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FIRST PLACE AWARD WINNERS

FROM THE

NEW YORK PRESS ASSOCIATION & AMERICAN SCHOLASTIC PRESS ASSOCIATION

The

Pace Chronicle PACE UNIVERSITY, PLEASANTVILLE/BRIARCLIFF MANOR, NY

VOLUME III, ISSUE IX

WWW.PACECHRONICLE.COM

SENIOR WEEK CANCELLED

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2013

Students React to NYC 21+ Smoke Law TAYLOR  LONGENBERGER  NEWS  EDITOR TAYLOR.B.LONGENBERGER@PACE.EDU

 PHOTO  FROM  PACE.EDU Students  can  contact  Niki  Fjeldal  if  they  would  like  to  be  part  of  the  commitee  for  senior  week  and  ensure  that  it  occurs..

TAYLOR  LONGENBERGER  NEWS  EDITOR TAYLOR.B.LONGENBERGER@PACE.EDU

The  Committee   for   Senior   Week  currently  does  not  have  any   seniors  on  it,  putting  a  damper  on   activity  planning,  so  therefore  se-­ nior  week  may  not  be  the  same  as   past  years. Senior   celebrations,   or   senior  

week  as   it   is   more   commonly   referred   to,   is   a   week   comprised   of  events  between  the  last  day  of   ÂżQDOVDQGGD\RIJUDGXDWLRQ7KH events  are  meant  to  bring  the  se-­ nior   class   together   to   spend   time   RQDQGRIIFDPSXVVHUYLQJDVDÂż-­ nal  get-­together  before  the  seniors   graduate  and  go  off  separate  ways   into  the  world. “Usually   the   committee   that   sets   up   the   events   for   the   senior  

celebration  is  made  up  of  juniors   and   seniors.   This   year   I   emailed   all   the   seniors   and   received   only   one   response,�   Assistant   Direc-­ tor   of   Student   Development   and   Campus   Activities   Niki   Fjeldal   said.  “Without  a  committee  com-­ prised   of   seniors   the   events   for   the  celebrations  may  not  be  what   the   seniors   want   and   could   be   very  limited.� Some  events  may  be  planned,  

but  without   the   input   of   the   se-­ niors  it  is  hard  to  determine  what   the  events  will  be.  When  seniors   are  not  giving  input  on  the  events   that  will  be  planned,  it  is  possible   that   what   is   planned   will   not   be   liked  by  the  senior  class,  and  the   CONTINUED  ON  PAGE  4  

“COULD  PACE  SENIOR  WEEK  BE   CANCELLED?�

Pace Plans Formal Ball to Celebrate 50th Anniversary TAMARA  BONET  FEATURE  EDITOR TAMARA.D.BONET@PACE.EDU

In  honor  of  the  50th  anniver-­ sary  of  the  Pleasantville  campus,   Pace   will   be   holding   a   grand   “Snow   Ball�,   a   formal   celebra-­ tion  for  all  students  to  be  held  on   Feb.  7,  2014.   Normally,  Pace’s  parties  usu-­ ally  consist  of  a  DJ  blasting  loud   hip   hop,   pop   and   reggae   music  

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while  people   dance,   sweat   and   party  to  the  fullest.  This  has  been   the   norm   for   as   long   as   anyone   can   remember,   but   in   honor   of   the   milestone   anniversary   cel-­ ebration,   Pace   thought   it   would   EH ÂżWWLQJ WR KDYH D FOHDQHU ORRN and  a  formal  event.  .     “We  wanted  to  do  something   a   little   different   with   keeping   the  celebration  going,â€?  Assistant   Director   for   Student   Develop-­ ment   and   Campus   Activities,   Niki   Fjeldal   said.   “We   looked  

through  older  yearbooks  and  saw   that  there  was  a  ‘Snow  Ball’  and   thought  that  we  could  try  to  bring   that  idea  back.�   Fjeldal   and   other   organizers   for  the  Snow  Ball  hope  students   take   advantage   of   this   event   so   that   they   may   show   themselves   in   a   different   light   and   enjoy   themselves  more  elegantly.   “There  will  be  a  more  formal   dress  code,�  Fjeldal  said.  “Think   like  a  banquet  or  gala,  not  a  Will-­ cox  Party.

 The  question  remains  wheth-­ er   or   not   students   will   be   as   in-­ terested   in   attending   a   formal   gathering  as  they  would  a  normal   party.    “It’s  nice  to  see  people  clean   up  and  look  nice,�  freshman  edu-­ cation  major  Natalie  Abreu  said.   “It   would   be   great   to   do   some-­ thing  different  like  that.�   CONTINUED  ON  PAGE  3

“PACE  PLANS  FORMAL  BALL  FOR   50TH  ANNIVERSARY�

POPSTARS Â ON CAMPUS

GUEST  POLICY  ON   CAMPUS

Entertainment  Page  9

News  Page  4

Meet  the  Pace  faces  that  comprise   the  up  and  coming  pop  band  Six   Stories  told.

With  numerous  security  breeches   on  campus,  The  Chronicle  de-­ bunks  students’  responsibility  for   their  guests.  

The  New   York   City   Coun-­ cil   raised   the   age   for   purchasing   cigarettes  from  18  to  21  last  Wed.   Oct.  30. The   council   based   their   rea-­ sons  for  raising  the  age  on  the  de-­ velopment  that  occurs  in  the  three   years  from  18  to  21.  The  law  was   passed  in  an  effort  to  decrease  the   dependence   of   young   adults   on   tobacco   with   an   attempt   of   pre-­ venting  them  from  starting  in  the   ¿UVWSODFH Statistics   used   by   lawmakers   pushing  the  law  showed  that  since   2007,  the  rates  of  young  adult  and   youth  smoking  have  leveled  off  at   8.5  percent. A   bill   was   also   approved   set-­ ting  the  minimum  price  per  pack   of  tobacco  cigarettes  at  $10.50.   The  state  of  New  York  has  the   highest  prices  for  cigarettes  in  the   United  States.  Although  the  price   of  a  pack  of  cigarettes  in  the  city   ranges   anywhere   from   $12.50   to   $14.50,   this   new   bill   will   make   it   mandatory   for   store   owners   to   keep  their  prices  over  $10.50  per   pack.   Storeowners   selling   tobacco   cigarettes  under  $10.50  or  to  mi-­ nors  under  21  are  subject  to  $1000   ¿QHVHQIRUFHGE\WKHDXWKRULWLHV Pace   Pleasantville   is   not   far   from   the   city   and   students   com-­ CONTINUED  ON  PAGE  4

“PACE  STUDENTS  REACT  TO  NYC   21+  SMOKING  LAW�

HOME  FOR   THE  HOLIDAYS Opinion  Page  7 We  know  you’re  counting  down  the   days  until  Thanksgiving,  but  is  be-­ ing  home  really  the  break  you  really   anticipated.  The  Chronicle    dishes.


FEATURE

The Pace Chronicle

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2013 PAGE 2

Lunch Buddies Program Brings Smiles for Miles TAMARA  BONET FEATURE  EDITOR TAMARA.D.BONET@PACE.EDU

The  Center   for   Community   Action   and   Research   (CCAR)   is   WKH JRWR RIÂżFH IRU VWXGHQWV ZKR are   looking   to   become   more   in-­ volved   within   their   community.   Years   ago   CCAR   partnered   with   the   Successful   Learning   Center   (SLC)   to   create   the   Lunch   Bud-­ dies   Program,   a   program   for   young  adults  with  developmental   disabilities  and  offers  them  a  col-­ lege  experience.   “Many   of   the   students   are   around   college-­age   and   the   pro-­ gram   really   empowers   them   to   continue   to   learn,â€?   program   co-­ ordinator   of   CCAR   Caitlin   Kelly   said.   “We   try   to   familiarize   stu-­ dents   with   mainstream   students   to   show   them   the   community   of   being  at  Pace.â€? Contrary  to  popular  belief,  the   students   involved   in   the   Lunch   Buddies   Program/SLC   are   very   involved   on   campus   and   during   campus   functions.   Students   can   be  spotted  at  Pace  athletic  events   sporting   Pace   gear   and   cheering   on  the  teams  to  the  fullest  extent.   The  students  in  the  program  ben-­ HÂżWIURPLWWKURXJKWKHVXSSRUWRI their   peers   who   show   them   the  

 PHOTO  PROVIDED  BY  CCAR Students  enjoyed  a  day  of  fun  activities  on  Halloween  as  the  Lunch  Buddies  program  hosted  a  gathering  for   students.

ropes  of  being  a  student  at  heart.   “Lunch  buddies  really  is  a  so-­ cial   program,�   Kelly   said.   “It’s   structured   to   build   interaction   amongst  our  students.� In   addition   to   the   support   of   individuals  across  campus,  mem-­ bers  of  the  Gamma  Sigma  Sigma  

Sorority  have  been  a  helping  hand   in   the   student   engagement   of   the   Lunch  Buddies  program.  The  so-­ rority’s   members   are   around   to   have  casual  conversations  and  in-­ teract  with  students  during  a  vari-­ ety  of  different  campus  activities.   “It  is  a  great  feeling  to  be  able  

Club Feature: Psych Club dreams big for school year EMILY  WOLFRUM  LAYOUT  EDITOR EMILY.R.WOLFRUM@PACE.EDU

