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THE

PAN AMERICAN

T h e S t u d e n t N e w s p a p e r o f T h e U n i v e r s i t y o f Te x a s - P a n A m e r i c a n

October 19, 2006

Students lobby for new graduation venue By EDWARD ELGUEZABAL The Pan American A group of seniors led by Elaine Gonzalez and Katrina Newell, both communication studies majors, met Tuesday with Student Government Association (SGA) senators in hopes of getting their support on a petition to move commencement ceremony to the

Dodge Arena. The group has been working for several weeks on the petition, designed to shift commencement exercises in order to allow more relatives of graduating seniors to share this accomplishment. The petition was distributed throughout each college on campus and has been signed by

approximately 730 students. SPACE ISSUES One of the main factors for switching the graduation location, according to Newell, is the need for more space as UTPA’s graduation rate increases. In 2001, UTPA granted 1,431 bachelor’s

degrees, 359 master’s degrees, and eight doctorates. Those numbers increased by 38, 46 and 50 percent respectively in 2005. Francisco Alday, a senior majoring in communication studies, said he supports the request because the Field House in no longer equipped to host an event of such magnitude given the larg-

er numbers. “As students, we have a right to choose where we want to have this ceremony,” Alday said. “After all, this is a day we worked so hard for, and we should not have to limit the number of loved ones we can invite to share this moment with us.” In addition, Alday said his grand-

See GRADUATION page 11

Protesters take on fast-food restaurant By ANA LEY The Pan American A crowd of young protesters stood in front of a McDonald’s restaurant Monday afternoon, picketing against the company. Their beef? That the fast-food chain promotes unhealthy food, slaughters animals for meat, and is a major player in globalization, among other criticisms Clad in black, the group of teens and 20-somethings protested against the company as part of “International AntiMcDonald’s Day,” and the United Nations World Food Day. They picketed a franchise located at the intersection of Savannah Avenue and 10th Street, holding signs with complaints such as, “Meat is Murder,” and “McSlavery,” “For the Environment” and “Eat Local.” Several teens in mohawks even bore black-andred anarchy signs. Though banding together against the same corporation, the protesters’ individual causes varied. Jordan Hughes, an undeclared sophomore at The University of Texas-Pan American, said she was against McDonald’s and its unethical treatment of animals.

See MCDONALD’S page 11

UTPA plans radio program By JAVIER CAVAZOS The Pan American Contrary to what the rumor mill will have you believe, The University of Texas-Pan American will not be getting its own radio station, said Fred Mann, lecturer for the department of communications. However, while a radio station is

not in the works, Mann did say UTPA is set to format a pilot for a monthly news magazine on local public radio station KMBH-FM 88.1, which will be run by his special topics class Bronc TV. “What we’re doing is the pilot for a show we would like to do in the spring semester,” Mann said. He added that he spoke with Peter

Dabrowski, associate dean for the College of Arts and Humanities, about the possibility of putting the university on the air, and the latter responded enthusiastically. “The support and encouragement we’re getting from the deans is wonderful,” said Mann. “We’ve been given lots of freedom by Dr. Dabrowski.”

The show will focus on campus issues and run 15 to 20 minutes long. If the pilot is a success Mann will consider running a monthly program on KMBH. “The ultimate decision would be left to administrators, but the news magazine is a great way to start,” Mann said. Expanding Web radio is another

See RADIO page 11

News

A&E

Sports

UTPA participating in “Save Lids to Save Lives” program

Take a look at the highs and lows of the fall TV season

Bronc cheerleaders to abide by new safety regulations

See page 3

See page 8, 9

See page 16


PAGE 2

R EADER FORUM

October 19, 2006 THE

PAN AMERICAN

Web Site Review By: Sandra Gonzalez

1201 West University, CAS 170 Edinburg, Texas 78539 (956) 381-2541 Fax: (956) 316-7122 http://www.panam.edu/dept/panamerican 56th Year – No. 9

Just as my palms were becoming sweaty with worry over my lack of an adequate Web site for my next review, a sign came to me from above. Well, actually, the little man in my computer told me I had mail. Thankfully, it was not a spam mail offering me 10 percent off an “herbal enhancement.” It was a suggestion from a reader. I’m hungry. What’s for dinner? www.etsy.com.

Editor Claudette Gonzalez ThePanAmerican@gmail.com News Editor

A&E Editor

Sandra Gonzalez sandra_panamerican@yahoo.com

Frank Calvillo

hennero@ msn.com

Sports Editor Luke Koong lkoong2004 @yahoo.com

Design Editor Erika Lopez lopez475@ yahoo.com

Photo Editor Onydia Garza north14star @aol.com

Designers Roy Bazan crazy_restless @yahoo.com

Laura C. Gomez lm.gomez@ yahoo.com

Gregorio Garza the_nataku@ yahoo.com

Reporters and Photographers Brian Carr Javier Cavazos Roderick Dorsey Leslie Estrada Trey Serna

Ana Ley Maria Mazariegos Kristyna Mancias Angela Salazar

Adviser Dr. Greg Selber Secretary Anita Casares Ad Manager Carolina Sanchez

Asst. Ad Manager Lillian Villarreal

Advertising information spubs@panam.edu Delivery Thursday at Noon

The Pan American gladly accepts letters from students, staff and faculty regarding newspaper content or current issues. The Pan American reserves the right to edit submissions for grammar and length. Please limit submission length to 300 words. The Pan American cannot publish anonymous letters, or submissions containing hate speech or gratuitous personal attacks. Letters are printed at the discretion of the editor and must include the writer’s name, classification/title and phone number.

The Pan American is the official student newspaper of The University of Texas-Pan American. Views presented are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the university.

Hrs. of Entertainment:

Is quality sacrificed when you buy homemade goods?

My love for eBay is no secret; just ask my bank account. Although, I have to admit, there are only so many times you can search for Wentworth Miller memorabilia and shoes before you begin to get a little bored. My qualm with eBay actually began last Christmas when I attempted to answer the question, “What do you get someone who has everything?” Apparently, the answer is a gift card to Red Lobster (Give me a break. I was on the highway and it was there). Admittedly, it was not the stunner of a gift I was looking to give. As a consequence, I’ve vowed to try not to mark the birth of Jesus by spreading the love of cheddar biscuits ever again. My answer came last week when I was sent a link to Etsy. Much like eBay, Etsy is a selling and trading site that gives users a chance to sell everything from accessories to clothes to art. However, the catch on Etsy is that everything sold must be a handmade creation. This makes for an interesting surfing experience, especially for those who can appreciate unique looks and products like those offered by Etsy, which was founded in June 2005 by (oddly enough) four college guys (who I predict will be the next wave of rich nerds to follow the Google guys).

Web site Overview:

As much as I love this site, I have to admit that visually it’s not as attractive as it could be. Also, there were a few things on there that were a bit hard to find. One of the most conflicting parts of Etsy was its search functions. I both loved and hated this part. Everyone needs a shopping Web site to have a complex and thorough search function. Etsy has that…kind of. For example, if I wanted an idea of something to match my hot pink fuzzy handcuffs, I would be in luck because Etsy has a nifty search-by-color function called ColorSpace. The site gives you color swatches that you drag your cursor over and ColorSpace picks out random listed items that match the color you pick. It’s not only addicting, but don’t try out this function while under the influence of anything. (If you drag your cursor over the colors really fast it looks like a beautiful rainbow. And that’s without smoking anything.) However, I have a big problem with their normal search function because you can’t filter results by size like on eBay. For someone of stunted stature, like yours truly, that could come to be a bit of a pain.

Graphics/Photos:

Love eBay? Try Etsy. 2 hours!

It’s no surprise that Etsy has its work cut out trying to stand out apart from eBay, with which it has no official connection. One of the ways it does this is by allowing users to write bios about themselves. This part of the site could have gone terrible wrong if sellers wrote lengthy metaphors for their damaged lives and how said life has influenced their “art.” As it turns out, few do. In fact, many take advantage of this space to give valid explanations of their work. Of course, you also get a colorful few who claim to be elves working in a Norwegian factory. Unless the claims are true, the outlandish stories should be left to old wise men with long white beards. I like reading stories about people and how they got their start; the more detailed and distinctive, the better. However, if they are in fact true let me go on record saying I’m very sorry if I’ve offended any readers who may be elves. Though I’m not one known for my apologies, it’s been a long-standing fear of mine that one night little people with pointy hats will come into my room and steal me. Since I don’t feel like sleeping with my hammer in hand, please accept my apologies. Elves aside, most of the work on Etsy seems to be genuinely handcrafted. In case you find something that isn’t, Etsy has equipped every page with a “Flag this item as not handmade” button. After surfing the site for a few hours, I should mention the quality of work on Etsy sometimes rivals that of “Project Runway.” Some of these sellers are truly talented. Though, as with anything, you have to filter through some pretty weird crap to find the good stuff. Sometimes, sellers’ overly eccentric items are the metaphorical leprechaun guarding the pot of gold. The same goes for music, accessories, toys, and home décor. However, it is well worth the search. A few pages at Etsy have as much (if not more) individuality than is found in 10 bins at Ropa Usada, and minus the fleas. Frankly, I wish more people shopped here. Then, I wouldn’t have to see 20 people every day wearing the same “Hottie” shirt that only five people in this world should be wearing. Furthermore, Wentworth, McDreamy, Mr. Clooney, Angelina and I have too much taste to don them.

