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Dickie Colburn: Fishing See Page 1B

Cooking with Katherine See Page 8A

Football Taunting Rules Page 1B

The Record TheRecordLive.com

Vol. 51 No. 13 Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

The Penny Record of Bridge City and Orangefield • Founded 1960

Surviving Summer Keeping your cool in Texas

Darla Daigle For The Record We are way above and way beneath. Above average temperatures for summer and beneath accumulated rainfall for the year. Typically temperatures for early summer in Southeast Texas average around 92*F. This has been anything but an average year thus far. There was the fairly mild winter with a possible snow/ice storm thrown in the mix, then a surprise cool spell at the beginning of May. If the trend in extreme weather that has been hitting the nation spreads to the Southeast Texas region this summer will shape up to be a challenging season. Being prepared and aware is a basic rule for extremes in weather. For Orange County the current extreme is the heat. Children and infants, the elderly, those with high blood pressure, outdoor laborers, athletes and pets are the most at risk to suffer harm from the heat wave that is plaguing the area. “With the rising temperatures in our area it is important to know how to protect yourself from the heat. Dehydration and heat exhaustion are very common this time of year, and it can happen to anyone,” said nurse practitioner Stephanie Hayden. “Drink plenty of fluids (water being the most important), take frequent breaks, and stay in the shade as much as possible if working or spending a lot of time outdoors. Planning outdoor projects early in the morning or prior to the hottest temperatures of the day is also suggested.” Caused by a number of things, heat exhaustion can very quickly lead to death if not treated. Heat exhaustion occurs when the body is heated for a prolonged period of time. When over-heating is coupled with labor of any kind, even walking, then heat exhaustion and possibly heat stroke can occur very rapidly.

Inside The Record • SHERLOCK BREAUX Page..................... 4A • Obituaries Page......................9A •Dicky Colburn Fishing..................1B • Kaz’s Korner Joe Kazmar...........1B • CHURCH NEWS Page......................7B • CLASSIFIED ADS Page......................8B

The Record Digital Edition Online Now

Children in Orange County stay cool in the pool of the Natatorium in Orange. RECORD PHOTO: Taylor Wendt

The body normally generates heat as a result of metabolic rate. It also usually is able to dissipate heat by releasing it through the skin or by sweating as a means of evaporation. However as temperatures rise to 90*F or higher accompanied by high humidity and or vigorous physical exertion, the body’s ability to function by

reducing heat normally is greatly inhibited allowing the body’s temperature, that is 98.6* F in most humans , to reach 106 F or even higher. When untreated, hyperthermia causes a multiple organ shut down and death can follow very quickly. SURVIVING SUMMER PAGE 2A

County to buy ‘burn ban’ signs Greg Hayes For The Record Orange County will continue to be under a burn ban, commissioners decided in a special court session Tuesday. According to Jeff Kelley, emergency management coordinator, Orange County is under extreme dry conditions, a condition that has spread across the state. “This past Wednesday (June 29), 236 Texas counties were under burn bans,” Kelley said. John Dubose, precinct three commissioner, asked Kelley how long the current ban is in effect. Kelley said that there is no cut-off date. “Currently, the burn ban is open-ended,” Kelley said. Dubose said that despite area publications and news organizations informing the public of the ban, he still receives many calls to inquire if the ban is still on. Kelley said that he has done some research into the price it would cost the county to get signs to place around the county that would inform people of the ban. Signs that would be approved by the Texas Department of Transportation would cost the county $1,781. For that price, they would be able to get 14 24-foot by 20-foot signs and 14 30-foot by 36foot signs that can be placed on existing poles owned by the transportation department. The cost would also cover 100 election-style signs on wire that could be placed along roadways. County Judge Carl Thibodeaux said that it would be important for the county to go ahead and get the signs now. The commissioners voted to go ahead and acquire the signs with money from the general miscellaneous fund. “We need them now, not in October when the ban could

very well be over,” he said. Kelley said that the signs would say that a burn ban is in efDUBOSE fect and that they would be red in color. “Do they glow in the dark?” Thibodeaux asked, garnering chuckles from those in attendance. “I actually had someone call me and ask if they could burn at night.” In other business, the court rejected all bids on biannual waste collection so that they could rebid the projects for collection and recycling. They also voted to waive county permit fees for the final ten properties receiving the sewer upgrade. Joel Ardoin, health and code compliance director, said that state permit-fees would still apply.

Strutter officers win Grand Champions The 2011-2012 Strutter Officers recently attended American Dance/Drill Team Officer Camp at Bella Harbor Resort in Rockwall, Texas. They were awarded Grand Champions, Super Sweepstakes, Outstanding Home Routine, Outstanding Choreography Assignment, and All American Officer Team of the Day. All American honors went to Captain Nicole Encalade and Lieutenant Kaitlyn Ezell. All American Honorable Mention honors went to Lieutenant Madison Woodruff and Lieutenant Sydney Shepherd. All American Dance Company and a dance scholarship were awarded to Lieutenant Kaitlyn Ezell. Outstanding Performer was awarded to Captain Nicole Encalade. Strutter Officers are Captain Nicole Encalade, 1st Lt. Karli Anderson who is recuperating from knee surgery, Lt. Kaitlyn Ezell, Lt. Madison Woodruff, and Lt. Sydney Shepherd. Strutter Director is Cathy Riley.

Salvation Army has new Captains Nicole Gibbs For The Record The month of June brought a pretty significant change for the Orange County Salvation Army. Major John Queener, who has been with the Salvation Army for over 51 years, and his wife, Linda were transferred to a Salvation Army in Fort Worth. Captains Michael and Laura Cox came to Orange from that same Salvation Army in Fort Worth. Michael and Laura, who have been married for 17 years and have three sons (15, 12, and 10 years of age), have been officers with the Salvation Army for the last four to five

years. “As officers, we are first off ministers for the Salvation Army and then we provide services or programs,” Cox said. “We are administrators as well. We have several employees that are responsible for social services, finances, the family store, our after school Boys and Girls club. We oversee all of the programs, but they oversee the programs they are responsible for in effect in Orange County.” Given that Fort Worth is much bigger than Orange, Michael and Laura are very excited to be part of the comSALVATION ARMY PAGE 3A


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• The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Bridge City Heritage Festival Oct. 1 The Historical Museum of Bridge City is hosting the Bridge City Heritage Festival on October 1, 2011, from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. at the Bridge City Community Center grounds. There will be live musical entertainment, carnival rides, antique cars, crafts and exhibits, a silent auction, bingo, children’s games and much more. For those interested in a craft/exhibit or food booth space, please contact Paige Williams at 409/738-3743, Tracey Broussard at 409/344-2341, Lisa Beuhler at 988-9999 or by email at info@bridgecityhistory.com to receive a vendor packet.

CASA to offer volunteer training classes Advocates for Children, Inc. “A CASA Program” will have a volunteer training class beginning July 7 and concluding July 9.   It will be 9 a.m until 5 p.m. daily at the Orange CASA office located at 2120 Gloria Dr.  For more information call 409-8862272 or go on-line at www.advocates-4-children-inc.org

The Record News The Record Newspapers- The County Record and the Penny Record- are published on Wednesday of each week and distributed free throughout greater Orange County, Texas. The publications feature community news, local sports, commentary and much more. Readers may also read each issue of our papers from our web site TheRecordLive.Com. • News Editor..........................................................Nicole Gibbs • Advertising Sales......Carol Allen, Amber Lingo, Al DeRouche • Creative Designer...................................................Russel Bell • General Manager.....................................................Mark Dunn • Distribution Manager..................................................Bill Pope • Staff Writers and Photographers... Mark Dunn, Penny LeLeux, Larry Trimm, Nicole Gibbs, Joey Encalade, Cody Hogden and Teri Newall

News Tips and Photos 886-7183 or 735-7183 E-mail: news@therecordlive.com

County Record: 320 Henrietta St., Orange, Texas 77630 Penny Record: 333 W. Roundbunch, Bridge City, Texas 77611 Offices Closed On Wednesday. Didn’t Get Your Paper? Call Bill Pope 735-5305.

TheRecordLive.com

Round The Clock Hometown News

Alice finds Wonderland in Orange Penny LeLeux For The Record Putting on a stage production is more than just learning lines. Costumes have to be made. Make-up and hair has to be decided on. Props and sets have to be created. Stage lighting and microphone placement determines where your marks are. It’s a tremendous undertaking. The Young Peoples Theater Workshop hosted by Orange Community Players, Inc. teaches youngsters everything there is to know about the stage. Codie Vásquez manages the program each year. Week one is devoted to classes covering the different aspects of theater and auditions. The rest of the workshop is devoted to rehearsals for the production; the fruit of their labor. This years production is “Alice in Wonderland.” Eight-year-old Waverlee Cooper of Bridge City plays the title character. Waverlee is the daughter of

Kim and James Cooper. Vásquez was surprised at Waverlee’s performance. “I gave [potential Alices] a long monologue and told them they had to memorize it if they wanted to try out for Alice.” She fully expected to cast an older child in the role because of the amount of lines required in the play. Waverlee’s parents were shocked she was cast as Alice. “I think everybody was surprised when she got on stage and how well she did at the auditions,” said her mother. “She knew [the monologue] word for word,” said Vásquez. Waverlee learned her lines in a week. “She just seemed really determined to do it. We were really proud of her for that,” said her mother. “I’m also happy to break the stereotype of the blonde haired, blue eyed Alice,” said Vásquez. “I am very proud of our Chinese-American Alice!” “She was in a little second grade play Waverly Cooper, 8, will play Alice in Alice and Wonderland. Record Photo: Penny LeLeux

Surving summer in Texas “Knowing the symptoms of heat exhaustion can help prevent injury and heat stroke. These symptoms can include: extreme fatigue and lethargy, agitation, weakness, headaches, intense thirst, profuse sweating, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, muscle aches, increased heart rate, low blood pressure,” said Hayden. “If you experience any of these symptoms take a break in a cool area and if no improvement after 20 to 30 minutes seek immediate help.” If the condition progresses, there may also be bouts of delirium or hallucination, vomiting and seizure. Preventing heat exhaustion is easier than dealing with the potential harm that it can bring to an individual. Hayden offers these tips: “Dress in loose fitting, light clothing that is breathable, avoid dark colors that absorb heat, and do not soak your clothing with water when you are hot. Other suggestions include wearing hats to shade your face from the sun, long sleeves that are made from lightweight material, and applying frequent sunscreen (with high spf) to prevent sun-

burns. The Mayo Clinic also recommends the following precautions: • Take extra precautions with certain medications. Several medications can affect your body’s ability to stay hydrated. These include medications that narrow your blood vessels (vasoconstrictors), regulate your blood pressure by blocking adrenaline (beta blockers), rid your body of sodium and water (diuretics), reduce psychiatric symptoms (antidepressants or antipsychotics), or drugs that act as stimulants (amphetamines and cocaine). • Avoid being inside a hot car. When parked in the sun, the temperature in your car can rise 20 F (more than 11 C) in just 10 minutes. Never leave children or anyone else in a parked car in hot weather for any period of time. Additional tips from other sources recommend that if you know that you’ll be in extreme heat or humidity, be sure that you have eaten salt as that will help prevent loss of fluids in a short period of time. This is not suggested for those with sodium restricted diets or those on di-

ALICE PAGE 3A

From Page 1

uretics however. If you suspect heat exhaustion or worse take steps immediately to begin a cool down process. Do call 911 then move victim to the coolest place possible. Removal of clothing is suggested. Spray with a mist or hose. Fan the victim to increase evaporation. Placing the person in cold water is a quick and effective method, placing cool rags or ice packs around the neck, armpits and groin area is another as these are points of access to large blood vessels moving larger amounts of blood. This can include placing feet in cold water as well. Hydrate with icy beverage or water if the person is able to drink and keep fluids down. Avoid alcohol and drinks with caffeine as these tend to lead to dehydration. Monitor the body temperature with a thermometer if possible while waiting for medical help. If it gets to 102 to 101 or the person begins to shiver stop the cooling process as shivering is a natural warming process the body will do and avoiding it is necessary until medical help arrives. SURVIVING SUMMER PAGE 3A

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The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Salvation Army Captains From Page 1

munity. “I grew up in a big city, so every time I end up in a smaller city I get excited about it,” Cox said. “It’s a little slower, a little calmer. My wife is from a small city, so she misses the big city [from time to time]. Orange has it’s blessings. People here are a lot nicer. Southern hospitality has really shown through.” They do face a pretty significant challenge: the financial situation of the Orange County Salvation Army. In November 2010, The Record Newspapers spoke with Major Queener about the financial situation at the Orange County facility. He said “”Our donations over the past twelve months have really dropped off. We really think it’s because of the economy. We are in desperate need for just about any kind of assistance people can afford to give.” It cost between $500,000 and $600,000 per year to operate the Salvation Army facility in Orange. They do receive a grant from the U.S. government, which is less than $10,000, to help with general operations. The United Way and the food bank in Beaumont lend a helping hand to help feed the families that come in. The Orange facility is not a licensed shelter, so the assistance they offer comes in the form of food, utility payments, rent assistance, etc.

This facility is currently running at a deficit and is having an extremely hard time helping those in the community that so desperately need it. Prior to his transfer, Major Queener said that new requests have jumped from 50 percent to 60 percent in the last few months and that number is expected to rise dramatically due to the intense heat wave across Southeast Texas. Major Queener was hesistant to leave such a burden on Michael and Laura, but when the Salvation Army needs you to move, what other option do you have? Even though the deficit can be a strenuous burden to bear, the Cox’s are fully prepared to do what they need to do to help the community. “We walked into a financial situation where we’re not as financially stable as we need to be,” Cox said. “My first day here, I started a campaign for the month of July with the Orange County Car Crew.” If anyone drives by the Salvation Army, they can see a few vehicles parked there. The Orange County Car Crew (David Self Ford, Cecil Atkission Toyota, Granger Chevrolet and Cecil Atkission Chrysler Jeep Dodge) have answered the call for assistance by starting the “Orange County Car Crew Challenge.” This group of automobile dealerships are pledging to donate $25 per vehicle

Surviving summer in Texas From Page 2A

For parents of students who may be involved in cheer or band camps with outdoor activities or athletic events over the summer, discuss these issues with the directors and coaches prior to allowing your child to participate. It is important to educate your children as well. A proactive approach is better than the alternative. Never assume someone

else will know the methods of prevention or symptoms. Consequently, keep the same thing in mind for pets. Animals tend to have higher body temperatures and different physiological ways of selfcooling. “Shade is the key thing, they’ve gotta have someplace they can stay out of the heat. Their water needs to be kept in

Alice

for everyone sold in the month of July. Although generous, the dealer principals felt more could be done for this charity so they are challenging local businesses to match the amount that this dealer group has agreed to pledge. The Orange County Car Crew expects to sell enough vehicles to donate $5,000 to the Salvation Army at the end of this drive but would like to at least double that with local business’ joining in with a match pledge. This drive will run through the end of July and the check will be given to the Salvation Army shortly thereafter to help meet the high demand. For more information on this campaign, please visit the Orange County Car Crew website, www.orangecountycarcrew.com. Pledges can be made on their website as well. All donations are tax deductible. While the Orange County Car Crew has a goal of $5,000, Cox said his ultimate goal is $10,000 for the month of July. The Salvation Army helps any who need it year around, not just during the holiday season. With the way the economy has been, many who didn’t need assistance last year find themselves walking in the doors of the Salvation Army. Church services are Sundays: 9:45 Sunday School Class, 11 a.m. Worship Service and they offer a Wednesday night Bible study. Those wishing to donate are encouraged to do so and can contact the Orange County Salvation Army at 409-883-4232.

the shade and they need fresh water every day. Water out in the sun gets too hot and they can’t drink it,” said local veternarian Albert Pugh IV. “The other thing to be really careful for with the dogs in the yard is some people turn the water hose on and think you’re going to cool them off with that water. If it’s been sitting in the hose it can actually

cause some second and third degree burns. It can be that scolding hot. If your going to spray the dogs with the water hose, make sure of the temperature, that it is cool.” Limit their activity during high heat times of day and, if possible, give them access to an indoor area. Consider contacting your vet for specifics for each type of pet you have. Dogs may play in a baby pool, while rabbits will enjoy a two liter bottle of water frozen and set in their pens. Some ani-

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at school,” said her mother. “She just really liked being on stage, so I thought I would look this summer and see if I could find anything in the area that might have to do with theater.” Thirty-nine young actors and actresses play 51 roles in the production. They are: Alice-Waverlee Cooper; The White Rabbit -Rachel Belcher; Mouse -Kierra Figgins; Duck-Ethan McCollum; Dodo-Abbigail Noah; Lory-Joshua Gosset; EagletAshlyn Scott; Old Crab, Clubs-Jonah Courtier; The Caterpillar, Hearts-Oceanna Rougeau; Frog-Footman-Cambree Williams; Fish-Footman, Sheep-Audrey Zeto; Duchess-Marlee Bradley; Baby, Clubs-Joseph Rougeau; Cook-Kyriea Sugg; Cheshire Cat-Lani Daniels; March Hare-Chloe Garrett; The Mad Hatter-Regina Marley; Dormouse-Bailey Noah; Five of Spades-Kaylee Lambert; Seven of Spades-Karly Rogers; Two of Spades-Jaden Henry; Knave of Hearts-Tristen Anding; King of Hearts-Chase Courtier; Queen of Hearts-Kayla Foster; Gryphon Julia Droll; Mock Turtle-Nathan Hayes; Ace of HeartsBrandyn LeBouf; Red Queen-Tyler Regan; White Queen-Aimee McNeil; Train Guard, Clubs-Gage Hale; Man in Paper Suit, Hearts-Hunner Font; Goat, Clubs-Jaycie Dronnett; Lady Bug, Hearts-Nonnie Courtier; Horse, Hearts-Edward Rucks; Tweedledum-Rhys Howeth; Tweedledee-Natalye Allen; Humpty Dumpty, Hearts-Brittany Dixon; White Knight, HeartsBrandon Curl; Leg of Mutton, Hearts-Austin Rollins. Waverlee has enjoyed her experience this summer. “I think it’s a great thing kids can do so they can start learning [how to act]. It’s been really good.” She said she may want to continue acting, but will probably wait till she’s older before taking the lead again. It’s a lot of lines for an 8-year-old to learn. You can see Alice in Wonderland this week only at the Orange Community Playhouse. Performances will begin at 7:37 p.m., Thursday-Saturday and 2:37 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets are only $5. Call 882-9137 for reservations. mals even can get sunburned. The National Humane Society indicates the following are signs of heatstroke are: heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, restlessness, excessive thirst, lethargy, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, and unconsciousness. For those traveling with animals this summer, Dr. Pugh says to take water with them. “When they do stop to walk the dog, try to get them to

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Sierra Bennett West Hardin HS

Haley Bomar High Island HS

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Abbey Johnson East-Chambers HS

Jacy Jones West Orange Stark HS

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Lauren Miller Central Medical Magnet HS

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Tran Pham Port Arthur Memorial HS

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drink. Don’t think they can stop and go into a restaurant and leave the dog in the car, because they will come back to a dead dog. If they are going to stop and eat, they need to do fast food or stop at some picnic area so they can eat and let the dog out.” Dr. Pugh also says when traveling with pets to make sure you have a microchip in them incase they get loose or away from you when you stop to walk the dog. In a few critical moments in our extreme above average temperatures, a child, a construction worker or an elderly neighbor working in her flower bed or your favorite pet can become a victim. Making this a fun, safe Summer takes a little knowledge, a little communication and a lot of water. Keep it in mind. Southeast Texas will cool off again in October – maybe.