“Throw  away  your  dream  dic-­ tionaries.  There’s  nothing  you  can   ÂżQG LQ WKHP´ 'U -RKQD 3RLQWHN said  last  Wednesday  in  the  second   of   a   two-­part   dream   interpreta-­ tion   workshop   held   by   Pace’s   Psychology  Club  and  the  Paragon   House. Pointek,  who  is  a  professor  in   the   psychology   department   and   the   adviser   for   the   Psychology   Club,   continued   her   presentation   stating   that   the   only   person   who   can  truly  interpret  an  individual’s   dream  is  the  individual. “It’s   about   you,   but   most   im-­ portantly  it’s  about  your  emotion-­ al  response  or  feelings,â€?  she  told   students  in  regards  to  interpreting   dreams   of   their   own.   “I’m   just   a   facilitator   or   dream   interpreta-­ tions,  not  an  interpreter.â€? Pointek   encouraged   students   to   keep   records   of   their   own   dreams,  bearing  in  mind  that  most   PHPRU\ RI WKH VSHFLÂżFV RI WKHLU GUHDP LV ORVW DIWHU ÂżYH PLQXWHV

from  waking  up.   For   those   who   claimed   not   to   dream   or   to   remember   their   dreams,  Pointek  urged  students  to   make   a   conscious   decision   to   do   so  before  going  to  bed. “Tell   yourself   before   you   go   to   bed,   ‘I’m   going   to   remember   my  dream  tonight,’â€?  she  said,  fur-­ ther  stating  that  with  this  advice,   students   would   begin   to   dream   within  a  week  or  two.   Pointek  added  that  dreams  of-­ ten   try   to   help   an   individual   sort   WKURXJK RU ÂżJXUH RXW VRPHWKLQJ that   is   worrisome   to   them   in   the   conscious  world. “You   wouldn’t   dream   of   something   happy,â€?   Pointek   said.   Âł7KHUHÂśVQRWKLQJWRÂżJXUHRXW´ Sophomore  psychology  major   and   president   of   the   Psychology   Club   Christina   Miller   said   that   Pointek’s   dream   interpretation   workshops   are   among   the   most   popular  events  that  the  club  holds. “A  lot  of  people  are  interested   in   dream   interpretation,â€?   Miller   VDLG Âł7KH\ÂśOO EULHĂ€\ FRYHU LW in   their   Psych   101   classes,   but   they  don’t  really  get  into  it.  Plus,   [Pointek]   really   loves   teaching  

it.� In  addition   to   hosting   the   dream   interpretation   workshop,   the   Psychology   Club   is   looking   forward   to   multiple   other   events   throughout   the   school   year,   the   soonest  of  which  is  an  ice  skating   trip  scheduled  for  Nov.  24.   The   Psychology   Club   will   also  be  hosting  a  Game  Night  and   an   event   on   “Hookup   Culture�   for   the   month   of   December,   and   hopes  to  plan  a  Zombie  Walk  for   the  spring  semester.   “We   just   wanted   to   make   Psych   Club   more   popular   and   known   on   campus,�   Miller   said   of  the  many  events  going  on  this   year.  “It’s  also  good  to  have  good   relations  with  the  other  organiza-­ tions.� The   Psychology   Club   meets   Wednesdays   during   common   hour  in  Miller  25.   “We   want   to   raise   awareness   about   anything   psychology   re-­ lated  on  campus  and  offer  people   who  may  not  have  time  to  pursue   a   psychology   major   or   minor   an   opportunity  to  learn  more,�  Mill-­ er  said.  

Follow The Pace Chronicle on Twitter: @PaceChronicle

to  just  sit  with  a  fellow  Pace  stu-­ dent   for   an   hour   and   converse   about  your  favorite  actors  or  mu-­ sic,�  senior  political  science  major   Marelina  Ortiz  said.   On   Halloween,   SLC   hosted   a   Halloween  Party  for  their  students   and   the   Pace   community.   There  

were  games,  crafts  while  interac-­ tion  and  learning  more  about  one   another  were  also  incorporated,  as   socializing   is   an   integral   part   of   the  program. Since  students  are  at  Pace  for   learning   as   well,   a   special   com-­ mencement  ceremony  will  be  held   for  them  as  well.  During  this  cere-­ mony,  students  are  awarded  a  cer-­ WLÂżFDWH IRU HDFK FODVV WKH\ FRP-­ plete.   Their   classes   include   but   are  not  limited  to  art,  music,  and   even   a   Glee   class.   Each   student   is  recognized  for  his  accomplish-­ ments   and   the   great   efforts   that   have  been  put  into  an  education. “The   greatest   contribution   is   time,â€?  said  Ortiz.  “Sometimes  all   anyone  needs  is  a  friend,  and  hav-­ ing  someone  to  listen  to  and  share   experiences   with   is   what   college   is  all  about.  SLC  fosters  that  type   of   dynamic   and   is   what   makes   Pace  unique.â€? The   Lunch   Buddies   program   is   a   rewarding   experience   for   all   of  those  involved. .   On   Nov.   9,   the   program   is   headed   to   a     local   bowling   alley   for  a  Saturday  full  of  fun.     To   register   for   the   Bowling   Trip  with  CCAR  and  the  Success-­ ful   Learning   Center,   or   to   learn   how   to   become   a   lunch   buddy,   please   contact   Caitlin   Kelly   ck-­ elly2@pace.edu.  

The Pace Chronicle PACE UNIVERSITY 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, N.Y. 10570 Phone: (914) 773-3401 PaceChronicle@pace.edu www.PaceChronicle.com

EDITORIAL STAFF JONATHAN  ALVAREZ EDITOR-­IN-­CHIEF JONATHAN.ALVAREZ@PACE.EDU

CECILIA  LEVINE MANAGING  EDITOR CECILIA.R.LEVINE@PACE.EDU

ANDREAS  CHRISTOU COPY  EDITOR ANDREAS.E.CHRISTOU@PACE.EDU

CARLOS  VILLAMAYOR COPY  EDITOR CARLOS.D.VILLAMAYOR@PACE.EDU

TAYLOR  LONGENBERGER NEWS  EDITOR TAYLOR.B.LONGENBERGER@PACE.EDU

TAMARA  BONET FEATURE  EDITOR TAMARA.D.BONET@PACE.EDU

SARA  MORIARTY OPINION  EDITOR SARA.M.MORIARTY@PACE.EDU

ANDREW  LINTHWAITE WEB  EDITOR ANDREW.D.LINTHWAITE@PACE.EDU

DEREK  KADEMIAN ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR DEREK.H.KADEMIAN@PACE.EDU

OPERATIONAL STAFF

NATALIA  ALVAREZ  PAGAN SPORTS  EDITOR NATALIA.M.ALVAREZPAGAN@PACE.EDU

IMERLYN Â VENTURA BUSINESS MANAGER IMERLYN.VENTURA@PACE.EDU

EMILY  WOLFRUM LAYOUT  EDITOR EMILY.R.WOLFRUM@PACE.EDU

HENRY  DE  LA  ROSA DISTRIBUTION HENRY.A.DELAROSA@PACE.EDU

The Pace Chronicle is published by Trumbull Printing: (203) 261-2548

PROF. KEVIN CZERWINSKI FACULTY ADVISOR KCZERWINSKI@PACE.EDU

Written and edited by the students of Pace University, The Pace Chronicle is published weekly during the academic year. Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of administration, faculty and The Pace Chronicle staff. The Pace Chronicle encourages responses to the opinions expressed herein, and welcomes letters and comments. The Pace Chronicle cannot guarantee publication of letters to the editor or unsolicited manuscripts, and reserves the right to edit or comment editorially on them. Appearance of an advertisement in The Pace Chronicle does not imply endorsements by the members of the editorial board, the advisor, or Pace University of the products or services offered. All photos and copyrights reserved unless otherwise indicated. Subscription and advertising rates available upon request.


FEATURE

The Pace Chronicle

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2013 PAGE 3

Pace Plans Formal Ball for 50th Anniversary Continued from page 1 Abreu  did   however   speak   about   possible   reasons   why   stu-­ dents   might   be   hesitant   to   par-­ take  in  the  ball. “It  all  depends  on  how  much   they  advertise  it,â€?  Abreu  said.  “If   it’s   advertised   well   and   it   gets   people’s   attention   then   people   will   want   to   go.   Money   might   play   a   part   in   that   as   well   since   people  might  not  want  to  pay  too   much.  I  think  it  will  be  worth  it.â€?   The   Snow   Ball   is   priced   at   $15  individually  or  $80  for  a  ta-­ ble.  By  charging  a  fee,  attendees   are   accounted   for   and   are   able   to   take   part   in   the   dinner.  There   DUHFXUUHQWO\QRVSHFLÂżFVRQWKH type  of  catering,  but  students  will   be   pleased   on   the   choices   made   and  can  also  give  their  opinion  to  

committee  members.   “People   are   cheap,�   senior   nursing   major   Anasia   Campbell   said.   “But   that   also   depends   on   the  maturity  level.  It’s  seems  like   it’ll   be   a   really   nice   event,   but   possible  that  only  a  more  mature   audience  will  attend.�   According   to   SDCA,   stu-­ dents   are   sure   to   expect   a   great   menu,   distinguished   attendees,   and  a  great  choice  in  music.  Fur-­ ther   details   will   be   announced,   but   for   now,   the   Snow   Ball   will   be   held   on   Feb.   7   in   the  Wilcox   gym.  Students  are  encouraged  to   keep  an  eye  out  for  the  registra-­ tion  link  that  will  be  going  live  in   the  coming  weeks,  prior  to  win-­ ter  break.  Anyone  interested  in  becom-­ ing  involved  with  the  committee   or   learning   more   about   Snow   Ball   can   contact   Niki   Fjeldal   at   nfjeldal@pace.edu.    PHOTO  FROM  PACE.EDU Students  can  anticipate  a  Snow  Ball  in  early  February  as  part  of  the  50th  Anniversary  of  the  Pace  University   Pleasantville  Campus.

Midterms Result in Student Stress

 PHOTO  FROM  RPM-­THERAPY.COM Pulling  too  many  all-­nighters,  neglecting  healthy  eating  habits,  and  becoming  overly  worried  with  schoolwork  can  all  affect  a  student’s  health.