Content:

Etsy.com wowed me. Thanks to reader and Etsy seller Kenia, no one will get a gift card for Christmas (PIMPING ALERT: visit her jewelry store on Etsy called UniqueInnovations.) Do you have a Web site to promote your band or where you go to entertain yourself? If so, e-mail me at Sandra_Panamerican@yahoo.com. Cyber lovin’ is for losers: no porn.

Side note:

IN THE NEXT ISSUE OF

THE PAN AMERICAN

Available Oct. 26

Vying for the title

Read if you dare

- Find out the latest on the Texas governor’s race

- Find out what haunting events are going on in the world of entertainment


N EWS

News in brief: There will be a Discrimination/Sexual Harassment Awareness Seminar Oct. 20 in the Student Union Theater from 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Attendees are asked to arrive 15 minutes early to register.

Future distinguished speakers announced By SANDRA GONZALEZ The Pan American The University of Texas-Pan American’s Distinguished Speakers Series has given students a little less than a two-week notice. However, the three-year-old series is far from quitting. In fact, in 11 days a visit from actor Louis Gossett Jr. will mark the beginning of this year’s cycle of speakers. Following Gossett’s Oct. 30 appearance will be Nobel laureate Rigoberta Menchu, broadcast journalist Dan Rather and former U.N. Weapons Inspector Scott Ritter, according to Samuel Smith, Distinguished Speakers Committee (DSC) chairman.

Argelia Barerra, Student Government Association president and DSC member, said the committee tried to think beyond “big names” when picking this year’s speakers. “The committee wanted to bring recognized speakers,” she said. “We didn’t just want popular people, but people who have been distinguished in the nation and in the world.” In addition, Smith said they looked at people from a variety of fields. “The students did look at athletes this year. They looked at an educator,” he said. “We couldn’t make all of those things happen. A lot of times it turns into

See SPEAKERS page 12

2006

2007

OCT. 30

NOV. 28

LOUIS GOSSETT JR.

RIGOBERTA MENCHU´

Academy actor

Award-winning

FEB. 13, 2007

SCOTT RITTER

DAN RATHER

Recipient of the 1992 Nobel Peace Prize

Former anchor Evening News.

of

APRIL 5, 2007

CBS

Former U.N. Inspector

Weapons

Sessions to teach assault-victim advocates Portuguese By LEZETTE VILLARREAL The Pan American One out of every six women across the United States has been a victim of some form of sexual assault, according to the Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network. With this fact in mind, it is no surprise The University of Texas-Pan American is raising awareness about sexual assault among students, faculty, and staff. Mujeres Unidas and the Campus

Assault Response Effort organization will host a free four-week training session starting Oct. 21 for any person interested in becoming an advocate for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault. According to Christine Carruthers, student judicial affairs officer, sexual assaults are underreported and can cause a great deal of emotional and physical pain. “We want to provide the best services available for anyone having to go

through a situation like that,” she said. However, sometimes assistance can only be given to those in need when volunteers are available. Many times volunteers for organizations are scarce. Nelda Hernandez, volunteer coordinator for Mujeres Unidas, believes that volunteers are a crucial part of every organization. “We have our faithful volunteers, but any new recruit is always welcomed,” said Hernandez. “The more volunteers we have for our organization,

the better we can help the community and the survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault.” Victim advocates will attend a four-week training session that will cover the dynamics of domestic violence and sexual assault. Carruthers said the event will also teach about medical and criminal components and the intervention process. The training will begin Oct. 21 and will continue until Nov. 9 on Tuesdays

Jennifer Terrazas/The Pan American SAVING - Claudia Barreto, a sophomore advertising major, was responsible for bringing Yoplait’s Save Lids to Save Lives program to UTPA.

Next time you stroll through the dairy aisle of HEB, you might be able to help save the life of another woman in the Valley. The University of Texas-Pan American faculty and staff are participating in Yoplait Yogurt’s annual Save Lids to Save Lives program for the first time in university history. The UTPA Valley Border Health Office (VBHO) has set a goal for collecting 1,000 lids to help against breast cancer. Claudia Barreto, a sophomore advertising major from Pharr, works in the VBHO and came up with the idea to take part in the Yoplait program. “Breast cancer is something that touches all women. Ninety percent that get it never had it in their family,” Barreto said. “It is a misconception that if my

By CLAUDETTE GONZALEZ The Pan American

grandmother doesn’t have it, if my mother doesn’t have it, then I won’t get it.” She said she selected the program because it is a good way to get the UTPA community involved and spread awareness about breast cancer. “I want faculty and staff to help out so that they can be a part of something,” she said. “It’s a great way to get their participation and start thinking about breast cancer and the families.” According to the American Cancer Society, 34 percent of Hispanic females diagnosed with breast cancer die from it. Data from the state health department estimates 200 women out of 1,000 living in the Rio Grande Valley will develop it. By saving lids and turning them in, people will enable Yoplait to donate money toward research in breast cancer. Each lid sent in translates to 10 cents toward the Susan G. Komen Breast

Maria Consuelo Guerrero is determined to bring a taste of the Brazilian language and culture to students at The University of Texas-Pan American. Accordingly, Guerrero, a lecturer in the department of modern and classical languages and literature, will offer the university’s first Portuguese class in the spring. “Our university is growing. We’re offering more programs. Now the language department is growing as well,” Guerrero said. “It’s so important for me that we’re offering more languages because there are many advantages to taking a foreign language.” According to Guerrero, the new Portuguese class will focus on communication. “We’ll have a textbook, we’ll study grammar, we’ll read, we’ll write, we’ll listen to music and we’ll watch some videos. But, the concentration and the purpose is going to be communicative,” Guerrero said. “In fact, the grammar and the vocabulary are going to be practical, common daily situations.” As a student in her native Mexico City, Guerrero learned Portuguese by listening to Brazilian music and participating in theater productions with Brazilian

See CANCER page 12

See PORTUGUESE page 12

See ASSAULT page 12

Yogurt lids raise funds By LUKE KOONG The Pan American

classes to be offered


Page 4

A&E

October 19, 2006


NEWS

October 19, 2006

Page 5

Local Habitat branch gets new director By CLAUDETTE GONZALEZ The Pan American The walls of Jack Tierney’s office at Rio Grande Habitat for Humanity are plastered with enormous strips of butcher paper, each containing lists of goals for the organization. Tierney is the new executive director for the Rio Grande Valley branch of the national non-profit group that provides low-cost housing to families in need through a system of “sweat equity” and volunteer workers. Although he’s only been in the position for about a month, Tierney already has a good idea of what needs to get done, and how. “This is really kind of our goals up here [on the walls)] The basic one is to get houses built,” Tierney said. “We want six this fiscal year and 12 next fiscal year and 20 the third year.” Tierney, a husband and father, says though he is “well past retirement age,” he is still up for the challenge. “I decided that I was looking for a challenge and this is a challenge,” he said. “I think this organization has a lot of potential. I think we can do a lot of good in this community.” In all, there are 34 houses in the Las Milpas subdivision near Pharr where crews have been working; that project is almost done. Now the organization is looking to acquire more land, either through donations or by purchasing low-cost land. “We’re running out of lots out there,” Tierney said. “We need to find

SOAKED - Raymond Crews gets dunked at an event held by the Association of Information Technology Professionals Oct 12. Crews, Jesus Tanguma, and Wayne Headrick, all associate professors of computer information systems and quantative methods, and Assistant Police Chief James Loya participated in the event in hopes of bringing awareness of AITP. Cynthia Castilla, president of AITP, said while they did not raise much money, they accomplished their main goal of the day. "It was more to get our name out there, especially since we'd been dormant for two years," she said. "We got a lot of feedback and positive reactions." For more information on AITP email Castilla at cynthia@aiptutpa.org or visit www.aitputpa.org

some land but the problem is we can’t pay too much for the land. If we pay too much then we price people out.” In order to keep homes within reach of the low-income families that Habitat serves, Tierney focuses on total monthly expense for each family. “We’re trying to hold the cost to the family at about $300 a month,” he said. “With that $300 a month, they pay the principal on their loan, and they pay insurance and the taxes.” And Tierney knows a thing or two about loans since his professional background is in banking. The Cambridge, Mass., native first moved to the Valley 24 years ago when he accepted a job as the president of a Harlingen bank. Since then, he has been at the helm of several financial institutions in the area. Most recently, he was president of McAllen National Bank before semiretiring and getting into independent financial consulting. “I think I have some skills that I could help them with. We build houses, then we bankroll them,” Tierney said. “Having been a banker, I know a little bit about how mortgages run and that’s one half of what we do. We’re like a bank on one side and a little construction company on the other.” LOOKING AT THE RESUME But while Tierney’s professional background may be in finance, his educational background is a different story. He began his college education at Harvard University but after only a year he transferred to West Point, where he

studied civil engineering. Then, during 10 years in the Air Force, he completed a law degree. Although these degrees may seem unrelated to his career, Tierney said he learned valuable skills through his military education. “In a lot of ways, the service academies are great places to learn how to handle people, how to manage and lead, which is really what you’re doing in any organization,” he explained. Tierney also has experience working with charitable organizations. For two years he was president of the local food bank. “I went through a lot of the growing pains at the food bank and I saw this and it’s a lot the same,” Tierney said. “It’s basic need that we’re fulfilling.” In Tierney’s opinion, owning a home is key to improving a family’s station in life and their standard of living “Instead of renting a substandard place for $300 a month, for $300 a month they become taxpayers. They have to start to pay property taxes. They start to build equity in their house, and at some point they own a house,” Tierney said. “If you look at what’s the biggest asset most of the people in the United States own, it’s their home.” But Tierney said it is sometimes hard to find families who qualify for a Habitat home. The two main requirements are that the family members be legal residents or U.S. citizens, and that they have a steady source of income within a certain range, depending on the size of the family.