BCISD to administer Credit by Examination

Bridge City ISD, in accordance with Chapter 74.24 TAC, will administer the Texas Tech University Credit by Examination Tests. Testing dates will be December 6, 7 and 8, 2011 and June 5, 6 and 7 2012. Students in grades first through fifth will be allowed to take each of the five tests (Math, Science, Language Arts, Reading, and Social Studies) at the elementary level without prior instruction. The student must score at least 90 on each of the five four tests to be considered eligible for grade level acceleration. Students in grades sixth through 12 will be permitted to take an examination to earn credit for an academic course for which they have had no prior instruction. Students must score at least 90 on the test to receive course credit. Additional information and registration forms can be obtained by contacting Gina Mannino at:  gina.mannino@ bridgecityisd.net.

Farmers’ Market open Wednesdays The Orange County Farmers’ Market has opened for the season and expanded to include Wednesdays from 4-7 p.m., in addition to the usual 6:30-10 a.m. on Saturdays. The market ends when the produce is sold out, which is often earlier than the times shown. The following items are now available: Watermelon, okra, tomatoes, eggplant, squash (yellow and zucchini), cucumbers and much more. The market is held in the parking lot in front of Big Lots on MacArthur Drive. For additional information, contact Texas AgriLife at 882-7010.


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• The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Heather” had to be towed home. The seagoing crew on board, “The boss” Cormier, “Buckshot” and Barbara, David and Laurie Ess, Kenneth and Connie Smith, Bobbie Burgess, Devera Cormier and Darlene Montagne. It’s remarkable they didn’t even have time for the first can of soda pop with the foam on top before the long sea trip came to an end. (Editor’s note: I believe the “Miss Heather” has been idle in port ever since.) 32 Years Ago-1979 The Harmon family opens the doors on their new Chevrolet dealership building at 2611 MacArthur Dr. The 44,000 sq. ft. building was planned and engineered by Bill Hughes, of Norstock Steel. *****A brand new Cadillac Coupe DeVille at Smith-Lee Oldsmobile-Cadillac, will set you back $9,997. A new Olds Cutlass Supreme, loaded, cost $4,997. ****Dick Bevins’ Texas Ave. Grocery specials this week, lean ground beef, $1.25 lb., baby beef veal chops, $1.79 lb., Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer, 6 pack, $2.99, Mrs. Tucker’s shortening, 42 oz., $1.19.

From the Creaux’s Nest RAIN, RAIN COME OUR WAY I’m sure now that we are in the worse drought I’ve ever lived through. For most of my life I’ve lived on the Gulf Coast in an area known for it’s annual rainfall. My estimation, at my place, is that we are 25 inches below annual rainfall so far this year. Thirty-nine inches since last October. A large oak tree across from the Creaux’s Nest, in Bridge City has died. Cox says he’s been watching it die for a month. A tour of the county shows up many treetops that are dying. Neighbor Cox’s rain dance was nice but way too little to help trees and shrubs. A little shower here and there will do little to relieve the problem. It will take a tropical disturbance, with several inches of rain, to save some of the hardwood. The earth is scorched. The fire band and band on fireworks was an absolute necessity. Any kind of spark right now could cause a tremendous loss. It was the quietest Fourth of July I’ve spent. I like fireworks but it wasn’t worth the gamble. In fact, everyone should be extra careful. If this heat and no moisture goes on for another month we’ll be in real trouble. Pray for rain. I would have never believed that in Orange County Texas I would be writing about desperately needing rain when I’ve lived in mud most of my life. *** I’m on a short leash this week so I may take a short cut. Hop on board and come along, I promise it won’t do you no harm. EDUCATION TAKES BEATING IN TEXAS When the 82nd legislature came to an end last week a $27 billion budget shortfall was filled with smoke and mirrors, fuzzy math and a blow to education and health. The Texas House holds a 101-49 Republican majority. Gov. Perry, who was raising his national profile with his eyes toward a national office, had his way and in the end. Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst wouldn’t cross Perry so he backed out of using the “Rainey Day Fund” to save education. He’s gutless. Texas Monthly magazine, in their Best and Worse, named him the Worse. The school fund took a $5 million hickey. A good selling point on the national scene for Perry, balance the budget and leave money in the bank. Regardless of what happens, Perry wins. He raises his brand. Like Sarah Palin, he’ll end up making plenty of money. I don’t believe he’s as sharp as Palin at making money but if he can land a V.P. spot, even if the team doesn’t win, he’ll do good in the aftermath. Perry and the 82nd Legislature have treated Texas education as an expense rather than an investment. Texas already ranked in the bottom half of rankings. High school graduation rate is 43rd. SAT scores, 45th, high school diploma, 25 or older, dead last at 50th. Before Perry cut $5 billion, Texas ranked 44th on local expenditures per pupil in public schools. Perry and company passed a bill that allows school districts to furlough teachers and cut their pay, a way to get around their union. School closings, teacher lay-offs and larger class sizes are in our future. Burdens have been shifted from the state to local school districts. Perry can brag that he didn’t raise taxes but public schools and colleges inherited Perry’s shortfall. He didn’t raise taxes and left money in the bank but that doesn’t tell the whole story, almost every fee in Texas was raised, some doubled, and other burdens were passed on to local entities. Cities and counties will have to pass the state’s shortfall on to local citizens. You see, Perry isn’t doing it to you, your county, city and school district is making your life harder. Gov. Perry is a hero. He balanced the shortfall and left the “Rainey Day” money in the bank. He has a good record to run on thanks to the expense of education, health care and infrastructure. He sold the people of Texas out for the national stage. The record speaks for itself; you will be amazed, two years from now, at what was passed on. CONDOLENCES We were saddened to learn about the death of coach Jeff Peveto, 52, who died July 1 at Ben Taub Hospital in Houston. Services were held Tuesday, July 5, at Claybar Funeral Home in Orange. Jeff was the son of coach Ed Peveto, who also died at a young age. His brother Garey recently passed away also. Jeff starred for his dad in several spots at Orangefield. He coached at numerous schools and was a history teacher. He coached at Bridge City with Les Johnson in the late 1990’s. To wife Zeida, brothers Greg, Bradley, sister Lisa and the entire family, we extend our deepest sympathies. He was and all right guy who fought the good fight against cancer. May he rest in peace. TURNING BACK THE HANDS OF TIME 12 Years Ago-1999 The “Miss Heather” pulled out of her homeport with Capt. J. Montagne at the wheel. She was hitting on just half her cylinders. At the Roundbunch crossing bridge, first mate D. Burgess called out to the bridge tender, “Open her up mate.” That’s when the “Miss Heather” went limp. Chief engineer, B. Cormier, had taken his boots off for smooth sailing but he had no answer for the ship getting crossways in the channel. A mile from port the long planned voyage came to an end. The “Miss

37 Years Ago-1974 Bridge City police agent David Hamlett is stabbed but was able to arrest the assailant after being wounded. Chief Wilson Roberts praised Hamlett, “This kind of crap has got to come to an end,” the Chief said. Officer Hamlett is in the hospital. *****On July 17, the Houston Texans will be playing the Chicago Fire, of the World Football League, in the Astrodome. Coach Jim Crossland, former head coach at Little Cypress-Mauriceville, is defensive coordinator for Chicago. The game will be televised. *****Jim Dunaway, a native of Cleburne, Texas, is a candidate for Orange City Council. He is in the law firm of Hustmyre, Harris, Dorman and Dunaway. (Editor’s note: Jim went on to become mayor of Orange. As far as I know, he is the only living member of that firm unless Murry Harris is still living.) 62 Years Ago-1949 Gov. Allen Shivers, of Port Arthur, takes the oath of office at the family home near Woodville. *****Barlow “Bones” Irvin is named athletic director at A&M. He has been track coach at San Antonio. *****Much of Texas copes with one of the worst outbreaks of polio in history. So far, Orange County remains free of the malady. A FEW HAPPENINGS Casey Anthony, a 22-year-old mother charged with killing her two-year-old daughter Caylee was facing the death penalty. The jury was facing seven charges. They found Casey not guilty on first-degree murder and all the charges, with the exception of lying to police. She was found guilty on those counts. She will probably serve less than a year if that much, maybe nothing. I wasn’t surprised she wasn’t convicted on the first-degree charge. Never bet on what a jury will do. *****From time to time I’ll let you in on a bargain somewhere. Right now if you’re in the market for a vehicle, car, truck or van, David Self has a large selection of low mileage, sharp, preowned autos. A deal with Ford Motor Company allows them to pass on some great savings with financing available. Tell them we sent you. Go look them over; you’re not obligated to buy. Nice cars are arriving daily. ***** You know you’re getting older if you recall the “Beatles” (British invasion). Drummer Ringo Starr turns 71 on July 7. ***George W. Bush qualifies for Social Security. He turns 65 on July 6. Time waits for no one. *****People were on the move over the July Fourth holiday. The streets are deserted. Corky and Betty Harmon were to spend a few days in Denver visiting daughter Debbie through the July Fourth holiday. Arriving at the Houston airport they lost an hour trying to find parking. They were then delayed when Betty had to go through an extreme search because of a bandage from a recent leg surgery. They missed their flight and a six-hour standby didn’t produce another flight. They turned down a flight to Oklahoma City to get on a waiting list for Denver. They spent their vacation in Houston’s humidity rather than Denver’s mountain air. What a bummer, shopping in Houston. ***H.D. and Pat Pate motored to Florida. *****Jenna Dunn Ballou and youngsters, Nate and Delilah arrived from Boston Monday night and were picked up in Houston by dad Mark. They plan a two-week visit with Mark but all the Dunn’s are excited to see them. She’s Mark’s youngest daughter. Dr. Amber, Mark’s other daughter, is expected in a few days from Cleveland. She hasn’t been home in a long time and the sisters will finally be together if the schedule works out. *****I heard someone say that no doubt we have the prettiest district judge in Texas. No, it’s not Dennis. *****Pitcher Roger Clemens goes on trial Wednesday on charges he lied about using drugs. He is charged with perjury and obstruction of congress. A July will decide his fate. He faces six charges and could face 30 years and $1.5 million in fines. The trial will probably last over a month. The “Rocket” faces bases loaded and a full count. *****A year ago, on July 6, funeral services were held for Lester “Buckshot” Winfree, who passed away on July 2. A year has gone by quickly but to Barbara and the family, I’m sure time drags slowly without him. *****It’s also been a year since Joe Chenella retired from BCISD after 48 years. His stint in BC began in 1962. In his first year at Bridge City the graduating class was around 25 students. Since Joe retired, Supt. Jamey Harrison has also left the district. ***** The Wednesday Lunch Bunch dined at Novrozsky’s last week. Park’s director Donna Scales always has a story to tell but last week’s story topped them all. Several from the Bunch, for various reasons, didn’t make it but a good group attended. The new 128th District Judge, Courtney Burch Arkeen, was right at home fellowshipping and shaking hands around the table. The Lunch Bunch will dine at Robert’s this week and back at Uncle Jim’s next. *****Every one’s buddy, Thomas “Sleepy” Smith admitted himself into University medical Hospital in Houston after returning from a cruise. He felt ill and rather than come home, he went straight to the hospital when the ship docked. We spoke with him Friday and he was undergoing test. He came home Sunday, attended church at McDonald Baptist and Wednesday he will get a new pacemaker in Houston.*****There is no doubt in my mind that Chief Sam Kittrell would be a good choice for police chief of Beaumont. He’s one of the finalists. His long record as Orange chief speaks for itself. If they select on qualifications and proven record, Sam should have it, but as always other politics are involved. ***** Special people we know celebrating their special day. ***Judge David Peck marks another year on

July 7. I’ll refrain from what I’d like to say because I know about pay back but I can truthfully say he’s not only a good guy but folks who know him tell me he’s a good judge. Happy birthday Judge.***My friend, the beautiful Donna Peterson, celebrates also on July 7. She’s aging well. ***Elizabeth Dupuis celebrates on July 8. She’s KeeKee and Nancy’s beautiful daughter. ***Cleon Hogan is not as well known as his famous brother Melvin, but he’s just as great a guy. He celebrates his birthday July 11. ***The medical lady, Lana Griffith, celebrates on July 11. ***Our longtime, good buddy, Dayle Gunn Weatherford, marks her special day on July 11. She’s been a fox for the nearly 50 years I’ve known her. ***Another very attractive lady, long ago water sports star, Joette Webb celebrates July 12. ***A special lady and good friend, Christy Khoury, marks her special day July 12 also. Best wishes to all. *****FaceBook friends have July birthdays. July 6, Lon LaRose; July 7, Alyson Nickum Smith and DeLisa Hallmark; July 8, Ronald VillaNoueva; July 9, Roxanne Alexander and Peggy McGuire; July 10, Billy Rowles, Sr. and July 11, Sandra Duvall.***Belated 98th birthday to Ollie Pitre, a wonderful lady, who celebrated July 2. *****Our friend Doug Harrington doesn’t say “Hanh” as much. He can hear better now that he’s had polyps removed from his throat which were blocking his hearing. He’s working at the pharmacy this week. I’ll have to check him out with a whisper.*****Bye, Bye Biden, Hello Cuamo. What a chess move by Obama if that comes about, however, I liked Biden. BIRTHDAYS THIS WEEK L.J. Braus, Lori Winstead, Makayla Peveto, Tom Arnold, Aaron Myers, Alyson Smith, David May, Denise Mumbach, Edith Peet, Gage Birmingham, Brantson Broussard, Jennifer Martinez, Jerry Wilson, Levy Hartman, James Swan, Devon Caldwell, James Arnett, David Peck, Jason Barclay, Margie Bean, Amber Seiler, Anita Hennigan, Elizabeth Dupuis, Eryn Lucas, Janice Gresham, Jesse B. Gunstream, Linda Dews, Liz Barclay, Maude Ball, Patrick Halliburton, Steve Stanley, Charles Vidrine, Clark Eastman, Emily Blanchard, Glenda Whitley, Henry Woodard, Kathy Fraccastoro, Paula Auffurth, Bertie Seitz, Corrine Welker, Dawnie Wilkinson, Donna Riley, Laura Childress, Brennan Dale Magee, Michael Brinson, Miranda Welker, Peggy Hebert, Sarah Cornwell, Shelby Welker, Arta Miller, Charlotte Stout, Cleon Hogan, Lana Griffith, Larissa Barclay, Joette Webb, Wickie Carter, Nancy Byers, Terry Meyer, Craig Simmons, Danna Fournet, Dawanna Landry and Dera Breaux. CLEBRITY BIRTHDAYS On July 6, Nancy Reagan will be 90; George W. Bush, 65; Gregory Smith, 28 and William Lee Scott, 38. ***Ringo Starr will be 71 on July 7. ***On July 8, Toby Keith will be 50; Kevin Bacon, 53 and Sophia Bush, 29. ***O.J. Simpson will be 64 on July 9; Jimmy Smits, 56; Tom Hanks, 55; Fred Savage, 35; Courtney Love, 47 and Kevin Nash, 52. ***Fiona Shaw will be 53 on July 10; Jessica Simpson, 31 and Quddus, 31. ***Georgio Armani will be 77 on July 11; Richie Sambora, 52; Lisa Rinna, 48; Lil Kim, 36 and Justin Chambers, 41***Richard Simmons will be 63 on July 12; Bill Cosby, 74; Kristi Yamaguchi, 40 and Michelle Rodriguez, 33. CAJUN STORY OF THE WEEK Clotile and Clovis Begnaud drove in from dere home at Cow Island and went to Shucks Restaurant, in Abbeville. Dey planned to got demselves a good storebought meal while dey in da city, dem. Clovis him, ordered one of dem big seafood platters. Clotile her, didn’t order jus yet but while Clovis was eating him, she fanned him wit her church fan. Wen he finish eating, dey boat went outside and came back in. She ordered a seafood platter and Clovis fan her while she eat. Da waitress, Lula Mae was observing dem her. Den she axe dem dere secret of being so loving in spite of dere age. Clotile answer Lula Mae, “Well Sha, we got to eat one at a time us because we don’t got but one set of false teeths.” C’EST TOUT A lot of good things are happening in Orange County. First are all the good things the Stark Foundation do on a daily basis; the City of Orange Downtown Riverfront Project; the Cow Bayou Park, for the City of Bridge City, a focal point for a proud and rebuilding community. For this, much praise should be given to the Historical Foundation and Giesla Houseman; the new CHAMPS building, a great asset for the citizens and county. The new city hall for Pinehurst, after so many years in a make shift city hall. Most importantly, the rebuilding of streets in West Orange and Bridge City, along with the county’s improvement of Roundbunch Road. Many other projects are ongoing, like the new Orange Central Fire Station, etc. As citizens we are truly blessed to live in this community. As a newspaper, we are proud to serve the citizens and business community with two well-accepted publications. Our Web site is enjoying great popularity and growing every day. We invite you to check it out at TheRecordLive.com. We certainly need more advertising. We have the best vehicle to deliver the advertisers message in our trade area. Not television, radio or any publication even comes close. We’re at every home, on every block, on every street, plus we distribute over 4,000 store copies. We need your support and guarantee you we will deliver results. Thanks to our loyal readers for your continued support. Over 45,000 of you read us regularly and for that we are grateful. We thank you for your time. Read us cover to cover and please patronize our family of advertisers. Take care and God bless.


