Issuu on Google+

Pitch Walter Johnson High School

the

A Fare

well to

WJ 3 n o i 4 t c n e a l r f r e a R G . A r D SG h t i w 2 1 A r e t t Q& a c S r o i n e S

Volume 56 Issue 8

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

6400 Rock Spring Drive, Bethesda, MD 20814

thepitch@walterjohnson.com

(301) 803-7302


Pitch

the

2

NEWS

MAY 25, 2011

CONTENTS

News

3 Graduation Speaker: Jody Olsen 3 SGA Reflection 4 Teachers Leaving WJ 4 Q&A with Dr. Garran

LETTER

6

FROM THE

9

Editorial 5 Up At Bat: Pitch Siblings 5 Fielder’s Choice 6 Trumped by Politics 6 To the Editor 6 Death of Osama bin Laden 6 Liz’s Life 7 Pitch Editors Sign Off 7 Curveball 8 Point-Counterpoint: Maryland Classes 8 Slugger 8 Shuttle Program Making a Permanent Landing

EDITORS

8

Dear Readers,

17

Feature

9 Celebrating the Class of 2011 10-11 Senior Standouts 12 Senior Scatter

Arts and Entertainment 14 Music Playlist 14 Out of Left Field 15 Student Tattoos 16 Prom Dress Review

16

15

Sports

9

17 All-Pitch Team 18-19 Season Wrap-Ups

THE

PITCH ONLINE

Osama bin Laden’s Death Relief at Home and Abroad

- Alexandra Sanfuentes and Sasha Tycko Print Editors-in-Chief

www.wjpitch.com Government HSA Requirement Nixed: Test Still Administered

Russell Brand: The Self-Obsessed Sellout Editors-in-Chief Alexandra Sanfuentes Sasha Tycko Katie Levingston* Abby Singley*

As much as we’d like to leave this letter blank and simply write “The effects of senioritis...sorry...” we know we can’t. We wouldn’t want to pass on The Pitch to its new editors without a final farewell. This year we threw a lot of new changes your way, from funky layout designs and cool new graphics to discussions of more scandalous story topics and world issues. With all these new ideas we wanted to bring a fresh new look to WJ’s student newspaper, a look that was completely different from years prior. Looking back on all of our hard work, we’re proud to say we definitely rose to the challenge. It’s with sadness that we acknowledge the departure of an instrumental player of The Pitch, our advisor Hilary Gates. Without her support we never would have made it through all of the hectic press days and late nights. Next year, the paper will be under the new leadership of English teacher Sylvie Ellen and current feature and sports editors, Rosie Hammack and Hannah Flesch. With the new staff will also come more changes to The Pitch, changes that will continue to improve the paper to make it the best that it can be. Thanks for your loyal readership, WJ, and cheers to the class of 2011!

THE

STAFF

Arts & Entertainment Editors Sophie Meade The Pitch is published eight times a year by the students of Walter Johnson High Ian Green* School, 6400 Rock Spring Drive, Bethesda, Md. 20814. Advertising and subAssistant Arts & Ent. scription rates are available by calling 301-803-7302. Editorial opinions repEditor resent those of The Pitch staff and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the News Editors Eleanor Janhunen staff, faculty, or student body. We welcome letters, articles, photographs and Devon Murtha artwork, to be submitted to room 211 or e-mailed to thepitch@walterjohnson. Feature Editors Ali Jawetz* com. The Pitch is an award-winning paper that works towards providing the stuAssistant News Editors Rosie Hammack dent body with accurate, as well as credible, information. Lily Sieradzki Julia Cinquegrani Sari Amiel* Jemile Safaraliyeva Taliah Dommerholt* Maryland HS Journalism Award Columbia Scholastic Sports Editors Best Newspaper Overall Press Association Editorial Editors Parker Smith Third Place Gold Medalist Liz Wasden Daniel Fanaroff* 2009-2010 2009 Jessica Evans* Assistant Sports Editors Assistant Editorial Editor American Scholastic Hannah Flesch Ryan Lynch Press Association Phillip Resnick Photo Editor First Place Daniel Gorelik* Stefany Carty 2010-2011 Copy Chief Videographer Abby Singley Emil Hafeez *Online Editors

Nationals: Up Against All Odds Staff Writers Cameron Keyani Josh Benjamin Alex Spinard Girard Bucello Jenny Deutsch Danielle Markowitz Megan Chun Erik Blad Evan Eggerman Adrian Zlotescu Sloane Guber Andres Valencia Rebecca Hansen Shanilka Puerto Nathaniel Rees Emily Cosentino Daniel Thaler Yun Zhou Bryn Molloy Anders Norberg Greg Kim Leslie Ferdani Claudia Nguyen Kiarra Strocko Dominick Hernandez Copy Editors Photographers Sari Amiel Alex Spinard Ali Jawetz Danielle Markowitz Jemile Safaraliyeva Devon Murtha PR Manager Sasha Tycko Alexandra Sanfuentes Alex Spinard Business/ Advisors Ad Manager Hilary Gates Phillip Resnick Sylvie Ellen


the

Pitch

MAY 25, 2011

NEWS

GRADUATION SPEAKER Jody Olsen

By Jemile Safaraliyeva

Chosen as this year’s commencement speaker, Dr. Jody Olsen was part of the first class to graduate from WJ and will be making an appearance on May 31 to speak at this year’s graduation to the Class of 2011. “It was the third year WJ was open, I was part of the first class to go out and graduate,” said Olsen reminiscing about life as a student at WJ. Graduating in the ‘60s, Olsen remembers when WJ was on a farm and referred to as the “cow-school,” and when the mascot was the Spartan and Mighty Moo was yet to exist. Over the past couple of decades WJ and the immediate area has been transformed. The physical geography has changed, defining establishments have been developed and the school has been renovated. However, the spirit of WJ has remained. This year’s senior class officers chose Olsen as the commencement speaker for the Class of 2011 because of her inspirational life and experience which all began at WJ. Olsen will address thousands of students, staff and families on May 31 at 2 p.m. at DAR Constitution Hall, graduation day. “Dr. Olsen has committed her life to service in a way that many of us at WJ can only aspire to,” said senior class secretary Xan Avendano, who will introduce Olsen on graduation day. “As a school characterized by giving back to the community, it is only fitting that our guest speaker does just that.”

Olsen’s gratitude goes out to her teachers and mentors who taught her the importance of working hard to achieve success. “I learned to work hard and respect learning in a way I had never had before,” said Olsen. “I worked much harder and was so grateful to those teachers that taught me what it meant to learn.” Olsen moved to the Bethesda area from Utah and entered WJ as a sophomore which made her uneasy about her acceptance, but WJ took her in with open arms. She recalls the sincere greetings and exchanges between various students in the halls. After graduating from WJ, Olsen pursued sociology and received her teaching certification from the University of Utah. Upon completion, she made a decision that set the course of her life. Olsen chose to become a volunteer for the Peace Corps. Her first opportunity with the Peace Corp occurred in 1966 in Tunisia. “I knew that I wanted to do things that would take me to other parts of the country,” said Olsen. “It was more of the idea of the adventure of it, testing the idea of who I am, trying things that were so different.” After only two years, Olsen leapt to the position of country director of Togo, under the Peace Corps. She’s been actively involved with the foundation since its early years and ultimately reached the position of Chief of Staff of the Peace Corps at the Washington

SGA REFLECTION

D.C. Headquarters, only four years after being the Regional Director of North Africa, Near East, Asia and the Pacific Regions. On May 31, Olsen wishes to communicate the importance of holding on to aspirations. “Hold on to a passion for life, keep a wonderful sense of humor,” said Olsen. “The emotions inside of us, the emotions that drive us are as important as the science, literature and math that we’ve been putting into our heads.” Olsen is proud of her beginning at WJ and expresses large thanks to the individuals who’ve defined the beginning of her adulthood. She anxiously anticipates the ability to address the Class of 2011 in a couple of days and to be able to thank the school. “I am who I am because of this school,” she said.

What do you consider to be your biggest accomplishment this year? Raising $38,780.30 What is your favorite memory from being in the SGA? The day that we all got elected and we met in Mr. Atencio’s room and we all looked at each other and we decided that we were going to be friends and it all went downhill from there. What was the hardest part of being in the SGA? The hardest part of being president was keeping check on Michael Li, my vice president. What advice would you give to next year’s SGA? I’m sorry to them because we did such a standup job and they’re going to have to live up to that, but advice I would say that they should be ready to work very hard and not set lofty goals because it’s not always easy to meet them.

Dr. Jody Olsen

Profession: Visiting Professor at the University of Maryland-Baltimore School of Social Work, former Acting Director of U.S. Peace Corps. Graduated from: University of Utah

and WJ

Photos courtesy of Jody Olsen

VICE PRESIDENT Michael Li

What do you consider to be your biggest accomplishment this year? Helping people out. What is your favorite memory from being in the SGA? Male poms. If you could have done anything differently over your tenure in the SGA, what would it be? Basically just getting more students involved because only a select group of students did stuff. What advice would you give to next year’s SGA? Be open to ideas [from everyone].

TREASURER Cole Ahnell

What is your favorite memory from being in the SGA? When we met the administrators and something inappropriate happened between one of our SGA officers and a teacher. And also hanging out with Mr. Merrill. If you could have done anything differently over your tenure in the SGA, what would it be? Probably been more involved with clubs and after-school activities because we always support the sports teams, but we don’t really support the clubs and things like debate and forensics. What advice would you give to next year’s SGA? Work your butt off, but have fun doing it.

Quick Hits

Dr. Jody Olsen speaking at events and on various Peace Corp missions as Country and Deputy Director.

By Jemile Safaraliyeva and Julia Cinquegrani

PRESIDENT Michael New

3

Photos by Julia Cinquegrani

SECRETARY Nick Regan What is your favorite memory from being in the SGA? Falling in love with power and responsibility; that’s going to leave a mark. If you could have done anything differently over your tenure in the SGA, what would it be? Well two things really; the more important one is I should have been more communicative, especially with the underclassman, on more serious topics rather than just “what are you doing Friday night?” On a lighter note, I regret the idea to sing “Shout” at the winter pep rally. Let me just say, I went to bed feeling great that I came up with that and then the next night I might have taken too many painkillers. Next question please. What advice would you give to next year’s SGA? Get Aetna as your medical insurance because you’re going to have a lot of psychologist visits. Was being in the SGA worth the time and effort it took? I don’t know, I mean I guess I’m happier and more depressed.Yeah, why not? The SGA sign off as their year in office ends. Clockwise: Michael Li supports his president, Michael New, Secretary Nick Regan hides behind a curtain and treasurer Cole Ahnell flashes a peace sign.


NEWS

By Claudia Nguyen, Greg Kim and Megan Chun

Dr. Garran Leaves WJ By Julia Cinquegrani

Kim Ahearn P. E. For physical education teacher Kim Ahearn, teaching paved the way to coaching. A graduate of WJ, Ahearn currently coaches baseball and has previously coached golf, football and girls basketball. Though some would think staying in one place for over three decades would become tiresome, Ahearn begs to differ. “Every day is a good memory here for me . . . I can’t imagine [that] any high school would be more enjoyable for me,” said Ahearn. Although he spent 32 years teaching at WJ, Ahearn is not eager to get away. He will continue to coach baseball and will substitute classes a few days a week. In his free time he looks forward to traveling with his wife.

