Page 1

THE

PAN AMERICAN

T h e S t u d e n t N e w s p a p e r o f T h e U n i v e r s i t y o f Te x a s - P a n A m e r i c a n

October 26, 2006

Car accessory thefts on the rise at UTPA By MARIA MAZARIEGOS The Pan American Madalyn Ochoa is contemplating selling her used SUV and purchasing a brand new Chevy Tahoe for Christmas. “I really love the look on the Tahoe. It fits me well,” said Ochoa, a junior biology major from McAllen.

What many fans of popular sport utility vehicles such as Tahoes and Suburbans are not aware of is this: a recent trend at The University of TexasPan American is the theft of side mirrors from these vehicles. “It is not something that we are just experiencing here, it is Valley-wide,” said Joe Loya, assistant UTPA police chief.

The GM vehicle side mirrors that are the target of theft are not the standard kind. They are the high-tech mirrors with built-in directional lights that light up to the command of a turn signal. “They are hot items since they take little effort to take off,” Loya said. This little effort can give the thief a good amount of profit. Side-view mir-

rors with built-in directional lights run anywhere from $300-$500 apiece; a set of two can yield up to $1,000, according to Loya. “Usually they are sold to people who have missing side mirrors or to local junk yards,” he explained. As of January of this year, there have been nine reports of stolen side mirrors at UTPA but no thief has been

caught. According to police reports, 40 percent of the car accessory theft takes place in parking lots F and G, located east of HPE I and the tennis courts, respectively. “We are asking officers to patrol these areas, and we are increasing patrols in the areas,” said Loya. He added that the police depart-

See THEFT page 11

Students set to ‘Make a Difference’ By TERESA TORRES The Pan American

They think it doesn’t affect them.” However, Debra Cardona, also a political science professor, thinks that general dissatisfaction with government among college students can lead to a heightened awareness of politics. “Some students are likely voters based on their political background,” she

The University of Texas-Pan American University Student Leadership Academy, primarily known for providing its members with tools for personal and professional success, will try to help improve the lives of others Oct. 28, which is Make a Difference Day. For last year’s Make a Difference Day project, the SLA traveled to Rio Bravo, Mexico to repaint a school. This year they plan to help enrich the lives of many Valley children by lending a hand to renovate the Boys and Girls Club facility of Alamo/San Juan. “It is the perfect place that would benefit not only the community but the children who participate at the club,” said Maricela De Leon, a senior marketing major and SLA member. “I believe that helping the Boys and Girls Club is not only a good cause but a great community service event.” Make a Difference Day, which was created by USA Weekend Magazine, is an annual event aimed at encouraging people to make an impact in their community by volunteering time and energy to help those in need. De Leon said the

See GOVERNOR page 11

See VOLUNTEER page 11

Governor’s race meets mixed student interest By ANA LEY The Pan American With as much controversy as this year’s gubernatorial candidates have generated, the significance of the race itself has been enough to stir discord at The University of Texas-Pan American. Or has it?

The 2006 Texas election, to be held Nov. 7, has incumbent Rick Perry facing off against democrat Chris Bell and independents Carole Keeton Strayhorn and Kinky Friedman. Samuel Freeman, a political science professor at the university, thinks that although some of this year’s quirky candidates have attracted attention, this

is no indicator of how much interest students have in political issues presented by each contender. “University students are notoriously poor in going out to vote,” he said. “Many of them have jobs aside from going to class, and they feel cynical toward politics because they can’t dedicate enough time to study government.

News

A&E

Sports

Students search for the paranormal as part of new club

Unravling the history behind Dia de los Muertos

New TV programs show lives of high school football players

See page 3

See page 8, 9

See page 16


PAGE 2

R EADER FORUM

October 26, 2006 THE

PAN AMERICAN

Letter to the editor

1201 West University, CAS 170 Edinburg, Texas 78539 (956) 381-2541 Fax: (956) 316-7122 http://www.panam.edu/dept/panamerican 56th Year – No. 10 Editor Claudette Gonzalez ThePanAmerican@gmail.com News Editor

A&E Editor

Design Editor

Sandra Gonzalez sandra_panamerican@yahoo.com

Frank Calvillo

Erika Lopez

hennero@ msn.com

lopez475@ yahoo.com

Sports Editor

Photo Editor

Luke Koong

Onydia Garza

lkoong2004 @yahoo.com

north14star @aol.com Designers Laura C. Gomez

Roy Bazan

crazy_restless @yahoo.com

Gregorio Garza

the_nataku@ yahoo.com

lm.gomez@ yahoo.com

To the editor: Mr. Edward Elguezabal states in his article “Students lobby for new graduation venue”: “In addition, (Francisco) Alday said his grandmother, who is wheelchair-bound, would have trouble getting to and around the Field House. ‘The venue does not count with the proper accommodations for handicapped individuals to see the ceremony comfortably,’ he said.” I would like to inform Mr. Elguezabal and Mr. Francisco Alday that his grandmother would probably not have trouble getting to and around

the Field House. We have a VIP section right behind the graduates that is reserved for individuals with disabilities. There are two ramps located on the east side of the field house, a general ramp and the ramp which the graduates use to enter. There is a group of us, “volunteers,” who are constantly on the look out for anyone we see that might have trouble getting in. We assist them in and escort them to this VIP section. They are protected from individuals bumping into them and they have a clear view of the graduates.

Community Bulletin By: Leslie Estrada

Q

“I would appreciate it if Mr. Elguezabal or Mr. Alday would volunteer to work the VIP section so they would know first-hand about our accommodations for our handicapped guests.” - Esmeralda N. Guerra EO/ AA officer/ ADA coordinator This section is filled during every ceremony. As the graduates exit, Dr. Cardenas makes her way to

our VIP section and greets our guests that are seated in this area. I would appreciate it if Mr. Elguezabal or Mr. Alday would volunteer to work the VIP section so they would know first hand about our accommodations for our handicapped guests. In addition, they might want to check our graduation website for more information on the VIP section. Esmeralda N. Guerra EO/AA Officer/ADA Coordinator Office of the President 381-2100

Photo Submission By: Onydia Garza

Reporters and Photographers Brian Carr Javier Cavazos Leslie Estrada Patrick Kennedy Ana Ley

Kristyna Mancias Maria Mazariegos Angela Salazar Trey Serna

Adviser Dr. Greg Selber Secretary Anita Casares Ad Manager Carolina Sanchez

Asst. Ad Manager Lillian Villarreal

Advertising information spubs@panam.edu Delivery Thursday at Noon

The Pan American gladly accepts letters from students, staff and faculty regarding newspaper content or current issues. The Pan American reserves the right to edit submissions for grammar and length. Please limit submission length to 300 words. The Pan American cannot publish anonymous letters, or submissions containing hate speech or gratuitous personal attacks. Letters are printed at the discretion of the editor and must include the writer’s name, classification/title and phone number.

The Pan American is the official student newspaper of The University of Texas-Pan American. Views presented are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the university.

If you feel ready for a change this Halloween and would like to experience something new, then the place for you to be Oct. 28 is EROS’ Horror Culture Fest. This event will be hosted at Salamandra, located one mile south of Shary Road on Old 83 in Mission, and will consist of many interesting components, according to EROS cofounder Alberto Gomez. “This event will consist of an occult art show, a shock fashion showcase by local designers, a costume contest and music, among other things,” said Gomez, a sophomore public relations major at The University of Texas-Pan American. Gomez said EROS, a company that promotes music, art and culture, tries to put a cultural and artistic spin on every event they hold. “We have a concept for every occasion. [We] try to implement innovative and fresh ideas which make every event a unique experience,” he said. Gomez added that this is not just another party. It is a cultural fest

where people can have fun and learn about local artists. “I think it is important for people to understand our concept,” said Gomez. “Our goal is to pass the message to young people of being more art- and culture-oriented.” Along with the preparation of this event, EROS is in the process of opening an organization on campus also called EROS. The organization will be dedicated to helping UTPA artists and is open to anybody interested in joining. “The organization is formed by students and has the task of uniting the artistic community on campus,” said Gomez. “Its purpose is to promote artistic events inside and outside the university.” Gomez added that he would like to invite everyone to assist the Horror Culture Fest and other EROS events as well. For more information about the Horror Culture Fest and other events please call Gomez at (956) 655-8370, visit www.erosculture.org, or e-mail to erosculture@gmail.com.

CAT NAP - A kitten takes a nap on top of some fellow cats as another looks on. It might appear to be just a random picture of a kitten, but, it is so much more. It is the small things about our campus and community (like napping kittens) that give us character. They are the kind of things that someone who doesn’t attend UTPA wouldn’t see. If you see something sweet on campus or in the community, snap a picture. It could be in next week’s edition of The Pan American.