The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Legals For The Record Marriage Licenses Issued by the office of Karen Jo Vance, Orange County Clerk for the week June 27 through July 1   Jonathan D. Franks and Kristin M. Freeman Bradley R. Carter and Carolina E. Ardoin Selvin R. Castro and Beatrice Ramirez Chad A. Britnell and Amy R. Kendrick Gerald B. Ballard and Laura A. Broussard Joshua C. Weeks and Brittni L. Durio Clinton E. Jones and Elena N. Brown Rodney J Gant and Chasity L Joulevette Frank J Martin and Rachelle E Henson Jacob S Bridges and Acacia C Borik James B Sims and Tracie R Morris

Orange County District Court- Divorces Edwin Edward Peddy and Linda Michele Peddy Melanie Ann Matthews and Coby Michael Matthews Leesa B. Jones and Russell Jones Melissa Ann Veronie and Thomas Elgin Denson Felicia June McCurley and Robert Allen McCurley Kaye Michelle Jones and Jonathan Paul Jones Robin Elizabeth Ybarra and Alfonzon Rene Ybarra Crystal Gail Baker and Michael Earl Cline Joi Renee and Willie Charles Reed II

VA issuing first payments to caregivers Staff Report

For The Record

The Department of Veterans Affairs will distribute more than $430,000 in stipend payments to Family Caregivers of Veterans in July. These Family Caregivers were the first to complete their Caregiver training under the program of Comprehensive Assistance for Family Caregivers. The first payments to five recipients in the Houston-area were issued today. “This is a long-awaited day for many Family Caregivers who diligently worked to achieve this landmark legislation to enhance services for Family Caregivers,” said VA Secretary Eric K. Shinseki. “I am proud VA can now offer direct support to the loved ones who give the Veterans we

The Orange County Grand Jury met on Wednesday, June 29 and returned the following true bills of indictments. The allegations are as follows: Cara Sue Long, 52, of Orange, debit card abuse. Jason Ray McFarlin, 37 of Nederland, two cases of criminal non-support. Kenneth William Vincent, 42, of Orange, criminal nonsupport. Kimberly Kirkwood, 39, of Orange, felony theft. Joshua David Latham, 24, of Orange, burglary of a habitation. Somer Nicole Cooper, 23, of Vidor, burglary of a habitation. Joe Keith Dodson, 20, of Vidor, burglary of a habitation. Tyler Wayne Ezell, 19, of Vidor, burglary of a habitation. Ashley Elizabeth Powell, 19, of Vidor, burglary of a habitation. Wesley William Granger, 19, of Vidor, felony evading arrest or detention. Jacky William Kelly, 48, Vidor, felony assault. Steven Angelle, 26, of Orange, felony assault. Kevin Dewayne Popilon, 21, of Orange, delivery of a controlled substance. Micah Allen Walker, 29, of Beaumont, felony possession of marijuana. Danny Frederick Houck, 56, of Emory, Texas, felony driving while intoxicated and felony evading arrest or detention. Jeremiah Xavier Thomas, 22, of Orange, delivery of a controlled substance. Jimmy Daniel Leatherwood, 25, of Vidor, felony possession of a controlled substance. Colton Wayne Palmer, 54, of Warren, Texas, felony driving while intoxicated.

Staff Report

Mary Ann Delano takes pride in announcing the retirement after 20 years of United States Naval Service of her son, Senior Chief Jeff Delano of West Orange Texas. Senior Chief Delano graduated from West Orange - Stark High School in 1991. On July 9, 1991 he shipped off to Great Lakes for boot camp. After recruit training he attended Basic Enlisted Submarine School in Groton, CT and reported to the USS WEST VIRGINIA SSBN 736, November 1991. While onboard he completed six, deterrent patrols and qualified Diving Officer of the Watch and Chief of the Watch as a Second Class Petty Officer. In March 1995, he trans-

Care Management and Social Work. “It has been profoundly gratifying to receive messages from Family Caregivers about the value of this program.”   Since May 9, nearly 1,250 Caregivers of Veterans who were seriously injured in the line of duty on or after September 11, 2001, have applied for the Program.  A core caregiver training curriculum is a required component of the program.  This comprehensive training, which was developed by Easter Seals in collaboration with VA clinical experts, has received many positive comments from Family Caregivers.      In addition to the training, eligible Family Caregivers can also access mental health services and are provided health care insurance, if they are not already entitled to care or services under a health

plan. Veterans may review the criteria for eligibility and download the Family Caregiver program application (VA CG 10-10) at www.caregiver. va.gov. The application enables the Veteran to designate a primary Family Caregiver and secondary Family Caregivers if needed. Caregiver Support Coordinators are stationed at every VA medical center to assist with coordinating the training or assist Caregivers in locating availableservices. Support for all Caregivers is also available via the national Caregiver Support Line at 1-855-260-3274. Caregivers of Veterans from all eras are encouraged to use the Website and Support Line to learn about more than two dozen supportive services VA offers to Family Caregivers.

ferred to NAVAL REACTORS Headquarters, Washington, D.C. Delano was picked to be a member of the Director’s briefing team before four Congressional committees. He was one of only five people assisting the Admiral in his testimony. In June 1998, he reported to U.S. Navy research vessel, SUBMARINE NR-1. He served as the Supply Department Leading Petty Officer. He also served as Supply Officer during three overseas deployments, earning recognition as the 2000 Sailor of the Year. In June 2002, Delano reported onboard the USS GEORGE WASHINGTON CVN-73 serving as Aviation Support Depot Level Repairables Officer and Material Division Officer. He completed two

six month Mediterranean and Arabian Gulf Deployments in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom and Southern Watch. In April 2005, he reported to his current assignment as the VQ-4’s Material Control Officer. As the Material Control Officer he oversaw the proper execution of 141 million dollars of aviation fuel and support funds that encompassed over 37,000 flight hours in support of U.S. Strategic and U.S. Central Commands missions. Senior Chief Delano volunteered for an Individual Augment deployment with Combined Joint Special Operations Air Component in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom and New Dawn from April 2010 to October 2010.

Senior Chief Delano’s personal awards are the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Navy & Marine Corps Commendation Medal (3 awards), Navy & Marine Corps Achievement Medal (6 awards), Expert Rifle and Pistol Medals. He is also qualified to wear the Naval Aviation Supply Officer, Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist, Enlisted Submarine Warfare, Deep Submergence, and SSBN Deterrent Patrol Pin (six awards) Breast Insignias. Senior Chief Delano is married to Cindy Huff Delano of Trout Creek, Texas. They reside in Noble, OK with their two children Cody 19 and Beth Ann 14. Jeff and Cindy have enjoyed the adventures that the Navy has brought over the last 20 years but are looking forward to the next chapter in life.

Heavenly Hearts Charity Pageant set for July 9 Staff Report

For The Record

The 2011 Heavenly Hearts Summer Kings and Queens Charity Pageant will be held July 9 at the Bridge City Com-

STUDIO & FORMAL WEAR

1403 GREEN AVENUE, ORANGE TX

serve a greater quality of life by allowing them to remain at home surrounded by family and friends.”    Family Caregivers will receive an average $1,600 in monthly stipend payments. The initial payments will average $2,500 because the first stipend checks are retroactive to the date of application.  The amount of the stipend is based on the condition of the Veteran and the amount of care they require as well as the geographic location where the Veteran resides.  An additional 80 stipend payments will be released from the U.S. Treasury on July 8 bringing the total to 176 Family Caregivers receiving the stipend in July. “We continue to process and approve applications on a daily basis” said Deborah Amdur, VA’s Chief Consultant for

Delano retires from U.S. Navy after 20 years For The Record

Orange County Grand Jury indicts 18

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(409)883-4253

munity Center in Bridge City. Entries will be accepted until June 24.  Early entries receive large discounts on the entry fee. Age divisions for boys and girls are from babies through adults with no residency requirement.  Heavenly Hearts is a state registered pageant title. Crowns, trophies, embroi-

dered sashes, plaques, and gifts will be awarded. Every contestant will receive a tiara. This pageant will benefit the Bridge City - Orangefield Ministerial Alliance.  Contestants and spectators are encouraged to bring a non-perishable food or personal hygiene item to distribute to the needy of the area, and will receive a discount on door ad-

mission with their donation. For more information log on to the web site www.heavenlyheartspageants.com or check out the Heavenly Hearts Facebook page, or you may e-mail karimstringer@yahoo.com Businesses are welcome to advertise free of charge with a donation of any value to the event.


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• The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Community Bulletin Board Farmers’ Market expands to Wednesdays The Orange County Farmers’ Market has opened for the season and expanded to include Wednesdays from 4-7 p.m., in addition to the usual 6:30-10 a.m. on Saturdays. The market ends when the produce is sold out, which is often earlier than the times shown. The following items are now available: Watermelon, okra, tomatoes, eggplant, squash (yellow and zucchini), cucumbers, peppers, frozen blueberry juice, blueberry bushes, a variety of jellies, fig and pear preserves, squash relish, pickled vegetables, tomato juice, fresh eggs, and local honey, okra, tomatoes, eggplant, squash (yellow and zucchini), cucumbers, peppers, frozen blueberry juice, blueberry bushes, a variety of jellies, fig and pear preserves, squash relish, pickled vegetables, tomato juice, fresh eggs, and local honey. The market is held in the parking lot in front of Big Lots on MacArthur Drive. For additional information, contact Texas AgriLife at 882-7010.

BCHS Project Safe Graduation 2011 is underway Bridge City High School Project Safe Graduation 2012 has officially begun! We are excited about our 2012 seniors and we are ready to begin working on giving them the best Project Graduation.  We need the help of the parents and seniors and we cordially invite you to our next meeting at the Bridge City High School Library.  The meeting is Monday, July 11 at 7pm.  We really hope to see you there!  Thanks so much in advance and if you have any questions, please send to our email address adelkbc12@yahoo.com.

American Legion Post 49 to host fish fry July 7 The American Legion Post 49, located at 108 Green Ave. in Orange, will host a fish fry on Thursday, July 7 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Plates will cost $7 and will consist of fish, potato salad, cole slaw, green beans, bread and a dessert. Deliveries and walk-in’s are welcome. Please call after noon on Wednesday, July 6 and before 9 a.m. on Thursday. For deliveries, call 409-886-9861 or fax 409-886-1241.

BCISD to administer Credit by Examination

Bridge City ISD, in accordance with Chapter 74.24 TAC, will administer the Texas Tech University Credit by Examination Tests. Testing dates will be December 6, 7 and 8, 2011 and June 5, 6 and 7 2012. Students in grades first through fifth will be allowed to take each of the five tests (Math, Science, Language Arts, Reading, and Social Studies) at the elementary level without prior instruction. The student must score at least 90 on each of the five four tests to be considered eligible for grade level acceleration. Students in grades sixth through 12 will be permitted to take an examination to earn credit for an academic course for which they have had no prior instruction. Students must score at least 90 on the test to receive course credit. Additional information and registration forms can be obtained by contacting Gina Mannino at:  gina.mannino@bridgecityisd.net.

WOHS Class of 1971 Reunion The West Orange High School (Chiefs) class of 1971 has scheduled a 40th reunion for Saturday, July 9. The event will be held at the Sunset Grove Country Club in Orange. The classes of 1970 and 1972 are also invited to attend. The following people have not been located: David Block, Dottie Block, Marsha Bridges, Kenneth Brown, Sharon Clark, Dyanne Davidson, Linda Gilmore, Larry LeBlanc, Philip McDaniels, Rhonda Moore, Dee Ann Robak, Gene Sims, Carol Theriot, Earl Trahan, Paul Watson & Larry Whitworth. For questions, call Carolyn Reese Hankins at 409-886-8618 or Tommy White at 409-886-1176 or email Judy Armstrong Brimm at judydi_73@yahoo.com.

American Legion Post 49 to host karaoke night The American Legion Post 49, located at 108 Green Ave. in Orange, will host American Dream Karaoke featuring Patty Ferguson on Saturday, July 9 beginning at 8 p.m. For more information, please call 409-886-9861.

OC Retired Senior Citizens to meet July 11 The Orange County Retired Senior Citizens of Orange County will have their monthly meeting on Monday, July 11 at The Salvation Army Building on MLK and Strickland. The meeting will start at a new time, at 9:30 a.m. The program and meal that had been planned has been cancelled. Instead, bring a covered dish for the noon meal, as usual. We are still collecting soaps for

OCS. Also, bring a Bingo prize. All seniors are welcome to attend. Call 409-883-6161 for more information.

WOS Class of ‘81 to host reunion July 15 WOS Class of 1981 will have a 30 year class reunion on Friday, July 15 from 7 to 10 p.m. and Saturday, July 16 from 7 to 11 p.m. Friday will be a gathering at the West Orange City Hall Community Room, 2700 Western Ave., West Orange. Saturday will be a reunion party at the VFW Hall, N. Hwy. 87, Orange. Tickets are $25 and may be purchased at the door.  For more info, contact Debbie Turley Womack at (409) 779-9035 or Martha Waddell Foley at (409) 330-0686 or by visiting the reunion website at www.wos1981.myevents.com

American Legion of host pool tournament The American Legion Lloyd Grubbs Post 49 in Orange will be hosting a pool tournament every Friday from 7 p.m. to midnight. There is a ten player maximum. The community is encouraged to join in the fun and free food to help support the Veterans. For more information, call 409-330-4847.

Free Diabetes Class Offered in July

Orange County Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Coalition of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service is offering diabetes classes to be held July 18 through July 22 from 10 a.m. to noon in Vidor. This is a free educational program for people with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. The primary goal is to help participants learn how to manage their blood glucose in the ranges recommended by the American Diabetes Association. It is recommended to attend all five classes to receive the full educational benefit of the course. For location and to pre-register contact the Texas AgriLife Extension Office at 409-882-7010 or 409-7692400 ext 7010.

Chevron Retirees Association to meet July 12

brunch will be a morning for final closing. If you know of anyone who attended those class years and is not aware of the reunion, please contact Denise Simoneaux Simmons at 409-735-6374, or Dana Zoch Mortimer at 409-3137261. Also, teachers who taught during that time are welcome to attend by contacting the above numbers for information, as well.

Bridge City HS Class of 1991 to hold 20 year reunion The 1991 graduating class of Bridge City High will hold their 20 year class reunion on the weekend of Aug. 12-13. There will be a private party at Madison’s in Beaumont at 8 p.m. on Aug. 12. A family skating party will be held at Spinnin’ Wheels in Orange at 11 a.m. on Aug. 13. The reunion will end with a party at Sunset Grove Country Club in Orange at 7 p.m. on Aug. 13. Early bird ticket prices are $40 for individuals and $75 for couples by June 15. Please go to their web site at http://BCClass1991.classquest.com for all details. For more information, e-mail Malinda Boudreaux mboudreaux1@gt.rr.com, and Christy Dobranski at crstydski@gmail.com.

Families Sought to Host High School Exchange Students SHARE! is looking for HOST PARENTS to host international exchange students for the 2011/2012 fall semester or school year. The students speak English, are covered by medical insurance and have spending money for their personal experiences. Host families provide a bed, meals, as well as friendship, understanding, and a genuine desire to share the American way of life. SHARE! families are diverse! Traditional two-parent families (with or without children), single parents or adults, and retired couples are wonderful host families. High school aged boys and girls from over 20 countries will be arriving late August to attend local high schools while living with their host family. Persons interested in hosting or obtaining more information can contact Yvette Coffman at 800-941-3738 or visit www.sharesouthwest.org.

The Chevron Retirees Association will meet Tuesday, July 12, at 11:15 a.m. at Robert’s Steakhouse, 3712 W. Park Ave., in Orange. All Chevron, Texaco and Unocal retirees, spouses and guests are cordially invited to attend this meeting for a good “Dutch treat” meal, fellowship, and an update on the latest activities of the CRA.

CASA to offer volunteer training classes Advocates for Children, Inc. “A CASA Program” will have a volunteer training class beginning July 7 and concluding July 9.   It will be 9 a.m until 5 p.m. daily at the Orange CASA office located at 2120 Gloria Dr.  For more information call 409-8862272 or go on-line at www.advocates-4-children-inc.org    There are abused children in our region that need your help!

Heavenly Hearts Charity Pageant set for July 9 The 2011 Heavenly Hearts Summer Kings and Queens Charity Pageant will be held July 9 at the Bridge City Community Center in Bridge City. Entries will be accepted until June 24.  Early entries receive large discounts on the entry fee. Age divisions for boys and girls are from babies through adults with no residency requirement.  Heavenly Hearts is a state registered pageant title. Crowns, trophies, embroidered sashes, plaques, and gifts will be awarded.  Every contestant will receive a tiara. This pageant will benefit the Bridge City - Orangefield Ministerial Alliance.  Contestants and spectators are encouraged to bring a non-perishable food or personal hygiene item to distribute to the needy of the area, and will receive a discount on door admission with their donation. For more information log on to the web site www.heavenlyheartspageants.com or check out the Heavenly Hearts Facebook page, or you  may e-mail karimstringer@yahoo.com Businesses are welcome to advertise free of charge with a donation of any value to the event.

Rape and Suicide Crisis Center to offer support group meetings The Rape and Suicide Crisis Center of Southeast Texas will be hosting a support group for female survivors of sexual assault the first and third Wednesday of every month, starting at 5:30 p.m. Meetings will be held at the Foundation of Southeast Texas building, located at 700 North St. in downtown Beaumont. To RSVP or for further information, please contact the Crisis Center at 409-832-6530.

Last two classes of Stark High School to reunite in July

The classes of 1976 and 1977, the last two years of students who attended Lutcher Stark High School, are planning the 35th Reunion of the Class of ’76, while at the same time merging with the class of ’77. Events will begin Friday, July 15, for a mixer of students and spouses, with Saturday and Sunday to be days of continued events.  A golf scramble is planned for Saturday morning, with a disc jockey and food finishing off the evening events.  Sunday

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The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

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Deaths and Memorials Death Announcements:

Valton David Landrum West Orange Valton David Landru, formerly of West Orange, passed from this life on June 27 in British Columbia, Canada. David was born to Valton and Wilma Dee Cain Landrum on Jan. 24, 1946. David was preceded in death by his mother, Wilma Dee, and his father Valton. David is survived by this loving wife, Susie Landrum; sons, Val Landrum and wife Christine, Jeff Smith and wife Paige; sister, Judy Landrum Turner and husband Kyle; aunt Laverne Landrum Hubbard; and cousin (like a brother) Tommy Hubbbard. Daivd was a mineral geologist and was proud of his military service. He loved airplanes and flying and had planned to build his own airplane. If a man’s stature were to be measured by his number of friends, David was a giant. All over North and South America, on projects from his highest boss to the lowest peon, he was loved. A memorial service will be held in Beulah County for family and friends.

To Be held:

AJ Bernardini Orange AJ Bernardini, 84, of Orange passed away on Sunday, July 3, at St. Elizabeth Hospital in Beaumont . He was a native of Everett , Mass. ; born on Jan. 13, 1927 to parents Alexander Bernardini and Lena (Tognert) Savarino. He served his country in World War II in the Navy. He had lived in the Orange area since 1948 and retired from US Steel after 40 years as a boilermaker. He was a member of First Church of Orange and he never met a

stranger. He was preceded in death by his father, Alexander Bernardini; mother, Lena Savarino; step father, George Savarino; sisters, Lenora Fermano, Beatrice Barret. His is survived by his wife of 64 years, Shirley Marie Bernardini of Orange; son, Rev. John T. Bernardini and wife, Shirley of Livingston; sister, Rita Anderson of Orange, Dorothy Cannta of Nashua, N.H., Jean Bonita of Malden, Mass., Anna Travis of Nashua, N.H.; brothers, Louis Savarino of Stoneham, Mass., Vincent Savarino of Dracut, Mass.; brother in laws, Tony Fermano, George Anderson; grandson, Rev. John T. Bernardini II and wife, Rebecah of Baytown; eleven nieces and eight nephews. A Graveside Service will be held on Thursday, July 7, at 10 a.m. at Evergreen Cemetery in Orange, with the Rev. John Bernardini II and Bro. Gary Wheeler officiating. Funeral arrangement are under the direction of Dorman Funeral Home. Pallbearers will be Leo Anderson, Gregory Willis, Larry Hammett, Jeff Anderson, George Anderson II and Mark Anderson. Honorary pallbearer is the Rev. Lester Roch.

