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Issue No.36 October 2018 R55.00 incl vat

FEATURED ARTISTS: Ilse Nieman • Marion Cross Dawn Lahner • Roger Melvill Lesley Martyn • Samukelo Gasa Marion Weymouth • Gerda Smit

• tips for pencil drawing • the art of papercutting • painting in Antarctica


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ISSUE 36

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A note from the studio 4 Feedback 5 Quick Art Quiz 5 What’s Happening? 6 FEATURED ARTIST: ILSE NIEMAN 10 What’s in store? Giveaways 14 FEATURED ARTIST: MARION CROSS 16 Miniature Art Society of South Africa 20 FEATURED ARTIST: ROGER MELVILL 22 Getting started with acrylics 26 The business of art: Malcolm Dewey 30 FEATURED ARTIST: LESLEY MARTYN 33 Business and Art: Creative Block 40 2


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10 Tips to keep motivated FEATURED ARTIST: DAWN LAHNER DALA Student’s Gallery FEATURED ARTIST: SAMUKELO GASA 30 minute warm up: KIM PEREIRA Seasonal palettes: Spring Big Painting Challenge No.6 FEATURED ARTIST: MARION WEYMOUTH FEATURED ARTIST: GERDA SMIT (O’GRIET) Quick art quiz answers Life of a working answer: ANA DE VLIEG Q&A Classes and Workshops


FEATURED ARTIST: ILSE NIEMAN

paper art


FEATURED ARTIST: MARION CROSS

mixed media

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TRAVELLING WITH ROGER MELVILL

photo: Daniel West

plein air

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ESSENTIALS

get started with

acrylics

Acrylic paints are the new kid on the block when compared to the history of watercolours or oil paints. Acrylics were originally developed as an interior wall paint, and the first artist-grade paints were produced in the 1950’s. Over the last few decades there have been great improvements in their manufacture, with the addition of richer pigments and improved recipes. Acrylics are becoming increasingly popular due to their fast drying time, lack of toxicity and versatility. Unlike oil paints which can takes days to dry in between layers, an acrylic painting can be completed in one sitting. The quickdrying, water-based medium becomes water resistant when dry, and can be diluted with water to create a watercolour effect or used with an additive to create an impasto effect. The consistency varies widely, and there are a range of soft, medium and heavy body brands available.

compromising the famous acrylic fast-drying time. And, with 80 brilliant colours, you’re spoiled for choice. Thin films of Professional Acrylic will dry in 20-30 minutes and thicker films can take an hour or two. This will vary according to environmental conditions. WINSOR & NEWTON GALERIA ACRYLICS: Our Galeria Acrylic are wonderfully affordable and yet impressive in their vibrancy and quality. We’ve made them with a high level of pigment and created opaque versions of some naturally transparent colours. You’ll find their texture buttery enough for quick and easy coverage, but thick enough for brush marks to remain, should you want them. There are 60 magnificent colours to choose from. Thin films of colour will dry in 10-20 minutes whereas thicker films can take an hour or more. Galeria and Artists’ Acrylic are fully intermixable ranges and can be used either in layers or together on the palette.

Acrylic colours tend to be brighter than oils, although they have a tendency to dry darker and can become dull if overworked. They should be kept away from heat and direct sunlight to prevent them from drying out in the container. Another difference between oils and acrylics is shelf life. Oils can last for decades, while once opened acrylics can lose their intensity of colour. Mould or a sour smell may mean that your acrylics have expired.

UNDERSTANDING THE DRYING TIMES FOR ACRYLIC PAINTS One of the main reasons for choosing acrylic paints is their ability to dry quickly. Professional Acrylic colours remain usable on the palette for slightly longer than many other acrylics. A longer working time allows artists to have less waste on the palette as well as a longer time on the canvas for blending as colours will remain workable for over 30 mins. The working or “open time” can be extended further by mixing the colour with Winsor & Newton Acrylic Retarders.