IN THE NEXT ISSUE OF

THE PAN AMERICAN

Available Nov. 2

Distinguished Speaker

Big hair, wacky clothes

- Get full coverage of actor Louis Gossett Jr.’s visit to UTPA

- Get the scoop on a 1980s-themed prom that will benefit independent filmmaking


N EWS

News in brief: Daylight-saving time comes to an end Oct. 29 at 2 a.m, so don't forget to turn your clocks back one hour

Students gather to hunt ghosts, spirits

By LUKE KOONG The Pan American The world of the paranormal is a topic most people try to avoid. Thoughts of ghosts, spirits and the supernatural have frightened the minds of children and adults alike for centuries. However, just as there are individuals who chase tornadoes, there are also those who look for the signs beyond the norm. The University of Texas-Pan American is home to a one-month-old ghost hunting organization. Although the group has no official name yet, members of the organization have been quite active. For Becky Reyes, a senior anthropology major, her curiosity has carried over from her time living in Ohio. “I lived out in the middle of nowhere where we were surrounded by ghost stories and certain sites where you could see things,” Reyes, now an Edinburg resident, said.

Reyes and fellow ghost chaser Margaret Rivera, a junior art major, came together to form the new organization as a result of one of Rivera’s classes and their shared interests in the paranormal. Reyes’ and Rivera’s interests have developed into a curiosity to investigate local ghost stories. Reyes said the appeal stems lies in coming in contact with the unknown. “You get to see something that is totally out of this world and beyond reality,” she said. “Actually looking for something like that is fun.” Rivera, an Edinburg resident, enjoys the spontaneity of the subject. “It’s something you don’t see every day, something out of your hands, out of the mundane. It’s a force that exists without you,” she said. “You live your life and you have control over the environment. Every now and then, something weird happens, but this is totally

See GHOSTS page 12

Margaret Rivera HAUNTED - The Alton bus crash site where 21 children were killed in 1989 is one of the places Margaret Rivera, a junior art major, says there has been paranormal activity. Rivera is co-founder of a new campus group of ghost hunters.

Program provides study help By CELINA A. GILPATRICK The Pan American Students no longer have to suffer alone over confusing notes or worry about cramming the night before an exam. The Supplemental Instruction

Program (SIP) provides study help and guidance to any student needing clarification or a new perspective. The SIP, offered by the Learning Assistance Center, is in its first semester at The University of Texas-Pan

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American and offers weekly review sessions for students taking notoriously challenging classes. Nancy Salinas, a senior psychology major from McAllen, leads two psychology study groups in the SIP, and does not want students to feel that she will be reteaching the class. “I help the students study better by answering questions and giving them tips,” said Salinas. “I’ve had students tell me that they score an average of 10 points higher on tests, and have a better general understanding because of my help.” Although Salinas excels in psychology, she appreciates the program’s help in chemistry. “I don’t know that I would have gotten through chemistry without the program,” said Salinas. “I find myself not understanding the material in class, and this helped me survive.” Juan Ovalle, SIP coordinator, feels that the program differs from the typical idea of tutoring, in that students help fellow students. “It is more like a study session with someone who not only is in the same class as the students but has also taken and passed the course previously,” said Ovalle. “A Supplemental Instruction

See TUTORING page 12

Kids need outdoor play for development By LEZETTE VILLARREAL The Pan American The grass and air at the playground may be a better learning experience than any educational video game can ever provide. According to a study done by the American Academy of Pediatrics, children need unorganized spontaneous free play just as much as they need in-class learning. According to Alejo Salinas, a lecturer in the College of Education at The University of Texas-Pan American, to a child every experience is a learning experience, whether it be playing outside or playing video games. “Children learn a lot from their senses. Playing outside is a concrete learning experience and everything outdoors can be a lesson of some sort,” said Salinas. “Actually seeing and feeling real things are a more valuable experience than just watching it on TV.” The more advanced we get in technology, the less likely parents are to let children have outdoor unscheduled free time. Parents sometimes think that the

new get-smart video game, ballet classes or karate classes they send their kids to will help them be more successful. But in reality, these things are not factors in helping a person become successful, the AAP study indicated. It also suggested that children who were free to play outside devel-

Q

“Children learn a lot from their senses. Actually seeing and feeling real things are more valuable experiences than just watching it on TV.” - Alejo Salinas lecturer in College of Education oped healthier lifestyles compared to kids who played mostly get-smart video games, or had lots of enrichment activities or classes to help them excel. “The development of healthy kids doesn’t only depend on the activities they do but on whether they’re truly interested in the activity,” said Nancy

See CHILDREN page 12


NEWS

October 26, 2006

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NEWS

October 26, 2006

Page 5

Student organization sets sights on peace By SANDRA GONZALEZ The Pan American Victoria Ibanez wants world peace. No, she’s not a beauty pageant contestant. She’s a girl who wants her friend who is at war - to come home. As acting president of the Student Peace Organization, the junior political science and sociology double major has set her sights on promoting change in American policy. “It’s very important to me that our country participate in things that are influential but in a peaceful way,” she said. The group has 85 members, and Ibanez said they obtained temporary recognition from the national organization about a week and a half ago. However, they have wasted no time holding an event. On Tuesday, Frank Enriquez, District 28 candidate for Congress, gave a speech in SBS 101 where he spoke about his plans for promoting peace in the United States. “I’m a veteran. I’ve got a brother in Iraq, and it is my feeling that we have lost our way in the United States,” he said. “Let’s get the war over and let’s get our families home.”

Ibanez added that the country should stop entering conflicts which they have no business interfering in. “We should not be attacking or invading countries where there’s not a proper reason for it,” she said. “If we’re antagonizing other nations, that’s a problem.” According to Ibanez, current U.S. policies do not promote peaceful relations or fair democracy. “We’re preaching democracy, but we’re not practicing,” she said. “We’re invading countries for reasons that president Bush feels inclined…[and] for imperial reasons.” SPO’s first meeting will occur Nov. 2 in SBS 207 from 5:30 p.m.- 6:30 p.m. At this time, they will be electing officers and discussing upcoming evens. Ibanez said SPO plans on hosting more speakers including war veterans, family members of fallen service people and politicians, according to Ibanez. In the long run, she hopes the group has a bigger impact than what may meet the eye. “Our organization is going to do its part and maybe that will spawn another organization to be formed or it can inform students at our university and

inspire them to do something on their own,” she said. “No one can make a huge difference on their own. It takes cooperation from other people.” While some may argue that local organizations do little in the long run, Zar Castillo, a junior computer information systems major, says every little bit helps. “Commitment to creating an impact will in fact make a difference. Whether it’s to one person or a hundred,” he said. “Compare it to a water ripple effect.” Ibanez said once those who have a message come together, they can impact a great population. “What needs to happen is the American people need to get together and demand change. They’re not saying, ‘This is wrong, we need change now,’” she said. “We need to get together because it’s our right as American citizens.” “[The Student Peace Organization wants] to promote peace and have a place for students to come together and make a difference. People are just standing by and doing nothing,” she said. “When people get together and promote change, that’s when something gets done.”

Onydia Garza/The Pan American SYMBOLISM - Frank Enriquez, District 28 candidate for Congress, shows off a bald eagle, which he said was a representation of peace, Tuesday in SBS 101.


EN ESPAÑOL

Noticias en breve: El tiempo de ahorro de luz empieza al final de Oct. 29 a las 2 a.m. No se les olvide retrazar sus relojes una hora.

Un cambio para el beneficio de la comunidad Por TERESA TORRES Traducido Por MERCEDES CANTU The Pan American La Academia de Liderazgo de Estudiantes (SLA) de la Universidad de Texas-Pan American, principalmente conocida por proveer a sus miembros útiles para el éxito personal y profesional, tratara de mejorar las vidas de otros en Oct. 28, que es el Día de Hacer la Diferencia. Para el proyecto del año pasado, el SLA viajo a Río Bravo, México para repintar una escuela. Este año tienen planeado enriquecer las vidas de muchos de los niños del Valle dándoles la mano para renovar las facilidades del Club de Niños y Niñas de Álamo/San Juan. “Es el lugar perfecto que no solo beneficiara la comunidad sino también a los niños que participen en el club,” dijo Marcela De León, estudiante de mercadotecnia y miembro del SLA. El día de Hacer la Diferencia, el

cual fue creado por la revista USA Weekend Magazine, es un evento anual dirigido para animar a las personas a crear un impacto en su comunidad dando su tiempo y energía siendo voluntarios para ayudar a quienes lo necesitan. De León hablo acerca de los puntos específicos del proyecto. “Los voluntarios pintaran el gimnasio y las paredes exteriores, reparar los baños y todo lo aquello que necesite arreglo,” ella dijo. Comoquiera, el proyecto principal será el construir una cerca alrededor de la cancha de básquetbol. Las condiciones actuales, de acuerdo a Leo Barrera quien recluta estudiantes para el evento del SLA, son peligrosas ya que las canchas están localizadas junto a una calle de transito pesado. Mientras renovar las facilidades en un día puede verse como algo ambicioso, Amy Martin, coordinador del SLA, siente que se puede lograr. “Yo no creo que vayamos a tener

problemas completando todo lo que necesita hacerse,” dijo, agregando que Home Depot nos ayuda a facilitar la tarea donando materiales. El SLA no limita la oportunidad de solo arreglar la facilidad, sino también miembros están colectando papeles de construcción, resistol y crayolas entre otros útiles escolares para los niños que atiendan al club. “Estoy nerviosa de que no podamos recolectar suficientes útiles,” dijo Deidra Jonson, miembro de SLA y estudiante de mercadotecnia. Hay por lo menos 12 organizaciones de UTPA recolectando útiles escolares para el proyecto. Cualquiera que desee donar útiles escolares, aun tiene tiempo de hacerlo, agrego Jonson. El SLA estará recolectando útiles hasta Oct. 28. Para ser voluntario del proyecto del Día de Hacer la Diferencia del SLA, diríjase a sus oficinas en University Center, cuarto 104.

