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Volume 67, No. 4

THE PAN AMERICAN

September 23, 2010

DREAM Act hits home Student tells how he ‘fell in love with the United States.’

Page 3 Page 2 - Big business Roxann Garciamight on have packed their bags, but cartel they never left wars

Page SGA 3 - Jobs after New leaders graduation becoming scarce take the reins

Mexican history: Page 11 - Holiday gift guide How much do we know?

Los quewith tendrá que Pageretos 14 - Q&A volleyball player Rebecca Toddy en los enfrentar Calderón próximos 2 años

Solid showing for cross-country teams


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September 23, 2010

Commentary

Vol. 67, No. 4

Drug war and immigration mix-up Recent slaying of Mexican journalist brings mixed reactions on both sides of the border

According to CNN.com, the watchdog g r o u p Committee to Protect Roxann Garcia Journalists News Editor reports 22 journalists have been murdered since President Felipe Calderon Hinojosa took office in December 2006, at least eight in direct reprisal for reporting on crime and corruption. The report stated that three media support workers have been slain and at least seven other journalists have gone missing during this period. In addition, dozens of journalists have been attacked, kidnapped or forced into exile. In every article related to border violence it is noted read that it’s all related to a crackdown imposed by Calderon at the beginning of his administration, with violence due to the ongoing drug cartel wars resulting in more than 28,000 deaths since December 2006. And you’re interested in what my opinion may be? The facts are laid out for you. People are dying and in my

chosen profession. Hope seems to be inserting the text into Google dwindling. Times are tough but we’re Translate, I was able to finally read not in the middle of a war zone. Our the whole thing instead of bits from assorted news sites. neighbors down South are. The whole thing tugs at my What’s worse is the drug culture is only becoming increasingly fueled heartstrings. People performing the job that I’ve longed by the demand and for most of my consumption that life are resorting seems to inhabit this region and “ Many of us complain to asking those in charge (in this case others. Many of us complain about about the violence that is the drug cartels) the violence that occurring next door but what is required of them. is occurring next They state that door but how many how many of us are taking they are not able to of us are taking part in the drug war itself, do their job with the part in the drug war itself, whether whether it be direct or in- increasing violence pressed upon it be direct or directly? ” them. The article indirectly? also notes that the The Mexican editorial is not public are becoming surrender, but rather desperate. a plea for a truce. In response to What pisses me off about the the slaying of a 21-year-old journalist last week, El Diario newspaper in whole thing is that when reading the Ciudad Juarez published a Page One article on CNN.com, one is subject to editorial on Sunday that begs the comments posted by other readers and question of the cartels, “What do you somehow they’ve seemed to get the idea twisted. want from us?” Chubbygob69 posts, “We have After locating the article and

enough resources to stop illegal immigration but those assets won’t be deployed any time soon thanks to illegal alien sympathizers in our government and in our society.” Wait a minute, come again? Did you just disregard a human life because there wasn’t an American flag stamped to their forehead? Now, that’s silly. That’s stupid. But then again with a screen name like that… And when did this turn into an immigration issue? A journalist who was doing his job died while doing so and we somehow have arrived at the subject of illegal aliens? Right now there may be a split decision and set of preferences when it comes to immigration in our country. Take for example those who are affected directly by the DREAM Act or the possible Birthright Citizenship Act. But does this constitute prejudice against people in a foreign country? Maybe my feelings are strong because I am a Mexican American and proud to be one. But as a human being I find compassion a necessity in this world. Get off your high horse, America.

Illustrated Commentary

THE PAN AMERICAN 1201 West University, CAS 170 Edinburg, Texas 78539 Phone: (956) 381-2541 Fax: (956) 316-7122 The Pan American is the official student newspaper of The University of Texas-Pan American. Views presented are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the paper or university.

EDITOR IN CHIEF: Kristen Cabrera kmcabrera22@gmail.com NEWS EDITOR: Roxann Garcia roxx.gar11@gmail.com ONLINE/SPANISH EDITOR: Denisse Salinas dns_145@hotmail.com ARTS & LIFE EDITOR: Benny Salinas 9_benny_9@live.com SPORTS EDITOR: Sara Hernandez shernandez261@gmail.com PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR: Alma E. Hernandez alma.e.hdz@gmail.com SENIOR DESIGNER: Jennifer Tate jen489@gmail.com DESIGNERS: Alexis Carranza alexis091@aol.com ADVISER: Dr. Greg Selber selberg@utpa.edu ADMINISTRATIVE ASSOCIATE: Anita Reyes areyes18@utpa.edu ADVERTISING MANAGER: Mariel Cantu spubs@utpa.edu WEBMASTER: Jose Villarreal josemvillarrealcs@gmail.com

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Thursday at noon Letters to the Editor

Elias Moran/THE PAN AMERICAN

The Pan American accepts letters of 300 words or less from students, staff and faculty regarding recent newspaper content, campus concerns or current events. We reserves the right to edit submissions for grammar and length. We cannot publish anonymous letters or submissions containing hate speech or gratuitous personal attacks. Please send all story ideas to thepanamerican@gmail.com. Individuals with disabilities wishing to acquire this publication in an alternative format or needing assistance to attend any event listed can contact The Pan American for more details.


September 23, 2010

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UTPA student struggles with DREAM By Kristen Cabrera The Pan American Some people spend more time scanning the headlines and watching CNN than others, usually because they have a vested interest in how current political events turn out. In the case of one UTPA student, this has been a particularly difficult week, as he has watched Congress put the stops to a piece of legislation that would have made his life a whole lot easier. Josse Alex Garrido has been closely following the progress of the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act, or DREAM Act, a proposed bill that has led an uneven career in the Congress. It would allow over 700,000 undocumented immigrants a pathway to citizenship after six years of temporary status, provided they are high school graduates who make a two-year commitment to college or the military. The bill fell short in the Senate Tuesday, amid much uproar from Democrats and especially American Latinos. For Garrido, who publicly disclosed his status as an undocumented immigrant recently as a way to raise consciousness about the issue, the result has not stemmed his fight to some day become a citizen. Nine years ago he came to a foreign land, but today, he calls it simply “home.” THE BACKGROUND Garrido entered this country against his wishes as a petrified 13-year-old boy. His father felt it would be safer for his family of four to live in the United States. “Originally I didn’t want to come here,” the 22-year-old said. “I was terrified because my friends would tell me how (the U.S.) was very bad, and in Mexico there was always stories on the news about how badly they treat (Mexican immigrants) in the United States.”

“It isn’t really a big deal for me. I don’t really follow politics but I can’t understand why immigration is such a big deal. If people want to be here, they should.”

Russel Slayton Junior biology major

“If it’s better for the country than why not? People need a chance to better themselves.”

Melissa Garcia Senior English major

Garrido’s family originally put their future in the hands of an attorney who turned out to be a fraud. Fake documents that the parents unknowingly filled out were useless and expensive. Despite this, his family decided to stay and settled in Mission. Garrido graduated from Sharyland High School in the top 10 percent of his class, but soon after, his family found out that they were under investigation; this led to the eventual detainment of his father, who unknowingly signed voluntary deportation papers. His father was deported in 2007 and a younger brother, a minor, was recently deported. His mother voluntarily left with her younger son and U.S.-born 6-year-old daughter. Throughout all this, Garrido chose to stay, but that means that he is now next in line for deportation. THE RATIONALE In the face of the deterioration of his family, Garrido stayed, recalling that even though he had once heard horror stories about el Norte, “I fell in love with the United States.” He was in the middle of his sophomore year and didn’t want to leave. “I decided to stay because I wanted to go to college,” he said. He enrolled at UTPA under Senate Bill 1528, which allows undocumented students to attend any university in the state of Texas and pay in-state tuition. Now he’s in his last semester, double majoring in psychology and philosophy. Though his ultimate goal is to attend law school, coming up with the money is yet another problem harkening back to immigration status. “Many students who are citizens can apply for FASFA and Federal Financial Aid but I can’t,” he said. “Scholarships are few, they are available to citizens first and then they allow students in my situation to be able to receive them. The Texas Grant helps but even then I cannot have a job or request a job…it’s hard

“I think they should pass this bill. People want to make something of themselves but they need the opportunity to do so legally.”