JAMES  MIRANDA  FEATURED  WRITER JAMES.MIRANDA@PACE.EDU

If  someone  has  ever  felt  their   temporal  lobes  pulsating  nonstop   while   studying   a   textbook,   that   will   mean   nothing   to   them   in   the   next   month   and   a   half,   then   they  have  experienced  something   called  midterm-­stress.   “Midterms   are   a   big   part   of   your   grade   and   considering   they’re   cumulative   there   can   be   a  slim  chance  of  passing,�  fresh-­

PDQÂżQDQFHPDMRU0LWFKHOO)DU-­ rell  said. The  body  owns  certain  stress-­ ors  that  are  stimulated  and  cause   people  to  act  and  think  in  certain   ways.  Midterms  can  almost  be  re-­ lated  to  several  different  stressors   such   as:   chronic,   life   changing,   job  and/or  frustrating  stressors.   Âł7KH ZRUGV PLGWHUP DQG Âż-­ nal,   are   associated   with   fear,â€?   Farrell  said. According  to  Ashland  Torres,   writer   for   The   Current   Online,   “with  half  of  the  semester  nearly  

over,  midterms   are   the   looming   darkness   over   every   students   head.� Although   students   may   pre-­ pare  for  the  looming  darkness  of   midterms,  even  the  prepared  stu-­ dent  experiences  the  worries  and   stress   when   faced   with   the   pres-­ sure  that  comes  along  with  mid-­ terms.   If   pondered   on,   the   idea   of   being   well   prepared   isn’t   that   easy  to  come  by  for  college  stu-­ dents.   Most   college   students   not   only   have   to   worry   about   mid-­ terms,  but  also  worry  about  oth-­

er  factors   such   as:   their   futures,   their   money,   maintaining   certain   GPAs,   holding   onto   a   part-­time   job,  etc.   According   to   US   News,   20   percent   of   students   report   anxi-­ ety   so   stressful   that   it   affects   their   grades   on   the   actual   test.   With  this  many  tasks  it  also  easy   for   students   to   forget   important   things,   simply   because   their   minds   are   off   somewhere   else.   Due  to  distractions,  students  may   DOVR ¿QG WKHPVHOYHV UHDOL]LQJ DW the   last   minute   they   must   take   a  

midterm,  causing  an  alarming  re-­ action. As   the   body   reacts   to   alarm-­ ing   news,   the   heart   has   a   reac-­ tion.   The   sudden   stop   of   heart   is   the   body’s   GAS   (generalized   adaptation  syndrome)  system  be-­ ing   activated.   The   way   this   sys-­ tem  works  is  that  generally  when   someone   is   initially   told   some-­ thing   alarming   they   experience   3   phases;͞   they   are:   the   alarm,   resistance  and  exhaustion  stages.   For  example,  when  a  student  sud-­ denly  remembers  a  big  test  he/she   is   startled   triggering   their   stress-­ ors.  The  second  stage,  resistance,   is  when  the  student  will  shake  it   off  and  say  that  they  have  enough   time   to   cram   the   night   before.   7KHQ WKH ¿QDO VWDJH H[KDXVWLRQ is   when   the   body   literally   gives   up,  they  call  it  quits  because  the   body   can   no   longer   take   what   is   being  thrown   at   it.  The   informa-­ tion  being  read  is  not  being  syn-­ thesized   and   people   will   go   to   sleep   because   they   are   literally   exhausted.   Stress  is  literally  a  bodily  re-­ minder.   Some   ways   to   deal   with   midterm   stress   are   simple   such   as:  getting  good  sleep,  exercise  so   the  body  remains  in  tip-­top  shape,   study   a   week   or   two   ahead,   etc.   The  next  time  the  syllabus  reads   midterm  make  sure  to  plan  ahead   because  with  that  single  step  they   are  avoiding  stressing  themselves   out.   Remember,   stress   is   what   one  makes  it.

“WE ARE THE VOICE OF THE VOICELESS.� If  you  have  a  story  idea,  The  Pace  Chronicle  will  help  you  share  it.  Go  to   www.pacechronicle.com/submissions  to  pitch  a  story  idea,  submit  a  letter  to  the  editor,  or  request  coverage  for  your  organi-­ zation’s  event.  Articles  and  ideas  can  also  be  submitted  by  e-­mailing  pacechronicle@pace.edu.  Submission  does  not   guarantee  publication.  


NEWS

The Pace Chronicle

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2013 PAGE 4

Could Pace Guest policy in question after security conflicts Senior Week be cancelled? TAYLOR Â LONGENBERGER

 NEWS  EDITOR TAYLOR.B.LONGENBERGER@PACE.EDU

Continued  from  Page  1 students   may   not   come   to   the   events.   If  seniors  that  were  interested   in   having   a   senior   week   were   to   join  the  committee,  they  could  as-­ sure   that   events   that   they   would   like   to   have   would   happen.   The   events   that   were   part   of   senior   week   in   previous   years   involved   on   campus   and   local   off   campus   activities.   In   the   past   there   was   a   Se-­ nior   Kickoff   on   the   Miller   lawn,   where   there   were   games   and   re-­ laxing   on   Shirley   Beth’s   Way.  A   wine  tasting  at  Millbrook  Winery   took  place  where  there  was  a  day   spent   at   the   winery   with   views   of   other   vineyards,   the   Catskills,   and   rolling   hills.   Similarly   there   was   a   brewery   tour   at   Captain   Lawrence   Brewery,   which   in-­ cluded   tastings   of   samples   of   all   of   the   Captain   Lawrence   ales.  A   boat  cruise  is  also  usually  part  of   senior  week,  creating  a  symbolic   full  circle  experience  at  Pace,  as  a   boat  cruise  is  also  an  event  when   VWXGHQWV ¿UVW HQWHU 3DFH GXULQJ their  orientation.   All  of  these  events  are  occur-­ ances  that  seniors  may  still  want   to   partake   in   as   their   Pace   expe-­ rience  comes  to  a  close.  Students   that  are  seniors  that  feel  as  if  they   are   missing   out   without   the   ex-­ periences  of  these  events  are  en-­ couraged   to   become   involved   in   the  committee  for  senior  celebra-­ tions  to  give  their  own.  Students   that   are   interested   can   contact   Niki   Fjeldal   at   nfjeldal@pace. edu.  

Guests  at   Pace   have   been   causing  more  problems  this  past   semester   than   the   residents   that   live   on   campus,   yet   the   hosting   students  are  the  ones  responsible   for  their  guests. According   to   the   Pace   Resi-­ dent’s   Handbook,   “Residents   assume   all   responsibility   for   the   actions   of   their   guests   and   must   accompany   them   at   all   times.   This   means   your   guests   are   not   permitted   to   wander   the   residence   halls   or   areas   of   your   Townhouse   without   you;Íž   nor   may   they   remain   in   your   room,   unaccompanied,   when   you   are   elsewhere.â€? In   the   past   semester   there   have   been   several   occasions   where   guests   have   caused   not   only  minor  disturbances  on  cam-­ SXV FRQĂ€LFWV WKDW QHHGHG FDP-­ pus  security  and  police  involve-­ ment.   In   a   minor   disturbance,   the   Resident  Director  (RD)  and  Res-­ ident   Assistants   (RAs)   on   duty   control   the   situation   and   follow   up  with  incident  reports  or  write   ups  when  necessary.  In  the  event   that  major  illegal  activity  occurs,   such   as   destruction   of   property   or   assault,   security   and   police   will  be  called  to  the  scene. “There  are  two  security  vehi-­ cles  on  the  Pleasantville  campus   and  one  on  the  Briarcliff  campus   at  all  times,â€?  Executive  Director   of   Safety   and   Security   Vincent   Beatty   said.   “If   it   is   determined   that   police   are   necessary   they   are  radioed  over  the  24-­hour  dis-­ patch.   Security   stands   by   until   police  are  called  and  arrive  at  the   scene.â€? In  the  last  semester  the  Mount   Pleasant   Police   Department,   which  has  jurisdiction  over  both   the   Pleasantville   and   Briarcliff   campuses,   has   been   called   to  

 PHOTO  BY  EMILY  WOLFRUM If  a  student  has  a  guest  they  should  make  sure  that  they  remember  to  follow  policy.  Remain  with  a  guest  and   knowing  where  they  are  doing  at  all  times  could  keep  one  out  of  trouble.

the  campus  due  to  illegal  actions   several  times.  The  police  can  be   called  to  the  campus  due  to  ille-­ gal  or  medical  emergencies. “It   is   preferable   that   calls   to   the   police   go   through   security,�   Beatty  said.  “Police  don’t  always   know   where   things   are   on   cam-­ pus.  They  are  more  familiar  with   the  residence  halls  but  if  it  is  in   one   of   the   academic   buildings   they  may  not  know  where  to  go.   If  it  is  an  emergency,  especially  a   medical  one  students  should  call   911.� When   guests   cause   a   disrup-­ tion   on   campus,   whether   police   are   involved   or   not,   the   actions   to   follow   are   based   on   what   se-­ curity   and   the   Resident   Staff   or   Area   Director   deem   necessary.   Students   that   are   responsible   for  the  guests  are  also  subject  to   consequences.

“A  complaint   against   a   stu-­ GHQW FDQ EH ÂżOHG DW DQ\ WLPH´ Beatty  said.  “The  dean  and  area   director   decide   action   to   follow.   “It   is   possible   that   the   student   can  be  banned  from  campus.â€? For   any   individual   that   is   asked   to   leave   and   is   banned   from  campus,  they  are  referred  to   as   a   “persona   non   grataâ€?   mean-­ ing   “person   not   welcome.â€?   The   vehicle   information   and   names   of   the   banned   students’   guests   are   at   the   gates   of   the   Pleasant-­ ville  and  Briarcliff  campuses  and   are  given  to  Residential  staff.   According   to   the   Resident’s   Handbook,   “Guest   privileges   may  be  revoked  for  violation  of   University   policies,   and   guests   may  be  prohibited  from  Univer-­ VLW\ SURSHUW\ LQGHÂżQLWHO\ ,Q DG-­ dition,   the   Residence   Life   Staff   may,  at  any  time,  require  a  guest  

to  vacate  any  residence  hall.� Guests   that   cause   major   dis-­ ruptions  on  campus  are  most  of-­ ten   asked   to   leave   and   escorted   out  or  banned  from  the  campus.   Students   that   are   responsible   for   these   guests   may   be   asked   to  leave  the  resident  hall  and  be   banned  from  housing,  but  a  case-­ to-­case  basis  may  be  taken. Through   major   disturbances   this  semester,  students  and  guests   have  both  found  out  that  the  ac-­ tions   that   they   take   can   have   consequences   that   can   remove   them   from   campus.   Students   with   guests   are   reminded   that   they  should  make  sure  to  follow   policy,  including  remaining  with   a  guest  and  knowing  where  they   are  and  what  they  are  doing  at  all   times.