Linnie Lavaldie Hill Hatcher Orange Linnie Lavaldie Hill Hatcher, 97, of Orange p a s s e d away Saturday, July 2. The Funeral Service will be at 2 p.m., Thursday July 7, 2011 at Claybar Funeral Home in Orange. Officiating will be Brother John Fontenberry of Calvary Baptist Church in Deweyville. Interment will follow at Burge Cemetery in Vidor. A gathering of family and friends will be from 5 to 9 p.m., Wednesday at the funeral home. Mrs. Hatcher was born March 12, 1914 in Vidor to Samuel and Annie Marie (DeWitt) Hill. She graduated valedictorian from Vidor I.S.D. and was later a member of the American Legion and the Disabled American Veterans.

Bingo was one of her favorite things to play along with Scrabble and different card games. She enjoyed camping, fishing and she was an avid hog hunter but more than anything else, she was an amazing mother and grandmother. She is preceded in death by her parents; husband, J.D. Hatcher; sons, Earnest “Guy” Hatcher and Cecil Bennett Hatcher; grandson, Timmy Swinney; sister, Lenora Stephens and brother, Dick Hill. Those left to cherish her memory and pass down her legacy are her daughter, Anna “Patsy” Marie Swinney and grandchildren, Debra Johnson and husband, Fred, Billy Swinney, David Swinney and wife, Jeanne, Jo Revere and husband Bradley, Kandi Jackson, Guy Hatcher, Jr., Michael Swinney, L.J. Puente and wife, Jamie, Bennett Hatcher, Jr. and wife, Michelle and Linda Gayle Smith and husband Donnie. She is also survived by 16 great grandchildren; 17 great great grandchildren; two great great great grandchildren; sister, Bonnie Hill Bell; many nieces, nephews and family members who all love her dearly.

Held:

Jeff Peveto Orange Jeffrey Allen Peveto, 52, of Orange, died Friday, July 1, at Ben Taub Hospital in Houston. Funeral services were held on Tuesday, July 5, at Claybar Funeral Home in Orange with the Rev. Bobby Spross and Dr. James Fuller officiating. Burial followed at Bland Cemetery in Orange. Born in Beaumont, on March 3, 1959, Jeff was the son of Edward Leo Peveto and Patsy June (Wilson) Stonecipher. He worked as a coach and teacher at nine different high schools throughout his career. He last worked in the Beaumont Independent School District at

Sea turtles returning to exactly that Staff Report

For The Record

Three rehabilitated green sea turtles, including some stranded by last winter’s record freeze, were returned to the wild July 1 in the lower Laguna Madre. The Jeff Boruff Memorial Sea Turtle Release was dedicated to the memory of Jeff “Yappo” Boruff, a young Texan who volunteered summers helping endangered sea turtles in Mexico. Boruff died in a tragic ATV accident in late 2009, but his passing gave rise to a fundraising effort acknowledged at the Sea Turtle, Inc. facility right after the July 1 turtle release. The nonprofit received a $5,000 donation that will be used to fund a student intern position for sea turtle nest monitoring. The YappoPalooza fundraising project supports a binational effort between the U.S., Texas and Mexico that has brought back

the Kemp’s Ridley turtle from the brink of extinction. The focus involves protecting the Ridley’s primary nesting sites. About 95 percent of the worldwide Kemp’s Ridley Turtles nest in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico along Gulf of Mexico beaches. Besides hosting a fundraising event, YappoPalooza allowed hunters to aid the turtle cause and get a shot at winning one of six beautiful firearms donated by Joe McBride of McBride’s Guns. At the July 1 check presentation, officials also drew winners for raffle prizes, which included a customized Remington 700 30-06 valued at more than $5,000, plus shot-

guns and other guns. Among those present at the check presentation was Jeff’s father Scott Boruff, who works as deputy executive director for operations at Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. “Some of my fondest memories with Jeff are from our days at the turtle camps,” Scott Boruff said. “We often sat out at night on the beach and watched the stars to the sounds of oceans waves rolling ashore. We laughed and shared stories with the locals about far ranging topics. We drove the deserted beaches on four wheelers looking for turtles. We went fishing on pristine beaches with no other people for miles in any direction. We always felt privileged to be close to nature.” Anyone can support the Kemp’s Ridley restoration effort by mailing donation checks to: Jeff Boruff “Sea Turtle” Memorial Fund, c/o Gladys Porter Zoo, attn: Dr. Pat Burchfield, 500 Ringgold Street, Brownsville, TX 78520.

Westbrook High School as a coach and history teacher. He coached football, soccer, track, and basketball. He was a member of Calder Baptist Church. He was preceded in death by his father, Ed Peveto; mother and step-father, Pat and Bill Stonecipher; and brother, Garey Birt Peveto. Jeff is survived by his wife, Zelda Peveto of Orange; sons, Scott Peveto and wife Erika, and Shane Peveto, all of Orange; daughter, Aubree Snipes and husband Johnathan of Bridge City; grandson, Brett Peveto; step-mother, Natalia (Murray) Peveto; step-children, Amanda Bertrand of Orange and Sabrina Bertrand of Silsbee. He is also survived by his brothers, Greg Peveto of Orange and Bradley Dale Peveto and wife Melissa of Natchitoches; sister, Lisa Maze of Beaumont; nieces and nephews, Britton Peveto, Derek Peveto, Ryan Maze, Payton Peveto, and Jacob Peveto; and sister-in-law, Margaret Bertrand. Chris Hall, Al Celaya, Joey Encalade, Mark Spross, Robert Smith, Keith Certa, Raymond Parish, and Slade Martin served as pallbearers. Honorary Pallbearers were Kevin Everett, Tony Tompkins, James Johnson, Nick Bryant, and Justin Jackson.

Samantha “Sam” Abigail Burch Bridge City Samantha was born June 10, 1989. She went to be with the Lord on July 1. She was 22 years old. A memorial service was held on Monday, July 4, at Liberty Baptist Church in Bridge City with Brother Bill Collier officiating. Cremation is under the direction of Claybar Funeral Home. She is survived by her husband, Anthony Daniel Burch and their daughter, Astra Jade Burch. She is also survived by her father, Carl Murphy and sister, Carli Murphy; grandparents, Joe and Betty Murphy and other various relatives. Sam lived a relatively short life, but she lived it like she wanted to take it all in as much as she could. She was quick to laugh and even quicker to let you know if she didn’t like something or

some one. She found the love of her life, A n t h o n y, and they married on October 17, 2008. They had their highs and lows as many young couples do, but their highest high was when their daughter Astra Jade was born on July 31, 2009. What a ride it has been for this little family, but for now their paths are taking a different direction, Sam has gone on ahead to be with our Lord and her loved ones who have gone before her and Anthony and Astra still have more roads to travel together until they all meet again someday.

Thelma Windham Emory Orange Thelma Windham Emory, 80, of Orange, died Friday, July 1, at Harbor Hospice in Beaumont. A memorial service was held on Sunday, July 3 in the chapel of Claybar Funeral Home in Orange. Mrs. Emory was born on June 13, 1931 in Beaumont. She was the daughter of Grace (Davis) and Bert Flickinger, Sr. and was a lifelong member of First Christian Church in Orange. In her earlier years, she worked as a photographer with All States Studios in Orange and then worked for 25 years with O.C.A.R.C. in Orange. Mrs. Emory was preceded in death by her husbands, Tom Windham Jr. and Tom Emory and her brother, Bert Flickinger Jr. She is survived by her children, Tom Windham III, Jill Windham Turner and her husband Ronald, David Windham and his wife Carla Sue; stepson, Gary Emory; stepdaughter, Donna Emory Havron, all of Orange. Mrs. Emory is also survived by her seven grandchildren, Jade Thomas Hearn and her husband Tory, Bucky Thomas and his

wife Heather, Thomas Windham IV, Travis Windham, Meredith Windham, Jessica Frazier, Melissa Windham; and her five great grandchildren, Aleigha, Kendyl, Kaden, Kellan and Karlie. Cremation arrangements were under the direction of Claybar Haven of Rest Crematory in Orange.

Leona LaBleu Hutton Orange Leona LaBleu Hutton, 83, lifelong resident of Orange passed away Sunday, June 26, in Port Arthur. Funeral Services were held on Friday, July 1, 2011 at Claybar Funeral Home in Orange with the Rev. Steve Neal officiating. Interment followed at Evergreen Cemetery. Mrs. Hutton was born Dec. 11, 1927 in Orange to Edgar LaBleu Sr. and Willie M. (Beattie) LaBleu. For 35 years she worked and ran Evergreen Cemetery along with her husband, Leonard. She was also a member of Cove Baptist Church. She is preceded in death by her parents; son, Charles Clawson; sisters, Pearl Dixon and Evelyn LaBleu and brother, Vernon LaBleu. Those left to remember her is her husband, Leonard G. Hutton; daughters and sonsin-law, Violet and Frederick Herachetta, Leona Mae and Karl Fields and Evelyn Clawson; son and daughter-inlaw, Dale “Butch” and Candy Clawson; 14 grandchildren; many great grandchildren and multiple great great grandchildren. She is also survived by her sister, Clara Murphy; brother, Edgar LaBleu Jr.; aunt, Ethel LaBleu and numerous nieces and nephews. Serving as pallbearers were Larry Pedder, Sr., Larry Pedder Jr., Larry Suárez, David Pedder Jr., Dale Clawson, David Pedder III and Karl Fields. Honorary pallbearers were Kurviest Murphy and Kevin LaRose. The family would like to thank all the nurses and staff at Gulf Health Care Center for all of their kindness and care during this difficult time.


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• The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Cooking with Katherine: Berry Cheesecake Parfaits Katherine Aras

For The Record

Dinnertime for families Staff Report

For The Record

Today’s families are busier and more budget conscious than ever. With kids more engrossed in extracurricular activities and Mom and Dad fighting to make ends meet in a still struggling economy, time spent together as a family is increasingly scarce. Perhaps nowhere is that more evident than around the dinner table. Only one in five families sit down to dinner together, with many instead grabbing meals on the go or choosing fast food. Neither option is especially healthy or cost-conscious. But there are ways even the busiest families can enjoy a healthy meal together without breaking the bank. * Embrace technology. It’s hard for many people, parents and children alike, to go an hour without being on the Internet. Families looking to spend more quality time together at the dinner table can now make the most of their time and their budget thanks to E-Mealz.com, a user-friendly online resource that provides a variety of easy weekly meal plans, complete with delicious dinner recipes and a corresponding grocery list that you just print and go! * Emphasize the importance

of dinner together. A healthy breakfast is often referred to as “the most important meal of the day.” But families should recognize that eating dinner together is just as essential to building a strong family as breakfast is to building a strong body. Dinnertime provides the perfect opportunity for families to converse, connect with and relate to each other on a daily basis. “Instead of crowding your full plate, we think that families should simplify,” says Jane DeLaney, founder and President of E-Mealz.com. “Making time for a shared meal around the dinner table means more time together ... more enjoying, more embracing, more capturing moments, more memories, more eternal perspective, and more reflection. It means more of all the things that truly matter.” * Be efficient when shopping for groceries. Trips to the grocery store can quickly turn into expensive odysseys for unprepared shoppers. Since time is of the essence for most families, be sure to bring a grocery list along on your next trip to the grocery store. A well planned list can drastically reduce time and money spent at the store, which only leaves more time for the family and money in your pocket.

Last week I gave you a recipe for a smoothie ice-cream cake.  Some of you might not have the time to put that together, so I thought I would give you this simple and fast recipe.  If you pick up these few items next time you go to the grocery store, you will be amazed how fast and easy this dessert is to make.  Especially if you have unexpected guest arrive.  Happy eating! 1 pkg.(8 oz.) Philadelphia Cream cheese, softened

1 ½ cup of cold milk 1 pkg.(3.4 oz.) Jell-O Vanilla Flavor Instant Pudding 1 ½ cups thawed Cool Whip Whipped Topping, divided 24 Nilla Wafers, coarsely chopped 1 ½ cups of seasonal berries (strawberries, blueberries) Beat cream cheese with mixer until creamy. Gradually beat in milk.  Add dry pudding mix; mix well.  Whisk in one cup Cool Whip. Layer half each of wafers, berries and pudding mixture in eight parfait glasses.  Repeat

layers. Tip: Use fancy brandy or other pretty glasses to look simply amazing.

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now you can have beef, chicken or turkey, what ever This recipe is for suits your fancy. our dear friend Sue’s Combine pansister Billie Hock all cake mix, cornmeal the way up in Jasper. and salt; mix well; Sue thinks her sister add milk and mix must be in her secwell. Insert a popsiVon Broussard ond childhood to cle stick in each want a child’s preferfrankfurter and dip ence for lunch. I think it is a in batter; coat well. Fry the great thing for any age, espe- corn dog in fat, heated to 365 cially if you are in a hurry and until golden brown. Turn corn are looking for something dog to brown evenly. Serve simple and quick. immediately. If their paper would be inNote: Batter will thicken terested in my article, I’d be while standing. If yours does, glad to send it to them. But just add a little more milk, a first things first. little at a time. According to Sue Phillips, • 2 cups pancake mix they are Gooder’n’ Syrup. Von • 1/2 cup cornmeal • 1 teaspoon salt • 1 1/2 cups milk • 10 frankfurters

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Staff Report

For The Record

Celiac disease is a condition that damages the lining of the small intestine, preventing it from absorbing parts of food. When a person has Celiac disease, his or her immune system attacks the villi, or areas along the lining of the small intestine, whenever foods that contain gluten are eaten. The

damage that results from such an attack makes it hard for the body to properly absorb nutrients, causing many people to become malnourished regardless of how much food is consumed. Found in foods such as bread and pasta, gluten is a protein that can be avoided if people adopt a gluten-free diet. Such a diet means avoiding foods, beverages and even medications that contain

wheat, barley, rye, and possibly even oats. While a gluten-free diet won’t cure Celiac disease, it can cause the symptoms to disappear and help the villi heal. Celiac disease is often mistaken for irritable bowel syndrome, so if such a condition has been diagnosed but nothing seems to be working, men and womenshould request they be tested for Celiac disease.

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The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

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9A

Shangri La Continues Wild Wednesdays Programs in July Staff Report

For The Record

Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center announces the July schedule for the Summer Wild Wednesdays programs. The Wild Wednesdays programs are hands-on activities and explore the natural world through informative natural history lessons from Shangri La educators. Below, you will find upcoming programs for the month of July. The Wild Wednesdays programs continue to mid-August with a different program topic each Wednesday. Program participants will

meet at the admissions window at the scheduled event time, 9:30 a.m., with sessions lasting about an hour. All programs are free of charge, but an RSVP is required as space is limited. Call 409.670.9799 to make a reservation. July 6, 2011 – Foraging for Frogs: Attendees will enjoy this friendly frog “fun-anza”. Visitors will catch and release tadpoles, learn about the frog life cycle and make scientific journals. July 13, 2011 – Hide-N-Seek: Visitors will seek out the local types of birds that are often “hiding” in trees around Shangri La and in area yards. This

program will give information about why so many different types of birds nest at Shangri La and how to make an athome yard an attractive place for birds to visit. July 20, 2011 – Sensing Nature: Experience Shangri La in a whole new way by using the five human senses to explore the pathways of the gardens. The whole family will enjoy this multi-sensory walk to tune-in to the quiet sounds, interesting smells and exhilarating sights of nature. July 27, 2011 – Who Polluted the River?: This handson adventure gives kids of all ages a chance to see who has

been polluting the Sabine River. Participants will take part in an interactive story, test water samples and collect marine life for study. Visitors will learn different ways to “Be Kind To Our World”. The Wild Wednesdays Series has programs for the young and young-at-heart. For those interested in attending, please RSVP by calling 409.670.9799. Located at 2111 West Park Avenue in Orange, Texas, Shangri La is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday, 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and Sundays, noon – 5:00 p.m. For more information, visit shangrilagardens.org.

Stark Museum of Art Hosts Powerful Portraits Family Day on July 16 Staff Report

For The Record

Landon Harris turned 7 on June 17. Parents are Patty Harris and Lannie Harris. Landon celebrated his big day with a birthday party and a Cars birthday cake.

The Stark Museum of Art, in Orange, Texas, invites families to Powerful Portraits Family Day on Saturday, July 16, between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Admission is free and all ages are welcome. Powerful Portraits Family Day will highlight portraits from the Stark collection. Children can search for clues during a scavenger hunt in the galleries and win a prize. Families will have the opportunity to try hands-on art activities and enjoy complimentary refreshments. A highlight of the Family Day will be a photo booth where families can pose for pictures. Props and costumes will be on hand to inspire creative portrait-making, both inside the booth and out. Art stations will be set up, and families will be able

to create their own portrait drawings with oil pastels, as well as color a unique coloring page inspired by portraits from the Museum collection. Amelia Wiggins, Public Programs Educator, welcomes the public, saying, “We invite families to Powerful Portraits Family Day to create art together and learn from the portraits in the Museum.” Wiggins reminds the public that the Museum welcomes all ages, but children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Families will also have the opportunity to view the special exhibition Visions of the West in a newly renovated gallery. Visions of the West features highlights of the Western collection of the Museum. This exhibition explores how the land, wildlife, individuals, conflicts and communities shape our concepts of the American West. Visions of the West will be on view through Dec. 31, 2011. Located at 712 Green Avenue in Orange, Texas, the Stark Museum of Art is open

Stark Museum of Art visitors will have the opportunity to create their own portraits at Powerful Portraits Family Day on July 16.

to the public Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Admission is free for all ages. Group tours are available by

appointment. For more information call 409-886-ARTS (2787) or visit http://www. starkmuseum.org/.

Families Sought to Host High School Exchange Students Staff Report

For The Record

SHARE! is looking for HOST PARENTS to host international exchange students for the 2011/2012 fall semester or school year. The students speak English, are covered by medical insurance and have spending money for their per-

sonal experiences. Host families provide a bed, meals, as well as friendship, understanding, and a genuine desire to share the American way of life. SHARE! families are diverse! Traditional two-parent families (with or without children), single parents or adults, and retired couples are won-

derful host families. High school aged boys and girls from over 20 countries will be arriving late August to attend local high schools while living with their host family. Persons interested in hosting or obtaining more information can contact Yvette Coffman at 800-941-3738 or visit www. sharesouthwest.org.