Amy Martin DANDO LA MANO - Judy Davila y Tanya Longoria ayudan a pintar una escuela en Rio Bravo, Mexico, en el Dia de Hacer la Diferencia del 2005.


A RTS & EN T E R T A I N M E N T

Editor’s Pick: Must-see movie This Halloween, Jigsaw is pulling out all the stops in “Saw III”

Local haunted house brings real-life horror to patrons By LESLIE ESTRADA The Pan American Halloween is just around the corner and with it comes trick-or-treating, witches, monsters and a must-visit to Scream Factor X, a haunted house in downtown McAllen. Scream Factor X has been in business for three years now; each night this season has been a record night compared to past years. “The response from the public has been huge,” said Marc Fantich, president and CEO of Fantich Media, who owns the ghostly building. “Lines get pretty long, but people don’t seem to mind waiting up to three hours to get in the house.” Students like Onesimo Romero, a junior biology major at The University of Texas-Pan American - who has gone to the haunted house - know what it’s like to wait for such a long time. “I went last week and there was a huge line,” Romero said. “I had to wait about two hours before being able to enter, but it was definitely worth the wait.” The house is three times as long as any other haunted house, and it takes customers about 15-20 minutes to get through. “It is twice as big as last year,” said Fantich. “In past years, we’ve only used

Genisis Moreno/The Pan American ENJOY YOUR STAY - Scream Faktor returns for another season of spine-tingling fright and blood-curdling chills. This year’s haunted establishment is the deserted “Rio Hotel.”

half of the building, now we are using all of it.” Even though there have never been any major accidents, people do occasionally get so scared, they run out before even starting to go through the maze. “We have what we call the holding area. It is where we explain the rules to our customers,” Fantich said. “Ten percent of the people get so scared in that room that they run out from there without even caring

about their money or the time they spent in line.” Fantich’s wife Susana, an actress at the haunted house, has several anecdotes about customer experiences. The Rio Hotel is located on 1710 Chicago St. in downtown McAllen. For more information regarding Scream Factor X, log on to www.screamfactorx.com.

“People psych themselves so much at the beginning that once they get through the door, they are so scared they can’t go on with the rest of the house,” she said. The location of the haunted house has somewhat influenced its popularity and success. It is situated in the former Rio Hotel, which had a long history of murders and horrible arrests. This is where rumors about ghost sightings originate. “I’ve heard many rumors about ghosts

but it sounds really crazy,” said Marc Fantich. “I don’t believe in ghosts but it sure is very coincidental that people who don’t know each other tell the same story.” Rolando Martinez, manager of Scream Factor X, said some customers report seeing real ghosts inside the exhibit. “People have come out saying that they really liked the scene where a lady smashes her baby against a wall,” said Martinez. “I’ve heard the same story from at least five different people, and we do not have a scene like that.” Fantich added that Cine El Rey is collaborating with Scream Factor X this year by converting the movie theatre into a “Voodoo Lounge.” It is a place for adults to go enjoy a cold beer, and watch scary movies for free, while they wait for their kids to come out of the haunted house. Starting today, Scream Factor X will be open daily for the rest of the month. Thursday is college night: any student with a valid school I.D. can get in at half price. Fridays and Saturdays are extreme nights, while Sundays are family nights. “Sundays are monster-be-goodnight,” said Fantich. “The way this works is that if you get really scared you say “monster-be-good” and they have to stop scaring you.”

Supernatural video game becomes new obsession By BRIAN CARR The Pan American It’s 11 p.m. Nicholas Kietzer just got off work and he’s ready to kill somebody. Kietzer, 22, is a part-time student at The University of Texas-Pan American and a full-time cook. “I’ve got a busy schedule. I work when other people are relaxing,” he said. “When they’re sleeping I’m killing Orcs.” Kietzer is one of nearly seven million subscribers to Blizzard Entertainment’s wildly successful World of Warcraft, a massively-multiple online role-playing game (MMORPG) released in 2004. The game, which takes place in the virtual world of Azeroth, allows players to fight, make friends and work to secure the land for either the good Alliance or the evil Horde. The online world is a meeting ground for the throngs of players who spend countless hours accumulating money and experience points to enhance their character’s status. Characters are selected from eight

different races, nine different classes and two different factions. Among the selection choices are humans, orcs, night elves, dwarfs and trolls. The point of the game is to enhance one’s avatar while completing missions throughout the world of Azeroth in battles with upgradeable weaponry and tactics. Oftentimes, however, finishing missions takes the help of other players. According to a local video store employee, who asked to remain anonymous as per company policy, the draw to Warcraft is the camaraderie it instills. “A lot of it is that people get hooked playing with friends,” he said. “It has an effect on life. You get into the story of the game, but you also get to be someone completely different. It’s addictive.” This addictive quality has pulled Warcraft into the forefront of MMORPGs. The game’s popularity was lampooned in this seasons “South Park” premiere. The episode, titled “Make Love, Not Warcraft,” followed Stan, Cartman, Kenny, and Kyle as they checked out of life to launch a collective attack on an on-line nemesis.

It took the boys months of continuous play to accomplish the feat, which is true to the game’s rigorous demands. According to one online account, “the highest level, most complex dungeons and encounters are designed to take raiding guilds months of playtime and many attempts before they succeed.” Gregory Gilson, an assistant professor at The University of Texas-Pan American’s philosophy department, finds this level of devotion to on-line gaming extremely interesting. “I heard that you can buy on-line money and items from other users on eBay,” Gilson said. “It’s like there is an exchange rate with the real world.” Gilson, who does not play MMORPGs, says the phenomenon resonates with ideas found in Hillary Putnam’s “Brain in a Vat,” which essentially argues that we could be nothing more than brains and spinal chords. “In modern terms it would be like we are essentially brains in vats with mad scientists or game providers or what have you

www.worldofwarcraft.org TROLLS, GOBLINS AND YOU - “Warcraft,” an addictive video game, transports its players from modern-day society to an otherworldy land.

providing everything we know,” Gilson said. “It’s the same principal that you see in the movie ‘The Matrix.’” According to Edward Castranova, associate professor of telecommunications at Indiana University in Bloominngton who has written several research papers on the MMORPG “Everquest,” the games

will lead to different things for the Internet. “Telecommuting, which now involves working on the home computer and e-mailing reports to the boss, will eventually become ‘going to work’ in a virtual office, and holding face-to-face meetings with the avatars of co-workers,” he said.


October 26, 2006

It’s the time of year when dark, grey clouds cover the sky and the once humid, sticky weather that is the norm for the Valley is swept away in a strong burst of cooler wind. Farther north, the trees become bare and the now orange leaves crunch underneath people’s shoes.

