue for his constituents and the opinions among them are divided. “There is not enough support,” he said. “Only 15 percent of the people approved this project.” So he is currently working on a bill

that would require at least 30 percent of the voters’ approval to pass any projects. Lastly, Rep. Wolkings discussed with the students the importance of providing more childcare centers in this community, but to make this possible, some of the buildings around this area need to comply with the state regulations.

Above: (Back, L to R)Kearstin Criswell, Olivia Bottorff, Lorena Oplinger, Jared Burkholder, (Front, L to R) Hannah Gray, Ericka DeBoes, Anna Steely, and Jalen Posy spent the day at the State House for the ICI Student Lobby Day on April 9, 2019.


8 The Sounding Board

Weekly Puzzles Weekly Riddle

Courtesy of Karissa Kornoelje

What has an eye but cannot see? A storm!

Sudoku Easy Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

6

3

9 3

6

8

3

1

9 6

8

5

2

7

6 3

8

7

8

2 5

5

7

7

5

2

9 1

9

2

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Tue Apr 9 19:57:26 2019 GMT. Enjoy!

Medium

Hard

5 5

9

6 5

7

8 3

8

4

2

7

8

2

9

1

9

6

3

9

2

1

2

3

8

1

7

1

8

6

7

6

9

2

1

4

1

4

5

3

7

8

2

1

6

1

4

2

8 6

2

8

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Tue Apr 9 19:57:29 2019 GMT. Enjoy!

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Tue Apr 9 19:57:34 2019 GMT. Enjoy!

6

3

7

1

3 6

6

3

9

5

5 6

6

8

2

3 3

7

2

3

9

5

8 3

6

6 7

5

Puzzle 1 (Very hard, difficulty rating 0.80)

7

4 9

Very Hard

Puzzle 1 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.74)

Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.47)

1

5 2

8

7

6 8

3

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Tue Apr 9 19:57:36 2019 GMT. Enjoy!

soundingboardsoundingboardsoundingboardsoundingboardsoundingboard The Sounding Board exists to provide Grace College students with a voice. The newspaper will contain articles which inform, stimulate thought, present various student opinions and provide entertainment. Accuracy, truth, fairness and professionalism are the highest priorities of the student staff members. The editors reserve the right to review all submissions to the newspaper to ensure they are God-honoring and meet the legal and ethical standards of a responsible press. Editorials and opinions are those of Grace students and may not necessarily represent the official view of the administration of Grace College. The Sounding Board encourages and welcomes editorial letters from students, faculty and staff. This is to provide everyone with the opportunity to voice his or her thoughts and opinions. Letters must be signed, although names may be withheld for justifiable reasons. Please send letters to the Sounding Board staff at soundingboard@ grace.edu. You can also find us at www.gcsb.com for more content and archives of previous issues. The Sounding Board is printed in cooperation with The Papers, Inc. and is a member of the Evangelical Press Association (EPA) and the Associated Collegiate Press (ACP).

Editor-In-Chief: Ethan Horst Layout Editor: Matthew Bliss Web Editor: Madi Brill Sports Editor: Ashley Gerhart Other Editors: Alaister McFarren Adviser: Dr. Paulette Sauders

Staff Reporters and Writers: Alicia Reeve Lorena Oplinger Andrea Castillo

Profile for The Sounding Board

Volume 65, Issue 11  

Volume 65, Issue 11  

Advertisement