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it’s Free! July 2021

fort wayne’s

HOMELIVING Indoor & Outdoor

Peek inside to read!

bold • bright • beautiful

inspiring today’ s woman

www.glo-mag.com


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| JULY GLO 2021 |

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“Focus on the Outdoors” ISSUE July 2021 | Vol. 12 No. 4

GLAM + STYLE Fashion: Spotlight on Swimwear............................................................. 6 Self Care + Beauty: (No) Stretching the Truth................................... 8

glo

COMMUNITY FOCUS She glows’ : Letrecia (Trish) Nichols .................................................... 10 He glows’ : Bryan Lineberry..................................................................... 12 glo Girls’ : Myeka and Mikaela Brown................................................ 13

FEATURES Feature Focus: Our Favorite Hiking Spots .................................................................. 14 Beginner’s Guide to Biking ................................................................ 16 Finance: Tips for First Time Home Buyers ........................................ 18

SHOPPING  glo Gal’s Shopping Guide ................................................................... 20

ALL ABOUT YOU glo-roscopes............................................................................................... 22

From the executive editor Greetings glo readers, This issue marks my 3-year anniversary with glo and HOME Living magazines — and what a wonderful three years it has been. During that time, we’ve connected with amazing women in our community and shared their stories, helped our partners and advertisers grow their businesses, celebrated our 10-year anniversary, and weathered through a global pandemic. And today, we have even more passion for our community and sharing inspiring content with you. Thanks for being here and for reading. Personally, since July 2018, I’ve added another daughter to my family, adopted a feisty Great Dane Puppy (she’s the reason I have so many grey hairs), and lost our rescue Great Dane to cancer. I’ve fallen even more in love with our region and made meaningful connections with our non-profit partners and those they serve: Francine’s Friends, Tapestry, Habitat for Humanity, and Sexual Assault Treatment Center. In my first editor’s note I wrote: “I am a big believer in serendipity. If we just wait, lean in, and really listen, we hear our calling… I was called to glo and I am overjoyed by the opportunity to bring you the engaging content you have come to expect from this magazine.”

Virual

a gloBash

Starting the week of August 2nd and culminating on August 13th with a grand prize giveaway!

glo

GIVEAWAYS

Tune in each day to Facebook.com/gloftwayne for giveaways. 4

| JULY GLO 2021 |

I still feel that way. Meeting fascinating people in our community and telling their stories is at the top of my list of things I am passionate about, and I am so grateful for the team at The Papers for allowing me to continue to do it. One of the things I enjoy most about my role is planning our annual glo Bash. Last year, due to COVID, we took the event online and gave away some incredible prizes from our partners. Because of the size of our event, we have decided to wait one more year before hosting it in person — but have no fear, we will host another virtual glo Bash the first week of August, so stay tuned to our social media sites for more information and a chance to win some prizes. This issue is another joint publication, with HOME Living tucked inside the pages of glo. Like our partners and many of you, we are taking it month by month, and we are hopeful that things will bounce back in the months to come. Xo,

Amber Bouthot ambouthot@the-papers.com

Pictured above Amber + glo account executive Melinda participate in Habitat for Humanity’s Women Build.


cover artist: Linda Schwartz Hometown: Fort Wayne, IN When did you start creating art? I’ve been creating all my life. I have a background in design.

What advice would you give young women artists? Never think your art is not good enough. Put yourself out there. Someone will love your art.

a the Title of piece:

Cover

Girl with a bike

What is your preferred medium? Acrylic

Where can we find your work? Facebook/ Manyfacesoflinda Three Rivers Festival – Art in the Park: July 10-11 Covington Art Fair: Jul 31– August 1 Ft. Wayne Arts Festival at Jefferson Pointe: September 11-12 Art at the Riverside Leo-Cedarville: September 25 a

Want to put your art on our front cover? Give it a glo! To submit your entry, send art as an e-mail attachment to ambouthot@the-papers.com or send a production-ready image on a CD via mail to: glo Magazine, Attention: Amber Bouthot, PO Box 188, Milford, IN 46542.

The Nitty Gritty:

glo front covers are open to female artists. Submissions from all original 2D media (digital art photographs are OK) are welcome.

E

PO Box 188 • 206 South Main St., Milford, IN 46542 800.733.4111 / Fax 800.886.3796 Editorial & Advertising Ext. 2491 • www.glo-mag.com

glo is a news magazine with emphasis on inspiring women of all ages. glo does not knowingly accept false or misleading advertising or editorial content, nor does glo or its staff assume responsibility should such advertising or editorial content appear in any publication. glo assumes no liability for any claims regarding services or products or claims made by advertisers. No reproduction of glo is allowed without express written permission. Mailed subscriptions are available, prepaid with order at $44 for 12 issues; $75 for 24 issues. Mail your request, along with your check to glo, P.O. Box 188, Milford, IN 46542. Your cancelled check will serve as your receipt. Copyright © 2021

Artwork must be photographed at a high-resolution (300+ dpi) for reproduction. Cover art selections are made at the discretion of glo staff. For cover placement, the artist will receive credit and added exposure via introductory copy and published photograph in a question and answer section. Cover art is cropped approximately to 10” wide x 13” high. Submitted cover art should be sized as 10.5” wide x 13.25” tall and, when possible, please allow 4.5” at top of artwork for glo masthead placement. The art chosen will confer rights to the cover image only as it relates to the publication and glo. The artist shall retain all other rights.

publisher Ron Baumgartner | rbaumgartner@the-papers.com

director of circulation Jerry Long | jlong@the-papers.com

executive editor + publications manager Amber Bouthot | ambouthot@the-papers.com

graphic designers Maymie Ankrom, Mary Lester

editor-in-chief Deb Patterson | dpatterson@the-papers.com

marketing assistants Darlene Eichelberger, Trina Hoy

director of marketing Steve Meadows | smeadows@the-papers.com

photographer: Mollie Shutt

account executives Melinda Musselman | mmusselman@the-papers.com Lynn Blanchard | Lblanchard@the-papers.com Rebecca Boone | rboone@the-papers.com

contributing writers Stacie Ball, Mary Jane Bogle, Lauren Caggiano, Jaclyn Youhana Garver, Kristin King, Cathy Shouse, Julie Young

business manager Carrie Goralczyk | cgoralczyk@the-papers.com

Connect with Us On Social Media

Facebook facebook.com/glofortwayne

Twitter twitter.com/glofortwayne

Instagram instagram.com/glofortwayne | JULY GLO 2021 |

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GLAM + STYLE | Fashion

Spotlight

ON SWIMWEAR By Kristin King

The wait is over; summer is finally here! As the days get warmer, many of us will be finding sanctuary in a refreshing pool or lake to beat the heat. Although it’s easy to dread swimsuit season, we’ve found a few trends that will melt away your fear of choosing the right style, size, or color. No matter your age, shape, or size--we’ve got you covered. You’ll be diving into a fashionable new look in no time.

Bold

CUT-OUTS

Make a statement with a daring cut-out suit that combines the essence of design with functionality. These one-piece suits add an amazing sense of flair to your look while still maintaining the structure and comfort you need. Plus, there are so many different options! Go with a small peek-a-boo back or a diagonal cut-out waist.

Textured

FABRIC

Aside from color, another way to be unique with your suit is textured fabrics. This year we’re seeing ribbed, waffle, and even crochet suits that stand out amongst traditional fabrics. Texture can also play into the overall design and pattern of a suit, allowing for black and white checks, multiple colors, and small details, such as buttons or ties, that accentuate your look.

Asymmetrical A major trend for 2021 swimwear is the asymmetrical suit. Perfect for those who may want a little more freedom but need the durability and compression offered by onepieces. This one-shoulder strap style allows you to be fun and flirty while still providing stability for those who need a little extra attention up top.

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Summer Sale

Vintage-Inspired This is the kind of past that won’t come back to haunt us. 2021 is all about embracing what came before with adorable floral, striped, and polka dot suits that are flattering on any shape or size! You’ll see colors like black, red, blue, and soft pastels with these suits. A bonus is that vintage-style suits typically tend to be high-waisted, have thicker straps, and have sturdier designs that complement all body types.

FABRIC

Sale Starts Tuesday, July 6 Closed Monday, July 5

(not valid on prior purchases or 70% off merchandise)

Bra-style

TOPS

Of course, the most comfortable fit for almost anyone is likely a bra-style top. It seems that these were unheard of in years before, but as our needs change, so do our trends. Companies are now offering tops that come in a range of cup sizes, making it easier for you to narrow in on the perfect suit that will guarantee support while still being fashionable. There are also options available by dress size for those looking for a more general size but have trouble with traditional tops sold at large department stores.