October 26, 2006 Spirits and ghosts seem to take over for this season and now the Day of the Dead, or Dia de los Muertos, approaches bringing with it a sense of joy and pride for a holiday that celebrates those who are no longer with us in the flesh. Dia de los Muertos began in the Aztec culture centuries ago. This holiday, Nov. 1 and 2, celebrates those who have died, as celebrators remember and honor their souls, coinciding with All Saint’s and Souls Days. “Dia de los muertos is both old and new world. It was a pre-Christian celebration that was adapted into the Christian calendar,” said Juanita Garza, a lecturer in the History department. This may seem like an awkward, slightly morose holiday, but as it is celebrated in Mexico and certain regions in the United States, it can be a joyous occasion. “The celebration is different in the U.S. and mostly celebrated among Catholics. The Catholic tradition includes going to church and praying for departed loved ones. However, Hispanics in the U.S. usually go to the graves of relatives to clean them, place flowers, sometimes bring an offering of a special food or beverage, and to simply show respect,” Garza said. “In Mexico it may also include church, but the emphasis is in the home and at the cemetery where elaborate altars are placed to remember all the family members who have died.” Many Valley residents celebrate this holiday and there are some celebrations going on to promote this special time in the Valley. The city of Port Isabel is holding its 10th Annual Day of the Dead Celebration. “The recognition of the holiday consisted of altar displays for the first seven years,” said Valerie Bates, the marketing director of Port Isabel. “Residents would create altars and display them at the Community Gallery in the Treasures of the Gulf Museum during October and November.” Now the celebration has expanded and has become a large one for the entire community in the Valley. “Three years ago the celebration expanded to include demonstrations, vendors, a tour of the cemetery and an extension of Museum of Port Isabel’s ‘Telling Our Stories’ oral history program with a presentation of the history of the Day of the Dead holiday,” Bates said. The festivities will conclude most appropriately with a viewing of “Ghostbusters” at the Port Isabel Lighthouse Oct. 28 at 9 p.m. All of the events are free and open to the public and located at the Port Isabel City Cemetery, Old Port Isabel Fire Hall, Port Isabel Lighthouse, Treasures of the Gulf Museum and the Port Isabel Historic Museum, all within walking distance of each other. Although the Port Isabel Day of the Dead celebration has been held for 10 years now, the tradition of honoring this day began long before that. “Early photographs of the Port Isabel Cemetery contain evidence that the Day of the Dead was celebrated here in Port Isabel since at least the 1920s,” Bates said. “Special meals and dishes were prepared as part of the celebration as a great deal of this holiday is privately shared in the home.”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Designed By: Roy Bazan

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Story By: Angela Salazar

Page 8

Page 9 It is believed that children’s souls return first and adult souls second. Graves are cleaned and families put a flor de muerto, or flower of the dead, on them to decorate the grave and serve as offering to the deceased. In Mexican tradition, toys are placed at the graves of children and a bottle of tequila at the graves of adults. The Museum of South Texas History also celebrated this holiday last Saturday at the museum’s location in Edinburg. The event offered performances, 15 different altars ranging from Father Hidalgo to Saint Jude, Maria Felix to Marilyn Monroe and of course personal altars for family members and loved ones. Students get into the celebrations as well and have learned to do so from the tradition that was passed down by their families. “It’s honoring what they represented in our family,” said Geronimo J.C. Ruedas, a sophomore music major at The University of Texas-Pan American. “They were the heart of our family. They were the people who created the following generations.” It becomes a party to celebrate the lives of the people who have died. “We have a comida [meal] where everyone gets together and cooks and we set aside plates and flowers,” said Ruedas. Many other cultures also celebrate this holiday, including those in the Philippines and China. In the Filipino culture it is believed to be more of a family reunion than a remembrance. Families camp out at grave sites and eat, play cards and just enjoy one another’s company. In the Chinese culture, the seventh calendar month is known as “Ghost Month,” during which it is believed that ghosts and spirits come back to visit those left on earth. Since this also coincides with a very popular holiday, Halloween, it raises questions as to how the two may compare to one another. Although, both have to do with ghosts, souls and life after death themes, they have less in common than often thought. “Halloween is not at all related or like dia de los muertos. Although Halloween (Holy Evening) is part of the pre-Christian tradition in that Druids believed that the dead would rise and visit during specific times, it really became what it is today—a funny/scary celebration— during the last century,” said Garza No matter what culture, the general idea remains the same: to honor and celebrate those who came before us. To celebrate a life should be a fun and joyous occasion and this is just one of the many ways to do so. For more information on any of the events visit www.mosthistory.org or http://portisabelmuseums.com/dod/


October 26, 2006

It’s the time of year when dark, grey clouds cover the sky and the once humid, sticky weather that is the norm for the Valley is swept away in a strong burst of cooler wind. Farther north, the trees become bare and the now orange leaves crunch underneath people’s shoes.

October 26, 2006 Spirits and ghosts seem to take over for this season and now the Day of the Dead, or Dia de los Muertos, approaches bringing with it a sense of joy and pride for a holiday that celebrates those who are no longer with us in the flesh. Dia de los Muertos began in the Aztec culture centuries ago. This holiday, Nov. 1 and 2, celebrates those who have died, as celebrators remember and honor their souls, coinciding with All Saint’s and Souls Days. “Dia de los muertos is both old and new world. It was a pre-Christian celebration that was adapted into the Christian calendar,” said Juanita Garza, a lecturer in the History department. This may seem like an awkward, slightly morose holiday, but as it is celebrated in Mexico and certain regions in the United States, it can be a joyous occasion. “The celebration is different in the U.S. and mostly celebrated among Catholics. The Catholic tradition includes going to church and praying for departed loved ones. However, Hispanics in the U.S. usually go to the graves of relatives to clean them, place flowers, sometimes bring an offering of a special food or beverage, and to simply show respect,” Garza said. “In Mexico it may also include church, but the emphasis is in the home and at the cemetery where elaborate altars are placed to remember all the family members who have died.” Many Valley residents celebrate this holiday and there are some celebrations going on to promote this special time in the Valley. The city of Port Isabel is holding its 10th Annual Day of the Dead Celebration. “The recognition of the holiday consisted of altar displays for the first seven years,” said Valerie Bates, the marketing director of Port Isabel. “Residents would create altars and display them at the Community Gallery in the Treasures of the Gulf Museum during October and November.” Now the celebration has expanded and has become a large one for the entire community in the Valley. “Three years ago the celebration expanded to include demonstrations, vendors, a tour of the cemetery and an extension of Museum of Port Isabel’s ‘Telling Our Stories’ oral history program with a presentation of the history of the Day of the Dead holiday,” Bates said. The festivities will conclude most appropriately with a viewing of “Ghostbusters” at the Port Isabel Lighthouse Oct. 28 at 9 p.m. All of the events are free and open to the public and located at the Port Isabel City Cemetery, Old Port Isabel Fire Hall, Port Isabel Lighthouse, Treasures of the Gulf Museum and the Port Isabel Historic Museum, all within walking distance of each other. Although the Port Isabel Day of the Dead celebration has been held for 10 years now, the tradition of honoring this day began long before that. “Early photographs of the Port Isabel Cemetery contain evidence that the Day of the Dead was celebrated here in Port Isabel since at least the 1920s,” Bates said. “Special meals and dishes were prepared as part of the celebration as a great deal of this holiday is privately shared in the home.”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Designed By: Roy Bazan

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Story By: Angela Salazar

Page 8

Page 9 It is believed that children’s souls return first and adult souls second. Graves are cleaned and families put a flor de muerto, or flower of the dead, on them to decorate the grave and serve as offering to the deceased. In Mexican tradition, toys are placed at the graves of children and a bottle of tequila at the graves of adults. The Museum of South Texas History also celebrated this holiday last Saturday at the museum’s location in Edinburg. The event offered performances, 15 different altars ranging from Father Hidalgo to Saint Jude, Maria Felix to Marilyn Monroe and of course personal altars for family members and loved ones. Students get into the celebrations as well and have learned to do so from the tradition that was passed down by their families. “It’s honoring what they represented in our family,” said Geronimo J.C. Ruedas, a sophomore music major at The University of Texas-Pan American. “They were the heart of our family. They were the people who created the following generations.” It becomes a party to celebrate the lives of the people who have died. “We have a comida [meal] where everyone gets together and cooks and we set aside plates and flowers,” said Ruedas. Many other cultures also celebrate this holiday, including those in the Philippines and China. In the Filipino culture it is believed to be more of a family reunion than a remembrance. Families camp out at grave sites and eat, play cards and just enjoy one another’s company. In the Chinese culture, the seventh calendar month is known as “Ghost Month,” during which it is believed that ghosts and spirits come back to visit those left on earth. Since this also coincides with a very popular holiday, Halloween, it raises questions as to how the two may compare to one another. Although, both have to do with ghosts, souls and life after death themes, they have less in common than often thought. “Halloween is not at all related or like dia de los muertos. Although Halloween (Holy Evening) is part of the pre-Christian tradition in that Druids believed that the dead would rise and visit during specific times, it really became what it is today—a funny/scary celebration— during the last century,” said Garza No matter what culture, the general idea remains the same: to honor and celebrate those who came before us. To celebrate a life should be a fun and joyous occasion and this is just one of the many ways to do so. For more information on any of the events visit www.mosthistory.org or http://portisabelmuseums.com/dod/