Jose De La Cruz Sophomore nursing major

“I think it’s OK. They’re paying the same tuition we are. Everyone deserves a chance as long as they aren’t bumming off the system.”

Steven Trevino Junior pre-dental major

Alejandra Moreno/The Pan American

Dream Act - UTPA student Josse Alex Garrido explains the DREAM Act at last Friday’s SGA meeting. with all the extra college expenses.” Garrido did household work and cut yards among other odd jobs, in order to make enough to sustain rent and buy books. He also got support from his family who would send money from Mexico whenever possible.

THE DREAMS His love for a country he can’t officially call home yet is a familiar plight, one he shares with more than 600 UTPA students. The number of people in this boat led Garrido to out himself. He wants to bring awareness to the circumstances that surround the UTPA community and hit very close to home. “I highly recommend for (undocumented students) to speak out to their friends to come out literally, because the more people know how its going to impact society the better,” he said. Garrido also believes that by bringing his situation out in the open he can connect with those who are not affected directly by the DREAM Act but might know someone who is. “If you see that your friends could be affected by this legislation and they can actually benefit and fulfill the dream of becoming a law abiding citizen then by all means do that, do something,” he explained. “I’m trying to be both an example and motivation “It’s awesome but there are way for those students to too many restrictions on it. We come out.” know a lot of people that wouldn’t qualify for the DREAM act. It Despite the fact also sucks that it got attached to that Congress halted the defense bill in order to get the DREAM Act’s the conservative vote. A lot of the freedom they get isn’t real freedom momentum Tuesday, because of the restrictions. It’s, in Garrido is still hopeful fact, a form of slavery.” for November. Victoria Garza “I am doing Non-student everything I can to Pete Rodriguez tell my friends to Junior anthropology major call their senators,” he explained. “The DREAM Act will

effect a lot of students I’m not the only one…there are millions and million of people who will have positive benefits from this all over the nation.” Like most students who would be affected by the legislation Garrido wishes to not be punished for the crimes of his parents. Being brought up in the land of the free makes it impossible for him to want to live anywhere else. “I did not make a conscious decision to be here, it was my parents that brought me here when I was a minor and as a minor I fell in love with the United States,” he noted. “When I was 18 and able to get into college and I just kept going with the dream, it’s all I know. I recognize this is my home and the reason I want to stay here is because I want to contribute, I want to be one of its contributing citizens.” THE OPPOSITION As for those opposed to the DREAM Act, Garrido said he keeps an open mind about them and their views. But he definitely stands firm in his self-identification. “I see their point, I more or less try to understand where they are coming from,” he said. “I came here to the United States as a minor I had the best years of my life in the United States, I think that I am as American as anyone else.” One misconception that Garrido notes is the belief that undocumented immigrants do not pay taxes. He’s determined to break that notion. “I pay my taxes, even though I’m not a citizen, I have to pay taxes,” he said. “And I’m happy to do it. I absolutely do not complain about it. I have a tax identification number, which is something the IRS gives you when you are not a citizen and don’t have a Social Security card. So that I can pay taxes.” Garrido said he works just as hard as any of his friends, and his 3.7 GPA is testament to that. “I am not a burden to this country,” he offered. “They think they are poor people who drug themselves and only think they are doing crimes,

and I think they have a very wrong misconception about it. I think they horribly misinformed. We can be a great contribution. “I think I would be a great asset to this nation because I am very passionate and I have demonstrated it. I do not have a criminal record; I do not even have a ticket.” Though Garrido said he knows that there always people who try to ruin opportunities for others, but argues that part of the DREAM Act’s purpose is to reward moral character and those students who genuinely want to try. Garrido has received threatening e-mails and been harassed by those who oppose the DREAM Act and also Garrido’s personal story. Despite the setback this week in terms of the legislation, the Bronc student reiterates that he will not give up hope. “I think that education is the answer to solve all the problems of society,” he said. “And by them denying those students who are willing to commit fully I think they are making a big mistake. I don’t know how anyone can be opposed to education.” There is also a local campaign on Facebook called “I am a UTPA Student and I support the DREAM Act,” where students can ‘like’ and add to their profile. A rally in support of the Act is planned for Oct. 1 at 6 p.m. in front of the University Chapel. Meanwhile, the center of controversy, a young man who was featured in The Monitor earlier in the week, soldiers on. “I think that it is more important what you actually do, than what has been done in the past,” Garrido said. “I think that what you do actually speaks louder than any other action. Because I fell in love with the United States. I grew up here and I recognize the impact the United States has had on me. The things I have learned and received, I recognize this country more as my place, my house than Mexico… Because Mexico? I can’t even remember it.”


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September 23, 2010

NEWS

Faculty concerns have an outlet with PAUF By Pamela Morales The Pan American

Last Friday, a group of professors attended a casual dinner for a meet and greet of new and old members joining the Pan American United Faculty. Because the organization, also known as PAUF, is composed of faculty and professional staff throughout campus, members rarely get to get hang out and discuss important issues. But the camaraderie is still present. The dinner was held to break the ice and begin a new agenda for the year. PAUF is a local branch of the Texas Faculty Association, which works with the Texas State Teachers Association and the National Education Association; it is independent of UTPA and was

created in the 1980s with current vice president James Aldridge, professor of psychology, as one of its first members. “[It] represents the interests of UTPA faculty and the teaching profession,” Aldridge said. “In the same way that medical associations represent the interests of physicians and bar associations represent the interests of attorneys.” PAUF meets intermittently throughout the year for social gatherings and talk about needs and wants of both professors and students; the fruits of discussion are eventually brought up at a meeting held once a year in Austin with TSTA and NEA. Current president Mark Winkel, professor in social psychology, said meetings are made to enable faculty

voice concerns and opinions on matters they deem important such as wages, unfair treatment, and lobbying for expenses such as grants for both professors and students. “Benefits that accrue from PAUF include providing a professional work environment that is conducive to a collegial atmosphere,” Winkel explained. “And by providing support and feedback to our local state legislators concerning issues related to higher education, such as student tuition, faculty salaries and benefits, and higher education working conditions that allow the local academic community to attract highly qualified and valuable educators.” They are 145 members in PAUF and any professor is able to join without any restrictions. Peter Farrugio,

professor in the College of Education, joined two years ago because of traditional values he learned at age 16. “I come from regions of the U.S. that have real union traditions, where, for example, even teachers sometimes go on strike,” explained Farrugio. “I believe that workers in Texas should overcome their anti-union brainwashing to form real unions and challenge the antiunion laws, like, for example the prohibitions against strikes. The advantage of a faculty organization at UTPA as an institution is that PAUF can advocate in an organized manner for better policies, and for more funding, in the interests of both faculty and students.” Although PAUF works closely with the Faculty Senate in trading and discussing ideas, the Senate seeks

support from the university and work mostly on academic polices, whereas PAUF is supported by state and national organizations and is focused mainly on job-related concerns. One of the measures Farrugio has worked with is “grievances against unfair scheduling practices that created large class sizes and inconvenient meeting times with students.” He says that these burdens have affected research time. He has also represented other colleagues in grievances against administrators “who threatened to fire them because they were too outspoken in faculty meetings, and because they openly disagreed with other professors who were friends of the administrators.” Aldridge also adds that PAUF is most valuable when faculty members need help with resources beyond those available within the university.