Sustainable

As we make conscious efforts to limit our waste within our households, the fashion industry is also attempting to limit their footprint. Websites like ModiBodi and & OtherStories offer swimsuits made from recycled material (and they’re super cute, too!) Give back to the environment and create a one-of-a-kind look at your pool party this year with a sustainable swimsuit. a

Fashions

Store hours:

Mon.-Weds., Fri.: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Thurs.: 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat.: 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. Covington Plaza, 6340 West Jefferson Bld. Fort Wayne, Indiana (260) 459-2828

SCHEDULE YOUR MAMMOGRAM CLOSE TO HOME A mammogram offers the best chance for early detection. IU Health offers advanced technologies designed for you and your loved ones. To schedule your mammogram, call 260.234.5390 or visit iuhealth.org for more information.

Resources: Barbara’s New Beginnings, barbarasnewbeginnings.com stylecaster.com marieclaire.com elle.com

iuhealth.org ©2021 IUHealth 04/20/21

| JULY GLO 2021 |

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shutterstock.com

GLAM + STYLE | Self Care + Beauty

(No) stretching the truth Why women get stretch marks and what we can do about them By Julie Young

They are the indented streaks that appear on the body during periods of rapid physical change. They may be silvery white in color or in varying degrees of red. They may show up on the stomach, breasts, hips, thighs and buttocks, and while these marks do not hurt and are not harmful to the body in any way, it’s no “stretch” to say that most women do not wear them as a badge of honor and would get rid of them if they could. A disruption in the dermis

Micro process, maximum results

Stretch marks (or Stria) are the rippled bands that occur on the skin when there is a disruption in the body’s collagen production. They may occur during puberty, pregnancy or a significant weight change, and although they do tend to naturally fade in time, they rarely disappear completely. They also tend to affect women more than men.

Radio frequency microneedling is a minimally invasive procedure in which radio frequency energy is introduced in order to accelerate collagen production in the desired area. Next, an LED light is used to calm inflammation and speed up the healing process. Finally, gold-tipped needles create invisible microchannels in the skin that are receptive to the applied serums which stimulate the body’s natural healing process to reduce the appearance of stretch marks.

“Stretch marks vary in degree of severity depending on the individual,” says Amy Ramos, LE with Belle Sante Med Spa. “If you have supple skin that has been well hydrated or if you use a moisturizer with decent ingredients, you may be able to reduce their impact before they start, but few women escape them entirely.” According to Ramos, depending on their severity as well as location, some women simply embrace their stretch marks as a natural part of their story. Others seek alternative solutions. Those who fall into the latter category may look into radio frequency microneedling. 8

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The treatment is almost painless, requires virtually no downtime, and the combination of the microneedling and radio frequency helps strengthen and improve the texture of the skin so that it can start to restore its appearance. It’s a fairly simple premise and patients should see a difference after a few treatments. “The average patient will see optimal results in three treatments, but it does take multiple treatments in order to get the maximum benefit – especially where stretchmarks are concerned.

TOP TRICKS TO TREAT STRETCH MARKS •  Control your weight •  Stay Hydrated • Eat a nutrient-rich diet (including foods that contain zinc.) •  Moisturize your skin. • Treat stretch marks as you get them through exfoliation, microderm abrasion or Radio frequency Microneedling. (Sunless tanning products can also help cover them up!)

Stretch marks are inherited and they tend to show more on fairer skin types,” Ramos said. “Although we can’t get rid of them completely, we can tighten the skin and firm it up in order to minimize their appearance and help women feel better about how they look.” a

Resource: Belle Sante Med Spa, bellesantemedspa.com


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Hormone & Nutritional Consulting • Compounded Medications • Nutritional Supplements | JULY GLO 2021 |

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glows COMMUNITY FOCUS | SHE

she

glows’

LETRECIA (TRISH) NICHOLS

By Mary Jane Bogle | Photo by Mollie Shutt

Nestled in the heart of Indiana’s lake district lies Black Pine Animal Sanctuary, whose mission is to provide refuge to captiveraised exotic animals for the rest of their lives. And located in the heart of Black Pine Animal Sanctuary is Letrecia (Trish) Nichols. Although her official title is executive director, Nichols admits that no two days are the same at this wildlife sanctuary, the only accredited multi-species animal sanctuary in the Midwest. At any given moment, you might find her unloading a truck of food, processing bills, organizing events or managing her eight staff members. Black Pine Animal Sanctuary traces its roots back to the early 1980s, when its founders agreed to take in a neighbor’s llama and quickly became known as the place to surrender wild and exotic animals. From those humble beginnings, Black Pine now provides refuge to over 60 different species, with 100 animals currently in residence. “Our animals are either confiscated by law enforcement or donated by previous owners who can no longer care for these animals properly,” said Nichols. “We could tell a lot of sad stories. This is not a business for the faint of heart.” Nichols admits that she is uniquely suited for her position. With experience in everything from non-profit management to landscape supply and property rehab, she notes that “everything I’ve done in the past comes into play here. For example, I can drive a forklift, which is a very helpful skill to have if you need to move a tiger.” A self-described spiritual person, Nichols also believes that she was put at Black Pine for a reason. In fact, Black Pine was the answer to a prayer back in 2019. When her husband’s 45-minute surgery turned into a 5-hourlong surgery, Nichols knew she needed to make some changes. “I was really praying about what to do next,” she said. “I saw the ad on LinkedIn and applied. I got my husband out of ICU and came into the interview. I just knew this was the job for me. I’m living my best life.” a

More About Black Pine Animal Sanctuary Open for the 2021 season, Black Pine offers staff-guided tours Thursdays through Sundays. Visitors must make reservations in advance and be prepared to wear masks throughout the tour, which lasts 1 – 2 hours. Options include educational tours, feeding tours and a special “Toddlers and Tots” tour. To learn more, visit bpsanctuary.org.

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| JULY GLO 2021 |

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COMMUNITY COMMUNITY FOCUS FOCUS || HE HE glo glows ws

he

BRYAN LINEBERRY

glows’

By Stacie Ball | Photo by Mollie Shutt

Adams County’s “Amazing Teacher,” Bryan Lineberry, has a love of nature and adventure that is contagious. Even his wife and two sons share his love for the great outdoors! This teacher and lifetime Scout believes one of life’s greatest rewards is “seeing youth develop into men and women of strong character and leadership abilities.” Youth benefit from his innovative ideas and hard work each day. Lineberry has been making history come alive for Bellmont High School students for the last ten years. In 2019, he took eight students on the trip of a lifetime to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings in Normandy. “We toured many WWII related sites, including Bletchley Park, Churchill War Rooms, and Pointe du Hoc, and participated in the official American Commemoration ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery,” Lineberry explained while describing their WWII-themed trip through London, Normandy and Paris. They heard from President Trump and French President Marcon, visited graves of fallen Hoosier WWII Veterans, and read a short bio/tribute. Three of these students missed their graduation back home, so Lineberry surprised them with a short graduation ceremony at Buckingham Palace! He commented, “All of us gained a deeper appreciation for the sacrifices made in defense of freedom.” Not only does the Indiana VFW (Veterans of Foreign Wars) Teacher of the Year for 2018-2019 have a zeal for teaching history, but he has also been involved in Scouts for over 30 years. He worked his way up to an Eagle Scout and began giving back by becoming a counselor and eventually the Summer Camp Director at Camp Chief Little Turtle. “Summer camp is a special place where I have the opportunity to give back to an organization that helped to forge the person I am today,” Lineberry stated. He credited camp with teaching him about God’s creation, fueling his passion for adventure, travel, teaching, and even introducing him to his wife, Karen. He continues to serve as the Chairman of the Council Outdoor Camping Program. During COVID, when most camps closed, Lineberry led a team of volunteers to develop a COVID-friendly day program where over 300 Scouts could still safely participate in-person. Lineberry said success is defined best by the tried-and-true Cub Scout motto, “Do Your Best.” He concluded, “If you can walk away from a project or goal and truly say, ‘I did my best,’ then you should have no regrets regardless of the outcome.” a 12

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FREE

July 2021

HOMELIVING Indoor + Outdoor

e k a L nd La

On

and

LAKE COTTAGE

décor ideas

LAKE DOCKS

& boat lifts HOST AN

outdoor dinner www.homeindooroutdoorliving.com


HOMELIVING Indoor & Outdoor

PO Box 188 • 206 South Main St., Milford, IN 46542 800.733.4111/Fax 800.886.3796 Editorial and Advertising, Ext. 2491 homeindooroutdoorliving.com PUBLISHER Ron Baumgartner rbaumgartner@the-papers.com

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING Steve Meadows smeadows@the-papers.com

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Deb Patterson dpatterson@the-papers.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Mary Lester mlester@the-papers.com

PUBLICATION MANAGER and EXECUTIVE EDITOR Amber Bouthot ambouthot@the-papers.com

MARKETING ASSISTANTS Darlene Eichelberger darlene@the-papers.com Trina Hoy thoy@the-papers.com