A&E

Page 10

October 26, 2006

Rob Zombie to direct latest ‘Halloween’ installment By TREY SERNA The Pan American It’s been nearly 30 years since John Carpenter’s horror classic “Halloween” was released in theaters. The film’s infamous killer, Michael Myers, has since become a staple of the horror genre and has managed to sustain a killer career spanning nearly three decades. “Movies like ‘Halloween,’ ‘Nightmare On Elm Street’ and ‘Friday the 13th’ – the teenagers who saw them then now have teenage children, so they have that sort of similarity or common interest with their child,” said Ed Cameron, an English professor at The University of TexasPan American who teaches a class on film studies. The last installment of the series, “Halloween Resurrection,” was released on July 12, 2002. The film brought back and killed off the lead character of the “Halloween” franchise, Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis.) Though the plot has gone in different directions, the last film still performed well at the box office. “Market-wise, there’s just a fascination with a creature that can’t be killed, and if it brings in money at the box office, they’ll continue making them,” said Cameron. The cliffhanger ending of

“Halloween Resurrection” left fans knowing another would be made; it was just a question of when and who would take the series under their hands. The official “Halloween” Web site, Halloweenmovies.com, teased fans with an update that said, “Halloween 9 news coming soon.” However, the Web site only updated every so often but never commented further on the new film. Finally, on June 12 an official press release was posted announcing that the whitemasked killer would soon be slashing his way into theatres again, with heavy metal musician Rob Zombie writing and directing the new project. Zombie, best known as the creator and lead singer for the rock band White Zombie, established himself as a movie director with the 2003 release of “House of 1,000 Corpses,” and its sequel, “The Devil’s Rejects.” Some people enjoyed the direction Zombie took with his horror-gore films and anticipate seeing what he can bring to the “Halloween” series. “I’m really looking forward to the release of the next ‘Halloween’ movie. I want to see how Rob Zombie directed it and see if it’s as freaky as his other movies,” said Sarah Taguilas, co-manager of the Harlingen Hot Topic store, where Myers’ masks and gear are usually sold for Halloween. “We haven’t gotten much of that in this

year, but there’ve been a lot of requests for it.” In an appearance on the late-night talk show “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” Zombie said he wants to do two things in his version of the “Halloween” project. His vision is to make half the movie a prequel, explaining to the audience what happened to Myers when he was a child. He says his reason for this is that in the original 1978 release, Myers is a 6-year-old kid at the start of the film and suddenly, he’s an adult going on a killing spree. The second half of Zombie’s version will be what he and other movie officials are calling a “re-imaging” of the original. Zombie hopes to bring the suspense and horror back into the “Halloween” series. “Michael Myers jumped the shark when you could buy a doll and press his stomach and it played the ‘Halloween’ theme,” he said on the late-night show. The new film is expected to be released in October 2007. For fans that can’t wait until then, select theatres across the nation will be hosting two nights of “Halloween” horror Oct. 30 and 31 at 8 p.m., featuring a showing of the original “Halloween” on the big screen. For more information on the ‘Halloween’ series, please visit http://www.halloweenmovies.com

www.gonemovies.com HORROR REVISITED - The decision to re-release John Carpenter’s “Halloween” into select theaters this October comes on the heels of the announcement that rock musician Rob Zombie will direct the latest edition of the cult series.

Courtesy of Yahoo movies SLEIGHT OF HAND - Christian Bale (left) embarks on a life-long rivalry with Hugh Jackman (right) for the title of world’s greatest magician in “The Prestige.”

‘Prestige’ casts spell over movie audiences By FRANK CALVILLO The Pan American When literary works make the dicey transition to film, the results can often be less than satisfying. Such is the case with Christopher Priest’s “The Prestige,” the story of two magicians, played by Christian Bale and Hugh Jackman in the film version. The two enter into a rivalry that lasts for years with each one trying to outdo the other in hopes of becoming the greatest magician alive. The two men try to accomplish this feat by infiltrating each other’s acts, sabotaging their performances and putting their own lives in danger by trying to create the ultimate magic trick that would forever mystify audiences. The movie keeps the heart of the story, but eliminates much of the interesting sub-plots which played a large part in making the book the page turner that it was. Sequences involving the future generations of the magicians’ families, the early careers and more importantly, the original way in which the rivalry came to be are all dropped from the film version. Visually, the movie is quite stunning to watch and at just more than two hours in length, proves to be quite an exhilarating ride with enough twists and turns to make any person feel as if they’re on a rollercoaster. Perhaps one of the film’s best attributes, if not the biggest, is the performances generated by the two leads. As dueling magicians, Bale and Jackman both give inspired performances that show the passion, drive and determination of each character. Both men have had big-screen successes (Bale with “Batman Begins” and Jackman with the “X-Men” series.)

However, very rarely is either actor given the opportunity to play against their toughguy exteriors by taking on roles that are purely character-driven. The only problem that remains are the actual characters themselves. At first, one roots for the two struggling magicians as they try to find their niche in such an unpredictable craft. Yet as time goes on, the two men become increasingly self-centered and obsessed, only focused on outdoing each other, and in turn develop complete disregard for their loved ones and the people they entertain. This works against the film, as both men turn into heavy characters with very few redeeming or heroic traits. As a result, the movie audience is left with no one to side with or root for, instead finding themselves simply watching two unlikable characters destroy each other. This is a flaw that continues until the film’s conclusion. The supporting cast, which includes Michael Caine, Scarlett Johannsen and David Bowie, spends most of the duration of the film appearing and then disappearing for large periods of time. Of the three, only Caine, one of cinema’s most trusted actors, fares well. He appears as a retired magician, giving a performance filled with authenticity for both the profession and the time period. The same can’t be said for Bowie who, as a reclusive scientist, is stuck with a rather flat role thanks to a lack of character development. Johannsen, giving the film’s worst performance, is embarassingly miscast as a British magician’s assistant who shuffles between the two men. Directed Christopher Nolan, the man behind the mind-boggling “Memento” and the re-vamped “Batman Begins”, “The Prestige” may be a loose adaptation of the much better Priest novel. But as a film in its own right, it is a never-ending cinematic bag of tricks.


NEWS

October 26, 2006

Page 11

GOVERNOR continued from page 1 said. “It’s harder to pinpoint the level of awareness students have of government than it is to determine how dissatisfied they are with it.” She also feels that determining a level of dissatisfaction could be directly related to how much of an increase there is in college student voter turnout. “However, this could be a doubleedged sword,” she explained, showing agreement with Freeman’s view. “A feeling of dissatisfaction could also lead to a feeling of inefficacy, which could lead to less people voting.” Cardona thinks that many students

appear apathetic about government because they are in a transitional period from adolescence to adulthood. “Many college students are still flexing their political muscle,” she said. “College is a good time to teach them how to become informed and understand the importance of politics in their lives.” And Freeman feels the political process should concern the college community before any other age group, since policy changes go into effect by the time students reach adulthood. “The stakes are much higher for college students, and a lot of them don’t

realize that,” he said. “Although voting is not enough to make a difference in government, it is the first step in getting involved in political affairs.” Noe Alonso, a junior biology major, thinks that this year’s election is more publicized than past ones, and certain candidates are making more of an effort to raise political awareness. “I don’t have much interest in [the gubernatorial] election, but national elections are important to me,” said Alonso, a McAllen resident. “I do read up a bit about the candidates online and look at their speeches, but I think stu-

dents are more interested in the Bush administration than anything…students like to bash Bush more than anything when they talk about politics.” Juan Colmenero, a senior political science major, agrees that students are more aware of candidates running for office this year. However, he feels that appealing to the general public is a tactic used by candidates to distract attention from pressing political issues. “You’re back to Roman times here, because people are getting all hyped up because they share similar tastes with a candidate,” said Colmenero, a La Joya

THEFT continued from page 1

VOLUNTEER continued from page 1 group has its work cut out. “The volunteers will paint the gymnasium and exterior walls, fix the restrooms and anything else that would need improvement,” she said. However, the main project will be building a fence around the basketball court. The current conditions, according to Leo Barrera, a SLA graduate and student recruiter for the event, are unsafe because the court is next to a busy street. While revamping the facility in one day may seem overly ambitious, Amy Martin, SLA coordinator, feels it can be done. “I don’t think we will have any problems completing everything that needs to be done,” she said, adding that Home Depot is making the task a little bit easier by donating supplies. The SLA is not limiting the scope of its community service project to just fixing up the facility; members are also collecting construction paper, glue sticks, crayons and other school supplies for children who attend the club. “I’m nervous that we won’t be able to collect enough supplies,” said Deidra Johnson, SLA member and senior marketing major. However, SLA is not alone in its search for supplies to donate. At least 12 other UTPA organizations are col-

Amy Martin FOR A CAUSE - UTPA student Freddy Guerra paints a wall at a Rio Bravo, Mexico, school last year as part of Make a Difference Day, held Oct. 28 every year. This year members of the Student Leadership Academy and others will be donating their time to the Boys and Girls Club facility in Alamo.

lecting school supplies to help with the project. Anyone wishing to donate supplies still has time to do so, Johnson added. The SLA will be collecting supplies until

resident. “They aren’t appealing to an educated mass, which is definitely a negative thing.” Colmenero believes immigration and poverty matters are issues the Valley should be focusing on, since “any decision made up north will affect us, and a lot of candidates are trying to keep us from thinking about this.” On Oct. 10, Friedman caused a stir when he came to UTPA and spoke in the Student Union Theater. On Friday, Bell will try his hand at a college crowd when he gives a speech in SBS 107 at 11:45 a.m.

