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Outturn Hop to it: Friday 6 March Issue 03, 2020

HOP INTO AUTUMN Let the Society lift your spirits: discover fresh flavours full of optimism for the new season.

BEFORE THEY FALL AT SMWS.COM.AU


CONTENTS Cellarmaster’s Note Andrew Derbidge............................. 3 Malt of the Month Cask 1.214 Indulge your sweet tooth........................................... 4 Teaninich Distillery This month’s feature....................... 10

An Islay Icon Andrew Derbidge............................. 16 Ambassador’s Wrap Matt Bailey........................................... 18 Events Check out the latest listings........ 19

OUR BOTTLINGS SWEET, FRUITY & MELLOW

JUICY, OAK & VANILLA

Cask No. 1.214 Indulge your sweet tooth (Malt of the Month) ..................................................................

4

Cask No. 12.29 Can’t cedar wood for the apple trees . ...........................

6

SPICY & SWEET Cask No. 59.59 Spock’s earwax ............................................................................

8

SPICY & DRY Cask No. 77.58 Wakey wakey! .............................................................................

Cask No. 72.79 Chocolate Bourbons..................................................................

9

OILY & COASTAL Cask No. 10.183 Velociraptor Vs Xenomorph ...............................................

12

Cask No. 93.117 Asian coastal delights .............................................................

12

LIGHTLY PEATED

6

DEEP, RICH & DRIED FRUITS

Cask No. 66.141 Roofing felt on a beach hut...................................................

15

PEATED

Cask No. 36.168 Fruity, earthy and exciting . ................................................

7

Cask No. 53.310 Kippers in slippers ....................................................................

15

Cask No. G6.8 Soothing the mind......................................................................

7

Cask No. 33.138 A thigh-slapping dram . .........................................................

17

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CELLARMASTER’S NOTE Dear Members, In the textbook method of assessing a whisky and writing out tasting notes and descriptors, the first category we encounter is “Colour”. Nose, Palate, Mouthfeel, and Finish subsequently follow in that order. The reason colour comes up first is that the visual cue (i.e. sight) is the first sense to engage and interact with the whisky. You see the whisky before any other part of you engages with it. Our sense of smell then sees to the Nose, and our sense of taste attends to the Palate. Our sense of touch accounts for the whisky’s Mouthfeel (or texture) and if you want to take your whisky appreciation to the next level, you can use your sense of hearing and try listening to your whisky. And if you can hear the difference between a Speyside and an Islay whisky, please visit your nearest X-Men or Avengers recruiting office. As a result of this, colour plays a very significant role in attracting a whisky to us. How often do we judge and critique a whisky purely by how it looks, long before our other senses get the chance to more objectively determine if it’s actually any good? Pale whiskies are occasionally dismissed for appearing young or insipid, tragically belying the incredible flavour and quality they might hold. (One of the greatest whiskies I ever tasted was a worryingly palelooking drop whose sickly hue gave no clue that we were enjoying a 45yo Springbank from a refill bourbon cask). Similarly, at the other end of the spectrum, dark whiskies often get an instant tick of approval, sucking the drinker into believing that the spirit is outrageously old or came from a juicy sherry butt. My experience has been that darker whiskies disappoint more often than they impress: Old age and/or sherry-wood maturation are difficult beasts to harness. More fail than succeed, and many are too dry, over-wooded, tannic, or hopelessly out of balance.

And yet colour remains king. When you walk into the room at a Society masterclass tasting and see the five or six drams poured and waiting for you, tell me you don’t scan across the colour palette before you and gaze expectantly at the glasses sitting at the darker end of the spectrum? The same goes for when you’re picking out a bottle from the shelves at your local liquor outlet…it’s little wonder some bottlers get accused of being heavy-handed with the spirit caramel.

Of course, the Society ignores cosmetic prompts and we leave our whiskies uncoloured and 100% natural. But by now you’ve hopefully gleaned the subtext here and identified that colour is the ultimate red herring. (Pun vaguely intended). Don’t let a whisky’s colour influence your judgement. An old adage about books and their covers comes to mind…

Andrew Derbidge ~ Director, Cellarmaster & NSW Manager

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MALT OF THE MONTH NUMERO UNO The distillery from which it all started for the SMWS, and what a ride. Cask 1.214 Indulge your sweet tooth is a textbook example of spirit complexity and youthful vigour. A powerhouse of a dram where the sweet spirit character dances a Can-Can with the 1st-fill bourbon barrel at the forefront. Squarely placed in the Sweet, Fruity & Mellow flavour profile and one to see the warm months out with.