10A

• The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011


THE RECORD

B

‘THE RECORD’ HOMETOWN HIGHLIGHTS

SPORTS

A fishing trip not soon forgotten

AND OUTDOORS

Colburn-Fishing Capt. Dickie Colburn For The Record Dustin Socha stared in the direction of the frothing water and stated matter of factly, “You don’t see this kind of stuff fishing from the bank!” His parents had given him a guide trip for graduation and we had already canceled the trip three times in an effort to at least get the weather conditions in our favor. While I felt honored to even be called for such a special occasion, I also felt more than the usual amount of pressure that comes with putting clients on fish. Dustin’s Mom was obviously pleased that he was so excited when she called to line up the trip and the fact that you can only earn that gift one time in your life was not lost on the guide. As it turned out, we could not have picked a more perfect day and the fish came to the party as well. The sight that prompted Dustin’s profound opening statement was a half acre of schooling redfish stampeding their way across the glassed over lake. As soon as we were in casting range he launched a morning glory Trout Killer into the melee and hooked up instantly while his girlfriend, Ashley, photographed the happening. We ran down two or three more schools with the same results before the largest school of the morning decided to run us down. It is a very special moment to simply stand there rod in hand and watch at least a hundred redfish swim directly at the boat as if it did not exist. That would be the last school of the morning, but it was the icing on an unforgettable day! Those fish never show up when I am struggling to catch a single keeper and this trip was no exception. We had already spent the entire morning catching redfish and flounder that were blasting away at the schools of small shad parading down the shoreline in East pass and the mouth of Black’s. As a matter of fact, we were already limited on reds when we stumbled up on

College fb’s new taunting rule in effect Kaz’s Fearless Forecast Joe Kazmar For The Record The 2011 college football season will begin in less than two months with at least one new rule that is already causing a stir around college campuses. This new rule has to do with taunting, usually by a player racing into the end zone for a touchdown. If this player high-steps, taunts by holding out the football or pointing at a player who can’t make the tackle, somersaults into the end zone or otherwise showboats on his way to the end zone and a game official throws his hankie, the new penalty will erase the touchdown. Starting this fall, an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty could erase a touchdown in certain circumstances, according to an article written last week by rivals.com. The player will be penalized 15 yards from the point of the foul. Previously, such penalties were enforced on the ensuing kickoff after the touchdown and point-aftertouchdown. The NCAA approved the new rule that turns an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty into a live-ball foul instead of a dead-ball foul. Rogers Redding, secretary of the Playing Rules Oversight Committee comments on the new rule. “It’s really up to the players,” Redding says. “If they do what they’re supposed to do, we won’t have a problem. But there will be somebody. They’re teenagers, for goodness sake.” As the national coordinator of officials, Redding aims to create more consistent officiating nationwide on every call, not just the high-profile unsportsmanlike conduct calls. The subjective nature of unsportsmanlike conduct KAZ PAGE 4B

Dustin Socha with a good start to a great day.

the schooling fish. We kept a nice mess of flounder as well, but we missed far more than we caught. Dustin was much more adept at getting a redfish to the boat than a flounder, but he certainly caught his fair share over the course of the morning. We were catching most of our fish on a “River 2 Sea” Swim bait, but Dustin did

RECORD PHOTO: Capt. Dickie Colburn

much better with the flounder when he switched to a Gulp Mullet. The fish held onto it a little longer and he missed far fewer strikes. Catching flounder on artificials takes a little getting used to, but he got it going in very short order. COLBURN PAGE 2B

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2B

• The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Oil spill restoration projects focus on Texas coast Other criteria include project cost, likelihood of success and sustainability, value to prevent future injury, avoiding or minimizing adverse impacts from project construction or implementation, benefits to more than one natural resource, and public health and safety. Any interested parties are encouraged to be a part of the early restoration process by submitting project ideas online on the Give Us Your Ideas web page of the NOAA Restore the Gulf website. Or send comments by regular mail to NOAA Restoration Center, Attn: DWH PEIS Projects, 263 13th Ave South, Suite 166, St. Pe-

A sea turtle rescued from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill is being treated before released back into the Gulf of Mexico. The early restoration agreement is a first step toward fulfilling BP’s obligation to fund complete restoration of injured public resources.

Staff Report For The Record

AUSTIN – Natural resource trustees are planning early restoration to start addressing impacts to natural resources caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and they’re welcoming ideas for specific restoration and conservation projects in Texas. In April, the trustees announced an agreement in which BP agreed to provide $1 billion toward early restoration projects in the Gulf of Mexico to address natural resource injuries caused by the spill. The trustees are the U.S. Department of the Interior, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, on behalf of the United States Department of Commerce, and state agencies from Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. Texas trustees include Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD), the General Land Office and Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. Texas will select and implement $100 million in early restoration projects, as will each of the other four Gulf states. The federal trustees, NOAA and DOI, will each select and implement $100 million in projects, and the remaining $300 million will be used for projects selected by NOAA and DOI from proposals submitted by the states. The early restoration agreement is a first step

toward fulfilling BP’s obligation to fund complete restoration of injured public resources, including the lost use of those resources by people who live, work and visit in the area. The full Natural Resource Damage Assessment process will continue until trustees determine the full extent of damages caused by the spill. “This is a critically important opportunity to invest in the well being of the Texas coast,” said Carter Smith, TPWD’s executive director and a member of the executive committee overseeing NRDA spill restoration efforts. “Any and all suggestions from interested parties about coastal fish and wildlife habitat restoration projects are welcome.” Early restoration funds can be used for projects such as rebuilding coastal marshes, replenishing damaged beaches, conserving sensitive areas of ocean habitat for injured wildlife, and restoring barrier islands and wetlands that provide natural protection from storms. Early restoration project selection criteria include whether projects contribute to making the public or the environment whole by restoring lost or injured resources; address one or more specific injuries associated with the spill; restore natural resources, habitats or services of the same type, quality and comparable ecological or human use value to compensate for losses due to the spill; and are feasible and costeffective.

Colburn: Fishing As if we hadn’t already been blessed with an even better day than I could have hoped for, we ran across two gulls picking at shrimp in the open lake on the way back and caught trout until we got tired of catching them. Maybe I should say “Until I got tired of catching trout.” I think Ashley silently shared my assessment as she was slowly baking away in the sun, but as far as Dustin was concerned…..”Just keep casting because this wasn’t going to happen once it was back to bank fishing!” The entire week was incredibly good, especially for the flounder fishermen. It has not been this easy in a long time and the average fish is easily in the 2 to 3 pound class. Amazingly enough, the bite is as good in the river as it is in the bayous or the lake. I feel certain most folks know that the limit is five fish per person, but the temptation to keep more has just been too much for some local anglers of late. Unlike trout or redfish, catching and releasing flounder after you have limited is not very practical. Any time we are fortunate enough to limit quickly we leave them alone and chase specks and reds rather than take a chance on killing fish that apparently need at least some degree of protection. The local Game Wardens are also aware of how good the flounder bite is and they are making more rounds in hopes that just their presence will keep folks honest. The fine plus the replacement cost of a game fish is significant! The Tuesday evening river tournaments continue to grow regardless of weather conditions. Forty teams fished last week and the Gopher Industrial sponsored team of Trey Smith and Hunter Gothia won again with 3 bass that

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weighed 4.68-pounds. Darren Youngblood and Chad Koonce had only one bass that weighed 3.02 pounds, but it was good for second place and the big bass pot as well. Steve Henson and Gary Loke took home third place money with a 2.54 pound fish. While most of the teams said that they caught a lot of small bass, only one three fish limit was weighed in. Extremely high tides and acres of bait fish have really scattered the fish in the river lately.

Lamar Athletics offers football ‘Flex Pack’ While season tickets offer fans the same great, guaranteed seats to every home football game, Lamar athletics understands that not every fan can commit to attending all six games that the 2011 season has to offer. But thanks to the newest offering by the Cardinals’ ticket office, Lamar fans can still enjoy some of the biggest games of the season and save money. The Cardinals’ Flex Pack is a three-game pack that gives Lamar fans the ultimate flexibility, allowing them to pick the games they want to attend. Fans will have the choice of one premium game, one non-conference game and one Southland Conference game. The Flex Pack is only available by calling (409) 880-1715 or visiting the Montagne Center ticket office at 4400 South Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway.

tersburg, FL 33701. General information about the Natural Resource Damage Assessment process is on TPWD’s NRDA FAQ web page. Any ideas provided by the public will be added to the list of suggestions already received by the trustees and will be considered for inclusion in the early restoration planning process. Projects selected by the trustees will be made available to the public for review and comment in a draft Early Restoration Plan. Comments received by the trustees will be considered prior to finalizing the plan.


The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

3B

Chrystal Beach shark puts scare in swimmers Staff Report

For The Record

GALVESTON- Large sharks caught in the Gulf of Mexico are creating a scare for swimmers and people on the beach. At least two sharks were caught by fishermen recently along the Texas coast. Experts say you are more likely to get hit by lightning than be bitten by a shark, but it’s still the talk of a couple beaches this holiday weekend. One was caught near Crystal Beach. The other was found near Matagorda Bay. Sharks have been around a lot longer than tourists, so it may not be that they’re coming closer to shore. Instead, people are wade-fishing in their territory and sometimes even catching them on a fishing line. On a Matagorda Beach Saturday, it was an unexpected but very celebrated catch of the day -- a 4-foot bull shark caught by a female angler. It’s a fair sized shark, but take that and double its size. For that, we move farther east on the Texas Coast near Rollover Pass. On Sunday, it was another fishing expedition. Three friends from Beaumont went to the Gulf for the day and wound up with a

Fishermen haul in a large bull shark that are common on the Texas coast.

300-pound bull shark on the end of the line. It took 45 minutes to pull it in and it was said to have been a group effort. “We just happen to be at the right place at the right time, right gear and hooked up with one of the biggest sharks we ever hooked up; brother-in-

The shark was released after the pictures were taken, so he’ll live to tell about the time he got away. The same fate was made for the smaller version off Matagorda. It was released as well, but with a tracker installed by state parks and wildlife workers.

law standing next to me, I handed him the stick. Fortyfive minutes later, we got an 8-foot 4-inch bull shark on the beach. Best friend Sparky here, my brother-in-law, my brother, everybody helping out; a good time, can’t beat it,” said Damian Diaz, who helped land the shark.

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Body of Purdue running back found in lake The body of a Purdue football player who had been missing since Sunday night has been recovered from an Indiana lake, the school confirmed Tuesday. Purdue said the body of Sean Matti, a 22-year-old running back from Shoreview, Minn., was found floating in Lake Freeman about 30 yards from shore by officers from the state Department of Natural Resources, the Carroll County Sheriff’s Department said.

Sean Matti

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hearts go out to Sean’s family ... and all those who knew and loved him,” Purdue athletic director Morgan Burke said in a statement. “Purdue football is a family, and I am terribly saddened by the loss of one of our young men,” coach Danny Hope said. “[Wife] Sally’s and my prayers continue to go out to Sean’s family and all his friends and loved ones. He was a special young man whose positive spirit will be a part of our program forever.”

The school said the Carroll County coroner’s office confirmed the death. Matti, a fifth-year senior walk-on who was attending a party with friends, was last seen swimming in Lake Freeman at 5 p.m. local time on Sunday afternoon, according to Indiana media reports. He was reported missing about six hours later. Lake Freeman is about 25 miles north of Purdue’s West Lafayette campus. “On behalf of the entire Purdue Boilermaker family, our

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• The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Health and Fitness-

Importance of proper electrolytes Lima, red, white and pinto beans are the highest in mineralrich electrolytes. Beans should be properly spiced to avoid excess gas. Most greens are a great source of the major required electrolytes. Spinach, in particular, is high in minerals. Incorporate more greens into your diet. You can choose from kale, beet greens, mustard greens, and chard, to name a few. Each of these greens holds sodium, calcium, potassium, magnesium, as well as “prebiotics” that foster good gut flora and digestion. Specifically, bananas are a great source of electrolytes as they are rich in minerals. Potassium is a key form of electrolytes, and this sweet fruit it one of the richest sources of potassium on the planet. Here is a great tip to help. Put a pinch of Himalayan salt and a teaspoon or so of organic raw apple cider vinegar in your purified water will replenish electrolytes rapidly. Greg the Trainer is a Fitness Advisor in the Bridge City, Orange, Vidor area. For additional information you may contact him at 409-550-0777 or gregthetrainer@yahoo.com.

Greg Burkett Greg The Trainer For The Record Electrolytes are ionic solutions (salts), existing in nature in the form of minerals. Electrolytes are responsible for keeping the body properly hydrated so the muscles and nerves can function properly. Since the human body is composed mostly of water, it is important that we take in adequate amounts of these minerals. What is more, when we are well hydrated, we are able to release toxic internal wastes such as harmful chemicals, urea and ammonia. Additionally we need to practice proper hydration all day long daily to help prevent exercise dehydration. Electrolytes are important because they are what your cells (especially nerve, heart, muscle) use to maintain voltages across their cell membranes and to carry electrical impulses (nerve impulses, muscle contractions) across themselves and to other cells. Your kidneys work to keep the electrolyte concentrations in your blood constant despite changes in your body. For example, when you exercise heavily, you lose electrolytes in your sweat, especially sodium and potassium. These electrolytes must be replaced to keep the electrolyte concentrations of your body fluids constant. So, many sports drinks have sodium chloride or potassium chloride added to them. They also have sugar and flavorings to provide your body with extra energy and to make the drink taste better. Another example where electrolyte drinks are important is when infants/children have chronic vomiting or diarrhea, perhaps due to intestinal flu viruses. When children vomit or have diarrhea, they lose electrolytes. This can contribute to dehydration. Again, these electrolytes and the fluids must be replaced to prevent dehydration and seizures. Drinks such as Pedialyte have sodium and potassium in them like the sports drinks do. However, pediatricians do not recommend giving sports drinks to a sick child! Sports drinks have much higher sugar concentrations than Pedialyte and the high sugar is not a proper treatment. As for your body, the major electrolytes are as follows:

You may think of getting a re-surge in electrolytes from a bottle of Vitamin Water or Gatorade, but truly the best and most natural way of replenishing electrolytes is from food. In fact, sugary sports drinks only provide a quick burst of minerals, but deplete the body over time. Most fruits and vegetables are of help. Apples, corn, beets, carrots and green beans, are all rich in electrolytes. Other electrolyte-laden fruits and veggies include limes, lemons, oranges, sweet potatoes, artichokes, all types of squash and tomatoes. For best results, choose fruits and vegetables that are organic and, if possible, local to your community. Nuts and seeds also are a great help. Most nuts and seeds are very high in electrolytes. For best results, choose nuts that are unprocessed and organic. Add some almonds, cashews, walnuts, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, peanuts, hazelnuts, pumpkin seeds or pistachios to your morning cereal of oatmeal.

Kaz: Football taunting breaks rules calls is an issue. One official may judge a celebration as a spontaneous response to a great play. Another may see it as showboating and excessive. Redding’s office distributes training videos to every official in the country of correct and incorrect calls and officiating mechanics. Training videos also are available during the season, recapping more recent games. There already has been criticism of the rule since it became official and Baylor head coach Art Briles commented during a recent Big 12 coaches teleconference. “If you’re letting me vote, I’m voting no,” he quipped. “I don’t see how taunting to you won’t be different than taunting to me. If a guy elongates his stride, is that taunting somebody?” Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops expressed his thoughts on taunting rules, “The enforcement of it, it’s not for me to say,” Stoops began. “But what I do know is what our players—what’s explained to them is that it is a judgment call. Everybody’s judgment is different. “So if you open the door for it to be called, then don’t be saying if it is called ‘All I did was this.’ You opened the door, gave them the opportunity, and everybody’s judgment is different. So don’t go there. And hopefully our players will abide by the rules,” Stoops concluded optimistically. Most coaches, with the rule

now possessing much bigger consequences, will likely have to explain a similar approach to their teams. But coaches can’t suppress players’ emotions, and a big play could mean forgetting those guidelines. “I would hate for one guy that views taunting differently that another to determine the outcome of a football game,” Briles pointed out. This Korner has seen this taunting business become more prevalent in the past couple of years and understand the NCAA wants it to stop. However, taunting can easily become confused with jubilation immediately after a big play occurs and some game officials can’t stand to have that yellow flag sit in his back pocket too long. I can see at least one touchdown per game get nullified by this new rule. College football is a very emotional sport. I look for this unsportsmanlike conduct call to be made after a sack, when the defensive player is dancing around the quarterback. It may be called whenever a player looks back to see how close the defender is when running for a touchdown and go into the end zone running backwards. I believe this new taunting rule will become so unpopular with the players, coaches and fans that it will be modified (watered down) BEFORE the 2011 season gets to the post-

season. KWICKIES…Our Houston Astros just finished a ninegame home stand against three American League teams and were able to win only one of those games. It appears their season has gone from poor to pathetic. Earlier the talk was that the Astros had a chance to lose 100 games for the first time in franchise history. With their record standing at 29-57 through Monday’s 5-3 loss at Pittsburgh, it’s inevitable the team will hit that century mark for losses before the middle of September. I sure hope I’m wrong, but with a boat-load of minor leaguer pitchers in the bullpen, those late-inning losses are mounting up daily. It seems so unfair to the position players and the starting pitchers. Manager Brad Mills needs to waive that stupid 100-pitch rule and let some of his starters who are having a good game finish it. Happy to see former West Orange-Stark Lady Mustang and University of Houston Lady Cougar star Brittney Scott will continue to play basketball at the professional level next season in Spain. Houston Texans’ head coach Gary Kubiak calls his weeklong trip to visit United States military troops in the Persian Gulf the “thrill of a lifetime.” Kubiak is one of four NFL representatives participating in the third NFL-USO Coaches Tour of military bases that began last week in Kuwait.

From Page 1B

Kubiak was joined by Arizona head coach Ken Whisenhunt, former New Orleans and Indianapolis coach Jim E. Mora and his son, former Atlanta and Seattle coach Jim L. Mora. Former Port Neches-Groves and Lamar University golf star Chris Stroud finished tied for sixth in last weekend’s AT&T National on the PGA Tour that was won by Nick Watney. Stroud fired rounds of 7068-66-68—272 to finish five strokes off Watney’s winning pace and collected a check for $215,450. Detroit Tigers pitcher Rick Porcello Sunday became only the fifth pitcher since 1919 to have three wild pitches and hit three batters in a game. Despite his wildness, Porcello was the winning pitcher in the Tigers’ 6-3 Interleague victory over the world champion San Francisco Giants. JUST BETWEEN US…As good a season as Houston Astros’ right fielder Hunter Pence is having, he is extremely lucky that Major League Baseball has a rule that every team MUST be represented in next Tuesday’s All-Star game hosted by the Arizona Diamondbacks in Phoenix. Otherwise neither Pence nor any other Astro would be on this year’s team. Pence finished 17th in the voting for National League outfielders and his teammate Michael Bourn, who leads the major leagues in stolen bases and is batting near .300, wasn’t even mentioned.