Oct. 28. However, according to Barrera, making donations is not the only way to contribute to the project. “We have about 80 volunteers for the renovation project, but I’m pushing

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for more,” he said. To volunteer for the SLA’s Make a Difference Day project, stop by their office in the University Center, Room 104.

ment has not identified any suspects. “It is hard to say if it is students or not. Everybody can be a suspect,” said Loya. University police urge the college community to report any suspicious activity in the parking lots. Caution-worthy behaviors include people simply hanging out in the parking lot near a vehicle with directional side mirrors. “Suspicious activity is obvious,” said Loya. “You see people get out of their vehicle and they have an agenda, they know in what direction they are going. Someone who is hanging around the parking lot by these vehicles does not seem right. It’s gut instinct.” Recommendations to avoid being the victim of theft are to be cautious of where one parks and to park in well-lit areas. Alberto Aguirre, a 2006 Suburban owner, said he is taking many precautions in light of the news. “I come in the evenings, so I usually will park in the meters to avoid the walk but mostly because I don’t want anything happening to my car,” said Aguirre, an engineering graduate student from McAllen. Any suspicious activity or theft may be reported via telephone at (956) 3167151 or via e-mail at crimeline@panam.edu.


NEWS

Page 12

October 26, 2006

CHILDREN continued from page 3

TUTORING continued from page 3 leader may take a different approach to helping students learn how to become better students for the class, how to improve their study habits, their notes, or how to read their books.” Being both a student and an instructor has given Salinas an added advantage. In addition to better understanding chemistry, she is also gaining valuable work experience teaching psychology. “I’ve learned that there is no problem with getting help because no one is all-knowing, and the guidance has helped me keep up with the professor in class,” she said. “Working with the program is helping me get relevant work experience and I’ve found that you reinforce what you’ve already learned when you teach.” Participation in the SIP is completely voluntary, and the program has the capacity to help many students throughout the university. “Students may attend sessions anytime they want to as long as the sessions are being held. It is a student service although it is limited to specific courses,” said Ovalle. Some of the courses offered include biology, math, psychology, and sociology.

Onydia Garza/ The Pan American STUDY TIME - Nancy Salinas, a senior psychology major, reads her textbook during a Supplemental Instruction session. In addition to receiving help with chemistry, Salinas is also leads a psychology study group with the program.

So far, the program has worked with about 389 students, but has the potential to help more than 1,000, according to Ovalle. The success of the SIP is still being evaluated, as it’s still in its first semes-

ter; however, nationally the added help has improved students’ chances of passing their classes. “Right now I don't have any projected ‘success rate’ since we’re just starting,” said Ovalle. “Nationally, I think I read or

heard somewhere that the pass rate of students in the program is about 15 percent higher than those who don’t attend.”

infrared capabilities, walkie-talkies, a tripod, candles and emergency kits. Compasses also come in very handy.

equipment, especially the tripod, to ensure that what they find is truly paranormal. “Sometimes you get mistaken and shake too much that you get something odd, but it’s really your fault because you’re moving around too much,” she said. Rivera wants to try to get a recorder to pick up electronic voice phenomena. The theory is that ghosts can speak to individuals on certain frequencies, frequencies a recorder is capable of picking up. “When I hear ‘get out’ clearly on a tape, that’s when I’m leaving,” Rivera said. She also said safety is always the main concern for any outing, whether in

For more information regarding supplemental instruction, call (956) 381-3588.

Casas, a junior bilingual education major. “A parent should let the child have somewhat of an input in the activities they want to do.” In addition, Casas, an Edinburg resident, said parents should listen to children and allow them to have playtime activities of their choosing. “If a child wants to play outside, let them have fun,” she said. “It’s healthier than sitting in front of TV playing video games.” Elizabeth Quintinilla, assistant director of the Child Development Center, said children should just be children. “A mother knows how long a minute can be to a child, so spending 15 minutes outdoors with a child can be healthy for both of them,” Quintanilla said. Salinas added that allowing children to spend time outdoors with supervision is a little something a parent can do to help their child develop better. “Instead of playing with your children indoors, take them for a walk or let them run around and be kids,” said Salinas. “It’s an excellent experience for the kids.”

GHOSTS continued from page 3 out of your control.” So far, one of the places the group has visited is the Alton bus crash site where a school bus was hit by a CocaCola truck in 1989 and sent off the road into a caliche pit; 21 kids died in the tragic accident. Viewers have reported seeing what looks like a bus still sitting in the water, even thought the actual vehicle was already pulled out of the water. There have also been reports of individuals sitting on the cliff near the road. Visiting sites like the one in Alton can bring a flurry of emotions. “There’s a somber affect that it has on people, a very grim feeling that you get,” Rivera said. “Some people might get sad, because you have to respect

what happened. It’s no place to make jokes, although some people might do it to ease their fears.” Reyes said her cynical nature helps when searching for true paranormal events. “I’m more of a skeptic, so it helps me view what is real and what’s not,” she said. “Some people might mistake it because they’re looking so hard that they’ll mistake anything.” Reyes and Rivera both said the best way to avoid making mistakes is to do extensive research work before ever setting out to explore a site. “If you go blind, you won’t know what to look for,” Reyes said. Some of the equipment they always take includes video cameras with

Q

“It’s something you don’t see every day, something out of your hands, out of the mundane. It’s a force that exists without you..” - Margaret Rivera, junior art major “If there’s electromagnetic interruptions, then you know something is going on, so you just stay in that one spot,” Reyes said. She added that it was very important to carry those specific pieces of

a physical or spiritual sense. “Most people use prayers. Some use St. Michael. It depends on your religion,” Rivera said. Rivera herself follows Holy Death, which she plans on calling upon on Friday when the ghost hunters head out to the Toluca Ranch in Progreso. The land used to accommodate a war hospital, which dated back to the late 19th century. “There’s got to be some residue of their energy there leftover,” she said. “Hopefully we’ll encounter some of it, but not on a dangerous level.” Anyone interested in the paranormal should contact Reyes or Rivera at the Gamer’s Club cubicle on the second floor of the UC.


October 26, 2006

SPORTS

Volleyball team loses eighth in a row, fall to 4-21 Lady Broncs’ errors lead to downfall Staying positive and giving 100 percent effort is what the Lady Broncs are doing to overcome their eight-game skid. UTPA fell to South Dakota State University Friday and to North Dakota State Saturday. Errors proved to be the determining factor as the team fell in three straight sets in both games. Oct. 6-7, the Lady Broncs hosted the SDSU Lady Jackrabbits but suffered two losses in three straight sets. Friday night’s game had the same outcome as UTPA fell 30-14, 30-27 and 30-16, making the record 4-21 on the season. UTPA started off slow in the first frame but came back strong in the second. They fought hard but the Lady Jackrabbits’ powerful offensive was a little too much. SDSU finished with a .442 hitting percentage with 53 kills and only seven errors. With the Lady Broncs having had just six home games this year, no one can deny that the number of road games has had an impact. “Road games are definitely not easy, and it does take a toll on your body,” said senior Karen Lyons. “We’re trying to salvage what is left of the rest of the season, and we’re all trying to have fun on the court.” Saturday night the green and orange traveled to North Dakota State for a rematch against the Lady Bisons, but fell short as NDSU picked up the win in straight sets, 30-20, 30-16 and 30-20. The Lady Broncs led in all categories including kills, total attacks, assists and digs but errors proved to be costly again. Sophomore Kellie Philips led UTPA with 16 kills and seven digs and Lyons collected a match-high 15 digs. This season has been tough especially for head coach Dave Thorn, who only wants to see his team succeed. Through it all he has been supportive and remains hopeful. The Lady Broncs will travel to Beaumont to face Lamar University and then be back at the Field House Nov. 7 for their last home game of the season. It will also be the final home game for seniors Heather Bravo and Lyons. “The last home game will be the final chapter in my volleyball career, so of course, I want it to end on a positive note and with a win,” said Bravo, the 5-foot-6-inch libero.