“It’s not a major amount of income but a lot of these people don’t have even a steady job, or particularly if they work off the books, if they work in the cash economy, it’s hard for them to show that they have a steady income,” Tierney said. After find a qualifying family, however, Tierney said Habitat does all it can to help them pay off the house. Once we get them in the house, if they hit a bump in the road, if somebody gets sick or gets laid off, we don’t have to collect right away,” he said. “If they’re making a good faith effort, as long as they’re keeping the taxes and the insurance current then we can work with them a bit.” According to Tierney, more often

than not they do succeed. “Since 1988 we’ve built 74 total houses and about 10 of them have been paid off,” Tierney said. “That many paid off in less than 20 years is really amazing. Rio Grande Habitat for Humanity is currently looking for volunteers to man its office and warehouse. “The thing we need right now is volunteers in the office,” Tierney said. “In order to keep costs down we have to have a limited staff but we have a lot of things that need to be done.” For more information on volunteering, call the Rio Grande Habitat for Humanity office at (956)686-7455.

Claudette GonzalezThe Pan American HARD WORK - Rudy Abrego and Jesus Pina put in sweat equity on a house in Habitat for Humanity’s Las Milpas subdivision.

Sandra Gonzalez/The Pan American


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RT S A E N T& E RTA I N M E N T

Editor’s Pick: Must-see movie “Marie Antoinette” starring Kirsten Dunst directed by Sofia Coppola

Gala offers dining, prizes, more for good cause

By LESLIE ESTRADA The Pan American The Women’s Athletic Club (WAC) is getting ready for its annual fundraising gala. This year the organization will be putting on a Caribbean Carnival Oct. 21. WAC is an organization that collects funds for the women’s athletic department. Members of this organization consist mostly of staff in the department and community members. Students who are interested are welcome to join. “Caribbean Carnival is our yearly fundraiser,” said Pegjohngy Moses, assistant athletics director for compliance services and senior administrator of the women’s department. “It is the gala that we put on every year to raise funds to give scholarships to female athletes here at The University of Texas-Pan American.” This year the event will take place at the university’s Annex Building located on Closner. It is scheduled to start at 7 p.m. and will go on until midnight. Tickets cost $50 per person and they include everything from being able to enter the different auctions and contests, to being able to enter the dancing

competition and enjoy the food and beverages provided. “Most people don’t eat before going there because the food is so enjoyable that it is like dinner for them,” Moses said. The gala will be filled with many fun activities for everybody. Two major auctions will take place during the night. “We are going to have a silent auction where we are going to have mostly the smaller gifts,” Moses said. “People can actually take them home as decorations, or gifts for friends or family members.”

A live auction will also take place, in which a lot of big items will be available. “Among other things, we have a plasma television that will be a part of this auction,” said Moses. “People from the maquilas were kind enough to donate it for us.” For more information about the Carribean Carnival, please contact the athletic department at (956) 381-2221 or (956) 381-2383. Moses added that local eye sur-

geon Dr. Carlos Manrique donated a laser eye surgery, which will be a part of the live auction. “We have many sponsors,” she said. “People donate most of the articles being auctioned.” Funds raised during this event will be given directly to female student athletes at UTPA in the form of scholarships. “In past galas we have been able to raise enough money to give scholarships to students who are not competing anymore,” said Moses. “This will help them until they are done with their degree.”

There is a whole list of criteria when deciding who to give the scholarships to. To discuss this, the club members got together in a committee meeting and decided the matter. This event has been taking place for the last four years, and every year the theme changes. “It is not always a carnival. It varies from year to year,” said Moses. “We’ve had many themes, including Mardi Gras.” Moses said that depending on the theme of the event, they decide on what type of music to play and the type of contests for attendees. She said attendance has gotten better with time. “We have been able to get the word out there more and more every year,” Moses said. “The more people understand what we are doing and that the purpose of the gala is to help women graduate and get their degree, the better the attendance is.” Moses mentioned that it is a fun event to attend and everyone is invited. “The food is great and you actually get to interact with the student athletes,” she said. “Students are there during the whole gala helping out with the auctions or serving food.”

McAllen coffee house opens its doors to local talents By BRIAN CARR The Pan American A bucket of beer at MoonBeans Coffee costs $15.10, and is the perfect primer for the Friday night open- mic performances. According to promotional materials, the gig starts at 8 p.m., but as members of the staff casually forewarn: “We wait for people to get here before we start.” Get to the 5401 N. 10th Street location early, choose five beers from their all-star list, plunk down three five-spots and a dime and sit in the corner of the dimly lit coffee house that showcases local artists’ work hung on beautifully painted walls. For many would-be musicians, poets and writers, open mic is the apex of their creative exposure – the only chance they get to showcase their talents.

For others, however, such performance nights are a casual dress rehearsal, giving them the opportunity to test their calm in front of a crowd, and try out new material. Conrad Ramirez’s violin broke the open-mic ice. Standing atop the twostep, quarter-circle stage he delicately navigated his horsehair bow across the four-stringed instrument, seamlessly showcasing excerpts from “The Red Violin” soundtrack, and works of his own composition. The 19-year-old Ramirez is a sophomore biology major at The University of Texas-Pan American. Since picking up the violin, he has had the chance to play in formal orchestras. The pursuit of a serious violinplayer position would interfere with his schedule. But open-mic night at MoonBeans gives him the perfect opportunity to continue to entertain with the instrument. “This is really the only chance I get [to perform],” Ramirez said. “For me it’s

just fun.” There was also a bespectacled, Spanish-speaking guitarist who sang beautiful psuedo-boleros. He prefaced each song with long verbal introductions that I couldn’t understand but appreciated nevertheless. There were more than 30 people in the MoonBeans audience at the height of attendance. Some sipped chilled white wine, leaned back in their chairs and applauded with reverence at the end of each performance. Steve Castillo, a McAllen resident and father of two, says a night at MoonBeans is the perfect evening for him and his wife. “We don’t really get a chance to go out very much because of the kids,” Castillo said. “This is the perfect thing for us because it’s relaxed but you can also have a really good time.” As the night progressed audience members watched as raindrops fell from the sky. Inside was warm, coffee-scented

Brian Carr/ The Pan American HOT CUP OF ENTERTAINMENT - MoonBeans Coffee holds open-mic night every friday.

and safe. Baths of soft light cast shadows across faces, and beer bottles sank into buckets of ice on unfinished wood tables. But it doesn’t take talent or creativ-

ity to perform at MoonBeans open-mic night. One enterprising attention seeker merely read an excerpt from “A Purpose-Driven Life,” which was kind of interesting.