Kelly Bean Math Kelly Bean, an Algebra 1 and pre-calculus teacher, as well as the sponsor of the Quidditch Club and National Honor Society, is leaving WJ after teaching here for two years. Bean previously worked at Eastern Middle School before coming to WJ and will be transitioning back to Eastern as the math department head. Bean also praised the students at WJ. “These are really bright students. [They’re] hardworking, sometimes overachieving, but in general, it’s refreshing because you see kids who want to learn and do well.”

Hilary Gates English

Pitch

the

4 Teachers Bid Farewell

On July 1, Garran will be replaced by new principal Jennifer Baker, who is currently the principal of Tilden Middle school.

Q: How has WJ changed since you first started working here? A: Oh, it’s gotten far worse; I’ve led it astray. We now have Pong competitions and Burrito Miles and we have staff members being duct taped to walls and for an entire month we’re not shaving, and the place is just going crazy; that’s why I have to leave, so we can restore some order here. Hopefully I created an environment in which kids felt comfortable coming to me, and actually bringing up crazy ideas and we supported them, even when I was a little uncomfortable with the ideas. . . .but I think it’s been well received here. That’s what makes this place so great. I take the work I do here very seriously, but I don’t take myself too seriously. Q: If you could have done anything differently over your tenure at WJ, what would it be? A: I would have done the Burrito Mile once. I think I could have eaten the burrito and done the mile, no problem. I think I could have actually beaten a couple of the kids. It’s my one regret; I missed that opportunity. I might have to come back and do that. Q: What qualities are you looking for in a new principal? A: What some of the students told me is that you need to find somebody who will be okay with being duct taped to a wall, and who will be in the Homecoming movie. And I’m also looking for a cameo in the next Home-

MAY 25, 2011 coming video. But I want somebody who will respect the culture and community here and thrive on the openness of the school. Q: What advice would you give WJ’s next principal? A: When the new principal is appointed, the f i r s t thing I’m going to say to that person is: ‘You just got the best job in the school system, and you’d better respect it.’ Because it is the best job; I’m giving up the best job in the school system . . . I just want them to understand how lucky and privileged they are. Q: If you could change anything about WJ, what would it be? A: I shouldn’t have been a bad guy in so many of the Homecoming movies.Why is the SGA always the hero and I need to be saved? Why am I stuck in a shed for the whole movie, and they’re running around saving the day? So I think I was miscast by not being the hero in the Homecoming movies. That’s it. Q: What do you see yourself doing in ten to fifteen years? A: I wouldn’t rule out the idea of possibly moving to the superintendence level, or going to a private school, or going back to another high school and being a principal, or teaching more at the university level. The most important thing that I will be doing is that my wife is expecting our first child, a boy, in September, so I’m sure that by then he will be a terror, and I will probably be on a first-name basis with his principal, and he will be getting back at me for all the students I have discplined at WJ. Q: If you could choose one accomplishment that defined your role as principal, what would it be? A: Oh boy. One year I used my keys, which were in my pocket, to actually get myself off the wall when I was duct taped to it [for Pennies for Patients], instead of having others cut me down. I bet them that I could get myself down from the wall. And my keys were in my pocket, so it took me all of fifth period, but I did it. I got myself down. I won the bet, so that was pretty good. I think they were impressed. I mean, think about it, that’s a slow process of cutting yourself out. And then when you finally do break through the tape, you fall forward pretty fast. Luckily they caught me. Photo by Devon Murtha

Hilary Gates, who teaches AP Language and Composition and works as advisor for The Pitch, is taking a year off for personal leave after teaching at WJ for eight years. There are several things that Gates will remember about WJ. “I was lucky to teach where I had freedom and students who had cared about the world [and] colleagues who were engaged and helpful,” said Gates. She currently does not have firm plans for the future, but she has options in the paramedic field. “I’ll miss knowing that every day I come to work, [I was] surrounded by students and teachers who care about what they are doing and people who are happy to be part of the community,” said Gates.

Aileen Leung Science

Aileen Leung, who teaches astronomy and honors matter and energy, is leaving after teaching for a year and a half. Leung has coached martial arts, tutored, volunteered and researched as her other jobs outside of teaching. Some of her best memories of teaching at WJ are the “work ethic of students, the sense of community and how easily the students interacted with the teachers.”     Overall, she will miss the students she has taught and the staff of the school.

Scott McGaw Math

Scott McGaw has taught math at WJ for two years, after moving here from Michigan. At the conclusion of this school year, McGaw plans to move back to Michigan and will be searching for a high school teaching job, due to his wife’s recent appointment as a professor at Adrian College. He is looking forward to living close to his friends and family again, but will miss the relationships he has built with students and other teachers at WJ. “It’s been excellent [teaching at WJ]. Everyone supports each other and it’s a very family-oriented school,” said McGaw. “I don’t feel like I have to come to work every day; I just feel like I’m coming to help family learn.”

Sarah Moss Math Sarah Moss has taught for 24 years in MCPS and is currently the math resource teacher, after teaching here for 17 years. She said that, while being a teacher is much harder and more time consuming than the previous jobs she held as a medical and legal secretary, it is also more rewarding. “I think that teaching is one of the most important professions there is,” Moss said. “It’s been a privilege teaching my students.” Moss will be staying in Bethesda after leaving WJ, and said that she will miss her students and colleagues the most.

Jim Zellers Foreign Language After spending 17 years as a French and Spanish teacher at WJ, Jim Zellers is looking forward to his retirement after this year. Zellers is eager for less stress and scheduling in his life, while he relaxes in his current home in Washington D.C., and in his former residence in Georgia. Zellers looks forwards to travelling after his retirement. Zellers has many memories to take with him. “My best memories are working with my colleagues . . . [this is] probably the best teaching experience that I’ve had, because [WJ is] one of the best schools,” said Zellers.

For a full list of staff members who are leaving, check out wjpitch.com. Deborah Maletz and Pu Mei Leng declined to comment for this article.


Up Bat

the

Pitch

MAY 25, 2011

at

EDITORIAL

For Up-At-Bat video responses, visit

WJPitch.com

Q: What will you miss about your Pitch sibling next year?

Cristina Sanfuentes

senior

A: “I’m going to miss having someone who understands my inside jokes.”

Sister of Alexandra Sanfuentes, Print Editor-in-Chief

Photos by Abby Singley, Liz Wasden and Stefany Carty

Ben Levingston

A: “I’ll miss her nagging me to check the website [wjpitch.com].”

freshman

Brother of Katie Levingston, Online Editor-in-Chief

Grant Wasden

A: “I will miss having to watch all [my sister’s] TV shows. Like The Real Housewives.”

junior

Brother of Liz Wasden, Print Editorial Editor

Emerson Smith

freshman

A: “I’ll miss having him critique me after my hockey games.”

Brother of Parker Smith, Print Sports Editor

Aliyah Carty

sophomore

Sister of Stefany Carty, Photo Editor

A: “I will miss arguing about who is the better Yankee, Jeter or Mo. I think it is Jeter.”

5

Fielder’s Choice

Move Aside Graduates, the New Seniors are Ready to Take Over By Ryan Lynch Print Asst. Editorial Editor

As we approach the end of the year, this being the last issue of The Pitch, it is time to say goodbye to the seniors who have been the face of WJ since August.  From quirky SGA events like speed dating to the pie fight that never happened, from the highly skilled male poms team that performed during the spring pep rally to the innovative new Pitch design ideas that senior staff members created, our seniors are definitely leaving a lot behind.  But with their departure, a new group of seniors will be emerging, a group of which I am proud to be a part. Next year, I will be in the returning group of starters on the boys varsity basketball team. As seniors, most of the responsibility and leadership duties will fall on our shoulders.  It will be our duty to get the team mentally prepared for practice and games and to maintain team chemistry and camaraderie.  While this task may sound daunting, somebody has to do it.  It’s just one of the many perks that come along with being a senior. Our SGA and senior class officer candidates are already meeting the high expectations set by their predecessors with extremely heated and competitive primary elections.  Two candidates that successfully passed the primaries and are drawing tons of attention with their sweeping campaign techniques are juniors Jake Karlin and current junior class president Cameron Keyani.  With Karlin, founder and head of the infamous Ginger Club, and Keyani, a notorious jokester known throughout the school, vying for the SGA presidency, I can guarantee that new, ground-breaking ideas will be brought to the table for the homecoming video, pep rallies, fundraisers and other events throughout the year. Before I sign off, I would just like to say thank you to all of the graduating seniors.  Thank you to the seniors who always kept my fifth period AP Spanish Language and sixth period Forensics class fresh and entertaining with their hilarious antics.  Thank you to the seniors who coordinated with one another to help lead the Minority Scholars Program.  Thank you to the seniors on the basketball team whose leadership helped us navigate through a long season.  And thank you to all of the seniors on The Pitch staff for always being helpful and encouraging and showing others the proper way to contribute to an award-winning student newspaper.  I wish you all the best during the next phase of your life, whatever it may be, but now it’s our turn to pass down our knowledge.


Liz’s Life Auf Wiedersehen *kiss kiss*

By LizWasden Print Editorial Editor

Ask any senior and they’ll tell you about some aspect of high school that was meaningful to them, be it a sports team, club, class or the support of a teacher or counselor. Personally, I didn’t have a life-changing experience until the second semester of my senior year. For a few years of my high school career, I was the random girl who sat at the back of the auditorium during S*T*A*G*E’s many dress rehearsals, waiting to drive my brother, the sound crew chief, home. I waited as he attached body microphones to the main characters, who were dressed in full costume, and flipped switches and turned dials on the sound board as actors paced on the stage saying a few of their lines. I was intrigued by this small window into the productions, before seeing the final product, and viewing friends as the characters they played rather than my friends in wigs. I thought about auditioning. I was jealous of those who had confidence and bravery in spite of possible rejection, to try out for the shows. I had no such confidence. After the conclusion of the fall play, The Importance of Being Earnest, I realized I had one last opportunity, possibly ever, to dabble into theater. I took the plunge, auditioned, and was beyond thrilled to be cast as a member of the ensemble for the spring musical, Pippin. Participating in Pippin has changed me. I gained confidence, a plethora of vocal warm ups, a new appreciation for all that the students and teachers of S*T*A*G*E do and a family of 40+ people. I will never forget what I have learned through my experience and all of the people who made it a truly life changing experience. Singing Brittany Spears while getting ready in the dressing room, rehearsing long hours during Hell Week, learning about the importance of diction (we had to be sure we sang “hark the blood is pounding in our ears” not “hark the blood is bounding in our rears” and “shout it out” not “shout tit out”) and all of the traditions that I have sworn for life to keep secret. The only thing I won’t miss is teasing my hair for each show. For underclassmen and incoming freshmen, think of high school as your chance to do something you may not ever do again after you graduate. Try taking an art class because it might be interesting, or Chinese even though your parents don’t think it’s practical. Try going out for football or lacrosse or volleyball because it seems like a lot of fun, even if you’re nervous about being cut. Join a club even though you don’t know any of the members. Join S*T*A*G*E. It sounds cliché, but high school is the time to make mistakes. This is the time to try different things, to figure out what you don’t like so you can focus on what you do like and what you are interested in.