Footballers set for competition at Region IV tournament Men advance after 2-1 victory over UTB A South Texas showdown at high noon last Saturday yielded an invitation for the Broncs to advance to the Region IV soccer tournament to be held from Oct. 27-29 in San Marcos. The game between men’s Lone Star South division rivals The University of Texas-Pan American and The University of Texas at Brownsville sent the Broncs to the postseason for the second time in the team’s two-year history. The intensity of the game was evident as the top spot in the division was on the line. A quick goal by Jose Ramon, followed by the game-winning goal of Eder Islas, a sophomore kinesiology major, secured the Bronc victory and guaranteed their spot in the tournament. The Broncs defeated UTB 2-1. UTPA will now go on to face 12 of the toughest teams in the state, including soccer Goliath Texas Tech University, ranked number one. The Broncs have their first game on Friday at 6 p.m. against Texas A&M University, followed by a second match against TCU Saturday. The teams are bracketed into four groups of three teams. If UTPA can emerge with the most points in their respective bracket, it’ll move on to the next round Sunday. Although only one team will emerge as champion, the last two teams will both be in a for a treat as they both receive invitations to the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association’s National Soccer Tournament. Bronc Soccer Club President Luis Aguirre, a criminal justice major from Alamo, said, “We all think that we have a good chance of winning the tournament.”

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SPORTS

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October 26, 2006

Bronc basketball gets facelift for ‘06-‘07 By PATRICK KENNEDY The Pan American The advent of the new basketball season at The University of Texas-Pan American has brought with it the ambitions of two talented teams, the hopes of fans everywhere, and the drive to succeed from two very determined coaching staffs. Heading up the newly assembled men’s basketball coaching staff is Tom Schuberth, a man with over 24 years of coaching experience and a vigor for winning. Schuberth feels that his most important characteristic is his ability to “adjust and adapt” his game strategy in order to defeat opponents. With his longterm goal of sending the UTPA Broncs to March Madness, Schuberth looks to hit the ground running, and to quickly add notches to the team’s win column. Assisting Schuberth in this year’s quest for the United Basketball League championship are three fresh faces to the university. The first new assistant coach is Lance Madison, no stranger to many a championship game. During his history as a coach, Madison helped UT-San Antonio gain the Southland Conference

Schuberth

Leonard

Championship, and assisted with the Redlands Community College Cougars’ three Bi-State West Conference Championships. “I’m used to winning, and I expect to win,” Madison said. Also joining the new coaching staff is Ben Johnson, a fresh graduate from the University of Minnesota who scored over 1,000 points in his college career. Johnson feels that his age will be a key factor for encouraging the guys on the team. “They know that I’ve been there myself, and I can relate to them,” said Ben Johnson, who was a starter for both Northwestern University and the University of Minnesota. Brad Enright has also been enlisted to help lead the Broncs to a winning season this year, after they won just seven times in 2005-2006. Enright comes to the university after helping the Paris Junior College Dragons earn the 2005 NCAA National Championship. He believes his experience can offer the team “a different perspective and alternatives.” Adding to the many new assets of the team, Enright brings with him much experience in recruiting, as he helped assemble squads at both Paris Junior

Enright

B. Johnson

College and the U.S. Naval Academy. Aiding the coaches are Grant Leonard, new administrative assistant, and Darren Johnson, new graduate manager. Leonard is a William Penn University graduate who served as recruitment coordinator for Washington College. He has proven himself as an experienced basketball player, and off the court, Leonard was a member of the Academic All-Region Team. As a player, he helped Washington College win 32 games. Darren Johnson is charged with many responsibilities including supervising all team managers, setting up practices and being in charge of media equipment. He brings his coaching experience from “across the pond” as assistant coach of the London Tower’s Basketball Team in England. “I want to do the best job that I can,” Darren Johnson said. LADY BRONC STAFF Returning to lead the Lady Broncs into victory this year is the university’s most successful women’s basketball coach in institution history, DeAnn Craft. This year marks Craft’s fourth

Madison

D. Johnson

season with the program, and the first season that she will be able to help the Lady Broncs compete for a league championship. Craft has had many years of head coaching experience besides those garnered here at this university. She served as head coach of Lamar University’s Lady Cardinal Basketball team. After joining up with UTPA, Craft’s first two seasons were the most successful seasons ever seen by a women’s basketball team here at the university, including 14 wins two years ago. Now she looks to take on a young team this year and turn it into a success. Assisting Craft in making this season a victorious one are three coaches. The first is Jill Davis, in her fourth season in Edinburg. Over the past three seasons, Davis has benefited the Broncs by using her expertise on perimeter play to guide players, and by working hard on the recruitment of incoming talent. Prior to joining UTPA, Davis worked under Craft at Lamar. Coaching in her third season is Keelah Wilson, who as a player once averaged 14.8 points per game as a lethal competitor on the court. She brings

Bell

Wilson

enthusiasm for winning to the team, along with knowledge of rebounding. Here, she works with recruitment, the coaching of low-post players, and is working strenuously toward building a video library for the team. Sept. 7, a new assistant coach was added to the women’s basketball coaching staff, Chelsea Bell. Bell spent the previous two seasons with the Lady Broncs as the administrative assistant. During her time as a student-athlete, she served two tours as team captain for the University of South Alabama women’s basketball team. The addition of Bell gives the staff four highly trained and experienced minds that can be put together to formulate a winning game plan for the coming season. Combined, these coaches will pit all of their strengths and skills against those of UTPA’s opponents on and off the court. Winning games is not the only priority. The coaches are also very concerned about the academic welfare of their players. Working diligently in the preseason, both coaching staffs believe that the teams are well prepared for their season openers in two weeks.

Davis

Craft

Senior runner looks back on collegiate career By RACHEL REIDA The Pan American Edinburg native Karla Hernandez has gone through a lot during her tenure as a cross country runner at The University of Texas-Pan American. After having her fourth coach leave during this year, her senior campaign, Hernandez has shown that she can battle against the odds to become one of the top runners for the Lady Broncs. Having been a runner for three seasons, and well on her way to finishing up her fourth, Hernandez has shown the rest of the athletes, as well as the coaching staff, that she deserves to be here. In addition to being one of the top athletes for the Lady Broncs in all four of her cross country seasons, Hernandez has also been a standout in academics. “One of my biggest accomplishments I have achieved during my tenure

here at UTPA is being on the Bronc 3.0 Club for seven consecutive semesters,” Hernandez said. Student-athletes learn many things, on the field and off, and Hernandez is no different. “I have learned that you must be patient,” Hernandez said. “I am on my fourth coach already.” With the constant coaching changes, Hernandez has also picked up many different techniques of running from each individual coach through the years, which may have contributed to her success. “I have learned a lot from each coach and have learned a lot about them,” she said. “Every year I have learned a different technique of running and of coaching, which will eventually help me when I start to coach.” Hernandez has run just about every race there is during her time as a Lady Bronc, but has focused more on longer distance races, hence her partic-

ipation in the cross country seasons. Hernandez attended high school locally before enrolling at UTPA. Being able to run and pursue a college career while staying in her hometown has been a plus for Hernadez “Being closer to my family and friends helps a lot,” Hernandez said. “My biggest inspiration in my life is my mother Gloria, my grandmother Fely and my high school coach [Milton] Galloso. They have always supported me with my running no matter what, and it is great to always have them there.” As a former Edinburg High School runner, Hernandez has also found herself running with athletes at UTPA that she had competed against in the past. “At first it was weird because there was a lot of rivalry between us,” Hernandez admitted, “but then I just welcomed them.” Having run at the university for so long, Hernandez has found many

things that she likes about UTPA and competing. “I have enjoyed hanging around my friends, from the veterans like Ashley Perez to the rookies like hometown rival Rose Escovedo,” Hernandez said. “They’re not only my teammates, they’re like my sisters and are all awesome runners.” With her senior season almost over, Hernandez has accomplished a lot. She has become a leader for the Lady Broncs and feels that they can do more this season, because there are great runners coming up behind her. “This year we have one of the best teams,” Hernandez said. “All the girls are very well trained. We are all coming in 45 seconds apart from each other in every race. All of us are working hard, and with three of our top runners leaving - Lorraine Garcia, myself, and Ashley Perez - I believe that any of the young runners can take our spots and lead without a problem.”