New SGA leaders seek to connect with student body By Roxann Garcia The Pan American With the new semester’s beginning come new events for the Student Government Association on campus. Headed by Alex Rodriguez as president and Mark Allen as vice president, the group is looking forward to a new start. “We can build a great team for the new year,” Rodriguez said. “Each of us can make a difference working with the senators and other people on campus by getting involved.” The biggest event the association is preparing for this semester is the 6th annual State of the Student Body address scheduled for Oct. 13 at 4 p.m. in the Student Union Theatre. Rodriguez, along with President Robert Nelsen, is expected to address the student body about the role SGA will have for the upcoming semester. Students, faculty and staff are expected to attend the event along with the

newest deans added to the university, David H. Allen of Engineering and Computer Science and John Miller Trant of Science and Mathematics. A reception is expected to follow. The association collaborated with the University Program Board to schedule the address during Spirit Week. Rodriguez, a business management major anticipating graduation in 2011, notes this is the first time SGA will do so. “We feel great to be working together in meeting one of our main goals, which is to engage with our student body,” said the Harlingen native, who won the election back in April and replaced Raghuveer Puttagunta as president. “We’re very excited because this year it will be in the middle of Spirit Week and we’re looking forward to including many more students.” This semester SGA plans to strongly promote campus life committees and council positions. The association is no

stranger to complaints about a need to become more active in decision-making policies, such as the recent rustle with the parking situation in lots B and B-1 for faculty, staff, students and residents. Rodriguez and Mark Allen both strongly encourage students to take an active role and be part of the processes. “We are looking for students that can improve the college experience for UTPA students,” the president said. “There are many vacancy positions and this is the opportunity to voice out concerns as well as contributing to improvements.” Rodriguez and Allen, a 21-yearold social studies composite major from Fort Worth, both stressed the importance of students becoming involved and occupying committee positions. There are well over 50 available positions according to the SGA website. Vacancies include seats on the Student Organizations committee, Food Advisory, Residence Advisory, Student Affairs, Student

Financial Aid, and also the Student Health Advisory committee. “Duties include attending meetings and providing student input,” Allen said. “This will allow the different segments of the university to communicate better, which goes a long way.” The association encourages students to voice questions and concerns at campus forums, which are held throughout each month. The next one is today during the noon hour at the College of Education and College of Science and Engineering lobbies. “There needs to be a stronger

student representation when it comes to decisions that directly affect us like the recent parking issues for one,” Rodriguez stressed. SGA recently updated its website (sga.utpa.edu) where students can find more information on how to get involved, including application forms for senatorial positions as well as campus life committees and councils positions. “There’s many things that we (SGA) would like to do but there just isn’t enough time,” Rodriguez said. “The most important goal is just to encourage participation.”

Alejandra Moreno/THE PAN AMERICAN

SGA BUSINESS - Left: SGA President Alex Rodriguez, leads an SGA meeting, Friday Sept. 17. Right: Rebekah Sepulveda engages in a conversation with Rodriguez at Friday’s SGA meeting.


September 23, 2010

NEWS

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Environmental journalist speaks her mind By Alejandra Martinez The Pan American

Freddie Martinez/THE PAN AMERICAN

ASK THE EXPERT - Distinguished Speaker P. Simran Sethi signs autographed posters after her speech on campus Wednesday.

P. Simran Sethi never took a course of journalism in her life. She learned by doing. This is what she told students, faculty and staff at The University of Texas-Pan American last night when she kicked off the 7th season of the Distinguished Speakers Series. The award-winning journalist and sustainability expert talked about the importance of the environment and what people can do to make this a better place to live. Sethi, a long-time reporter in multiple venues and now an educator, talked at the Fine Arts Auditorium about how people tend to think of the environment as a distant issue that does not affect their daily lives. Things like ice caps melting, gas emissions, and polar bears struggling don’t seem to worry people that much because they don’t have an immediate connection to home. She noted that the environment is also not a top priority in the government’s list of concerns, as opposed to the economy, health care, or the war on terrorism. So how does the environment connect to these things, she asked. “Everything that we care about, everything we love, everything we wear and do exists in this ecosystem,” she said. Sustainability is a term that brings all those things closer to home, she stressed. It’s not just about shopping differently. It’s about

University efforts at sustainability gain momentum under Franklin’s guidance working with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department to start a summer nature camp for middle-school students. The goal is to introduce them to different types of environmental careers the university has to offer, and help kids The Office of Sustainability at UTPA is understand their environment and how to live currently working with the sustainably. marketing department to launch “What we’re trying to do a series of campaigns to create here is not just for us, it’s awareness on campus and with for the entire community,” the outside community. “The sustainability Franklin said. There are also ongoing The Energy Conservation talks with deans from UTPA program looks to form a committee has installed colleges with the purpose of lighting retrofits in five close relationship with the buildings on campus to incorporating sustainabilityrelated courses into the surrounding communities. help save on the cost of curriculum. electricity. These savings “The sustainability What weʼre trying to do will go into retrofitting program looks to form a more buildings. here is not just for us, itʼs close relationship with the In regard to Simran Sethi, the surrounding communities,” said first lecturer of the 2010-2011 for the entire community.” Marianella Franklin, manager Distinguished Speakers Series, of campus sustainability. Franklin said she’s excited The office is also working about the journalist coming to closely with students to maintain speak Wednesday because it a successful recycling program. Marianella Franklin will create awareness within UTPA has had an operational the community. Campus sustainability one since 2005 and currently “She covers sustainability recycles paper, cardboard, used at a global level, which is very motor oil, printer cartridges, important because every little and scrap metal. thing we do here is not just Two of the sustainability impacting our region,” Franklin office committees, covering Health and Wellness said. “We need to understand that sustainability is and Landscape and Grounds, are currently encompassing our entire planet.” By Alejandra Martinez The Pan American

protecting natural resources and developing communities in a way that is socially and economically sustainable. “We all deserve access to clean water, clean air and clean soil. The environment is everything,” she said. “To preserve what we care about, we have to do more than we are doing.” She said that the Valley, one of the fastest growing areas in the country, is at an advantage because of its proximity to the border and its close relationship to Mexico. When it comes to resources, borders are artificial. Everyone shares the air, water and soil. She also noted that college students could make a big impact in the world, saying, “You are the future of this nation.” Sethi asked students to think about the legacy they would like to leave and the kind of world they want for future generations. “Sustainability is about balancing the needs between making a living, earning money, making a profit,” she explained. “It’s about caring for communities, caring for each other, and supporting people.” According to Sethi, natural resources are a necessity, not a luxury. Going green is not all about quick tips like changing light bulbs, although that does help. People need to think about the big picture, she said. “There are so many opportunities here to save what we care about. As soon as we start to understand that we all need to be able to make a living,” Sethi said “But we also have to make

sure that we don’t destroy our natural resources to a point where we are not able to live at all.” Sethi, who is of Indian descent, received a bachelor’s degree in sociology and women’s studies from Smith College and an MBA in sustainable business from the Presidio Graduate School. She received the Smith College Medal in 2009 for professional achievements and service to the community. She also received the Leader in Sustainability award from Kansas University, where she currently teaches a course called “Media and the Environment.” She has contributed segments to “Nightly News” with Brian Williams, CNBC, “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” “The Today Show,” “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” “The Martha Stewart Show,” and the History Channel. The decision to bring her to campus was based on student desire to hear a sustainability expert who would complement ongoing efforts at the university to become a greener place, said Edna Zambrano, director of the Student Union. The other Series speakers are: global political economist Parag Khanna on Oct. 11; David Gergen, senior political analyst for CNN and former presidential advisor on Feb. 23; and Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist, author and host of PBS program NOVA Science NOW on March 28. For more information contact the Student Union at (956) 665-7989.