Pitch

the

6

EDITORIAL

MAY 25, 2011

The Death of Osama bin Laden As “We Got Him” Syndrome Wears Off, Americans Ponder Exactly What They Got

re-elected?” “Should I trust the news media?” “Shouldn’t the government release pictures of the body?” “Is this any real milestone for the war on terror?” A combination of “yes,” “no” and “maybe so,” came from different people and organizations across the world. The lack of unity is one thing very interesting Image courtesy of ssoosay, graphic by Liz Wasden about this moment, which might have been assumed to be By Cameron Keyani one of unilateral joy in America. Osama bin Laden is dead.When I first A great many foreign leaders heard those words I had mixed feelings commended the U.S. government for of excitement and confusion. On one killing one of the world’s most wanted hand, I was thrilled to hear that the men, such as Prime Minister of the man who planned the 2001 World Trade U.K. David Cameron, who called it a Center bombing was gone. “huge achievement in the fight against On the other hand, I could hardly terrorism.” In a similar spirit, D.C. put my thoughts together to ponder all residents took to the streets to revel in my questions. “Reports of his death have the news of bin Laden’s death. existed since 9/11; should I believe this But Pakistan condemned the U.S. for one?” “Does this mean Obama will get overstepping its authority in executing

a strike within their borders and some, even in the west, have questioned the scruples of celebrating someone’s death, even a mass murderer. Skeptics even argue that there is nothing to condemn or celebrate, as we have no proof of bin Laden’s death beyond what the news media and our government has told us. In the wake of the conservative “Birthers” who doubted Obama’s birth in the U.S., a group of “Deathers” have emerged, who doubt the reports of bin Laden’s death under the reported circumstances. Prominent documentarian Michael Moore tweeted that he believed bin Laden was under house arrest and the CIA cut a deal with the Pakistani government. Furthermore, some of those who do believe the reports venture to say that bin Laden’s death means nothing because the next generation of terrorist leaders is already in place, and bin Laden did not have real power in Al-Qaeda anyway. As Japanese Foreign Minister Takeaki Matsumoto succinctly put it, “His death was confirmed, it does not mean that terrorism was eliminated.” Now the only thing I know is that we did/didn’t get him, and that this is great/unimportant/sensationalized news.

Trumped By Politics The Donald sat stone-faced at his table at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, as President Obama and Saturday Night Live news anchor Seth Myers ripped him apart. Others at Trump’s table sat in awkward Photo courtesy of Philadelphia Inquirer 2009 silence, as more politicians lit into Trump, and the Donald became more sullen. Had I been at that table, I would not have stopped laughing for a second. Trump deserved no such courtesy. Trump’s attention-seeking campaign has finally come to a well-deserved ending. In true Trump style, Donald Trump dropped out of the nomination race

By Nathaniel Rees

on Mon. May 16, explaining that, if he were to run, he would have been able to win both the primary and general elections. Yeah, right. Trump’s terrible campaign was just one big publicity stunt only someone as crazy as the Donald could conceive. His persistence in asking Obama to hand over his birth certificate was just ignorant. Yet, somehow this nut job led in the polls for a Republican Presidential nomination for two weeks. Were there actually people in America who supported his Presidential bid? Thankfully, Trump’s foolish campaign has ended. After Obama turned over his birth certificate (yes, he was born in the U.S.A.) and then ordered the capture of Osama bin Laden, Trump faded from the news. In addition, both Obama and Seth Myers criticized Trump in front of many notable politicians in Washington

To the Editor:

at the White House Dinner. This was a chance for Trump to show some character and laugh at himself. Instead, Trump looked apparently angered as Myers and Obama drew many laughs with their comments. Whatever respect I had for Trump disappeared that instant. Trump’s entire campaign was centered on destroying Obama’s credibility, but once Obama finally replied to Trump’s comments, Trump did not have the courage to laugh at himself. “Is there anyone else they could talk about?” asked Trump after the dinner in an ABC news interview. No, Trump, there was no one else to talk about.You wanted to play in the big leagues of politics.Well, welcome to the game. And in this game, people like you get most of the flak. In politics you have to be able to laugh at yourself. None of the jokes told about you were nearly as bad as the petty lies you used to boost your fame. Trump, the game is over.You’re fired.

Dear Editors of The Pitch, In the April 28 issue’s Point/Counterpoint, a claim was made that buying marijuana benefits the Mexican drug cartels that cause so much suffering south of the Texas border. However, this is not necessarily the case. In a study done by the RAND Corp. during the Proposition 19 debate in California in 2010, it was determined that if marijuana were legalized for recreational use in California, cartel profits would only drop from two to four percent. Fact of the matter is, the cartels are dealing with much more serious, addictive substances than marijuana, such as cocaine and heroin, because of the customer base that keeps coming back, creating a huge profit margin. While I applaud The Pitch for taking an educated view on the issue, I respectfully disagree that the consumption of marijuana promotes cartel violence, and as a result, I believe it should be legalized, if only so that weed smokers do not end up eating up public funding in the prison system. - Junior Eli Gerber


the

Pitch

MAY 25, 2011

EDITORIAL

7

Slugger

Compiled by the Editorial section

Pitch Seniors Sign Off

Senior editors of The Pitch staff share their favorite memories of working on the newspaper.

Wow, What a Ride

By Alexandra Sanfuentes Print Editor-in-Chief Ian Green (IG) Alexandra Sanfuentes(Al.S) Abby Singley (AS) Sasha Tycko (ST) Katie Levingston (KL) Jemile Safaraliyeva (JS)

Devon Murtha (DM)

Lily Sieradzki (LS)

Stefany Carty(SC)

Sophie Meade (SM) Eleanor Janhunen(EJ) Parker Smith (PS)

Liz Wasden (LW) Photo by Ryan Lynch

Al.S: One time during press, for some reason only the female editors and Cami were around. I looked away for one second and the next thing I knew he had his whole fist in his mouth. SM: The Pitch is like a warm bubble bath... We work together to create a soothing experience for the reader. I was the potent body soap that irritates your skin! I can hardly bear to leave behind such an effervescent mix of bath products—I mean, journalists. IG: Two words. Cameron Keyani. DM: Throughout the year, The Pitch has had our share of controversy; some of our articles, which dealt with issues like sex, drugs and military recruitment, received mixed reviews, and there were definitely strong reactions to a couple columns. My favorite thing about being on The Pitch was being able to walk through the hallways knowing that people were talking about the paper, even if what they were saying wasn’t always positive. It’s nice that people cared enough to have an opinion. PS: Resnick’s laugh still haunts me in my dreams.

AS: One day, during press, Cami and girl that they were best friends. What Ian were half-playing, half-fighting with a sneaky liar. One time I told him the a metal tech ed ruler. Then, out of no- truth, which is that Feature > Sports where, Ian started beating Cami with and we were in a fight for a week. But the ruler. It worked out, though. A few then we “bonded.” hugs and back massages later, they were ST: The Pitch won’t be the same without all good. its fearless leader Hilary Gates. In the SC: It was a slow start to press and Cami dysfunctional yet loving family that is had just arrived. He took a moment to the Pitch, she is the mother lion. She cerlook around and realized that he was tainly cracks the whip and gets us to do the only male, not including Philip, and work, but also jokes around and comdecided to jump up on the table to an- forts us in our low moments. In a typinounce, “It’s me and the ladies.” cal display of our familial relationship, when someone failed to throw away the JS: I’m definitely going to miss the at- empty OJ carton she exclaimed, “You mosphere. Press is priceless in that last bastards!” and reprimanded us on our hour when everything somehow comes poor etiquette. together. I’m going to miss this group. It’s like a family in here and Cami is the KL: I’ll miss being in an environment where everyone is curious about everycreepy uncle. But we love him. thing, where everyone is wanting to find EJ: Without a doubt, my favorite mem- new ways to tell information. I’ll also ory of being on The Pitch was using the miss the wonderful Ms. Gates and the microwave. I loved microwaving my twitch I get in my right eye after staring popcorn every third period, heating up at iMovie too long. my lunch and then coming to press late after a volleyball game to microwave LW: I’m going to miss all the random leftover dinner. What an amazing appli- outbursts at press that always seem to get crazier as it gets closer to 10 ance. o’clock. Things like “Boom! Solution,” LS: I’m going to miss Phillip Resnick’s and “Where’d her arm go?!” and “How extremely loud and obnoxious laugh. do you make the runners dance?” and NOT. I am going to miss him asking to “Whoa, Obama’s way too big.” We have “bond” with me and telling every senior our own jargon.

Photo by Emily Cosentino

What makes the past pleasurable? Memorable experiences. Of course, at the culmination of high school, you’re bound to find yourself deep in thought, considering everything you’ve done in your last four years, scouring your memory files for something meaningful. An enlightening experience. Something new you tried, someone cool you met who influenced you. At first, I thought that my life up until year 18 had lacked anything significant. I thought, unfortunately, that high school stunk and I couldn’t wait to get it out of my sight. The first thing I couldn’t wait to do was to break out of this cage of pressure that we’re all locked into. But now that the door is being opened for me and I can actually see a light at the end of the tunnel, I can actually move past all the frustration and deterioration I used to associate with high school. What I failed to realize these last few years was that everything happened for a reason. At the time, I could only think that a D on a math test was the end of the world. It wasn’t. I survived. If you asked me today which math test it was that I was so devastated over, I wouldn’t be able to tell you. That’s because that part of my high school experience wasn’t significant. What was significant, however, is that I learned how to ball up all of those crappy math tests and put them behind me. What I do remember, the memories that stick out the most, are probably the weirdest times of my life so far, that just happen to be the best. What makes them, and any memory you keep, excellent is that they made you laugh so hard you cried. Times you felt proud, times you felt elated and overjoyed. Or times that made you smile. So when I look back on high school, and push aside the harsh thoughts I kept bottled up inside about how awful parts of it were, I see those memories. To this day they make me smile. Many of us work hard toward one goal: getting into college. For me, it was the time that everything finally paid off. It was five o’clock and my mom wasn’t home yet. She had made me wait to check the status of my application to Vassar until she got home. We had already established that I would wait for her, but she was late and I was antsy. When she burst through the door and ran downstairs, my heart was pounding nearly out of my chest. In a split second, the huge boulder of school pressure all these years finally lifted off. My mother reached into her pockets and showered glittery stars of confetti all over our living room, tossing them in the air as we laughed and hugged. It’s memories like this one that keep me going. To know that one day, it’ll all pay off. Just be patient, work hard for what you want, and, in the end, you’ll be glad you did.


the

8

Pitch

EDITORIAL

Curveball Farewell, WJ

By Sasha Tycko Print Editor-in-Chief

University of Maryland Young Scholars Class

CounterPoint

By Daniel Thaler

Point

By Dominick Hernandez

Tired of tedious high school classes? Anxious to get a taste of college? Then the University of Maryland at College Park’s Young Scholars Program is tailor-made for you. This program gives students a terrific opportunity to escape high school for two periods every day and to challenge themselves with a college course of their choice. A wide array of subjects are offered, including World Affairs, Engineering, Moral Issues, Entrepreneurship, Social Violence and Psychology. Juniors who have the required minimum GPA of 3.00 should definitely jump at the chance to apply. With actual professors and college lectures, no class, not even an AP, comes close to paralleling the preparation Young Scholars gives students for college. “I think that if I hadn’t taken the class, the transition from high school to college would have been much more difficult,” said Young Scholar senior Sara Blad. Since very few people in the world are presented with such a beneficial class option, students who choose to take on the challenge of Young Scholars will enter college at a significant advantage. Not only will they already have college credits, but they will also know how to cope with heavy workloads and busy schedules. Although Whitman students are involved with the program as well, all classes are held at WJ. Twice a week, UMD professors make the trip to WJ to teach their class during periods one and two. Yes, that’s right, only twice a week. The three other days of the week, students get the double period off. The educational benefits are good, but the extra sleep in the morning is what makes this program great. Just imagine how rejuvenating it would feel to wake up at 9 a.m. and only have five classes to endure. How could anyone turn down this luxurious lifestyle? Before you get too excited, it must be noted that the class is not a just a walk in the park. There will be tough assignments and it will be necessary to devote some time to studying. After all, it is a college class. But, it’s still a worthwhile challenge to take on. Colleges will be enamored to see a student ambitious enough to commit to a college class while still in high school. If you’re not sure whether or not to apply for the Young Scholar Program, at least sleep on it.That is, if you get enough sleep. A Young Scholar does.

