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Anti-abortion demonstrators hit campus

Chico State’s Independen t S t u de n t Ne w spa pe r , since 1975

Wednesday October 13, 2010 Volume 65 Issue 8

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Grant may create jobs for graduates Teresa De Luz STAFF WRITER

The Center for Economic Development has received a $100,000 grant from the federal government, which was then matched by another $100,000 grant from the state of California. The Federal and State Technology Partnership Program grant will be used to introduce consultation firms called Innovation Hubs, said Don

SPORTS >>

Paddle Out Surf's up at the Forebay Aquatic Center

Krysakowski, assistant director of the Center for Economic Development. Small businesses that want to pioneer a new product or idea can take their concepts to iHubs for direction, he said. “What we will be doing is handing the companies off to the iHubs who have the expertise needed in the field of the small business,” Krysakowski said. “We will marry them up with the right talent in the iHubs.”

The federal grant funds small business projects because of the possibility that iHubs will develop products useful to government operations, Krysakowski said. Product development can also create jobs. “This is great for students coming out of Chico State who are engineering or computer engineering majors,” Krysakowski said. “Things like this are creating jobs for them.” The ever-changing field

of technology allows for new jobs to develop continually, said Ben Carlsson, a computer science major. “I don’t think it will be as difficult to find a job after graduation as people in other majors because our skills are constantly evolving,” Carlsson said. When the grant money is put into place, a positive output is sure to come, said Michael Suplita, a project specialist at the center who began as an intern from Chico State.

“Anything that brings money to the area will increase the likelihood of employment,” Suplita said. The creation of a new product is a way to keep the local economy afloat, he said. “A stimulant for the area – like spending to buy a product that is developed – is beneficial,” Suplita said. Teresa De Luz can be reached at tdeluz@theorion.com

ENTERTAINMENT >>

Three Cheers for Oktoberfest Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. shares beer, culture, music at first public Oktoberfest.

Hundreds of students celebrated Chico State’s third annual Queer Week. The goal was to showcase and educate people about issues faced by the LGBTQ community. >> Features, D2

FEATURES >>

■ VIDEO For more Queer Week coverage check out the video at theorion.com

Beware Bedbugs edbugss Bedbugs are bitting for a comeback k

PHOTO BY KENNEDY COKER PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY LIAM TURNER

OPINION >>

Smart Phones not safe new phone technology causes concerns for security

ONLINE >>

Online Calendar Visit theorion.com to view and add events on the new interactive calendar

INDEX >> Weather

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Police Blotter

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Opinion

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Calendar

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Classifieds / Games

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Features

D1

High 104 Low 66° Sunny

Register to vote by Monday

Building windmills

Anthony Siino

STAFF WRITER

Tasha Clark

NE WS EDITOR

Tablers with bright signs and registration forms post themselves from the Marketplace Cafe to the front of Plumas Hall, hoping to involve students in the political process before voter registration closes on Monday. Students, along with everybody else, should be paying close attention to the general election, said John Crosby, a lecturer in the political science department. The election of senators and the governor, along with the propositions, are points that will dictate California’s future. Crosby thinks students need to make sure they understand their own core political ideals before deciding on specific issues when they vote, he said. “I think young people in particular have a hard time coming to grips with what they believe in,” he said. While the deadline draws closer, more and more students are registering, such as junior business management major Christina Tan. “I will register today,” Tan said as she helped to register students at a stand promoting “Rock the Vote” on Monday. The ballot has some interesting topics on it, said Paul Sparacino, a fifth-year resort and lodging management major. “There’s a couple props that totally caught my attention, like 19 and 23, but I couldn’t tell you what else was on there,” he said. Proposition 19 offers a turning point in California politics on a grander scale than just the legalization of a marijuana, Crosby said. If the proposition passes, it

THE ORION • ELI MAY

VOTER REGISTRATION ENDING Senior Julian Reyes-Rauen, a construction management major registers to vote Tuesday at a studentrun table at Trinity Commons. Voter registration ends Monday. sets a precedent for defiance of the federal government, he said. “We need to look at Proposition 19 understanding that it has huge implications,” Crosby said. Proposition 23 carries more weight than previously thought as well, he said. The proposition would repeal sustainability efforts voted in with Assembly Bill 32 until California reaches 5.5 percent unemployment or below for one year. Proposition 23 effectively decides whether or not it would be California policy to suffer for sustainability, Crosby said. “If we’re not willing to do that, then no one else is,” he said. “And if no one else is, then we’re just going to continue merrily on, polluting until we

come to collapse.” Aside from propositions, students need to seriously consider who takes the office of governor, Crosby said. Since the state government subsidizes higher education, the leader of the state will influence costs of education to students. Whether or not students come out to vote, many just want to make sure they had a chance to be heard. “I feel like I need to put in my two cents about it,” Sparacino said. Anthony Siino can be reached at newseditor@theorion.com

For more on voting See page A4 for how to register along with a related story on Chico City Council

Chico residents are taking a page from the book, “The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind,” by building windmills out of different materials – but unlike author William Kamkwamba, they built them as a fun way to raise money. A.S. Mentor Student Association and the First-Year Experience sponsored the windmill building competition from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the Gateway Science Museum. The competition was inspired by Kamkwamba, author of this year’s book in common, “The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind,” said Mackenzie Morris, civic mentor of the First-Year Experience. Kamkwamba was 14 when he built his first windmill out of recycled items to generate electricity for his home and village. Twelve teams built windmills out of recycled materials, Morris said. There were four categories that teams could choose from – artistic, whimsical, functional and junior, with each category having one winner. The winning teams were Team Shrek, Dr. Badger, CSUC Eggbeaters and Hooker Oak Elementary. Their windmills will be displayed Dec. 7 in the Bell Memorial Union Auditorium. Prizes were $100 toward a local cause of the team's choice. Team Shrek donated to the Boys and Girls Club, Dr. Badger to the Butte Humane Society, CSUC Eggbeaters to AMSC and Hooker Oak Elementary donated to Moving Windmills. Team Shrek participated in the whimsical category, which meant the windmill had to be novel and interesting. The idea for the windmill came from watching Shrek and they wanted >> please see WINDMILL

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 13, 2010

Campus Clips

University Police to hold self-defense seminars >> The Rape Aggression Defense class is set to begin Oct. 26 and run through Oct. 28. RAD combines an extensive program of risk reduction and awareness techniques with basic physical defense techniques, according to the University Police website. The free self-defense class is not teaching people to fight, but teaching basic physical defense using speed. The first of the fourhour classes is set to start in Yolo Hall and several spots are still available. Students can sign up by e-mailing Detective Corinne Beck at crbeck@csuchico.edu.

Weather >>

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Forecast features highs/lows in degrees Fahrenheit source: weather.com

today

thursday

friday

saturday

sunday

monday

tuesday

91/54°

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sunny

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parly cloudy

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sunny

World News >>

World News compiled by The Orion’s Walter Ford

Devecser, Hungary – Police in Hungary have detained the director of the aluminum company responsible for a flood of caustic red sludge that killed eight people last week. Zoltan Bakonyi is being held on suspicion of public endangerment causing multiple deaths and environmental damage. Source: Yahoo.com

Belgrade, Serbia – Somalia, Africa – Pirates have

Police withstood a battery

struck again, seizing a ship with a

of petrol bombs and stones Mexico City, Mexico –

as they attempted to protect

20-person crew off the coast of East

Gunmen attacked four police

participants of a gay pride march

Africa.

cars Sunday in northern Mexico killing eight police officers and

Source: CNN.com

be identified. Source: Yahoo.com

Free shots prevent seasonal illness Heidi Parodi STAFF WRITER

About 1,380 free flu shots were given out to students from Sept. 29 to Oct. 7 at various locations on Chico State’s campus to prepare for the seasonal flu. Last year, all 2,000 flu shots were gone in three weeks, although that may have been because of the H1N1 epidemic, said Cathy Felix, director for the Student Health Center. As of now, 670 flu shots remain in the Student Health Center. These clinics are presented every fall for the flu season, Felix said. Various interns assisted with the flu shot clinic, including Stephanie Dunbar, a senior majoring in health education. “When the seasonal flu hits, it runs rampant on

college campuses,” Dunbar said. “We’re all touching the same environment.” The Student Health Center acquired 2,050 shots this season, Felix said. Of those 2,050 shots, 50 of them are mercury-free vaccines for those who are allergic. Unlike the $30 flu shots at a drug store, these flu shots are free because of the $120 mandatory health fee students pay in their tuition, Felix said. The leftover shots will be administered to students in need or faculty and staff who want to pay $15. These flu shots prevent the most common 50 of the known 290 viruses of the season, she said. The clinics generally run from September to October because the season’s risk factor is highest in November, Felix said.

“But it lingers on through March,” she said. The Student Health Center sets up clinics partnered with the school of nursing as soon as it is known when the shots will be received from GlaxoSmithKline, a pharmaceutical manufacturing company, she said. People who are allergic to chicken eggs should not receive these flu shots because eggbased products are used in the shots, Felix said. Nursing students, such as fifth-year nursing major Joelle Koski, were administering the shots to students. Usually getting the flu isn’t an issue, Koski said. But because college students are often in close quarters, it can be a problem. On average, about 400 shots

Infected person

were administered every three hours during the clinics, Felix said. Flu shots are just like any regular shot in the arm and takes about two minutes. Brian Perry, a freshman majoring in computer engineering, was in line to get his flu shot to prevent him from getting sick. “I don’t look at it when they inject,” Perry said. Some students opted to forgo the shot and waited outside while their friends were vaccinated, such as freshman pre-nursing major Kayla Kriech. “My parents never really wanted me to get a flu shot just because you get sick right after,” Kriech said. “I don’t think that’s worth it.” Heidi Parodi can be reached at

Dorm living

hparodi@theorion.com

Vaccine Information: -You cannot get the flu from the vaccine - The vaccine is made from a killed virus - Side effects include soreness or swelling where shot was given, low-grade fever and aches, which occur one to two days after the shot was given

make an appointment with the Student Health Center

Source: http://www.cdc.gov/ flu/protect/keyfacts.htm

With the high degrees of contagion Infected the flu can strike at any moment

person

Public dining

Approximately 670 FREE flu shots left

Classroom

Although the young and the elderly are highly advised to have the flu shot, college students are exposed to high amounts of contagious bacteria every day.

Public bathroom

Shared living space

C h i c o S tat e’s I n d e p e n d e n t S t u d e n t N e w s pa p e r , s i n c e 1975 Editor In Chief

Delaine Moore Managing Editor

Patty Conover News Editor

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gunmen fled from the scene and are yet to

ONLINE

Also from the same issue, the story titled “Delayed budget shrinks admissions” incorrectly stated that the transfer students would be accepted for spring 2010. The correct date is spring 2011.

in charge of the ship.

Source: CNN.com

DESIGN

The story on the Chico Experience Week from the Oct. 6 issue incorrectly stated that more than 145,000 invitations were sent out by the Chico State Alumni Association. The correct number is 50,000 e-mail invitations.

the Izumi’s captain who said the pirates are

nearly 60 people were arrested.

cartel that goes by the same name. The

DESIGN

[Corrections]

attack. A Danish warship made contact with

about 40 police officers were injured and

region, which is known for its powerful

EDITORIAL

>> Tehama Group Communications will celebrate its 20th anniversary Friday with a series of job-hunting workshops followed by an evening celebration. TGC alumni will give conferences on “Creating a Million Dollar Resume,” “How to Land Your Dream Job in a Down Economy” and more. To register, send an e-mail with your name and the workshop you wish to attend to tehamagroup@ csuchico.edu.

signal Sunday and that the ship was under

No marchers were injured, but

The attack took place in the Sinaloa

EDITORIAL

Career professionals speak at anniversary workshops

Izumi reported they had received a distress

Belgrade.

wounding a ninth.

Suicide awareness walk to shed light on depression >> The Out of the Darkness Community Walk will take place from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Saturday at Bidwell Park. This event is hosted nationwide by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention to create awareness about suicide and depression in the community, said event coordinator Ariel Ellis in an e-mail interview. The walk raises money for research, education programs and to assist people who have lost someone to suicide. “It is so important that we create awareness about suicide and depression, especially in a community that is largely made up of students,” she said. People can register at the event or online at afsp.org.

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Sunday in the Serbian capital,

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 13, 2010 |

Quality, affordable and friendly housing Open M-F 8am - 5pm TOWNHOUSES/DUPLEXES

HOUSES Location 504 W. 7th St. 1632 Laurel St. 871 Inyo St. 564 Grandsmokey Ct. 1 Camberwell Ct 49 Garden Park

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ROOMS FOR RENT Location 1057 Diablo Ave. 1826 Magnolia 803 W. 2nd Ave. # 2C, # 2D 630 W. 2nd Ave. # 12 A

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Bd/Ba Rent Dep. 1/1 $550 $650 1/1 $550 $650 Rent Special 1/2 month free!

1382 Longfellow Ave. Chico 895-1733 www.reliableproperty.com

APARTMENTS cont. Location 2423 North Ave #C, #1 1161 Citrus Ave #G, #O, #N 925 Chestnut St #4 371 E 7th St. #1 630 W. 2nd Ave #11, #16 238 Hazel #3 1245 Esplanade #8, #10 923 W. East Ave #11 939 W. East Ave #9 2135 Elm St. #2,7,9

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 13, 2010

National News

Re g i s te r N ow If you're not already registered in Butte County, here's how to do it:

Party leads to 12 overdoses in possible sex assault plot >> Washington police are investigating a possible sexual assault scheme after 12 people were hospitalized from overdosing at a party. The investigation started after a woman was found unconscious in her car. The woman’s friends alerted the authorities to where she had been partying. When police arrived, they found 11 other people who were violently ill, unconscious or semiconscious. Police think something may have been slipped into their drinks and they expect toxicology tests on blood and urine samples to help determine what might have happened. Source: foxnews.com

California News

Schwarzenegger signs budget without new taxes >> A budget to solve the $19 billion state deficit with no new taxes or severe cuts to services was adopted by California officials. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed the plan Friday. With the new plan, the California Community Colleges will get $108 million more than it did last year. University of California and California State University systems will receive an increase of about $250 million each from the previous year, along with $200 million each to make up for previous cuts. Source: sfgate.com

Voter Registration Cards are available at: 1. Local post offices 2. Secretary of State website 3. DMV 4. Local libraries 5. Local city clerk’s office 7. Butte County Elections Office 8. Local volunteers tabling around town 9. Rock the Vote - 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., today at Trinity Commons

Important dates for registration Register no later than Oct. 18 Mailed registration forms must be postmarked by the 18th, and are null and void if not turned in three days after signed and dated.

Voter options for city elections Weekend Voting Sat. prior to Election Day 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Friday Butte County Elections Division Office 25 County Center Dr. Suite 110, Oroville (530)538-7761 Vote at your designated polling place 7 a.m. to 8 p.m Polling place: info on the back of sample ballot Options no longer available for 2010 election Vote Early 29 days before the election 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Friday Butte County Elections Division Office 25 County Center Dr. Suite 110 Oroville (530)538-7761 Vote By Mail 29 days before the election For overseas citizens and military personnel

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Council candidates speak up Teresa De Luz STAFF WRITER

Eight candidates campaigning for seats on the Chico City Council met Oct. 4 at a public forum at City Hall to discuss their platforms and answer questions from a media panel and the public. The event was sponsored by the League of Women Voters and featured a media panel consisting of Northstate Public Radio, the Chico EnterpriseRecord and the Chico News & Review. Two positions on Chico City Council are open. A member of the public asked the candidates if the Nov. 2 election should be moved to June when a majority of students are no longer in town. This question was followed by a mixed response from the candidates. Scott Gruendl, Mary Flynn, Mark Herrera and Quentin Colgan all agreed that pushing back the election date would take students out of the election. “This is not appropriate,” Gruendl

said, who is running for re-election. “We would be disenfranchising a major member of our community.” Bob Kromer supported moving the election to June, he said. Students have access to absentee ballots. Bob Evans thought the date of the election shouldn’t make a difference, he said. “College-educated kids should be voting,” Evans said. Brahama D. Sharma and Mark Sorensen agreed the date of the election is not an issue. Making students aware of the issues in the community is the first step to help them protect their rights, Herrera said. “We are fighting for the students and we need to get them fired up,” he said. “I would love to see a greater student turnout in this election and other elections as well.” The 90-second response for each candidate was a challenging situation for the setting, said Flynn, who has been a council member for four years

and is running for re-election. “Though the time was limited, it was a great turnout from the community to get people interested,” she said. “That is one thing I believe really strongly in – this election is for everyone in the community, and everyone needs to be interested and involved.” Flynn is the director of Community Action Volunteers in Education on campus. Tad Whaley, a senior political science and public administration major who attended the forum thinks Flynn's direct connection to students on campus makes her aware of issues they face, he said. “Mary stands for the students,” Whaley said. “I think she understands us and can help us out.” Registration to vote ends Monday and the election will take place Nov. 2. A voting station will be open in Bell Memorial Union. Teresa De Luz can be reached at tdeluz@theorion.com


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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 13, 2010 |

A5

Disorderly events ordinance reviewed, used infrequently It would be difficult for a small group of officers to arrest several people in a STAFF WRITER large group, Merrifield said. When the ordinance was proposed, The long-debated disorderly events there was substantial opposition against ordinance was reviewed Oct. 5 by Chico it, he said. Police Chief Mike Maloney before the “I think people had the idea that we Chico City Council. were going to be going around breaking The ordinance, which is reviewed up weddings and political discussions,” annually, was used three times in 2010 Merrifi eld said. – all within a period of about nine days, The disorderly events ordinance gives according to the Chico police reports on Chico police a middle ground, he said. If the uses of the ordinance. the group does not disperse, instead of Maloney requested the council disconarresting all of them, the police can just tinue his annual review of the ordinance, which has been used less than ten times in give out citations. In all of the incidents where the disthe two years since it was created, he said. orderly events ordinance was used, the “I frankly think there’s other things offi cers would have been justified in we should be talking about that relate to using a higher level of force, Maloney public safety,” he said. said. There was opposition to “I would submit continued use of the ordithat we have demnance from Jessica Allen, an The ACLU onstrated very American Civil Liberties Union declared this law clearly that this is chapter organizer for Chico. not a tool for us to “The ACLU declared unconstitutional. abuse our power this law unconstituand authority and tional,” Allen said. “It’s still It's still it has been used unconstitutional.” unconstitutional." in a very reasonThe advocacy group colJessica Allen able manner,” ACLU chapter organizer lected signatures against Maloney said. the ordinance before it was The disorderly events ordinance made effective, she said. became effective in May 2008, Merrifield “Now that they want to not even report said in an e-mail interview. In the two why they’re using it or how they’re using years that the ordinance has been effecit,” she said. Allen thinks there should be more tive, no one has been given a citation for review sessions on the ordinance and violation of the ordinance. The first use of the ordinance this year police business to know how they are was on Aug. 14 involving a fight and a spending citizens’ money, she said. The council deliberated after the large group with a possible stabbing meeting and decided to have broader victim at the 500 block of Fifth Street, community-based forums on police staff- according to the report. The ordinance was then used Aug. ing and services to the public, said Mayor 21 to disperse a large group on the 600 Ann Schwab in a phone interview. The block of West Third Street, according to mayor will meet with Maloney to discuss the report. Bottles were thrown at police. when they can hold the forums. The last time the ordinance was used Before the ordinance was created, when Chico police officers wanted to this year was Aug. 22 to clear a large disperse a large group, they could only group and stop a fight on the 300 block of declare it an unlawful assembly and Ivy Street, according to the report. Any citations given would be counted start arresting people who would not as infractions and include a fine of up to disperse, said Sgt. Rob Merrifield. Those $1,000, but would be more likely to be arrested would be charged with a misdeequivalent to a noise complaint, which is meanor violation. “What we wanted was a tool that about $148, Merrifield said. Kelly Ward

would help us to disperse the party – to break it up without having to arrest people,” he said.