INDULGE YOUR SWEET TOOTH SWEET, FRUITY & MELLOW CASK NO. 1.214

$149.00

REDUCED FROM $170

REGION

Speyside

CASK TYPE

1st fill bourbon barrel

AGE

8 years

DATE DISTILLED

06 April 2011

OUTTURN

246 bottles

ABV

58.6%

AUS ALLOCATION

30 bottles

A very pleasant aroma of perfumed wood, soft peaches, vanilla custard slices and creamed coconut permeated the room and brought a smile to our faces. The taste had plenty of sweet oak, aromatic perfumed rosewater shortbread and Turkish Delight with hazelnuts, pistachios and coconut. When we added water the scent was that of honey drizzled on pears, as well as Parisian rose and Fancy French macaroons. On the palate so incredibly sweet but still remarkably fresh - think of nectar-level honey and ripe perfumed dark sweet cherries dancing around the tongue like a Can-Can performance on stage at the Moulin Rouge. 4


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CAN’T CEDAR WOOD FOR THE APPLE TREES

REGION

Speyside

CASK TYPE

1st fill bourbon barrel

AGE

9 years

DATE DISTILLED

29 September 2009

SWEET, FRUITY & MELLOW

OUTTURN

191 bottles

CASK NO. 12.29

ABV

58.9%

AUS ALLOCATION

18 bottles

$165.00

The nose opened with bursts of solid cedar wood encasing sweet butter, custard and malted biscuits. Fruits rapidly followed with a pleasing display of pineapple, honeydew melon and caramelised pear doused with a splash of citrus. A peppery tingle brought the palate towards deliciously sweet flavours of toffee apples and crème brulee dusted with Demerara sugar and orange blossom. Water enhanced the cedar tones with lots of sweet wood and its welcomed companions of coconut and vanilla ice cream. Herbal elements teased at the edges but it was a boost of tangerine, caramel and pineapple puree that seized the show. Fluffy candyfloss and baked Alaska furthered the sugary delights before cereals, ripe apples and plenty of oak bound the finish.

REGION

Highland

CASK TYPE

1st fill bourbon hogshead

WAKEY WAKEY!

AGE

11 years

SPICY & DRY

DATE DISTILLED

07 August 2007

CASK NO. 77.58

OUTTURN

251 bottles

ABV

58.6%

AUS ALLOCATION

12 bottles

$185.00

A full dose of wood delivered aromas that blended buttery notes with charred tannins as fresh grass emerged from the trees. The palate brought a fiery spice that exploded in the mouth before hay and barley bound with leather. With water however, it was coconut and digestive biscuits that dominated alongside the exotic fruits of mango, pineapple and guava. The heat had now sweetened to ginger cake with salted caramel and the soothing spices of nutmeg and cloves. Warm granary bread arrived with melted butter and the soft notes of porridge oats. A mouth-coating sweetness lasted through to the finish where it was joined by fine wood and apple bitters. 6


FRUITY, EARTHY AND EXCITING DEEP, RICH & DRIED FRUITS CASK NO. 36.168

$249.00

CIAL SPE NISH FI

REGION

Speyside

CASK TYPE

1st fill Moscatel hogshead

AGE

19 years

DATE DISTILLED

31 May 2000

OUTTURN

272 bottles

ABV

56.6%

AUS ALLOCATION

36 bottles

The nose delivered plum jam, plum pie and strawberry fruit leather – fruity, earthy and exciting – dried cranberries, orange muscat, chardonnay and valinch spillage. The palate was similar – Amarena cherries in syrup, tangerines and nectarines – but we also found tobacco leaf, dark brown sugar, tree bark and cinnamon toast – a lovely mouth-filling intensity. The reduced nose involved crème brûlée, old strawberry jam, tannic red wine, shoe leather and Indonesian long pepper. The palate softened to peach melba, Tangfastics, marmalade and tawny port, with a drying finish of wood spices. After 16 years in ex-bourbon wood, we transferred this into a first-fill Moscatel hogshead.