The University of Maryland’s Young Scholars Program is definitely not for everyone. While it remains a very popular option among those determined to get ahead in the race towards college, due to the inconveniences of a very different schedule, a college-level workload, a heavy price tag and sometimes unsatisfactory results, taking any class in the program is a decision that cannot be taken lightly. I, like any other teenager, know that high school never runs short of things to do or classes to take. With the looming competitive trials of getting into and surviving in college ahead, the rush to get all the class credits you need, dealing with the classwork and keeping up with all of your extracurriculars can make high school life feel like a field of flaming hoops and hurdles. Throwing a chunk of college life into that mess can be a death sentence to the unprepared student. Rather than listening to what your parents, older siblings or friends have to say about whether or not you should decide to take a class in theYoung Scholars Program, it is critical to judge your schedule and figure out whether or not you can manage it. In addition, being different from high school altogether, the classes are normally very long, lasting up to two periods. While some AP courses offer similar classes, the Young Scholars Programs would not give you high school credit and because they take up two class periods, your opportunities to get your credits may diminish. College classes come with college responsibilities. Yes, that includes fees for everything. From the application to the tuition, the Young Scholars program is definitely not a cheap program. While the cost per credit is less than many colleges, the fact that you’re doing a college course in high school might not be the best course of action. In addition to taking away from the whole college experience, it also takes away from the high school experience. With each class around a thousand dollars, this step must definitely be considered closely with parents to determine whether or not they believe it’s worth it as well. Overall, the courses offered by the University of Maryland are definitely a unique but rigorous program that can definitely help you achieve your goals, but that may also be a major task for the unprepared high school student. Sacrifices, monetary and social, definitely have to be made, and any decision you take regarding the program should be taken with careful consideration for what you can and can’t handle.

Shuttle Program Will Be Making a Permanent Landing By Girard Bucello

ber O

d Hu

e by R

designed. Many shuttle parts, from the massive fuel tank to the navigation systems for the Space Shuttle, are designed and tested here. The effect of the end of the shuttle program will be enormous at companies large and small. NASA will still launch space vehicles, but, without any manned space flights run by NASA, no longer will there be a need to sustain humans in space, nor will there be a need to repair a reusable space craft, such as the Space Shuttle. It follows, then, that work- ers at companies who supply NASA must either change focus or face layoffs in the wake of the dying shuttle program. Perhaps more profound, however, is the cultural impact of the Space Shuttle’s last flight. Since the Apollo program, Americans have always been fascinated watching a white rocket ascend rland

CT l/M

ntine

o Se

It feels almost tragic: on June 28, 2011, the Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to lift off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for the last time. It will carry a crew of four, as well as several pieces of cargo, to the International Space Station, but it will carry more: a 34 year legacy and the dreams of a nation – and, indeed, the dreams of the entire world. The shuttle has been an icon across generations and the very symbol of space exploration. It has also ushered in significant scientific breakthroughs that began in the space program: virtual reality, water purification methods and solar panels pioneered to sustain men and machines in space. Despite such obvious economic and cultural significance, the project and its proposed replacement, the Constellation program, were deemed too expensive to continue funding. It’s here, along the Interstate 270 corridor, where much of the technology is

o Phot

Whew. After a frenzied race to the finish line that is graduation, I’m exhausted. I’ve spent the past year in longing anticipation of this moment and, with commencement only a week away, I’m stopping to catch my breath. Walking through WJ these days, I can’t help but see myself as a freshman, running to Ms. Baker’s classroom to be first in line for those dreaded book reports. Or as a sophomore, attending weekly meetings of the Peace Club.Or as a junior, starting the stressful process of applying to colleges. A lot has changed in the last four years. Most seniors have transformed from excited, naïve freshmen into mature adults ready for the next step. In this transition, my perspective has shifted, broadened. I now realize most of the little things I agonized over in the past are trivial. Held up to the uncertainty of the near future, the daily toils of high school seem insignificant. I’m much more forward-thinking. But for a little while, I want to reflect. The world has changed in the past 18 years of my existence.You could almost say that we’re at the tail end of a generation. Technology has shaped the culture we know today. I remember a time before cell phones became a necessity, when calling friends’ house phones was the norm. We used clunky PCs and primitive video games and interacted on Xanga and Myspace. We traded Pokemon cards and read paperbacks instead of collecting apps and reading Kindles. Cassettes, then CDs yielded to online downloading and iTunes. In jumping headfirst into an age of technology, we lost some elemental aspects of humanity. Personal interaction is being replaced by twenty-word text messages and faceless computer messages. But change is inevitable; we’ll just have to work harder to maintain interpersonal relationships. WJ has changed a lot, too. It’s sleeker, glossier, glitzier. Construction is over and freshmen don’t know what it’s like to attend class in a trailer park, to not have ceilings or to have your route to class obstructed by a closed hallway. They don’t know what it’s like to storm the football field in celebration of the first win in four abysmal years. What WJ gained in brighter hallways and shinier fields replaced some of the funkiness, some of the personality. There used to be a certain aura of indignant pride. Yes, our football team sucked and the facilities weren’t as nice, but we bonded. Now we’re barely distinguishable from our neighbors at B-CC and (gasp!) Churchill. Class of 2011, it’s been a good run. I hope your next four years will be a whirlind of new challenges and experiences. In the midst of the changes you will inevitably go through, be wary of your immersion into these changes. Seek out change and yet hold on to yourself.

MAY 25, 2011

into the sky with the initials “U.S.A.” emblazoned on the side. The space program has since changed to a symbol of international cooperation as much as one of national pride: the Space Shuttle crew has received a number of calls from the Russian president, and fifteen countries’ staff support the International Space Station, which the Space Shuttle supplies. Nothing can erase American pride in the space program, however. For a nation which successfully landed on the moon, and has turned to other planets in fascination, it will be heartbreaking to watch American astronauts leave Earth on a Russian Soyuz rocket or a commercial charter spacecraft. An icon as American as the Statue of Liberty or the flag raised on Iwo Jima should at least have a worthy “Made in America” successor. Without it, we will lose not just skilled workers and opportunities for advanced technology, but also a piece of the American spirit itself.


Pitch

the

MAY 25, 2011

SENIORS

9

celebrating the

Cartoon by Michael Matthes.Yearbook photos courtesy of The Windup. Group photo by Sasha Tycko


carl adams

MAY 25, 2011

across the map

colorado college

By Anders Norberg

Most of the graduating class of 2011 has impressive plans for next year. However, these individuals have shown their remarkable talents and drive through their unique and noteworthy future paths.

Imagine only going to one class each day for three weeks, surrounded by the clear air and craggy cliffs of the Rockies. This is exactly what senior Sara Peterson will be doing next year. Peterson plans to go to Colorado College in Colorado Springs in January 2012.For three months before that, she will be participating in a National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) trip in the northwest United States where she will be backpacking, rock climbing and sea kayaking. “Since [Colorado College] just handed me three months to use however I wanted, I decided that I would take that time to get away from home and experience some amazing things in the same part of the country that I’ll be going to college,” said Peterson. The NOLS offers programs for people of any age to learn leadership skills through hiking, kayaking and other outdoor activities all over the U.S. and Mexico. “The skills I learn at NOLS are definitely going to come in handy over my four years at [Colorado College],” said Peterson. Peterson chose Colorado College because it is small and it has a unique schedule. The students take one class for three weeks and then take an exam at the end of each set of three weeks. She found this schedule better than a regular college semester because she could focus on each subject individually. Peterson is excited to go to Colorado College and has plans to travel after she graduates. “When I graduate from college, I want to go around the world,” she said.

washington

new york

minnesota 2

oregon

eastman school of music

By Emily Cosentino

Out of the 12 total students from WJ who have applied to the prestigious Eastman School of Music since 2006, senior Sam Um is one of the three who have been accepted. As a sophomore, Um decided to pursue classical percussion. While researching top-ranked music schools, Eastman caught his eye. Eastman is a professional school inside the University of Rochester in New York. It was named “The Hottest School for Music” by the Kaplan Newsweek in 2008. Even with the extra time and practice Um put in, the application process was nerve-racking. “It was a wakeup call,” said Um. “I saw a lot of really good people and realized there was competition.” Although Um grew up surrounded by music and can play a variety of instruments, including drums, piano, cello, bass and French horn, he was nervous about applying and did not expect to be accepted. The school offers five different degrees. Students can strive to achieve a Bachelors of Music, Masters of Arts, Masters of Music, Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Musical Arts degrees. “My ultimate goal is to achieve a Ph.D. and become a music professor for a school similar to Eastman,” said Um.

7 1

nebraska

5

iowa

7

1

indiana

illinois

colorado

california

5

6 ohio

n. carolina

1

1

14

louisiana

#

new jersey 2 delaware

virginia

151 maryland

umbc towson 10

14

mc

9

52 52

umcp

s. carolina smcm

4

6

georgia

international: 11 7 florida

all numbers taken from Senior Scatter information

massachusetts

2 rhode island connecticut

d.c.