Karla Hernandez


SPORTS

October 26, 2006

Page 15

Pro syndicate wrestling hits the Valley By ERICK QUINTERO The Pan American Upon first look, William Starns, a freshman graphic arts major at The University of Texas-Pan American, looks nothing like the wrestling stars of the World Wrestling Entertainment. He doesn’t have to; he’s an independent wrestler. Starns has always been interested in becoming a wrestler, but found himself strapped financially while pursuing his dream. “Since I was younger I wanted to get into wrestling, but I never had a real outlet in the general area,” Starns said. “I had heard of a school in San Antonio but the tuition was several thousand for six months and I just couldn’t come up with that kind of money.” After being pointed in the direction of some local wrestlers who at the time were in training at a local gym, he met Sergio Tamez, current vice president of the Pro Wrestling Syndicate and a sophomore general studies major at UTPA. Starns’ interest in wrestling was further sparked when he watched an International Wrestling Federation match broadcast on XERV Channel 9. “I was flipping channels one day and I came across the International Wrestling Federation out of Brownsville… I assumed it was just luchadores, but they were speaking English. It freaked me out,” Starns said. Starns and his friends got in touch with the IWF, went to one of its shows,

showed off their skills and eventually ended up training with the IWF for three years. Tamez’s introduction to wrestling was different, to say the least. He became interested in the sport at age 13 when his mother began dating Scorpion, a luchador from Mexico. After Scorpion taught him the basics of the trade and the psychology of wrestling, Tamez was hooked. IWF was funded and owned by Robert Bruce Tharpe, a Brownsville lawyer, but the federation eventually became dormant due to financial issues. After financial struggles halted the effort, Starns and Tamez were left with a taste for wrestling and a hunger to produce their own shows. Together they embarked on a journey to bring professional-style wrestling to UTPA and created the Pro Wrestling Syndicate, with Starns as the president of the newly formed syndicate. “Me and my boys just kind of got tired of waiting around for him (Tharpe) to come up with the money,” Starns admitted. “With UTPA [and the syndicate] being an organization, now they will provide us with a lot of little things that we would need to run a show. We figured to start the club and get some people involved and interested. Eventually we would want to start doing shows here.” The ring he and his friends use for practice does not meet safety standards for members so they need a new one. Starns said after the initial growing pains are over, he would like to begin doing events by the spring semester of

William Starns BODY SLAM - Sergio Tamez, a junior general studies major, is one of several UTPA students taking part in the new Pro Wrestling Syndicate. The organization is currently garnering support to expand from the university community.

James L. Garza HEADLOCK - John Cena (top) and Edge are two wrestlers from World Wrestling Entertainment that competed for the championship back on Jan. 29.The championship, known as the Royal Rumble, was shown on Pay-Per-View. The results from the match between the titans resulted with a win by Cena. The Pro Wrestling Syndicate hopes to develop the same excitement as their professional counterparts.

2007. “We are trying to raise money with the club to buy a ring so we can start doing live shows here at UTPA,” Starns said. The club is in its infancy and although its founding members hail from the ranks of IWF, it seeks to be independent from that company. “Even if it does pick up and we start doing shows outside of UTPA, we still want to be basically UTPA students,” Starns explained. “We have wrestlers that work for the IWF that we could call to come do shows for us, but we kind of prefer to just keep it as college students. Not so much as to try and get people into a career in wrestling, but there is a lot of people around that want to wrestle they just don’t know how to do it and they don’t have any way to do it.” The syndicate is not meant as a stepping stone to a professional career in wrestling, as Starns said. It is for students interested in wrestling as an alternative outlet for physical energy. “If the shows played out here and people excelled at what they are doing, then I don’t have any doubt in my mind that the IWF would probably pick up one or two guys and try to help them out in their career,” Starns said. “But for the most part we are just here for people that would like to wrestle, not necessarily for the rest of their lives, but for something to do.” Triauna Carey, a sophomore communication TV and film major, said the

syndicate provides an alternative toward physical fitness. “I’m more into getting in shape and things like that, so I was looking for a new way to do it and they suggested I try wrestling,” Carey said. SAFETY FIRST Starns said the training members receive includes safety measures such as learning how to roll properly and how to land. It’s safe to say that members will not be involved in any of the crazy stunts fans are accustomed to watching on television. “We don’t want anyone to end up getting hurt,” he stressed. “We have no intention of having any crazy stuff like that. We are not backyard wrestlers, and we don’t condone backyard wrestling. It’s not safe or well thought out and it makes the business look bad to an extent.” Story lines may be silly in the sport. But fans keep coming back for more. Not only are the stories entertaining, but they create color and provide much of the pageantry fans have come to love. Story lines also invent opportunities for other characters who may not necessarily want to wrestle, such as agents, referees, managers and scantily clad hot women, all of whom are in demand from the syndicate. “It’s not just wrestlers. We are in need of referees and managers and personality types in general,” Starns noted. “If they just want to be a character, you know they don’t want to actu-

ally do anything physical, we can find a spot for them. If we can find some guys who want to run their mouth or some girls that want to show off what they got then by all means we’ll find somewhere to put you.” In addition, Tamez said, “The club is not only for people that just want to learn how to wrestle; it’s for people that just like wrestling or want to watch wrestling. They don’t have to become wrestlers.” The theatrics of a wrestling match mirror the psychological aspects of the sport - for every action there is a reaction. Tamez said the thinking aspect of wrestling is something members will also be thoroughly instructed in; he compared wrestling’s psychology to that of a “Rocky” movie, where the protagonist must battle the antagonist in a fight between good and evil. “How you punch, how you kick, how you react to certain moves, they are all psychology, Tamez said. “When I punch you, you should react a certain way. You will stumble back and almost fall down.” Furthermore, Tamez said members of the syndicate can also expect to learn the terminology, watch wrestling footage from different parts of the world, much unlike what fans are used to watching, and most important of all, achieve physical fitness. “I’ve always been a fan of wrestling. It’s just a nice way to go and watch matches and learn more about wrestling in general,” he said.


SPORTS

Nikki Rowe

Editor’s Pick: Game to Watch When: Oct. 27 Time: 7:30 p.m. Where: McAllen Veterans Memorial Stadium

McAllen Memorial

Warren newest member of tennis staff By KRISTYNA MANCIAS The Pan American A former North Texas tennis star brings her expertise to The University of Texas-Pan American, as she becomes the newest member of the Bronc family. On Sept. 20, UTPA announced the addition of Robin Warren as a volunteer assistant coach for the tennis programs. The former collegiate athlete has a resume full of accolades that would impress any university. As a junior, Warren was ranked in the top five in Texas and was ranked top 15 in the country. The assistant coach was ranked 10th in the state in doubles and was number one in the state alongside her new head coach, Rob Hubbard. Warren served as the assistant tennis professional and director of junior development at the Walden Racquet Club in Montgomery, Texas. The nationally ranked tennis star has taught privately for 12 years and hopes to improve the program at UTPA. “I want to bring back the sprit of playing tennis. UTPA at one time was a first-class tennis team and this is probably the best two teams that have been here for a long time, especially the women’s team,” Warren said. Last year’s tennis team finished with a combined 10 wins, and Warren is ready to share her professional experience with her new family. “I see a lot of potential in this program,” she said. “We have a couple of players that have less experience but with our experience we can bring it out of them.”

Robin Warren

TV shows explore drama of high school football By JORGE HINOJOSA The Pan American At The University of TexasPan American there are plenty of students who used to play high school football. For some it seemed like high school would last forever, but now it is only a memory. As former players think about the time they spent on the football practice field they find themselves missing it. Even more so they miss the Friday night lights. “The practices were long and grueling. I may not have been having that much fun at the time, but when I look back, it was probably the most fun I could have. I miss it a lot actually,” said Josh Yamaguchi, a sophomore biology major who played for the McAllen Memorial Mustangs. Building on the success of a handful of football movies, television has recently gotten into

Design By DA XIE

the act, seeking to show what life is like for a high school student-athlete. “Friday Night Lights,” the big movie inspired by the book of the same name, got it all started; it has now been turned into a TV series. Plus, MTV’s “Two-a-Days” have also shed some light on the world of prep football. “That show, [‘Two-a-Days’] they have a lot more pressure than I did,” Yamaguchi said. “They were on a thirty-game winning streak, the best in the nation. They had their high school games on ESPN. That’s big time stuff for high school football… The pressure on them seems higher than most high school football teams.” Other former players note that the portrayal of details on the MTV show is realistic. “When I watch the show, they just show what they do before the game and practically just their life,” said Art Longoria,

a sophomore business management major who used to play for McAllen High. Longoria said the show was very reminiscent of what he experienced. “It was kind of similar to what we did, as far as before the game and after the game,” he noted. “There are certain lifestyles that high school football players live. You have to leave everything behind and focus when you’re out there on game night.” Longoria also added he understood what the players on the show went through each time they hit the field. “You have to try to please your family and the community. It’s pressure,” Longoria said. “You have to represent your school.” “Two-a-Days” is a documentary series of the life and role of Alabama high school football players attending Hoover High

School. The show follows the lives of Alex, a safety; Repete, a defensive lineman; Ross, the quarterback; and Max, another safety. Through nine episodes, viewers were able to take a glimpse into the preparations, the practices and the games of the entire 2005 season. The Bucs went 14-1 and notched their fourth state championship. This year, they are ranked No. 9 in the nation and trying to win their sixth state title in seven years in Class 6A, Alabama’s largest classification. The last episode of the show was shown Oct. 11, but don’t worry. “Two-aDays” had a lot of success and is likely to air a second season sometime next year. “Friday Night Lights” premiered for its first season Oct. 3 and airs Tuesdays at 8 p.m. on NBC. In this show Eric Taylor is a first-time high school coach who finds himself with the talented Dillon Panthers.

October 26, 2006  

Students search for the paranormal as part of new club New TV programs show lives of high school football players SSeeee ppaaggee 88,, 99SSe...

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