Kelly Ward can be reached at kward@theorion.com

THE ORION • RYAN RICHARDS

ARMS WIDE OPEN [FROM LEFT TO RIGHT] President Paul Zingg, Vice President of Student Aff airs Drew Calandrella, President of the Residence Hall Association Michael Barret and University Housing and Food Service Director David Stephen cut the ceremonial ribbon at Sutter Hall's grand opening ceremony on Saturday.

Sutter Hall gets official introduction Julia Vazquez STAFF WRITER

The ribbon was cut and Sutter Hall is officially open. Students, faculty and alumni gathered Saturday for the hall’s dedication event to officially introduce the project to the Chico campus and community, said David Stephen, director of University Housing and Food Service, in an e-mail interview. The ceremony cost the department $1,200. The ceremony consisted of four speakers and fewer than 100 guests. Each speaker focused on the running themes of building community and academic success. Tours of Sutter Hall led guests through the first floor and displayed the study rooms, residential room, restrooms and computer lab, which will eventually provide a printer. Refreshments were also available. The grand opening was scheduled for Saturday so it could be part of

The Chico Experience Week, Stephen said. With this weekend being geared toward parents and alumni, it was a perfect backdrop for the event. “This project has been a labor of love because several of the folks involved with this project are Chico State grads,” Stephen said in his speech at the event. Sutter Hall represents a commitment to a high-quality living, said President Paul Zingg. “The spaces have been designed in order to be comfortable and supportive of students’ success in and outside the classroom,” he said. Chico State wanted to create a space that was inviting, attractive, encouraged community activity and gave a sense of belonging to the students who lived there, Zingg said. The layout is an opportunity to promote academic success, said Michael Barrett, president of the Residence Hall Association and current resident of Sutter Hall.

“Students should enjoy it and appreciate that they are the first residents in the facility to occupy it – and I believe they already do,” he said. Students moved into the hall despite its unfinished cafeteria and general maintenance problems, though the issues are considered typical of a new building, Stephen said. Plans for Sutter Hall began in 2004, and it is one of the nine projects he is most proud of, Stephen said. “This is their first time away from home in college and this is something that they will carry with them forever,” he said. “It’s such a small part of what we do.” Sutter Hall is only 10 percent of what University Housing and Food Service does on campus, Stephen said. “It’s nice, big and new, but if we don’t build community here, we suck,” he said. Julia Vazquez can be reached at jvazquez@theorion.com


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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 13, 2010

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Online Corner

All accused of violating the law are innocent until proven guilty | Information cited directly from Chico Police Department Thursday, 6:29 a.m.: Subject disturbing the peace reported at 100 block of East 11th Street. “Female in front of the residence yelling, doesn’t appear to be anyone else around. Reporting party can’t understand what female is yelling.”

Theorion.com has breaking news, exclusives, blogs, slideshows and an interactive calendar BLOG SAMPLER >>

Allegedly Adult - Emily Hirshman Oct. 11 - Nothing better to do “Because I have little wisdom to impart this week, I will share a recipe. I love to cook, and sometimes I feel that it is one of the only things keeping me sane. I really enjoy visiting a farmer’s market, buying a bunch of vegetables and going home and seeing what delicacies I can create. Unfortunately my lack of planning in this department usually means missing ingredients, therefore the need for substitution. But the good thing is it usually turns out…”

Friday, 10:24 a.m.: Reckless vehicle reported at 900 block of Linden Avenue. “Subject riding mini bike up and down the street at high rate of speed. Reporting party concerned for pedestrians in area.” Friday, 11:21 a.m.: Fraud reported at 1000 block of Hobart Street. “Received a phone call advising her she won $1.1 million and she needed to send them $400. Subject stated they would come to her house and take her to the bank.” Friday, 2:50 p.m.: City municipal code violation reported at Timber Creek Apartments on 1000 block of West Fifth Street. “Across the street, two college-aged males shooting darts from a 4-foot blow-dart gun. Shooting from a second story balcony across the roadway.” Friday, 5:03 p.m.: Object thrown at vehicle reported at 1000 block of Springfield Drive. “Subject jumped out of the bushes and threw water balloon at reporting party’s vehicle as they passed by.” Friday, 7:51 p.m.: Trespassing reported at Warner Street Market on 1000 block of Warner Street. “Subject has been going in and out of store for last three hours. Not taking anything, but bothering customers.”

Friday, 10:49 p.m.: Drunk in public reported at 100 block of East Lincoln Avenue. “Subject was standing on hood of reporting party’s vehicle urinating all over the windshield.” Saturday, 1:27 a.m.: Suspicious subject reported at 400 block of Warner Street. “Two nude white male adults jumping in front of vehicles on Warner by bridge.” Saturday, 6:53 a.m.: Drunk in public reported at 1000 block of Manzanita Avenue. “Male subject passed out in back of reporting party’s truck. Reporting party drove home before she found subject was in the truck.” Sunday, 4:06 a.m.: Suspicious subject reported at 40 block of Fuchsia Way. “Reporting party woke up to unknown male in her bedroom. When reporting party woke up, he said, ‘Oh sorry.’ Reporting party got up thinking her roommate brought someone home, but roommate isn’t home. He walked out the front door.”

I use different colored bells for a twist, turns out pretty cool.”

Mike Glassner

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Go to allegedadult.wordpress.com to check out Emily’s recipe for vegetarian stuffed peppers and to follow her adventures as a recent Chico State graduate.

From Czech to Chico - Thomas Lawrence Sept. 29 - Kick it up a notch “Last weekend, I was fortunate enough to go to Oktoberfest 2010 in Munich, Germany — one of the best, yet hazy weekends of my life. And it got me to thinking. We need to take our game to the next level, Chico. It’s time to band together all of the scattered games of beer pong, flip cup, and the like into an annual…” Go to czechtochico.wordpress.com to check out Thomas’s ideas and his adventures as a Chico State student studying abroad in Prague, Czechoslovakia.

From charms of Chico - Rebecca Hucker Oct 7 Made in Chico: The Name says it all “Buying local is a wonderful thing. It benefits you, the store, the producers, and the community. One store in downtown Chico exemplifies buying local to include everything it sells. What is this place? Made in Chico. Made in Chico is a consignment store…” Go to charmsofchico.wordpress.com to check out more of what Rebecca has to say about the store, Made in Chico, and other local gems.

Compiled by Orion Staff Illustrations by Chelsea Ross

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[ Editorials ]

Petition threatens to mute students’ voice Students traditionally exhibit signs of chronic lethargy around voting time. Even when mainstream politicians such as President Barrack Obama urge students into action, local elections go largely unnoticed. Nevertheless, city politicians have often pandered to the student vote in the past, as we represent a substantial chunk of the population. This left many residents resentful of the political leverage students held, but perhaps didn’t deserve. This year, however, a petition is poised to change the playbook on local political strategy by moving city council elections from November to June – when most of the students have left town. If 15 percent of voters sign the petition, a special election could be held in early 2011. The petition was proposed by Stephanie Taber, a conservative Tea Partier and the treasurer for city council hopeful Bob Kromer. This is worthy of note since the student vote usually leans to the liberal side. While this petition won’t directly block students from voting, it will make local elections even more of a peripheral issue to us than they already are. Unsurprisingly, students have been characteristically indifferent to the issue. The reason for this is typically attributed to a sense of transience. Since we will be leaving in a few years, why bother changing things? One major concern is that

students as a group tend to have a similar agenda. We enjoy some of the things past students have fought for. While we may be leaving, there will most certainly be a new generation of students to replace us – students who will probably have similar needs. This petition threatens to further mute our collective voice in the local political discourse. A graduating senior may not be affected by the change in voting dates, but an incoming freshman will – and by then it will be too late for him or her to change anything. On the other side of the coin, there is validity to the concern that giving influential power to a group of individuals who have little personal interest invested in the community can have consequences – but so can biting the hand that feeds us. Chico State students provide much of the city’s financial lifeblood. We need to find a balance that doesn’t push students to the periphery, but also accounts for the fact that most of us are not permanent residents. While the real motive of this petition may be misguided, the resulting action can serve a purpose in opening the doors to a productive dialogue between students and the city’s longtime residents. As students we need to earn the right to be heard in the local conversation. We really don’t have a leg to stand on if we don’t make our needs known by voting when the time comes.

Disorderly events ordinance surprisingly student friendly who hasn’t been to or seen a party that made them pause to think, “Dear God, that’s ridiculous – even by my standards.” At times like this, it isn’t unreasonable to give police the power to ask people to leave so they can access crimes in progress or assist injured parties. Used exclusively in this manner, the ordinance is an excellent measure. However, it ultimately comes down to police discretion in determining whether or not the ordinance is applicable – that’s a tightrope we don’t like walking. While there have been revisions that reduce the scope of the law, it’s still a looming concern. In no way could we condone the use of the ordinance to suppress personal or political expression. Should such abuses ever occur, we would no longer support it – this is why the review process is so critical to the success of the ordinance. So far, the police have not abused their new power. As students, we’re still reaping the benefit of the law. As long as regularly scheduled reviews continue to address any possible misapplications, the disorderly events ordinance is a needed and welcome addition to the municipal code.

Editorial Board Sports Editor

Video Editor

Managing Editor

Entertainment Editor

Online Editor

News Editor

Features Editor

Chief Copy Editor

Patty Conover Anthony Siino Opinion Editor

James Jelenko

Lindsey Barrett Matt Shilts

Almendra Carpizo Photo Editor

Jeb Draper

Kevin Hagedorn Esmeralda Ramirez Katie Mills Art Director

Mark Rojas The opinion editor can be reached at

opinioneditor@theorion.com

Alexander Seymour OPINION COLUMNIST

Smartphones have solved an age-old e-old d dilemma – no longer will people be forced rce ced d to make a last-minute run to the bank before efo fore re closing time, all thanks to a recent applicalica li c tion release that allows users to pay credit red editt card bills and make deposits remotely y by y taking a picture of a check and digitally tall ta ly sending it to the bank. Though this service is currently only ly available to members of Chase bankss with iPhones, new generations of smart-phones and creative applications are consistently introducing higher levels of productivity and convenience into our lives. But these advantages are not the only thing being introduced by these devices – they also represent the next big forum for identity and financial theft. t. Unfortunately, few are taking an appropropriate attitude toward their phoness to o prevent a painful watershed moment ntt in n phone security. As our cell phones become more likee litl tli t tle laptops, they inherit many of the same ame assets. Their sophistication allows larger rge gerr and more sensitive amounts of data a to to be stored, and their convenient size a and nd interface make them emerging hubs in n tthe hee management of our personal and financial lives. But they also share some of a computer’s disadvantages, such as the ability to pick up viruses and spyware. Just like their laptop brothers, malicious software can scam, steal and monitor anything on a phone. One piece of software acts as a “porn dialer,” sending SMS messages to third parties for sex services, according to security research website daniweb.com. Phone owners know nothing of this, until they see the bill. How embarrassing would this be if it happened to you? The mobile app market can offer another security threat, with some downloadable applications turning out to be malicious. Last year an app called Storm8, disguised as a game, downloaded the contact lists of its users before it was removed from the online store, according to Businessweek.com. So far, the smartphone market has not become large enough to elicit the same attention from hackers as its desktop cousins. This luck will not last forever. Mobile devices are already becoming a victim of their own popularity. Smartphones are increasingly common and capable of handling more tasks such as trading stocks, paying bills and buying

things online, which makes them all the more attractive to thieves and hackers, according to Businessweek.com. The size and convenience of smart devices also encourages their physical theft – a theft that will provide increasing payoff over time as devices advance and carry more information. Something as simple as access to an e-mail account can reveal compromising details, with social security numbers and passport information being the tip of the iceberg. Anti-virus software produced by companies such as McAfee and Kaspersky are available for mobile devices and can even be used to remotely wipe a phone’s hard drive if it’s stolen, but this software does not come preloaded like it would on most laptops. Consumer awareness of phone security simply has not come to the point where there is a demand for protective software, and the limited system resources of a phone may also hamper the ability of antivirus software to perform. Currently, those most interested in protective software are corporate and government entities that have already learned phone security lessons the hard way. Air force officials reported over 500 cyber attacks targeting their Blackberry fleet in

May, according to an article in the Wall Street Journal. Contrary to popular belief, Apple product owners are not immune to viruses. The relatively new Snow Leopard operating system includes rudimentary anti-virus software, indicating that Macs have become popular enough to be targeted by malware. Spokespeople have always claimed that Apple takes security very seriously and has a very thorough approval process that reviews every app. In truth, iPhones are also susceptible to attack and in 2009, a virus infected phones that changed their wallpaper to a picture of ’80s pop star Rick Astley, according to the 2010 Sophos Security Threat Report. While this cyber attack was relatively benign, the increasingly convenient yet sophisticated nature of smartphones demands that users start treating mobile device security like they would a laptop or desktop. Until phone security features become commonplace, police smartphone hacker Jonathan Zdziarski has a low-tech solution. “I just don’t put anything on my iPhone I’d not want somebody to see,” he said to Businessweek.com. Alexander Seymour can be reached at aseymour@theorion.com

Chico Alum Seeks Your Vote Dear Students, My name is Mark Herrera and with your vote on Nov. 2, I will be the only council member under 50 – I am 25 – even though we are the largest demographic in Chico. Seven out of 10 residents in Chico are under 50. Don’t you think that at least one person on the council should represent that demographic? I graduated two years ago from this campus with degrees in criminal justice and environmental justice. I have set deep roots in this community, including co-founding the GRUB Cooperative. I love Chico, as I am sure you do. I am writing to share my feelings of the importance of voting in local elections. You and your voices are invaluable to this town. Chico would not be Chico without you. Some people running for city council think that

students are not an asset to this community. I believe students have been a valuable part of this community for 123 years, and they will continue to be for a long time into the future. You need a voice, and so do future students who will come after you. Let me be your voice on the city level. Let someone like you, represent you. We are in a unique position to make an impact in the community in this upcoming election. I cannot imagine doing it without you. Who do you want making decisions that directly affect you – someone like you, or someone who tries to disenfranchise you? Let me be your voice. Thank you, Mark Herrera

Letters Editor

to the

Editor in Chief

New apps pose old problems

The Orion encourages letters to the editor and commentary from students, faculty, staff, administration and community members.

• Letters and commentaries may be delivered to The Orion, Plumas Hall Room 001. Deadline is 5 p.m. Friday. Letters are also accepted by e-mail and go directly to the opinion editor at opinioneditor@theorion.com

Letters Editor

to the

The disorderly events ordinance gives police the authority to order innocent participants in large events to disperse – and ticket them if they do not comply. When students first heard about it, many were concerned. It sounded like a convenient way for police to break up a controlled, if lively, party or protest when they alone deem it appropriate. Call us crazy, but we hold our first amendment right to free assembly close to our hearts. But on Oct. 5, the Chico City Council reviewed the use and effectiveness of the ordinance since its creation – and the results were surprisingly comforting. The ordinance has only been used three times this year, two of which were in response to serious violence. Each use resulted in the successful dispersion of large groups without a single citation or arrest. This is a far cry from the previous method of arresting students involved in large, chaotic, alcohol-fueled gatherings. While the ordinance seemed scary at first, it does seem to be used solely for the benefit of the public. It’s difficult to believe there is a single student at Chico State

Delaine Moore

Thumbs Up to athletes with crazy personas. They make even the boring games exciting. We’re looking at you, Ron Artest.

Thumbs Down to distractions. I was doing something a minute ago, I just know it.

Thumbs Up to opposable thumbs - The added grip is awesome, and they are just perfect for expressing approval.

City Council member offers balance Wow! A politician who gets back to you personally. When I e-mailed Mary Flynn requesting information about her position on issues before the Chico City Council, she answered me with an offer to meet for coffee to discuss my concerns as well as her history and efforts. As a newcomer to Chico, I was deeply impressed not only by her responsiveness to my inquiry but also by her genuine interest in hearing my hopes for the future of my new community.

I was further impressed that, in this time of limited resources, financial and natural, Mary is committed to a balanced approach to growth. She has a history of struggling to juggle the need for economic development with critical issues of sustainability. She is also a consensus builder, another impressive attribute critical at this time of such misunderstanding and acrimony in our society. Patty Weber

Read the guidelines below for information on how to submit your own Letters to the Editor • Commentaries should be limited to 500 to 700 words and are subject to editing for length and clarity. Please include your phone number.

• Letters to the editor should be limited to fewer than 300 words, must include writer’s name and phone number (for verification) and are subject to condensation. Please include your year in school and major, or your business title.

• The Orion does not publish anonymous letters, letters that are addressed to a third party or letters that are in poor taste. The opinions expressed by The Orion’s columnists do not necessarily reflect those of The Orion or its staff.