17

1

alabama mississippi

number of seniors attending this specific college

12

3 w. virginia

kentucky

3

4 1

michigan

1

By Jenny Deutsch

university of edinburgh

Whether it’s because of the Harry Potter-esque campus, the rich Scottish history, or just because the city of Edinburgh is really cool, senior Gaby Cavanagh has decided to enroll in the University of Edinburgh in Edinburgh, Scotland. She feels that the advantages of going abroad are the reasonable price and the excitement of being in a new place, as well as the glorious opportunity to travel around Europe. Despite these various advantages, Cavanagh warns that going to Edinburgh may not be a wise decision for individuals who are undecided about their major because unlike most American universities, one must declare a major immediately and cannot spend the first two years of their college experience taking general classes. Cavanagh is planning to major in international relations, which she will receive a master’s degree after only four years, thanks to this European style of higher education. For next year, she is worried about different European culture and being far away from her friends and family. “I don’t know if they are going to laugh at my jokes or understand me,” said Cavanagh. This college, which has been “influencing the world since 1583,” is the alma mater of Charles Darwin and Nobel Prize winners Charles Barkla, Max Born, Peter Doherty and James Mirrlees. Perhaps Cavanagh can join this list of impressive people who attended this school across the pond.

harvard university By Emily Cosentino

12

pennsylvania

gaby cavanagh

tianhao he

24

27

wisconsin

number of colleges applied to

sam um

where the seniors are scattering, by state

1

2

14% in state tuition 10% scholarship 12% reputation of school 15% location 11% specific academic program 14% dream school other 24%

sara peterson

vermont 2

#

11

primary reason for attending your college

Graph compiled by Abby Singley, Lily Sieradzki, Sari Amiel and Rosie Hammack

number of seniors in this state

SENIORS

west point military academy

Dating back to its founding in 1802, West Point Military Academy has long remained loyal to its motto “Duty, Honor, Country,” in its mission to prepare its students to be future commissioned leaders in the American military. Senior Carl Adams has known about the Academy for as long as he can remember. His father is an alumnus and as such Adams grew up with military influence. “Through most of high school, all of the colleges kind of looked the same to me,” said Adams. “West Point [was] way different from anything else out there.” West Point’s education consists of dual programs: one in the field of specialized education and the other in cadet life. Students balance high-caliber classes with competitive sports and intense military training for the four years at the school and then graduate to a subsequent five years of active duty as a Second Lieutenant. Less than 1,500 students are admitted out of the thousands that apply. The application process to West Point is very unique in that applicants must be nominated from the state’s Senators and Representative in Congress. But Adams’ work paid off as he was offered a spot as part of the West Point class of 2015 after completing the lengthy applications and various fitness tests. Students live by military standards at West Point and are expected to behave according to the honor and codes of the U.S. Military. Students must also make the transition between citizen and military life from the second they step on campus. “Basically, you come in a civilian,” said Adams. “During those six weeks over the summer, they wring all of the civilian out of you and replace it with the letters A, R, M, and Y.”

key

MAY 25, 2011

senior135statistics seniors were polled

By Danielle Markowitz

5

Pitch

the

the

10

Pitch

SENIORS

Harvard University, located in the heart of Cambridge, Mass., has been considered a prestigious school since it was established in 1636. From Presidents to Supreme Court justices to the creator of facebook, many influential people have attended Harvard, a school ranked number one in the nation by the “U.S. News and World Report.” This fall, senior Tianhao He plans to add himself to this esteemed list. Despite being accepted into other such prestigious schools as Yale and Stanford, the strong connection He feels to Harvard factored into his decision process. “My heart was really at Harvard,” said He, who plans on majoring in economics. He said the attractions of the school were not limited to the lofty ranking, but also included Harvard’s location and generous financial aid programs. What excites He most about college is learning and excelling in all types of new activities and taking advantage of the diverse range of resources at Harvard. “I’m opening up a new chapter of my life and keeping my mind open about it,” he said. Before he steps foot on Harvard’s grounds, He can already boast a plethora of achievements. Among these, in the March-April 2011 “Bethesda Magazine”, he was featured in the article “Top Teens 2011,” and was published in the “Concord Review” for his 11,200-word history paper on Alexander Hamilton. He is also a National Merit Finalist and Scholarship winner. These achievements are made possible by He’s driven attitude. “I am always trying to find the fun in everything I do and learn something new each and every day,” said He.

4% zero 11% one 42% two to five 32% six to nine 7% ten to thirteen 4% fourteen plus

number of colleges accepted to

6% zero 16% one 57% two to five 18% six to nine 2% ten to thirteen 1% fourteen plus

how you were admitted to your school

17% early decision 26% early action 42% regular decision 13% rolling admission 1% deferral from early decision 1% waiting list major is

45% undecided 55% declared compiled by Josh Benjamin and Lily Sieradzki

jake reynolds

rhode island school of design

By Anders Norberg As a small boy, senior Jake Reynolds loved to watch Saturday morning cartoons and draw pictures. He never knew this hobby of drawing would lead him to the college of his dreams. Reynolds is attending Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) one of the nation’s most prestigious art schools. According to its website, 96 percent of RISD graduates are employed in creative fields within one year of graduation. According to “U.S. News and World Report”, RISD is the top fine arts college in the United States. Reynolds decided to apply because of its prestige and was surprised he was accepted because only 34% of students who apply are accepted. Reynolds’ desire to pursue art started in his freshman year when he took digital art. Though initially the class was taken for fun, he really enjoyed art and continued to take it for the next three years and decided to pursue it in college. This differs from Reynolds’ childhood dreams. which included being an archeologist or a conductor. “I wanted to be a samurai at one point, [with the] next best thing [being] drawing,” said Reynolds. Reynolds is excited for RISD. He hopes the curriculum will improve his art skills and he looks forward to meeting new people. Reynolds is now preparing to fulfill his dream of being a comic book illustrator or author. Cartoon by Michael Matthes. Photos by Stefany Carty


the

12

Pitch

SENIORS

MAY 25, 2011

Seniors who did not supply their information are not featured in the Senior Scatter. Logo by Michael Matthes

Last

First

Plans

Last

First

Plans

Last

First

Plans

Last

First

Plans

Last

First

Plans

McDermott-Adler

Zoe

Eckerd

Sanoir

Shenelle

Marymount

McKenna

Charlie

Gap Year

Scaduto

Erica

UC Davis

McLean

Caitlin

James Madison

Scalet

Sarah

Hamilton

Jackson

Charlotte

UNC Chapel Hill

McLean

Kelsey

Virginia Tech

Scheibel

Matt

Washington Coll

Jacobs

Kim

Emory

Meade

Sophie

Oberlin

Schiffman

Anna

Arcadia

Abraham

Yehudah

GWU

Dabney

Colin

Stevenson

Jacobs

Daniel

Northwestern

Mears

Daniel

George Mason

Schill

Dmitri

Lincoln Tech

Adams

Jasmine

MC

Dabney

Ashley

Undecided

Jamieson

Lindsey

U of Pittsburgh

Meendoza

Vanessa

MC

Schiponi

Alex

College of St. Rose

Adams

Carl

West Point

Darby

David

St. Mary’s of MD

Janhunen

Eleanor

GWU

Mejia

Brian

Full Sail

Schliessler

Federika

Gap Year

Aehle

Nate

U of Mississippi

Davidson

Gabe

Coll of Charleston

Jones

Sarah

Catholic U

Mejia

Christophe

MC

Schonman

Ian

U of Michigan

Afework

Martha

St. Mary’s of MD

Davidson

Paul

U of Wisconsin

Joutz

Marguerite

Brown

Merkel

Shaiyon

UMCP

Scott

Michael

Salisbury

Ahnell

Cole

Dickinson

Davis

Ryan

Greensboro College

Katz

Melanie

U of Miami

Merrick

Emma

La Salle

Scully

Spencer

UMBC

Akhverdiev

Oktai

Undecided

Decker

Lisa

MC

Kennedy

Laura

Wake Forest

Mertz

James

Clemson

Sealover

Nancy

UNC Wilmington

Alberto

William

MC

DeKenty

Victoire

U of Rochester

Kennedy

Emma

William & Mary

Miller

Stewart

James Madison

Segal

Gregory

UPenn

Alexander

Christian

Colgate

Devia

Juan

PSU

Kepple

Allison

Mount Holyoke

Mitchel

Colleen

U of Michigan

Seghieri

Alex

Navy

Alonso

Daniel

MC

Dickison

Kailey

Coastal Carolina

Khananayev

Marina

Clark

Mitchell

Shannon

U of Kentucky

Shea

Katherine

Clemson

Altekruse

William

UMBC

Djourabtch

Ardalan

MC

Kidd

Jessica

WVU

Moersen

Maria

Georgia Tech

Shpak

Eva

St. Mary’s of MD

Andes-Gascon

Sophie

Pratt

Dodrill

Alicia

High Point

Kim

Sera

Towson

Montgomery

Sean

WVU

Shulimson

Sam

Indiana U

Andrews

Sarah

UMCP

Dolan

Suzy

Northeastern

Kirchner

Catherine

Michigan State

Moomau

Cassie

UMCP

Sidibe

Abraham

Undecided

Andreyev

Oleg

U of Pittsburgh

Dorbu

Henry

Gap Year

Kirilyuk

Ksenia

U of Chicago

Morales-Ortiz

Jennifer

MC

Sieff

Talia

UMCP

Atreya

Vamsi

Indiana U

Dossa Soss

Joyce

MC

Konapelsky

David

Towson

Morgun

Eva

UMCP

Sieradzki

Lily

Tufts

Avendaño

Xan

AU

Drill

Sidney

Columbia U

Kong

Lisa

UMCP

Morris

Brian

The Citadel

Singh

Pallavi

Drexel

Claire

Ohio U

Yashovardhan

Furman

Avila

Amanda

MC

Duong

Eric

U of Michigan

Kormann

Morris

Elyssa

UMCP

Singh

Olivia

Loyola U of MD

Kratzke

Gavin

Beloit

Moschkin

Julie

UC Santa Barbara

Singley

Abby

Hofstra

Bae

Geun

UMCP

Earenfight

Banai

Rotem

Towson

Earley

Neal

Indiana U

Kravitz

Rachel

MC

Mostafa

Meraz

U of Vermont

Skay

Rachel

Virginia Tech

Banerji

Robin

Haverford

Edgar

Emily

U of Vermont

Kruger

Maddie

Tulane

Motazed

Ariana

Carnegie Mellon

Smith

Donitto

Howard CC

Bara-Garcia

Daniel

Catholic U

Ellis

Liza

U of South Carolina

Kwon

Sara

UMCP

Namvar

Houman

MC

Smith

Jeremy

Indiana U

Barr

Jackson F

Bard

Evans

Jessica

UMCP

Lake

Marisa

Elon

Nation

Nichelle

Allegany of MD

Smith

Parker

Tufts

Barrera

Lizzy

Salisbury

Fansler

Aubrey

East Carolina

Laska

Taylor

Catholic U

Nau

Mikaela

Radford

Snyder

Cory

MC

Bavousett

Lindsey

Gap Year

Fascenda

Lisa

Towson

Lavadenz

Camila

UMCP

New

Michael

Harvard

Spelke

Samantha

UMCP

Benahmed

Farah

UMCP

Ferguson

Claire

Carleton

Lavine

Simone

Pitzer College

Nogueira

Jessica

MC

Spencer

Daniel

Northeastern

Bender

Rachel

UVA

Fernandes

Gaby

Towson

Lazaro

Norwel

MC

Oates

Island

MC

Spies

Kevin

St. Mary’s of MD

Benicka

Julia

Work

Ferrari

Francisco

Native Country

Le

Anh

UMCP

Odgers

Michelle

GWU

Spinard

Alexander

Eckerd

Berlin-Fischler

Mariel

UMCP

Fingerman

Inbal

IDF (Israel)