Pace Students React to NYC 21+ Smoking Law Continued  from  Page  1 mute  from  the  city  to  Westchester   everyday.   There   are   also   many   more  students  that  attend  classes   at  both  the  Westchester  and  New   York  City  campuses. Not  all  Pace  students  are  over   the   age   of   21   and   if   they   are,   many  students  cannot  afford  ciga-­ rettes  that  are  so  expensive.  With   the  new  law  limiting  the  purchase   of  cigarettes,  students  have  many   points   of   view   and   responses.     Some   question   if   the   law   should   have  been  passed  despite  whether   it  directly  effects  them  or  not. ³,I \RX DUH DEOH WR ¿JKW IRU your  country  at  18  you  should  be   able   to   buy   a   cigarette,�   junior   nursing  major  Andrew  Samanich  

said.  “But,  at  the  same  time  peo-­ ple   aren’t   fully   developed   at   18   and  it’s  easier  to  form  a  habit  of   smoking  at  a  younger  age.� Many   New   Yorkers   agree   with   Samanich.   The   idea   that   lawmakers   had   for   the   bills   was   that  it  is  important  to  incorporate   the  health  and  developmental  as-­ pects  of  the  young  adults  that  do   smoke. “I   don’t   smoke   anymore,   but   I  understand  it.  I  think  it’s  a  good   way   to   get   young   people   to   not   start   smoking,�   senior   informa-­ tion   technology   major   Matt   Oel-­ sner   said.   “If   they   don’t   start   by   21  then  they  most  likely  won’t. Pace  students  seemed  to  agree   with   the   law   in   one   way   or   an-­ other,   saying   that   the   addictive  

properties  of  smoking  are  hard  to   break  and  that  if  people  never  try   them   then   they   are   less   likely   to   become  addicted. “I   think   that   it’s   actually   a   good   law,�   junior   education   ma-­ jor   Victoria   Mornhineway   said.   “Kids   are   starting   to   smoke   younger   and   younger   these   days   so  if  they  enforced  this  law  I  think   it   would   be   really   helpful.   But   only  if  it  is  enforced.� One  of  the  other  propositions   that   is   being   pushed   for   in   New   York  City  is  for  the  sale  of  ciga-­ rettes  and  other  tobacco  products   to   be   modeled   after   countries   such   as   Ireland   and   England.   In   these   countries,   the   products   are   hidden   in   cabinets   and   draws   or   concealed   behind   curtains   until  

the  customer  asks  for  them.  This   is   only   another   idea   in   trying   to   prevent   the   market   of   tobacco   products  to  younger  people. Lawmakers   and   several   resi-­ GHQWV RI DOO ¿YH ERURXJKV DUH hopeful  that  the  attention  brought   to  the  limitation  of  cigarettes  that   is   forced   by   the   new   laws   will   DLG LQ WKH ¿JKW DJDLQVW VPRNLQJ They  are  aimed  at  saving  younger   people  from  the  addictions  of  to-­ bacco   and   the  life  threatening   i l l n e s s e s   that   can   be   c a u s e d   by   tobacco   use.  

 PHOTO  FROM  SMOKEFORWHAT.COM Pace  students  seemed  to  agree  with  the  law  in  one  way  or  another,  saying  that  the  addictive  properties  of  smoking  are   hard  to  break  and  that  if  people  never  try  them  then  they  are  less  likely  to  become  addicted.


BULLETIN BOARD

The Pace Chronicle

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2013 PAGE 5

Lunch at Pace

SUDOKU |  INTERMEDIATE CLASSIFIEDS: Health Editor The  Pace  Chronicle  is  currently  looking  for   a  new  Health  Editor.  If  interested,  please   contact  Jonathan  Alvarez.  Writing  sample   and  resume  recommended. Basketball Student Manager The  Pace  Men’s  Basketball  Team  is  look-­ ing  for  a  student  manager  for  the  upcom-­ ing  season.  Student  must  travel  with   the  team  and  attend  practice  and  home   games.  Monetary  compensation  is  pos-­ sible  in  addition  to  team  apparel.  If  inter-­ est,  contact  Coach  Andrew  Impastato  by   e-­mail  at  aimpastato@pace.edu  or  phone   (914)  773-­3274

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THIS WEEK’S PACE POLL Do you prefer to read The Pace Chronicle in print or online? Let us know!

Alice Altshuler  is  one  of  the  many   students  at  Pace  who  is  able  to  enjoy   the   college   experience   through   the   Successful  Learning  Center  (SLC). SLC,   according   to   its   website,   is   a  program  that  enables  students  with   disabilities   to   meet   and   interact   with   other  college  students  and  become  ex-­ posed  to  the  collegiate  environment. On   Wednesdays,   students   in   SLC   come   to   Pace   and   spend   time   with   other   students   through   the   Lunch   Buddies  program.  It  was  through  this   program   that   the   Chronicle’s   Editor   in  Chief,  Jonathan  Alvarez,  met  Alice   and  learned  of  her  future  aspirations   of  becoming  a  journalist. When  Jonathan  promised  to  pub-­ lish  her  writing  in  The  Pace  Chronicle,   she  immediately  began  typing  away  at   a   nearby   computer   and   assured   him   she  would  have  her  article  submitted   the  next  day. Alice   kept   her   word,   and   the   fol-­ lowing   column   gives   in-­depth   ac-­ counts  of  her  days  at  Pace.   For   more   information   on   SLC   or   the   Lunch   Buddies   program,   stop   by   the   Setter’s   Lounge   on   Wednesdays   or  visit  their  website  www.successful-­ learningcenter.com.    

Today I   had   lunch   with   my   friends   Ian,   Connor,   and   Nick.   It   is   nice   talking   to   them.   They   are  so  fun  and  cool.  I  miss  them   when   they   go.   We   have   a   very   nice   friendship.   It   is   fun   here.   Nick   is   19   and   Connor   is   19   as   well.   They   are   on   the   Pace   la-­ crosse   team.   Nick   played   base-­ ball   when   he   was   younger   and   Connor   played   football.     Nick   wants   to   be   an   accountant   and   eventually   become   a   teacher   and   Connor   wants   to   work   on   :DOO6WUHHWGRLQJ¿QDQFH1LFN¶V favorite   food   is   pizza   and   Con-­ nor’s  is  pasta.  Nick  was  born  in   October  while  Connor  was  born   in   February.   They   both   like   any   kind  of  music.  I  like  hanging  out   with   these   guys.     They   are   all   great  people.

VOTE ONLINE AT PACECHRONICLE.COM IF YOU HAVE ANY ADDITIONAL COMMENTS OR THOUGHTS, SEND A LETTER TO THE EDITOR AT PACECHRONICLE@PACE.EDU


OPINION Among  Other Things SARA  MORIARTY  OPINION  EDITOR SARA.M.MORIARTY@PACE.EDU

We  all   know   the   type.   The   guys  who  are  always  on  top  of  the   world;Íž  on  top  of  their  game.  They   know  the  system  when  it  comes  to   work  and  women.  They  know  how   to  charm  their  way  into  and  out  of   nearly  any  situation,  whether  it  be   taking  a  midterm  without  studying   or  living  in  some  girl’s  dorm  room   for   free   for   nearly   two   months.   Not   to   mention   these   charmers   always  dress  well  and  smell  nice,   even  when  living  out  of  a  suitcase.   They   always   seem   to   have   some   women  on  hand,  and  this  may  not   be  outwardly  bragged  about,  but  it   is  no  big  secret  either.   It  is  simply  known.  “Yeah,  she   was  hooking  up  with  him  about  a   year   ago.â€?   “You   wouldn’t   think   she’d  go  for  it,  but  yeah  she’s  been   with  him  a  bunch.â€?  “He  played  her   so  bad,  kept  leading  her  on,  she  re-­ ally  hoped  he  would  think  of  her   in  as  his  girlfriend  once  she  went   all  the  way.â€? These   top-­of-­the-­world   men   might  also  be  willing  to  converse   of   their   ways   with   you.   But,   of   course,   the   conversation   will   be   from  their  perspective. “I  told  her  I  didn’t  want  a  re-­ lationship;Íž   she   knew   the   whole   time‌ I  just  want  to  be  free  and  not  be   tied  down... She’s  not  exactly  my  type... Nice  girl,  good  sex,  but  I  can’t   see  myself  with  her‌ I’m   waiting   for   the   right   per-­ son  to  start  a  relationship  with... I’ve   had   some   bitchy   girl-­ friends   in   the   past   I   need   to   get   over... I   have   issues   with   myself   I   need   to   work   out   before   I   start   a   relationship  with  others...â€? All  of  these  excuses-­-­some  of   which  make  sense,  some  of  which   may  be  true-­-­but  think,  where  are   these   “perfect,   relationship-­wor-­ thyâ€?   girls   they’re   “waiting   forâ€??     Do  they  even  exist?    Or  are  these   just  excuses  to  make  meaningless   sex  seem  more  morally  acceptable   and  worth  a  try? Either  way,  these  boys  are  hard   to  pity.  Poor  guy,  you  had  a  bitchy   ex.  Better  take  up  that  no-­strings-­ attached  offer,  because  you’re  not   ready  for  a  relationship  after  what   she  did  to  you.     That   was   sarcastic.   Lots   of   people   have   had   this   same   prob-­ lem.  Meaningless  sexual  relations   ZLOOQRWÂż[DQ\VHOIHVWHHPLVVXHV or  make  up  for  the  fact  that  a  cer-­ tain   ex   was   completely   terrible   and   you’re   still   not   over   him   or   her.   In   other   words,   don’t   speak   of  self-­esteem  problems  in  an  at-­ tempt  to  make  yourself  more  relat-­ able,  more  self-­defeating,  and  less   on-­top-­of-­the-­world,  just  as  an  at-­ tempt   to   garner   the   attention   and  