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Rebecca Boone rboone@the-papers.com

what’s trending  |  interior design

Keep It

DIRECTOR OF CIRCULATION Jerry Long jlong@the-papers.com

BUSINESS MANAGER Carrie Goralczyk cgoralczyk@the-papers.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Stacie Ball, Ray Balogh, Bethany Beebe, Mary Jane Bogle, Lauren Caggiano, Jaclyn Youhana Garver, Deborah C. Gerbers, Rod King, Cathy Shouse, Julie Young Home Living Indoor + Outdoor is a news magazine with emphasis on home decor, design and remodeling. Home Living does not knowingly accept false or misleading advertising or editorial content, nor does Home Living or its staff assume responsibility should such advertising or editorial content appear in any publication. Home Living reserves the right to determine the suitability of all materials submitted for publication and to edit all submitted materials for clarity and space. Home Living has not independently tested any services or products advertised herein and has verified no claims made by its advertisers regarding those services or products. Home Living makes no warranties or representations and assumes no liability for any claims regarding those services or products or claims made by advertisers regarding such products or services. Readers are advised to consult with the advertiser and/or other home repair and renovation professionals regarding any such claims and regarding the suitability of an advertiser’s products. No reproduction of Home Living Indoor + Outdoor is allowed without express written permission. Mailed subscriptions are available, prepaid with order at $44.00 for one year; and $75.00 for two years. Mail the order form, along with your check to Home Living Indoor + Outdoor, P.O. Box 188, Milford, IN 46542. Your cancelled check will serve as your receipt. Copyright © Home Living Indoor + Outdoor All rights reserved, 2021

a division of

Milford, Indiana

the-papers.com

Cover photo shutterstock.com

contents

July 2021 Vol. 13 No. 3

what’s trending ~~

at HOME (cont.) ~

keep it natural

when pets go missing

interior design...............2

features ~

household pets........... 12

well being..................... 14

main feature.................4

exploring gut health and what it means

main feature.................6

community ~

lake cottage décor trends docks and lifts 101

how to........................... 7

 lanning the perfect outdoor p dinner party

reader DIY..................... 9

the black sheep houseboat

at HOME ~

garden/landscape.......10

proper watering

support small.............. 16 The Workbench Fort Wayne

company spotlight...........17 Indiana Warm Floors

event calendar........... 18

essentials ~

I am HOME.................. 19

Melissa Shenkel

2  Home Living  |  July 2021

When it comes to styling, the go-to accessories in 2021 are all about natural elements. Stick to earthy tones, terracotta vases, marble coffee tables, wicker baskets and wooden furniture pieces. These all work together to add texture and warmth to a room, creating a more organic look that can produce a relaxed, calm vibe.

Why we love it: Giving your space a sense of texture is simple, especially if you go heavy on fabrics. Interior designer Oksana Kreiman recommends adding a leather pillow, a faux-fur throw or a knitted pillow or pouf to your room for an extra soft and homey touch.  https://www.thespruce.com/hottest-design-trends-for-2021-according-to-experts-5089289


Natural

July 2021  |  Home Living  3


features  |  main feature

Lake cottage décor trends By Jaclyn Youhana Garver

Northeastern Indiana is home to so many lakes, we don’t even bother to name them to each other. We spend weekends, holidays and firefly-lit evenings at, simply, “the lake.” The very idea of a lake cottage brings about the feeling of a getaway, even if it’s only an hour from home. It’s a place that’s cozy and welcoming; what family looks like if you built it with wood and stone. This season, décor trends for lake cottages keep things simple: Colors are neutral, and lines are clean. It’s less farmhouse and more contemporary coastal. Allison Hanford, an interior designer at Niche Market Furniture in New Haven, shares some of 2021’s lake cottage design trends.

It’s all about texture Think woven light fixtures, natural fiber rugs, baskets and pillow tassels.

Keep it bright and airy … Colors are light and neutral for everything from sofas to wall paint. Natural wood tone, too, is popular. Ditto cotton and linen fabrics.

Looking to 2022 and beyond, Hanford suspects cottage décor will move even more toward a modern vibe and away from the previous farmhouse trends. Heavy frames and curved lines will phase out for clean, straight lines and soft textures. “You might have some metals mixed with woods mixed with soft textures,” she says, “but it is going to be more of a contemporary coastal vibe.” 

  …  but mix in modern touches Hanford says designers are mixing light, textured pieces with, say, an über modern coffee table or end tables with black metal legs. Combining these trends gives rooms a clean, calming, light feel.

Allison Hanford, an interior designer at Niche Market Furniture in New Haven, recently helped her parents with the kitchen update in their Lake of the Woods home in Hudson. “We painted all our cabinets, which were a dark wood, and got a lighter countertop and subway tile backsplash,” she says.

How to achieve the vibe Short of financing a complete redesign, Hanford suggests some small, inexpensive ways homeowners can spruce up their lake cottages: • Update your fabrics. New throw pillows can change the look of a couch. Choose pillows with textured fabric and solid, natural colors or light stripes. White drapes, too, can lend a coastal vibe to a lake cottage. • Get some new coffee and end tables. To keep it on-trend, select natural wood tables. • Switch out heavy, ornate rugs with natural-fiber rugs. • Give a room a repaint. Previous trendy colors were vibrant reds and blues. Today, lighter colors are more popular. “We will throw some navies in there, but you wouldn’t have a bright red couch or something like that,” Hanford says. • Ditch the themes. Previous lake cottage trends focused on nautical items — like oars and anchors hung on the walls and small boats around the home. This year’s coastal vibe is more subtle than that. “It might have a little bird here and there or a fish here and there, but it’s not in your face,” she says.

Resource:

Niche Market Furniture, nichemarketfurniture.com

4  Home Living  |  July 2021


VISIT OUR Kitchen & Bath Showroom

TO SEE THE LATEST IN DESIGN TRENDS

6040 Innovation Blvd. Fort Wayne, IN 46818 (260) 423-9577 shopwkbw.waynepipe.com

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Brick & Fireplaces

www.nobbrick.com

Call us at 260-483-2126 Visit us at 4936 Nob Road, Fort Wayne July 2021  |  Home Living  5


features  |  main feature

Docks and Lifts 101 By Cathy Shouse

Summer is prime time for fun in the sun, and hassle-free docks and lifts at the lake are a musthave. The Pier Place’s Brook Vande Zande, owner and president, along with his wife Sue, who handles bookkeeping and human resources, gave us the scoop.

Q

.F  or the inexperienced, what are docks and lifts?

Brook: A dock or pier is what you walk on and a lift or boat lift is what lifts your boat out of the water. I quote piers and docks and the discussion begins with budget and placement.

Q

. What should we know about piers?

Brook: I will come out to their location and get in the water to see how we will install the pier. The pier can be made from wood, aluminum or vinyl. Vinyl is the most asked-for since its life span is so long, so it is literally the last pier you will have to buy. If the water is too shallow, we will put the pier on stands. If they have adequate water depth, we will install pods. Pods are steel pipe that stay in the bottom of the lake and the pipe you see above the water slides in and out for easy installation/ removal. If the water gets deep, we will install sockets; the same theory as pods, just a longer pipe so we can find them in the spring from sitting on a float, versus having to dive down to locate them.

Q

. What considerations are there for a boat lift?

The first questions: Is the lift for a speed boat or pontoon, and what is the weight of the boat? There are 4000, 5000, 6000 or 7000 pound lifts. Soon, Shore Station will have an 8000 pound, 120” wide lift. Since the boats keep getting bigger, the lifts have to adjust. Then, how long is the boat for the length of the canopy frame? Next, it’s all about the placement. Longer legs or added wood below the feet might be needed to help support the lift. We bring the lift by water with one of our barges and install the lift, put the boat on and install the canopy cover. When we leave, you are ready to use the lift and enjoy the lake.

6  Home Living  |  July 2021

Q

. What are available product choices?

Brook: For piers, the Brock Dock vinyl pier, with its 25-year warranty and the fact that it cannot get hot, makes it the most popular pier. Shore Station is the best in the industry as far as boat lifts go. Because of the quality and its hydraulic system, it is the most reliable lift. If you go with wood, there is no guarantee; it may get hot or warp. Aluminum is a good option as it is anodized to help keep it cool.

Q

. Anything else?

Brook: The biggest mistake I see is consumers buy a property that doesn’t have enough frontage for all their toys or they do not inspect what the water is like where their cottage is. Not all shorelines have clean water to swim in. Note: There is a shortage on product for both lifts and piers this year. Hopefully, more product will become available as the season progresses. 

Resource:

The Pier Place, thepierplace.com


how to  | features

Planning the Perfect

Outdoor Dinner Party By Mary Jane Bogle

Whether you’re hosting an elaborate spread or just getting together for a potluck or hamburgers and hot dogs, planning a party in outdoor spaces is a great way to enjoy all that summer has to offer. Follow these simple steps to make the entire evening one to remember.