Lee

Michael

MC

Ollayos

Macklin

UMCP

Stamler

Lisa

Stevenson

Berman

Orli

Emory

Fisher

AnneMarie

U of South Carolina

Lee

Aaron

Stony Brook

Ortiz

Cristy

Work

Stokes

Stefan

McDaniel

Biesecker

Ryan

Cornell U

Foley

Graham

UMBC

Lefkow

Josh

Marines

Oyarzabal

Ignacio

Argentina

Swann

Michael

MC

Blad

Sara

Barnard

Fowler

Nicky

Ohio Wesleyan

Leon

Laura

GWU

Panossian

Nadia

UMCP

Szebeni

Zoltan

St. Mary’s of MD

Blass

Abby

Towson

Galetovic

Emilie

MC

Levine

Max

Wesleyan

Park

Sharon

UMBC

Talisman

Lita

Northwestern

Boas

Glenna

Tulane

Galli

Jinae

MC

Levine

Gordon

WVU

Parker

Hayley

Indiana U of PA

Teklehiwot

Maedot

Morgan State

Katie

Boston College

Chris

MC

Boman

Brian

Boston U

Gamiz

Victoria

Argentina

Levingston

Pei

Daniel

Clemson

Thomas

Brendan

Coll of Charleston

Li

Michael

UMCP

Pendergrass

April

Undecided

Tillman

Michael

Coastal Carolina

Boman

John

MC

Gates

Bonacorda

Ronnie

Empire Beauty Sch

Gautereaux

Kaitlyn

MC

Lifshitz

Ophir

UMCP

Pepper

Elizabeth

Florida State

Torbenko

Vladimir

MC

Bosse

Anna

Loyola U of MD

Geier

Sean

U of Wisconsin

Lillibridge

John

RIT

Pepper

Joseph

Lake Forest

Tran

Dennis

UMCP

Bouvet

Camille

Virginia Tech

Gekker

Lianna

UMCP

Linder

Andrea

U of New Haven

Perkins

Cassandra

UNC Chapel Hill

Triantos

Katerina

U of Edinburgh

Brami

Lauren

Coll of Charleston

Gendelman

Moriah

UMCP

Link

Katrina

Mitchell

Perone

Sara

MICA

Tycko

Sasha

U of Chicago

Brockett

Taylor

MC

Gidez

Ally

PSU

Lisse

Naomi

Northwestern

Peterson

Sara

Colorado College

Um

Sam

Eastman

Brown

Robert

UNC Chapel Hill

Gierszewski

Christine

East Carolina

Liu

Elizabeth

UMBC

Phelps

Tyler

UMCP

Van Acker

Etienne

MC

Buel

Trip

PSU-Army ROTC

Giorgis

Dawit

MC

Lock

Sarah

MICA

Plata

Kathryn

George Mason

Van der Tak

Lea

U of South Carolina

Burke

Allen

MC

Goldstone

Jessica

Syracuse

Locker

Maggie

Pratt

Plata

Kristine

George Mason

Vanegas

Sabina

London C of Fash

Campagnone

Therese

Towson

Gradowski

Brady

Loyola U of MD

Lom

Peter

UVA

Platais

Emma

PAC-Rio

Vasquez

Indihra

MC

Campbell

Dylan

Keuka

Green

Ian

Denison

Lorenzetti

Gina

U of Edinburgh

Ponce

Jose Andres

France

Vickery

Oliver

PSU

Campos

Omar

MC

Green

Zachary

High Point

Lubbert

Rebecca

Washington Coll

Popovich

Claire

Kenyon

Vinson

Bobby

UMCP

Caplon

David

UMCP

Guber

Sloane

Towson

Lutes

Alexander

MC

Rains

Caroline

UNC Chapel Hill

Vistnes

Michelle

Juniata

Carty

Stefany

UMCP

Guinan

Allegra

Tyler School of Art

Lutes

Victor

MC

Rasul

Kahlil A.

MC

Vocal

David

Towson

Carvalho

Alexander

UMBC

Guzman

Katherine

Military

Lux

Michael

Salisbury

Ravin

Nitay

UMCP

Votaw

Kecheri

Washington Coll

Casellas

Rafael

UMCP

Hafeez

Emil

NYU

Ma

Yuchi

UMCP

Ray

Jordan

UC Berkeley

Wade

Dorine

MC

Alexis

Washington Coll

Cavanaugh

Gaby

U of Edinburgh

Hamm-McEwen

Jordan

Appalachian State

Maddox

Alexander

MC

Razmjou

Ashkan

MC

Wang

Sarah

U of Washington

Magenheim

Steven

PSU

Reardon

Madeleine

Susquehanna

Ward

Charlie

MC

Chang

Alice

UMCP

Hansen

Charme

Samira

MC

Hartzell

Lauren

U of Scranton

Mahdavi

Katherine

Wake Forest

Regan

Nicholes

UMCP

Wasden

Liz

UMCP

Chichester

Ashley

U of South Carolina

Hassan

Ishmail

MC

Maldonado

Andres

University in Spain

Reiss

Yuval

UMBC

Weich

Sam

UMCP

Chidamber

Niranjani

UMBC

Hawkins

Zachary

Work

Mamonau

Aliaksandr

UMCP

Ren

Shu Yang

AU

Weitzner

Aaron

Tulane

Chin

Kuo-Kai

Harvard

Hazlett

Zach

PSU

Mandel

Gabriel

CIA

Ren

Jen

UVA

Whitaker

Victoria

Military

Choi

Yun Ju

Undecided

He

Tianhao

Harvard

Mariola

Madeleine

NYU

Reshef

Eadoh

U of Delaware

Whitman

Casey

UMCP

Chow

Angela

PSU

Hernandez

Manolo

MC

Markowitz

Seth

UMCP

Reyes

Franz

Air Force

Willett

Alex

UMCP

Cochran

Annelise

Eckerd

Hessler

Brian

UMCP

Marks

Dana

Wellesley

Reyes-Lozada

Mulawin Diwa

Hawaii Pacific

Wilson

Eric

MC

Collier

Michael

U of Iowa

Hirshell

Lizzie

MC

Marquez

Alexander

Indiana U

Reynolds

Jake

RISD

Wilson-Gay

Angenae

U of Tampa

Collins

Katie

Denison

Holcomb

Ross

Oregon State

Marquina

Luis

Carnegie Mellon

Ricker

Joseph

MC

Wolman

Jonathan

Hofstra

Conroy

Elyse

PSU

Holcomb

Nicholas

Oregon State

Marsh

Hannah

UMCP

Rivera

Michael

Marines

Wong

Brandon

Marist

Cooney

Caroline

U of Wisconsin

Holmes

Melanie

DePaul

Martin

Sophia

MC

Rivera-Brown

Cait

U of Edinburgh

Woo

Julia

GWU

Cooper

Jamie

PSU

Holtzman

Michael

William & Mary

Martinez

Jose

Stevenson

Rizzi

Mia

Gap Year

Wright

Raymond

NYU

Cooper-Wall

Amelia

Nebr. Wesleyan

Hong

Wonpyo

Korea

Martinez

John

UMCP

Robinson

Evie

Mitchell

Yaffe

Bert

Macalester

Cope

Talie

U of Wisconsin

Horner

Skye

AU

Martinez

Claire

UMCP

Rodriguez

Laura

MC

You

Yang

Carnegie Mellon

Cotter

Kristin

Princeton

Houle

Anna

Alfred

Martinez

John

UMCP

Romani

Adrianna

Auburn

Zechter

Mariela

James Madison

Covaliu

Sigal

MC

Howie

Sarah

U of Delaware

Masood

Asad

UMCP

Safaraliyeva

Jemile

St. Mary’s of MD

Zelarayan

Vania

MC

Grace

UMCP

Maydan

Daniel

UMBC

Salazar

Oscar

Undecided

Zelenko

Jennifer

U of Wisconsin

Crenca

Jack

Coll of Charleston

Hsu

Crumbley

Josh

MC

Hutton

Emily

MC

McCarson

Cortney

Work

Saling

Marci

Dean

Zhao

Tingrui

UMCP

Cyr

Kate

Emory

Im

Ji-Eun

UMCP

McCune

Adair

MC

Sanfuentes

Cristina

Cornell U

Zhou

Yannan

UMCP

Dabney

Kristin

Salisbury

Ivanova

Valentina

UMCP

McCurry

Marjorie

U of Michigan

Sanfuentes

Alexandra

Vassar

Zlotescu

Adrian

MC


Pitch

the

MAY 25, 2011

ADVERTISEMENTS

13

Walter Johnson All School Booster Club We are here to support YOU! TEAMS AND CLUBS CAN EARN MONEY FROM BOOSTERS IN THESE WAYS: 1) Sign up to work the concession stand at any of the events posted. All groups who work will receive $100. 2) Sponsor, create and run a fundraising event that is co-sponsored with Booster. Take advantage of the events we already use to raise funds, or ask us to help you with your own fundraiser. 3) Direct request for assistance. Request assistance through our Funding Request Form. TO JOIN THE BOOSTER CLUB – Look for our flier ONLINE at www.wjboosterclub.com. GOT BOOSTER?


Pitch

the

14 Out of Left Field: MAY 25, 2011

Dear Underclassman

By Sophie Meade Arts and Entertainment Editor

Pitch Picks

Summer Playlist By Rebecca Hansen and Shanilka Puerto Adele “Someone Like You”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Every summer needs a soundtrack. Here are six songs for all those hazy days and crazy nights.

This new release from praised British vocalist Adele is the song for summer love. The lyrics are reminiscent of a romance ending before desires and hopes for a future are reached.When your summer fling doesn’t meet your expectations, just let this perfect break up song soothe your broken heart. Danger Mouse and Jack White have paired up to produce this master collaboration.This song explores the relationship between one’s inner self and inner demons. The lyrics are poetic and introspective, while the calm beat is great to listen to when relaxing with friends.