HERE WE GO AGAIN? Solutions to parking situation for upcoming HESTEC are promising By Roxann Garcia The Pan American The university just thought the recent faculty/staff parking fracas had died down. With Hispanic, Engineering, Science, and Technology Week beginning Monday bringing its huge annual crowds, spaces will be even harder to come by. But the university has been proactive in offering solutions. Since its inception nearly a decade ago, HESTEC has become a national model for promoting science and technology careers, as it seeks to help South Texas students excel in those areas. The surrounding community is encouraged to join in on seminars and activities planned by campus coordinators, and every year, tens of thousands do come to campus., making for busy traffic and parking difficulty for regular campus community members. With the added influx of visitors during the weeklong event, the administration and police, buffeted by the August storm over parking, have sprung into action with the university’s biggest annual show on tap. The flow of solutions to the problem promises to ease the traffic flow for HESTEC. On Monday only, the university will close off the “U” lots on the East side of Miguel Nevarez Drive to students, facul-

ty and staff on campus; it will be reserved for those attending HESTEC events. An off-campus shuttle bus will be provided to pick up and drop off students, faculty and staff at various locations surrounding UTPA from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at 30-minute intervals. The pickup/dropoff locations, which will also include areas for added parking, include Wal-Mart on the corner of Sugar and University Drive, Edinburg City Hall on West University Drive, and Region One on West Schunior. In the notice sent out through the office of President Robert Nelsen, it was noted that the specified drop-off location for all HESTEC visitors will be the UTPA Field House. On Tuesday thru Thursday, parking lot G-3 in front of the ITT building will be blocked off for HESTEC events from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Career Expo, scheduled for Friday, will result in four parking rows in lot F on the Northeast side of the Field House being closed off from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Approximately 90 spaces will be blocked off, the notice confirmed. That’s the way it works for such an important event. The University Police Department advises all students to take note of posted signage in each parking lot Monday morning.


THE PAN AMERICAN

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Meet Your Coaches

What do you like the most about being a collegiate coach? I enjoy helping student-athletes to learn how to balance academics and competitiveness on and off the court while they learn independence. I take a lot of pride guiding them. What’s your favorite sport aside from tennis? Baseball, I played baseball all growing up. It was my first love. What’s your favorite book? “The Purpose Driven Life” by Rick Warren If you weren’t a coach, what would you like to be? My passion has always been to own a minor-league baseball team. A tip for success? Strive for perfection and define perfection as giving everything that you have, giving everything on the court and doing everything in your hands.

x xx o Ofelia Lopez o Golf

What do you like the most about being a collegiate coach? First, I love volleyball and love that I get to be around it everyday in its truest form. I enjoy being in a position where I have the ability to be apart of the decision making that goes on within our sport with the changes and growth that is forever taking place, even if it is a small part. I enjoy the relationships that I am able to form with my athletes and their families, the opportunity to be apart of young women’s life during a crucial growing period, and hopefully be apart of who they eventually become.

What do you like the most about being a collegiate coach? Definitely the relationship with your student athletes and the coaching staffs. There’s a unique camaraderie that comes down with being in a college athletic department. It’s rewarding to see when seniors move on and where they go.

What’s your favorite sport aside from volleyball? Basketball.

If you weren’t a coach, what would you like to be? A sports columnist, talk-radio or game commentator…work in the sports media. A tip for success? I learned from my parents that if you’re passionate, have work ethic and never let anything get in your way - as well as being a goodhearted person and build strong relationships - you’ll do well.

o Dave Hartman Track & Field

What’s your favorite sport aside from golf? Basketball. I used to play it up to middle school and I was good at it.

What’s your favorite sport aside from track and field/cross country? Bicycling.

A tip for success? Nobody can take away that degree from you. Be a student first, success isn’t just on the golf course, it’s about you carry yourself and the type of person you are.

What’s your favorite book? “Tuesdays with Morrie” by Mitch Albom.

If you weren’t a coach, what would you like to be? I would be a managing consultant.

What do you like the most about being a collegiate coach? Having motivated young men and women on a daily basis makes my job both challenging and fun.

If you weren’t a coach, what would you like to be? Play professional and be the next Nancy Lopez.

What’s your favorite sport aside from basketball? I like to watch football and I like to play baseball.

What’s your favorite book? Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell.

What do you like the most about being a collegiate coach? You get to help young adults to reach their goals; you get to teach them little lessons through golf and through competition.

What’s your favorite book? The “Twilight” series by Stephenie Meyer.

Ryan Marks Men's Basketball

Angela Hubbard Volleyball

Chris Taylor Tennis

What’s your favorite book? “The Complete Works of Shakespeare.” If you weren’t a coach, what would you like to be? I would like to do whitewater rafting. A tip for success? Balance what you enjoy doing and what you’re good at and follow that for as long as you can.

x

Manny Mantrana Baseball What do you like the most about being a collegiate coach? You get to make a difference in the life of your players, you get them as 17- or 18-year-old kids and develop them so once they get out of the program they’re 22 or 23. The biggest thing I enjoy is the change that you see when they come in as freshmen to when they leave as seniors. What’s your favorite sport aside from baseball? Every college sport especially football and basketball. What’s your favorite book? “The Bible.” If you weren’t a coach, what would you like to be? I always wanted to be an anesthesiologist. A tip for success? Never second-guess yourself on whether you can do something or not. If you believe in yourself, you work hard, you’re enthusiastic and you make good choices whatever you decide will come into effect.

Denny Downing Women's Basketball What do you like the most about being a collegiate coach? The difference you get to make in the ladies’ life. What’s your favorite sport aside from basketball? Football. What’s your favorite book? I Never Played the Game by Howard Cosell. If you weren’t a coach, what would you like to be? I’d be a high-school administrator. A tip for success? Stay focused, stay the course; you’re going to have peaks and valleys, but stay focused on your goals.

x x o x


THE PAN AMERICAN

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x ooo xx

September 23, 2010

THE PAN AMERICAN

September 23, 2010

Page 9

Meet Your Coaches

What do you like the most about being a collegiate coach? I enjoy helping student-athletes to learn how to balance academics and competitiveness on and off the court while they learn independence. I take a lot of pride guiding them. What’s your favorite sport aside from tennis? Baseball, I played baseball all growing up. It was my first love. What’s your favorite book? “The Purpose Driven Life” by Rick Warren If you weren’t a coach, what would you like to be? My passion has always been to own a minor-league baseball team. A tip for success? Strive for perfection and define perfection as giving everything that you have, giving everything on the court and doing everything in your hands.

x xx o Ofelia Lopez o Golf

What do you like the most about being a collegiate coach? First, I love volleyball and love that I get to be around it everyday in its truest form. I enjoy being in a position where I have the ability to be apart of the decision making that goes on within our sport with the changes and growth that is forever taking place, even if it is a small part. I enjoy the relationships that I am able to form with my athletes and their families, the opportunity to be apart of young women’s life during a crucial growing period, and hopefully be apart of who they eventually become.

What do you like the most about being a collegiate coach? Definitely the relationship with your student athletes and the coaching staffs. There’s a unique camaraderie that comes down with being in a college athletic department. It’s rewarding to see when seniors move on and where they go.

What’s your favorite sport aside from volleyball? Basketball.

If you weren’t a coach, what would you like to be? A sports columnist, talk-radio or game commentator…work in the sports media. A tip for success? I learned from my parents that if you’re passionate, have work ethic and never let anything get in your way - as well as being a goodhearted person and build strong relationships - you’ll do well.

o Dave Hartman Track & Field

What’s your favorite sport aside from golf? Basketball. I used to play it up to middle school and I was good at it.

What’s your favorite sport aside from track and field/cross country? Bicycling.

A tip for success? Nobody can take away that degree from you. Be a student first, success isn’t just on the golf course, it’s about you carry yourself and the type of person you are.

What’s your favorite book? “Tuesdays with Morrie” by Mitch Albom.

If you weren’t a coach, what would you like to be? I would be a managing consultant.

What do you like the most about being a collegiate coach? Having motivated young men and women on a daily basis makes my job both challenging and fun.

If you weren’t a coach, what would you like to be? Play professional and be the next Nancy Lopez.

What’s your favorite sport aside from basketball? I like to watch football and I like to play baseball.

What’s your favorite book? Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell.

What do you like the most about being a collegiate coach? You get to help young adults to reach their goals; you get to teach them little lessons through golf and through competition.