Fun games are a great way to get guests mingling and add some levity to the evening. Consider a make-and-take craft or simple ice breaker games. You might even tackle lifesized versions of Twister or Jenga for extra backyard fun.

Step 7: PLAN FOR PEST CONTROL.

Step 1: START EARLY.

As soon as possible, remove all standing water. And don’t forget to set out citronella candles or even offer guests small cans of bug spray.

While you might be able to throw together a party in a week or two, remember that summer schedules fill up quickly, so plan ahead if you want as many guests as possible to attend.

Step 8: M  AKE ALLOWANCES FOR THE WEATHER.

Step 2: PICK A THEME. Choosing a theme can make everything from invitations, decorations and even the food easier to plan.

Well-situated revolving fans, screens that block the sun, and tents or canopies set up in case of rain can keep guests comfortable and dry, no matter what Mother Nature dishes out.

Step 3: MANAGE THE MENU. Whether you decide to grill, host a potluck or hire a caterer, a little menu planning goes a long way. And remember, it doesn’t have to be expensive or elaborate, just delicious.

Step 9: P  REPARE FOR TRASH PICKUP. If you’re using disposable plates and tableware, be sure to set out waste containers in easy reach of guests.

Step 4: SPRUCE UP THE SPACE. If you haven’t already, now is the time to pull those weeds, mulch the landscape beds and put outdoor tools and toys in their proper places.

Step 10: CONSIDER PARTY FAVORS. Help guests remember the fun by offering them a small gift as they leave. Consider giving away centerpieces as prizes, or look to your theme for further gift-giving inspiration. 

Step 5: ADD AMBIENCE. Your decorations can be as simple as fresh-cut flowers from your own garden displayed in fun vases or Mason jars. Try placing them atop table runners or placemats from your linen closet. And don’t forget to add market lights, which not only add a touch of cheer but can also keep the party going long into the evening.

Step 6: C  REATE CASUAL ACTIVITIES.

Resource: Photo provided by Flourish & Flounce

Flourish & Flounce, flourishandflounce.com

July 2021  |  Home Living  7


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reader diy  | feature

The Black Sheep Houseboat After

Before

By Amber Bouthot

Every month, we highlight do-it-yourself projects from our readers. Do you want to see your project featured in our magazine? It can be something as simple as a craft project or as large as a home addition. If you did it yourself, it can be featured. Email Amber at ambouthot@the-papers.com. This month’s Reader DIY project comes from Kathy Boles. She and her husband purchased and completely transformed a houseboat

What was your inspiration for the project? We have been working up to a larger project from several years ago when we were gifted an older model RV, which we remodeled, sold and used the proceeds to help purchase our first houseboat. We remodeled the interior and replaced the motor, and then we sold the finished project to help finance a larger houseboat. We wanted a low maintenance recreational space large enough for our entire family to enjoy during the summer months. This three-bedroom, 1.5 bath, 16 feet by 64 feet houseboat was the perfect solution! It is only 45 minutes from home and was a cost-effective solution to pricy lake property with less maintenance than that of a traditional land home.

How long did it take from start to finish? This will certainly be a work in progress to update/upgrade portions of the houseboat, but most of the work to update the interior and the structure to include a new roof was approximately 9 months of weekends from September 2020 to May 2021. We estimated about 70+ days and over 650 hours or more as we did have some help from a friend or two here and there.

After

Before

Was it easier or harder than you anticipated? The roof was as difficult as I expected. We struggled getting the many sheets of plywood from the trailer to the roof (approx. 18 ft high) by hand with three people. I am not a fan of fiberglass, but by watching some YouTube tutorials in fiberglass application and gel coating, we did a pretty good job. The interior remodel was a bit harder than a typical home improvement project because much of the work was done off site then brought to the houseboat, where it is dry docked during the off season, then lifted over 8 feet into the houseboat to be installed. All power to the boat while it is off the water comes from the campground where it is dry docked, so we had to use several extension cords to get power to it. The removal of the old full-sized kitchen appliances and installation of the new ones was a definite challenge since the boat is dry docked about 9 feet off the ground.

What was the total cost of the project? We paid $20,000 for the houseboat “as is, no warranty” knowing we had to replace the entire roof and update the entire 700+ sq.ft. of interior space! We put about $15,000+ into repairs, updates, LED lighting, solar panels and furnishings for a total of about $35,000+. After the completion of the marine survey the value was assessed at $72,000.

What did you like best about the undertaking? We were able to spend weekends together building something for our family and friends to enjoy with us during the summer. We always enjoy a challenge, and this was our biggest ever!

What was the most challenging aspect? For me it was the cold weather, the almost 2-hour drive round trip each day we were there, and the sheer exhaustion ending the weekend going into the work week. For my husband Rick, it seemed it was the hope that his measurements were exact when making custom items then to get back to the boat to install them in hopes of a perfect fit!

Where did you source the materials?

Before

After

We purchased most of our building materials and flooring at our local Menards. Interior paint and primer were Dutch Boy. Livingroom and kitchen rugs were www.Ruggable.com. Fiberglass and gel coating was at www.fiberglasssite.com. Solar panels are LG 340 watt from www.solaris-shop.com. Solar panel mounts and advice locally from Precision Fabrication. Outdoor carpeting was from www.marinevinylfabric.com. Car Wrap vinyl Black Sheep exterior signage locally at Testify Marketing Media. Aluminum welding by Moore’s Welding in Leo, IN. Electrical wiring by Doug Drewery. Custom laser designs from Simple Glow Fort Wayne.   

July 2021  |  Home Living  9


at HOME  |  garden/landscape

Proper Watering By Bethany Beebe

personal touches regarding color, function, and wildlife habitat can Most plants of the garden need between 1 to 1.5 inches of water be made. each week1. When the garden hose is the source instead of nature, it For many, a personal touch in the form of residential pride is a green is best to do fewer waterings that are more thorough instead of going lawn, even during dry conditions. What may seem a drop in the bucket light on the liquid over the course of many applications. Young roots compared to the entire water cycle, the EPA offers that watering will stay closer to the surface of the soil rather than growing more the lawn actually has a huge impact. If the average-sized yard were deeply if they never need to stretch down to find moisture. Then, watered 20 minutes each day, seven days each week, the equivalent when drier conditions occur, the closer-to-the-surface roots struggle. water consumed would equal taking 800 showers or running the Conversely, overwatering prevents needed oxygen from getting to the kitchen faucet continually for four days.5  roots. The City of Fort Wayne also suggests that using less water means fewer chemicals washing into the water supply, creating cleaner rivers while saving money2. When watering, trickle or drip-style irrigation is recommended1. With this method, foliage stays dry because water is deposited at the base of the plant. Since many fungi and plant diseases are spread in splashing water, this delivery is preventive. Should you not have a soaker hose to accomplish the task, Purdue Extension suggests morning waterings. Less evaporation with the benefit of quick drying makes this a noteworthy option. Once you have gone to the time and expense to water properly, keeping that water with the plants that need it is desirable. Mulch will not only keep water in place; it is also prevention against weeds2. Taking the task of watering to the next level could mean making landscaping changes. Rain gardens, according to Purdue Extension, are special gardens that filter water from driveways, downspouts and other impervious surfaces4. A normal residential rain garden is between four and eight inches deep and 100-300 square feet. Resources: Home to deep-rooted, well-adapted or native 1 https://www.purdue.edu/hla/sites/yardandgarden/watering-101/ plants that can handle dry and wet conditions, 2 https://www.cityoffortwayne.org/images/stories/Utilities/docs resources/2018_Green_Landscaping_-_mj.pdf their roots promote water infiltration. Once you 3 https://extension.purdue.edu/article/34739 have selected a spot that drains in 24-48 hours, 4 https://extension.purdue.edu/rainscaping/bioretensionrain-garden/ 5 https://www.epa.gov/watersense/statistics-and-facts

10  Home Living  |  July 2021

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The Fourth of July gives us the chance to celebrate the freedoms we are fortunate to have. To many, the pursuit of happiness, among other things, means maintaining a pride-worthy yard and garden. The challenge of maintaining proper moisture levels despite the warmth and wind can be met with freedom of worry with a plan grounded in good science.