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4B


The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

5B

Local science teachers explore Trinity Bay ecosystems Staff Report For The Record

Fourteen Southeast Texas science teachers and future teachers learned about the local environment recently with field trips throughout the area in Lamar University’s Department of Earth and Space Sciences 16th annual Teaching Environmental Science summer institute. On Friday, the participants took a boat trip on the Trinity River where they learned about ecosystems in the Trinity Bay estuary. The 10-day field institute, called “Teaching Environmental Sciences in the Three Rivers’ Watersheds and Wetlands,” is offered in conjunction with the Region 5 Science Collaborative and 24 local industries, state and federal agencies, and environmental non-governmental organizations. The institute is a co-enrollment graduate/undergraduate course for both in-service and pre-service (education major) teachers. In order to understand the bay and the estuarine species that inhabit it, the teachers and Lamar University students put on hip waders and walked around in the coastal water. Using a large fish net (seine) and small hand nets, they looked at different species including juvenile shrimp, comb jellyfish and plants that can grow underwater. They also tested the water salinity and found that it was unusually high at 13 parts per thousand because of on-going drought conditions. “By literally immersing teachers in the Trinity Bay estuary, we not only get their full attention on the subject, but we also get them to experience what it is like to be an estuarine organism surrounded in warm, brackish and turbid water,” said Jim Westgate, director of the institute and University Professor of Earth & Space Sciences at Lamar. “The teachers now have a deep connection with the bay organisms and the ability to teach to their students from their own experiences.” Area teachers participating were Minta Bergeron, Jami Burns and Melinda Vail of Port Arthur; Katie Kornegay of West Orange-Stark; Summer Linscomb of West Brook; and Mary McLean of Lumberton. Also attending were Lamar University students Hilary Allen, Michael Black and Heather Burgess of Beaumont, Nick Brandes of Sealy, Samantha Chauvin of Vinton, La., Sandra Griffin of Vidor, Tania Stephens of Nederland and Johanna Todd of Liberty. The summer institute introduces Southeast Texas’ EC-12 teachers (and students studying to be teachers) to environmental issues, problems and solutions through first-hand experiences, Westgate said. In the program, the teachers and

venues. These have included conferences of the Australian Association for Environmental Education (2006), National Science Teachers Association (2003 & 2005), North American Association for Environmental Education (2002 & 2003), Science Teachers Association of Texas (2001-2004), Texas Academy of Science (2002, 2003, & 2005), and the Texas Environmental Educators Partnership (2002

Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Season to Open July 15

In order to understand the bay and the estuarine species that inhabit it, the teachers and Lamar University students put on hip waders and walked around in the coastal water.

LU students explore environmental topics such as industrial, agricultural and domestic wastes and emissions that affect the Neches, Trinity and Sabine River watersheds and air sheds. “Good teachers know their subjects at a level higher than the level at which they attempt to convey the information,” Westgate said. “The fastest way to learn and retain information is to experience learning through multiple senses, sight, touch, sound, etc.” The teacher participants receive full scholarships, as well as teaching materials they can use in their classrooms after the course. Teaching materials fulfill the No Child Left Behind professional development requirements for teachers, while the field activities prepare teachers and future teachers to instruct through selfdirected, inquiry-method learning. Each institute’s cohort of in-service teachers instructs more than 2,000 students each fall. Since its inception, more than 150,000 Texas students have taken courses from teachers who have ex-

perienced the institute. The Teaching Environmental Science Institute is jointly sponsored by the Texas Regional Science Collaborative, Entergy, ExxonMobil, MeadWestvaco, Sempra Energy, Chevron Phillips, Valero, Magnolia Garden Club, Waterborne Education Center, National Park Service’s Big Thicket National Preserve, Big Thicket Association, The Nature Conservancy, Village Creek State Park, Texas Energy Museum, Shangri La Botanical Gardens & Nature Center, Sea Grant, Texas Agrilife Extension Service, Texas General Land Office Oil Spill Prevention & Response, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Texas State University Texas Stream Team, Texas Parks & Wildlife Coastal Fisheries, Clean Air & Water Inc., DuPont Sabine River Works, Lower Neches Valley Authority, U.S. Coast Guard and Lamar University. The Lamar University TES Institute has received international, national and statewide exposure through presentations at numerous

AUSTIN— The Gulf of Mexico commercial shrimp season for both state and federal waters will open 30 minutes after sunset Friday, July 15, 2011. The opening date is based on an evaluation of the biological, social and economic information to maximize the benefits to the industry and the public. In making its determination, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Coastal Fisheries Division used the best available scientific information including samples collected by using trawls and bag seines in TPWD routine data collection. The purpose of the closed Gulf season is to protect brown shrimp during their major period of emigration from the bays to the Gulf of Mexico until they reach a larger, more valuable size before harvest and to prevent waste caused by the discarding of smaller individuals. Federal waters (from 9 to 200 nautical miles offshore) will open at the same time that state waters will open. The National Marine Fisheries Service chose to adopt rules compatible with those adopted by Texas.

(409)735-9263 • www.SETX-LC.com


6B

• The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Events For The Record July 6 - Wednessday 9:30 a.m. - Wild Wednesdays: Foraging for Frogs at Shangri La Botanical Gardens 2111 West Park Ave, Orange, 409.670.9799 6:00 p.m. - MCM ELEGANTE’S “TRADEWINDS” PUB Presents Jimmy Kaiser at Tradewinds Tavern at the MCM Elegante Hotel 2355 I10 at Washington, Beaumont, 409-842-3600 4 p.m. - Farmers’ Market in the parking lot of Big Lots on MacArthur Drive in Orange.

July 7 - Thursday 9 a.m. - CASA volunteer training. 2120 Gloria Drive, Orange. 409-886-2272. 10:30 a.m. - Johns Branch Hosting Poetry Reading at Theodore Johns Library 4255 Fannett Road, Beaumont, 409-842-5223 11:00 a.m. - American Legion Post 49 Fish Fry, 108 Green Ave in Orange. 409-886-9861, fax: 409-8861241. 11:00 a.m. - “Gift of Life” Day at Chili’s at Chili’s , Beaumont, 409-833-3663 6:00 p.m. - MCM ELEGANTE’S “TRADEWINDS” PUB Presents Kris Harper at Tradewinds Tavern at the MCM Elegante Hotel 2355 I10 at Washington, Beaumont,

409-842-3600 6:00 p.m. - First Aid Course at American Red Cross 3260 Eastex Freeway, Beaumont, 409-832-1644 6:30 p.m. - McFaddin-Ward House Movie Night Features “Sabrina” at McFaddin-Ward House 1906 Calder Avenue, Beaumont, 409-832-1906 7:00 p.m. - Josh Abbott - In Concert at Dixie Dance Hall 236 Crockett Street , Beaumont, 409-833-4002 7:00 p.m. - ARC of Greater Beaumont SETX Self Advocates Meeting at Spindletop Center Rec. Room 655 South 8th, Beaumont, 409-784-5556 7:30 p.m. - B B & Co Featuring Britt Godwin & Bubba Moore - Classic Country at MacKenzie’s Pub 229 Dowlen Road #9B, Beaumont, 409866-2288

July 8 - Friday 8:00 a.m. - Larry’s Old Time Trade Days at Larry’s Old Time Trade Days and Antique Mall I-10 at Exit 829, Winnie , 409-296-3300 3:00 p.m. - The 4th Annual His and Hers Weekend Featuring The Peddler Show and The SE Texas Great Outdoor Expo at Ford Exhibit Hall 5515 IH-10 South, Beaumont, 409-951-5400 7:00 p.m. - American Legion Post 49 Pool Tournament. 108 Green Ave. in Orange. 409-886-9861.

6:00 p.m. - Steak Night at Sanderson’s Steak House 2095 Hwy 69 N, Nederland 8:00 p.m. - Tequila Rok on Crockett Street in Beaumont. 5 bands, 5 bucks: The Kingdom Mafia, Eviscerate the Proletariat, Avaris, End Creation and Boxing Dei Dei. 8:00 p.m. - 40 Oz to Freedon In Concert at The Gig 240 Crockett Street, Beaumont, 409-839-1808 8:00 p.m. - Racing: Stinger, PS, HS, LM, Mod at Golden Triangle Raceway Park 16583 Highway 90, Beaumont, 409752-7200

July 9 - Saturday 6:30 a.m. - Farmers’ Market in the parking lot of Big Lots on MacArthur Drive in Orange.a.m. 8:00 a.m. - Larry’s Old Time Trade Days at Larry’s Old Time Trade Days and Antique Mall I-10 at Exit 829, Winnie , 409-296-3300 8:00 a.m. - Farmer’s Market at Beaumont Athletic Complex 950 Langham at College, Beaumont 8:30 a.m. - Twogether Marriage Workshop - Orange at Lamar State College Orange 506 Green Ave, Orange Wilson Bldg #125, Orange, 409833-2668, ext. 119 or 122 9:00 a.m. - CPR for the Professional Rescuer Course (Life Guard, EMS, Health Care Worker) at American Red Cross Beaumont Chapter Office 3260 Eastex Freeway, Beaumont, 409-832-1644 9:00 a.m. - The 4th Annual His and Hers Weekend Featuring The Peddler Show and The SE Texas Great Outdoor

Expo at Ford Exhibit Hall 5515 IH-10 South, Beaumont, 409-951-5400 9:00 a.m. - Twogether Marriage Workshop - Jasper at 21st Century Community Learning Center 1013 Helen Street, Jasper, 409-833-2668, ext. 119 or 122 10:00 a.m. - Cumulus Baby & Family Expo at Beauamont Civic Center Complex 701 Main Street, Beaumont, 409833-9421 11:00 a.m. - Cecil Atkission: will be giving away tickets to the Bayou Outlaw Roller Girls vs. Cenla Derby to be held on July 16 with every test drive. 7:00 p.m. - Nutty Jerry’s Presents Aaron Watson at Nutty Jerry’s 18291 Englin Rd, Winnie, 877-643-7508 8:00 p.m. - American Legion Post 49 American Dream Karaoke. 108 Green Ave in Orange. 409-886-9861. 8:00 p.m. - House Rockers In Concert at The Gig 240 Crockett Street, Beaumont, 409-839-1808

July 10 - Sunday 8:00 a.m. - Larry’s Old Time Trade Days at Larry’s Old Time Trade Days and Antique Mall I-10 at Exit 829, Winnie , 409-296-3300 9:00 a.m. - “Animal Trackers” at Big Thicket National Preserve Visitor Center Field Research Station, Saratoga, 409-951-6700 9:00 a.m. - “One Tree and Me” at Big Thicket National Preserve Sundew Trail CR1910, Kountze 11:00 a.m. - The 4th Annual

LIT debuts Pharmacy Technician program for Fall 2011 semester Staff Report

For The Record

Lamar Institute of Technology will offer a certificate program in Pharmacy Technician beginning in Fall 2011. Pharmacy technicians assist licensed pharmacists in the preparation and distribution of prescription medications in a variety of healthcare settings, including hospital and community pharmacies, and home health pharmacies. Pharmacy techs enter data;

provide customer service; count, pour and label pharmaceutical products; prepare sterile products; and manage inventory. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that the future for certified pharmacy technicians is bright; techs with significant experience or training can expect promotions to supervisory positions. Some may choose to gain more training for spe-

cialty positions. To be admitted to the Pharmacy Technician program at LIT, students must satisfy these requirements: Be at least 18

years old. Have a high school diploma or GED. Complete a criminal background check. Complete the COMPASS Exam and earn the following

minimum scores: Prealgebra/ Numerical, 25; Reading, 62; and Writing, 32. Pharmacy Technician students must maintain a 2.0 GPA in all coursework, make a ‘C’ or higher in all coursework and complete the recommended program of study. Students will also be required to wear uniforms and name badges during the second semester of their schooling. For more information on the program, call Sheila Trahan at 409-880-8845.

TxDOT Kicks Off Buckle Up in Your Truck Campaign Staff Report

For The Record

The Texas Department of Transportation’s Buckle Up in Your Truck campaign kicks off this month to remind pickup truck drivers and their passengers about the importance of using seat belts every time they get in a vehicle. While seat belt use across the state is seeing record highs among people in cars, people in pickup trucks are still not using their seat belts regularly. TxDOT is launching a summer campaign focusing on those pickup truck drivers and pas-

sengers to ensure that all Texas motorists are buckled up. Safety officials attribute lower seat belt use among truck drivers and passengers to a false sense of security in larger vehicles and the incorrect belief that seat belts aren’t necessary for short trips. “Pickup truck drivers and passengers tend to be younger and male, and they are not getting the message that seat belts save lives,” said Carol Rawson, TxDOT’s Traffic Operations Division Director. “In fact, crashes involving pickup trucks can be particularly deadly because of the tendency for the trucks to roll

over and for occupants to be thrown from the vehicles unless they are buckled up.” Studies have shown that wearing a seat belt reduces the risk of fatal injury by 45 percent in passenger cars. That number increases to 60 percent for pickups due to their likelihood of rolling over in a crash. According to TxDOT, one out of every two pickup truck drivers killed in a traffic crash was not buckled up. Despite an overall downward trend in fatalities between 2003 and 2009, traffic crashes remain the leading cause of death for those between one and 44 years of age

in Texas. On average, the number of trucks involved in fatal crashes exceeded the number of passenger cars by 20 percent. In 2009 in Texas, more than 3,000 people died in fatal collisions on Texas streets and highways, and just under half were not buckled up. Fines and court costs for failing to fasten your seat belt can add up to $250 or more. It’s not just drivers that must buckle up—state law also requires passengers in the front and back seat to buckle up. Visit HYPERLINK “http:// w w w.t ex a s c l ick itor t icket . com” www.texasclickitorticket.com for more information.

His and Hers Weekend Featuring The Peddler Show and The SE Texas Great Outdoor Expo at Ford Exhibit Hall 5515 IH-10 South, Beaumont, 409-951-5400 8:30 p.m. - “Night Life in the Big Thicket” at Big Thicket National Preserve Kirby Trailhead FM 420, Kountze, 409-951-6700

July 11 - Monday 8:00 a.m. - SETBA - Southeast Texas Baseball Academy 11U and 12U Select Nationals at Ford Fields 5110 IH-10 South, Beaumont 9:30 a.m. - Orange County Retired Senior Citizens to meet at the Salvation Army Building on MLK and Strickland in Orange. 409883-6161

July 12- Tuesday 8:00 a.m. - SETBA - Southeast Texas Baseball Academy 11U and 12U Select Nationals at Ford Fields 5110 IH-10 South, Beaumont 11:15 a.m. - Chevron Retirees Association to meet at Robert’s Steakhouse, 3712 W. Park Ave., Orange. 7:30 p.m. - Ed Dix Jazz Quartet & Friends at MacKenzie’s

Pub 229 Dowlen Road, #9B, Beaumont, 409-866-2288

July 13 - Wednesday 9:30 a.m. - Wild Wednesday: Hide-N-Seek at Shangri La Botanical Gardens 2111 West Park Ave, Orange, 409.670.9799

To Our Family, Friends and Patients; Thank you for all the thoughts and prayers for our family during the loss of our father, Shannon Messer. He was a very kind and gentle man, and he will be missed by many! Thank you, Dr. S. Mark Messer, Sherry Boling, Thelma Swearingen, Karen Meaux, Judy Schrumpf and Becky Picard.

JULY 15 THRU JULY 17

FRI. - SUN. 9:00 A.M. TIL 5:00 P.M.

Free Parking - Free Admission East town shopping is back!

Remember the good ol’ days of shopping? We’re happy to offer the same experience with a hometown feel at our indoor/outdoor flea market & farmers market. There are many local community members & vendors offering a great atmosphere and products for you!

Check us out @ www.orangetradedays.com Coming to

You Each Month After the 2nd Monday! 409-883-4344 200 TURRETT IN ORANGE Off Simmons Drive

across from the water tower


The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Complete Common English Bible Arrives From Printer While the New Testament was released last August, and the digital version of the entire Bible just debuted on 20 platforms, this is the first time the complete Common English Bible is available in print. Originally expected this fall, the paperback edition is shipping to stores now. Six other editions, including one with the Apocrypha, will be available in August. “The Common English Bible is the result of collaboration between opposites: scholars working with average readers; conservatives working with liberals; teens working with retirees; men working with women; many denominations and many ethnicities coming together around the common goal of creating a translation that unites rather than divides, with the ultimate goal of mutually accomplishing God’s overall work in the world,” says Paul Franklyn, associate publisher. Combining scholarly accuracy with vivid language, the Common English Bible is the work of 120 biblical scholars from 24 denominations in American, African, Asian, European, and Latino communities, representing such academic institutions as Asbury Theological Seminary, Azusa Pacific University, Bethel Seminary, Denver Seminary, Princeton Theological Seminary, Seattle Pacific University, Wheaton College, Yale University, and many others. They translated the Bible into English directly from the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts. Additionally, more than 500 readers in 77 groups field-tested the translation. Every verse was read aloud in the reading groups, where potentially confusing passages were identified.

The translators considered the groups’ responses and, where necessary, reworked those passages to clarify in English their meaning from the original languages. More than 700 people worked jointly to bring the Common English Bible to fruition; and thanks to the Internet and today’s technology it was completed in less than four years. The Common English Bible is a denomination-neutral Bible sponsored by the Common English Bible Committee, an alliance of five publishers that serve the general market, as well as the Disciples of Christ (Chalice Press), Presbyterian Church (Westminster John Knox Press), Episcopal Church (Church Publishing Inc.), United Church of Christ (Pilgrim Press), and United Methodist Church (Abingdon Press).

7B

Sisters of Mercy elect new leadership team Nearly 300 Sisters of Mercy from across North, South and Central America, the Caribbean, Guam and Philippines gathered at Saint Xavier University in Chicago, Ill. June 20–30 to pray, discern a direction for the next six years and host a public witness to call attention to the need for comprehensive immigration reform. On June 29, the Sisters of Mercy elected the new leadership team for the Institute of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas: Patricia McDermott, RSM, president; Eileen Campbell, RSM, vice president; Anne Curtis, RSM; Mary Pat Garvin, RSM; and Deborah Troillett, RSM. Their term begins August 1. View photos at www.sistersofmercy.org This meeting of largest order of women religious in the U.S. is the Fifth Institute Chapter of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas. On July 20, the order will celebrate the 20th anniversary of the founding of the Institute of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas, which is comprised of six Communities with more than 3,800 sisters who serve in North, South and Central America, the Caribbean, Guam and the Philippines. This year also marks the 180th anniversary of the Roman Catholic order of nuns’ foundation in Dublin, Ireland. The Institute of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas is one of 13 congregations of the Sisters of Mercy serving in 47 countries around the world. The Sisters of Mercy serve people who suffer from poverty, sickness and lack of education, with special concern for women and children.

CHURCH BRIEFS Solid Rock Baptist Church to host family, friends Wednesday, July 13. The times are 3 until 6 p.m. in the church 1078 in Orange.  Events include barrels, poles, speed race, baton office. Distribution date is Saturday, July 30 at 1 p.m.  A variety race and flag race.  Buckles will be awarded at the end of the service of food is available at discount cost. Cash or LoneStar card ac- Playday.  Solid Rock Baptist Church, located at 1207 Link Ave. in Orange, will host a family and friends service on Sunday, July 10 at 3 p.m. All are invited to come and listen to Pastor Irastele Thomas of Turkey Creek Missionary Baptist Church in Liberty, Texas. Please call 409-886-5387 or 409-221-7873 for more information.

cepted. The church location is the corner of South and Broad Streets, near the Lions Den Park. Area residents may contact the church office at 883-3974 for information.