SOOTHING THE MIND

REGION

Lowland

CASK TYPE

1st fill Oloroso hogshead

AGE

37 years

DEEP, RICH & DRIED FRUITS

DATE DISTILLED

03 December 1980

CASK NO. G6.8

OUTTURN

173 bottles

ABV

48.4%

AUS ALLOCATION

12 bottles

$599.00

CIAL SPE NISH FI M MIU PRE T TLING BO

Fragrant, perfumed tropical wood notes like Malaysian agarwood incense sticks combined with ripe tropical fruits as well as burnt oranges and lemon tart made this a real fascinating nose. The taste was just like a glass of well-aged Sauternes or Tokay wine or indeed a Brandy de Jerez Solera Gran Reserva. If you so wish add the tiniest drop of water and the aroma becomes a little ashy, rum and raisin fudge with some antique wood polish and to taste a little more oily and resinous with hints of candied orange, oak and hazelnuts. After thirty five years in an ex-bourbon hogshead we transferred this whisky into a 1st fill Oloroso hogshead. 7


8


SPOCK’S EARWAX

REGION

Highland

CASK TYPE

New oak heavy char hogshead

AGE

10 years

SPICY & SWEET

DATE DISTILLED

29 September 2008

CASK NO. 59.59

OUTTURN

297 bottles

ABV

55.2%

AUS ALLOCATION

24 bottles

$170.00

CIAL SPE NISH FI

There’s sweet pastries and runny honey at first. Then molten toffee, salted caramel, coconut wafers, gorse, heather flowers, talcum powder and shilling ales. A hearty dollop of fruity muesli too. A little water brings turmeric and dried thyme. A bouquet garni of herbs, shoe polish, new leather, pine cones and Earl Grey tea. Some bandages wrapped around a light sootiness and some slabs of wet concrete. The palate fizzes like lemon vitamin tablets in soda water. There’s sheep wool, soft medical waxes, butter biscuits, aged calvados, green banana, heather honey and lemon balm. After reduction there’s more warm spices, lime pith, pink grapefruit, tarragon, wax, tobacco leaf, green pepper and potpourri. Matured for nine years in a bourbon hogshead before transfer to a “number 4” heavily charred new oak hogshead.

CHOCOLATE BOURBONS JUICY, OAK & VANILLA CASK NO. 72.79

$180.00

CIAL SPE NISH FI

REGION

Speyside

CASK TYPE

New oak heavy char hogshead

AGE

11 years

DATE DISTILLED

05 July 2007

OUTTURN

245 bottles

ABV

58.9%

AUS ALLOCATION

12 bottles

Aromas of fresh wood with a heavy layer of sweet char bellowed from the glass alongside thick coconut and vanilla to create a made-in-the-USA quality. Familiar notes of banana flambe, caramel and dried cranberries merged with pink peppercorn spice and maple syrup to give the impression of dry rye whiskey over sultanas. Water released milky textures that morphed into cocoa and praline with the oiliness of toasted pine nuts. Heavier flavours presented truffles and burnt toffee served beside warm cognac and gingerbread. More sweetness followed as fudge, chocolate and honey combined with toffee apples and spiced rum whilst mahogany dominated the finish with a thick layer of beeswax polish. After spending 11 years in an ex-bourbon hogshead this was transferred to a heavily charred new oak hogshead for the remainder of its maturation. 9


TO MASH OR NOT TO MASH? If you’ve never visited Scottish distilleries and have a purely idyllic perspective on what all distilleries look like, then when you do visit, you’re likely to be a bit disappointed...

BY MATT BAILEY

As I’ve said at tastings before, not every distillery looks like Strathisla. Some do, but many look like fairly nondescript industrial estates with rows of grey warehouses and often a few steel pipes poking out here and there. Others have the misfortune of looking downright ugly (no offence, Tomatin). 10

Teaninich falls into the middle category. Its purpose is to supply the demand for blended whiskies in the Diageo folio like Johnnie Walker and Black & White. It’s an important part of the chain and with the exception of a Flora & Fauna release at 43%, there’s no real core range bottling to speak of.


Founded in 1817 by Napoleonic war hero and estate owner Captain Hugh Monroe who lived on the site along with his brother John Munro, who ran it until 1869, and then a few more changes in hands until in 1933 it was taken over by DCL, which would eventually become the Diageo we know today. Ever since DCL took over the reins, it has been central to their blenders and has seen periodic upgrades and new stills added from time to time. As late as 2014 a further six stills and eight washbacks were added – a sign of the times in whisky demand! But if we’re to nerd out for a moment about the uniqueness of Teaninich and how it’s an oft-overlooked code at the SMWS, is how it’s the only Scotch malt whisky distillery in Scotland to NOT have a mash tun. Traditionally, the mashing process takes place in a vessel known as a ‘mash tun’ and uses heat in the form of hot water to induce natural enzymes to break down starch in the grain into fermentable sugars. The word itself is a shortened version of ‘maceration’ aka macerating the barley with hot water, and is a crucial part of the production process. Most distilleries have a Lauter Tun which is far more efficient, but a couple still use old-school ‘rake and plough’ style ones like seen at Bruichladdich. If you’ve ever seen a mash tun in action, you’ll know it’s quite a sight to behold, especially an old-school rake and plough one.