Thumbs Down to the Yankees for sweeping the Twins for the third time in a row. We get it, you’re good.

Thumbs Down to making up statistics. Studies show that 78 percent of statistics are only 32 percent true.

Thumbs Up to the start of hockey season. You can go see a fight — and if you’re lucky, a hockey game might break out.

Thumbs Down to every animated movie being remade with CGI. Bambi went from cute to creepy.

Thumbs Up to alien theorists. UFO sightings closed two major Chinese airports last month. The truth is out there.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 27, 2010 | always online >> theorion.com

| A9

‘Ds get degrees’ attitude can ruin motivation to learn in college Nick Pike N OPINION COLUMNIST O

Since higher-education accolades have become the road to success in America’s cutthroat marketplace, it seems some of us have gotten lost along the way and forgot to soak in the substance of university learning. The institution of college has always symbolized the exploration years where we spread our wings and find ourselves – where mom, dad and everyone else fade to black, and we actually get to figure out who the hell we really are. However, a few significant factors have numbed our appreciation for the educational side of college — giving many the “get through it” attitude. A well-endowed upbringing and financial security are two thorns I have noticed that pierce students’ perspectives on how crucial and privileged a college education really is. I knew a lot of kids growing up who thought attending a four-year university out of high school was as special as folding your laundry. Their perspective was tainted because they were groomed to feel that, like high school, college was pretty typical and just another step in the process of what you’re supposed to do at this juncture in life. I’m not putting every financially stable student under the “spoiled brat” umbrella, but it’s a recurrence that I’ve noticed more often than not. It seems that when we don’t have to fight to stay financially afloat in college or aren’t in love with what we’re studying, the educational facet is second tier to us. All too often, many choose a major just because it’s the best choice out of a pool of unfavorable options – or because of the salaries we’re promised when we have a diploma. This is very prominent in my major – business. Sure, we want to learn

the trade and crave to be knowledgeable at every aspect of commerce, but in the end, it’s a money-driven career path and the desired outcome is a primo job out of college. In contrast are those who study subjects such as philosophy, psychology, English or the arts where the majority chooses the major understanding that there isn’t much possibility of a 401k and luxury car awaiting them. These students usually study by passion and want to absorb all the education they can, instead of just getting through it to reach an outcome. It’s sad to see because many of us simply go through the motions and when it’s finally over, we realize the wealth of knowledge that we just squandered and wish we could do it over again. I find myself falling into this routine occasionally. Skipping classes, memorizing study guides so I’ll retain the curriculum for a day and staring blankly through the windows for hours on end as my professors drone on like the teacher from Peanuts. How can I kick the habit, you ask? The same remedy that makes me fall in love with school all over again when I get nonchalant about studies – going home. I see my family regretting their lifestyle choices because they got bored with college after two years and never really explored the possibilities. I go back every summer to wait tables at the same restaurant with the same people who have been there for the last five to 10 years. They all took college for granted and got nothing out of their education, wasting time and money only to end up in a sea of regret. Once in a while, we all need a wakeup call – a glimpse of what could be if we utilize our education, or if we treat it carelessly. This is your wakeup call – don’t let your education pass you by. Nick Pike can be reached at npike@theorion.com

Redheads pigeonholed Serena Cervantes OPINION COLUMNIST

In both day-to-day life and especially in the dating world, red hair can be the most burdensome physical attribute one can have. Redheads usually find themselves feeling either eternally grateful or damned for life. Red-haired women don’t perpetuate a stereotype any more or any less than blondes who just want to have fun or brunettes who are bookish. The older I get, the more I’m convinced that being a redhead inhabits qualities of a subterranean life. Our culture sees redheads as passionate on the surface, yet we are also viewed as mutants hiding personality traits, depicted by cliché words such as “feisty,” “dorky,” “tempered” or “kinky.” Red-haired people are a minority that gets noted — as in a quick footnote to the human race — yet redhaired people are a minority that does not get acknowledged. Instead, artifacts of pop culture such as books, movies and music acknowledge redheads in exchange for comedy, titillation and fancifulness. Perhaps it is because society has never known what to make of redheads. American author Tom Robbins satirically speculated in his essay on redheads that their existence “is a matter of scholarly debate.” However, he agrees in the same essay that “to believe that blondes and brunettes are simply redheads in repressive drag is to believe that UFOs are kiddie balloons.” Robbins even suggests that redheads are mutants and set apart from

ILLUSTRATION BY TYLER NEUMANN

the rest of womankind. Redheads are set apart and dropped into the pop culture factory that caricatures them and reels them out to resemble Jessica Rabbit – arguably the sexiest cartoon ever to be produced by Disney – who further portrays the banal, hyper-sexuality of a redhead. Jessica Rabbit even has women’s magazines using her “body type” as a gauge for sex appeal and appropriates the celebrity “Jessica’s” – Alba, Biel and Simpson – as living up to this ideal. One sees an example of this sort of out-of-whack sexual appetite with the character Dr. Jean Grey in the movie “X-Men.” A redhead will inevitably come in contact with infantile men who actually believe this – a stereotype so overly used that it makes me want to barf. The sci-fi imagery of Milla Jovovich in “The Fifth Element.” Does anyone else think that Jovovich’s character Leeloo resembles a grownup, future-esque version of

Pippi Longstocking? It seems like a simulated image – a computer geek’s fantasy – has leaked out and caught on with the rest of the world. When are we going to realize that sleeping with a hair color is about as adolescent as the quintessential South Park episode about gingers? Well, no thanks to Bruce Springsteen and his “Red Headed Woman” song about getting the “dirty job done,” men across America will forever hold a honky-tonk, rock ’n’ roll view over redheads as sexual beings who possess a skill unmatched by blondes and brunettes. Is this saying that redheads are supreme in sexual feats and are celebrated by mankind? Or does this simplistic ballad suggest that we’re good for only one thing? Of course there are classically beautiful and goofy redheads, such as Lucille Ball who I grew up watching in “I Love Lucy” and contemporary, beautiful

redheads such as YouTube star Spricket24, who resembles a modern day Lucille Ball with her signature animated facial expressions. But even if it is beautiful, red hair is still a minority feature, no matter how much comedy tries to cover it up. Spricket24 has been called everything from “carrot top” to the proverbial “firecrotch” throughout her life, she said in an e-mail interview. Eventually, however, she grew a thicker skin and learned to brush it off. It takes time to grow into your red hair, she said. You should wear it with pride. “I’ve been blonde and brunette and I get a lot of attention as a blonde, but definitely not as much as I do as a redhead,” she said. “The best compliment I get though is when a guy tells me he doesn’t normally like redheads, but has changed his mind after seeing me.” Serena Cervantes can be reached at scervantes@theorion.comv

The Naked Lounge intimidating until stereotypes stripped off Joanna Hass OPINION COLUMNIST

PHOTO BY RYAN RICHARDS PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY JEB DRAPER

It’s time to confront Chico’s own little abortion topic – The Naked L ounge. If you haven’t been hip to the scene-splitting debate, then you can just stagger back to the keg you’ve been living under, because it seems as though everyone paying attention has one opinion or another about this downtown coffee house. The Naked Lounge is known for hosting an army of clients clad in previously owned clothing, backroom tattoos and armed with an X-ray stare that could burn through your designer sweater before they even light their next home-rolled cigarette. No matter the time of day or type of weather outside, there is usually a steady guard on post outside the doors of this innocent-looking cafe with a dog-eared copy of “Catcher in the Rye” and an eyebrow raised in your direction. For those who don’t make a habit of hanging out at this hipster hideaway, the mere thought of stopping in for a quick pickme-up can be frightening enough to deter them from ever trying it out. The fear of this place is not so much from an actual threat to

your safety or well-being, but even just the act of walking past it makes you question how important walking on that side of the street really is to you. In spite of any bias, I decided to shed my prejudgment like a snakeskin and become one of these Naked Lounge lizards – at least for a little while. After throwing on my most non-descript clothing and giving myself a quick gut check, I marched into this brick-fortified commune and became determined to do as the Nakeds do. I had two questions during the first stages of this undercover spy mission – where have they been hiding this hot chocolate my whole life, and is this the best customer service I’ve ever had in Chico? Answers – heaven, and yes. Quality of drinks aside, the real issue here is the atmosphere, and I can honestly say that each time I visited this stylishly unkempt stereotype, both I and my partner in Chai stuck out like cops at a cool-people convention. This surprised even me, however. Sincerely, I thought if anyone was going to feel at home in this bohemian den, it would be me. By all accounts, it should have been a fit. I’m a college-aged journalist with a visible facial

piercing, toting a Klean Kanteen and a Rasta-inspired tote bag. Why I didn’t fit in perhaps only my third-grade self could tell you after she was fitted for her first pair of glasses. Just like every other clique, the only way to fit in is to be the one telling someone they don’t. And yes, I admit that the toxic levels of judgment are probably just the gurgling guilt bubbling up in my chest projecting onto the faces of my peers. This fine conveyor of crushed beans and warm milk is only a façade of unwashed cultural honesty and the patrons are about as ‘naked’ as the emperor parading his new clothes. Maybe it’s an Adam and Eve situation and the only thing keeping me from being one of the naked is my own embarrassment from not buying local or boycotting Wal-Mart. But that doesn’t change the fact that it’s still too dimly lit to do the reading and journaling these artsy exhibitionists are famous for. Regardless of the reason for this great divide, I can’t help but tread softly around it every time I venture down Second Street. The lesson here is simple – you either are or you aren’t one of the Naked natives, and being a customer at the Naked Lounge has nothing to do with it. Joanna Hass can be reached at jhass@theorion.com

PIECE OF MIND >> What is your perception of the Naked Lounge?

Whitney Abelia sophomore | business

Michael Shaffer junior | chemistry

“It’s the best coffee shop in town, but don’t tell my boss I said that because I work at Augie’s.”

“I think it’s a bunch of hipsters. Good place, good mood, good coffee.”

“They have really good tea, I think it’s a pretty chill place.”

“I think it has a really chill, good atmosphere.”

Britney Carrino junior | philosophy

Will Cryer senior | English


A10 |

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 13, 2010

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It is a complete sentence.

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Rape Crisis Intervention & Prevention (530) 342-RAPE (collect calls accepted) Serving Butte, Glenn & Tehama since 1974


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Lindsey Barrett Sports Editor

From the Cheap Seats

William “Bill” Mickelson 1948–1951 Golf Skiiing

Rich Miller 1962–1965 Football 1963–1966 Track & Field 1963 Baseball 1965 Boxing

THE ORION •KEVIN LEE

COMING HOME Nine of the 2010 Chico State Hall of Fame inductees were honored Saturday. Athletes were recognized not only for their athletic achievements, but also their academic and societal roles. Left to right [top row] Leslie “Les” Hord, Rich Miller, Josh Ozbourne, John-Eric Hernandez [2nd row] Phil Mickelson, Wiiliam “Bill” Mickelson, Paul Sengo, Donna Peirano, Mose Mastelotto. Sophia Horn STAFF WRITER

Mose Mastelotto 1954–1956, 1959 Football 1955–1956 Basketball

Josh Osborn 1997–1998 Baseball

Gwynne Schwartz 1983–1986 Track & Field

Nostalgic conversations could be heard all over the Bell Memorial Union Saturday as past athletes described their fondest memories at Chico State and discussed what they would never forget about college. The content alumni reunited for the Hall of Fame ceremony, which honored 10 of the finest athletes to play for Chico State. These individuals were recognized for outstanding performance in sports such as baseball, soccer, football, basketball, skiing, golf, boxing, softball and field hockey. John-Eric Hernandez, Leslie “Les” Hord, Mose Mastelotto, Rich Miller, Josh Osborn, Donna Peirano, Gwynne Schwartz and Paul Sengo were among the athletes inducted. The two honorary inductees of the event were Phil Mickelson and William “Bill” Mickelson. “I loved how there was three females to every male,” Phil Mickelson said, who skied for Chico State from 1956-1958. Phil Mickelson participated with various groups during his time at Chico State. He was involved in the Greek community with the Lambda Pi fraternity and was the junior class vice president and later the senior class president. Phil Mickelson was joined by his son Phil Mickelson Jr., who is currently one of the topranked golfers in the world. Phil Mickelson was excited about the event and was surprised to hear that he was one of the people chosen to be inducted, he said.

“I didn’t know if it was a common thing,” Phil Mickelson said. “I didn’t know if I was really worthy of it – I was never really anything that special.” As the evening continued, various people congratulated him on the award and described how amazing his athletic abilities were as a skier. “Do the very best you can in every attempt,” Phil Mickelson said as a message to the athletes of today. Mickelson’s brother, Bill Mickelson, was also there as an honorary inductee for golf and skiing. Bill Mickelson participated in Chico State athletics from 1948-1951, helped reinstate the golf team and was part of the Delta Psi Delta fraternity. He also received the University’s Distinguished Alumni award in 2003, a feat accomplished by fewer than 100 Chico State alumni. Bill Mickelson was in disbelief when he heard of the award he was receiving. “It’s truly a wonderful event,” he said. “I’m making the most out of every moment.” Osborn and Hernandez picked up right where they left off upon being reunited, having both played for Chico State’s baseball team from 1997-2000. Both Osborn and Hernandez were honored to be inductees at the Hall of Fame ceremony. Osborn gained titles such as Northern California Athletic Conference Pitcher of the Year, 1997 West Region Pitcher of the Year and was a fi rst team All-American. Hernandez also made a name for himself at Chico State as an all-time leader in wins, innings pitched,

strikeouts, appearances and games started. He was also named West Region Pitcher of the Year in 2000 and was a fi rst team All-American and MVP of the College World Series in 1999. “I was just completely shocked,” Hernandez said. “Chico State has always been a big part of my life, and I feel even closer to the school.” Osborn and Hernandez both vividly remembered their most memorable moment as Wildcats, helping to lead Chico State to two NCAA National Championships. “Hard work pays off,” Hernandez said. “Teamwork was, and still is, a big factor in sports. It doesn’t matter how good you are.” Fellow inductee Sengo was recognized for his accomplishments in wrestling from 1959-1961. Sengo won the Far West Conference Championship three times in a row and went to the NCAA National Championships in 1961. “I’ve had butterfl ies in my stomach since I heard I was getting inducted,” Sengo said. “I was completely surprised.” Sengo remembered that Chico State assisted him in making lifelong friendships and wanted to thank the supportive teachers he had throughout his time at the university, he said. The athletes received compliments and congratulations from various individuals throughout the night and were all pleased to be a part of the event. For more information on the inductees and the event, visit www.chicowildcats.com. Sophia Horn can be reached at shorn@theorion.com

Phil Mickelson 1956–1958 Skiing

John-Eric Hernandez 1997–2000 Baseball

Leslie “Les” Hord 1971–1974 Soccer

Donna Peirano 1969–1972 Field Hockey Basketball 1969–1970 Softball

Paul Sengo 1959–1961 Wrestling

Remembering an icon When I was in junior high, there was nothing more important to me than basketball. It consumed every part of me. I played year round and went to as many camps as my parents could afford. I like to think those were my prime playing years. The summer before eighth grade, there was one camp that stood out as the hardest camp in the North State. The Chico State women’s basketball camp was intense, excruciatingly hard and smack dab in the middle of summer. The camp went five days and ran for twelve hours a day with a lunch and dinner break splitting up sessions. The Wildcat coaches and players broke up the age groups between Shurmer and Acker Gym, and since I was in the younger group, I played in Shurmer. With no air conditioning and only a few fans to circulate the thick gym air, we ran drill after drill after drill. I sweat more that one week than I would during an entire season. I remember seeing the women’s head coach stroll through our camp each day, watch over what we were learning and even sometimes jump in to demonstrate herself. If you were a girl who played basketball in Chico, you knew the name Mary Ann Lazzarini. Her presence made me nervous, but I strived to work even harder when she was around. She had a manner about her that was friendly, but also down to business. Lazzarini spent 14 years as an associate coach for the women’s basketball team before being named head coach in 1989, according to Inside Chico State. The term “icon” is not easily given out to just anyone, but to me, Lazzarini was an icon. I dreamed of playing for a coach like her. She died Feb. 21, 2002, after a battle with pancreatic cancer. She was 49. The legacy that she left wasn’t only seen in her wins as a coach, but also in her playing time as a Wildcat. In the 1992–1993 season, the Wildcats won the Northern California Athletic Conference title, and Lazzarini was selected NCAC coach of the year, according to Inside Chico. She still holds the record for game-high steals with nine in one game. In the 1973-1974 season, Lazzarini and the Wildcats won the Northern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference championship. Lazzarini wore the Wildcat uniform from 19721974 and was inducted into the Chico State Hall of Fame in 1993. Before current head coach Brian Fogel, there have only been five women’s basketball coaches and, to me, Lazzarrini was the most memorable. “If I can convince a player that there’s nothing she cannot do, that her mind is the most powerful asset she has – more so than a jump shot or a rebound – that is what will help her for the rest of her life.” - Mary Lazzarini Inside Chico State Lindsey Barrett can be reached at

of the week

lbarrett@theorion.com

’catfights

Men’s Soccer 7 p.m. Friday @ UC San Diego 2 p.m. Sunday @ Cal State East Bay Women’s Soccer 4:30 p.m. Friday @ UC San Diego 11:30 p.m. Sunday Cal State East Bay Women’s Volleyball 7 p.m. Tonight @ Cal State Stanislaus 7p.m.Fridayv.CalStateDominguezHills 7 p.m. Saturday v. Cal State L.A.

sports

TO DAY I N

oct. 13, 1903 Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Boston Pilgrims five games to three in the first World Series.

[ jock talk ] One player was lost because he broke his nose. How do you go about getting a nose in condition for football?”