Page 8

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

October 19, 2006

October 19, 2006

When fall rolls around, it’s about much more than just school and homework. It’s also time to get drawn back into the world of procrastination by watching the new fall season television line-up. This season of shows promises superhero adventures, scandalous storylines, humorous situations and more. NEW SHOWS TO WATCH A promising show that hit ABC airwaves on Sept. 28 was “Ugly Betty.” The show stars America Ferrera (Betty) who is an ordinary girl with so much to offer. But her talents and true personality are overshadowed by her not-so-hot looks when she enters the superficial world of high fashion as the editor-inchief’s personal assistant. In an interview on the late-night talk show “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” Ferrera said the show wasbased on “Yo Soy Betty La Fea” (I Am Ugly Betty), a popular, Colombian telenovela that has become an international success. The premise has been re-made in many other countries and has been successful. Betty’s charm with a U.S. audience has already won people over. “The reason I watched ‘Ugly Betty’ was because it was right before ‘Grey’s Anatomy,’” said Michelle Gonzalez, a communication disorders major. “It reminded me a lot of the movie ‘The Devil Wears Prada.’ I like it a lot and I think I’ll continue watching it on a regular basis.” Another ABC show that’s gotten a lot of attention is “The Nine,” which follows nine strangers and how they cope after experiencing a bank robbery together in Los Angeles. Unlike crime-scene shows such as “CSI” or “Law and Order: Special Victims Unit,” which have a puzzling or gruesome murder/mystery at the start and then conveniently solve the case by the end of the hour, a lot of shows this season have taken on a different formula. One storyline is usually extended a n d

Story By: Trey Serna Designed By: Roy Bazan

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

stretched throughout an entire season, leaving a major key point out of the storyline and ending each episode with a cliffhanger, such as in “The Nine.” While the show has done well, some are a little less impressed by the pilot. “I saw the premiere and I really didn’t like it,” said Jennifer Terrazas, a sophomore biology major. “To me, the plot wasn’t that good and it lacked some depth.” NBC struck TV ratings gold with the debut of “Heroes” Sept. 25. The series tells the story of people who believed they were average, until they woke up with incredible abilities and superpowers. Writers from the show say the series will follow a storyline of each character discovering what their power is, why they have it, the origins of it and much more. “I love this show because the writers are taking a different perspective on superheroes,” said Ernesto Solis, a sophomore print journalism major. “They’re taking it from a more realistic point of view.” According to NBC, it was the mostwatched program of the night; attracting 14.3 million viewers and received the highest rating for any NBC drama in five years. RETURNING SHOWS TO WATCH Some of last season’s shows left audiences at the edge of their seats for almost four months, anticipating what would happen next season. One such program was ABC’s “ D e s p e r a t e Housewives.” The dirty laundry was hung out to dry and just as one load seemed to be getting clean, it all got dirty again. “I love the drama on that show,” said April Vallejo, a freshman nursing major. “Gabrielle [Eva Longoria] has got to be

my favorite character because she has so much attitude.” “Desperate Housewives” aired for the first time Oct. 3, 2004 with a reported 21.3 million viewers, according to the Nielsen 2004-2005 TV season ranking. This made it the best new drama series for the year and the highest rated show that week. It had people talking by the water cooler the next day. However, the excitement died down during the second season when fans and critics agreed that the program didn’t live up to the dark, comedic drama of the first. “I didn’t like the second season because after the first one, it just dragged on with the same ol’ stuff and didn’t really go anywhere,” said Gonzalez, an original “Housewives” fan. “I really didn’t watch much of that season and I haven’t even watched the start of the third.” During the promotion for the third season, it was made clear by the cast and creators that this season would attempt to go back to the style of the first. Another Sunday night favorite on a different network is the crudehumored, “Family Guy.” This is one of the very few shows in history that has been cancelled and re-hired twice by the same network. “Family Guy” originally aired on Fox in 1999. It was cancelled in 2000, brought back and then cancelled again in 2002. But, the series began airing re-runs on the Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim. High ratings and strong DVD sales of the first three seasons prompted Fox to revive the series on May 1, 2005. “Family Guy” premiered its newest season on Sept. 10, with its frequent, random cutaway jokes that usually take a rudimentary stab at pop culture. “I like ‘Family Guy’ because it’s viciously humorous,” said Solis. Among other returning shows are the action-drama “Prison Break,” the Jennifer Love Hewitt vehicle “Ghost Whisperer,” the noirish mystery “Veronica Mars” and the powerhouse adventure series “Lost.” SHOWS THAT TANKED With success of new and returning shows, there’s bound to be some losers

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among the crowd. NBC may have hit a home run with “Heroes,” but they scored a major strikeout with “Kidnapped,” which premiered Sept. 20 to minimal ratings. The series was supposed to feature a different kidnapping each season, bringing in different cast members each time. NBC was disappointed with the ratings of the first three episodes and ordered production to shut down. According to the networks, when a television pilot is picked up by a network, 13 episodes are contracted. Depending on the ratings of the first few episodes, the network will order the “back nine,” bringing a total of 22 episodes per season. However, NBC has not ordered the “back nine” for this show. For the mere seven million viewers that did gain interest in the show, producers say “Kidnapped” will be moved to Saturday nights starting Oct. 21 and the storyline will tie up all loose ends by the end of the 13th episode. Another casualty in the television world is “Smith,” which premiered Sept. 19. The series was supposed to follow the lives of a group of professional thieves who keep their work separate from the rest of their lives. Looks like no one will be following anything since the show was dropped Oct. 6, after only three

episodes. It’s still unclear as to whether the series will give closure to their audience or simply vanish without a trace from TV airwaves.


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

October 19, 2006

October 19, 2006

When fall rolls around, it’s about much more than just school and homework. It’s also time to get drawn back into the world of procrastination by watching the new fall season television line-up. This season of shows promises superhero adventures, scandalous storylines, humorous situations and more. NEW SHOWS TO WATCH A promising show that hit ABC airwaves on Sept. 28 was “Ugly Betty.” The show stars America Ferrera (Betty) who is an ordinary girl with so much to offer. But her talents and true personality are overshadowed by her not-so-hot looks when she enters the superficial world of high fashion as the editor-inchief’s personal assistant. In an interview on the late-night talk show “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” Ferrera said the show wasbased on “Yo Soy Betty La Fea” (I Am Ugly Betty), a popular, Colombian telenovela that has become an international success. The premise has been re-made in many other countries and has been successful. Betty’s charm with a U.S. audience has already won people over. “The reason I watched ‘Ugly Betty’ was because it was right before ‘Grey’s Anatomy,’” said Michelle Gonzalez, a communication disorders major. “It reminded me a lot of the movie ‘The Devil Wears Prada.’ I like it a lot and I think I’ll continue watching it on a regular basis.” Another ABC show that’s gotten a lot of attention is “The Nine,” which follows nine strangers and how they cope after experiencing a bank robbery together in Los Angeles. Unlike crime-scene shows such as “CSI” or “Law and Order: Special Victims Unit,” which have a puzzling or gruesome murder/mystery at the start and then conveniently solve the case by the end of the hour, a lot of shows this season have taken on a different formula. One storyline is usually extended a n d

Story By: Trey Serna Designed By: Roy Bazan

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

stretched throughout an entire season, leaving a major key point out of the storyline and ending each episode with a cliffhanger, such as in “The Nine.” While the show has done well, some are a little less impressed by the pilot. “I saw the premiere and I really didn’t like it,” said Jennifer Terrazas, a sophomore biology major. “To me, the plot wasn’t that good and it lacked some depth.” NBC struck TV ratings gold with the debut of “Heroes” Sept. 25. The series tells the story of people who believed they were average, until they woke up with incredible abilities and superpowers. Writers from the show say the series will follow a storyline of each character discovering what their power is, why they have it, the origins of it and much more. “I love this show because the writers are taking a different perspective on superheroes,” said Ernesto Solis, a sophomore print journalism major. “They’re taking it from a more realistic point of view.” According to NBC, it was the mostwatched program of the night; attracting 14.3 million viewers and received the highest rating for any NBC drama in five years. RETURNING SHOWS TO WATCH Some of last season’s shows left audiences at the edge of their seats for almost four months, anticipating what would happen next season. One such program was ABC’s “ D e s p e r a t e Housewives.” The dirty laundry was hung out to dry and just as one load seemed to be getting clean, it all got dirty again. “I love the drama on that show,” said April Vallejo, a freshman nursing major. “Gabrielle [Eva Longoria] has got to be

my favorite character because she has so much attitude.” “Desperate Housewives” aired for the first time Oct. 3, 2004 with a reported 21.3 million viewers, according to the Nielsen 2004-2005 TV season ranking. This made it the best new drama series for the year and the highest rated show that week. It had people talking by the water cooler the next day. However, the excitement died down during the second season when fans and critics agreed that the program didn’t live up to the dark, comedic drama of the first. “I didn’t like the second season because after the first one, it just dragged on with the same ol’ stuff and didn’t really go anywhere,” said Gonzalez, an original “Housewives” fan. “I really didn’t watch much of that season and I haven’t even watched the start of the third.” During the promotion for the third season, it was made clear by the cast and creators that this season would attempt to go back to the style of the first. Another Sunday night favorite on a different network is the crudehumored, “Family Guy.” This is one of the very few shows in history that has been cancelled and re-hired twice by the same network. “Family Guy” originally aired on Fox in 1999. It was cancelled in 2000, brought back and then cancelled again in 2002. But, the series began airing re-runs on the Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim. High ratings and strong DVD sales of the first three seasons prompted Fox to revive the series on May 1, 2005. “Family Guy” premiered its newest season on Sept. 10, with its frequent, random cutaway jokes that usually take a rudimentary stab at pop culture. “I like ‘Family Guy’ because it’s viciously humorous,” said Solis. Among other returning shows are the action-drama “Prison Break,” the Jennifer Love Hewitt vehicle “Ghost Whisperer,” the noirish mystery “Veronica Mars” and the powerhouse adventure series “Lost.” SHOWS THAT TANKED With success of new and returning shows, there’s bound to be some losers

Page 9

among the crowd. NBC may have hit a home run with “Heroes,” but they scored a major strikeout with “Kidnapped,” which premiered Sept. 20 to minimal ratings. The series was supposed to feature a different kidnapping each season, bringing in different cast members each time. NBC was disappointed with the ratings of the first three episodes and ordered production to shut down. According to the networks, when a television pilot is picked up by a network, 13 episodes are contracted. Depending on the ratings of the first few episodes, the network will order the “back nine,” bringing a total of 22 episodes per season. However, NBC has not ordered the “back nine” for this show. For the mere seven million viewers that did gain interest in the show, producers say “Kidnapped” will be moved to Saturday nights starting Oct. 21 and the storyline will tie up all loose ends by the end of the 13th episode. Another casualty in the television world is “Smith,” which premiered Sept. 19. The series was supposed to follow the lives of a group of professional thieves who keep their work separate from the rest of their lives. Looks like no one will be following anything since the show was dropped Oct. 6, after only three

episodes. It’s still unclear as to whether the series will give closure to their audience or simply vanish without a trace from TV airwaves.