Special classes will include lead line, mutton busting and stick horse races, with special awards presented at the end of Playday. Registration is from 8 to 9:30 a.m and the events begin at 10 a.m.  All age groups are welcome.  For more information contact Debbie Vance at 409-745-0656 or Alice Castille at 409-313-6621.

Bread of Life Feeding Ministry offers hot lunches

St. Mark Lutheran Church to host VBS McDonald Memorial Baptist to take Angel Food The Bread of Life Feeding Ministry of Starlight Church of God St. Mark Lutheran Church will host their yearly Vacation Bible orders in Christ Evangelism Team will provide hot lunches every Friday School at the Fellowship Hall and Church from July 18 thru July McDonald Memorial Baptist Church of Orange invites the public to place food orders from Angel Food Ministries on

from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.. The meals will be served at the E.B. Lindsey Family Life Center at Starlight, 2800 Bob Hall Road. For more information call 409-886-4366.

THE APOSTOLIC PENTECOSTAL CHURCH

Solid Rock Baptist Church to host worship conference

IH-10 AT Highway 62

presents:

PASTOR LEO ANDERSON

Scripture of the Week

Each Sunday Morning @ 7:30 a.m. On A.M. 1600 KOGT

24 Hour Prayer Line 779-4703 or 779-4702 CALL (409) 745-3973

An hypocrite with his mouth destroyeth his neighbour: but through knowledge shall the just be delivered.

Proverbs 11:9

Trinity Baptist Church 1408 W. Park Ave. @ 14th Street, Orange Office: 886-1333 Pastor Dr. Charles Walton Music Director Dan Cruse Morning Worship Sunday 11 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Nursery Provided

Apostolic Pentecostal Church IH-10 at Highway 62, Orange (409) 745-3973 Rev. Leo Anderson Sunday Morning at 7:30 a.m. on A.M. 1600 KOGT Radio Sunday: 2 p.m. • Tuesday: 7:30 p.m. 24 Hour Prayer Line: 409-779-4703 or 409-779-4702

Echo Church 1717 FM 3247, Orange 409-735-8580 Pastor George A. Cruse Jr. Sunday Service 10:30 a.m. Praise & Worship - Contemporary music! Come as you are!

Harvest Chapel 1305 Irving Street, Orange 409-882-0862 Ruth Logan Burch, Pastor Sunday Morning 10 a.m., 11 a.m. Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednesday Service 5 p.m.

SPECIAL THANKS TO THE FOLLOWING BUSINESSES AND INDIVIDUALS FOR THEIR SPONSORSHIP OF THE CHURCH DIRECTORY

Solid Rock Baptist Church, located at 1207 Link Ave. in Orange, will host a worship conference on Friday, July 8 and Saturday, July 9. The services on Friday will be at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. The services on Saturday will be held at the same times. Bishop Andrea Hinton of Picaynne, Miss. will deliver the message. The community is invited to attend. This conference is sponsored by the Touch of Hope Ministries, Pastor David Allen and Co-Pastor Patsy Allen. For more information, please call 409-221-2213,409886-5387 or 409-221-7873.

Cowboy Church to host third Buckle Series Playday The third of three Buckle Series Playdays was rescheduled to Saturday, July 9 because of the rain last week. Events will be at the Cowboy Church of Orange County Arena located at 673 FM

22. Ages from four years thru 12th grade are welcome. The hours are from 10 a.m. till 2p.m.  Youth must bring a SACK LUNCH DAILY.  The lesson/plan for the week is to learn about David, so come and enjoy a spitited and fun break from the hot weather with St. Marks, “The Little Church with the BIG HEART” located at 945 W. Roundbunch Road. Please call 409988-3003 or 409-735-8727 with any questions.

New Anointing Church to host gospel singing Area residents are invited to join members of New Anointing Church at 7 p.m., Friday, July 29 for an old-fashion gospel singing. This is open-mic singing. Bring your favorite gospel song on tape and/or CD, or bring your musical instrument. Singers are welcome to have musician’s accompany you. This will be an evening of worship and praise, lifting up the name of JESUS. Refreshments will follow the singing. The church is located at 10681 N. Hwy 87 (about 7 miles on left from Northway Shopping Center). For more information, call 746-9515. Hope to see you there and bring a friend too!!!!

Church Directory

First Baptist Church of Bridge City

Miracle Restoration Revivals Church

St. Paul United Methodist Church

200 W. Roundbunch, Bridge City Office: 409-735-3581 Fax: 409-735-8882 www.fbcbc.org Rev. Bob Boone, Pastor Sunday Schedule: Traditional Worship - 8:15 a.m.; Bible Study at 9:30 a.m.; Celebration Service - 10:45 a.m.; CSI, Youth Bible Study, Discipleship Classes - 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Schedule: Prayer Meeting - 6:30 p.m., Youth Worship “Living Stone”

608 Dogwood St., Orange (2 streets behind Horseman Store) 409-883-5466 Residing Pastor Rev. Larry Doucet Founding Pastor Rev. Tunney Vercher Sr. Sunday morning services 10 a.m., Sunday night 6 p.m. Wednesday night Prayer Meeting 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night Bible Study 7 p.m.

1155 W. Roundbunch Rd., Bridge City 409- 735-5546 Pastor Brad Morgan E-mail office@stpaulfamily.org Sunday Mornings: Worship Experience - 8:15 a.m.; Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.; Worship Experience - 10:45 a.m. (Nursery provided at all services) For Mid & Sr. High Youth on Sunday Afternoon: 3:30 to 6 p.m. Sunday Evening : Taizé Service - 7 p.m. For Children Ages 4–10 on Wednesday evening – 6 to 7 p.m. – JAM (Jesus and Me) Club

Cowboy Church of Orange County 673 FM 1078 Orange, Texas 409-718-0269 E. Dale Lee, Pastor Worship Service 10:30 a.m. Sunday “Round Pen” (Small Group) Studies: Men’s group: 7:00 p.m. Mondays, Ladies’ group: 6:30 p.m. Thursdays Come as you are! Boots and hats welcome!

West Orange Christian Church 900 Lansing Street, West Orange 409-882-0018 Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship Service - 10:40 a.m. Sunday Evening - 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening - 6 p.m. “Our church family welcomes you”

Celebrating 50 years Four Area Locations

First Christian Church of Orangefield 4234 FM 408 (between BC & Orangefield) 409-735-4234 Minister Jim Hardwick Sunday: Sunday School: 9 a.m.; Worship: 10 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer and Bible Study 7 p.m. Nursery provided For a ride, please call 735-4234

First Baptist Church Orangefield 9788 F.M. 105 Orangefield, 409-735-3113 Pastor Forrest Wood Sunday: Bible Study - 9:30 a.m., Worship Service - 10:30 a.m., Evening Worship Service- 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Midweek Meal- 5:30 p.m., Praise and Prayer - 6:30 p.m. Youth and Children Activities, 7:15 p.m. - Choir Practice Email: office@fbcof.com Website: www.fbcof.com

YOUR AD COULD BE HERE Call 886-7183 for more information!!!

First United Methodist Church 502 Sixth Street, Orange 409-886-7466 Pastor: Rev. John Warren Dir. of Fine Arts & Music: Doug Rogers Organist: Justin Sanders Dir. of Youth & Christian Education: Allisha Bonneaux Sunday: Worship in the Chapel: 8:15 a.m., Celebration Service in Praise Center: 8:55 a.m., Sunday School for all ages: 9:50 a.m. Worship in the Sanctuary: 11 a.m., UMYF & Methodist Kids: 5 p.m. Web site: www.fumcorange.org

And now abide faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love. - 1 Cornithians 13:13 NKJV -

TO LIST YOUR CHURCH Call 886-7183 for more information!!!


8B • The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

THE RECORD

• Just $10 For A 30 Word Ad In Both Papers And The Web • Classified Newspaper Deadline: Monday 5 P.M. For Upcoming Issue • You Can Submit Your Ad ANYTIME Online At TheRecordLive.com

Community Classifieds Your ads published in both newspapers, the County Record and the Penny Record plus on our web site TheRecordLive.com EMPLOYMENT DRIVERS

GENERAL LINE ADS

HIRING REGIONAL DRIVERS In the Beaumont, TX Region, $900/wk Pay Guarantee. Highway Transport Chemical. “Safety Focused Quality Drive, our CSA rating reflects our commitment” Great Pay & Benefits, Pd. Orientation, Assigned Truck, Fuel Card, Pre-Pass, Mileage pay-same loaded or empty. $500 Signon Bonus. Must have: TWIC Card, CDL-A with Hazmat & Tanker Endorsement. 18 mo. Current TT exp. EOE/MF/V/D. Apply Online: www.hytt.com/ jobsForDrivers 800-800-5856

Field Workers 10 temporary positions; approx 5 ½ months; Duties: to operate tractors during the preparation and maintenance of the sugar cane fields for the harvesting season and during the harvesting season. $8.97 per hour; Job to begin on 8/15/11 through 2/1/12. All work tools provided. Housing and transportation provided to workers who can not reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the work day; ¾ guaranteed of contract. Employment offered by Lane Blanchard LLC located in New Iberia, LA. Worksite located in Jeanerette, LA. Qualified applicants may call employer for interview at 337-519-5683 or contact their nearest SWA office at 409-839-8045 and use job order number 386888.

COMPLETE

STAFFING

NEEDS CDL drivers with X endorsement, $20 hourly w/ overtime, (409) 735-2600. EMPLOYMENT YARD PERSONGARDENER wanted. Large home in Orange needs person 2 to 3 days weekly for all required yard work. Weeding, edging, planting, trimming and all other yard related items. Job would be year around. 1 day required in non-growing months. Knowledge of plants and references required. No yard services need apply. Retired persons are fine. Owner has all tools. 8863410, 351-0089. HITCHIN’ POST PACKAGE store is looking for part time

SOUTHWESTERN PRINT SOFA AND LOVE SEAT $200 Excellent condition, (409) 330-5940

help. 12 - 14 hours a week, 3 to 9 shift and 1-9 Sat., must be 21 or olderperfect for retiree. Pick up application at 280 E. Roundbunch Rd., BC. (7/13) APPLIANCES USED APPLIANCES, starting at $99.95 & up, Harry’s Appliances, 302 10th. St. (10th. & main), Orange, We buy used appliances, 8864111. KENMORE WALL MOUNT GAS oven w/ LED read out, 21.5” wide, 30.5 “ tall. 23.25 “ deep, $85; Kenmore gas cook top, 19” x 27”, $45, both used only 2 years, (409) 553-3332. FRIDGIDARE REFIG., runs good, white, $150, (409) 6512520. FRIDGIDARE FREEZER, upright, frost free, $200, (409) 330-5864. Whirlpool AC 26,000 BTUs, Kenmore Freezer, Kenmore Refrigerator, 5-burner gas heater, 3-burner gas heater, gas stove, US Craftsmaster 30 gal. gas hot water heater. Call 409-920-1082 FURNITURE SECTIONAL SOFA w/ fold out bed, $60, (409) 332-3914. FULL BED SET, complete set

Truck Drivers Wanted Immediately!!!

THE RECORD NEWS CAROL ALLEN You Can’t Buy Better Orange County Advertising (409) 239-1956

$ Sign On BONUS for Experienced Drivers $ Local Work, Regular Schedule, Class A CDL with “X” endorsement and 18 Wheeler or Tanker Experience Preferred.

OUR COMPANY OFFERS: 401K, Health, Dental & Vision Insurance.

Apply Online: www.gulfmarkenergy.com 800-577-8853 EOE

. CARPENTER WORK THE SMALL JOBS THE BIG BOYS WON’T TOUCH. Carpenter work, vinyl siding, minor plumbing & more, call for free estimates, Call Larry English at (409) 882-1471 or 8824288

TRACTOR WORK BY DANNY COLE

• Dirt / Shell Spreading • Bushhogging • Garden Tilling • New home pads Prepared • Sewer / Water / Electrical Lines Dug Home 735-8315 Cell 670-2040

BATES

Call 735-5305 • Penny Record Office: 333 West Roundbunch, Bridge City • County Record Office: 320 Henrietta, Orange Note: Offices Closed On Wednesday

w/ mattress, $450, (409) 6709272 or 886-5725.

offers, call for an appointment to see, (409) 886-5725

LOST & FOUND FOUND, MALE CAT, in BC off John St., black & white, nutered, please call (409) 735-3590.

FREE CANNING PEARS, (409) 882-4167 or 792-0636. DIAMOND ANNIVERSARY RINGS, 1 Kt. A marque diamonds, 14Kt. gold, $850, (830) 822-7050.

LOST RED TOOL BOX, on W. Roundbunch Rd. at Ferry, if found please call (409) 6262755.

I HAVE A LIKE NEW SCOOTER that my grandmother, who recently passed away, used very rarely. I am wanting to sell it to a person in need. I am asking $1,200 o.b.o. Give me a call at 409-332-9263.

MISCELLANEOUS BEAUTIFUL DOLL COLLECTION MUST SEE! will consider all reasonable

313-3840 988-0638

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

Notice is hereby given that original Letters of Administration for the Estate of WESLEY KAY FRANKLIN, Deceased, were issued on June 29th, 2011, in Cause No. P15876, pending in the County Court at Law of Orange County, Texas, to: OLGA FRANKLIN. All persons having claims against this estate, which is currently being administered, are required to present them to the undersigned within the time and in the manner prescribed by law.

Notice is hereby given that original Letters of Administration for the Estate of Lillie Mae Harris, Deceased, were issued on May 27th, 2011, in Cause No. P15777, pending in the County Court at Law of Orange County, Texas, to: ANNIE M. ALLEN. All persons having claims against this estate, which is currently being administered, are required to present them to the undersigned within the time and in the manner prescribed by law.

c/o George B. Barron Attorney at Law P.O. Box 279 Orange, TX 77631-0279

c/o George B. Barron Attorney at Law P.O. Box 279 Orange, TX 77631-0279

DATED: the 29th day of June, 2011

DATED: the 29th day of Junet, 2011

George B. Barron

George B. Barron

GEORGE B. BARRON State Bar No.: 0187500 Attorney for Bess Victoria Burger

GEORGE B. BARRON State Bar No.: 0187500 Attorney for Bess Victoria Burger

TRAPEZE BAR & FLOOR STAND will enable a person to get into and out of bed or change body positions. Used, but in very good condition. $150. 409-882-0240.

YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. You may employ an attorney. If you or your attorney do not file a written answer with the clerk who issued this citation by 10:00 A.M. on the Monday next following the expiration of 20 days after you were served this citation and petition, a default judgement may be taken against you.

The petition of JOHN STEPHENSON IV, Petitioner, was filed in the County Court of Law #2 of Orange County, Texas, on June 16, 2011, against Gerald Martin, numbered 110530D, and entitled IN THE INTEREST OF ANNABELL MARY ADKINS A CHILD. The suit requests ORIGINAL PETITION FOR TERMINATION & ADOPTION OF STEPCHILD. The date and place of birth of the child/ren who are the subject of the suit: ANNABEL ADKINS BORN MARCH 1, 2004 IN ORANGE, TEXAS The Court has authority in this suit to enter any judgment or decree in the child/ren's interest which will be binding upon you, including the termination of the parent-child relationship, the determination of paternity and the appointment of a conservator with authority to consent to the child's adoption. ISSUED AND GIVEN under my hand and seal of said Court at Orange, Texas this June 27, 2011. VICKIE EDGERLY, District Clerk Orange County, Texas By: Charlean

Lindsey

H&H

Stump Grinding RESIDENTIAL GRINDING NO JOB TOO SMALL BBB ACCREDITED BUSINESS

882-9672

Deputy

R&S

Tractor and Dump Truck Service

We haul dirt and spread, sand, 60/40, top soil, slag, limestone, wash-out, bark and garden mix. We also do Dozer Work, backhoe, mini & large Excavator work. We dig ponds and fill swimming pools, remove concrete. No Job too small. call for price @ (409) 735-6588

Bring your info to 333 W. Roundbunch Rd., BC, or 320 Henrietta, Orange

HARRY’S

Since 1963

APPLIANCE & SERVICE INC Big Selection of Reconditioned Appliances All Used Appliances Sold with Warranty • FREEZERS • DISHWASHERS • REFRIGERATORS • WASHERS/DRYERS AIR CONDITIONERS • RANGES

We Sell Parts For All major Brands ~ We Service What We Sell

886-4111

TO: Gerald Martin, Respondent:

(Save $4 weekly over a 2x2, 4 week minimum)

Orange’s Oldest Hometown Appliance Dealer

302

FINANCING AVAILABLE

302302

DOMESTIC CITATION BY PUBLICATION/PC - CDVPCWD THE STATE OF TEXAS

Card Ads Only $25 Per Week

735-5305 OR 886-7183

302 N. 10TH. Street

BENNY BARNES RECORD collection. This collection con-

BOX TRAILER, 4’ x 8’, good cond., all sides & top removable, $750; gas grill; Golf cart, needs batteries, (409) 7462636.

GET A GOOD DEAL HERE!

HERE’S MY CARD!

FREE LOCAL DELIVERY

WHIRLPOOL WASHER & DRYER, $350 for both; 1 1/2 Ton Fredrich A/C unit, $150; Hotpoint gas stove, $150; Dearborn heater w/ blower, $150; fire proof safe, $400; ‘85 Mercury Marquee, excellent shape, $1,500, (409) 8833883.

sists of 60 of his 45 RPM records, all are in excellent cond., asking $440, Call Tony at (409) 718-6785.

LEGAL NOTICES

HOME SERVICES

DUMP TRUCK AND TRACTOR SERVICE (409)

GRIZZLEY VERTICAL TABLE top drill press $600, pd $1,200; 2 acetlyne bottles, 1 lrg 1 small w/gauges, $200. Call 670-7641.

• Bush Hogging • Field Mowing • Dirt Work

FREE ESTIMATES (409) 626-2265

302

TERRELL’S 302302

738-5001

302

Insured & Bonded

• Tree Removal • Tree Trimming • Haul Offs • Stump Grinding

• General Landscapes • Tropical Landscapes • Spring/Fall Clean Ups • Lawn Maintenance • Palm Trees Installed • Grass Installation • Tree Removal • 8 Yard Loads Delivered • 60/40 Sand/Garden Mix • Driveway Materials

Enlarged Actual

To be pu The Record Ne

PLEASE CORREC NOON T to 73 Tha

F # 73


The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011 • 9B

Garage sale success tips

It’s prime garage sale season. Those interested in conquering the clutter once and for all and offering items to willing buyers can improve their chances of success by following some key tips. Individuals have different reasons for holding garage sales. Some people are moving and want to thin out items before packing. Others are looking to make a little extra spending cash. Still others simply enjoy the socialization garage sales provide. Garage sales can garner a person a good profit. However, if the goal is to make as much money as possible on highend goods, such as antiques or collectibles, a garage sale is probably not the best place to do this type of selling. Instead, choose a reputable online bidding site or advertise

specialty merchandise in the local newspaper. Those who want to clear out their home, cull through the excess clutter and make a few dollars along the way will find that garage sales can be the ideal way to do so ... if done the right way. Otherwise they can be a waste of time. Here are some pointers to maximize success. * Wait until there are enough items to fill a few tables and spread larger merchandise on the driveway or lawn. Individuals will be drawn to a sale that looks like it has a good quantity of items to pick through. * Think about a joint garage sale. Getting together with neighbors enables a larger amount of sale items and may attract a bigger crowd. * It’s better to have the sale on one main day than stretch it

over two or three days. Weekends provide the most action, particularly Saturday. Avoid long weekends to hold a garage sale because most people go

out of town. * Garage sale visitors tend to be early birds. Therefore, schedule the sale for the early morning into the afternoon.