- Darrell Royal head football coach, University of Texas


B2 |

WEDNESDAY, OCT 13, 2010

Sports Shorts College sports around the nation

fifth straight match lost A SSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

Wildcats and Tritons ranked in preseason Top 25 >> California Collegiate Athletic Association defending regular-season champion UC San Diego and 2010 tournament participant Chico State received national Top 25 rankings in the Division-II Bulletin Women’s Basketball Preseason Top 25 poll released last Tuesday. The Wildcats earned a No. 17 spot while the Tritons are ranked No. 7. source: goccaa.org g

Cal Poly Pomona basketball ranked No. 1 >> With a strong cast back from its Division-II national championship team, Cal Poly Pomona is the No. 1 team in the 2010-11 Division-II Bulletin Men’s Basketball Preseason Top 25 poll. Cal Poly Pomona, 28-6, shoots for its third straight title game this season with three returning starters and eight of its 10-man squad back. Rounding out the top five are Findlay, St. Cloud State, Indiana (Pa.) and Florida Southern. source: goccaa.org

Wildcat of the Week

Lisa Webster women’s soccer

Chico State junior midfielder Lisa Webster notched two goals for the Wildcats over the weekend, keeping the ’Cats playoff hopes alive with her performance in Friday night’s 2-0 victory over Sonoma State. Webster’s first goal gave the ’Cats the 1-0 lead in the 18th minute. The ’Cats’ leading scorer scored again in the 83rd minute with a header after an impressive pass into the middle by Kasey Wall and Ashley Perlman. Wildcat of the Week is a regular feature meant to acknowledge the contributions made by individuals to the team. Winners are chosen by The Orion sports staff from nominations taken from all sports. To nominate: sportseditor@theorion.com

always online >> theorion.com

Gators chomp Wildcats; Dane Stivers

Preseason All-American basketball players selected >> Humboldt State’s Brian Morris and Marquel Hoskins of San Francisco State will represent the California Collegiate Athletic Association on the 2010-11 Division-I Bulletin Men’s Basketball Preseason All-American Team, it was announced Wednesday. Morris is one of two players from the west selected as a “Super 16” selection, while Hoskins received honorable mention. Seattle Pacific senior guard Chris Banchero joined Morris as a “Super 16” pick from the West Region. source: goccaa.org

S P O RT S

The Wildcats knew heading into the season that their youth and inexperience would be a factor that they would need to overcome to be successful. Seventeen games later, the talented group of youngsters is on a five-game losing streak and has reached a destination they were hoping to avoid – mediocrity. After dropping Friday’s match against San Francisco State in four sets and Saturday’s match against Cal State Monterey Bay in five sets, the Wildcats find themselves at a underwhelming 8-9 overall record. Against the Gators on Friday night in Acker Gym, the Wildcats fell behind early in the first set, ultimately succumbing to a 25-20 defeat, despite staying in contention for most of the set. The second set showed a side of the ’Cats that has often been amiss this season, as an early deficit prompted the ’Cats to bare their teeth and go on a late run that pulled them ahead of the Gators at 24-23. But the ’Cats’ display of grit and determination ended in heartbreak, as the Gators fought their own way back to a wild 29-27 set win, despite being just one point from the loss multiple times. On the brink of their sixth loss in the past seven matches, the ’Cats needed all the maturity they could muster if they were to pull off a come-frombehind win. The third set saw the ’Cats come roaring out of the gates with a 10-1 lead. The Gators would respond with a few small runs of their own, getting as close as within four points, but they would ultimately drop the third set to the ’Cats, 25-17. With the Gators clinging to a 2-1 set advantage, the Wildcats looked to continue strutting their way up the comeback trail in the fourth set. Even as the Gators began with a 3-0 burst, the ’Cats would take their own early lead at 6-4, setting up what looked to be a fifth and final set.

But the Gators would pull ahead from there and not look back, turning a 10-10 deadlock into a 25-18 set victory for the 3-1 match win. It was ultimately the Wildcats’ own poor play that saw them extend their losing streak, said sophomore opposite and outside hitter Jessica Leek. “We’ve been losing confidence in each other and haven’t been able to pick it back up,” Leek said. Leek led the ’Cats with 12 kills on the evening, while sophomore setter Sable Villaescusa chipped in 36 assists and eight digs. On Saturday night, the Wildcats would face tough competition against the heavily favored Cal State Monterey Bay Otters, who were ranked second in the CCAA with a 7-2 conference record and a 10-2 record overall. Despite the odds, the Wildcats pounced early in the first set. A quick 2-0 ’Cat start continued to swell over the course of the set, and the ‘Cats settled in for a surprising 25-17 win. In the second set, the Otters exploded for an 18-8 advantage as the match got under way. But the Wildcats would not lie down, as they scored the next six points and 10 of the next 13 to shrink the Otter lead to 21-18. Unfortunately, the Otters would be too much to handle, winning 25-20 to square up the match at 1-1. In the third set, the ’Cats again saw themselves playing catch up, as a 5-1 Otter start did not look good for the struggling Wildcats. The Otters would take the set by a score of 25-18 for a 2-1 set advantage, and the ’Cats suddenly had their backs against the wall again. But the Wildcats would not be tamed in the fourth set. Despite being down 2-0 to start, they clawed their way back into the lead with diving saves, clean hits and all-around hustle. With the score 22-18 in Chico’s favor, the set was in the ’Cats’ paws as they looked to even up the match, but a quick

THE ORION • SAMANTHA YOUNGMAN

MEET ME AT THE TOP Sophomore Sable Villaescusa [No. 10] sets the ball for junior middle hitter Jacqueline Johnson during the game Friday. The Wildcats lost to San Francisco State 1-3 in four sets. 4-0 Otter run knotted up the score, causing fans to groan. However, the Otters could not get their next serve over the net, giving the ’Cats the gift of a point and some muchneeded momentum, as they managed to hang on for the set victory, 25-23. The fifth and deciding set would start off much like those before it, with the Wildcats conceding an early lead to the Otters. But this time,

there would no comeback, as the ’Cats dropped the final set, 15-10, and the match, 3-2. A big component of the tough loss was the mindset the ’Cats played with in the final set, Villaescusa said. “We weren’t playing to win – we were playing not to lose,” Villaescusa said of her team’s passive play in the fifth set. As the Wildcats look to regroup Wednesday against Cal State Stanislaus, their current

3-8 conference record must improve before they entertain any hopes of returning to the CCAA playoffs. It’s the team’s inability to capitalize on its vast potential that’s holding it back, said head coach Cody Hein. “We’re better than this,” he said. “It’s absolutely frustrating.” Dane Stivers can be reached at dstivers@theorion.com

Continued success in Wildcat athletics Isaac Brambila STAFF WRITER

When it comes to Chico State being No. 1, the fi rst thing many students think of is the university’s previous ranking as a party school. Fortunately, that number is also an adjective describing some of our sports teams. Since Wildcat involvement with the California Collegiate Athletic Association began 11 years ago, Chico State athletes have won 38 CCAA North Region titles, 93 NCAA berths, 23 NCAA West Regional titles and 13 national titles, according to information from Sports Information Director Luke Reid. Leading Chico State in national titles is the track and field team, from which nine athletes have won titles. Golf and baseball have each won two, baseball won one before joining the CCAA and the crosscountry team won a national title as well. While the most successful records belong to the track and field and cross-country teams, the only team sport to experience the glory of a national championship is baseball. The first NCAA championship came in 1997, and the second in 1999 to a program that had recently begun to offer recruitment scholarships, said current baseball head coach Dave Taylor, who was assistant pitching coach that season. It was a team that started off

Wildcat

Line Bottom

slow and didn’t really have an identity, but it became a hard team to beat as the season progressed, he said. “The ’99 team was overachievers,” Taylor said. The most satisfying part of winning a championship is watching the end product and watching the team enjoy the program, Taylor said. There have been only a few Chico State teams that have come close to the highest honor in college sports – the NCAA championship – one of which was the 2003 men’s soccer team that narrowly lost in the championship game. That year, the men’s soccer team broke the NCAA record for the greatest turnaround from one season to the next. It was a team effort with players that complemented each other, Reid said. Reid traveled with the team during the tournament and had one of the best experiences in his time at Chico, he said. He vividly remembers the celebration with head coach Mike O’Malley when the ’Cats scored the game-winning goal in the regional championship against Cal State Dominguez Hills. “He jumped into my arms and I was holding him and we were screaming and jumping up and down,” he said. Another program that has experienced considerable success in the past 11 years is cross-country. The women have won seven Men’s Soccer The Wildcats posted a 2-1 loss and a 2-1 victory over the weekend, losing to conference nemesis Sonoma State on Friday before beating the Humboldt State Lumberjacks Sunday.

CCAA titles and the men have won nine in the past nine years, with its most successful athlete, Scott Bauhs, leading the way. In 2008, Bauhs won the national championship in cross-country. Bauhs had a commendable cross-country season in 2008, despite starting late after having participated in Olympic trials in spring, said cross-country coach Gary Towne. Bauhs won every race he participated in that year and topped his season off with the NCAA championship, giving Chico State its first NCAA crosscountry title. Bauhs was a naturally gifted runner, but had other qualities that helped make him a great competitor, Towne said. “He was unmatched when it came to mental toughness,” he said. “Champions are special people – they can handle tough scenarios.” With half of the fall season still ahead, the future is still a mystery for Wildcat athletes. However, optimism is in the air surrounding men’s soccer and both cross-country teams. Men’s soccer has gotten off to a strong start this season with an 8-2-0 record, ranking 14th in the NCAA. Women’s cross-country is currently ranked fifth and the men’s team is ranked third in NCAA Division II. Isaac Brambila can be reached at ibrambila@theorion.com

Women’s Soccer The ’Cats went 1-1 over the weekend, defeating the Sonoma State Seawolves 2-0 on Friday before dropping a 2-0 decision to Humboldt State Sunday.

14 NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS

23 NCAA REGION WEST TITLES 38 CCAA TITLES

93 NCAA CHAMPIONSHIP BERTHS

99 POST SEASON BERTHS

13+ YEARS OF DOMINATION CHICO STATE

WILDCATS

Stats of the week Chico State junior defender Kasey Wall notched two assists for the Wildcats on Friday, setting up Lisa Webster twice for goals in the ’Cats’ 2-0 shutout win over Sonoma State at Rohnert Park.


S C H E D U LE S

always online >> theorion.com

WEDNESDAY, OCT 13, 2010 |

B3

Fall 2010 >> it might get rowdy MEN’S BASKETBALL

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL | CONT.

|

MEN’S SOCCER | CONT.

CROSS COUNTRY

|

Nov. 6

Red/White Scrimmage

3 p.m.

Dec. 31

@Cal State Dominguez Hills 12:30 p.m.

Sept. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

Nov. 7

@University of Pacific

5 p.m.

Jan. 7

UC San Diego

5:30 p.m.

Sept. 24

Humboldt State

Nov. 18

@Cal State Stanislaus

7 p.m.

Jan. 8

Cal State East Bay

5:30 p.m.

Sept. 26

Nov. 22

Bethany University

7 p.m.

Jan. 14

@Cal State San Bernardino

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 1

Nov. 26

Northwest Christian

7:30 p.m.

Jan. 15

@Cal Poly Pomona

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 3

Cal State L.A.

Nov. 27

Dominican

7:30 p.m.

Jan. 21

San Francisco State

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 8

@Sonoma State

L 1-2

Nov. 20

TBD

TBA

Dec. 3

Humboldt State

7:30 p.m.

Jan. 22

CSU Monterey Bay

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 10

@Humboldt State

W 2-1

Dec. 4

TBD

TBA

Dec. 4

Sonoma State

7:30 p.m.

Jan. 28

Cal State Dominguez Hills

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 15

@UC San Diego

7 p.m.

Dec. 8

Cal State Stanislaus

7 p.m.

Jan. 29

Cal State L.A.

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 17

@Cal State East Bay

2 p.m.

Dec. 11

Pacific Union

7 p.m.

Feb. 3

@Sonoma State

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 22

San Francisco State

Dec. 30

@Cal State L.A.

2:30 p.m.

Feb. 5

@Humboldt State

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 24

CSU Monterey Bay

11:30 a.m.

Dec. 31

@Cal State Dominguez Hills

2:30 p.m.

Feb. 10

@Cal State East Bay

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 27

Cal State Stanislaus

4:30 p.m.

Sept. 3

@Dominican

W 3-1

Jan. 7

UC San Diego

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 12

@UC San Diego

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 30

@Cal State Stanislaus

7 p.m.

Sept. 3

@BYU- Hawaii

W 3-1

Jan. 8

Cal State East Bay

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 18

Cal Poly Pomona

5:30 p.m.

Nov. 5-7

TBD

TBA

Sept. 4

@Grand Canyon

W 3-1

Jan. 14

@Cal State San Bernardino

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

5:30 p.m.

Nov. 12-14

TBD

TBA

Sept. 4

@Seattle Pacific

Jan. 15

@Cal Poly Pomona

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 24

@CSU Monterey Bay

5:30 p.m.

Nov. 20

TBD

TBA

Sept. 7

William Jessup

Jan. 21

San Francisco State

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 25

@San Francisco State

5:30 p.m.

Dec. 2-4

TBD

TBA

Sept. 10

@Cal State L.A.

Jan. 22

CSU Monterey Bay

7:30 p.m.

March 1-5

TBD

TBA

Sept. 11

@Cal State Dominguez Hills

W 3-0

Jan. 28

Cal State Dominguez Hills

7:30 p.m.

March 6

TBD

TBA

Sept. 15

@Simpson

W 3-0

Jan. 29

Cal State L.A.

7:30 p.m.

March 15

TBD

TBA

Sept. 17

Humboldt State

W 3-1

Feb. 3

@Sonoma State

7:30 p.m.

Sept. 18

Sonoma State

L 3-0

Feb. 5

@Humboldt State

7:30 p.m.

Aug. 17

@Nevada

exhibition

Sept. 22

Cal State Stanislaus

L 3-0

Feb. 10

@Cal State East Bay

7:30 p.m.

Aug. 25

@Southern Oregon

exhibition

Sept. 24

UC San Diego

W 3-2

Feb. 12

@UC San Diego

7:30 p.m.

Sept. 2

Western Washington

L 1-2 (2OT)

Feb. 18

Cal Poly Pomona

7:30 p.m.

Sept. 24-25

@Saint Martin’s Inv.

2nd

Sept. 4

Central Washington

Feb. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

7:30 p.m.

Sept. 27-28

@Western Washington Inv.

TBA

Sept. 10

@Cal State Monterey Bay

Feb. 24

@CSU Monterey Bay

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 11-12

InterWest Wildcat Classic

TBA

Sept. 12

@San Francisco State

Feb. 25

@San Francisco State

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 18-19

D-II Championship Preview

TBA

Sept. 17

Cal Poly Pomona

Sept. 25

@Stanford Invitational

6th/9th

W 1-0

Oct. 2

@Williamette Invitational

2nd/3rd

Sonoma State

W 2-0

Oct. 16

@Santa Clara Invitational

TBA

Cal State Dominguez Hills

W 3-0

Nov. 6

@CCAA Championships

TBA

L 0-1 (OT)

Nov. 6

@Doc Adams Invitational

TBA

WOMEN’S SOCCER MEN’S GOLF

|

L 2-1

7 p.m.

| 5-3-0

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL

| 8-5-0

L 1-3 W 3-1 L 1-3

Sept. 25

Cal State East Bay

L 3-1

W 2-1

Oct. 1

@Cal State San Bernardino

L 0-3 L 2-3

W 2-0

Oct. 2

@Cal Poly Pomona

L 0-1 (2OT)

Oct. 8

San Francisco State

L 1-3

L 0-1 (OT)

Oct. 9

CSU Monterey Bay

L 2-3

March 1-5

TBD

TBA

Sept. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

W 2-1

Oct. 13

@Cal State Stanislaus

7 p.m.

March 12-15

TBD

TBA

Sept. 24

Humboldt State

W 1-0

Oct. 15

Cal State Dominguez Hills

7 p.m.

March 23-26

TBD

TBA

Sept. 26

Sonoma State

W 4-0

Oct. 16

Cal State L.A.

7 p.m.

Oct. 1

Cal State Dominguez Hills

L 0-1

Oct. 22

@Sonoma State

7 p.m.

L 0-2

Oct. 23

@Humboldt State

7 p.m.

W 2-0

Oct. 29

@Cal State East Bay

7 p.m.

L 0-2

Oct. 30

@UC San Diego

7 p.m.

WOMEN’S GOLF WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

|

|

Sept. 19-21

@Sonoma State Inv.

8th

Oct. 3

Cal State L.A.

Sept. 27-28

@Grand Canyon Inv.

TBA

Oct. 8

@Sonoma State

Nov. 7

@St. Mary’s

2 p.m.

Oct. 11-12

@Viking Inv.

TBA

Oct. 10

@Humboldt State

Nov. 12

@University of Nevada

7 p.m.

Oct. 18-19

@Golf Mart Lady Otter Inv.

TBA

Oct. 15

@UC San Diego

4:30 p.m.

Nov. 5

Cal Poly Pomona

7 p.m.

Nov. 19

Academy of Art

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 17

@Cal State East Bay

11:30 a.m.

Nov. 6

Cal State San Bernardino

7 p.m.

Nov. 20

Hawaii Pacific

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 22

San Francisco State

4:30 p.m.

Nov. 12

@CSU Monterey Bay

7 p.m.

Nov. 23

Cal State Stanislaus

6 p.m.

Oct. 24

CSU Monterey Bay

2 p.m.

Nov. 13

@San Francisco State

Nov. 27

@Cal State Stanislaus

2 p.m.

Oct. 27

Cal State Stanislaus

7 p.m.

Nov. 18-20

TBD

Dec. 3

Humboldt State

5:30 p.m.

Sept. 2

Western Washington

W 2-1

Oct. 30

@Cal State Stanislaus

Dec. 2-4

TBD

Dec. 4

Sonoma State

5:30 p.m.

Sept. 6

Seattle Pacific

W 1-0

Dec. 10

@Western Washington

5 p.m.

Sept. 10

@Cal State Monterey Bay

Dec. 11

@Seattle Pacific

5 p.m.

Sept. 12

Dec. 30

@Cal State L.A.

12:30 p.m.

Sept. 17

MEN’S SOCCER

| 8-2-0

4:30 p.m.