&ROOHJHLVDERXWÂżQGLQJRXU-­ selves,  and  learning  from  any   and  all  experiences.  Here,  I’ll   examine  the  implications  behind   anything  and  everything-­  from   classes  to  relationships,  from   7ZLWWHUVHOÂżHVWRVHOIUHDOL]D-­ tions‌  among  other  things. understanding  of  a  girl  who  wants   to  help.   And   by   “garner   attentionâ€?   I   mean  garner  sex. For   a   minute   there   a   guy   who  takes  10  minutes  to  spill  his   heart’s   problems   and   talk   about   how  he’s  really  NOT  on  top  of  the   world  might  seem  like  a  genuinely   good   person,   but   then   it   always   goes  back  to  sex.  And  the  pity  thus   leaves.  What  if  this  is  an  act? Coming  to  the  conclusion  that   it  probably  is  just  an  act,  the  girls   can   move   on   quickly.   He   clearly   just  wants  one  thing.  He’s  still  on   top   of   the   world.   Everyone   has   problems;Íž   he’s   no   exception.   He   GLGWU\WRKRRNXSZLWKDERXWÂżYH girls  that  you  know  just  a  week  af-­ ter  the  special  heart-­to-­heart.  See?   Same   guy   from   the   beginning,   through  and  through. But‌.. Then   one   night‌he   cries.   Real   tears.   Well,   drunken   tears,   but   real   nonetheless.   “I’m   aloneâ€?   “People  have  this  idea  of  meâ€?  “It’s   not  trueâ€? Hmmm‌ Still  not  convincing. “I’m  still  not  over  her.  I  can’t   be  with  that  other  girl.  I  can’t  deal   with  this  any  more.â€? Ok,  maybe  a  little  convincing. This  guy  is  really  down,  he’  s   crashing  hard.   This   very   same   guy   who   you   wanted  to  punch  in  the  face  for  a   PRQWK\RXQRZÂżQG\RXUVHOIWDN-­ ing  care  of  like  a  small,  innocent   child.  You  feel  your  motherly  in-­ stincts   come   out   as   you   rub   his   back   and   let   him   lean   on   you   as   you   walk   to   a   cab   or   to   another   house.   How   could   this   poor,   in-­ nocent,   semi-­conscious   guy   be   the  same  one  that  screwed  over  so   many,  including  a  good  friend  or   yourself?  Is  he  really  the  same  one   that  spilled  his  guts  to  you,  only  to   try  other  things  with  you?  Maybe   he  really  does  deserve  pity.  May-­ be  he’s  not  so  bad  after  all. But  maybe  he  is. He’s  down  and  out  right  now,   but  give  it  a  half  hour-­  he  may  still   try  to  spend  the  night  with  you  or   a  friend.  Or  both.   Everyone  has  their  issues;Íž  ev-­ HU\RQHKDVWKHLUQLJKWVÂżOOHGZLWK emotions   and   intoxication.  These   things  make  an  always-­on-­top  per-­ son  seem  less  so;Íž  these  degrading   things  that  come  with  crazy  nights   and  pent  up  esteem  problems  have   a   way   of   making   a   high-­on-­life   man   seem   vulnerable.   The   con-­ trast  between  the  normal  high-­on-­ life  attitude  and  the  all  of  a  sudden   hard   crash   into   a   state   of   vulner-­ ability   intrigues   women.   Seeing   men  vulnerable  and  being  able  to   take   care   of   them   is‌well‌.   a   turn  on.  But  please  be  aware  that   these  vulnerable,  passed  out  guys   might  be  (or  at  least  act)  on  top  of   the  world  tomorrow.   And,   of   course,   the   situation   can  go  for  any  gender.  

The Pace Chronicle

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2013 PAGE 6

Trash in residence halls-- Do all students respect common space?

 PHOTO  FROM  PACE.EDU Residence  halls  at  Pace  look  clean  from  the  outside,  and  generally  are  on  the  inside  too.  But  students   do  have  to  remember  to  care  for  their  home  away  from  home  and  get  rid  of  their  trash  responsibly. SARA  MORIARTY  OPINION  EDITOR SARA.M.MORIARTY@PACE.EDU

Walking  into   the   hallway   of   Dow   Hall   in   Briarcliff   on   a   lazy   Saturday   afternoon,   one   might   see  the  remnants  of  a  fun  Friday   QLJKWVWUHZQDURXQGWKHĂ€RRU3L]-­ za  boxes,  cans,  napkins,  and  even   bubble  wrap  might  appear  in  the   hallway.   Bubble  wrap  doesn’t  appear  to   be  much  of  problem,  but  leaving   trash  in  the  halls  can  attract  bugs.   Bugs   and   trash   do   not   make   for   happy  residents.   Sure,   the   halls   are   cleared   and   cleaned   quickly   enough,   but   the  garbage  shouldn’t  have  to  be   cleared   out   of   the   halls   to   begin   with.   Most   students   respect   their   residence,   but   problems   remain.   Remnants  of  Friday  night  parties   or   even   Sunday   night   study   ses-­ sions  really  should  not  be  visible   in   the   hallway   or   in   any   shared   space.   Sophomore   Resident   Assis-­ tant   Patrick   Dooley   spoke   to   me   about   respecting   shared   space   in   dorm   halls.   He   is   a   RA   in   North   Hall.   “Well   to   my   residents   I   tell   them   to   be   more   aware   of   their  

surroundings.  Their   section   is   a   community   and   other   people   have  to  deal  with  what  they  do.  I   wouldn’t   say   there   is   an   issue   in   North   though,�   Dooley   said,   re-­ ferring  to  issues  of  improper  dis-­ posal  of  trash.   Several   residence   halls   alleg-­ edly   have   some   variation   of   the   problem   of   improper   garbage   disposal   and   lack   of   respect   for   shared   space.   I   spoke   to   some   students   about   any   cleanliness   problems   in   their   residence,   and   the  majority  of  answers  involved   bathrooms.  One  answer  that  con-­ tinually   came   up   was   garbage   disposal   of   students.   According   to   students   in   residence   halls   on   both   Pleasantville   and   Briarcliff,   residents   will   dispose   of   their   trash   in   bathroom   garbage   cans   instead  of  the  large  garbage  bins   they  are  supposed  to  use.   “Hillside   is   generally   clean.   The   only   thing   is   people   throw   things  out  in  the  bathroom  trash,�   Hillside   resident   and   sophomore   education  major  Jack  Quinn.   Another   alleged   problem   ac-­ cording   to   some   on   Briarcliff   have  been  cockroaches,  but  that  is   another   issue   entirely.   It   is   com-­ mon   knowledge,   however,   that   keeping   trash   in   its   proper   place  

can  prevent  bug  infestations.   It   apparently   isn’t   all   dorm   KDOOVWKDWIDFHWKLVWUDVKGLIÂżFXOW\ however.     Howard   Johnson   resi-­ dents  don’t  claim  to  be  facing  any   problems   with   students   respect-­ ing  shared  space.   More   complaints   don’t   stem   from   trash,   but   from   smells.   Some  students  complain  of  strong   smells   allegedly   coming   from   particular  rooms.  Pat  Dooley  also   spoke  to  me  about  this  issue.   “In  my  section  personally  we   have  a  B.O.  problem,  but  a  major-­ ity  of  my  residents  are  athletes  or   go  to  the  gym  on  a  regular  basis   so   that’s   something   I’ve   talked   to   them   about.   The   North   Hall   girls   have   really   helped   me   out   because   my   guys   realized   that   they  didn’t  want  to  come  to  their   rooms  if  it  smelled  bad.  So  hurrah   for  women!â€?  Dooley  said.   So,   residents,   whatever   you   happen   to   be   doing,   try   to   keep   it  contained  and  invisible  for  the   sake  of  all  the  others  living  with   you.    Pat  Dooley  agrees.   “Everyone   should   respectful   to   the   residents   of   their   commu-­ nity.  That  just  because  you  don’t   care  that  your  room  reeks  doesn’t   mean   your   neighbors   don’t   ei-­ ther,â€?  Dooley  said.  

DO YOU DISAGREE WITH SOMETHING YOU READ OR HAVE MORE TO ADD? E-­mail  all  story  ideas  and  articles  to  pacechronicle@pace.edu  or  visit   our  website  www.pacechronicle.com


OPINION

The Pace Chronicle

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2013 PAGE 7

Home For the Holidays: A Stressful Season for Students SARA  MORIARTY  OPINION  EDITOR SARA.M.MORIARTY@PACE.EDU

With  the  holiday  season  upon   us,   some   students   living   at   Pace   are  beginning  to  mentally  prepare   before   going   home   for   Thanks-­ giving  and  winter  break.    Living   on   campus   gives   many   students   a   sense   of   independence   that   they   do   not   have   at   home.   I   live   on  campus  because  I  craved  this   independence,   as   do   many   other   students.   Thus,   going   back   to   your  parents’  house,  for  some,  is   a  source  of  stress.  This  stress  can   be   partly   because   of   losing   the   sense   of   college   independence   upon  going  back  home.   Personally,   I   don’t   get   so   stressed  out  with  going  home.  It’s   a   bit   annoying   having   a   curfew   after   spending   a   whole   semester   without   one,   and   it’s   weird   go-­ ing   back   to   a   house   always   full   of  children  after  living  in  a  dorm   full  of  young  adults.  Still,  I  don’t   mind  going  home.  Other  students   have  differing  opinions.     “I   love   going   home,�   sopho-­ more  nursing  major  Asma  Vohra   said.  “Whenever  I’m  on  campus,   I   have   a   lot   of   work,   which   is  

what  causes  stress  for  me.  Being   at   home,   I   can   relax   more   eas-­ ily   while   still   being   productive.   I  try  to  go  home  once  or  twice  a   month,  but  this  semester  I  haven’t   had  time  to  go  home  that  often.    I   like  being  around  family.  “   Other  students  are  not  looking   forward   to   going   home   for   up-­ coming  holiday  breaks.   “There’s   nothing   to   do   at   home.   Here,   you’re   always   ac-­ tive.   There’s   always   homework,   there’s  always  something  to  do,�   sophomore   communications   ma-­ jor  Steve  Cosentino  said.   This   college   activity,   in   my   opinion,   can   be   associated   with   independence.   It   is   up   to   the   student   to   go   to   class,   to   get   in-­ volved,  to  make  friends,  and  to  go   to  activities  available  on  campus.   Going   back   home,   the   activity   suddenly   stops   and   you   are,   in   some  cases,  stuck  with  family  ac-­ tivities  and  stuck  being  dependent   on  parents  once  again.   “I’m   excited   to   go   home   for   Thanksgiving   break,   that’s   only   a  few  days,�  sophomore  psychol-­ ogy   major   Christina   Miller   said.   “Not   so   much   for   winter   break,   because  I’ll  be  home  for  so  long.   It’s   like   going   back   to   being   the  

 PHOTO  FROM  TECHNORATI.COM Going  home  for  the  holidays  might  not  be  very  relaxing  for  some  students,  despite  portrayals  of   relaxing  family  meals  all  over  social  media.   kid  again.�     Being  the  kid  again‌  I  can  re-­ late  to  that.  I  love  being  with  my   family.  But  I  don’t  love  having  a   curfew  and  an  obligation  to  baby-­ sit  my  brother.  Still,  I  love  going   home,  and  there  are  perks  to  not  

having  college   independence.   Free   food   is   one   of   these   perks.   Good  food  is  another  one.  Being   surrounded   by   family   is   a   major   reason  that  going  home,  for  some,   is  looked  forward  to.   No   matter   what   your   home  

situation  is  like,  most  of  us  have   to  leave  campus  for  the  holidays   and   are   already   getting   mentally   prepared  to  make  the  switch  from   college  lifestyle  to  home  lifestyle.  