A&E

Page 10

October 19, 2006

Blue Man Group wows audience at Dodge Arena By FRANK CALVILLO The Pan American At 7 p.m. Monday, lines stretched out for more than half a mile at Dodge Arena as Valley residents waited patiently for tickets to the worldwide entertainment phenomenon, the Blue Man Group. The European-originated group is currently on its “How to be a Megastar” 2.0 tour in which the often-times comical group learns what it takes to be rock stars on stage through an act filled with a variety of songs . All ages were represented at the event as older couples, young 20-somethings, families and teenagers filled the arena expecting to see a spectacular show. J.C. Lopez, a junior advertising major at The University of Texas-Pan American, hoped the show would live up to his expectations. “I’ve never had the chance to see them before, but I’m expecting them to

be good,” Lopez said. Lopez, who was first introduced to the group via a commercial for IBM, says the band’s music is what makes them so appealing. “It’s really an eclectic sound that they have that is both rock and electronica, which are both genres that I like,” he said. For others, the event provided a chance to see the group close to home, instead of having to go out of town. “I was supposed to see them in San Antonio early last year, but it just didn’t happen,” said Valley resident Gabriel Vasquez. “At first I didn’t know who they were or what kind of show they could put on, but I’ve heard they’re awesome, especially the way they get the audience involved.” As fans eagerly continued to fill the arena, opening act Tracy Bonham performed several songs for the crowd, giving a set that ran a little over due to the increasing number of concert-goers still waiting for tickets.

“We were supposed to begin the show at 7:30, but there’s still such a huge crowd outside that we’ve had to start later,” Dodge Arena marketing director Yajira Flores said. THE SHOW GOES ON Finally, caked in their traditional

BLUE IN THE FACE- The Blue Man Group performed their new show “How to be a Megastar 2.0,” Monday which featured a variety of insturments as well as physical comedy.

Photos by Onydia Garza /The Pan American

blue makeup, the eagerly awaited men of the hour took the stage. The crowd burst into an uproar as the group started their opening song, a rock-influenced number that was performed with their trademark plastic pipes and drumsticks. One head-banging, foot-stomping, hand-waving, pelvic-thrusting jam followed after another as the men in blue employed sounds of rock, electronica and funk among others. Each production was met with unanimous applause from the audience, which was wowed by the group’s effort. Staying true to their signature, members of the group employed the use of unconventional stage instruments and props, including among other things, wooden spoons, paint-filled drums, a very long baton, and an oversized gong. In keeping with another of the group’s

famous trademarks, members never uttered a single syllable throughout the two-hour show. Even when it was time to introduce the band members to the audience, a tradition at the end of most concerts, the Blue Man Group instead pulled up an audience member on stage and had her read each band member’s name and instrument into a microphone. Once the thunderous applause had died down after the final number of the evening, there was a feeling of sadness yet joyful bewilderment following the group’s departure. After the show, UTPA’s Lopez said he felt that the music and comedy were the show’s strongest assets. “I really like what they did with the comedy and with the instruments too,” said Lopez “My favorite part was when they put on those LED light suits and started to jump up and down.” As the crowd departed the arena, many attendees were enthusiastically swapping their reactions to the show. “It was like nothing I’d ever seen before,” a teenage girl said to her friend as they walked out. Indeed it was.


NEWS

October 19, 2006

RADIO continued from page 1

GRADUATION continued from page 1 mother, who is wheelchair-bound, would have trouble getting to and around the Field House. “The venue does not count with the proper accommodations for handicapped individuals to see the ceremony comfortably,” he said. Ana Maria Rodriguez, chair of the commencement committee, said administration looked into the option of holding graduation at the Dodge Arena last year, but ran into several problems. “The Dodge Arena was already booked for those days, it is an expensive venture, and it is too distant from the university,” she said. “If you are graduating from here, the graduation should be here or at least close to here.” REQUEST DENIED Although the commencement committee has not agreed to hold commencement at Dodge Arena, university President Blandina Cardenas is pleased to hear students’ ideas. “We welcome students’ thoughts and input on issues of concern to them. We are always open to discussion,” Cardenas said. However, tension has increased

during the last couple of weeks, as the group of students petitioning are being more active to get their matters heard. Newell said it is necessary to use available resources in the best way possible. “By presenting this petition, we hope to portray the number of students that genuinely want to have graduation in a place where we won’t have to stretch six or seven tickets,” Newell said. POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS Rodriguez, who is also associate vice president for undergraduate studies, said the administration has looked into other options for a venue, but none have worked out yet. “We also considered having graduation at the [Edinburg Baseball] Stadium, but the weather was not going to help and we would still need to have two different graduations,” she said. Rodriguez added that they also considered having commencement at the new Fine Arts auditorium that’s in the works, but the planned size of the building does not coincide with the number of people required. The new center will seat more people than the Field House,

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however. Some recent graduations have begun to segment graduates by pairs of colleges during the commencement day. However, Rodriguez said departmental graduations at the same time bring scheduling problems. “The president and vice-president would not be able to attend all the ceremonies to confer the degrees,” she said. During Tuesday’s meeting with SGA, Gonzalez and Newell presented their results to the senate, and several questions were raised. Senators wanted to ensure students who signed the petition were aware that a venue change to the Dodge Arena would cost more and higher tuition would have to cover that increase. Despite the questions still in the air, SGA senators plan to sponsor this petition and write a resolution plan to present to the commencement committee, said Tony Matamoros, a junior and government senator at large. The SGA senate and petition leaders met with the commencement committee today at 9 a.m. in the Provost’s Conference Room at the Student Services Building to discuss a resolution.

possibility that Mann and his team are looking at. “Right now we offer play-by-play coverage of baseball, volleyball and men’s and women’s basketball home games that can be listened to on the UTPA Athletics’ Web site,” Mann said. The projected costs for a radio station are anywhere from $100,000 for an Internet broadcast to $1 million for traditional broadcasting. Mann said he would look at equipment at the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) conference in Las Vegas this spring. “The NAB has the latest equipment and technology,” Mann said of the conference. “It’s like a flea market for broadcasters.” Perez added that being able to work in an actual studio and interview public figures are other compelling reasons he and his classmates want to move forward with the pilot. “We get to work with teams and develop those skills along with our leadership abilities while we do really fun projects,” said Perez. Rodolfo Franz, a sophomore marketing major, says a student-produced radio

program is an idea some students quickly embraced as a way to put the university and its broadcast hopefuls on the map. “I know that UTB has a radio program they produce, and a similar program would be a way for us to showcase our own talent to the community,” Franz, a Hidalgo resident, said. With the high cost of starting a station and the amount of work involved, Mann and his students definitely have their work cut out for them. “In order to start a radio station we would need a professor who was dedicated to that, and that’s all they would probably be able to work on,” said Mann. The department could add a new hire in that area as early as next year. They would also need someone who was good with computers and broadcast equipment along with rights to play music, Mann said. Obstacles make it difficult to start the university’s own station, but Mann says his people hope the new pilot shows that a program produced and generated by students is viable. For more information on Bronc TV, call Mann at 381-3580.

MCDONALD’S continued from page 1 She also thinks the fast-food chain hides ingredients in its nutrition facts and said she stopped eating at McDonald’s after watching the film “Supersize Me,” a pseudo-documentary recording the physical effects of eating only items off the McDonald’s menu for 30 days. Hughes added that she wore black Monday to mourn the death of animals slaughtered by the company. “Even though it’s not necessarily the only company that does this to animals, it’s the largest one that does because it’s on a global scale,” she said. Still, the company’s Web site boasts of its Animal Welfare Council, which was co-developed by Temple Grandin, a professional designer of humane livestock facilities. The program allows suppliers the freedom to develop additional standards and compliance systems.