What’s your favorite book? The “Twilight” series by Stephenie Meyer.

Ryan Marks Men's Basketball

Angela Hubbard Volleyball

Chris Taylor Tennis

What’s your favorite book? “The Complete Works of Shakespeare.” If you weren’t a coach, what would you like to be? I would like to do whitewater rafting. A tip for success? Balance what you enjoy doing and what you’re good at and follow that for as long as you can.

x

Manny Mantrana Baseball What do you like the most about being a collegiate coach? You get to make a difference in the life of your players, you get them as 17- or 18-year-old kids and develop them so once they get out of the program they’re 22 or 23. The biggest thing I enjoy is the change that you see when they come in as freshmen to when they leave as seniors. What’s your favorite sport aside from baseball? Every college sport especially football and basketball. What’s your favorite book? “The Bible.” If you weren’t a coach, what would you like to be? I always wanted to be an anesthesiologist. A tip for success? Never second-guess yourself on whether you can do something or not. If you believe in yourself, you work hard, you’re enthusiastic and you make good choices whatever you decide will come into effect.

Denny Downing Women's Basketball What do you like the most about being a collegiate coach? The difference you get to make in the ladies’ life. What’s your favorite sport aside from basketball? Football. What’s your favorite book? I Never Played the Game by Howard Cosell. If you weren’t a coach, what would you like to be? I’d be a high-school administrator. A tip for success? Stay focused, stay the course; you’re going to have peaks and valleys, but stay focused on your goals.

x x o x


10

September 23, 2010

Aging exhibit educates at Visitors Center By Yngrid Fuentes The Pan American

Republicans blocked a repeal of the controversial “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” law on Wednesday. Passed in 1993, the law keeps gays and lesbians from serving openly in the U.S. Armed Forces.

High school never ends, or at least not for the women of “You Again.” The film about women re-encountering their high school rivals in the build up to a wedding opens on Friday.

Young Jeezy has proclaimed Sept. 28 as “G-Day” as he prepares to release his latest album “TM103.” Jeezy calls the album a return to form, a form he describes as “keeping the club and the streets just straight off the chain.”

Looking into the future to show people how will they look in up to 25 years, tracking the United States population’s increasing life spam, and several other activities are some of the features of “The Amazing Feats of Aging.” The carnivalthemed exhibition promised to explain the biology of aging across the animal kingdom, healthy aging, and aging of the brain. Starting on Sept. 27 through Jan 9, the University Visitors Center will open the exhibition for UTPA and the Valley community. “We hope that students and all visitors will walk away with an importance to be healthy, to learning how to take care of yourself and the way we grow older and how we can grow older on a healthy way,” said Sally Mendiola, associate director of admissions and new student services. “The Amazing Feats of Aging” is an interactive exhibit focused on understanding the significance of aging as a demographic, biological and personal phenomenon. Visitors can analyze aging cells in the body, explore why and how people age, and identify strategies for healthy aging. Visitors will also be able to explore the physiological effects of aging on different animals and compare the life expectancy of males and females of different species. Mendiola explained that exhibits displayed at the Visitors Center are chosen out of numerous proposals from traveling exhibit companies, and the Center tries to host at least two per year. Past examples include “A T-Rex

Alma E. Hernandez/THE PAN AMERICAN AGING GRACEFULLY - Joel Garza, a work-study student, analyzes “The Amazing Feats of Aging” exhibit in preparation for giving 30-minute tours of the showcase, which runs Sept. 27 to Jan. 9.

‘Beard Show’ at ManicHaus Art Gallery closes Friday Facial hair tribute examines masculinity and self-shielding

By Lorena Balli The Pan American

An inmate at the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections is suing the Kardashian sisters for emotional distress caused by events on the show. These include domestic abuse and racism as well as Kourtney’s “rantings.”

Named Sue” and “Masters of the Night, the True Story of Bats.” “The Visitors Center exhibits committee meets and reviews different types of proposals,” explained Mendiola, who has been at UTPA for seven years. “We try to select exhibits that would be meaningful to all students, UTPA students primarily, in addition to younger students that come there wanting to learn about being a Bronc. So we try to bring new fresh ideas and new themes that would teach all our students and the community.” Mendiola noted that the selections are calibrated with the University calendar in mind. “In the fall we try to find a science exhibit to go with HESTEC,” she said. “In the spring we try to find an arts and humanities exhibit to coincide with FESTIVA.” “The Amazing Feats of Aging” is from the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) a scientific, educational and cultural resource center dedicated to improving the public’s understanding of science and technology. OMSI is a non-profit organization that seeks to promote science through learning experiences using traveling exhibits and programs in an attempt to reach broader audiences. For groups of 10 and more people, the Center offers guided tours, registration for tours is available at the university’s website by following the exhibition’s link. Tour requests come from schools, day-care centers, community organizations, and Winter Texan groups, among others. For more information go to www.utpa.edu.

The “Beard Show” began as a joke in Carl Vestweber’s art class but it has turned into something much more. Vestweber, a senior art major at UTPA, and fellow classmates jokingly poked fun of the original paper-mache beard that Vestweber had created for his project. Although, after personal recognition of his true admiration for the hairy-faced fellow, “The Beard Show” was turned into a collection of paintings, drawings, sculptures, and wearable art which currently holds its place on the walls of the ManicHaus Art Gallery in McAllen.

Vestweber added a touch of humor to the at times pretentious art crowd by presenting his collection with ease and wit at the opening reception Sept. 3. “Humor is what the art scene needs more of,” said Lucia Morales, 23, of Mission. “I’m a fan of Carl’s work because he doesn’t take art too serious.” Included in the collection are pieces that tell the unique story of each individual kind of beard; titled, “39 Random Beards,” “Full Body Beard,” “4 Cycles of Beard Growth in 5 Stages,” and “4 Scenes of Beard Art at the Museum of Modern Beards.” Vestweber explains his fondness for beards by saying, “I’ve always liked beards; they sort of tell a story.”

The idea of masculinity as a shield is one of the main conceptions that Vestweber depicts. The beards represent a revolutionary change or metamorphoses of how personal experiences can change a person’s entire appearance. The beard is representational of time in a person’s life. “You see someone after they shave and it’s almost as if they were wearing a mask, so that’s where the mask idea sort of came to light,” said the artist. The wearable beard masks are made of felt and other fabric pieces dyed a variety of bright and whimsical colors. A closing reception will be held from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Friday, Sept.

24 at the ManicHaus, located at 1301B, North Main Street in McAllen. Admission is free.


September 23, 2010

ARTS AND LIFE

Page 11

Holiday highlights Hispanic identity crisis

By Nadia Tamez-Robledo The Pan American

Mexico’s bicentennial may have passed like any other Sept. 16 at The University of Texas-Pan American if not for the posters featuring a mustachioed Bucky the Bronc promising face painting and bingo at the Student Union. Across the border, Mexico threw itself a $40 million birthday party last Thursday. Parades filled streets of Mexico City while the scents of posole, tamales and other traditional dishes wafted through homes, said Reynosa native Hector Vivanco. The 22-year-old political relations major celebrated in Edinburg due to the violence in his hometown. “It gives me a lot of pride,” Vivanco said. “I’m a Mexican in the U.S. Because I’m far from Mexico, I appreciate it.” All the fanfare commemorated the day Father Miguel Hidalgo rang the church bells in Dolores, Mexico, and signaled the start of the country’s revolution against Spain in 1810. The University Program Board’s Heritage Committee sought to bring a piece of the revelry to UTPA students with a 16 de Septiembre event featuring mariachi musicians and folklorico dancers on stage while onlookers sampled Mexican food. “Whatever culture you consider yourself, it’s important to be open to other cultures and how they celebrate,” said 19-year-old Rigoberto Gutierrez, chair of the committee. “We

live in a place that is a mix of Mexican and American culture. I’m Hispanic myself, and I’ve lived in Mexico.” The independence movement in 1810 started with Hidalgo’s grito, and its retelling in history books is peppered with iconic symbolism that has survived to this day in Mexican consciousness. However, the connection of that momentous moment in Mexican history to the marriage booth that stood near the Student Union game room wasn’t clear to sophomore Amanda Lozano. “The wedding thing, it’s cool, but I don’t get it,” the 19-year-old public relations major said. “These things are fun to go to, but I don’t know the history behind it.” Gutierrez said that UPB wanted to educate students about 16 de Septiembre traditions by letting them experience the sights, sounds, and flavors firsthand. “They get a taste of what it’s like somewhere else in the world,” the Mission resident said. “We focused on the performance aspect. If you were to go to Mexico on that day, that’s something you would see.” Even so, it didn’t seem like there was much explanation behind the festivities to Ferny Salinas, an 18-yearold science and engineering major. “I guess since we already live down here, they already expect us to know,” the Edinburg native said. Professor of history Sonia Hernandez said that most UTPA students don’t know the significance of 16 de Septiembre, which is often confused with Cinco de Mayo.