Nov. 5-7

TBD

TBA

W 2-1 (OT)

Nov. 11-14

TBD

TBA

@San Francisco State

W 2-1

Nov. 19-21

TBD

TBA

Cal Poly Pomona

W 3-0

Dec. 2-4

TBD

TBA

TBA TBA

schedules subject to change

Students, public ‘Paddle Away’ at aquatic center to go around. The weather was warm in STAFF WRITER contrast to the chilly water, but Paddle Away at the Forebay for all 10 students who showed was full of opportunity, but up at the event, there were plenty of things to do. short on attendance. Attendance at the event, and The event was hosted Saturday by the Chico State Rec- to the Forebay Aquatic Center reation Hospitality and Parks overall, has been one of many Society at the Forebay Aquatic obstacles for Bridget Hand, a Center in the Thermalito North Chico State alumna and manForebay State Park – approx- ager of the center. Hand imately 20 thinks there miles south We try to are a numof Chico. The ber of reasons center opened invite the public to why student its doors and involvement dock to stu- generate revenue, has declined, dents and the but unfortunately she said. public. we are not serving “One of the There challenges we were kayaks, a lot of Chico face out here stand-up padis our peak dle boards State Students.” Bridget Hand season, which sponsored manager of the Forebay Aquatic Center is late spring, by Angulo summer and Hawaii, hydrobikes, canoes and paddle early fall,” Hand said. For Chico State students, this boats, to name just a few of the water activities that were is the time when everyone’s offered along with coaching gone for the summer. “We try to invite the public from Angulo Hawaii represento generate revenue, but unfortative Andrew Whitman. A volleyball net was set tunately we are not serving a up, bocce balls were at the lot of Chico State students,” ready, a barbecue was cook- Hand said. Junior parks and recreation ing and plenty of Monster energy drinks were on hand major Russell Buller thinks the Kevin Augustine

THE ORION • SAMANTHA YOUNGMAN

DUCKS ON A POND Senior Jenna Della Cella [right] and senior Kara Hearn [left], both recreation majors, paddle Saturday at the Forebay Aquatic Center at an event hosted by Recreation Hospitality and Parks Society. Paddle Away at the Forebay taught students to use water craft sports. The event fell short on attendence with only 10 students showing up, which has been a common problem at the center. Forebay Aquatic Center’s location is a bit too far from campus, he said. “It’s far from Chico,” Buller said. “The distance keeps students like freshmen and those

THE ORION • SAMANTHA YOUNGMAN

FLATWATER FLOAT Junior Swang Sanders [left] and sophomore Egypt Howard kayak at Paddle Away at the Forebay, an event held Saturday at the Forebay Aquatic Center in Oroville.

who don’t have a car from coming out.” Since 2004, The Forebay Aquatic Center has been providing boating safety programs, training clinics, private lessons and rentals to Chico State and surrounding communities. But the decline of student involvement has hurt the center’s ability to grow and expand, hindering initial projections of the program’s potential, Hand said. This comes at a time when the five-year lease agreement between the Associated Students and the water resources department is up, leaving the Forebay Aquatic Center program under review and a less-than-likely chance for another event such as Paddle Away at the Forebay to happen again, Hand said. “If it was a stable economy, I don’t think it would be up for review,” he said. “They want us out here and we have been for five years, but our lease – along

with everything at this point – is up for review.” Senior parks and recreation major Sam Kabert, who helped set up the event by contacting sponsors, thinks the event could be the start of something long term for the Forebay Aquatic Center, he said. “If we can bring groups like R.H.A.P.S. together with the Forebay Aquatic Center, the potential for more students being involved is there,” Kabert said. “So much so, that this event could be held every semester.” With sponsorship from Monster energy drinks and Angulo Hawaii boards, Paddle Away at the Forebay looked to garner more attention. To those who showed up, however, there were plenty of chances to try any water sport of their choosing. For senior parks and recreation major Andrew Hopkins, the hydrobike was a favorite aspect – until the lake weeds took hold.

“It was perfect as I kept heading out, and then here comes a weed patch,” Hopkins said. “I kept getting stuck on the weeds after that, and I knew it was time to pedal back.” Kevin Augustine can be reached at kaugustine@theorion.com

Forebay Aquatic Center For more information be sure to check out: • http://www.aschico.com/ forebayaquaticcenter •http://www.aschico.com/ adventureoutings •http://de-de.facebook. com/pages/OrovilleCA/Forebay-AquaticCenter/112144332141107 Also during the month of October, two-for-one equipment rental and 10 percent discount on facilitated events for university groups.


B4 |

S P O RT S

WEDNESDAY, OCT 13, 2010

always online >> theorion.com

Coed recreation leagues adjust to new rules the net, but men cannot block women, which is a tough adjustment for Skinner and others, such as junior Setu Palma. “It’s like you can’t put full effort into it for the game,” Palma said. While both Palma and Skinner understand why the rules are in place, it’s difficult to not go full force. Graduate student Krista Winkler has some gripes with some of the rules, specifically dealing with the stringent check-in procedures, she said. But in general, Winkler was supportive of the rules for women, as they are put in place not to discourage men but rather to protect women participants, she said. Riccomini is considerate of the issues people have with rules and tries to address them when problems arise, he said. He helped revive the flag football coed league with certain rule changes when he took over as director of intramurals in 2008. Another flag football rule that is now enforced is that when a ball is fumbled, the play is ruled dead. Overall, more people have been coming out for coed leagues with little resistance to the changed rules that he has seen, Riccomini said.

THE ORION • KENNEDY COKER

COED HOOPS Nicole Slocum [left], a player on JC All Stars, sets up a play against Bengi Meshek [right] on Alternative Energy. The two play in a coed intramural basketball league at Chico State.

INFOGRAPHS BY MAX ZAVALA

A loophole allows women to comprise an entire team for STAFF WRITER coed leagues, while a team Recreational sports and with men must have at least intramurals are fi nally under- as many women as men, if not way and providing an outlet more. Some fi nd this to be a doufor students to exercise and ble standard, including junior enjoy themselves. Coed sports are one of the Elizabeth Jaramillo. “Today there was a team most popular activities among students. However, some of that was supposed to be coed, the rules have been tweaked to but all girls, and I had to ask if level the playing field between they could start playing,” Jaramillo said. men and women. It perplexed her that a coed Intramurals are also a favorteam could ite of Steve still play withRiccomini, any guys, the director I think it evens out she said. She of intramuout the game, but thinks there ral sports. should be at “EveryI’m not going to say least one guy one is going per coed team. out there to it isn’t frustrating.” Jeff Skinner She has just have Chico State junior heard people fun,” Riccoattack these mini said. There are many coed sports rules, Jaramillo said. She even available to those interested, heard one male saying the including flag football, basket- rules were “sexist” against ball, soccer, volleyball, dodge men. Though the rules could ball and kickball. In recent years, rules have annoy some, there are those been adjusted to accommo- who understand their purdate women who had felt left pose, such as junior Jeff Skinner. out, Riccomini said. “I think it evens out the Flag football had the most drastic facelift, letting wom- game, but I’m not going to say en’s touchdowns be worth it isn’t frustrating,” Skinner three more points than men’s, said. Football is not the only among other changes. Other sports, such as soc- sport that has been adjusted cer, have had almost no rule for coed play. In volleyball, it is instincchanges to accommodate tive for some to try to defend women. Blake Mehigan

Blake Mehigan can be reached at bmehigan@theorion.com

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Editorialcore

Sierra Nevada hosts celebration of fall, German culture, beer with first public Oktoberfest Candyce Chilson STAFF WRITER

A

s beers were hoisted into the air and a large toast erupted, it was clear Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.’s Oktoberfest had begun. Oktoberfest, most famously a German celebration, is a festival that takes place from the last week of September to the first weekend of October. It’s a tradition for celebrators to feast on hearty food and enjoy a cold glass of beer. After many years of commemorating this tradition with company parties of its own, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. decided to open its doors from 4 to 10 p.m. Saturday for the first-ever public Sierra Nevada Oktoberfest. The entire event had a genuine German Oktoberfest ambiance, with everything from traditional German food to men and women dressed in authentic German attire. Ticket prices ranged from $20 to $30. The 2,000 available tickets sold out well before the festival on Saturday. Employees such as Hunter Sasser, Sierra Nevada’s national events manager, weren’t sure how the public would react to such an idea. “It’s the community of supporters that keep us in business,” Sasser said. “The community of Chico has always been very generous. This is about saying thank you to our supporters and letting them see what’s behind the green label.” The spacious white tent in which the event took place sat in the hop field to the east of the brewery. On one side of the tent, attendees were able to watch professional demonstrations of glass blowing. The intense heat waves of the furnaces filled the area as 18 regional glass artists took turns blowing glass into vases, bowls and a variety of other shapes. On the other side of the tent stood a stage for Polkacide, who performed at 7 p.m. They stood against a backdrop of more than a dozen stacked beer barrels and played authentic Polka music with a slight punk twist. Ken O’Connor, filtration technician at

THE ORION • ELI MAY

AN EVENTFUL TENT-FUL Sierra Nevada’s hop field held the main gathering place for Oktoberfest Saturday. Beer, traditional German food and live music entertained the crowd from 4 to 10 p.m. Sierra Nevada, expressed his pleasure with Polkacide. “The band they hired is brilliant,” he said. “They’re an event-appropriate band – they are out of control and crazy. This is a band that fires up what people in Chico really want.” In the middle of the tent stood rows upon rows of wooden tables under a sea of white twinkling lights and blue-and-white streamers. Attendees were free to roam around with large steins of beer and plates full of food from the large buffet. The buffet included an array of beer-infused slow-roasted pork, potato salad, German rye bread, sauerkraut with apples and cucumber salad. Tickets for the event came with two drink tickets for the beer garden, which offered Pale Ale, Crystal Wheat, Estate Ale, Tumbler, Kellerweis and Oktoberfest. Sierra Nevada underestimated the popularity of the buffet, which ran out of food around 7:30 p.m. However, pork, sausage and potatoes were available for those who didn’t get to enjoy the feast. One of the main events of the night was the Ein Stein Design contest, in which eight glass artists from around the country competed to design a new beer stein for Sierra Nevada. The panel of judges based the winning beer stein on creativity, quality and how well beer could be consumed out of it. The festival was a hit to many that attended,

THE ORION • ELI MAY

OF THE PEOPLE Mayor Ann Schwab grabs a beer at Sierra Nevada’s first public Oktoberfest, which was sold out by Friday morning. including senior construction management major Matt Sudol. “I would definitely come again,” Sudol said. “It’s a good local event. There’s good food, good people and good beer – really good beer.” After the success of this year’s Oktoberfest, the possibility that Sierra Nevada will host this party next year seems promising. “We’re just warming up,” O’Connor said. Candyce Chilson can be reached at cchilson@theorion.com

DESIGN BY MARK ROJAS AND KRISTEN BROOKS

“Noob-friendly” Game series are like a band’s discography. Often, the fi rst album comes out and it’s awesome – then they try to do it again, and the product falls short. When “StarCraft II: Wings of Liberty” came out in late July, consumers could have bemoaned the fact that it took 12 years for one of the most important games of all time to produce a sequel. The original “Starcraft” blended resource management, combat strategy and time efficiency so well that you can still buy a copy at gaming stores. Try to see how many other games from 1998 are on retail shelves. Part of the reason developer Blizzard Entertainment wasn’t in a hurry to get a sequel out was that people were still playing the old one. They also had a respect for the game and its players – why not take the time to make sure the game was actually worthy of being a sequel? Some companies don’t give this respect. Many times when a game sees a little success, the sequel reverts to the lowest common denominator to reach out to a wider audience. Financially speaking, simplification may not be such a bad idea. The Nintendo Wii and much of its software aim for simplicity. “Wii Sports,” a family-friendly game packaged with the Wii, has sold the most units of any game ever. It doesn’t have to be the all-time best-selling game to bring about this effect. “Gears of War 2” was a game that many people enjoyed, but it spent too much effort on appealing to non-“Gears” fans. The graphics were great, but there were too many “cool” things going on that it was spread too thin. There was also an abundance of “quick-time events,” where the player is prompted to press a button during a cinematic sequence or other nonstandard game-play segment. If timed correctly, the character does something such as slay an opponent or dodge an attack. Game critic Ben “Yahtzee” Croshaw coined the phrase “press X to not die” in response to the flash-oversubstance gaming device. Croshaw is right on the money here, despite being a critic who usually focuses on the negative. It’s less modern gaming than a throwback to the laserdisc games of the ’80s and early ’90s. It’s a waste of technological innovation if a game is just going to snub all the things that technology can do. Game producers do have a bottom line, and gaming is a casual thing for many people — the authenticity of certain sequals may not be a big deal to the everyday user. However, it is immensely important to a few people, and going for the bucks isn’t a good way to keep those core gamers happy. Matt Shilts can be reached at entertainmenteditor@theorion.com

VIRAL VIDEOS >> SPEAKING

“Stormin’ through the party like my name was El Niño.” Sum 41 “Fat Lip” 2001

“Auto-Tune the News: Backin’ up song” YouTube

“Declaration of War Against Justin Bieber Haters” YouTube

The Gregory Brothers have been auto-tuning with success for a while now. Their most recent offering takes footage video of an eccentric woman in the aftermath of an attempted robbery.

In the spirit of Chris Crocker’s “Leave Britney Alone” video, a young Canadian spews hate and promises consequences for those who talk trash about Justin Bieber. You’re going to have to watch it at some point.


C2 |

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

WEDNESDAY, W DN WE WEDNES D ES ESDAY, OCT. 13, 2010

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the good, th d the th bad b d & th the undecided d id d new releases

THE GOOD >>

>> “Red” (MOVIE)

“The Passion of

Starring Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and many others, this over-the-top action

Tyler Ash T

flick about over-the-hill CIA agents

STAFF WRITER S

looks like a winner. There will be shooting, chasing, intrigue and cool actors saying one-liners.

>> “Fallout: New Vegas” (VIDEO GAME) The latest “Fallout” game has big shoes to fill. “Fallout 3” revolutionized first-person role-playing games and won all kinds of gaming awards. Bethesda Game Studios didn’t develop this one, though, so it’s Obsidian Entertainment’s time to shine. Because many of its members worked on the original “Fallout” games, this game should be in good hands.

>> “Come Around Sundown” (ALBUM) It’s easy to hate Kings of Leon. The extraordinarily successful quartet has produced a solid stream of rock anthems and have been criticized for ego issues. But boy, can they write a hook.

>> “P “Predators” d t ” (DVD) The “Predator” movies are admittedly not for everyone, but this installment provides exactly what it should – action, killing, fighting and destruction. If this isn’t what you’re into, then you already know this movie isn’t for you. If you like this stuff, you’re in for a treat.

THE BAD >> >> “DJ HERO 2” (VIDEO GAME) This isn’t necessarily a terrible game. It’s just that with the $99.99 price tag and the fact that not many people play it compared to how many play other music and rhythm games, it’s not a great investment. The music should be decent, so if you really want it, give it some time

When “South Park” first aired on Comedy Central in the ’90s, I remember very distinctly being “too young to watch it.” I begged and pleaded with my parents to let me catch just a few minutes of it before being forced to change the channel — I knew that I was missing out on pure comedic gold. My dad would always wait to watch “South Park” until I had gone to bed, and I’d hear him from my bedroom trying unsuccessfully to stifle his laughs. One night, I just couldn’t take it anymore. I got out of bed and crept down our hallway, listening to my future favorite show in the TV’s flickering shadow. I forget what Eric Cartman said on the show that blew my cover, but eventually I couldn’t suppress my secretive giggles any longer. I got caught crouching in my pajamas and laughing hysterically by my dad. Surprisingly, he let me watch the rest of the show with him that night – and I’ll never stop thanking him. I’ve been a huge fan ever since. In fact, “South Park” is the only show that I would stop everything I’m doing just to watch a new episode, even if I had a big final the next day. “South Park” restarted its 14th season last Wednesday with “Poor and Stupid,” an episode about Cartman pursuing his dream of becoming a NASCAR driver and learning that it takes more than just being “poor and stupid” to be a good racer. The episode started out with Cartman crying in the hallway over an essay his teacher assigned his class. The essay was about what he wants to be when he grows up. He was quite distraught because he knew that he’ll never be a NASCAR driver because he’s not poor and stupid enough. His friends convinced him that he might be able to race if he gives away all of his money

the Jew”

Mel Gibson as Cartman views ic Er : is ps no Sy ion of the Christ” seeing “The Pass r r te af or vi sa s hi ainst Jews, simila n a revolution ag d an sh ar M and tries to begi Stan Also, characters to that of Hitler. el Gibson’s film M of l ca iti cr e ar k ic m or cC M y Kenn fund. and demand a re t Christ’s mesIt should be abou e a movie is The message: d that just becaus an h, at de s hi t sage, no a great film. t mean that it is n’ es do s su Je t abou

Randy Marsh

> > e m o s e w a y l l u f w a son” Jesse Jack to s ie g lo o “With Ap Fortune” Wheel of “ n o g n ri ea Randy : After app e word “naggers,” Synopsis th on racism as ing wrong , mocking s s d e le u e g b d la n a and stracized Marsh is o a whole. say the rompted to p mind is h rs a und in his ge: M a ro s a s e ts a m o e fl Th cause it e key, the nd just be By the sam t. is N-word, a c is to hate ra a absurd it an he’s w e o m h ’t ts n h s g e do so. do ighli easy it is to ard him h w o w h to t d u e b , tr s ha son stupid rea people for

an Eric Cartm and gets as dumb as he possibly can. He gave his money to his friend Leopold “Butters” Stotch and watched a marathon of “Two and a Half Men” while hanging upside down so his blood would pool in his head and make him extra stupid. Later in the episode, Cartman told his friend Kenny McCormick that he had to become poor all on his own – unlike McCormick, whose parents did that for him. “I wasn’t born with a plastic spoon in my mouth,” he said. The second episode airs tonight and is titled, “It Came From Jersey.” It will poke fun at the fist-pumping pop culture phenomenon known as “Jersey Shore.” If you think “Jersey Shore” is as dumb as I do, then you’ll be in for a treat. Every “South Park” fan knows that you can’t watch the show and not be offended every

now and then. I was slightly offended when I watched the newest episode, but that’s just the beauty of it – no one can escape its hilarious and sometimes cruel comments on the society we live in. Not even its fans. Over the years, “South Park” has had some extremely controversial episodes. One of my favorites is the Scientology episode, “Trapped in the Closet,” where creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone boldly make fun of Tom Cruise, John Travolta and R. Kelly for being “in the closet.” Did I mention they also publicly disclosed the inner workings of Scientology? In the episode, the Church of Scientology determined Stan Marsh to be the reincarnation of their founder, L. Ron Hubbard. Their doctrine, which Scientologists must go through many steps and donations to

see, was shown to him, as well as to viewers, in a nifty cartoon with a label at the bottom of the screen reading, “This is what Scientologists actually believe.” Soon after the airing of this episode, Isaac Hayes, the voice of “Chef” and a Scientologist, left South Park Studios. The show’s 200th episode from last season could be its most controversial. The episode, titled “200,” mocked the one person many people haven’t been able to easily depict – the Prophet Muhammad. In the episode, Muhammad is hidden from view in a large bear costume. Even though you can’t see a single inch of him, members of a U.S.-based terrorist website called RevolutionMuslim.com threatened Stone and Parker’s lives, saying that they could end up like the Dutch filmmaker Theo

Van Gogh, who was murdered by extremists after depicting Muhammad on his program. The site has been shut down, but Comedy Central is still uneasy about the whole situation. South Park Studios can’t even stream episodes “200” or “201” on their website at this time. In episode “201,” Comedy Central decided to cover Muhammad up with a large “censored” bar, as well as bleep out certain words, without Stone and Parker’s permission. Few people know that the opening credits of each “South Park” episode has a small image of Muhammad standing between Scott Tenorman and Satan. It’s interesting that it has gone largely unnoticed, proving that “South Park” will always have the last laugh. Tyler Ash can be reached at ash@theorion.com

and the price should drop.