Teaninich have innovated here by using a hammer mill as a two-in-one affair, where it mills the barley separately and the barley then passes to the mashing stage just like any other distillery. Essentially a ‘horizontal tea bag’ operation that is the mash filter that replaces the traditional mash tun. So to think that you’re able to get a single cask of quite an innovating distillery is already quite unique, but especially from a distillery that has little to no core range. It makes for a very intriguing and delicious cask selection from the tasting panel.

FEATURED THIS MONTH CASK NO. 59.59

SPOCK’S EARWAX SPICY & SWEET

$170.00

11


VELOCIRAPTOR VS XENOMORPH OILY & COASTAL CASK NO. 10.183

$230.00

ASIAN COASTAL DELIGHTS

REGION

Islay

CASK TYPE

Refill Sherry butt

AGE

14 years

DATE DISTILLED

25 November 2004

OUTTURN

546 bottles

ABV

61.1%

AUS ALLOCATION

30 bottles

A wonderful mix of salted toffee, golden sultanas, orange muscat dessert wine and wee flickers of old school sherry. On the other hand, the coastal vigour of the distillate charges in the background with big, wind-whipped lashes of sea spray, wet beach sand and an invigorating shot of sherry vinegar! Water unleashes seaweed, fizzy surf gathering in rock pools and oysters dunked in bitter malt beer. Yet, the sherry resurges with caramel chocolate, full fat cream and a nutty amontillado richness. The neat palate is rich with the funk of old bodegas! Mint choc chip, hessian cloth, chopped dates and salty old oloroso. Add to that liquorice, beach pebbles, chalk, heather and floral teas. Even something akin to raw, peppered mackerel. Water brings out citrus pith bitterness, lemon balm, menthol tobacco, iodine laced malt, miso broth, herbal tinctures and tiger balm! A monstrous battle between the seashore and the sherry cask with no clear victor!

REGION

Campbeltown

CASK TYPE

1st fill bourbon barrel

OILY & COASTAL

AGE

13 years

CASK NO. 93.117

DATE DISTILLED

06 March 2006

OUTTURN

154 bottles

ABV

60.3%

AUS ALLOCATION

24 bottles

$210.00

12

A soft and gentle nose neat with aromas of hay, floral meadow, lime cordial and in the background a hint of roasted sea salted and vinegar almonds. Spicy hot, but at the same time sweet & sour like a Chinese stir fry with duck scratchings adding pineapple and a good dose of Sichuan pepper. After adding water we were certainly at the seaside and ordering a slice of Hawaiian pizza topped with pineapple and bacon, whilst to taste it turned into a crunchy thin crust Asian seafood pizza with shrimps, crabs, also pineapple and peppers served in a creamy wasabi honey mayo sauce.


13


14


ROOFING FELT ON A BEACH HUT

REGION

Highland

CASK TYPE

Refill bourbon hogshead

AGE

12 years

LIGHTLY PEATED

DATE DISTILLED

09 March 2006

CASK NO. 66.141

OUTTURN

276 bottles

ABV

60.5%

AUS ALLOCATION

30 bottles

$180.00

The peatiness gives the nose some char and sharp smoke, like green wood on a bonfire; it also has medicinal elements (bandages, Germolene) and shell sand or sandstone dust. On the palate, marmalade and Battenberg sweetness is surrounded (though not overwhelmed) by menthol, tarry driftwood, charcoal and roofing felt on a beach hut. The reduced nose picks up liquorice, pipe dottles, burnt molasses, hessian bung cloths, salt and lime. The palate becomes much sweeter and tamer – apple tart and lemon meringue pie with a good mouth-tingling swirl of peat smoke. It ends up with a very acceptable balance indeed – eminently drinkable.