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July 2021  |  Home Living  11


at HOME  |  household pets

When Pets Go Missing

By Stacie Ball

Our pets are an important part of the family, so it’s understandable how devastating it can be if a pet goes missing. Jaclyn Goldsborough knows the feeling first-hand, as her dog, Napoleon, was lost not long ago. She and Fort Wayne Animal Care and Control (FWACC) have some great advice for what to do if you realize your pet is missing. “It was so terrifying!” Goldsborough recalled. “We were working in our yard when we realized, too late, that the wind blew our gate open. Napoleon is a very social dog, so he strolled out of our fenced-in yard and walked a block away, where he was picked up by a friendly neighbor and taken to FWACC for safety. Since it was the weekend, FWACC had limited staff and were unable to provide some services.” Realizing Napoleon was microchipped but did not have his collar on, Goldsborough leapt into action posting pictures on the Lost Dogs of Fort Wayne page. “I cannot thank the admins and followers enough,” she commended. “They were able to follow the FWACC page and realize there was a matching description of Napoleon. Then they used social media photos to post that he was found safely at the shelter, and my mind was finally at ease.” She also greatly appreciated FWACC for being very helpful, even though it was a very busy time. “Since Napoleon is old and on medication, they were able to release him within 24 hours of when he was dropped off at the shelter.” FWACC strives to make sure lost pets are reunited with their owners. They recommend these actions if you have lost your pet.

File a Missing Pet Report Complete this report in-person at 3020 Hillegas Road, on the telephone at 427-1244, or online at cityoffortwayne.org/lost-andfound-pets/i-ve-lost-a-pet.html. Describe your pet in as much detail as

12  Home Living  |  July 2021

possible. Have a photo available and be sure to disclose whether the animal is microchipped and wearing identification tags.

Utilize Social Media and Photos Online Lost Dogs of Fort Wayne and Lost Cats of Fort Wayne have been instrumental in reuniting many pets with their families. The FWACC website posts pictures of all dogs, cats, and small animals found and brought to the shelter. The photos include the date the animal entered the shelter and a short description.

Other Suggestions “Since dogs and cats have an incredible sense of smell, put out their food and water bowl, their bed, and litter box (if you’re missing a cat),” FWACC suggested. Also, hang signs in your neighborhood with your pet’s photo and your contact information. Remember to bring your photo ID, proof of ownership like a pet photo or microchip verification, and a $15-$100 fee to pick up your pet from the shelter. Most importantly FWACC said, “The best way to ensure your lost pet gets home to you is to keep its microchip information up-to-date.” For more information on lost and found pets, visit Fort Wayne Animal Care and Control at cityoffortwayne.org/animal-care-and-control.html. 


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July 2021  |  Home Living  13


at HOME  |  well being

A Gut Feeling:

Exploring and What it Means By Deborah C. Gerbers

The human digestive system is incredibly complex, and in recent years ‘gut health’ and its importance to our overall health is a topic of increasing research in the medical community. In the past twenty years or so, scientific studies have found important links between gut health and the rest of our bodies — including the immune system, mood, mental health, autoimmune diseases, endocrine disorders, skin conditions and cancer. Why is ‘gut health’ important? Every food we eat is ultimately broken down in the gut to a simple form that can enter the bloodstream and be delivered as nutrients throughout our bodies, which is only possible with a healthy, functioning digestive system. A healthy gut with a good balance of helpful bacteria also communicates with the brain through nerves and hormones, which helps maintain general health and well-being (health.ucdavis.edu). According to healthline.com, the buzz word “gut microbiome” refers specifically to the microorganisms living in our intestines. A person has about 300 to 500 different species of bacteria in their digestive tract, and while some microorganisms are harmful to our health, many are incredibly beneficial and even necessary to a healthy body. Having a wide variety of good bacteria in the gut can improve immune system function, lessen symptoms of depression, help fight obesity, and provide numerous other benefits.

14  Home Living  |  July 2021

Our daily lives likely include high stress levels, lack of quality sleep, eating processed and high-sugar foods, and taking too many antibiotics, which can all damage our gut microbiome. This can affect several other aspects of our health like the brain, heart, immune system, skin, weight, hormone levels, ability to absorb nutrients, and even the development of cancer.

Be on the lookout for the signs and symptoms of an unhealthy gut: • Upset stomach: gas, bloating, constipation, diarrhea, and heartburn can cause irregularity and abnormal bowel functions • High-sugar diet: refined sugars can increase inflammation all over the body, leading to diseases and possibly cancers • Unintentional weight changes: can impair body’s ability to absorb nutrients


• Sleep disturbances or constant fatigue: imbalance of serotonin in the gut • Skin irritation: inflammation and eczema may be related to a damaged gut • Autoimmune conditions: unhealthy gut may increase systemic inflammation and alter the proper functioning of the immune system, causing the body to attack itself rather than harmful invaders • Food intolerances: may be caused by poor quality of bacteria in the gut According to Dr. Gerald Mullin, Johns Hopkins University gastroenterologist, the main drivers of gut health change are shifts in stomach acid, gut immunity and gastrointestinal flora — the complex ecosystem of bacteria in your digestive system. Here are five tips to keep your gut working properly, and in turn, help the rest of your body functioning well: • Eat the right foods to support your health • Get more sleep • Exercise more • Manage stress • Get help to manage anxiety and depression As gut health refers to the entire complex digestive system, there are many other facets to be considered, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). While many prescription and over-the-counter medicines, such as Prevacid or omeprazole, can be helpful, consulting with a medical expert at Fort Wayne Custom Rx and creating your own customized treatment plan tailored to your individual condition can be more effective. Knowledgeable staff at Custom Rx can help reduce your symptoms and gastrointestinal discomfort with a Custom Dietary Supplement. Various studies have concluded that the customized supplement formulation promoted regression of GERD symptoms with no significant side effects.

Role of ‘probiotics’ in the diet We’ve all seen the increased popularity of probiotics in foods like yogurt and nutritional supplements. But what exactly are they and how do they help improve the health of our gut? Probiotics are made up of good bacteria that helps keep your body healthy and working well. These good bacteria help you in many ways, including fighting off bad bacteria when you have too much of it, helping you feel better. Probiotics are part of a larger picture concerning bacteria and your body — your microbiome (clevelandclinic.org). Foods that build a healthy digestive system include kefir (a fermented milk drink that’s similar to yogurt and is rich in probiotics); yogurt with added probiotics, such as Activia brand; and fermented or pickled foods (such as kimchi, sauerkraut and pickled ginger). A healthy gut is an integral part to maintaining our overall health — so be good to your tummy and your whole body will thank you. 

Resource: Fort Wayne Custom Rx, fwcustomrx.com

July 2021  |  Home Living  15


community  |  support

small

THE WORKBENCH Fort Wayne

By Julie Young

For entrepreneurs looking to start or advance businesses that specialize in tangible products, The Workbench Fort Wayne is ready to help. Since opening their physical location in 2019, The Workbench has assisted approximately 30 companies and has a number of partnerships with local organizations that are invested in fostering small business operation and growth within the community. “We work with clients to design, prototype, and produce things that they want to sell,” said Jon Rehwaldt, founder of The Workbench Fort Wayne. “In addition, we have a workshop that is accessible through a membership model and allows (clients) to access 3-D printing equipment, Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machinery and a host of other tools to do the (production) work themselves.” Rehwaldt says most of the businesses that his organization works with are those that are focused on innovation inside of an existing industry. These are people who have been working in a business or service environment and come to The Workbench with an idea that already has a place in the market but needs to be brought to fruition. The Workbench then helps them prototype and design the product so that the entrepreneur can raise funds and bring that product to production. “We’ve helped people in a lot of different industries: the medical field, pharmaceuticals, packaging, and even some direct-to-consumer products that might be on shelves in the next year or so,” he said. In addition to offering both design and print services, The Workbench helps people figure out supply chain logistics and how to move their small business from the garage or basement to a facility that allows them to make their products more efficiently and distribute those products in a way that increases their profit margin. Rehwaldt said The Workbench is ready to help anyone who has an idea for making something physical, regardless of whether they plan to bring

16  Home Living  |  July 2021

that item to market or not. Through the support of their sponsors, The Workbench is able to keep their prices affordable for those who do not have a lot of capital to invest but want to increase their revenue stream. “The people who are ready to take advantage of what we have to offer already have a clear picture of what they want to make and how they can sell it, but there are other resources in the community for people who are just starting on their business journey and we can refer them if necessary,” Rehwaldt said. The Workbench is also ready to help people with their personal projects, even if they are never intended to become a business, as well as those who have an idea for a potential product and are ready to explore the possibility of turning that concept into a reality. Rehwaldt says that Fort Wayne has always been a place where people are proud of the things they make, and The Workbench wants to continue that legacy of skilled makers bringing products into the world that can impact those who encounter them. “We’re really excited to be part of that experience,” he said. 