“There’s a segment of the population that does know, but I would say that the majority of the student don’t because they probably haven’t gotten it from their classes,” she said. “They might have heard something about it in their homes, perhaps, [or] in the media.” Almost 88 percent of UTPA students were identified as Hispanic in 2009, according to statistics from Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness. There were 366 international students from Mexico, two percent of the student body. “Here, most of the students are Hispanic or Latino or Mexican,” said Vivanco, who sees 16 de Septiembre as an important part of students’ heritage and estimates that about 40 per cent of students understand the holiday’s meaning. “They don’t celebrate like they should.” Hernandez points to the “generation gap” between Hispanics and how important they perceive Mexican history to be. “Say they grew up here… in a whole English-speaking household,” said Hernandez. “They might understand Spanish, but they might not speak it, and so they just feel more removed from Mexican culture. Then there are others who feel very close to it.” A 2009 report by the Pew Hispanic Center found that 52 percent of Latinos ages 16 to 25 first identify themselves by their parents’ country of origin. Twenty-nine percent of participants were of Mexican decent. “As expected, young foreignborn Latinos are more likely than native-born young Latinos to say their

parents often emphasized pride in their no real connection to it,” the 25-yearcountry of origin,” the study found. old Mission native said. “I think “In contrast, third-generation young it’s important because it ties into the conquest and Hispanics are more the revolution. likely than first- or We talk about second-generation the conquest, young Hispanics “I know the basic history colonization, to say their parents mestizaje, but we often talked about [of the holiday], but other their pride in being don’t sit down and than that, I have no real American.” talk about what The next bighappened on that connection to it. I think gest identifier seday. It ties into the itʼs important because lected by particibroader theme.” pants was “AmeriHowever, in an it ties into the conquest can” at 24 percent, informal survey and the revolution. We followed by “Hisof 51 UTPA stupanic” or “Latino” dents, 74 percent talk about the conquest, with 20 percent. answered that on In the Mexican a scale from one colonization, mestizaje, American Studies to 10, their conbut we donʼt sit down and program at UTPA, fidence of their students explore understanding talk about what happened mestizaje, the of the holiday is on that day. It ties into the mixture of Spanish seven or higher. and indigenous Thirty-seven stubroader theme.” cultures. Graduate dents rated their student Orqidia interest in learnMorales, who is ing about and/ studying for her or celebrating 16 certification in Orqidia Morales de Septiembre at Mexican American seven or higher. Mexican American Studies Studies, said that “I think the Graduate student parts of Mexican main point here history like 16 is to emphasize de Septiembre that the Hispanic usually appear at community is the beginning of classes to help discuss very diverse,” Hernandez said. the origins of Mexican-American “Diversity is a key term here, that identity. not all Hispanics think the same, not “I know the basic history [of the all Hispanics are going to celebrate holiday], but other than that, I have 16 de Septiembre.”

Number of people

30

20 Do you know what the holiday celebrates? Are you interested in celebrating and/or learning the history of 16 de Septiembre? 10

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

1 = Not at all ; 10 = Absolutely

7

8

9

10


12

23 de septiembre del 2010

Paneles solares prometen excelentes resultados

Por Sergio Giron The Pan American Mientras que la lenta y dolorosa extinción de los combustibles fósiles se convierte en una realidad mas visible a los ojos de la población mundial, y sus consecuencias afectan tanto a nuestra naturaleza como a la economía; los científicos voltean a un tipo de energía moderna, futurista, limpia y abundante pero que aún nos mantiene ocultos algunos de sus secretos. Es por todo esto que en la Universidad de Texas-Pan Americana se ha motivado el estudio y la comprensión de los sistemas de captación de energía solar mediante diversos proyectos, y uno en especial esta dando esperanzadores resultados. Sobre el techo del edificio de ingeniería, 20 paneles solares observan el sol todos los días y producen energía eléctrica en cantidades suficientes para que Román García, estudiante de ingeniería eléctrica pueda aprender el exacto funcionamiento, ejecutar ajustes y calibraciones, compartir datos y si es posible en un futuro tomar esta tecnología y llevarla proactivamente al siguiente nivel. García es parte de un proyecto de investigación bajo la consejería del Dr. Jaime Ramos, profesor de sistemas eléctricos y energía renovable del departamento de ingeniería, que intenta comprender el funcionamiento entero del sistema eléctrico fotovoltaico, para poder mejorarlo y utilizarlo mas eficientemente. “Siempre pensé que seria interesante conocer sobre la energía renovable,

ya que la idea de aportar algo bueno al mundo siempre ha estado en mi cabeza”, menciono García. “Puedo decir que este proyecto me eligió a mi, ya que cuando busqué una oportunidad de trabajo con el Dr. Ramos, me preguntó que si estaba interesado en máquinas eléctricas o en celdas solares y la respuesta era más que obvia.” Después de un año completo de haber trabajado en su proyecto, García ha obtenido resultados en cada área de su vida. Además de que su participación en el proyecto es remunerada, dice sentirse académicamente más fuerte y confiado, además de poseer experiencia en un campo prometedor y sentirse satisfecho al proveer su granito de arena en el área de conservación. “Este proceso a influenciado mi vida y mucho, gracias a este proyecto mis metas son mucho mayores y valoro el mensaje de la energía renovable. Siento que cada día de trabajo, es un día de resultados”, afirmó García. “Es la manera en que te sientes bien como investigador, sabiendo que todos los días atraerás algo positivo a la investigación”. García dijo que por el momento su siguiente meta es mejorar la conservación de la energía en baterías, ya que eso ayudará a que el sistema de celdas solares pueda ser más efectivo al momento de la demanda de energía eléctrica. Ramos, quien ha sido mentor de García, ha participado en este proyecto y el de muchos estudiantes más proveyendo las instrucciones y la asesoría adecuada de tal manera que los estudiantes desarrollen su potencial

Fotografía por Marcelo Arredondo

TECHO DE INGENIERIA - Son 20 los paneles solares que se encuentran en el techo del edifico de ingeniería, y el proyecto será presentado en HESTEC el próximo 2 de octubre durante “Community Day”. y se preparen para la vida profesional. “El proyecto fue iniciado con el fin de contar con la herramientas educativas para que trabajen los ingenieros eléctricos y para que cuenten con una plataforma de despegue para desarrollar futuros proyectos”, comentó Ramos. El proyecto será presentado el próximo 2 de octubre y es sólo uno de los primeros pasos que se están

tomando en el entendimiento de esta moderna tecnología. “Queremos también integrar sistemas eléctricos a la energía solar y conectar el modelo del sistema fotovoltaico al sistema eléctrico del edificio, así como también alimentar focos de tipo LED que proveen mas iluminación”, comentó el profesor graduado de la universidad de Stanford en California, sobre lo que

se desea en cuestión de proyectos que se harán mas adelante. Sin duda, en la UTPA existen proyectos prometedores y jóvenes con el talento para llevarlos a cabo. Estudiantes interesados en el aprovechamiento de los recursos y el desarrollo de nuevas tecnologías trabajan junto con profesores para darle un respiro al mundo, haciéndolo un lugar mejor.