KIPPERS IN SLIPPERS

REGION

Islay

CASK TYPE

Refill bourbon hogshead

AGE

10 years

PEATED

DATE DISTILLED

01 September 2008

CASK NO. 53.310

OUTTURN

275 bottles

ABV

60.7%

AUS ALLOCATION

18 bottles

$210.00

A wall of preserved lemons, brine and smoked mussels dusted with wood ash greets the nostrils at first. Then flaming hospitals, iodine-soaked gauze, sea air, rock pools, burning gorse and paint. Some notes of oysters, seawater and lemon juice follow up more gently. With water there is more iodine, mezcal, kelp, burnt rope, gravel and various ointments and medical tinctures. Kippers over a coal fire. The mouth is, as expected, a vast ocean of peat oils, herbs, seaweed, beach bonfire smoke and salty liquorice. Water adds more lemon juice, green olives, anchovies, smoked mackerel and some herbs de provence.

15


AN ISLAY ICON BY ANDREW DERBIDGE

The island – and whisky region – of Islay is often erroneously pigeonholed under one label: “Smoky and peaty”. The reality is far from this. There are the unpeated whiskies of Bunnahabhain and Bruichladdich, the broad-spectrum malts of Bowmore, Kilchoman, and Caol Ila, and there are the heavyweights of the Kildalton three: Laphroaig, Lagavulin and Ardbeg. And yet even within those divisions, there are sub-divisions. After all, the latter three vary enormously in style and character. The last one, which Society members fondly refer to as “Distillery 33” has a particularly interesting story to tell… Located on the southern coast of Islay, roughly six kilometres east of the village of Port Ellen, our friend 33 makes the heaviest peated whisky on the island, with the peat content of its malt coming in at 55 phenols in parts per million. (This is said in the context of each distillery’s “regular” everyday make. Port Charlotte (at Bruichladdich) is 40ppm; Lagavulin, Laphroaig, and Caol Ila are all 35ppm. We’re ignoring Octomore (again at Bruichladdich) which is a very limited campaign each year). And yet, despite this, 33’s spirit is renowned as being sweet, balanced, and complex. Yes, there’s smoke galore and loads of earthy peat, but whiskies from 33 are famous for being refined and sophisticated. With a touch of citrus, the softest brine, and often some vanilla, it is a spirit that works beautifully with both bourbon and sherry casks. Of course, no good story is without its twists and turns, and the distillery has not enjoyed the smoothest of rides. Closed or mothballed for the majority of the 1980’s and 90’s, it was in a sorry, rundown state when the Glenmorangie company acquired the distillery in 1997 and began its road to recovery. It was already a cult distillery in the 1990’s, and the quality of releases in the early 2000’s – small, limited, and sporadic as they were – only added to the cult and the enigma.

16

The Society has obtained some incredible casks from the distillery over the years – more than our fair share, given the distillery’s small size and the rarity of its casks amongst independent bottlers. And whilst we don’t see a 33 cask on every Outturn, they are always worth the wait.


A THIGH-SLAPPING DRAM PEATED CASK NO. 33.138

$375.00 REGION

Islay

CASK TYPE

2nd fill Oloroso butt

AGE

12 years

DATE DISTILLED

24 May 2007

OUTTURN

615 bottles

ABV

60.9%

AUS ALLOCATION

48 bottles

PR BOTEMIUM TLIN G

Nose - brandy snaps, cafe noir biscuits, dark toffee, Oddfellow sweets, liquorice, treacle, molasses and crispy mackerel skin grilled over peat. Palate - visceral sweet smoke, burnt twigs, raisins, dark chocolate and Lapsang Souchong - a mouth-filling, lip-smacking, cockle-warming, thigh-slapping dram. The nose turns sweeter with water - maple syrup and brown sugar but there’s a coal-fire in a wood-panelled room or a bucket and spade on the beach by a tarry driftwood bonfire. Now the palate balances maple candies, treacle toffee and sugar-coated fennel seeds with pipe dottles, medicinal notes and tying leather thongs with your teeth - you can provide the back story!

March Outturn features an extremely rare allocation of 33.138 A thigh-slapping dram available to members with a limit of one bottle per member. 17


At Queen St in Edinburgh with Fay & Graeme Coull from Dingle Distillery

COLOURFUL EXPERIENCE Part of the new leaf we’ve turned at the Society with the change of our visual identity and monogram, is the renewed focus on the member experience – the colourful experience of being a member in every facet, and being all together unique. It’s in our club mantra to bring these colourful whisky experiences to you and to share in the enjoyment of single cask, cask strength whisky. If I recall back to my first ever interaction with the Society*, it was sitting in the back room at the Oak Barrel in Sydney next to a Mr Murray Hassan. We were drinking some vintage whiskies from Orkney at the time and he asked if I’d ever been to an SMWS event. I said no, but that I had heard of the Society. Fast forward about two weeks and I was sitting in the iconic Macquarie Room at the Royal Automobile Club listening to the very first Andrew Derbidge presentation I had been to. It was a rollercoaster of interesting facts, fascinating stories, historical heft, and some super tasty whisky. It was a colourful experience. It was one that I still recall today and still wish I’d picked up two of that 125.71 instead of just the one! 18