THE UNDECIDED >>

>> “Jackass 3-D” (MOVIE) This film marks the 10-year anniversary of the working man’s daredevils. All of the 3-D nonsense aside, it seems like these guys are getting a little old to be getting kicked in the testicles for the sake of humor. Maybe they will step it up in the stunt department. We’ll have to wait and see if the well has run dry.

>> “Power Gig: Rise of the SixString” (VIDEO GAME) The karaoke-style world of music gaming has proven that it’s more than just a fad. With great success comes great competition, and “Power Gig” is going to try to take its share of the market. It differentiates itself by using an actual guitar and a motion-sensing drum kit. There are some interesting ideas, but wait for your friends buy it before shelling out big bucks.

THE LOCAL >>

>> “Embracing the Shroud of a Blackened Sky” (ALBUM) The Makai’s final album for the foreseeable future comes on 12 inches of vinyl. The one-track, 35-minute LP also comes with extensive art in the sleeve and a delicious sampling of their mix of punk, metal, black metal and post-rock.

Challenge raises money for dance groups Lauren Beaven STAFF WRITER

Comedy joined dance Friday night at Chico Creek Dance Centre’s Fourth Annual Community Dance Challenge, which helped raise money to keep dance alive and well in Chico. Until this year, the fundraising event was hosted by the Full Force Dance Company, a division of the Chico Creek Dance Centre devoted to hip-hop and jazz dancers. This year’s competition was expanded to encompass several other companies associated with the dance center, but the show still had viewers laughing out loud. The contest, which was more comedic than technical, included performances from teams of dancers’ parents as well as teams of community employees from Mondo’s Cafe, Poison Apple Salon and Chico Natural Foods. Winning teams would be decided by the amount of money raised per routine. An undisputed highlight was the performance by Men in Tights, a group of fathers dancing in revealing black tights. Their dedication to costume design won these daring dudes a “Best Costume” award at the end of the night. The grand prize winners were Golden Delicious, a team of Poison Apple Salon employees who took glitter to a new level with their bedazzled costumes and

claimed pre-competition rituals, which included vodka and Red Bull. This was the salon’s third year winning the grand prize. Their secret to success lies in friendship, teamwork and an unbeatable competitive spirit, said Alisen Low, hairstylist and member of the Golden Delicious team. “We just like to do stuff with the community, so we’re all about whatever fundraisers we can do to help,” Low said. Golden Delicious alone raised $661 for the Chico Creek Dance Centre. The money raised goes toward payments for necessities to help keep the dance center open, said Deborah Jorritsma, artistic director of both Chico Creek Dance Centre and Chico Community Ballet. The dance center’s rent was doubled unexpectedly last year, and it has been struggling to keep up with further budget cuts, Jorritsma said. The nonprofit center’s mission to provide education and fun to the community means fundraising is especially important. The Chico Creek Dance Centre serves as the hub for teams and companies such as Full Force Dance, Chico Community Ballet, Studio One Ballroom and Pilates with Camille de Ganon. “We’re like a mega-center for dance in our community,” Jorritsma said. “We’re all trying to pull together to survive right

THE ORION •RYAN RICHARDS

TUTUS, CHUCK TAYLORS Christopher Green and Aly Russell leap during a dance at the Community Dance Challenge Friday at Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. The event raised funds for local dance groups. now.” The dance center has played a pivotal role in community involvement with the arts for more than 25 years and is also involved with Chico State through association with the dance club Momentum and on-campus performances such as last year’s ballet, “Sleeping Beauty.” Catherine Sullivan, founder and associate director of Chico Community Ballet, spoke to the unexpected success of local dance. “In a small community such as Chico, the number of

talented dance performers that we’ve launched into the world in all forms of dance is quite extraordinary,” Sullivan said. Chico State student and Full Force dancer Heather Morris has seen exactly why fundraisers such as Friday night’s competition are important. “We have our monthly costs, we have costume fees, we have our workout gear, we have to get our shoes, we have competition fees and we have our hotel fees when we go to competitions,” Morris said. “It’s very pricey.” Full Force Dance and the

Chico Community Ballet both gave performances at the fundraiser separate from the competition, contributing professional moves to the night of dance. While helping an organization in need may have been the purpose of the night, nothing would stop the upbeat attitude of the attendees and the laughter that rolled through the room during the competition. The night was nothing less than hilarious, Morris said. Lauren Beaven can be reached at lbeaven@theorion.com


WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010 |

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

always online >> theorion.com

C5

Folk talent shares stage, fills seats, pleases crowd Candyce Chilson STAFF WRITER

THE ORION • EMILY WALKER

DANGER IN A BOLO TIE Zach Zeller, a music industry major, fills Cafe Coda with his folk rock sounds Friday. Erin Lizardo, Mad Bob Howard and Rustwater joined Zeller in performing.

Appetizers and beer covered the tabletops as guitar strings hummed the night away. The sounds of indie, blues and rock music filled the air as Zach Zeller, Erin Lizardo, All on Seven, Mad Bob Howard and Rustwater stood against the dimly lit red wall at Cafe Coda. Small groups of people walked through the door, and the tables at Cafe Coda filled up as Friday night progressed. The soft lighting welcomed people with a thirst for music, such as 19-year-old Max Goolsby. A fan of Zeller, he always likes to frequent Cafe Coda because of the quality acts, he said. Mad Bob Howard started off the night, setting the tone for the entire evening. With a blue button-down shirt and black slacks, Howard stood alone picking at his guitar strings and singing in a low and raspy voice, comparable to lead singer Dave King of Flogging Molly. The atmosphere made it easy to get caught up in the songs as Howard sang one of his newest tunes, “Lost Drunk and Crazy.” Slowly strumming at his guitar,

his lyrics seemed both rebellious and heartfelt as he sang about losing a girl he cared about. Cafe Coda offers an intimate way to hear music because the audience can interact more with the musicians, as they are seated only a few feet away from the stage. “It’s always nice to get those first couple songs out of the way,” Howard said after his first two songs. “You never know how it’s going to go.” Rustwater then took to the small stage with his harmonica around his neck and an acoustic guitar wrapped over his shoulder. His powerful, deep and raspy voice filled the room as he feverishly hissed on the harmonica and pounded on his guitar. His songs were filled with stories and spoke about the human experience of highs and lows. He mentioned that he has been called a “lyrical genius,” which he didn’t seem to take too seriously. “I’ll take that,” he laughed. Will Watje, senior music recording arts major, enjoyed Rustwater’s performance for one specific reason, he said. “His voice,” Watje said. “He

has a really cool, distinct voice.” On day three of their tour, All on Seven, a duo out of Sacramento, brought a charismatic presence to the stage. The band consists of Kayla Schureman and Evan Palmer, both vocalists and guitarists. The two matched well as they harmonized and played off each other, turning toward one another in a playful manner. The pair played tunes from its most recent album, “The Cars, The Bars and The Lights: Part One,” as well as a cover of Brandi Carlile’s “How These Days Grow Long.” Their voices soared together to make a melody charming and sweet, akin to the style of Lady Antebellum. The night proceeded in a relaxed way when Erin Lizardo and Zach Zeller took the stage. Both sitting down, Lizardo at the electric keyboard and Zeller on guitar and a bass drum, they began to play Lizardo’s set. Lizardo, an acoustic indiefolk artist, has a soft, but soulful voice. Zeller harmonized with Lizardo to the slow and delicate beat of the music. The two share a unique indie-rock sound, humble and soft. Zeller and Lizardo frequently

play together whenever the opportunity arises, but they have managed to build up successful solo careers as well. Zeller, senior music industry major, began playing music more than seven years ago, he said. He describes his style as alternative indie-rock, but enjoys all types of music. After playing a couple shows a month in Chico with a four-piece band, the Redding native likes to play at least one solo show a month. “I like to mix it up,” Zeller said. “I can play new songs that the band hasn’t learned yet.” The pair switched up the instrumentation for Zeller’s set. Zeller continued to play the bass drum, but moved to acoustic guitar while Lizardo played the accordion. He played old songs and some new ones from his upcoming album, set to release in February 2011. Cafe Coda offered a special blend of artists, each with their own style and musical flair that worked well together. “I felt good about the show,” Zeller said. “I liked the differences between the bands.” Candyce Chilson can be reached at cchilson@theorion.com

The Makai release final LP before hiatus Josh Hegg STAFF WRITER

The ground will open, pillars of fire will spring from the earth and heavy metal will ring throughout the land Saturday as The Makai release their newest LP, “Embracing The Shroud of a Blackened Sky.” The album-release show will draw from a well of local talent. Mad Bob Howard, Zabaleen and Teeph will lend their artistry to the crowd at Monstros Pizza, before The Makai step up to destroy the

place. For six years, The Makai have kept Chico engrossed with their blend of heavy music, and fans of their previous work will be excited by this new release as well. Zeke Rogers, who plays guitar and provides vocals for the group, thinks the new LP is the group’s best work to date, he said. The music is diverse, but still rooted in something that is undeniably metal. “The album has some of the most varied stuff we’ve ever done,” he said. “It’s more melodic, but at the same time

it has some of the slowest stuff we’ve ever played and some the fastest stuff we’ve ever played. It’s really all over the place.” “Embracing The Shroud of a Blackened Sky” consists of one 28-minute track. The song took more than a year and a half to record and was something The Makai had wanted to do for a while. The Makai had always talked about writing a continual album and the time seemed right to do it, said Ian Makau, guitarist and main songwriter on the album.

The LP release also doubles as the first of two send-off shows for The Makai, who are going on an extended hiatus after the album is released. Teeph frontman Sesar Sanchez, a local music proponent, understands the impact of losing the group. “Chico is losing a really good go-to band that they enjoy watching,” he said. “There is never going to be another Makai – they will be missed.” In celebration of The Makai’s music and what they have given to the Chico music scene, they will be playing

material from throughout their career, including some songs not often heard. Even with the last Chico shows drawing close, The Makai want to make sure people know that this is not to be a solemn occasion. “We don’t want these shows to be to serious,” Rogers said. “We just want to have fun playing metal with bands we like to play with.” Bands come and go in Chico, and there is still an abundance of talented acts for people to see around town. But as Sanchez put it,

there will never be another The Makai. Josh Hegg can be reached at jhegg@theorion.com

Show info • Time 8 p.m. Sat. Oct. 9 • Place Monstros Pizza • Bands The Makai, Teeph, Zabaleen, Mad Bob Howard • Cost $5 donation

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SHOW PREVIEW >>

Folk duos The Weepies, MaMuse to play at El Rey Stephanie Maynard STAFF WRITER

The El Rey Theatre will be infused with folk music and fun Sunday thanks to The Weepies and MaMuse. MaMuse is a local band with members Sarah Nutting and Karisha Longaker. “We’ve been playing together for two and a half years,” Longaker said. “It was clear from the beginning this is what we should do.” MaMuse plays “heart music,” Longaker said. Their songs tend to be harmonic and based around vocals. “Sometimes we just sing a cappella and let our voices press up and against each other,” Longaker said. Besides experimenting with their voices, the band also likes to play with many different instruments, Longaker said. In addition to more standard instruments such as her guitar, Longaker also plays the mandolin, and the pair is always looking to try out new sounds. “If we don’t know how to play a particular instrument, we learn,” Longaker said. “There’s no reason we couldn’t do it, so let’s do it.” The duo has also used a train whistle and even a unicycle as a percussion instrument, Longaker said. Nutting turned the unicycle upside down, spinning it and beating on the spokes. “We almost put a song using the unicycle on one of our albums, but the recording we

did wasn’t rocking so we left it off,” Longaker said. MaMuse have not played with The Weepies before, but Longaker has heard their music and are looking forward to the experience, she said. This sentiment was echoed by The Weepies member Steve Tannen. “We’ve only heard MaMuse through the Internet and we’re looking forward to seeing them live,” Tannen said in an e-mail interview. The Weepies launched a nationwide tour on Sunday with Chico being one of many stops. The Weepies, like MaMuse, are a musical duo, comprised of Tannen and Deb Talan. They were fans of each other’s music when they both did solo projects, Tannen in New York and Talan in Boston, Tannen said. Talan came to see one of Tannen’s shows and the two made an “instant connection” that turned into the pair forming The Weepies and tying the knot. “We’re both obsessive compulsive writers – we write all the time, every day of course, but also while we’re out at dinner, walking home, etc.,” Tannen said. “We’re lucky in that we both had the same process when we met, so we can put

Met Your Mother” and “Gossip Girl” as well as films such as “Sex and the City,” according to the group’s website. The Weepies have released four albums. Their latest album, “Be My Thrill,” was released August 2010 and reached No. 34 on the Billboard Top 40. The group was well known to North Valley Productions producer Steve Schuman, he said. “I was in San Francisco when they were playing at a very small venue and contacted The Weepies about meeting with them and seeing the show,” Schuman said. Schuman invited the group to play in Chico, pairing them with local MaMuse, whose members are personal friends of Schuman. “My goal is to bring known or unknown bands to Chico and make sure the bands and the people that attend have

up with the other person getting up in the middle of a sentence to write something down.” The process of a tour can be long and tiring, Tannen said. The band and crew will sometimes travel six hours, set up, break down and drive another six hours all in the same day. “The best part about touring is unquestionably the few hours we get to spend on stage,” Tannen said. Their songs have been played in popular TV shows including “Scrubs,” “One Tree Hill,” “How I

a very positive experience,” Schuman said. “I also want to help MaMuse and show Chico how talented they are.” Schuman is the producer and promoter, and the reactions he has gotten have been extremely positive, he said. The show has already sold over half its tickets. “I can’t tell you how many people have come up to me to tell me how excited they are or how they’ve been waiting their whole life for a Weepies show,” Schuman said. Schuman plans on inviting The Weepies back as often as they want to come, he said. “This is a group that attracts people of all ages,” Schuman said. “They have fans my age, 52, and fans that are 14. They are a very multigenerational group.” Stephanie Maynard can be reached at smaynard@theorion.com

Show info •Time 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 17 • Place El Rey Theatre • Bands The Weepies, MaMuse • Cost $15 advance

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Multi-genre ensemble to mix up Laxson Josh Hegg STAFF WRITER

Imagine sitting around a table, listening to the conversation of Duke Ellington, Beethoven and Tupac. What would they talk about? While it is impossible to know for sure, Chico can hear what that collaboration might sound like with the music of Jazz Mafia Symphony as they perform their album “Brass, Bows, and Beats” Friday at Laxson Auditorium. Jazz Mafia Symphony began their musical endeavor like many other bands – in the underground of the Bay Area music scene. Open-ended jams and

improvisation allowed the group to expand its instrumentation and incorporate different genres such as hip-hop and classical, said founder and songwriter Adam Theis. It was during one of these jams that – because of the underground mentality and genre-bending songs – one of the DJs they were working with described the ensemble as “some sort of jazz mafia,” and the name stuck. A 60-piece orchestra will perform the work, but what will really intrigue onlookers is the composition itself. The orchestra is made up of many different eras and musical styles. The songs incorporate jazz, hip-hop, funk, rock,

classical and other influences into a melting pot of creativity and virtuosity. Theis could be described as something closer to a musical mad scientist than a composer in the classical sense. Theis, a self-described “garage band type of guy,” wanted to bring in his own influence and fuse it with his compositional training in jazz, he said. Tired of being a “hired man” for jazz ensembles, Theis’ real ambition was to blend the complex compositions of ’40s big bands with the camaraderie that he felt with the underground ensembles he was a part of, he said. This thought blossomed into a reality with the 60-piece

orchestra he now oversees and composes for. Even though “Brass, Bows, and Beats” was the brainchild of Theis, the composer emphasized how Jazz Mafia Symphony would not be possible without the group’s willingness to collaborate. “Jazz is all about using your ears,” he said. “It doesn’t matter where you come from and what style you play. As long as you use your ears, it’s easy to collaborate.” Jazz Mafia Symphony’s list of festivals and headlining gigs is enough to make any musician cry in jealousy, but Theis is especially excited to play in Chico for the first time, he said.

“People are coming from all over places like Tahoe and Reno to see us – it’s crazy!” he said. As part of Jazz Mafia Symphony’s trip to Chico, they are hosting two classes for students at Chico State. The first one is for younger kids from the surrounding schools, and the other is for the Chico State students. The class will cover the compositional and playing techniques from individual members of the band. There is something refreshing about seeing a style of music presented in an unexpected way, and Jazz Mafia capitalizes on this, said Risa Romero, an organizational communication major.