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ENTERTAINMENT

The Pace Chronicle

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2013 PAGE 8

This  Week  at  the

JACOB  BURNS   FILM  CENTER

Lou Reed (1942-2013) $UHÀHFWLRQRIZKDWœVKRWLQHQWHUWDLQPHQWIURPWKHSHUVSHFWLYH  of  Pace  student’s  versus  that  of  one  eccentric  writer

405  Manville  Road,  Pleasantville

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Blue  is  the  Warmest   Color 7KLV FRQWURYHUVLDO 3DOPH G¶RU ZLQQHU FHQWHUV RQ \HDUROG Adèle   and   her   relationship   with   WKH FRQ¿GHQW DQG FKDULVPDWLF (PPD D VOLJKWO\ ROGHU EOXH haired   art   student.   Their   intense   DQGFRPSOLFDWHGORYHVWRU\VSDQV VHYHUDO \HDUV DQG LV WRXFKLQJO\ XQLYHUVDOLQLWVGHSLFWLRQRIVH[XDO DZDNHQLQJ $EGHOODWLI .HFKLFKH    P 1&)UDQFH)UHQFKZLWKVXEWLWOHV ,)&)LOPV

 PHOTO  FROM  THESELVEDGEYARD.WORDPRESS.COM Reed  (right)  stands  with  musical  legends  David  Bowie  (left)  and  Iggy  Pop  (center).

12  Years  A  Slave %DVHG RQ WKH WUXH VWRU\ RI RQH PDQœV ¿JKW IRU VXUYLYDO DQG IUHHGRP  ,Q WKH SUH&LYLO :DU 8QLWHG6WDWHV6RORPRQ1RUWKXS &KLZHWHO (MLRIRU  D IUHH EODFN PDQ IURP XSVWDWH 1HZ <RUN LV DEGXFWHG DQG VROG LQWR VODYHU\ )DFLQJ FUXHOW\ SHUVRQL¿HG E\ D PDOHYROHQW VODYH RZQHU SRU WUD\HG E\ 0LFKDHO )DVVEHQGHU  DVZHOODVXQH[SHFWHGNLQGQHVV HV6RORPRQVWUXJJOHVQRWRQO\WR VWD\DOLYHEXWWRUHWDLQKLVGLJQLW\ 6WHYH 0F4XHHQ   P 5 86$)R[6HDUFKOLJKW

DEREK  KADEMIAN  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR DEREK.H.KADEMIAN@PACE.EDU

On  Oct.  27  one  of  the  most  in-­ Ă&#x20AC;XHQWLDO VRQJZULWHUV RI WKH FHQ-­ tury   passed   away.   Unknown   to   many   inside   the   Pace   communi-­ ty,  Lou  Reedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  work  with  the  Vel-­ vet  Underground,  collaborations,   and  solo  albums  set  the  stage  for   generations  to  come.  He  was  best   known   for   his   song   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walk   On   The  Wild  Side.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  bums  me  out  that  a  lot  of   people   in   our   generation   prob-­ ably  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  his  name  or  who   KHZDVEXWKLVLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHRQURFN and   roll   will   forever   resonate   in   the   music   of   those   who   know   him   and   even   those   who   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t,â&#x20AC;?   junior   journalism   major   Farrah   Lopez  said. Reedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   death   was   almost   in-­ evitable  after  he  received  a  liver  

transplant  last   May,   which   was   eventually  the  cause  of  his  death.   This  came  from  a  lifelong  prob-­ lem  with  drinking  and  drugs,  he   was  71  when  he  passed.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Normally   when   you   hear   about  celebrity  deaths  or  anyone   substantial  dying  you  kind  of  get   that   momentary   passĂŠ   kind   of   shock  and  it  hits  you  later,  but  I   was   immediately   affected   even   for   someone   that   I   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   know   and  the  fact  that  it  happened  out   of   nowhere   made   it   even   more   GLIÂżFXOW WR FRSH ZLWK´ VHQLRU history   major   Andrew   Linth-­ waite  said.   Reed   had   been   known   to   work   with   some   of   the   biggest   names   in   music   like   Iggy   Pop,   David  Bowie,  and,  most  recently,   Metallica.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;When  I  heard  he  had  passed   away,   I   thought   of   every   person   I  listen  to  who  was  close  to  him   DQGWKHLUVDGQHVVRQO\DPSOLÂżHG

mine,â&#x20AC;?  Lopez  said.   +H PDGH KLV ÂżQDO SXEOLF DS-­ pearance   at   the   John   Varvatos   Presents  Transformer  event  at  the   beginning  of  Oct.,  where  Genesis   Publications  announced  a  limited   edition   book   that   photographi-­ cally  depicts  his  legendary  album   Transformer.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  was  that  kid  in  high  school   that  would  bail  on  her  last  period   class   after   a   long   day   to   listen   Transformer   in   her   boyfriendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   car.   I   was   15   years   old   when   I   ÂżUVWGLVFRYHUHGDFDVVHWWHWDSHRI the  Velvet  Underground  and  Nico   in   my   grandmotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   basement.   Lou   reed   helped   soundtrack   my   formative   years,â&#x20AC;?   senior   media   communications   and   visual   arts   major  Marielle  Iljazoski  said.   My  Two  Cents:   It   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   until   I   got   to   Pace   that   I   started   listening   to   Reed.   At   the   time   I   had   been   going   through  a  lot  of  issues  in  my  life  

and  it  was  Reedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  musical  genius   that   helped   me   sort   it   out.   Even   as   a   child   driving   around   in   my   momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   car   listening   to   his   song   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walk   On   The   Wild   Side,â&#x20AC;?   I   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  what  he  was  neces-­ sarily  talking  about,  but  I  knew  it   was  terribly  catchy  and  it  perma-­ nently  ingrained  into  my  mind. 7KLVLVWKHÂżUVWWLPHLQP\OLIH that   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   found   myself   mourn-­ ing   the   death   of   someone   who   left   such   an   outstanding   impact   on  the  rock  and  roll  community.   I  think  that  the  next  two  decades   are   going   to   bring   nothing   but   sorrow   to   rock   because   of   the   legends  that  are  aging.  Paul  Mc-­ Cartney  is  the  same  age  as  Reed   and   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   interesting   to   think   that   it   could   have   been   him   instead.   Lou  Reed  was  an  icon  and  a  leg-­ end,   he   will   be   greatly   missed,   and  may  he  rest  in  peace.

All  is  Lost $FDGHP\ $ZDUG ZLQQHU 5REHUW 5HGIRUGVWDUVLQWKLVRSHQZDWHU WKULOOHU DERXW RQH PDQœV EDWWOH IRU VXUYLYDO DIWHU KLV VDLOERDW LV GHVWUR\HGDWVHD:ULWWHQDQGGL UHFWHGE\$FDGHP\$ZDUGQRPL QHH -& &KDQGRU 0DUJLQ &DOO  WKH¿OPLVDJULSSLQJYLVFHUDODQG SRZHUIXOO\PRYLQJWULEXWHWRLQJH QXLW\DQGUHVLOLHQFH -& &KDQGRU   P 3* 86$5RDGVLGH$WWUDFWLRQV

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ENTERTAINMENT

The Pace Chronicle

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2013 PAGE 9

Artist Spotlight: Joanna DeRosa and Six Stories Told DEREK  KADEMIAN  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR DEREK.H.KADEMIAN@PACE.EDU

Junior  Joanna   DeRosa   has   been  quite  busy  this  past  year  be-­ tween  being  a  full  time  commu-­ nications   student,   professional   cheerleading,   and   now   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the   front   woman   for   the   band   Six   Stories  Told.   Six   Stories   Told   is   a   power   pop   band   based   out   of   Walden,   New  York,   who   in   the   past   year   has  had  an  incredible  amount  of   success   opening   for   bands   like   The   Naked   Brothers   Band,   Red   Jumpsuit  Apparatus,   and   the   re-­ cently  revived  Aaron  Carter.   DeRosa  grew  up  in  a  musical   household  with  her  mother  being   in  a  rock  band,  where  her  and  her   husband  would  eventually  meet.   Her   sister   Samantha,   who   at-­ tended  Pace  for  two  years,  is  also   an   accomplished   songwriter   and   now   attends   the   Berkeley   Col-­ lege   of   Music   in   Boston,   Mas-­ sachusetts.   Her   mother   was   also   Joannaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   long-­time   vocal   coach   and  created  a  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;family  bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  con-­ sisting  of  her  sister  and  herself.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  competing  in  sing-­ ing  competitions  since  I  was  six   and  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  won  some  national  com-­ petitions  also,â&#x20AC;?  DeRosa  said.   Besides   having   the   oppor-­ tunity   to   open   for   such   notable   names,  the  band  has  also  played   dozens   of   other   shows   through-­

out  the   tri-­state   area   at   well   known  venues  like  Webster  Hall,   The   Chance,   and   The   Revolu-­ tion.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   sometimes   play   up   to   four   shows   a   week   and   at   least   one   a   day,   I   think   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   played   around  50  shows.  I  lost  track  af-­ ter  about  30,â&#x20AC;?  DeRosa  said.   Outside   of   her   hectic   sched-­ ule   with   the   band,   DeRosa   also   dances   for   the   Gotham   City   &KHHUOHDGHUVWKHÂżUVWSURGDQFH team   to   cheer   on   behalf   of   the   New  York  Giants.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   taking   17   credits   right   now,  balancing  rehearsal  twice  a   week   with   the   team,   band   prac-­ tice  once  a  week,  playing  shows   and  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  trying  to  maintain  a  so-­ cial  life,  but  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  tough,  I  feel  like   a  ghost  sometimes,  but  the  way  I   see  it  is  that  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  to  have   any   wasted   days,   I   want   every-­ day  to  get  me  one  step  closer  to   my  ultimate  goals,â&#x20AC;?  DeRosa  said. Six  Stories  Told  were  recent-­ ly   added   to   the   daily   rotation   of   songs   on   the   radio   station   Fox   103.1,   which   makes   them   the   ÂżUVWEDQGLQ\HDUVWREHSOD\HG on  the  station  that  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  signed  to   a  major  label.   DeRosa  and  Six  Stories  Told   are  just  getting  started,  and  with  a   band  mainly  consisting  of  musi-­ cians  under  the  age  of  20,  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   plenty  of  room  to  grow.   Âł:HÂśUHJRLQJWRDÂżOPDPX-­ sic   video   for   our   song   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Round  

 PHOTO  FROM  SIX  STORIES  TOLD  FACEBOOK  PAGE Six  Stories  Told  (left  to  right)  Tyler  McDermott,  Jesse  Sheppard,  Joanna  DeRosa,  Nikki  Conero  and   Ben  Langer. and  Roundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  in  the  coming  weeks   of   fame,   but   DeRosa   is   staying   make   their   day   better,   or   make   and  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  recording  our  EP  right   humble  and  making  sure  the  mu-­ the   people   think   differently,â&#x20AC;?   DeRosa  said.   now  so  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  trying  to  put  it  all   VLFFRPHVÂżUVW â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Making   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   what   ev-­ Six  Stories  Told  will  be  play-­ together   for   a   press   package   to   eryone   says   it   is   like   getting   a   ing  at  The  Loft  in  Poughkeepsie,   send  to  labels,â&#x20AC;?  DeRosa  said.   In  the  world  of  pop  music  art-­ Grammy   or   selling   out   the   big-­ New   York   on   Nov.   23,   contact   ists  tend  to  become  jaded  or  con-­ gest   venues,   making   it   to   me   is   them   via   Facebook   or   through   sidered   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;sell   outsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   because   they   just  to  be  able  to  have  ten  people   Joanna   DeRosa   for   tickets   and   change   their   music   against   their   know  your  songs,  have  the  songs   information. will   just   to   reach   a   certain   level   change   their   lives   or   even   just  

Hudson Stage Co.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4000 Miles is a journey not to be missed

 PHOTO  FROM  THE  PULSE The  Hudson  Stage  Company  will  be  performing  4000  Miles  at  the  Woodward  Hall  Theater  in  Briarcliff  throughout  November.