Jeffrey Schmatz, a spokesperson for JS Media LLC, which represents McDonald’s Rio Grande Valley franchises for marketing and public relations, said that the information distributed by the picketing group, particularly a flyer advertising the event, “is filled with inaccuracies and untruths.” “We have reviewed the flyer that was distributed at the South 10th store,” he said. “Are you aware that this particular flyer was written nearly 20 years ago? This can be easily verified with a quick Google search.” WHAT HAPPENED While the restaurant’s supervisor asked the group to leave, the protesters stood their ground. “As long as we don’t touch the grass or touch their property, we’re free

to exercise our rights,” said Sofia Garza, a freshman anthropology major at UTPA. “If an officer asks us to stop, we just go limp and drop to the ground. It keeps us from getting into any legal problems and it attracts attention.” Located in one of the busiest parts of town, the protest had little trouble drawing an audience, but several drivers made an effort to reach out to them as they waited for traffic lights to turn green. Greg Rodriguez, who organized the protest, said he wore black to mourn workers who have been injured or killed on the job because he thinks McDonald’s is guilty of employee discrimination and a lack of worker’s benefits. Rodriguez, a sophomore at South Texas College, also said McDonald’s exploits its workers by using cheap labor in foreign countries, though the compa-

The Law Offices of Daniel S. López, P.C. DWI LICENSE SUSPENSION OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE BOND REDUCTION MISDEMEANORS Call (956) 424-1600 to find out whether you are a candidate for a reduction to a lesser offense.

Daniel Flores/The Pan American ACTIVIST - Sofia Rivera, a freshman anthropology major, protests outside the McDonald’s off Savannah and 10th Street in McAllen Oct. 16.

ny’s Web site claims the company’s pay is at or above local market rate. About 30 picketers showed up for the protest. Vicky Garza, a junior at

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Edinburg North High School, said she was surprised at the event’s popularity. “When we planned for this, only 10 people came,” she said.

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October 19, 2006

ASSAULT continued from page 3

CANCER continued from page 3 Cancer Foundation. Yoplait has already guaranteed $500,000, with a maximum donation of $1.5 million possible. Barreto encouraged participation, saying it only required a visit to the grocery store. Participants can submit lids directly to Yoplait by mailing them to Save Lids to Save Lives at P.O. Box 72716, Rockford, MN 555727016. On campus, lids can be submitted to UC 103 to Marla Hinojosa. Participants who donate at least three lids on campus will receive a lapel pin. About 200 lids have been collected so

far, and Barreto anticipates many more as the submission deadline approaches. She thinks the 1,000-lid goal for UTPA will be met and is excited about the involvement already shown. “This is a good way to bring us all together. When we send in the 1,000 lids, it will be from the faculty and staff from UTPA,” she said. “This is isn’t just an individual. We’re all together to help find a way to end breast cancer.” Denny Meline, a health education coordinator at the VBHO, said the university’s participation in Yoplait’s program has additional benefits. “We’re also trying to promote

nutrition,” he said. “By eating yogurt, it is a healthy snack that faculty, staff and students can choose from.” While this is the inaugural year for participating in the Yoplait program, UTPA has been running a wellness program for three years, that helps raise awareness of many indigent health issues. “We’re trying to get more awareness out there on what affects our community, the population that makes up UTPA,” Meline said. “A wide variety of health issues affect the make-up of the faculty and staff, so once a month we’ll do the seminar series based upon the biggest factor.”

Such health issues include diabetes and other forms of cancer. One glaring problem affecting UTPA is high cholesterol. Meline said five of the top 10 medications taken by university faculty and staff deal with cholesterol. Operation Wellness, a 13-week program aimed at improving the health of the departments around campus, is entering its fourth week. There are currently 14 departments and 120 employees competing in categories such as weight loss, exercise and attendance of health presentations. At the end of December, the program ends and awards and prizes will be given out.

when I was a college student, [and seeing Rather] in the mud reporting live from Vietnam with a helmet on,” Smith said. “There wasn’t as much news as there is today. There was no CNN. So if you wanted to see world news you got that at 5:30 from the T.V. You’d gather in the dorm lobby.” Smith said Ritter, who will speak on April 5, should bring an interesting perspective on what occurred during the weapons inspection that prompted the beginning of the Iraq war. “I hope he doesn’t say something that brings the CIA down on us,” Smith said with a laugh. “But I think it’s important for us in Mid-America, away from all that, to know what goes into making those decisions. Let’s talk to somebody who was there. That seemed to be in the appeal of the students (representatives) this year.”

However, this year the committee will be facing a new challenge with one of the speakers. “Rigoberta Menchu’s speech will be in Spanish,” Smith said. “It had nothing to do with we’re a Spanish-speaking part of the country. This is her language. So this is something we’d have to gear up for if we had a person coming from Czechoslovakia, or some other part of the world.” Currently, the committee is working on figuring out the best way to translate the speech. Thought he has some ideas, Smith said the biggest challenge is determining the best avenue to pursue with just 45 days until her Nov. 28 speech. This year, all events will be held free of admission in the Student Union Theater. Doors will open to students at 7 p.m and to the public at 7:20 p.m.

SPEAKERS continued from page 3 what is their schedule and what is our schedule.” After choosing an initial list of 50, Smith said the committee then narrowed the number of speakers based on cost and availability. Furthermore, Smith said the committee wanted to secure speakers who had legitimate opinions to offer on their given subjects, not just people with controversial opinions. “I don’t think everyone has to be a Nobel Prize winner, but I think someone has to have some notoriety for the information that they are espousing. They have to have validity,” he said. “How have they distinguished themselves?” In the end, Smith says they ended up very happy with the list. “Some people were concerned that we only had one woman speaker. Three of the four student votes are females, but

when given the chance they voted for the males,” he said. “It was all based on no other criteria than what distinguishes them.” However, it takes money to get distinguished people to visit UTPA. While Smith admitted that the committee does spend a decent amount, he said it is only possible because of the support the series gets. “This year, we were blessed with [receiving funds from] student service fees, student union fees, and the president supported us this year too,” he said. COMING EVENTS While he is looking forward to all the speakers, Smith said he has special memories regarding Rather, who will speak on Feb. 13. “I remember watching T.V. back

PORTUGUESE continued from page 3 friends, co-workers and professors. In her class, she plans to use these cultural aspects - especially music - to capture her students’ attention and help them learn how to pronounce words like a native speaker would. “The sotaque Brasileiro (Brazilian accent) is very special. With music, you really get a feeling for the language,” Guerrero said. “I think it’s going to be a fun way and it’s going to really strengthen the communicative aspect of the course.” Guerrero said she has already had a positive response from students who have heard about the course. “I think that the students are going to get so attracted to the language. They are already,” she said. “I’ve talked to a few of my own students and they immediately think futbol, bossa nova, music, carnaval. I think it’s going to be a success.” For Guerrero, offering Portuguese is particularly important because of the connections she sees between Brazilians and the Spanish-speaking students at UTPA. To begin with, Guerrero cites

geographical proximity to Brazil as a reason to learn the language. “We are in the Americas. Brazil is in the Americas,” Guerrero said. The country’s economy is also significant, especially for those who plan on going into international careers. “Brazil is one of the three most important countries in Latin America, along with Mexico and Argentina,” Guerrero said. “Brazil’s economy is very important for the continent and for the world.” For more information, students can contact Guerrero at mcguerrero@panam.edu. Guerrero mentioned that the Hispanic and Brazilian cultures share many features. “We are very similar in history culture,” she said. “We both have this love for music. The language is similar. It comes from the same root – Latin.” These similarities come from shared history between the Brazil and the

Spanish-speaking Latin American countries. Both were conquered by Europeans from the Iberian Peninsula – Brazil by the Portuguese, and the Spanish-speaking countries by the Spanish. “The culture, the music, the new cinema, the people – we are different but so much alike in many ways,” Guerrero said. While the United States is not technically a Latin American country, the university’s proximity to Mexico puts it in an interesting position. “We have to take into account the geographical situation UTPA is in. We live on the border with Mexico. More than 90 percent of our student population is Hispanic,” Guerrero said. “All of those geographic, historical, economic and cultural similarities are stronger here on the border than at other universities in the country.” The class will be listed under Foreign Language as FORL 1391.01 in the Spring class schedule and will be held Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 12:45 p.m.

and Saturdays. Anyone interested in becoming an advocate is encouraged to visit the UC Room 320 to pick up an application form to reserve a spot at the training. Each student signing up for the training should attend every session, but Hernandez said that make-up periods would be available if students could not attend. Once trained, the victim advocates will be in contact with survivors of domestic violence and/or sexual assault. They will speak directly to the victim and can be asked to stay at the hospital with the victim to help them sort through the situation. A victim advocate can also be asked to speak to survivors through the telephone hotline. “We want to support students when something happens. We want victims to understand the importance of reporting the crime,” said Carruthers. “Just because a person has been drinking, doesn’t make what has happened to them okay.” Students sometimes think that they will be held at fault for being victims of sexual assault, but any time a person is forced to do something, the blame is on the person who has forced them. Donna Arevalo, a sophomore rehabilitation services major from Falfurrias, said she thinks the training will be full of benefits. “I’m glad the victims have an outlet at one of the hardest times in their lives,” Arevalo said. “Victim advocates represent those victims and can help make the situation a little easier.”