Felipe Calderón a enfrentar retos mas grandes

Profesor de gobierno da conferencia sobre lo que le espera a Calderón por el resto de su sexenio. Por Alejandra Martínez The Pan American La Universidad de Texas-Pan Americana dio inicio a la serie de platicas de Estudios de Seguridad Global con la visita de George W. Grayson de la Universidad de William and Mary. El profesor de gobierno habló frente a aproximadamente100 personas en el edificio de ingeniería el viernes al mediodía sobre la ola de violencia que azota a México en una presentación llamada “Los Retos Que Enfrentará Calderón Durante sus Dos Años Restantes en el Gobierno”. Grayson dijo tener una actitud pesimista en cuanto a los problemas que enfrenta México debido a la violencia relacionada con el crimen organizado. Estos problemas son el resultado de 70 años de corrupción que se vivieron durante el mandato

del Partido Revolucionario que controlaban la economía del Institucional, más bien conocido país y no daban lugar a la libre como el PRI. competencia. De El país estuvo esta manera se bajo el mando del podían producir PRI de 1929 hasta “Cuando asumió la presiproductos o el 2000, cuando el dencia se dió cuenta que prestar servicios Partido Acción Nade no tan buena cional (PAN) tomó el grandes secciones del país calidad a precios poder. Durante ese tibastante altos. ya no eran controladas por empo los presidentes En 1994 cuando usaban el conocido la policía y el ejército, los Carlos Salinas de “dedazo” para esGortari dejó la cárteles se habían apoderacoger a su sucesor. presidencia y Er“Parece más in- do de varios estados.” nesto Zedillo tomó teligente que los Essu lugar México tados Unidos, donde sufrió una crisis se tiene que lidiar económica que con partidos, elecafectó gravemente George W. Grayson a la clase trabajadociones primarias y Profesor de gobierno ra. Esto provocó un campañas negativas”, dijo Grayson. gran descontento Durante el hacia el PRI, y en mandato del PRI se crearon varios el año 2000 el PAN entró al poder con monopolios como Telmex y Televisa Vicente Fox en la presidencia.

El gobierno de Fox fue considerado como un sexenio perdido para México y en el 2006 cuando el pueblo mexicano seguía en descontento con el PRI, el PAN recibió una segunda oportunidad con Felipe Calderón. “Cuando asumió la presidencia se dio cuenta que grandes secciones del país ya no eran controladas por la policía y el ejército”, dijo Grayson. “Los cárteles de la droga se habían apoderado de Michoacán, Durango, Sinaloa, Chihuahua, y Tamaulipas”. Según Grayson la falta de policías honestos e incorruptibles es un resultado del régimen priísta, lo cual le dificultó a Calderón la lucha contra el narcotráfico y el crimen organizado. “Cuando el PRI estaba en el poder, hicieron tratos con los cárteles y corrompieron la economía. Pero tenían sus propias reglas de juego”, dijo Grayson. “El trato era que los cárteles

podían importar y exportar drogas pero tenían que respetar a las autoridades”. Los cárteles no podían venderle droga a los niños, practicar secuestros, y si alguna riña debía solucionarse de manera violenta, los cuerpos debían ser llevados al norte del Río Grande. Además de la guerra entre el ejército y el crimen organizado, también se ha suscitado una batalla entre cárteles. El Cártel de Sinaloa, el Cártel del Golfo y La Familia Michoacana le han declarado la guerra a Los Zetas. Este último grupo es considerado el más brutal y sanguinario. Finalmente aseguró que el futuro de México yace solamente en las manos de los mexicanos, hasta que los miembros de la elite se comprometan a afrontar el problema y mejorar las condiciones de vida de los ciudadanos, México continuará sufriendo a manos de criminales.


September 23, 2010

13

‘Swaggin’ their way to a new beginning

The UTPA volleyball team broke a losing streak last weekend and began conference play 1-1. Now the women say they’ve found the formula for victory and are ready turn the season around. given credit for bringing the term onto the court. The modern term for the word swag is riddled all through hip-hop songs to express one’s The crowd was electric and the “cool” factor. The Broncs remind Broncs fed off the energy. With every themselves of their kill they grew “cool” when faced confidence, with adversity on and one could the court. tell they were “ Tonight we showed what The Broncs determined to (0-1 in Great West keep the lead in this team is capable of doing Conference, 3-12 their hands and overall) have their foot on their when we play how we know played well at opponent’s neck. times during the Just a few how to play.” season but for weeks ago, The some reason could Broncs would not get it together probably have Kaitlin Vasquez at key moments to let an early lead Senior finish games. slip from their This not the case grasp, but those on Monday as they mental slip-ups faced off against are no more the Prairie View A&M University with a new mentality on the court. Panthers at home in the Wellness and “High swag,” senior starter Recreation Sports Complex earning Marci Logan of Centennial, Colo., an impressive three-game sweep, 25explained. “When times get tough 16, 28-26, 25-18. on the court, we all huddle up and “We came in wanting to make tell each other ‘high swag.’ We a statement and get on a winning were ready to get out here and streak,” said Kaitlin Vasquez, senior show everyone that we’re not that outside hitter from Garland. “Usually team from a few weeks ago that lets when a team is beating us like they leads slip at the crucial point of the were tonight in the second game we game.” fold, but tonight we showed what this Ijanae Holman, the 5-foot-9 team is capable of doing when we sophomore from Niceville, Fla., is

By Dionicio “Nune” Rodriguez The Pan American

Alma E. Hernandez/THE PAN AMERICAN

GOING HIGHER - Senior Megan Fichtel (left) and sophomore Sarah Davis block an attack Monday against Prairie View. Fichtel returned to her more comfortable position after Davisreturned from an injury. play how we know how to play.” The Broncs came out firing in the first game to take a dominant victory (25-16) but had a rough patch in the second game, going down early. They managed to fight off the Panthers and

tie the game at 24; then the lead then changed a few times. After taking a one-point advantage, Holman an outside hitter, soared through the air giving the team a game-winning kill, 28-26. Aside from their “high swag” meditation tactics that have helped them earn victories the last two games, the return off 6-foot sophomore middle blocker Sarah Davis (Murrieta, Calif.) helped the women feel more comfortable on the court. “It got the girls in better positions, especially Megan who has played terrific the last two games,” fourth year Head Coach Angela Hubbard said. “She is back over on the right side of the court which is where she is most comfortable and that is thanks to Sarah being back in our

line-up.” Megan Fichtel, the 5-foot-10 senior from Corpus Christi, TX, has been all over the court this season filling in where ever the team might require her services. The Broncs hit the road later this week looking to improve their record against two Great West Conference opponents. Thursday they face the New Jersey Institute of Technology at 7 p.m. and Saturday they will compete against Chicago State at 2 p.m. The Broncs are not only going by “high swag” to help them in their journey through a tough conference; they’ve added “we’re done losing” to the list. “The girls got a taste of victory already and they like it,” Hubbard stated. “They’ve realized what us

WEEKEND RESULTS UTPA 3-0 Texas Southern Houston Baptist 3-0 UTPA Alma E. Hernandez/THE PAN AMERICAN

REFOCUSED - Head coach Angela Hubbard talks to the Lady Broncs during a timeout Monday evening. The coach said that the women have regained confidence in themselves after Monday’s victory.