DEREK  KADEMIAN  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR DEREK.H.KADEMIAN@PACE.EDU

EMILY  WOLFRUM LAYOUT  EDITOR EMILY.R.WOLFRUM@PACE.EDU

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Remember  to  love  your  par-­ ents...We   are   so   busy   growing   up,  we  often  forget  they  are  also   growing  old.â&#x20AC;? This   idea   resonates   in   Amy   Herzogâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   play   4000   Miles   which   being   performed   by   the   Hudson   Stage  Company  at  the  Woodward   Hall  Theater  on  Paceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Briarcliff   campus  this  month.

Led  by   director   Dan   Fos-­ ter,   4000   Miles   tells   the   story   of   young   adult   Leo   (Jacob   Perkins)   who   leaves   his   home   in   St.   Paul   to  live  with  his  hearing-­impaired   grandmother   (Alice   Cannon)   in   her  West  Village  apartment.   Following   the   traumatic   loss   of  his  best  friend,  Leo  struggles  to   discover  himself  and  atone  for  his   past   wrongdoings.   Meanwhile,   his  grandmother  Vera  copes  with   her  own  fear  of  losing  her  grand-­ son,   as   he   grows   less   dependent   on  her.  Both  stories  show  the  tri-­ als  and  tribulations  of  life  and  its   stages  with  frequent  comedic  re-­ lief  from  Cannon.  

&DQQRQ GHÂżQLWHO\ VWRRG RXW throughout  the   play   with   her   au-­ thentic  New  York  City  accent  and   her   snappy,   judgmental   remarks.   Anyone   who   was   brought   up   in   the  tri-­state  area  can  attest  to  the   authenticity   of   her   character   or   knows  someone  just  like  her.   But   her   importance   is   more   than  meets  the  eye.   While   the   play   seems   to   cen-­ ter   on   Leo,   with   the   only   other   visible   characters   serving   as   his   romantic  interests,  Cannon  steals   the  show  through  her  portrayal  of   Vera,   easily   becoming   the   most   sympathetic  character  in  the  play. (YHQ KHU DSSDUHQW Ă&#x20AC;DZV EH-­

come  endearing.  This  is  seen  dur-­ ing   Perkinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   darkened   aside   in   which  he  discusses  the  details  of   his  best  friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  death.  Cannonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   character   waits   until   the   end   of   his   soliloquy   to   reveal   that   her   hearing   aid   was   not   in   and   that   she  had  only  heard  pieces  of  his   pained  monologue.   As   4000   Miles   progresses,   so   too   does   the   age   group   that   is   highlighted.   The   characters   and  the  life  lessons  age  with  the   development   of   the   play,   ending   with   Vera   struggling   to   hold   on   WR KHU Ă&#x20AC;HHLQJ JUDQGVRQ DQG DQ LPPDWXUH /HR ÂżQDOO\ EHFRPLQJ more   independent   and   coping  

with  his  problems. Leoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  character  develops  dra-­ matically.  From  unemployed  and   unable  to  bring  himself  to  attend   his   best   friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   funeral,   Leoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   character   ends   the   play   with   a   stable  job  in  the  Rockies  and  pre-­ paring  a  eulogy. The   archetypes   displayed   in   the  play  are  highly  tangible.  Leoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   long-­time   girlfriend   Becca   is   the   characteristic   headstrong,   intel-­ ligent   go-­getter.   The   unraveling   of  their  relationship  as  she  moves   forward   with   her   education   and   he   remains   stuck   in   his   depres-­ sion   and   lack   of   ambition,   is   re-­ latable  to  many  college  students. 4000  Miles  is  a  story  for  adults   of   all   ages,   though   some   of   the   script   content   can   be   very   crude   and   suggestive.   Audience   mem-­ bers  should  bear  this  in  mind,  but   also   take   it   with   a   grain   of   salt.   The  production  is  raw  and  honest,   and   any   seemingly   inappropriate   dialogue   serves   to   promote   the   storyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  authenticity. This   opportunity   to   see   Time   magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  deemed  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Best  Play  of   the  Seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  is  one  that  should  not   be   missed.   From   the   cozy   stage   set,   relatable   characters,   and   fa-­ miliar   setting,   4000   Miles   hits   home   for   all   viewers,   especially   those  in  the  Pace  community  and   Westchester   area.   Future   perfor-­ mances  will  be  held  Nov.  8,  9,  10,   15,  and  16.  


The Pace Chronicle

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2013 PAGE 10

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SPORTS

The Pace Chronicle

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2013 PAGE 11

Stonehill Clinches Playoff Berth With Pace Defeat

 PHOTO  FROM  STOCKTON  PHOTO,  INC. Pace  Quarterback  Antwan  Washington  against  Stone  Hill NATALIA  ALVAREZ  PAGAN   SPORTS  EDITOR NATALIA.M.  ALVAREZPAGAN@PACE.EDU

The  Setters  took  on  the  Stone-­ hill   Skyhawks   on   Sat.   afternoon,   losing  the  game  by  a  score  of  42-­ 14.   Stonehill   secured   a   spot   in   the   Northeast-­10   Conference   &KDPSLRQVKLS IRU WKH ¿UVW WLPH in  franchise  history  with  the  win,  

improving  their  season   record   to   7-­2.  Pace  falls  to  0-­9  as  the  foot-­ ball  season  nears  its  end. Pace   won   the   coin   toss,   re-­ ceiving   the   ball.   Freshman   quar-­ terback  Antwan  Washigton  made   an  18  yard  pass  to  junior  wide  re-­ ceiver   Cameron   Davis,   and   then   a   six   yard   pass   to   wide   receiver   Matt   Tarpley,   a   graduate   student   from  Plymouth,  Minnesota  to  get   the   Setters   to   third   and   fourth.  

But  an   incomplete   pass   to   Davis   forced  the  Setters  to  punt  the  ball   to  the  Skyhawks.   7KH ¿UVW VFRUH RI WKH JDPH came  with  nine  minutes  left  in  the   ¿UVWTXDUWHUDVVHQLRUTXDUWHUEDFN Logan   Meyer   completed   a   three   yard  pass  to  junior  wide  receiver   Nate   Robitaille   to   make   to   give   the  Skyhawks  a  7-­0  lead. Stonehill   scored   another   touchdown   early   in   the   second  

quarter  as  tailback  Colin  Markus   made  a  14  yard  rush  play  to  make   it  14-­0  Skyhawks. A   six   yard   pass   by   Meyer   to   freshman   fullback   Billy   Pierce   for   a   touchdown   extended   the   lead  for  Stonehill. The  Setters  fought  back  how-­ HYHUVFRULQJWKHLU¿UVWWRXFKGRZQ towards  the  end  of  the  quarter  as   running  back  Delaney  Wallace,  a   freshman   from   Moorestown,   NJ,  

helped  lead  the  way. After   Wallace   made   two   rush   plays  for  seven  and  six  yards  re-­ spectively,   Washington   made   a   one  yard  pass  to  quarterback  Bri-­ an   Beeker,   a   junior   from   Spring   Hill,  Florida  to  get  to  second  and   12.   Washington   then   made   a   12-­ yard  rush  play  to  the  Stonehill  49   yard  line.   A   few   passes   later,   Wallace   had   the   ball   once   again,   making   a  one  yard  rush  play  to  score  the   ÂżUVW WRXFKGRZQ IRU WKH 6HWWHUV making  it  21-­7.   After  halftime,  Stonehill  came   back  to  dominate  the  third  quarter,   scoring  two  more  touchdowns.   Markus   scored   both   touch-­ downs  for  the  Skyhawks,  both  on   one   yard   rush   plays,   as   the   Sky-­ hawks  further  extended  their  lead,   making  it  35-­7.   Stonehill   ended   their   scor-­ ing  in  the  beginning  of  the  fourth   quarter,   as   senior   wide   receiver   Paul   Piccirillo,   from   Shelton,   Connecticut,   made   a   two   yard   rush  play,  making  it  42-­7.   The   Skyhawks   were   able   to   keep  the  Setters  scoring  to  a  mini-­ PXP DV WKH ÂżQDO WRXFKGRZQ RI the   game   came   with   11   minutes   left,   with   Washington   making   a   one  yard  rush  play  to  give  the  Set-­ WHUVWKHLUVHFRQGDQGÂżQDOWRXFK-­ down.   7KH ÂżQDO KRPH JDPH IRU WKH Setters   will   be   on   Sat.,   Nov.   9   against  Saint  Anselm  College.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Senior   Day   as   well   as   Faculty/ Staff   Appreciation   Day,   as   the   seniors  will  be  recognized  before   the  game.  