October 19, 2006

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Men’s soccer making their way to the top UTPA sets sights on UTB soccer club The past few weeks have proved to be quite a rollercoaster for The University of Texas-Pan American Men’s Bronc Soccer Club, along with the rest of the Lone Star Southern Division. After what seemed like an open and shut case for the Broncs heading to the regional tournament, the games in the past two weeks of play have turned the division on its head, and have given the once hapless UTB Soccer Club a sliver of hope in going to the regional tournament. UTB’s hopes of going to the regional tournament rest on the Bronc soccer club’s performance. UTPA finally fell to arch rival UTSA in a grueling 3-1 upset on Oct. 8 at home. After putting practice into high gear, and churning out a high-octane offense, the Broncs next managed to put away Texas A&M-Kingsville in a 3-1 victory. The Broncs, however, were not alone in the turnaround department with the division’s runners-up, UTB and UTSA, managing to put in hard-earned victories in the past two weeks. The sudden turnaround by those two teams has spelled trouble for UTPA’s hopes of going to the tournament. They are both one game away from tying the Broncs for the division lead. Unfortunately for UTSA, their season is done and over with, meaning that they won’t get that chance. Only UTB stands in the way of the Broncs’ path to glory. The game that would decide the fate of the division was to be played this past Sunday. However, due to the arrival of thunder and rain, the game was called off, and now, the clincher of the 2006 regular season will have to wait until Saturday. The footballers will travel to neutral venue Morningside Park in Brownsville and play UTB at 1 p.m.

Bronc Hall of Fame on the horizon Nominations accepted through Nov. 20 The University of Texas-Pan American will be looking for nominees to induct into the UTPA Athletics Hall of Fame in February 2007. The Department of Intercollegiate Athletics has invited nominations for candidates into the inaugural class. Nominations, which begin Monday, can be made by anyone in the community through the university Web site. The university has been working for close to a year to establish the hall. Scott Street, athletics director, said nominees would be recognized for their contributions to the university and the community. “We’re doing it to honor all of our student-athletes, coaches and administrators who have shown exemplary achievements, not only in athletics but in their personal lives as well,” Street said. Some of the areas nominees will be evaluated on include earning letters while in varsity sports, outstanding athletic performance, earning a degree at UTPA and completing athletic eligibility while at the university. In addition, their reputations must reflect positively on UTPA. Nominations are limited to former athletes who have not competed for at least 10 years. Coaches and administrators can be nominated at any time after they leave their position. Nominations will be accepted until Nov. 20.

Onydia Garza/The Pan American ZOOT SUIT RIOT - Steve Guevara, a senior journalism major, shushes the crowd for the preformace of his fraternity, Omega Delta Di, during Midnight Madness. In the end, they walked away with first place for their skit.


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October 19, 2006

Senior standout quits team midseason By KRISTYNA MANCIAS The Pan American The three seniors are now down to two after the permanent leave of absence for volleyball starter Chrissie Carrigan. The libero/outside hitter was missing from the Lady Bronc line-up on Oct. 6 against South Dakota State, and will not be back in 2006. The 5-foot-11 British Columbia native came to The University of TexasPan American in fall 2003 and made her presence known. As a freshman, Carrigan saw playing time early and finished sixth on the team in hitting percentage and kills per game. During her time at UTPA, Carrigan continued to rack up big numbers for her squad. Before leaving the team, she reached the 1,000-dig mark for her career, becoming the fifth player in program history to do so. The libero/outside hitter found great success not only in achievements on the court, but also with individual relationships at UTPA. “Accomplishments mean nothing. It’s the relationships I made that I will

cherish forever,” Carrigan said. “I couldn’t ask for better friends or a more supportive coaching staff; I am so thankful for them.” The starting senior is back in her hometown of Victoria, British Columbia, and said personal reasons caused her to leave the squad before her last season was up. “I just felt that it was time for me to move on and do other things,” she said. “Obviously there were certain things that happened that were a catalyst for my decision, but for the most part it was just the feeling that my time at Panam had taught me everything it was going to, and it was time to move on.” The Lady Broncs, currently 4-19 overall, have had a rough season, but Carrigan mentioned the team’s record was not the determining factor in her leaving. “The losing season had nothing to do with my decision to leave. I absolutely love my teammates and coaches, and had an amazing experience playing, regardless of the win/loss situation,” Carrigan said. The Pan American asked for a statement from the athletics department, but they were not allowed to comment.

“Chrissie Carrigan has decided to leave the team due to personal reasons. The University of Texas-Pan American Department of Intercollegiate Athletics does not discuss issues surrounding any of our administrators, coaches or studentathletes,” said Joe Monaco, director of athletic media relations and sports information. The Canadian senior came to UTPA to play volleyball and make an impact on the squad and she did just that. Despite the sudden departure, her name will be forever embedded in UTPA’s record books. Without their star, the Lady Broncs suffered their sixth straight loss last Saturday, against Texas Christian University, now 16-6. TCU handed UTPA a 3-0 setback (30-14, 30-20 and 30-27). Senior Heather Bravo finished with a match-high 20 kills, along with five digs, marking her second consecutive 20-kill performance. Sophomore setter Chelsea Blakely finished with a double-double, as she collected 33

assists and 10 digs. The past two seasons, the Lady Broncs managed to finish with 10 wins and there’s still time to meet that standard. They have five games left before the National Independent Tournament, and the Lady Broncs will focus on the rest of the season and look forward to the last home game against Texas A&M-International Nov. 7.


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Golfer selected for tournament in South Africa By PATRICK KENNEDY The Pan American Among the hardened and talented athletes here at The University of TexasPan American, there is a girl who would stand up against raging storms and all of the competition in an entire nation to achieve her dreams. This athlete goes by the name of Mariale Camey, and she’s off to the World Amateur Golf Team Championships in South Africa this week, where she and her team will play a grueling 72 holes from October 18th through the 21st. “This is like a dream to me,” said Camey, a sophomore business management major from Guatemala in reference to her acceptance to the Guatemalan Amateur team. Dreams do come true as Camey takes her place among the top three women amateur golfers in Guatemala, alongside the mother/daughter duo of Beatrice de Arenas and Cristina Arenas. At this very moment, the three women are fighting it out among a record 51 women’s teams from around the world

that have shown up to claim the Espiritu Santo Trophy. As she packed her bags a week ago, Camey reflected on all of the work and dedication that she has put in to get her where she is. As a young girl, Camey was introduced to the sport by her family. “My whole family plays golf in Guatemala,” she said, “and one day, my father asked me to try to play, and I did.” After that, Camey said that she played golf with her father every weekend, and then gradually began to compete in local tournaments. “I liked the way it would challenge me,” she said. Strangely enough, as Camey’s talent for golf rose, so did her other athletic skills. She proved to be an agile swimmer, winning 10 championships, and proved her worth on the basketball court, earning player of the year honors twice. But perhaps the strongest highlight of her career as an athlete was all of the time she spent winning tournament after tournament while a member of some of the most prestigious Central American golf teams. Camey did a tour

Mariale Camey with the championship team Central American Junior Golf team, and won three championships on another Central American women’s golf team. At the ripe age of 18, Camey was invited to try out for the national Guatemalan Women’s Amateur team to represent the nation at the 2004 World Amateur Golf Team Championships. With hard work and determination, Camey worked her way up the rankings, down the green, and into the top three slots, earning a spot on the national team. But the date of the world champi-

onship fell upon the date of her high school graduation, and Camey opted to attend it with her family instead. When asked about why she gave up the spot, Camey said, “You only get one high school graduation, and I was determined that I could make the team again.” After high school, Camey chose to attend college and play golf for the University of New Orleans. Shortly after she arrived, however, Hurricane Katrina pounded the Gulf Coast and forced Camey and her teammates to seek refuge in Tennessee. Although she was affected by one of the worst disasters in American history, Camey took to the green again as soon as she could, and applied to The University of Texas-Pan American. During the transition period, Camey received her second invitation to try out for the national Guatemalan team, and accepted. As the youngest player to ever play the qualifying rounds for her nation, Camey felt the pressure. “I knew that each shot was going to count,” she said. Camey ended up with the Arenas

duo on the national team, with people she had known and played golf with for 10 years. With the long-term companionship they have, the elements for a strong national team are more potent. Camey said that she feels confidence in her team and herself. “The most important thing is to do well as a team.” And so now Camey and her teammates are in an international struggle for the World Amateur Golf Team Championship, the Espiritu Santo Trophy, which was once owned by Czar Nicolas II, currently held in Stellenbosch, South Africa. The tournament will consist of each team playing 72 holes over a series of three courses, the Spier Estate Golf Course, the De Zalze Golf Club, and the Stellenbosh Golf Club, with two rounds being played at each course. Camey wanted to thank her coaches and her professors for the support they have given her, and wanted to convey a message to the students of the university. “Golf isn’t just for old people; it’s fun,” she said.

Houston Astros release pitching coach, former Bronc By JORGE HINOJOSA The Pan American

Charles Rex Arbogast/AP CALL THE BULLPEN - Jim Hickey, who pitched for The University of Texas-Pan American baseball team, served as the Houston Astros pitching coach since 2004, but was released on Oct. 4.