The Workbench Fort Wayne theworkbenchfw.com


company spotlight  | community

Indiana Warm Floors

Radiant Floor Heat

Versatile, Comfortable By Rod King

Scott Patton operates two businesses under the same roof in Angola. He started Indiana Warm Floors in 1979, and about 12 years ago, he added Red Hot Golf Carts, which he says he can’t keep in stock. Patton was one of the first to install radiant floor heat in Northeast Indiana. “That was back when no one really knew how to do it,” he said. “In our research, we found that delivering heat in a home by making the floors warm would give the best results to our clients. After about 10 years, we got so busy that we quit designing and building solar-efficient homes to concentrate strictly on designing and installing radiant heating systems.” His team of three employees now designs radiant systems for floors, walls and ceilings in residential homes, commercial buildings and farm structures. The company also installs hydronic systems and snow-melt systems for driveways and sidewalks. “With an energy-efficient/air-tight home, the floor temperature only needs to be warm enough to meet the heat loss of the walls and windows,” Patton said. “So, the floor temperature might only need to be 75 degrees, which to some home-owners might not feel warm enough. That’s why educating customers about their radiant heating system and how it operates is so important. In other words, we have to manage their expectations. We actually have to caution them about what to expect so that they’re not disappointed when the floors aren’t as warm as they expected.” Over the years, acceptance of radiant heating has become more and more wide-spread. “Homeowners in our area are pretty knowledgeable about it. They’ve either read something about it, seen it advertised, know someone who has it, or have seen it on some home and garden

television program. Now,” he added, “architects are specifying it on their blueprints.” What pushed Patton into deciding to focus his efforts on designing and installing radiant heating systems was America’s dependence on oil back in the 1970s. “There were shortages of gasoline and heating oil, long lines at gas stations and prices were skyrocketing,” he said. “An alternative was needed. I think it’s even more important now. That’s when I went to radiant floor heat, geothermal and snow-melt systems. “The versatility of radiant heat allows us to maximize comfort and efficiency for our customers through the use of specific home zones,” he explained. “For instance, a thermostat in a master bedroom can control the temperature just for that room. We can put a floor sensor in the master bathroom to regulate the heat of the floor so the homeowner can step out of the shower onto a warm floor.” Indiana Warm Floors utilizes separate thermostats in the basement, first floor, second floor, and in the garage to account for their different use, different exposure to the sun, heat load and different floor coverings. Indiana Warm Floors’ 250-mile service area covers all of Indiana, a good portion of Michigan and Ohio and part of northern Kentucky. 

Indiana Warm Floors indianawarmfloors.com

July 2021  |  Home Living  17


community  |  events

Honeywell Center By Ray Balogh County Fairs: 10-17, LaGrange County 4-H Fair, 1030 E. 075N, LaGrange. 260.463.2862, lagrangecounty4hfair.org. 10-17, Noble County Fair, 580 Fair St., Kendallville. 260.347.0666, noblecountyfair.org. 11-17, Kosciusko County Community Fair, 1400 E. Smith St., Warsaw. 574.269.1823, kcfair.com. 27-Aug. 1, Allen County Fair, 2726 Carroll Road, Fort Wayne. 260.449.4444, theallencountyfair.com.

Botanical Conservatory •T  hursday, July 1, $1 Night Insight: Botanical Fireworks, 6 p.m.-7 p.m., $1 • Thursday, July 1, “Alpine Holiday” exhibit (through Jan. 3, 2022), regular admission • Saturday, July 3, “Visions of the Old West” summer-fall exhibit (through Nov. 14), regular admission • Saturday, July 10, Daylily Show, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., regular admission • Saturday, July 17, “Jazzworks!” concert featuring The Mad Scatter and Aleena York & Blue Pluto, 7 p.m.-10 p.m., $5/ages 13 and older, free for 12 and under • Tuesday, July 20, Tai Chi Skill Building, 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m., $9 ($7 for member or volunteer) • Sunday, July 25, Iris Sale, noon-3 p.m., regular admission Adults $5, children (3-17) $3, children (2 and under) free. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Thursday; noon4 p.m. Sunday; closed Monday. Open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve. 1100 S. Calhoun St., Fort Wayne. 260.427.6440, botanicalconservatory.org.

Embassy Theatre •S  ummer Nights at the Embassy, 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Wednesdays, $5: • July 7, JustPrentis and Friends • July 14, Q and the Cold Fusion • July 21, Shelly Dixon and Company • July 28, Fatima Washington 125 W. Jefferson Blvd., Fort Wayne. 800.745.3000, fwembassytheatre.org.

Memorial Coliseum •F  riday-Saturday, July 16-17, Expedite Expo 2021, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., free admission, register at expediteexpo.com • Saturday, July 17, Fort Wayne Region Sports Car Club of America Autocross, 10 a.m., in the parking lot, free admission Parking $6 main lot, $10 preferred lot. Allen County War Memorial Coliseum, 4000 Parnell Ave., Fort Wayne. 260.482.9502, memorialcoliseum.com.

Fort Wayne Museum of Art Exhibitions: • Personal to Political: Celebrating the African American Artists of Paulson Fontaine Press (through July 18) • Alphonse Mucha: Master of Art Nouveau (through Sept. 26) • AFROS: A Celebration of Natural Hair by Michael July (through Dec. 31) • A Century of Making Meaning: 100 Years of Collecting (through March 13, 2022)

18  Home Living  |  July 2021

•T  hursday Night Movies, main screen,13-24 DriveIn, $8/carload: • July 1, “Smokey and the Bandit,” 9:45 p.m. • July 8, “Forrest Gump,” 9:45 p.m. • July 15, “Beetlejuice,” 9:45 p.m. • July 22, “Apollo 13,” 9:45 p.m. • July 29, “Jurassic Park,” 9:30 p.m. Friday, July 9, Asian Buffet, 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m., Eagles Theatre, Parkview Ballroom, $15.95, make reservations at honeywellarts.org • Saturday, July 10, Night Ranger with special guest SIIN, 7:30 p.m., $35/$49, show night dining available for $21.19 • Thursday, July 22, Chanticleer String Quartet, 7 p.m., outdoor terrace of Honeywell House, free admission, make reservations at honeywellarts. org • Thursday, July 29, Mrs. Honeywell’s Birthday Tea, 11:30 a.m., outdoor terrace of Honeywell House, $25 Ford Theater, 275 E. Market St., Wabash. 260.563.1102, honeywellarts.org.

Shipshewana Blue Gate Theatre •T  hursday, July 8, John Conlee, 8 p.m., Performing Arts Center, $17.95 to $59.95 • Friday, July 9, Del McCoury Band, 8 p.m., Performing Arts Center, $17.95 to $49.95 • Saturday, July 10, Gene Watson, 7:30 p.m., Performing Arts Center, $19.95 to $54.95 • Friday, July 16, The Mavericks, 8 p.m., Performing Arts Center, $34.95 to 94.95 • Saturday, July 17, Leonid & Friends, 8 p.m., Performing Arts Center, $19.95 to $54.95 • Thursday, July 22, Battle of the Big Bands: Glenn Miller vs. Tommy Dorsey, 8 p.m., Performing Arts Center, $19.95 to $64.95 All shows add $18 for dinner theater. Performing Arts Center address is 760 S. Van Buren St., Shipshewana. Music Hall address is 195 N. Van Buren, Shipshewana. 888.447.4725, thebluegate.com.

2 WABASH: First Friday: “Star Spangled Downtown” Party like it’s the 4th of July, with live entertainment, food, kid’s activities, shopping, evening specials and more. Free admission. 5 p.m.-8 p.m. Friday, downtown. 260.563.0975, wabashmarketplace.org.

3 DECATUR: Flea Market Nearly 100 indoor vendors, hot food available. Sponsored by the Adams County Coin Club. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday (year-round), Riverside Center, 231 E. Monroe St. (Highway 224 East). Contact Carla at 260.517.8182, facebook.com/decaturindianafleamarket.

3 DECATUR: Decatur Coin Show and Marketplace Nearly 100 indoor vendors, hot food available. Sponsored by the Adams County Coin Club. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday (year-round), Riverside Center, 231 E. Monroe St. (Highway 224 East). Contact Carla at 260.517.8182, facebook.com/decaturindianafleamarket.

3, 10, 17, 24, 31 FORT WAYNE: South Side Farmers Market 100 stands featuring produce, hand-crafted items, antiques, fresh baked goods, eggs, local honey, hormone-free pork and chicken. Master gardeners on hand to answer questions. Free admission. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, 3300 Warsaw St. 260.456.8255 or 260.456.1228, southsidefarmersmarket.com.

3, 10, 17, 24, 31 FORT WAYNE: Barr Street Farmers Market Produce, handmade jewelry and crafts, local artwork; family-friendly music will be provided. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday (through Sept. 25), 302 E. Berry St. ylni.org.

9-17 FORT WAYNE: Three Rivers Festival More than 80 events, live music, food vendors. Free admission. All day Monday through Sunday, Headwaters Park, downtown Fort Wayne. 260.426.5556, threeriversfestival.org.