Setters Volleyball Falls in Close Match Against Ravens NATALIA  ALVAREZ  PAGAN   SPORTS  EDITOR NATALIA.M.  ALVAREZPAGAN@PACE.EDU

As  the  Volleyball  season  starts   to  come  to  a  close,  the  Setters  took   on   the   Franklin   Pierce   Ravens   in   an  exciting  match  that  ended  with   the  Ravens  edging  the  Setters  3-­2. Franklin   Pierce   started   the   game   off   strong   as   they   took   an    OHDG LQ WKH ¿UVW VHW ORRNLQJ OLNHWKH\ZRXOGHDVLO\ZLQWKH¿UVW set.  The  Setters  fought  back  how-­ ever,  as  they  obtained  18  points  in   RUGHUWRWDNHWKH¿UVWVHWE\DVFRUH of  25-­21.   Kayla   Witwer,   a   freshman   from   Southlake,   TX,   had   seven   NLOOVLQWKH¿UVWVHWZKLOHVRSKR-­ more  Rebecca  Italiano,  from  East   Rockaway,   NY,   contributed   with   nine  digs. The  Setters  were  able  to  keep   the   momentum   going   in   the   sec-­ ond   half   as   they   took   an   early   5-­1  lead,  and  continued  on,  never   trailing   behind   the   Ravens   in   the   set.   Ashley   DiFulvio,   a   freshman   majoring  in  communications  from   Lakewood,  CO,  provided  six  kills   as  the  Setters  won  the  second  set   25-­16.   But   the   momentum   started   to   slip  away  for  the  Setters,  starting  

in  the  third  set  as  they  got  into  a   hole  early  on,  trailing  the  Ravens   21-­9  at  one  point.   Âł,WKLQNDIWHUZLQQLQJWKHÂżUVW two   sets,   we   just   kind   of   relaxed   a  little  bit  too  much,â&#x20AC;?  said  sopho-­ more   Sara   Anastasi,   a   business   major  from  Branchburg,  New  Jer-­ sey.   The  Ravens  ended  up  winning   the  third  set  25-­12. Things   got   interesting   in   the  

¿QDO WZR VHWV DV WKH WZR WHDPV battled  till  the  end.   The  Ravens  took  an  early  lead   in   the   fourth   set,   but   the   Setters   quickly   tied   the   game   up   at   3-­3.   Pace  continued  to  rack  up  points,   increasing   their   lead   against   the   Ravens.   They   led   20-­15,   but   the   Ra-­ vens  slowly  made  their  way  back,   knotting   the   game   at   23-­23.   It   remained   close   after   that,   but   ul-­

timately  Franklin  Pierce  was  vic-­ torious  as  they  took  the  fourth  set   27-­25.   7KH ÂżIWK DQG ÂżQDO VHW ZDV D close  one  throughout,  but  the  Set-­ ters   were   unable   to   secure   a   vic-­ tory,  as  Franklin  Pierce  held  on  for   a  16-­14  win.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those   last   two   sets   were   tough   because   we   were   so   close,   but   ultimately   it   came   down   to   us   not   being   able   to   do   the   little  

things  better,â&#x20AC;?  Anastasi  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But   we  fought  till  the  end,  and  we  just   have  to  continue  going  full  speed,   we  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  slow  down.â&#x20AC;?   The  Setters  are  now  4-­23  with   just  three  games  left  in  the  season.   The   next   game   will   be   an   away   game  on  Fri.,  Nov.  8  against  As-­ VXPSWLRQ 7KH ÂżQDO KRPH JDPH for   the   Setters   is   on   Nov.   15   against  Merrimack.

 PHOTO  FROM  STOCKTON  PHOTO  INC.

.D\OD:LWZHUKDGVHYHQNLOOVLQWKHÂżUVWVHWLQWKHJDPHDJDLQVW)UDQNOLQ3LHUFH


The Pace Chronicle

PAGE 12

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2013

SPORTS THIS  WEEK  IN  SETTERS  SPORTS VOLLEYBALL Fri.  Nov.  8 @Assumption 7:00  p.m.

FOOTBALL  Sat.  Nov.  9 St.  Anselm 12:00  p.m.

VOLLEYBALL Sat.  Nov.  9 @  Stonehill 1:00  p.m.

MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  SWIMMING/ CROSS   WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S   MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S   BASKETBALL DIVING COUNTRY BASKETBALL BASKETBALL Sun.   N ov.   1 0 Sun.   Nov.  10 Sun.  Nov.  10 Sat.  Nov.  9 Sat.  Nov.  9 @   L IU   P ost   T ournament Assumption/LeMoyne @  NCAA  East  Regionals Queens @  LIU  Post  Tournament 12:00  p.m. 2:00  p.m. All  Day   5:00  p.m. 4:30  p.m.

NCAA Champion Aims to Lead Setters to New Heights NATALIA  ALVAREZ  PAGAN   SPORTS  EDITOR NATALIA.M.  ALVAREZPAGAN@PACE.EDU

Pace  Athletics  has  made  many   new  additions  and  changes  to  var-­ ious   athletics   programs   over   the   past  year.    Among  these  changes,   the  athletics  department  has  hired   a   new   coach   for   the   menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   and   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  diving;Íž  Logan  Pearsall. With   notable   hires   like   Tom   Mariano,  the  new  lacrosse  coach,   and   Pat   Kennedy,   the   new   bas-­ ketball  coach,  along  with  the  an-­ nouncement   of   the   additions   of   two   new   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   sports   teams   ODFURVVH DQG ÂżHOG KRFNH\  /R-­ gan   Pearsall   comes   in   eager   to   help  continue  to  build  up  the  Pace   diving  team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  that  the  program  here   at  Pace  has  a  very  strong  founda-­ tion  that  can  we  build  upon,â&#x20AC;?  said   Pearsall,   a   graduate   of   Clarion   University,   where   he   majored   in   Liberal  Studies  with  a  concentra-­ tion   in   athletic   coaching.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;From   here  we  can  only  look  to  make  it   stronger,   and   we   do   that   by   put-­ ting  the  Pace  name  out  there,  us-­ ing  our  resources  and  contacts  to   show   how   good   this   school   can   be.   We   want   to   get   to   the   point   where   we   can   be   recognized   on   the   Conference   level   and   on   the   National  level.â&#x20AC;? Coming   from   a   Division   II   school,   where   he   was   named   the   NCAA   Diver   of   the   Year   two   years   in   a   row   (2010-­2011),   Pearsall   comes   to   familiar   terri-­ tory  with  Pace.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;One   of   the   reasons   I   chose   Pace   was   because   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   Division   II   school,â&#x20AC;?   said   Pearsall,   who   was  previously  the  head  coach  at   Wheaton   College,   a   Division   III   school.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  Division  I  schools  you   see   that   they   are   very   competi-­ tive,  but  the  focus  is  put  more  on   athletics  and  not  so  much  on  the   academics.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Division   III   schools   on   the   other   hand   are   not   as   competi-­ tive.  I  think  that  with  Division  II  

schools  you  strike  the  perfect  bal-­ ance   because   they   are   competi-­ tive,  but  academics  are  also  very   important,â&#x20AC;?  Pearsall  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think   that  this  is  important  because  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a  great  way  to  showcase  complete   student  athletes.â&#x20AC;? Pearsall   feels   an   importance   in  bringing  out  the  best  in  student   athletes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   enjoy   coaching   because   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   great   way   to   interact   with   people,   and   it   allows   me   to   pass   on  my  knowledge  to  my  pupils,â&#x20AC;?   said   Pearsall,   who   also   coaches   the  age  group  powerhouse  Whirl-­ wind  Diving,  a  kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  diving  group   out  of  the  New  Canaan,  Connect-­ icut   YMCA.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything   I   have   learned  throughout  my  career  and   life   I   am   able   to   contribute   and   that  gives  me  a  great  sense  of  sat-­ isfaction.â&#x20AC;? Pearsall   has   plenty   of   expe-­ rience,   considering   he   has   been   coaching  since  he  was  a  freshman   in   high   school.   He   started   off   as   an  assistant  coach  in  high  school,   while  swimming  has  been  some-­ thing  that  he  has  done  his  whole   life.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   love   anything   that   is   com-­ petitive,   but   the   thing   about   swimming  is  that  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  very  indi-­ vidual   sport,   but   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   also   a   team   sport,â&#x20AC;?  said  Pearsall,  who  is  a  four   time  NCAA  Division  II  champion   between  the  one  and  three  meter   boards,   which   is   tied   for   most   ever  in  NCAA  Division  II  menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   diving.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  very  much  like  a  fam-­ ily.   I   still   have   teammates   from   high   school   that   I   am   very   close   with,   and   we   all   see   each   other   whenever   we   can,   and   we   have   gone   to   each   otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   weddings,   and  those  are  just  bonds  that  last  a   lifetime,â&#x20AC;?  Pearsall  said.   Having  started  off  as  a  swim-­ mer,  Pearsall  made  the  transition   to   diving   in   the   summer   of   his   junior  year  of  High  School.  What   VWDUWHGRXWDVMXVWJRRÂżQJDURXQG ended   up   being   something   that   changed  Pearsallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   got   into   diving   in   high  

 PHOTOS  FROM  PACESETTERSATHLETICS.COM,  NCAAPHOTOS.COM,  AND  CLAIRON.EDU   Pace  Athletics  has  recently  announced  the  new  hire  and  addition  to  the  swimming  and  diving  program.  Diving   Coach  Logan  Pearsall  was  an  NCAA  Champion  during  his  athletic  career  at  Clairon.

school,  but   it   was   really   when   I   got   to   college   that   it   took   off,â&#x20AC;?   said  Pearsall,  who  was  named  the   Clarion  University  of  Pennsylva-­ nia   Male   Athlete   of   the   Year   in   2009.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Especially   when   I   got   to   Clarion  University  because  when   I  was  at  the  University  of  Rhode   Island,  our  program  there  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   the  greatest  and  it  got  to  the  point  

where  I  felt  like  I  just  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  do   it  anymore.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;My  grades  werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  really  that   good,   and   I   thought   that   I   might   have  to  quit,  but  I  felt  like  if  I  did   quit,  I  would  not  only  quit  diving   but   school   overall.   Transferring   to   Clarion   University   ended   up   being  the  best  decision  for  me  be-­ cause  I  was  able  to  get  it  together  

again  and   really   re-­focus   on   my   studies   and   get   through   it.   The   coaches   there   are   fantastic,   they   kept   encouraging,   kept   helping   me  to  work  hard  and  be  the  best   athlete  I  could  be,â&#x20AC;?  Pearsall  said.   The   next   meet   for   the   Swim-­ ming   and   Diving   Team   will   be   Nov.  10  at  Pace  against  Assump-­ tion  College/Le  Moyne  College.  

SPORTS WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED Do  you  enjoy  watching  sports  or  attending  Setters  athletic   events?  Do  you  have  a  camera  and  a  keen  eye  for  action?  Then  The  Pace  Chronicle  wants  you.  Contact  Jonathan  Alvarez   at  Jonathan.Alvarez@pace.edu  to  start  your  involvement  with  the  student  newspaper  staff.

The Pace Chronicle Volume III, Issue IX  
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