“I really enjoy seeing artists with different musical styles work together,” she said. “It’s really cool when they collaborate.” The group is being brought to the Chico public by Chico Performances. Daran Goodsell, the head of Chico Performance’s marketing and publicity department, advises students not to be scared by the word “jazz,” she said. “I’m not a huge jazz fan myself, but these guys have such a big group and play so many styles,” she said. “It’s not just for jazz purists.” Josh Hegg can be reached at jhegg@theorion.com

Chikoko to put on out-of-this-world fashion show Ben Mullin STAFF WRITER

Reports of UFOs gliding across the runway have been confirmed by Chikoko, Chico’s fashion, textile and performance artist collective. These Unadulterated Fashion Outfits have been designed, sewn, plugged in and powered up by the five-woman team at Chikoko, who are showcasing their stellar looks Friday night at Tronic, a self-proclaimed “sci-fi fashion experience.” More than 100 different outfits will be on display, sleek as starships and glinting with electric sex. Sara Rose, one of Chikoko’s founding members, described their new designs. Chikoko, whose name is derrived from a play on “Chico Co.” created a far-flung, futuristic look with the unconventional combination of colored vinyl and bright glow wires, Rose said. “Some of the outfits are battery powered, so they’re going to light up onstage,” Rose said. Beyond the glossy gold

of classic sci-fi fashion, the diversity of designs that will be modeled at Tronic is considerable. Rose, who created many of Tronic’s scifi styles, designed her clothes with a desolate scifi future in mind – one without the niceties of space travel, cyborgs or even other human beings, she said. “I wanted to create a post-apocalyptic future with some of my outfits,” Rose said. “They’ve THE ORION • EMILY WALKER

LITTLE GREEN OUTFITS Michalyn Renuick displays a design from Chikoko’s upcoming fashion show “Tronic.”

got a very ‘Mad Max’-type feel.” Chikoko’s studio, which doubles as a non-profit educational center, is cluttered with a variety of bold and bizarre objects – a futuristic “ammo belt,” loaded with recycled nail “bullets,” bright gold stunner shades that are polarized to ward off the Martian sun, Jedi-like hoods draped over painted mannequins and even a necklace crafted from the spinal column of a deer. Tronic will feature bones in many of its looks, as a nod to the dystopian sci-fi worlds of “Dune” and “Mad Max,” Rose said.

“We found this bone sledding up in Lassen,” Rose said, indicating the spinal bone, now polished bleach white. “It was freeze dried with cartilage and other slimy things that looked like beef jerky.” Tronic represents a six-month labor of love for the five designers at Chikoko, who all laughed when thinking of funny moments that had occurred while the outfits were being sewn. Nel Adams, one of the cocreators of the show, explained the laughter. “There’s nothing funny about sewing,” Nel Adams said. “It’s kinda brutal. I have to wear goggles when I sew really heavy stuff, because sometimes a needle will pop off and almost hit me in the eye.” Muir Hughes, a seamstress and designer from Chikoko, sewed 1,000 stuffed animals this summer, she said. “Sewing is just a lot of hard work,” she said. “While you’re doing it, you have to maintain a sense of humor – otherwise you’ll go crazy.” Chikoko’s hard work will be

showcased in sexy and thoughtprovoking fashion, Hughes said. She hinted that there were several surprises in store for Tronic attendees. “We’re going to have some show-stopping performances in between fashion sets,” she said. “And we have a lot of beautiful local women and men modeling our outfits who are all different – different ages, different sizes and different ethnicities. We’re not delivering one narrow version of beauty.” A warning is in place because the show is risque, but not offensive, Hughes said. “There’s some adult language in the music and some partial nudity in the show itself,” she said. “But it’s beautiful, not smutty. It’s art.” The styles to be showcased at Tronic are inspired by science fiction movies and TV shows that the women of Chikoko love. Many of the outfits Adams designed are inspired by “Barbarella,” a cult classic from 1968 that starred Jane Fonda as Babarella, an interstellar sexual

adventurer, Adams said. Hughes, who is a fan of both “Star Trek” and “The Fifth Element,” designed outfits that stitch together the drama of Captain Kirk and the glamour of Leeloo in “The Fifth Element.” The founders of Chikoko have similar reasons for getting into fashion. “I started sewing because my mama wouldn’t buy me the cool stuff at the mall,” Rose said. Adams laughed, and explained that her motivations for designing and creating new styles have changed over the years. “People always tell me things like, ‘I won a costume contest in your lobster outfit,’” Adams said. “It’s exciting and validating when we see people wearing our clothes, and it inspires us to continue to put on fashion shows for the community.” Tronic will be held at 7:30 p.m. on Friday at Manzanita Place. Ben Mullin can be reached at bmullin@theorion.com

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Necessities >> T ODAY

Ana Lucia 9 p.m. @ LaSalles $3 cover

Come support a local indie-rock treasure as they take the stage at LaSalles. Having recently released their first CD, Ana Lucia’s sound is laid back with an alternative edge.

T H U R S DAY

Wicked Honey 8 p.m. @ Cafe Coda $5 admission

These bands rule. Cafe Coda rules. If you don’t spend your Thursday rocking out with some of Chico’s finest, it’ll be a mistake.

F R I DAY

Jazz Mafia Symphony y

7:30 p.m. @ Laxson Auditorium m $15 student admission Love jazz? Love hip-hop? If that’s a yes to either or both, don’t miss this performance from a fuse of jazz era, bi big g b nd and ba d turnt ntab able le hip hi ip-ho ho op. p.

SAT U R DAY

Holistic Arts Festival 10:30 p.m. @ Cafe Culture free

Alternative healers, vendors, artists and more gather at Cafe Culture.

SU N DAY

MON DAY

The Weepies

Jonathon Keats

The Weepies with special guest MaMuse. Enjoy a night of music from nationally known band The Weepies and local Chico duo MaMuse.

Johnathan Keats, an experimental philosopher who has opened a porn theater for house plants and created a Ouija voting booth, invites spectators to observe his vision of a modern space race.

9 a.m. @ Chico Mall parking lot

8 a.m. @ Ayers 100 Free

Daily Dose >> Oct. 13 - 20

T U E S DAY

Cirque Mechanics 7:30 p.m. @ Laxson Auditorium $23 student admission

Come witness spectacular acrobatics, contortions, gymnastics, mimes and comedy put on by Cirque Mechanics in Laxson Auditorium. Chico Performances will outdo themselves with a hilarious and exhilarating performance on an old western set complete with giant props and thrilling mining machinery.

<< Options TODAY

Izzy and the Kesstronics

9:30 p.m. @ Lost on Main $3 cover Izzy and the Kesstronics are a rare musical blend of classic rock ’n’roll, jazz and country bringing a unique sound to Chico all the way from New York.

West African Dance with Baba 5:30 p.m. @ Cafe Culture $10

Cafe Culture offers a variety of dance classes and this is one of their newest additions to the schedule. Learn the art of West African Dance instructed by Baba Mujamal.

FOCUS Film Festival 7 p.m. @ Sierra Nevada Big Room $5 admission

T H U R SDAY

Badi Assad

7:30 p.m. @ Laxson Auditorium $16 student admission Come join South America’s Badi Assad as she graces the stage at Laxson with her special blend of jazz, pop and folk. Joining her will be Chico favorites, MaMuse.

Griffin House

8 p.m. @ El Rey $12 advance admission Enjoy yourself at El Rey to the sounds of Nashville’s Griffin House and Tyler James as they play a set filled with countryfringed Southern rock.

F R I DAY

SAT U R DAY

We Are Country Mice

Noise-A-Tron

Head out to give a warm Chico welcome to We Are Country Mice, an experimental band all the way from Brooklyn. Also featuring Last Workhorse, Genna Giacobassi and Jesse Dyen.

Seattle’s Noise-A-Tron makes a stop in Chico. With Teeph, Helm of Cerberus and Mom and Dad joining in, “NoiseA-Tron” should sum it up nicely.

World-Class Piano Concert

7 p.m. @ Cafe Flo $5 admission

8 p.m. @ The Maltese Free

7:30 p.m. @Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall $6 student admission The Chico State music department presents a stellar performance of Beethoven, Hummel, Liszt, Mendelssohn and Skoryk by internationally acclaimed pianist Mykola Suk.

7 p.m. @ Ol’ Hawk Eyes Art Shackle Donations only

The Black Ball

This spooky dance party brings in the aid of ’80s music to help celebrate Halloween early.

SU N DAY

Rich & Kendall Country Showcase 6 p.m. @ Scotty’s Landing Free

Grab your cowboy hats and snakeskin boots for some country music fun.

Chico Community Marketplace

9 a.m. @ Chico Mall parking lot Oversleep and miss the Farmer’s Market? Head over the Chico Mall parking lot to browse local products and creations.

Chico Brewfest

6 p.m. @ Chico Elks Lodge $50 admission Beer, wine and a hell of a time are on the menu. The event is being put on by Chico Sports Boosters.

MON DAY

Advanced Painters: New York All day @ BMU Third Floor Gallery Free

Chico State’s best and brightest artists showcase their newest and most complex art. Support your peers and see some real culture, not that stuff that’s growing on the bottom of your shoe.

Swing Dance Class 7:30 p.m. @ The Chico Women’s Club $10 admission

Tired of dancing that involves grinding against your partner or moshing with them till they’re bloody? Me either, but check out this class if you’re in the mood for something new.

T U E SDAY

Flyleaf

8 p.m. @ The Senator Theatre $22.50 admission I’m Alive! Go see Flyleaf with special guests Story of the Year. Make them feel you all around them. You won’t want to miss it.

The Great Sabatini 8 p.m. @ Ol’ Hawks Eyes Art Shackle Donations

Like good music? Like new venues? Come to Chico’s newest music venue, Ol’ Hawk Eyes Art Shackle, and see Canadian sludge metal band The Great Sabatini, New Hampshire punk rockers The Cryptics and locals The Great Good and Clouds on Strings.

Cafe Culture offers a variety of dance classes and this is one of their newest additions to the schedule. Learn the art of West African Dance instructed by Baba Mujamal.

STAFF FAVORITES >> FOREIGN FILMS “He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not” — This 2002 French film is notable for its format. Split into two halves both chronicling a bizarre series of events from two different perspectives, it stars Audrey Tautou as a woman convinced a stranger is in love with her. —Liam Turner Editorial Design Manager

“Brotherhood of the Wolf” — An armored lion plays lethal peeka-boo in a plot rich with religious fervor, political intrigue and sexy espionage. Throw in some beautiful fight scenes and a French forest shrouded with suspicion, and you’ve got the makings of a noir flick that would leave any movie lover howling for more. — Ben Mullin Staff Writer

“The Crime of Father Amaro” — Every time I watch this movie I’m enthralled in the drama of a story that can be all too real. The story of 24-year-old Father Amaro, who struggles with temptation and while doing the right thing, examines the power of love, faith and lust. — Anthony Siino News Editor


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In a nutshell...

ILLUSTRATION BY CHELSEA ROSS S

4-5 I 7

Gina Pence STAFF WRITER

The size in millimeters of the average bedbug

The number in years that Chico hi hi State housing has been bedbug free

130-150

The temperature in Fahrenheit required to kill bedbugs

10

The number of cases per year Clark Pest Control has averaged recently

$400 - $3,500 $ The cost in dollars of eradicating bedbugs depending on severity

3

The number of cases suspectt ed in Chico State residence halls this semester -Source Clark Pest Control and David Stephen, director of University Housing

n New York, they’re all the rage. Abercrombie & Fitch, Victoria’s Secret and Hollister Co. all have them, and it’s not a new clothing trend – it’s bedbugs.

Bedbugs are small, nocturnal, parasitic insects that can infest homes and businesses. They usually reside in mattresses, but can travel all over a building and dig themselves into any crack or crevice. While the majority of cases in the U.S. have been on the East Coast, colleges are often a primary source for an infestation to start. There hasn’t been a case of bedbugs in any of the residence halls for the past seven years, said David Stephen, director of University Housing and Food Service. However, bedbugs are not uncommon on college campuses because of the influx of students from other places. “The way they get in is that they’ve been imported,” he said. “Once they’re here, you’re going to have to deal with it, but they’re not here before you get here.” In Chico, bedbugs aren’t unheard of, but the number of cases doesn’t indicate the start of an epidemic, said Fred

Ruggiero, an employee of Clark Pest Control. However, over the past few years, there has been an increase in reported cases to Clark Pest Control. “When I broke into the business 13 years ago, they were unheard of, but in the past three to five years it’s becoming more prevalent,” he said. The rise in cases is largely credited to a developed resistance to pesticides and an increase in travel, Ruggiero said. Bedbugs in hotels can infest suitcases or luggage and travel back with the host into their home. An effective prevention h method is inspecting hotels for bedbugs when travelling. “When you get to your hotel, spend about 10 minutes to look around,” he said. “If you see bloodspots, it’s a dead giveaway. What you don’t want to do is pick them up and bring them home.” University Housing and Food Service has a contract with Clark Pest Control, who sprays

around und the residence den halls for various insects and pests on a regular basis. Other preventative measures include six yearly health and safety inspections of rooms in the residence halls. The inspections can help staff discover potential cases or environments that would be conducive to an infestation, such as a cluttered room that needs cleaning. “There have been a few reports of students who think they have them,” Stephen said. “There were three situations this semester where they thought they had a case.” It was determined that the suspected cases were caused by mosquito or flea bites, rather than a bedbug, he said. “Mosquito bites and bedbug bites can look very, very similar,” Ruggiero said. “That can be really tough to tell, but bedbug bites will bite a number of times in a close proximity, which can help you tell it’s bedbugs.” Victims of bedbug infestations are rarely unaware of the problem, said Cathy Felix, director of Student Health Service. “Your body will tell you if something is wrong,” she said.

“If you’re get getting bit, you’ll feel it.” Felix recommends making sure sheets are regularly washed at home as a prevention method, she said. “To be healthy is to stay clean,” Felix said. “Wash your sheets. Good hygiene can be a deterrent – an attractive home to them is unwashed sheets.” Treating a case of bedbugs can be expensive, Ruggiero said. Costs can be anywhere from $400 to $3,500, depending on the severity of the infestation. Bedbugs are treated with steam heat, which reaches temperatures up to 150 degrees to kill them, he said. Clark Pest Control in Chico has treated an average of 10 cases a year for the past few years, Ruggiero said. “Heightened student awareness can prevent bringing bedbugs to campus,” Stephen said. “We send out information about bedbugs before students get here so they know what they are and what they can do to prevent them.”

3. Check furniture, box spring, drawers, carpet, corners and picture frames. Although they typically stay close to the food source, they will burrow anywhere they can hide.

4. Items that cannot be washed or steam cleaned can be put out in the sun during the summer in black plastic bags to superheat the item and kill the bedbug infestation. Source: Clark Pest Control

Gina Pence can be reached at gpence@theorion.com

DON’T LET THE BED BUGS BITE, CHECK OUT THESE TIPS 1. Check sheets for small bloodspots. If you have a number of small bites on your body, investiage a little closer. Bedbugs will bite many times around the same area.

2. Wash all sheets, pillowcases and clothes in hot water with soap and dry on high heat in the dryer. Extreme heat at temperatures of 130-150 degrees kills bedbugs.

and Food Service

Catalyst wants people to speak out Amanda Jacobs STAFF WRITER

Twenty-one percent of college students report they have experienced dating violence by a current partner, and 32 percent report dating violence by a previous partner, according to The National Center for Victims of Crimes. As part of domestic violence awareness month, Catalyst, a non-profit organization for domestic violence services, started an anonymous postcard campaign to raise awareness called “SPEAK OUT.” Catalyst is encouraging people to decorate postcards as an outlet to express experiences, secrets or thoughts about domestic violence. Catalyst has distributed more than 1,000 postcards and plans to distribute 1,000 more to coffee shops, Safe

DICTIONARY

Place and the Women’s Center. The deadline for submission is Friday. The finished postcards will be displayed as an art exhibit from 6 to 9 p.m. Oct. 21 in Catalyst’s conference room. The event is about raising awareness of domestic violence, not only for those who may have experienced it, but also for people who have the ability to help, said Molly Heck, the client and housing services director for Catalyst. “My hope is that we reach a new group of people who will want to stand up for people who are victimized,” Heck said. Catalyst sees the relevance and importance of educating the college community about domestic violence just by looking at the statistics, she said. >> please see CATALYST | D5

featureseditor@theorion.com THE ORION • KENNEDY COKER

WRITING ON THE WALL Some postcards for Catalyst’s domestic violence awareness campaign.

Check-in next week:

See who’s mayor of your favorite locations in Chico and campus

Going out to the movies or dinner alone.

Elora Paulo

senior | liberal studies

Andrew Rena-Dozier senior | psychology

Related Article:

See Catalyst, above

“I’m trilingual.”

“When I was in high school, I was a nude model for a college.”

“My boyfriend is afraid to buy toilet paper.”

[mas • tur • day • ting]

source: urbandictionary.com

Almendra Carpizo can be reached at

WORD OF MOUTH >> Tell us one of your secrets ...

masturdating

“Dude, I saw ‘The Social Network’ twice by myself. I’m addicted to masturdating.”

Foursquare has people on check Watch out Mayor Ann Schwab, there are people coming for your title during Chico’s mayoral race. These people are not just claiming mayorship of the city, but also of every business, bus stop, park and place with available Wi-Fi signal. Like myself, these people are among the more than 3 million Foursquare users worldwide. Foursquare is a locationbased mobile application where people check in using GPS and tell their friends where they are, according to its website. People can also earn badges for completing certain tasks, such as checking into four different spots in one night. For every million users, there are probably millions more who don’t understand it or think it’s a stupid idea. I tthought that myself. The first draw to Foursquare for my friends and me was the bandwagon effect. It was the b new, hip social networking n site, so we had to join. As we learn more about it, we like it and use it more – plus, we’re in a heated competition to see who gets more mayorships and badges, and I’m losing. It has become second nature for me to walk in, take out my phone and check in to my current location, whether it is Tehama Hall, Madison Bear Garden or the Bell Memorial Union. I want to win. I want the stupid badges. I want to be mayor. Like a fellow Foursquarer said, this probably does nothing for my social standing but decrease it among non-Foursquarers, but who really cares? I’m sure many thought Twitter was stupid because they didn’t care to hear what people were doing, yet Twitter remains popular and useful. There are many other draws to Foursquare, although the badges make it a bit addictive. Aside from the bragging rights, users can earn rewards and incentives from places like the Wildcat Recreation Center. Users can also view tips on places from people who have previously checked in, on where to go or what to order and create to-do lists. If the user is near one of the places where they have a to-do item, a “ping” reminder will be sent to them. The biggest complaint that I’ve heard is that users don’t want people stalking them and knowing their every move. Like many of the other social networking sites, you can choose who sees where you are and what you’re doing. Foursquare also includes an “off the grid” option that hides your location from everyone. Recently, a group of more than 300 people gathered at a bar in the U.K. and all checked in. The group earned the “super swarm” badge. I suggest we outdo them and plan an event to get Chico State that “super swarm” badge, maybe an event at the WREC or Trinity Commons. Come on, Chico State, let’s get that badge.