The fact that I still recall that particular tasting isn’t because it had the most stunning lineup, or that it had that sumptuous (and admittedly quite dark) 125 on the tasting mat, but it was the whole experience, the whole colourful experience. The whole kit and caboodle. That’s what our goal is for every Society experience around Australia. Whether it be a cheese pairing in Brisbane to a whisky cruise in Melbourne and everything in between, that’s what we do best: colourful experiences. Cheers, Matt

Matt Bailey ~ SMWS National Ambassador

CO WITHNNECT MATT bail ey@ sm

@sm ws.com ws_ . mat au t

*A story I’m sure some of you have heard before, so you’re welcome to flip past this page and continue onto the rest of Outturn!!


EVENTS PERTH

SYDNEY

Single casks from Scotland, Pizza from Italy, and one delightful evening of full flavour with your State Manager. Don’t miss out.

Join Andrew Derbidge for an incredible tour of Speyside. We’ll explore its history, its geography, its style, its place in the industry, and – of course – its distilleries and their whiskies..

ITALY MEETS SCOTLAND

FRIDAY 6TH MARCH, 6:30PM Chelsea Pizza Co 145 Stirling Hwy, Nedlands Host: Jason Davies, WA Manager

ADELAIDE

CHEESE & WHISKY PAIRINGS

Delicious cheeses, new single casks, flavour pairings like no other. All welcome.

FRIDAY 13 MARCH, 6.00 FOR 6:30PM Courtyard Room, Seven Stars Hotel 187 Angas Street, Adelaide Host: Jenny Forrest, SA Manager

WOLLONGONG

SUMMER WHISKY DRAMS Let’s kick off 2020 back at our ancestral home with new cask releases, summery tastes and a delicious full supper.

FRIDAY 13 MARCH, 6.00 FOR 6.30PM Novotel Northbeach Hotel 2-14 Cliff Rd, North Wollongong Host: Fred Apolloni, Wollongong Manager

HOBART

AN AFTERNOON IN THE VAULTS

Explore a full lineup of new single casks from the Vaults paired up with local cheeses and the team from Gold Bar with your National Ambassador and State Manager.

SATURDAY 21 MARCH, 3PM Gold Bar, 11 Morrison St, Hobart Hosts: Matt Bailey & Alex Moores

BRISBANE

Our next event listing will be online soon.

A GRAND TOUR OF SPEYSIDE

FRIDAY 27 MARCH, 6.30 FOR 7.00PM Royal Automobile Club 89 Macquarie St, Sydney Host: Andrew Derbidge, NSW Manager

MELBOURNE

SINGLE CASK SUNSET WHISKY CRUISE

The most requested event from 2019 is back. All the whisky, all the beer, all the food, all the fun. Come sail the seas with your Captain ambassadors this month!

SATURDAY 28 MARCH, 3:45PM Pickup from Federation Wharf Hosts: Matt Bailey & Alex Moores

SAVE THE DATE

A very special guest graces our shores all the way from Glasgow with a bag full of previews and rarities from the Society. Save the date now!

FRIDAY 1ST MAY, 6:30PM Venue TBA Host: A special guest host...

CANBERRA

TASTE AND TEST WHISKY DINNER Single cask whiskies paired with a full degustation dinner at the marvellous Sage Restaurant. A true adventure into flavour never before seen in Canberra. Tickets strictly limited.

THURSDAY 2 APRIL, 6:00 FOR 6:30PM Sage Restaurant, Gorman House Arts Centre, Batman St, Braddon Host: Matt Bailey, National Ambassador

TO BOOK IN FOR AN EVENT, PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE OR CONTACT OUR OFFICE.

SMWS.COM.AU/EVENTS

19


HOP TO IT

OR THEY MIGHT JUST BOUNCE ON OUT

SMWS.COM.AU

02 9974 3046 Mon-Fri 9.00am - 5.00pm AEDT

@SMWS_AUSTRALIA

AUSTRALIANSMWS

SMWS_AUS

Society whiskies are offered and sold through The Wine Empire Pty Ltd, Liquor Licence LIQP770010175.

Profile for The Scotch Malt Whisky Society

Outturn March 2020  

Outturn March 2020  

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