As I leave high school once and for all, JackWhite and Danger Mouse I keep seeing the faces of the students “Two Against One” who have one, two, three more years of the same routine and fluorescentlit halls. I keep thinking of words I Beyoncé upholds her legacy of empowering women with this upbeat new single. The beat is Beyoncé wish I could impart to my freshman, engaging and the lyrics encourage women to feel self-confident enough to make a difference “Run the World (Girls)” sophomore and junior self if only to in the world around them. Pump this jam in preparation for a date, party or sports game. ease the burden of adolescence. Some songs aren’t exactly catchy at first listen if they seem out of your musical element, but When you think about it, high school Santigold and Karen O the more they’re played, the more likable they become. “Go” is a prime example. The song is a pretty ridiculously designed system. “Go” is a captivating mix of indie and R&B that makes it a perfect upbeat summer song. At the most volatile and developmental stage in their lives, a large group of The title track of FF’s new album captures the feeling of being part of something greater than Fleet Foxes people are set on the same mindjust yourself.The song personifies the feeling of being trapped in traditional expectations and numbing schedule, inhabiting the same “Helplessness Blues” motivates the listener to break free. Summer is a time to rebel and this is your soundtrack. building five days a week. Sh** will Jai Paul’s origins are almost as mysterious as the meaning of his first single. Paul released inevitably go down. It often becomes Jai Paul it quietly from his MySpace page in 2010 and wasn’t heard from again until earlier this difficult to separate illusion from reality “BTSU” year when he signed with XL Recordings. “BTSU” itself is a trippy mix that puts a twist on and the inconsequential from the traditional elements of Dubstep. significant. We can mostly thank sexual repression WJ Staff and Students fill in the blank for this hazy state of mind. Consider the fact that about 99.9 percent of the actions you complete are either directly By Rebecca Hansen and Daniel Gorelik or indirectly motivated by sexuality. And when I say sexuality I mean the ...makes you want to dance? ...is perfect for driving with the gender you identify with, your sexual top down? ______________ “Blue Monday” orientation, your sex drive and more. “10,000 Miles” ______________ Even if you can’t help it, you can still New Order foster an awareness toward your true Vanessa Carlton ...would you listen to trapped on motives. If you’re going to go to great pains an island? ...do you work out to? to wear clothes that give you good “Just Like Heaven” _______________ “Jump Around” ______________ cleavage and show lots of leg, at least do The Cure House of Pain it with conviction. Either face the fact that you need to look “sexy” in order Karen Generose Sean Geier to feel validated or live a self-conscious Foreign Language Senior lie. If you really feel so compelled to blurt out “no-homo,” in seriousness or ...is stuck in your head? ...do you fall asleep to? as a joke, then do it knowing that you “The Sun” ____________ are fulfilling the desire to affirm your “Always and Forever” __________________ Portugal the Man masculinity. Cory Morrow None of us can escape the power that sexuality wields, but you can make the ...would you listen to for the rest choice to be honest with yourself when ...is your favorite foreign song? of your life? no one else is. “Quelqu’un m’a dit ” _________________ “Ready Able” _____________ This can be especially hard when most Carla Bruni Grizzly Bear of the friendships in high school are completely contrived. It’s easy to hide Peter Chamberlain Katherine Baird from yourself when you have online Junior Foreign Language social networking and a priority list that includes partying, sleepovers, and ...would you listen to trapped on partying. All the texts, notifications, ...do you sing in the shower? an island? alcohol and hookups can be enough to distract you from the terrifying “Guns of Brixton” _______________ “Knives and Pens” ________________ reality that inside your mind you are The Clash Black Veil Brides alone—but do you really want your internal stability to rely on something ...is the soundtrack of your life? ...is stuck in your head? as impermanent as a high school social “Search and Destroy” __________________ “Nightmare” chemistry? ____________ For those of you who are tormented The Stooges Avenged Sevenfold daily by the pressures of social identity, Nathan Schwartz there’s good news: once high school Carolina Melo Social Studies comes to an end, the social constructs Sophomore no longer matter—unless you let them. They are as ephemeral as your hairstyle ...makes you want to dance? ...did you first slow dance to? and as inconsequential as your ‘B’ in “Edge of Glory” _______________ freshman biology. “Kiss From a Rose” __________________ Lady Gaga For others, this will pose a problem. Seal If your identity is dependent on your ...would you listen to for the rest setting, then you’ve built yourself a ...is perfect for a rainy day? glass house which could shatter at of your life? “Love is Hard” _______________ any moment. Luckily, there’s this “Outrageous” _______________ James Morrison thing,called introspection and it’s not an Britney Spears FB feature, an iPhone app or a stretchy piece of clothing. It’s simply a method Ana Lorenzo Kelly Bean Photos by Eleanor Janhunen, Sophie Meade and Sasha Tycko of thought—and your shot at freedom. Freshman Math

What song...


Pitch

the

15

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MAY 25, 2011

WJ students get By Alex Spinard Tattoos are becoming increasingly popular among students in the WJ community, but what is causing this trend? Are they acting in youthful rebellion against parents’ disapproving attitudes? Or, is it a genuine expression of one’s self that parents have trouble relating to? Students who are tattooing themselves as a rebellious act with little thought behind it might regret that decision later in life and could end up spending money to remove them. Those serious about the true art of tattoo generally put months, if not years, of thought into the ink they want to put on their body, as opposed to the irrational decisions many high school students make. Often, tattoos are conceptual and pertain to the interests of their carriers. For example, senior Madeleine Reardon has a tattoo of a sound speaker which also transforms into a flower. “I’m really into music and I think the type of music I listen to can bring out my personality and show how fun and colorful I can be,” said Reardon. “Being an artist, I envisioned the flower tattoo idea in my head and decided it expressed how music was relevant to my life.” I personally chose to get a tattoo of a sun on my ankle when visiting Austin, Texas’s art district. The sun art is relevant to my life because I have seasonal affective disorder, which makes sunlight a crucial element in my life. While there is definitely a stigma in our society against tattoos, painting them as unnecessary aspects of the counter-culture, well-thought-out tattoos can be an appropriate expression of one’s personality and identity.

Illustration by Michael Matthes

Tattoos belonging to (clockwise from left): Lea Van Der Tak, Ryan Kersten, Van Der Tak, Van Der Tak and Spinard.

Photos by Eleanor Janhunen


the

Pitch

MAY 25, 2011

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

PROM 2011

16

BEST OF THE DRESSES Dress destinations such as Jovani and BCBG dominated the landscape of prom 2011. Jovani’s online store is so exclusive that their web site doesn’t even list prices next to dresses – after all, if you have to ask, you can’t afford it – while BCBG is so commonly shopped that dress disputes occurred and true originality comes into question. Many senior girls resorted to online shopping in order to find the perfect ensemble for the perfect prom, but many also trolled department stores such as Nordstrom, Bloomingdales, Macy’s and Dillard’s. Regardless of retailer, most prom dresses seem to blend together across the prom scene, a sameness seen not only throughout WJ, but also throughout Montgomery County, the Eastern Seaboard and the country. Of course, the long dress is a mainstay – when else is it appropriate to wear a floor-length gown other than at your wedding? – along with the ever-present up-to-there slit. However, the modern short dress is breaking through, with bare legs becoming the new “it”accessory. Despite similarities in cuts, dress color trends seem to be approaching opposite ends of the spectrum as blacks and midnight blues face off with pastels, while patterns are few and far between. The one-shoulder, by far the most visible trend this prom season, dominated with its coveted asymmetry, closely followed by the strapless gown. For girls, prom conjures up an almost fairy tale image in our minds as we were inundated for the majority of our previous 18 years with magical movie and television scenes of “the best night of our lives.” However, once the moment actually arrived, instead of standing out and absorbing the moment, many tended to sport the typical prom dress – long and strapless with slight glitter detail. But this is a night to celebrate graduating high school, to celebrate your friendships and to celebrate yourself, so senior girls should have gone for something more unique and personalized. Prom dresses should utilize the variability inherent in the fashion industry – why not use more texture, more architectural shapes, more vintage, more types of fabric, more more. Prom should be the greatest night of your life so why not dress for the occasion?

For the most classic of prom attire, the long gown is the way to go. But this isn’t your mom’s gown as modern twists on this traditional style abound. The asymetrical neckline is the latest trend to take over the style scene, but prom seasons to come will show the changing potential of this tradition.

Photo courtesy of Sarah Hansen

Sarah Hansen

VARIED LENGTHS

SHORT

A break from the traditional long dress that dominates prom season after prom season, the short dress displays a more casual elegance. Show off your legs in these gam-revealing gowns that are perfect for dancing the night away.

Olivia Earenfight

Photo courtesy of Maggie Locker

Grace Hsu

Gabriela Cavanagh

Photo courtesy of Sophie Anders Gascon

su

Caught between dress styles? The mixed length is your solution. Whether the dress be long in the back with a cropped hem in the front, short overall with longer pieces of fabric or a mid-length, you’re treated to the best of both fashion worlds.

Grace H cour te

sy of

Talia Sieff

Photo

Photo courtesy of Kei Votow

LONG

Photo courtesy of Olivia Earenfight

By Eleanor Janhunen

Sophie Andes Gascon


the

Pitch

MAY 25, 2011

ALL

2010 2011

SPORTS

PITCH

-top athletes of the sports year-

17

By the Sports staff

ALL-SENIOR FIRST TEAM

Photos by Stefany Carty

Rachel Skay

Cole Ahnell

Anna Bosse

Alex Willett

Elizabeth Pepper Daniel Spencer Swimming

Soccer

Skay had a tough act to follow after her 2010 season when she scored a county record 86 goals. But in her senior season, Skay didn’t disappoint, scoring 79 goals and 107 points. Skay was a senior captain and led the team to an 8-0 start and a 10-2 regular season record.

The quarterback and leader of the football team, Ahnell led the Wildcats to the best football season (6-4) in recent memory. Ahnell was the orchestrator of the offense in the Cats’ key wins, including a thrilling season opener, 47-41 over Rockville and a 48-26 homecoming game win over Wootton.

Bosse has built up quite a reputation in Montgomery County, and continued her dominance with a second individual cross country state championship with, an indoor track state championship in the 3200m and a third place finish at the outdoor track 4A West regional meet.

Won 4A West individual cross country championship and helped cross country to a state championship. Also won indoor track individual 3200m state title and won outdoor track 1600m 4A west regional title and was runner up in 3200m in same event.

First-team All-Gazette and first-team All-Met swimmer has been a force in the pool for the swim and dive team at WJ. As a senior she won the 200 free and 500 free at Metros, in addition to 200 IM and 100 fly at the county championships.

First-team All-Gazette and Second All-Met soccer player, Spencer was the anchor of the Wildcat defense that lost in the second overtime of the regional championship game. The Gazette has described him as “flawless.”

Skay will play lacrosse at Virginia Tech.

Ahnell will play football at Dickinson College.

Bosse will run for Loyola University of Maryland.

Willett will run for UMCP.

Pepper will swim at Florida State.

Spencer will attend Northeastern University.

Lacrosse

Football

XC, Indoor Track, Outdoor Track

XC, Indoor Track, Outdoor Track

ALL-SENIOR SECOND TEAM Sarah Howie

JP Brennan

Camille Bouvet

Nick Regan

Shannon Mitchell

Juan Pablo Zuluaga

4-year varsity player has been warrior through some tough times and leaves WJ on the upswing.

Co-captain and talented attackman, Brennan put the team on his back late in the season.

Bouvet won the outdoor track 4A West 1600m crown, and has provided important points to compliment Bosse.

A major contributor to a handful of great relay teams, Regan was also runner-up at cross country states.

Won 3 of 4 individual events at counties, including the all-around around championship, and helped gymnastics to team county title.

An All-Gazette firstteamer in 2011, the transfer from Colombia led boys volleyball to an 11-3 season.

Annie Kastler, jr.

Jake Verner, jr.

Laura Dally, jr.

Carina Deandreis, soph.

Mateo Arenas, soph. Caroline Hagerty, jr.

Basketball

Lacrosse

XC, Indoor Track, Outdoor Track

XC, Indoor Track, Outdoor Track

Gymnastics

Boys Volleyball

ALL-UNDERCLASSMEN TEAM Elad Covaliu, jr.

Bethany Buel, jr.

Drew Ohlrich, soph.

Stephanie Paul, soph. Gus Gill, soph.