WINSOR & NEWTON PROFESSIONAL ACRYLICS: These are our very finest acrylic paints - they’re made with the latest developments in resin technology. Most acrylics darken as they dry, but our clever, translucent binder means that what you see is what you get. With no colour-shift, colour-matching is made much easier. We’ve also made sure these paints have a longer working time without

UNDERPAINTING LAYERS FOR OIL PAINTING When acrylic colours first became widely available in the 1950’s and 60’s, there was a reluctance to recommend overpainting them with oil colours because of suggestions that this might be unsound – notably

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THE BUSINESS OF ART

by Malcolm Dewey

MALCOLM DEWEY is an artist and art teacher based in Port Alfred, Eastern Cape. He paints landscapes, seascapes and figure studies. You can view his gallery, sign up for FREE art lessons and more at his website.

It could have been the start of a beautiful relationship. But it soon faded away and you are wondering what went wrong? It is a shame, but what do you expect if you never write or visit? No this not some cheap romance novel. I am referring to your art business followers.

best way to stay in touch

with your art fans 30


FEATURED ARTIST: LESLEY MARTYN

pencils

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FEATURED ARTIST: DAWN LAHNER

acrylics

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students gallery

A monthly selection of art by talented high school students in South Africa.

this month’s winner

“Sarification” 42 x 29,7 cm charcoal and pencil drawing by Jemma Mckenzie Penryn College; Nelspruit Art Teacher: Mrs Booysen


various mediums

FEATURED ARTIST: SAMUKELO GASA

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30 oils

minute warm up

with Kim Pereira

Starting off your painting session with a short study is a great way to loosen up. These paintings need not be saleable, and although you could turn out some little gems, this is not the end goal. Painting with this kind of freedom means that you will be more experimental and it will help to ‘get your eye in’ and develop your hand-eye coordination to a reasonable level. Start the clock...

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cell: 0836405487 | e-mail: kimpereira@telkomsa.net | Facebook: kim pereira art | Instagram: kimpereira_art 56


TECHNIQUES WITH GRANT WOOD

watercolours

seasonal palettes

part 3: Spring

In this demonstration I have tried to portray new growth and the vibrant colours that accompany spring in this interpretation of the seasonal palette. 58


FEATURED ARTIST: MARION WEYMOUTH

pastels

portrait demo

in soft pastels

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STEP 1: First and foremost, do an accurate line drawing, checking on your proportions constantly. In this case I chose a sepia-coloured paper for my subject.

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STEP 2: Once you are satisfied with your drawing, using Sennelier Pastels, lay in your dark tones bearing in mind that with pastels you should work from dark to light.

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STEP 3: Now start adding you middle tones and begin laying a bit of colour in the background. Keep the palette cool which will create a lovely balance against the warms of the skin. Add a few highlights so you can see where your focal point will be, and begin mapping the facial lines. STEP 4: The next step is to work on the hat and feathers, bearing in mind that you should always contrast texture and smooth areas in painting. If you are using black, add purples or dark blues - Sennelier has a superb range.

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FEATURED ARTIST: GERDA SMIT

illustration

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LIFE OF A WORKING ARTIST: ANA DE VLIEG

oils

Ana de Vlieg teaches, trains and transforms art making into a world of therapy. This connects with topics related to colour mixing, drawing one’s way into “seeing” and opening up opportunities to pause life whilst discovering the hidden “gold “within. 75

SA Artist magazine Issue 36 Oct 2018  

Featured Artists: Lesley Martyn Ilse Nieman Marion Cross Roger Melvill Dawn Lahner Samukelo Gasa Marion Weymouth Gerda Smit (O’Griet)

SA Artist magazine Issue 36 Oct 2018  

Featured Artists: Lesley Martyn Ilse Nieman Marion Cross Roger Melvill Dawn Lahner Samukelo Gasa Marion Weymouth Gerda Smit (O’Griet)

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