An 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. sale will enable a good number of people to make it to the sale. * Set up the merchandise the night before and house it in the garage or another locked area. Simply move it out onto the display tables before the sale. * Realistically set prices. Remember, a garage sale is an opportunity to unload items quickly. Don’t expect to earn what was originally paid for each item. Be prepared to part with things for a steal. * Advertise the garage sale in the local newspaper several days in advance. Some people like to post signs in hightraffic areas as well, such as traffic intersections or by the entrance to the local supermarket. * Have easy-to-read signs that mark the way to the sale, including the address and any

directional markers. Balloons and streamers can help make the signs more visible. Be sure drivers can read the signs from the car. Writing that is too small will be ineffective. Keep the signs brief: * It is best to host the sale in the front yard where passersby can easily see the items on display. Garages are ideal for poor weather conditions but are more difficult to scan for possible treasures. The backyard should only be used as a last resort because it is the least visible. * Remember that the goal is to sell the most items so they don’t have to be packed back up and either put inside or taken to the dump. Be able to part with items for less than originally marked. Consider slashing prices as the end of the sale draws nearer.

TO BUY, SELL, PLEASE CALL THESE REALTORS JERRY HUGHES REALTY

AMERICAN REAL ESTATE

SERVICES CHRISTIAN LADY WILL CLEAN your house, very reasonable, (409) 233-8048.

GENERAL LINE ADS CONT. SEARS CRAFTSMAN 10-inch table saw. Used condition but still works well. $125.00, Call Judy @ 409882-0240.

PETS & LIVESTOCK FREE LAB PUPPIES, to good homes, (409) 313-1556. 2 BEAUTIFUL KITTENS, free to good homes, shots & wormed: one grey Tabby W/ white markings, &big eyes; on pretty Calico w/ beautiful markings, both friendly and healthy, (409) 988-6551.

FREE PALLETTS, (409) 7356970. 16’x20’x12’H BARN, 4 years old, can be moved, 2 lofts, $2,500; Kenmore washer and dryer, 4 years old, $100 ea., (409) 738-2906

Land Co.

www.americanrealestate.com

HELP ME FIND A NEW HOME! My mommy passed

NOW OPEN Resale Shop Open 10 a.m. ‘til

New & Used Items Knives • Baby Items Hot Wheels Collectibles Furniture • Tools Corner of S. 10th & Henderson

away, I’m a 6 yr. old neutered male cat, only knew the inside life (409) 886-8630. FREE KITTENS 6 wks old. 1810 Crockett in W.O. Call 670-3982 or 883-8372. RESCUE DOGS, spayed & neutered, needing good homes. Pet food donations welcome. (409) 746-9502. 2 ABANDONED DOGS, sisters, free to good homes, about 1 yr. old, good with kids & other pets, wormed, have ads & picts. on Bridge City Classified.com, call Amy @ 920-3765. GERMAN & AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD MIX, male, neutered, all shots & wormed, must have fenced yard, (409)746-9502. FREE TO GOOD HOME, male Chihuahua & rat terrier mix, house trained, all shots

up to date, can’t keep due to living arrangements, very lovable, month supply of dog food, (409) 988-8560 after 6. RAT TERRIER DOGS, mother and son, must go to same home, must have fenced yard, shots & wormed, free to good home, (409) 746-9502. LAB/PIT MIX, 8M old, spayed female, on heart worm prev., free to good home, (409) 7469502. APARTMENTS 1/1 BEDROOM UPSTAIRS, liv. / kit & bath down, granite counter tops, all S.S. appliances, tile floors, cathedral ceiling w/ fans, carpet upstairs, concrete patio & parking, No Pets, $500 monthly + elec. & water + dep., call for an appointment at (409) 7356277 or 626-1968. (ss) MAGNOLIA TRACE APARTMENTS, Bridge City,

GARAGE SALES

Moving/garage sale Fri & Sat, from 7 a.m. until. 449 GARDENIA (ROSELAWN). Furniture, tools, clothes, etc. THURS., 4849 TURNER RD., OF, off Bessie Hts. Rd., 7:30 till ? Large solid wood entertainment center, dining room set, end tables, full and queen size inens, pots and pans, books, toys, Much More! (409) 330-6633. Friday Only, July 8 (9 a.m. to noon). Beautiful household items, Christmas items, Dell printers, double bed with mattress, etc. 2107 CLARK LANE, ORANGE. 409-886-5725.

The Oaks Apartment Homes One, Two and Three Bedroom Homes at Affordable Prices!

199

$

TOTAL MOVE-IN SPECIAL!

FORMER LAWYER’S OFFICE, just off Texas Ave., $1,200 monthly, Call for an appointment to see @ (409) 735-2030. (M&R) MINI STORAGE SPACES, $40 monthly & up, Call for an appointment to see @ (409) 735-2030. (M&R) APPROX. 900 SQ. FT., very nice, 1 bath, $500 monthly; Approx. 1,200 sq. ft., $650 monthly, both very nice, CA/H, carpet, suitable for business or office, (409) 735-6277 or 626-1968. (ss) HOME RENTALS 1/1 IN MAURICEVILLE, Log Cabin, in the woods, $550 monthly, Call for an appointment to see @ (409) 7352030. (M&R) 4-2 HOME IN COUNTRY. $500. deposit. $900. monthly. LCM schools. Call to see 409735-7268 or 293-0012 NICE 3/2/2, w/ granite counter tops, ceramic floors, $1,000 monthly + $1,000 dep., (409) 735-2030. (M&R) 3/2/1 IN BCISD, CA/H, on 1 acre, outside city limits, call for info @ (409) 670-2620 or 735-3237.

MOBILE HOME RENTALS BC AREA , as little as $30 daily for rooms, M.H.’s by day or week, starting at $30 a day or weekly, 735-8801 or 7347771. (cctfn) 3/2 IN BRIDGE CITY, full baths, laundry room, CA/H, new carpet throughout, very clean, stove & refrig. & dishwasher, water & garbage paid, $675 Monthly + dep., references req., Call (409) 474-1518 to see. Available Now! 3/1 & 2/1 IN OFISD, 1 block from schools, Large lot, W./D hookups, No Pets, $550 & $400 monthly + dep., (409) 720-8699 or 735-6701. (7/20) 2/1 IN BCISD, $400 monthly + dep., to see call (409) 498-1573. HOME SALES OWNER FINANCE. 2211 Travis. 3/1/1. $36,900. $3000 down, $364 a month. Call 409-504-5945. Beautiful Custom Home 155 Colonial Estates Subdivision Bridge City. 2100 sq ft home on .873 acre. 3BR, 2.5BA and 3 car garage. Open floor plan, formal DR room with French doors Wood burning fireplace! Insulated garage and with the flip of a switch, it can be turned into a party room and heated/cooled. Reduced from $269,900 to $249,900. Call 409-738-3529 or 409-7180790.

719 Front St. Orange TX 77630

Close to everything you need!

•Spacious 1, 2 & 3 BR Floor Plans •Newly Renovated •Lg. Patios •Washer & Dryer Connections in Every Home! •Homes as Low as $599 •Our New Look will Move You!

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COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL SPACES on Texas Ave. & Roundbunch Rd., BC, Call for an appointment to see @ (409) 7352030. (M&R)

MCLEWIS AREA. 2 bedroom, 1 bath with central A/C. Located in Orangefield ISD. One month’s rent, rental contract, deposit and references required. Call 745-988-9539.

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Conveniently located in the heart of Historic Downtown Orange! BRING IN THIS COUPON TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR

special 2/1 w/ laundry room in Apt., $625 monthly + $500 dep., (extremely nice409) 886-1737, leave message. (7/6)

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SMALL HOUSE ON A LARGE LOT. Call 886-5545 or 779-1123. 4/2 W/CP ON 3 ACRES, OFISD, fireplace, 2 living areas, Lg. kitchen w/ island in middle, storage build., slab out back for garage (not finished), off Hwy 62 at 325 Goss, good nieghborhood, Call Tina @ (409) 354-5625. anytime for an appointment to see. 2 FIXER - UPPERS: 3614 Kenwood, Orange, 3/1/1; 3900 A.W. Liprie, Orange, 2/1.5/2. Owner can finance, no credit check, legal contract, call Deborah @ (409) 920-2686. LAND & LOTS TEXLA ROAD, Mauriceville, close to Hwy 62, 1.9 acre tract, partially cleared, commercial/ residential, MMUD water & sewer available, .WOODRIDGE LAND, (409) 745-1115. 4 LOTS IN N. ORANGE, N 87, CR 3127, Sunset acreas, Trailer pads 2 (24” x 75”), 6x8 Front Stoop, water and sewer, Deweyville ISD. $13,500. 409-886-3233. 1/2 ACRE IN OFISD, 6370 McGill Rd., unrestricted, all utilities, asking $9,800, (254) 527-3805. (6/29) OFISD, 3 ACRES of cleared land on ridge off Tanglewood Rd, mature trees, small pond, owner financing is available, WOODRIDGE LAND CO., (409) 745-1115. TWO CEMETERY PLOTS in Hillcrest Memorial Gardens Bridge City, Texas. These plots are in Lot 119 Block A Spaces #3 and #4 - Section 2 of Garden of The Last Supper. $1,200 per plot or $2,200 for both. Call 214 704 9519 or 972 333 1000 if interested PERFECT FOR MOBILE HOME IN BCISD, just outside city limits, concrete mobile home runners and patio slab already on property, nice location, reduced to $8,500, (409) 882-8073. (tfn) 1/2 ACRE IN QUAIL VALLEY, BC, on Oak Glenn St., the lot is ready for building, completely fenced with black vinyl chain link fencing, has pecan tree and Lg. Live Oak tree, This is a great neighborhood, (409) 735-3364. MOBILES OK, 1.282 acres on 2 wooded lots in Mauriceville, LCMISD, MMUD water & sewer available, financing available, .WOODRIDGE LAND, (409) 745-1115. MOBILE HOME SALES ‘07 REDMAN MANUF. HOME, IN EXCELLENT CONDITION, 15’ x 54’, 2/1, roll in shower, custom built handicap accessible, skirting, 2 porches w/ ramps, Must Sell Soon, asking $24,000 OBO, (409) 351-9260.

AUTOMOBILES

‘02 TOYOTA COROLLA. Runs great and gets excellent gas mileage; automatic, 4 door, CD player, air-

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Interest Rates on Select Vehicles 2012 Ford Focus with 34 mpg

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9207 Beverly, OFISD

This 4/2.1/2 home in Oak Manor has TONS of space with 2647 sq ft. on .44 acre. Beautiful landscaping and many updates, including granite, hardwood floors and tile. REDUCED price and motivated sellers!

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WWW.REmAxFIRST-TExAS.COm EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

conditioning, keyless entry. 109K miles. $5,300. Call 409-886-5415.

GO-CARTS

2 SEATER W/ NEW MOTOR and body, in excellent cond., $400, (409) 221-5119.

MOTORCYCLES ETC.

‘06 HARLEY DAVIDSON Sportster, 883XL, black, $5,300. Call for details at (337) 552-8178. ‘TR AV E L T R A I L E R S

& TRAILERS

30’ LIKE NEW CAMPER. 2001 - 30 Ft. Trail-lite Camper; Bumper pull; in excellent condition;sleeps nine; many extras - sway bar---stabilizer. $7,900 firm. Good for home away from home or Hurricane evacuation.. Must see to appreciate quality. Call 409-745-0537 evenings for appointment to see, or leave message and will return call. IF YOU SEE IT, YOU’LL BUY IT. Also, e-mail at straydawg7763244yahoo.com.

T R U C K S & VA N S

‘88 CHEVROLET P.U., runs good, $1,200, 543-8089 or 886-7329.

‘'85 CHEVY C-10, V-8, LWB, A/C, C. player, auto trans., PS/B, good motor, no oil leakage, real workhorse, $3,000 OBO, ask for Ruth @ (409) 735-7353 ‘98 CHEROKEE CLASSIC. 3 yrs old. Std body & fair for parts. Call Dee at 658-5225. ‘02 Ford Ranger XLT- Red, 2d extended cab. 94,305 miles. 3.0 Liter--engine, all power windows and locks, tow hitch, AM/FM Radio &CD player, automatic transmission, AC/ Heater works great! Looks and runs just like new! Very clean! $5,000. Call 8867513. ‘02 Ford Ranger XLT- Red, 2d extended cab. 94,305 miles. 3.0 Liter--engine, all power windows and locks, tow hitch, AM/FM Radio &CD player, automatic transmission, AC/ Heater works great! Looks and runs just like new! Very clean! $5,000. Call 8867513. PUBLIC NOTICES: AL-ANON MEETS ON Wednesday & Sunday at 7pm. 1512 Strickland Dr., Orange, call (409) 779-4289 or Cindy @ 994-5503 for details. GOLDEN TRIANGLE TOUGHLOVE is a self help parents support group for parents of children displaying unacceptable behavior. Meets every Tues. at 7 pm. at Immaculate Conception education building, 4100 Lincoln (corner of Lincoln & Washington) in Groves. For more information call 9620480. AT. ST. PAUL UNITED METHODIST you can experience the warmth of friendly people, beautiful music, and inspiring sermons. Join us at 1155 W. Roundbunch Rd., BC each Sunday at 8:15 AM or 10:45 AM for worship experience at 9:30 AM for Sunday School. You’ll be glad you came, and so will we!

THE RECORD NEWS Bridge City Rentals AMBER Furnished Garage Apt, 1/1 LINGO Furnished small M.H., 1/1 2/2 & 3/2 Mobile Homes You Can’t Buy All have A/C, stove & Better Orange refrig. Also 2 M.H. Spaces Avail- County Advertising able (409) QUIET 651-1578 697-2552

R&R RV PARK


10B

• The Record • Week of Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Science teachers explore ecosystems Staff Report

For The Record

Fourteen Southeast Texas science teachers and future teachers learned about the local environment recently with field trips throughout the area in Lamar University’s Department of Earth and Space Sciences 16th annual Teaching Environmental Science summer institute. On Friday, the participants took a boat trip on the Trinity River where they learned about ecosystems in the Trinity Bay estuary. The 10-day field institute, called “Teaching Environmental Sciences in the Three Rivers’ Watersheds and Wetlands,” is offered in conjunction with the Region 5 Science Collaborative and 24 local industries, state and federal agencies, and environmental non-governmental organizations. The institute is a co-enrollment graduate/undergraduate course for both in-service and pre-service (education major) teachers. In order to understand the bay and the estuarine species that inhabit it, the teachers and Lamar University students put on hip waders and walked around in the coastal water. Using a large fish net (seine) and small hand nets, they looked at different species including juvenile shrimp, comb jellyfish and plants that can grow underwater. They also tested the water salinity and found that it was unusually high at 13 parts per thousand because of on-going drought conditions. “By literally immersing teachers in the Trinity Bay estuary, we not only get their full attention on the subject, but we also get them to experience what it is like to be an estuarine organism surrounded in warm, brackish and turbid water,” said Jim Westgate, director of the institute and University Professor of Earth & Space Sciences at Lamar. “The teachers now have a deep connection with the bay organisms and the ability to teach to their students from their own experiences.” Area teachers participating were Minta Bergeron, Jami Burns and Melinda Vail of Port Arthur; Katie Kornegay of West Orange-Stark; Summer Linscomb of West Brook; and Mary McLean of Lumberton. Also attending were Lamar University students Hilary Allen, Michael Black and Heather Burgess of Beaumont, Nick Brandes of Sealy, Samantha Chauvin of Vinton, La., Sandra Griffin of Vidor, Tania Stephens of Nederland and Johanna Todd of Liberty. The summer institute introduces Southeast Texas’ EC-12 teachers (and students studying to

be teachers) to environmental issues, problems and solutions through first-hand experiences, Westgate said. In the program, the teachers and LU students explore environmental topics such as industrial, agricultural and domestic wastes and emissions that affect the Neches, Trinity and Sabine River watersheds and air sheds. “Good teachers know their subjects at a level higher than the level at which they attempt to convey the information,” Westgate said. “The fastest way to learn and retain information is to experience learning through multiple senses, sight, touch, sound, etc.” The teacher participants receive full scholarships, as well as teaching materials they can use in their classrooms after the course. Teaching materials fulfill the No Child Left Behind professional development requirements for teachers, while the field activities prepare teachers and future teachers to instruct through selfdirected, inquiry-method learning. Each institute’s cohort of in-service teachers instructs more than 2,000 students each fall. Since its inception, more than 150,000 Texas students have taken courses from teachers who have experienced the institute. The Teaching Environmental Science Institute is jointly sponsored by the Texas Regional Science Collaborative, Entergy, ExxonMobil, MeadWestvaco, Sempra Energy, Chevron Phillips, Valero, Magnolia Garden Club, Waterborne Education Center, National Park Service’s Big Thicket National Preserve, Big Thicket Association, The Nature Conservancy, Village Creek State Park, Texas Energy Museum, Shangri La Botanical Gardens & Nature Center, Sea Grant, Texas Agrilife Extension Service, Texas General Land Office Oil Spill Prevention & Response, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Texas State University Texas Stream Team, Texas Parks & Wildlife Coastal Fisheries, Clean Air & Water Inc., DuPont Sabine River Works, Lower Neches Valley Authority, U.S. Coast Guard and Lamar University. The Lamar University TES Institute has received international, national and statewide exposure through presentations at numerous venues. These have included conferences of the Australian Association for Environmental Education (2006), National Science Teachers Association (2003 & 2005), North American Association for Environmental Education (2002 & 2003), Science Teachers Association of Texas (2001-2004), Texas Academy of Science (2002, 2003, & 2005), and the Texas Environmental Educators Partnership (2002).

BCISD to administer Credit by Examination

Staff Report

For The Record

Bridge City ISD, in accordance with Chapter 74.24 TAC, will administer the Texas Tech University Credit by Examination Tests. Testing dates will be December 6, 7 and 8, 2011 and June 5, 6 and 7 2012. Students in grades first through fifth will be allowed to take each of the five tests (Math, Science, Language Arts, Reading, and Social Studies) at the elementary level

without prior instruction. The student must score at least 90 on each of the five four tests to be considered eligible for grade level acceleration. Students in grades sixth through 12 will be permitted to take an examination to earn credit for an academic course for which they have had no prior instruction. Students must score at least 90 on the test to receive course credit. Additional information and registration forms can be obtained by contacting Gina Mannino at: gina.mannino@bridgecityisd.net.

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