Football, Wrestling

Ice Hockey

Softball

Girls Volleyball

Jordan Krasner, jr. Boys Tennis

Baseball

Diving

Girls Soccer

Boys Lacrosse

Boys Soccer

Indoor Track, Outdoor

Girls Soccer


the

18

Pitch

SPORTS

Bryn Molloy

Photo courtesy of David Dabney

Paige Waqa

MAY 25, 2011

Photo courtesy of David Dabney

Yuval Dan

Photo by Stefany Carty

Spring Sports Review

Alex Schiponi Tyler Modjeska

Photo courtesy of David Dabney

Photo courtesy of David Dabney

Baseball ByYun Zhou Record: 8-9 Playoffs: Lost in second round

Wrapup-The varsity baseball team started the season slow, beginning with three losses and two wins, and then they had a great middle season with four consecutive wins and only one loss. The end of the season proved to be the toughest part of their schedule, as they ended the season with four consecutive losses. The team notched quality wins against Churchill, Wootton and Gaithersburg, and advanced to the second round of the playoffs after defeating Blair, a team who beat them twice in the regular season, in a 6-4 thriller of a game. Unfortunately, the team fell to Gaithersburg in the second round of the playoffs, ending their postseason hopes. Standouts-The team was anchored by ace pitcher and star shortstop Gus Gill. The sophomore pitched the team to key victories against Gaithersburg during the regular season and against Blair during the playoffs, and was a very consistent bat in the middle of the lineup as well. Senior Dylan Campbell and junior Caldwell Clarke also contributed, both with the bat, and both were solid defenders as well. Coach’s Take-“A lot of people didn’t give us a chance because of the graduation of nine seniors last year. They exceed my expectations.”- Kim Ahearn, head coach.

Alex Schiponi

Photo courtesy of David Dabney

Boys Lacrosse By Leslie Ferdani

Photo courtesy of Jeff Campbell

Record: 8-4 Playoffs: Lost in regional final

Photo courtesy of Jeff Campbell

(Left to Right): Brad Hampton and Gus Gill

James Lillie Photo by Stefany Carty

By Phillip Resnick

Softball Record: 6-12 Playoffs: Lost in second round

Wrapup-The girls softball team ended the season with a tough loss against Paint Branch 1-15 after rain delayed the initial game in the fourth inning with the score 9-1 in favor of the Panthers. Despite the second round exit, the Wildcats earned a first round win against Churchill in a rematch of the regular season matchup in which the Bulldogs edged the ‘Cats 2-1. Defense proved to be the Achilles heel of the team this year, with an average of five errors per game, despite consistent pitching performances by junior Bethany Buel, who finished the season with 113 strikeouts. The team opened up with a dominating win against Rockville but lost to future regional champion Blair and would go on to lose two of their next eleven games. Standouts-Junior Sarah Bernstein was a pivotal player on the offensive side of the ball, hitting opposing pitchers al-

Photo courtesy of Scott Marks

Sarah Duncan

most every game for a .484 batting average from the leadoff spot. Senior Katie Levingston also provided a solid bat in the cleanup spot and was a key third baseman. Although this was a rebuilding year in some respect, freshmen Sarah Duncan and Catherine Royston were impact players in their first season on the team. Along with their contributions, every member of the team was able to play and step up in light of injuries and absences. Coach’s Take- “Despite the rain, injuries and inconsistent practice schedule, the girls worked hard, never gave up and learned how to fight back throughout the season. Ending the season with a big win in playoffs to Churchill sealed our reputation in this county and for our future.” -Jamie Ahearn, head coach.

WrapUp- The lacrosse team ended the season with a 10-5 record. After losing their first game against Wootton by one goal, the WJ lacrosse team won the next four games. Although the team was not as consistent with its wins this year, the team made it to the third round of the playoffs. The team used stellar goaltending, a lockdown defense and an extremely potent attack to dominate other teams. Standouts- The most valuable players were attackers junior Jake Verner and senior attackers Colin Dabney and JP Brennan, along with senior midfield player Alex Schiponi. “I would say our potential was restricted when everyone wasn’t playing together. But when we played as a team, we were lights out. I’m definitely going to miss playing for WJ. Our attack line really carried us a lot, but there were too many key players to really say one person was the main player.”-Alex Schiponi. Coach’s Take- “I think this was a transition year as new coaches came in, and next year there will be new chemistry. My favorite part of the season would be beating Sherwood 17 to 16, and my least favorite part was getting beat by Wootton. This is the place and type of school I’ve always wanted to work in.” Alan Pohoryles, head coach.


the

Pitch

May 25, 2011

Girls Lacrosse

Record: 11-3 Playoffs: Lost to Sherwood in regional semifinal. Team’s Take- “Coming into the season I didn’t think we would be as strong as we were because of how young we were but through our hard work and dedication we really improved as a unit and became one of the best teams in the county. [The team] will be strong next year. Coach Yetter did such an amazing job this year and will turn the new and returning players into a great lacrosse team.”-Sarah Howie, senior co-captain

Kristin Dabney

Wrapup- The track team has had a remarkable season so far this year. Led by seniors Alex Willett and Nick Regan on the boys side and Camille Bouvet and Anna Bosse for the girls, the team has dominated in almost every event, including posting record-breaking performances in certain events. Willet has consistently run sub 4:20 miles, making him a favorite at the state meet, and Laura Dally is a serious state contender in the triple jump as well.

Photo courtesy of David Dabney

Volleyball By Erik Blad Boys: 11-3

Track

Taylor Swift

Photo by Stefany Carty

Coach’s take- “We have had some great performances and some really nice surprises. Unfortunately, we’ve had a lot of disappointing injuries late in the season, but I’m still happy with what we have achieved so far, and think we can still have a lot of success.” Tom Rodgers, sprint coach: “Everyone is working hard toward the common goal of qualifying for states. Our team has done a great job continuing the tradition of championship caliber running here at WJ.-” Tom Martin, distance coach Standouts- The team is full of stars on both the girls and boys teams. Willet and Regan anchor the boys distance team, but junior Joshua Ellis is a great compliment to them as a standout 800m runner. Junior Elad Covaliu has been an outstanding hurdler and before injuries hampered them, Donitto Smith, Nicky Fowler and Michael Li were all part of a very good 4x400m relay. For the girls, Bosse and Bouvet were the core of the distance team, but Sarah Breen, Megan Spurell and Taylor Swift also were key contributors as distance runners. The girls sprint team was led by many underclassmen, including Laura Dally (also an outstanding jumper), Caroline Hagerty and Maya Campbell.

Gymnastics By Sloane Guber County Champions

Coed: 5-8

WrapupCoed: After going 1-4 to start the season, the coed volleyball team ended the season strongly by winning 4 out of 7 games to finish 5 -7. However, they lost their playoff game, ending a season full of ups and downs. As a developing volleyball program, the team will definitely continue to be a pipeline for upcoming boys and girls volleyball teams here at WJ. Boys: After finishing the season 102, they were due for a long playoff run, but, their dream was cut short after they lost to Blair in the second round. With some quality seniors leaving, the team may have to rebuild next year but this was definitely a successful season. Team’s Take:- “We learned a lot of things this season, one of them would be that you have to work very hard in order to get to the level you expect, I think we could have done better than what we did,”- Junior first team All-Gazette outside hitter Juan Pablo Zuluaga, “Next year will probably be a rebuilding year for us, because we are losing a large amount of players,”-Junior all-county middle Halid Hamadi Coach’s take- “I am not sure what to expect next year.  We have a good core, but some of the boys may end up playing on the boys team and some of the girls may not return. Each year is so different from the last I just never know.” – Bill Morris, co-ed coach. “I knew that we were going to win most of the games…[we are] graduating lots of seniors.” On whether it is interesting being a woman coaching a man’s sport, “it always poses for interesting moments.” – Sylvie Ellen, boys coach

19

By Phillip Resnick AlexWillett: Regional champion in mile and runner up in two-mile Camille Bouvet: Regional champion in mile and two-mile

By Hannah Flesch

Standouts- Senior co-captain Rachel Skay ended her stellar career with 78 goals and 29 assists, including two against Sherwood in her final game as a Wildcat. Skay, along with junior attack Bryn Molloy, averaged over nine goals per game to produce a lethal duo of attack for the ‘Cats. Meanwhile, defense helped the team win pivotal games as junior goaltender Paige Waqa ended her first season as a goalie with an .857 save percentage and the defnse, led by seniors Sarah Howie and Kristin Dabney and junior Paige Keller, kept opposing offenses held to just 5.4 gpg. Wrapup- After a dominating regular season which started out 8-0, the girls lacrosse team fell in the 4A regional quarterfinals to third-ranked Sherwood 6-9. Despite high expectations, the Wildcats failed to reach the regional finals for the second straight year. Coach Chrissy Yetter, in her first season at the helm, coached a stellar defense and balanced attack which prevailed in many of the Wildcats’ games. The team will miss Virginia Tech commit Skay next year but will return goalie Waqa and attack Bryn Molloy.

SPORTS

Photo by Stefany Carty

(From left to right): Juan Pablo Zuluaga and Leron Gil

By Daniel Thaler

Shannon Mitchell

Photo by Sasha Tycko

Tennis Record: 7-4

Playoffs: Lost in county quarterfinals Wrapup- The Wildcat’s tennis team recently wrapped up a respectable season. They finished tied for fourth in the 4A-west division and reached the quarterfinals of the regional playoffs. Despite the strong play of Jordan Krasner, Kevin Spies and Michael New, the team struggled to find enough consistency to warrant a long winning streak. However, when they did win, it was by no small margin. Six of the seven matches were won by five points or more. Next season, both Krasner, as well as sophomore Jamie Schmidt will have to fill the roles of eight graduating seniors. S t a n d o u t s - K r a s n e r, ranked as the no. five player in Maryland, was the Eric Duong

teams no.one singles player. New and Spies were also big contributers to the team. However, none of them were able to overcome the stalworts of Wootton, Churchill and Whitman as they finished tied for fourth in the county. Coach’s Take- “Overall, it was kind of what we expected. We’re not able yet to compete with Wootton, Whitman and Churchill. I think we’re starting to see what it’s going to take to defeat these teams. We need to win way down in doubles and we’re going to need much stronger commitment to doubles. We’re still going to be strong next year unless our doubles can be deeper [and] stronger”-Mike Laukaitis Photo courtesy of Jonathan Wolman

Wrapup- The girls gymnastics team had a very impressive spring season, placing first in three out of its four meets. The girls’ hard work and dedication to the team was shown when they were named the MCPS County Champions on May 3, beating B-CC, Blair, Blake, Sherwood, Gaithersburg and Whitman. Contrary to years past, the team had many gymnasts who also competed on a club team, resulting in a County Championship and dethroning the four-time defending champion B-CC.The team also came in second at a bi-county meet on May 11, with Grace Leslau placing top five in both the vault and the bars. Standouts- The team’s key players, or “big three” are senior Shannon Mitchell, freshman Ella Wu and sophomore Grace Leslau, all of whom compete in club gymnastics outside of school. Mitchell placed first in vault, bars, beam and all-around at the MCPS Championship meet at Blair High School. Mitchell will compete for the University of Kentucky next year, a huge loss for the Wildcats as they try to defend their county title. Coach’s Take-“I feel that our overall season went well.  The girls worked well as a team and did the best that they could at every meet. The girls got better at every meet as far as their individual scores on the events that they competed on, and that was their goal. My expectations for the team this year was  to win counties and that was my ultimate goal and it was met; the girls worked so hard this season and worked as a team at counties!”-Ursula Bright


Sports

spring sports review

20

MAY 25, 2011

18

Baseball Boys Lacrosse Softball

19 Boys/Coed Volleyball Girls Lacrosse Boys/Girls Track Boys Tennis Gymnastics

60 - 46 1 4 overall spring record

County Championship [Gymnastics]

teams with winning records

17

ALL PITCH 2010

2011


The Pitch May 25, 2011