15-17 ST. JOE: Pickle Festival Pickle-themed poker walk, derby; pickle tastings, fish fry, live music, kids’ area, contests, fireworks, vendors. Free admission. All day Thursday through Saturday, Riverdale Elementary School. 260.337.5461.

24 NORTH WEBSTER: Dixie Day Festival & Art Fair Sternwheeler boat cruises, arts and crafts fair, open air market, antiques, area boat dealer show, vehicle and tractor shows, food vendors. Free admission. All day Saturday, downtown and fairgrounds. 574.834.7076.

29-31 BERNE: Swiss Days

2 WARSAW: First Friday

Swiss experience with food, crafts, games, competitions, family-friendly rides, quilt show, horse pull, concerts, tours, polka music, parade. Free admission. All day Thursday through Sunday, downtown. 260.589.8080, swissdaysberne.com.

Family-friendly monthly festival. 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Friday, downtown. 574.267.6311, warsawcdc.org/first-friday.

29-31 NORTH MANCHESTER: Fun Fest by the River

2-3 WARREN: Salamonie Summer Festival: “Just Imagine” Concerts, parade, fireworks, antique tractors and engines, games, contests, sporting events, kids’ activities, food vendors. Free admission. All day Friday and Saturday, various parks and Knight Bergman Center. 260.356.4440, visithuntington.org.

Family festival with free kids’ activities; car, tractor, motorcycle show; parade; live music; 5K; food and craft vendors. Free admission. All day Thursday through Sunday, downtown. 260.982.7644, manchesteralive.org.

30-31 PIERCETON: Pierceton Days Sidewalk sale items 30-80% off, many specials inside the shop. Country, primitive, vintage and artisan gifts. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Homespun House, 112 S. First St. 574.594.2774, facebook.com/homespunhouse. 

Shutterstock.com

Events: • Friday-Saturday, July 9-10, Chalk Walk 2021, along Main Street in downtown Adults $8, students (pre-K through college) $6, seniors (65 and older) $6, families $20, free admission for veterans and veterans’ families, free general admission 5 p.m.-8 p.m. every Thursday. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Thursday; noon-5 p.m. Sunday (closed Mondays), 311 E. Main St., Fort Wayne. 260.422.6467, fwmoa.org.


m a I HOME

essentials

Melissa Shenkel By Lauren Caggiano

They say home is where the heart is, and Melissa Schenkel’s heart most certainly belongs to and in Fort Wayne. The STAR Bank executive resides in northwest Fort Wayne with her husband and two kids. “My family lives just north of Dupont Road, and many of our friends jokingly call it living in the ‘Canada of Fort Wayne,’ since it’s so far north in their eyes,” she said with a smirk. On a serious note, Schenkel said her home’s location represents a significant life decision. “When both of our kids were born each had significant health issues in which we spent much time in and out of hospitals,” she said. “I believe those experiences have always weighed heavy on my heart; thus, I’ve always wanted to live within a certain vicinity of a hospital or medical facility. The great part about living in Fort Wayne is that we have so many leading healthcare options nearby.” Beyond access to quality care, Schenkel is enamored with the thriving nature of northwest Fort Wayne and the opportunities it presents. In her words, “we very much enjoy the growth and development that continues in our specific Northwest corner of Fort Wayne.” For instance, her family enjoys dining staples like Casa Grille and Cebolla’s, as well as other great local restaurants like Sol Bird, Salsa Grille and Hideout 125. And rounding out the quality-of-life experience are amenities like the Parkview Family YMCA and Parkview Park in the warmer months. “We also enjoy taking our seven-month-old puppy, Lily, to walk the Pufferbelly Trail or Salomon Farm Park,” she added. However they spend their days in Fort Wayne, Schenkel said the predictability of home is a source of comfort. There’s one reason in particular her house speaks to her. “I have always done my best thinking and my best work in natural light, and we have a room with many windows in my home that brings

me energy and enlightenment,” she said. “It’s pretty much the reason I decided to move here. The good light is good for my soul!” Schenkel is also keen on another element — one that commands attention and offers both form and function. “We also have a podium in our living room, which is probably my favorite piece of furniture in my home,” she said. “I found the podium at a great local furniture restoration store, Totem Interiors on Coldwater Road. I was browsing the store and found a couple of pieces I was interested in. In the back corner was this worn, dark podium that looked lonely and was calling my name. I asked about it, and I was told I could have it free with the other pieces, as they had trouble selling it. I paid them to paint it, as I could see its potential in my head. Once we brought it home, I knew I had made a good decision.” 

July 2021  |  Home Living  19


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MYEKA AND MIKAELA BROWN

By Julie Young | Photo by Mollie Shutt

They may not take a sunrise and sprinkle it with dew, but since 2018, Fort Wayne sisters Myeka and Mikaela Brown have been making the world a little bit tastier through their customized candy company M.A.K. Chocolates. “We are known for our customized chocolates based on our customers’ interests and preferences, as well a variety of flavored apples, pretzels and delicious truffles,” Myeka said. Myeka and Mikaela began making their chocolates for family, friends and within their dance ministry Endless Smiles for nearly six years until feedback convinced them that they could turn their passion project into a profitable business. Today, they make their products in a licensed kitchen and ship them throughout the country, earning rave reviews. “We create new products from the taste of holidays like Thanksgiving’s pumpkin pie, sweet potato pie and peach cobbler, as well as products that come from the favored suggestions of a custom order,” Mikaela said. “Our Marg Butter Creams are our signature chocolate.” Every chocolate is made with love and care as it is shipped to customers across the US or delivered locally by hand, and when they aren’t creating new confections for their online customers, Myeka and Mikaela are equally passionate about helping people live their best lives and become the best version of themselves. Whether it is helping the youth of the community evolve into the people they were meant to be, inspiring other women entrepreneurs, or volunteering to help others in need, the Brown sisters believe that it is important to give back as they grow. “Myeka was honored as a 360AWARD finalist for the RespectTeam for making a positive difference in her community,” Mikaela said. “She was also the founder and motivational speaker for Unity Walk following the racial tensions of last summer. Myeka’s passion for impacting the community is also apparent through her social media platforms where she regularly posts motivational videos to encourage others to be who they truly are.” Mikaela said she hopes that the success of MAK’s Chocolates encourages other young women to spread their wings, follow their passions and become their own bosses. “Just go for it,” she said. “It’s OK to fail. This is not school. The difference between failing in school and in business is that in business you learn what not to do and can move forward from there. After that, the sky’s the limit.” a | JULY GLO 2021 |

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FEATURE | Feature Focus

Our favorite hiking spots By Jaclyn Youhana Garver

It can be tough to find scenic, exciting spots to hike when your city is a suburban haven. Lucky for Hoosiers in northeast Indiana, the region has its share of forestry, parks and urban trails. Here are some of our favorite spots for a day hike. Lindenwood Nature Preserve Wendy Stein and her boyfriend started going for longer and longer walks last year during the pandemic. Once they fully explored their own neighborhood and others nearby, they ventured into more in-depth hikes, and she calls Lindenwood Nature Preserve (600 Lindenwood Ave., Fort Wayne) a great spot for beginners. “It’s this beautiful nugget of wilderness in the middle of the city,” she says. “The terrain is easy, and it’s completely landlocked so you don’t have to worry about getting lost or reading a map or following trail markers. You can just wander.”

Chain O’ Lakes State Park “One of the benefits of hiking Chain O’ Lakes State Park (2355 E. 75 S., Albion) is the variety of other things to do there, too,” Stein says. After a morning of enjoying the well-marked trails, for example, hikers can hang out on the beach or stay overnight in a cabin.

Robb Hidden Canyon As hinted at by the name, Robb Hidden Canyon (425 Lane 201 Ball Lake, Hamilton) has a hidden feature.

Hathaway Preserve at Ross Run For slightly more challenging terrain than is offered in Allen County, Stein recommends Hathaway Preserve at Ross Run (1866 E. Baumbauer Road, Wabash). “It gave me a confidence boost that I can hike more than just flat northeast Indiana,” says Stein, and she adds that one of the best parts of the preserve is the waterfall. “I had no idea there were waterfalls less than an hour drive from my house.” Reena Ramos, the outreach manager at ACRES Land Trust, also calls Hathaway Preserve one of her favorite spots to hike in the area. Part of the trail follows the stream through Ross Run gorge, and it winds hikers to a 75-foot gorge overlooking the stream and forest. 14

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“After walking through a relatively flat tree planting in a grassy field,” Ramos says, “you’ll suddenly find yourself along a deep ravine. You can spot a small creek winding through this ‘hidden canyon.’” At the top of the meadow, hikers get a panoramic view of Ball Lake.

The Rivergreenway Hiking doesn’t have to mean wooded trails and parks: The Rivergreenway connects Fort Wayne to New Haven, a 25-mile path along the St. Marys, St. Joseph and Maumee. The trail starts in Shoaff Park and heads south, crossing St. Joe Center Road and following the St. Joseph River to downtown. As the river feeds into the St. Marys and Maumee rivers, the trail splits west (ending at Wildwood Park) and east (ending in New Haven).