UTPA 3-0 Prairie View


Page 14

September 23, 2010

SPORTS

Broncs tie home match against St. Edward’s fense is one of the things to polish in order to obtain positive results. “I felt good, but we all needed to get A humid Saturday afternoon, a more into the game… for it being the besmall crowd and the mild sunshine ginning we’re doing pretty good; more that dried the remainders of the preapproaches and more vious night’s rain power and we’ll accompanied the make it,” said RoberBronc Soccer Club “Dedication is reflected to Aguilar, a sophointo its first confermore biology major ence game against from Harlingen who on the field the same St. Edward’s. has been playing for In the middle of the Broncs for two way it is in life. ” a first half in which years. both teams attacked Coach Carlos proportionally, the Trevino mentioned Cesar Olivares Hilltoppers manthat the guys are Junior aged to score the still falling short in first goal on a weird certain aspects, such bounce that misled as playing together starter goalkeeper Noel Gonzalez, but as a team, and that although the team Alejandro Hinojosa responded with a played well, the main goal will be to kick just outside the penalty box that go one step further to get a win. and tied the score. “The other team played their game During the second half, the Broncs and we tried to improve and to be better attacked constantly, while St. Ed- than them and we weren’t able to do it,” ward’s was only able to complete a he said. “What we need is to be able to couple of plays that could have seri- play more united. We had six goal opously affected the home team. How- portunities… we can’t settle for being ever, neither team scored; the match almost there, the point is to win.” ended 1-1 in the midst of a light rain. The coach added that unlike in ofThe players were partly satisfied ficial games where teams are only with the way the day worked out, es- allowed to make three substitutions, pecially a stiff defense. They pointed eight alternates participated in this out that a lack of determination on of- contest in order to give everybody the By Sara Hernandez The Pan American

opportunity to play as he searches for a steady starting group. After losing the opening game against Texas and tying against TCU two weekends ago, the Broncs (0-11) will head to San Antonio to face UTSA this weekend. The men will seek their first win of the season in a rematch of last year’s loss against the Roadrunners. “They beat us 3-2 last year, we have new guys this year, so we need to win,” midfielder Aguilar said. Cesar Olivares, who has been a key player for the Broncs so far, reflected on the struggle that the team is going through to be effective attackers. He mentioned that the way things evolve in the field is very similar to they do in real life. Besides helping the team to have a successful season, the learning will teach them that effort is the surest path to accomplishing a goal. “It’s a good thing that we didn’t lose the game and that we’re improving from previous weeks,” said the business management junior from Edinburg. “Now we have to think of the next game and to get better as a group and as individuals. “Dedication is reflected on the field the same way it is in life.” After facing UTSA, the Broncs will return home to take on Houston Oct. 2 at 3 p.m.

Freddie Martinez/THE PAN AMERICAN

THROUGH MOTIONS - Forward Adrian Flores (left) overcomes St. Edward’s defender Saturday afternoon in the first conference game for the Broncs.

Cross country starts with right foot

By Astrid Villegas The Pan American

Freddie Martinez/THE PAN AMERICAN

HEAVY DUTY - Junior Andrew Lopez was one of the UTPA runners that finished in the top 20 last weekend at the Ricardo Romo/Six Flags Fiesta Texas Classic.

Last Friday the cross-country teams traveled to San Antonio, with the men second and the women fourth at the Ricardo Romo/Six Flags Fiesta Texas Classic. Both teams ran the 5K (three miles and 200 meters) at Brooks City Base. For the women, Lilian Lagat and Judith Chumba were ranked in the top 20. Other female competiors were sisters Diana and Hilda Galloso, Brittney Garza and Shayna Parker. The men had five of the top 20, led by Matthey Kotut (second), Omar Doria (seventh), Luis Serrano (13th), Frank Garcia (14th) and Andrew Lopez (17th). Victor Ramos, Adrian Sepulveda, and Ricardo Reynoso also competed. Even though there was a 15-minute delay on the start of the race due to rain, plus a muddy course, coach Dave Hartman was pleased with the results. The runners persevered. “It was raining somewhat and it was muddy but we went through it,” said Lopez, a 2008 class from Nikki Rowe “Our team did really good but I still feel like we have some work to do.” Doria noted that rainy weather is part of cross country and one has to deal with the elements and conquer them. “In the end we helped each other as teammates and we have improved on our previous season performance,”

the Edinburg native said. Hartman was thrilled because his four best runners, Lagat, Chumba, Kotut, and Doria are looking strong at such an early stage. Veteran Doria agrees. “I feel that our team is performing a lot better than last year,” said the graduate student in biology. “We are learning and we have been training together, helping each other, and it’s going to show in our big meets.” The Broncs and Lady Broncs will compete at the Chilli Peper Classic in Arkansas in October and will host the Great West Conference championship at Los Lagos Golf Course by the end of the same month before the NCAA South Central Regional meet in Waco. Overall, Doria feels that the teams are performing a lot better than last year and that they are learning to help each other with the high degree supplied resources from Hartman. “We are a combination of upperclassmen combined to lead by example to freshmen and sophomores and any walk-ons or transfers to have a better form of leadership,” he commented. Zamora explains the bond the women work toward helps the team set goals and feel better about their

UTPA TOP FINISHERS RUNNER

PLACE

TIME

Mathew Kotut

2nd

15:01

Omar Doria

7th

15:15

Luis Serrano

13th

15:27

Frank Garcia

14th

15:28

Andrew Lopez

17th

15:38

17th

18:48

Judith Chumba 18th

18:49

Diana Galloso

29th

19:28

Hilda Galloso

36th

19:46

Brittney Garza

45th

20:35

MEN

WOMEN Lilian Lagat

performance. “As a team, everybody is working really hard and friendship wise we are really close” the sophomore, said. Lopez thinks that the solid performance bodes well for the future. “First real race and I think we did pretty good,” she said. “We are looking forward to the next race and to get a place in regionals.” The Bronc teams will have their next competition at Corpus Christi, in the Islander Open Sept. 24.


Page 15

Sports

September 23, 2010

New season, new blood for women’s tennis

Norma Gonzalez/The Pan American

veteran - Junior Reetta Raty is the only returner in action so far as Malin Andersen is still recovering from a knee injury.

The Lady Broncs lost four seniors after the 2009-2010 season --Luisa Cantu, Megan Bedeau, Sarah Burton and Nina Ciric. Second-year coach Chris Taylor brought in a generation of newcomers that will complement returners Reetta Raty (left) and Malin Andersen. Russian sisters Zalina Nazarova are both juniors and transfers from Sacramento State University. Suncica “Sunny” Strkic from Bosnia and Herzegovina is a junior transfer from Northwestern Louisiana. From France, freshman Wanda Beguelin (right) played for TC Charbonnieres in Lyon and was a two-time champion in her region. The women competed last weekend at the Islander Invitational at Corpus Christi. Each of the Lady Broncs lost in the first round with the exception of Zalina Nazarova who won by default and lost in the second round against Houston’s Maja Kazimieruk. Strkic lost against Mia Matuszak from Houston 1-6, 6-4, 10-6, while Abilene Christian’s Leane Macall defeated Dana Nazarova 6-4, 6-4. Beguelin fell against Mecklin Raga from Rice 6-4, 6-4 and Raty dropped a 6-2, 6-2 decision against Joanna Kacprzyk, also Norma Gonzalez/The Pan American from Houston. The women’s tennis program will trav- rookies - Freshman Blanca Garcia el to San Marcos Oct. 16 to play at the (pictured), from Tamaulipas, Mexico, and Wanda Beguelin, from France, are the Texas State Play Day.

only two freshman on the team this year.

GOLF RESULTS MEN UTA WATERCHASE CLASSIC 19 UTPA

921

T24 Brandon Reyna

219

T67 Kevin Kirakossian

228

92 High Wongchindawest 239 T93 Walker Barrett

240

99 AJ Gonzalez

24

WOMEN UC CLASSIC 12 UTPA

963

T27 Sarah Kothny

235

T42 Majo Camey

239

T42 Haley Hocott

239

T74 Elena Arroyo

255

T77 Melinda Uriegas

256

NEXT EVENTS Sept 28. Oral Roberts Shootout @ Broken Arrow, Okla. Oct. 4 Oral Roberts Shootout @ Tulsa, Okla.


Page 16

THE PAN AMERICAN

September 23, 2010


September 23, 2010