After the regular season ended, the Houston Astros released pitching coach Jim Hickey. The former star for The University of Texas-Pan American was appointed to the interim position in July 2004 and was then named the full-time pitching coach in October 2004. “I was shocked,” said UTPA baseball coach Willie Gawlik, of Hickey’s release. “He’s a personal friend of mine and a personal friend of the baseball program here at The University of TexasPan American. He played here and had his career here. He has had a lot of success at the major league level and it’s kind of shocking and disappointing that the Astros did him that way.” In his first year as pitching coach Hickey and some of his more notable pitchers, including Roger Clemens, Brad Lidge, and Roy Oswalt, helped drive the Astros to the World Series. In 2005 the Astros hurlers finished second in the National League with a 3.51 ERA with Clemens finishing first and Petite finishing second among individuals. The staff also led the league with the fewest allowed runs and walks and at the end of the regular season Houston advanced to the playoffs. They made it to the World Series but lost four straight games to the Chicago White Sox.

Despite that, Houston arms had a relatively good two seasons with Hickey. Yet they still went through with releasing him. “I feel like he’ll catch on with somebody because he’s had a nice career in the minors and the major league level. He’s done real well,” said Gawlik. “The Astros were struggling and then he came in and in his first year they made the wild card.” The Astros finished this season with a great run. They were creeping up to St. Louis for the wild card and ended up only finishing 1.5 games out. Just a couple turns out of 162 games in the season and the team could have been right back in the postseason. “They could have won a lot of those games, anything could have happened,” said Gawlik. “I think it came down to the owner or the general manager of the Astros. I don’t know this for a fact. I’m just speculating that coach [Phil] Garner was probably told that he needed to make another change.” After releasing the hitting coach in mid-summer to make some changes, the Astros are still looking to make a change that fits with their club. With many going on in Major League Baseball, it’s always hard to anticipate anyone’s future. Joe Girardi made a great run with a group of young Marlin players and was named National League Manager of the Year, and yet he was released also.

“Professional baseball is not kind to anybody. I’ve known players personally in this situation, where things just didn’t workout. But [Hickey] will land on his feet because he’s a Christian and a good man,” Gawlik said. “I talked to him on the phone yesterday and I’m confident that he’ll get another job at the major league level.” Prior to joining the Houston Astros, Hickey spent 14 years in the minor league system. There he molded young players for the major league level. In 2002, he was named Astros Player Development Man of the Year. Dating further back than his time spent as a coach, Hickey was a standout pitcher in his final season at UTPA. Starting out, Hickey wasn’t even on the pitching staff; he began his career here as a first baseman and utility player. After a disappointing junior season Hickey went back to his hometown of Chicago and played in a baseball league. Moving to the mound he pitched a couple of no-hit shutouts and after that, he returned to UTPA as a pitcher. That year Hickey finished with an astonishing 1.66 ERA, striking out 109 batters in 130.1 innings and allowing just 19 walks. At the end of the season the Broncs had engraved a school record of 64 wins, pushing them into the NCAA tournament. In the regional finals UTPA lost to The University of Texas in Austin.


SPORTS

Editor’s Pick: Game to Watch When: Oct. 21 Time: Noon Where: Memorial Stadium Texas Longhorns

Game will be aired on ABC

Nebraska Huskers

Cheering with a new set of regulations By ERICK QUINTERO The Pan American Injuries are all too common for athletes. Bumps, bruises, cuts, scrapes and sprained ankles are among the most frequent. Often the more severe injuries shape the way sports are regulated; every athlete must adhere to safety measures enforced by their respective governing body, who in turn resort to some form of protective padding as the answer. In the summer, the Universal Cheerleading Association met with The University of Texas-Pan American cheerleading squad as they do every summer to teach stunts and review new safety regulations. In order for the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) to cover the squad through catastrophic insurance, certain guidelines must be followed. The new rules state that onehanded stunts, pyramids and basket tosses cannot be performed without a padded surface, which the squad will abide by. The coach must also be certified through the American Association of Cheerleading Coaches and Advisors. According to Alex Herrera, a sophomore communication disorders major and UTPA cheerleader, the main changes are somewhat of a hassle and she doesn’t see them as something that will completely prevent injuries.

Herrera went on to say the main difference audiences would notice are the mats during stunts, which must now be used for every performance. But she questioned the effectiveness. “As a collegiate cheerleader personally, I don’t think it is very effective,” Herrera said. “I mean a 2.5-inch mat isn’t going to help a fall from very high, so I don’t really think it’s a big difference.” She said the new restrictions are liable to cause more problems. “I think it’s more of a hassle to take the mats everywhere, especially us,” Herrera said. “We go to the high schools and we have to take them and unroll them and make sure nobody messes them up.” While protective gear often minimizes the degree of injury, Herrera believes there is no substitute for responsibility. “As a collegiate cheerleader you should be responsible for your flyers, and bases should assume that responsibility and catch them,” Herrera, a base herself, said. “Also, the flyers they should do their job.” Charlie Caceres, coordinator of campus activities and cheerleading coach, doesn’t see the new rules as something the squad cannot deal with. “There is no doubt we’ve already done it. When we travel to the high school pep rallies, we travel with mats,” he said. “We welcome the change, if that’s what is going to make my kids safer, then by all

means I’m going to do it.” Caceres said the new standards have not strayed much from safety precautions taken during practice. “The mats are one and a half inches. It’s your standard all-purpose mat, the ones we use for practice are two and half, but the standard is one and a half,” he said. Caceres understands there will be injuries, but he and his squad work hard toward minimizing them through training. “My bases are not going to let the flyers touch the ground to begin with,” he explained. “Basically my motto is real simple. Your flyer is like gold and you never let gold touch the ground. I mean it’s real simple, the way I preach this. I tell my bases, you will put your body between the flyers and the floor.” Bases in general take more of the punishment as they absorb most of the impact from the force of a 20-foot high toss. According to Caceres, most tosses performed range from 20 to 25 feet. Common injuries for bases are black eyes or sore ribs. Herrera wore a bad scrape on her left shoulder, the result of Caceres’ philosophy. Caceres said the familiarity of stunts would not change. “I think the audience expects to see some niceties, pyramids and tosses. It’s not a question of anything else. The last thing we want to do is be groundbound,” he said.

Onydia Garza/The Pan American STUNT SAFETY - Kacey Capelo, a junior communication major (top), is supported by Tina Rojas (left), a freshman management major, and Karese Jenkins (right), a sophomore communication studies major, during Midnight Madness. New NCAA regulations require the use of mats during performances.

Broncs see mixed results at Brooks Pre-Nationals Meet By RACHEL REIDA The Pan American

Onydia Garza/The Pan American CROSSING THE LINE - Sonya Rivera, a sophomore biology major, and her teammates tried their best in Terre Haute, Ind.

The University of Texas-Pan American cross country teams have returned home from a long trip to Terre Haute, Ind., where they competed at the Brooks Pre-Nationals Meet held by Indiana State University. The Lady Broncs came home after having placed 11th overall out of 13 teams. “I was very pleased with the way the women competed,” head coach Ricky Vaughn said. “Most of them have never been to a big meet like that, but they came out focused and competed hard. They had a great race.” Great indeed, and by their personal marks, who wouldn’t be pleased? Each one of the women posted a personal best last weekend in the 6K race.

Leading the pack was freshman Carolina Izaguirre, finishing 45th overall. Other notable performances came from Ashley Perez of Falfurrias, who was closely followed by Sonya Rivera (Brownsville) and senior Karla Hernandez of Edinburg. All three women finished the race seconds apart from one another capturing 62nd, 63rd, and 65th place honors, respectively. “Carolina had a tremendous race,” Vaughn said, “but it is hard to single out just one person on the women’s side. The team as a whole ran very well. They were very focused and went out with a plan and executed it. Their finish shows you just how much of a difference being focused and determined helps in a race.” On the men’s side, the Broncs seemed to have had somewhat of a hard time at this meet placing last out

of 36 teams overall. “I was very disappointed with how the men performed,” Vaughn said. “We had targeted this meet specifically and they knew they had to perform; they just didn’t show up and run well. Overall the men had a poor showing.” Top finisher for the Broncs was freshman Edinburg native Omar Doria, who crossed the finish line in 25:58, giving him 205th place. Texas A&M-Kingsville transfer Alex Moncivias was the next top finisher for the Broncs coming in 231st, while La Joya native Luis Nava came in 233rd. “Omar ran a solid race,” Vaughn said. “He did although put himself in a situation he couldn’t hold, but I was impressed with how much he pushed early on in the race.” Up next for the Broncs and Lady

Broncs is the National Independent Championships Oct. 29 held in Fort Wayne, Ind. In the past the teams have treated this competition as just another chance to better themselves before regionals, but this year Vaughn and the athletes are looking to win the Independents as a team. “In years past our focus was more on regionals,” he said. “This year we are going to try and win them. The men’s team needs to search for their identity for this competition. They are a young team this year and in the past we have had standouts like Westley Keating establishing who we are. We are looking for individuals to step up. Winning this competition will help then get prepared for regionals, and help them gain the confidence they need to win.”


October 19, 2006