This year, Visit Fort Wayne launched the mobile Fort Wayne Outdoor Pass (visitfortwayne.com/outdoorpass). Use it to find the perfect hiking spot, check in and win prizes. It includes more than 100 miles trails and rivers in Fort Wayne, including parks, wetlands and preserves. a


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BEGINNER’S GUIDE

FEATURE | Feature Focus

to biking By Cathy Shouse

The wind in your hair and the sight of trees breezing by can be excellent therapy. That’s why riding a bicycle is one of the great joys of summer. Although it’s true that you never forget how to ride, shopping for bikes has changed since you were handed a trike when you were a kid. We’ve tracked down local experts on the subject to weigh in.

“There’s been a resurgence of interest in biking,” said Jaclyn Shaw of Fort Wayne Outfitters. “More families have come in to look for their entire family, and they didn’t have bikes before.” Discussing the kinds of bikes offered almost sounds like alphabet soup. “M” is for mountain bikes and “R” is for road bikes. There are hybrids, trail bikes, and electric bikes, and cruisers for taking an easy spin around the neighborhood. “Trail bikes are for all around riding; more the entry level,” Shaw said. “You can ride them on the Rivergreenway Trail, for short distances, and on country roads.” Deciding where you want to ride and how much is where it starts, and experts will walk you through your goals and needs. Trail bikes begin at around $650. Road bikes are for racing and long distances, and prices can hit as high as $3,500. “We highly encourage people to ride them,” Shaw said. “We will let them test ride, often bring them several to try, and make adjustments to the seat so it’s comfortable before they leave.” The tiny, hard seats of yesterday are not the norm. Today’s bike seats are typically more ergonomically designed and tailored to our bodies.

Bike Accessories 101 • A bike bottle that fits in a cage attached to the bike • Daytime running lights for safety • Fenders to stop water from splashing up • A phone holder • Special pedals that clip onto shoes • A different, unique seat However, shiny objects are not always required. Fixing up your old ride can certainly help, so be sure to get an evaluation at a bike shop, when appropriate. “The biggest thing for us is to get you on a bike, and for you to enjoy it. We’re definitely not bike snobs. We just want people out on bikes,” said Shaw. Both Shaw and Eccelstone agreed that bikes are in drastically short supply, for numerous reasons. They don’t know when, or how much, new stock will come in. If you see a bicycle that meets your criteria, better grab it and take it home for a spin! a

Resources: Fort Wayne Outfitters, fwoutfitters.com Trek Bicycle Fort Wayne, trekbikes.com

Scott Ecclestone works at Trek Bicycle Fort Wayne (formerly Summit City Bicycles) and said, “We try to listen to what your needs are and determine what bike, based on your needs and goals, and then to get you sized properly.”

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photos: shutterstock.com

They said to remember to have fun with the bells and whistles.


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FEATURE | Finance

TIPS FOR

HOME By Lauren Caggiano

With mortgage rates still low, many who’ve been sitting on the sidelines are considering making the move to first-time home ownership. If this applies to your situation, STAR Financial Bank’s Lisa Keirns offers some expert tips. First, it helps to start out with the fundamentals. Keirns advises that you look at your overall financial picture, including your credit score. You can access this from your bank and other reputable websites. As your score can fluctuate monthly, she advises that you keep an eye on it but don’t get obsessive, as it’s a moving target of sorts. Still, credit score and down payment savings aren’t the only important criteria. Even if you’re in good shape, don’t forget to account for other related home-buying expenses, such as your first year of homeowner’s insurance, which is due at the time of closing. “And then there’s going to be ongoing expenses, like property taxes and utilities, in addition to your mortgage payment,” she said. “PMI (private mortgage insurance) might apply, too.” For these reasons Keirns said it’s essential to not wipe out your savings when purchasing a home. Budget for a buffer so you’re not cutting it too close. “Really at the end of the day, we need to talk about what’s really the right choice for you,” she said. “Because you want to have a little cushion before you have a chance to get your savings built back up.” Unrelated to the direct costs of the purchase, Keirns reminds readers not to forget about expenses like furniture. Depending on your previous living situation, you may have to budget for several thousands of dollars to curate your space. The same goes for appliances. Some houses come with them as part of the negotiation, but that’s not always the case. 18

| JULY GLO 2021 |

Once you’ve determined that you’re in a good position to begin the application process, Keirns said to expect scrutiny from the potential lender. When deciding, the financial institution will look at employment history, credit history, assets, debt-to-income ratio, etc. In her words, “all those things are analyzed during the pre-approval process. And so, when you’re pre-approved, the seller is a little bit more comfortable looking at offers from you, because they know that that reduces the chance of running into issues down the road.” Another way to ensure you have the most leverage is to hire a real estate agent. “In this hot housing market with inventory so low, consider hiring someone to help you with

contract negotiations,” she said. “When you have hired a professional, you’re reducing your exposure to legal risks. Plus, you’re able to contact your agent and talk through an offer and get their feedback on whether they think actions are necessary, things like that. Agents also have larger networks to work with. A lot of times they have insight into what’s going to become available in the coming weeks. They may be more in the know than someone just doing that on their own.” Here’s to you and the exciting journey ahead! a

Resource: STAR Bank, starfinancial.com


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ALL ABOUT YOU | Glo-roscopes

JULY 2021

glo-roscopes By Julie Young

Cancer (June 21 - July 22)

Capricorn (December 22 - January 19)

You are restless for adventure this month, and in your quest to satisfy that desire, be careful that you do not binge on adrenaline. Choose your company with care, and do not allow yourself to become overwhelmed by their eagerness. Your energy is contagious.

You will feel the pressure to step up in a family matter that will cause you to be overly protective of a loved one. This could backfire depending on who the individual is. When the pull of vacation beckons, don’t resist it. You need to get away and discover new things.

Leo (July 23 - August 22)

Aquarius (January 20 - February 18)

Watch out for excessive spending, especially on your travels. Though you always manage your money wisely, an unexpected expense could throw your budget off, so it’s best to be frugal. Remember, memories do not cost a dime, and the experiences you have will more than make up for a lack of souvenirs.

There is nothing you can’t do this month, so don’t hold back. Unfortunately this energy will result in a number of confrontations with those who lack your ambition. It’s best to avoid these people rather than engage in unpleasantness. Family relationships are more important than ever.

Virgo (August 23 - September 22)

Pisces (February 19 - March 20)

Don’t judge a book by its cover this month, especially not a beach read. Though your vacation plans may seem less than idyllic, remember that time to rest and relax is a gift and not one to be taken for granted. Even if the weather doesn’t work out or plans change at the last minute you can make your own fun.

A minor problem will drive you crazy for days and it will upset the delicate balance in your life. Watch out for depression and anxiety and restore your inner peace by engaging in some yoga or deep breathing exercises. Go for a long walk in the woods with someone you love.

Libra (September 23 - October 22)

Host a family reunion this month and get closer to your relations. Imagine the stories you will hear and the memories you will share when you take the time to listen. Don’t be afraid to reach out to cousins that you barely know. It’s also a great time to begin a new hobby or sport.

This July, everything will be calm in your world and this balance will lead you to engage in a creative activity. Though you will be nervous about your abilities, you will excel at this new endeavor. Old wounds will dissipate and you will feel free at last.

Scorpio (October 23 - November 21) Changes abound this summer, sweet Scorpio and you will be eager to see where these changes will lead. Your relationship could suffer an upheaval unless your partner is on board with your new outlook. Take a break from work and head for an interesting vacation spot.

Sagittarius (November 22 - December 21) Your perfect July includes an old fashioned cookout followed by ice cream and a fireworks display. As you try and impart all of these values on your family members, they may opt for a more unconventional holiday. Try to find a compromise that gives everyone something to enjoy. A change of employment is looming. 22

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Aries (March 21 - April 19)

Taurus (April 20 - May 20) This is the month to stop worrying about things you have no control over. When you need to get away, consider a spiritual retreat rather than a traditional vacation so that you can connect with yourself, identify goals and create a plan to achieve them. Meditation and prayer will also give you a sense of balance.

Gemini (May 21 - June 20) July will be an emotional month for you and all of the feelings you have been keeping inside will come to the surface. While there will be plenty of invitations extended, don’t feel compelled to socialize if you don’t feel like it. A little alone time can be a good thing. a


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Contact: 260-490-2013 | JULY GLO 2021 |

23


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Disclaimer: Limited quantity available. Must be purchased in July 2021. Additional exclusions may apply.

260-427-7473 AspirePlasticSurgery.com

Profile for The Papers Inc.

Fort Wayne's Glo July 2021  

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