Yadiva Valera freshmen | french

“I’m a lot happier than it appears.”

Mike Dieho

sophomore | biology


D2 |

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 13, 2010

E ATT U F EF A URRE SE S

always online >> theorion.com

the

face SE X COLUMN>>

Boshion Crandall Bosh SE S X COLUMNIST

Oral sex deserves respect Exposure to drugs, alcohol and nudity is common at any given house party on a Saturday night in Chico, and there was a time when my weekends were characterized by similar behavior. However, being a fulltime student with two jobs put my wild child to rest. Now, I get to live vicariously through my friends. One of these friends is constantly engaging in sexual activities – particularly oral sex – but rarely intercourse, therefore keeping her numbers low. This makes me wonder at what point we should add mates to our unwritten list of people we’ve slept with. I have had this debate many times. Depending on whom I am talking to, the answer varies. Lesbians, who use oral sex as a primary form of expressing intimacy, will consider it to be sex. However, a heterosexual male might say that he only fooled around with a woman he had oral sex with and therefore not add her to his list. My boyfriend gripes that I’ve been with so many girls, but I have to constantly put it into context for him. I consider these women I’ve been intimate with as people I’ve slept with, but if he counted all the women he’s gone down on then our numbers would be on par. Oral sex has become so common on college campuses that we’ve reduced it to something as nonchalant as groping while kissing, thus failing to recognize individuals we’ve been intimate with as lovers. In the article “The History of Fellatio” by Annie nnie Auguste, she talks aboutt her experiences, or lack thereof, reof, as a young adult during g the ’70s. She describes fel-latio as something “you u graduated into” and put ut it beyond home base in the sexual analogy. The first blowjob Auguste gave ave was in marriage. Today, Urban Dictiontionary jokes that oral sex ex is something rarely practiced ticed among married couples.. Times sure have changed. ged. Nowadays oral sex is used as a precursor to sex, x, a cheap thrill or a cop out ut of sex. In reality, oral sex is more intimate than intercourse urse and should be reserved d as something special. When someone is between my legs and pressressing his or her lips against ainst my most exclusive parts, I trust them more than if we were having intercourse. During intercourse, both parties are players in the game and both have needs they are trying to fulfill and have fulfilled. In oral sex, it is all about you. The only satisfaction your lover seeks is yours. That is incredibly intimate. In those moments, the giver has complete control of what is happening to you, and you trust them with that control. They are gifting you a little piece of heaven, which, for many women, is better than sex itself. Oral sex was once regarded as the most intimate form of sex — and it deserves more respect. I’m not suggesting that people like my friend should have less oral sex, only that they give it and their mates the respect deserved for engaging in such a personal act of trust and intimacy. Boshion Crandall can be reached at sexcoluminst@theorion.com

That’s a wrap!Queer Week ends, but lessons learned don’t

THE ORION • SARAH BROWN

PICTURE PERFECT In preparation for Queer Week, seniors Kerrie Lione [left] and Shane Morey [right] invite students into the photo booth to show support and advertise events going on.

major, thinks these types of events are vital because STAFF WRITER they show the community how important LGBTQ Rutgers University freshissues really are, he said. man Tyler Clementi took “Queer Week reminds his life by jumping off the me of V-day inspired by George Washington Bridge Eve Ensler’s Vagina Monoafter his roommate broadlogues,” Lyons said. “It’s cast live images on the like we’re reclaiming a word Internet of the 18-year-old meant to put us down. It’s a having a sexual encounter celebration of our strength with another man. and pride as a community.” Clementi was one of six Queer Week featured reported teenagers from daily events including across the U.S. ranging panel discussions, various from ages 13 to 19 who took workshops, a “Coming Out” their own lives this Septempotluck and ended with ber as the result of Internet Chico State’s third bullying and harassment annual LGBTQ leadership regarding their sexual conference. identity. Jillian Ruddell, director Gay, straight, bisexual, of the Women’s Center, was lesbian, transgender, queer very pleased with the turn– it didn’t matter which oriout of students and allies entation, as hundreds of this year, she said. students came out and cele“I hope that students are brated their sexuality while empowered and understand addressing the that expression of self and issues individuality is something we do celebrate,” Ruddell said about the Women’s Center. “We are a space that is accepting and happy for these students who are choosing to come out of their bubble and step into an atmosphere that they may not have experienced before.” Every event that took place was significant in its own way, Lyons said. Each had ER ILY WALK ION • EM its own message, but n T HE OR n’s Ce Wome cusalso fit together and , ll e d Rud dis UT Jill s at a panel Week. O K A eak SPE eer ctor sp t of Qu ter dire sday as par e sion Tu Kelly Smith

faced by the LGBTQ community at Chico State’s third annual Queer Week. The Women’s Center hosted the weeklong event starting Oct. 4, which centered on the theme “Pride not Prejudice.” The event kicked off with a pride march in Trinity Commons where more than 100 students came together and proudly marched downtown as many onlookers joined in and supported the march. The original intention of Queer Week was to bring LGBTQ issues to campus, said Kerrie Lione, event coordinator for the Women’s Center. The goal was to showcase and educate people who weren’t familiar with LGBTQ issues. Senior Aaron Lyons, a musical theater

preached understanding and acceptance. Lyons thought the panel discussions were especially significant, he said. He particularly enjoyed the guest panels because it was a very personal experience for everyone involved. Sometimes the smallest groups and smallest interactions can have the most impact on people, he said. The Cross-Cultural Leadership Center teamed up with the Women’s Center for the event and held a “Coming Out” potluck. “We were able to talk about people’s personal experiences with coming out and ways people can assist others with the coming-out process,” Lione

said. “We also discussed the six recent suicides because it’s really affecting everybody – we really want to find ways to reach those people before it’s too late.” Lyons thinks it’s critical for people to come out and be who they are, but it’s not something people should take lightly, he said. “In many cases, it allows the person more freedom than anything else,” he said. “You no longer have to hide yourself and it gives you a strong sense of pride. I came out in college which was the perfect time for me, although the timing is different for everyone.” Kelly Smith can be reached at ksmiththeorion.com

THE ORION • EMILY WALK

ER GUITA R HERO Shaw na Virago plays the guitar du ring a queer week event Fri day.

Y COKER THE ORION • KENNED

tluck where “Coming Out” po e th r fo er th ga ts suicide s. SU PP ORT Studen d the si x re cent COM ING OU T TO ’s ex perience with coming out an le they discuss pe op

THE

ORION • KENNEDY COKER CONNECTING Jackey Humphrey-Straub speaks during the build ing connections workshop, “Identifying Safe Networks.”


E ATT U F EF A URRE SE S

always online >> theorion.com

LOOKING BACK >>

c. 1975

c. 1980

c. 1980

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 13, 2010 |

1986 | Print yearbooks gone, memories remain at library THEN “Association raises both friends and funds” Oct. 22, 1986 As a non-profit service to the university, the Chico State Alumni Association links current students, alumni and the university together. It has kept in touch with graduates and raised funds for university projects, said Mary Casamajor, former director of the association. From 1969-1986, the association raised more than $150,000

for school projects, she said. One project was the university’s yearbook, which did not exist during the 1970s, but was able to begin again in 1980 largely through alumni financial support. The association also loaned more than $200,000 in emergency loan funds through the financial aid office, Casamajor said. However, money isn’t the only reason the association exists. “We’re a ‘friend-raiser’ before we’re a fundraiser,” Casamajor said.

The association kept in touch with former graduates, utilizing them as guest lecturers and counselors on campus, she said. Alumni represent Chico State and serve as recruiters for the campus. When graduates move to new areas and struggle meeting new people, Chico State alumni chapters help connect graduates to each other, Casamajor said. The alumni association’s primary goal is to serve graduates who enjoyed the Chico State experience and want to stay in touch.

c. 1981

A: Eye Love Peace is a concept suggesting that naturally, it pleases the eye to view peace. Peace is the earth’s natural state of being – it cannot be made, it can only be. Eye Love Peace spreads this concept. Doing a little less is one way to let there be more peace.

QA &

c. 1983

THE ORION • KELLY SMITH

HE LOVES PEACE DeMario Glemann wears the logo he designed for Eye Love Peace.

c. 1985 THE ORION • SARAH BROWN

KEEPING RECORD People can look through yearbooks at Special Collections in the Merriam Library or on its website. Although yearbooks returned in 1976, they were discontinued in 1997.

c. 1986

c. 1988

c. 1988

c. 1995

NOW The Alumni Association, now incorporated into the office of Alumni and Parent Relations, continues its mission “to enrich the Chico experience by supporting alumni, students and the university to ensure a lifelong connection and enduring legacy,” according to its website. The office manages alumni chapters, offers scholarships and advocates for California State University issues, among other things, said Sue Anderson, director of Alumni and Parent Relations. One of the most recent projects includes the first Chico Experience Week, which started Friday and will run through

Sunday. It’s an event designed for alumni visitors, but also unites Chico and the university. The office still raises money for scholarships and other projects that would directly impact students, she said. As for yearbooks, however, Chico State has once again discontinued printing those since the 1990s. The earliest record of something akin to a yearbook at Chico State was “The Normal Record,” started in 1896, said George Thompson, head of the Library Special Collections Office. It went through a few changes up until 1970 when cost forced the university to discontinue making them. The yearbook made a comeback from 1976 until 1997, but the university hasn’t had another

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one since, he said. This semester, special collections has been scanning and uploading all the old yearbooks onto its website. This news is exciting for the alumni office, Anderson said. Having access to yearbooks is important, especially when someone wants to look through old pictures as their reunion approaches. Despite the benefit of new technologies, printed yearbooks should still be created, she said. Photos that are taken today might not be available 50 years from now. “I still really appreciate the tangible, historic records like yearbooks,” Anderson said. -Compiled by Sarah Brown

D3

Campus Spotlight: DeMario Glemann starts concept to spread love, peace

DeMario Glemann thinks doing less with more purpose is one way to bring about peace. The young entrepreneur from Larkfield-Wikiup, Calif., has applied this concept to a business that he hopes will bring about peace as well as help people to reach their goals. Q: What is the concept behind Eye Love Peace?

Q: What is the inspiration behind the symbol itself? A: I come from a design background, I feel it’s the original way to communicate. It’s interesting how you can use simple lines and shapes and apply meaning to it. The elements of the symbol aren’t mine, but when put together, they mean something so much more. The symbol itself is copyrighted, but anyone can draw it. Q: What is your goal for this business? A: I want the things that I produce to have purpose and meaning. Hopefully my ideas can influence others. I want to spread the message of Eye Love Peace before I start to sell products featuring the symbol. Q: As a young entrepreneur, what was your fi rst business? A: I had my first business when I was in the ninth grade. I would make custom macramé bracelets using hemp and beads. I let my friends choose which colors, patterns and beads and charged $5. Q: How has the concept of Eye Love Peace influenced your own life? A: My relationship with my girlfriend is much more peaceful because I’ve learned not to argue as much. My goal is to have a great relationship with my girlfriend and in order to reach that, arguing is something I’m striving to do less of. Q: How are you promoting this idea? A: I’m trying to spread the word – one fl ier at a time. -Compiled by Kelly Smith

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D4 |

F E AT U R E S

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 13, 2010

Students get real, help girls PHOTO COURTESY OF • MICHAEL MANN

MENTORING YOUTH Students from Chico Junior High collaborate during an activity that Chico State students came up with for the Reaching for Excellence in All of Life program, which runs for two days. Ally Dukkers STAFF WRITER

Something seemed wrong to senior Julie Matthews, a health science major, when she noticed the usually outgoing girl from Chico Junior High School was suddenly quiet and would not participate in class activities. After some hesitation, the girl opened up to Matthews, saying boys had ridiculed her

in class, calling her “Shamu.” She told Matthews she was not going to eat until the fat jokes ceased. Junior high can be a rough couple of years for many adolescent girls, but with mentoring and can help. Every semester, students from the health education techniques class from Chico State work with a group of girls from Chico Junior High School to help them cope with their

problems and learn about body image, sexual health, depression, stress and alcohol and drug education. When Michael Mann, a health science professor, began teaching health education techniques, he was surprised to see the students in the class were almost all female, he said. Having worked with high-risk children in the past, he thought this would be the perfect opportunity to set up a

program for his students to be mentors to girls going through a difficult time. REAL Girls, which stands for Reaching for Excellence in All of Life, is a two-day workshop with the junior high girls, but Chico State students spend most of the semester researching and developing it, Mann said. “It is a completely student-led and student-owned program,” he said. “It is my job to support them and keep them moving in the right direction.” Mann is proud of the work his students are doing, he said. Many of the students are so passionate about REAL Girls that they continue working with the girls in an after-school program once a week for 10 weeks, where they help the girls with their homework and discuss situations and troubles they are facing, Matthews said. The two-day program has been a component in the health techniques class for four years, Mann said. The after-school program was developed a year later. He plans to continue the program because the students are always excited about it and gain from the experience, he

always online >> theorion.com said. “I have very high expectations,” Mann said. “Every semester they exceed my expectations.” The students in the health techniques class conduct surveys and evaluations on the girls to find out what issues they are concerned with or dealing with in their lives, Matthews said. The class then splits into teams to develop a program including activities and discussions that the students think will benefit the girls. After each team presents its proposed program, the class decides which program they want to bring to Chico Junior High School. The strength of the program comes from the quality of the people in the major, Mann said. “It’s a perfect combination of very skilled people who are also very giving, which makes this program so successful,” he said. Each Chico State student is assigned two to three “little sisters” who they will mentor and work closely with, Matthews said. Matthews has already completed the health techniques class and is now in her fourth week at the after-school program, Matthews said. She has

a close relationship with her little sisters as well as some of the other girls. Matthews likes to spend oneon-one time with the girls and will sometimes pick her little sisters up from school, she said. She has taken one out to dinner, one out to ice cream and been to another girl’s piano recital. “They really open up to me when I take them away from the school environment,” she said. The attention Chico State students give the girls means a lot to them, said Patty Haley, a counselor at Chico Junior High School. Matthews and her classmates provide support for their younger peers, she said. She told the girl who had been struggling with name-calling and weight issues that if she wanted to lose weight, she should do it for herself. “Many of these girls don’t have anyone to connect with and don’t have good relationships in their life,” Matthews said. “They walk away from this program knowing ‘someone cares about me and supports me.’” Ally Dukkers can be reached at adukkers@theorion.com

WINDMILL: Auction to be held in April continued from A1

THE ORION • RYAN RICHARDS

“TO INFINITY AND BEYOND” [from left, clockwise] Stefanie Volk, Jay Virdee, Brooke Poggi and Juan Alcala work on a Toy Story themed windmill during the windmill building competition Saturday.

to create the swamp, said senior Nicole Talisse. The base of the windmill was made from paper mache and the propellers are used rain gutters. The swamp was an old fire pit, and the smoke coming out of the swamp was made from dry ice, she said. An old bucket, bicycle wheel, shoe laces, chicken wire and old water bottles for flowers were also used. To win the artistic category, Team Dr. Badger used many different materials, such as bamboo sticks, Styrofoam for the propeller and a steel bottom of a rolling chair, said senior Calley Smith.

In order to win the functional category, contestants needed to create something that would actually move with the wind, said William Loker, one of the judges and dean of Undergraduate Education. If it generated electricity, it was a plus. To win this category, CSUC eggbeaters made their windmill out of a used tire, two bike hubs, wood, cardboard and some electronic components, said junior Steven Lemos. The team was trying to give power to a USB port so that the iPods could charge. Participants 18 years old and younger participated in the juniors, which is where parents

Josh Gettis and JoAna Brooks signed up with their daughters Ruby and Fiona Brooks after hearing about the event at the City of Chico kick-off and reading the book, Brooks said. The kids worked on the windmill as an after school project on Fridays. The students used rolled-up paper for support, cookie dough bucket, recycled mini blinds for the propellers, and shoe boxes, Gettis said. When Kamkwamba comes to Chico State to speak in April, the windmills will be auctioned off and the money will go toward Moving Windmills, his non-profit organization that

built facilities for schools and supplied books for libraries, Morris said First year students were part of organizing the event, she said. The goal of the First-Year Experience is to involve students in organizations so they can have an identity as part of a member of the community, not just a student. “Involving them in projects like this is how the organization helps freshmen connect with the community and campus in a meaningful way,” Morris said. Tasha Clark can be reached at tclark@theorion.com

THE ORION • ELI MAY

A WORK OF ART Graphic designer Jake Early stands where the original twisted slide at Caper Acres once was. He wanted to buy the slide when he found out it was available, but someone beat him to it.

THE ORION • ELI MAY

CRUISE CONTROL Jake Early’s first print captures the bike-friendly atmosphere of Chico. Close inspection reveals a hidden message inside the front weel, which reads “Today Decides Tomorrow.”

Jake Early draws crowd at unveiling of artwork Sarah Brown STAFF WRITER

Crowds lined up at the Chico Paper Co. Thursday night in anticipation for the Friday unveiling of Chico-inspired artwork as part of the kick-off event for The Chico Experience Week. Jake Early, a local graphic design artist and Chico State alumnus, revealed the first of five serigraph prints he made in honor of the Chico experience. The week, running from Oct. 8-17, is hosted by the office of Alumni and Parent Relations

and includes more than 80 events around town. Early Kickoff for the Chico Experience A survey of alumni revealed nine attributes that depict what the Chico experience was for them while they attended Chico State, said Sue Anderson, director of Alumni and Parent Relations. The attributes include the obvious — such as trees, bike friendliness, fun, Bidwell Park and creeks and bridges. Other attributes include the proximity of Chico State to

downtown, supportive staff and professors at Chico State and job opportunities. To kick off Chico State’s version of a homecoming, the alumni association invited Early to create a series of serigraphs over the next five years incorporating those attributes, she said. Early was a logical choice for the project because he’s from Chico and is the iconic Chico artist at the moment. The host of the event, Chico Paper Co., is owned by alumni as well. “It just felt like the right fit,” Anderson said.

The crowd gathered around the first of Early’s Chico Experience prints, which had been veiled up to that point. Short speeches were given by Early and President Paul Zingg before the veil was removed to reveal a red bicycle on a green background. Alumnus Tim Lehor thinks Early’s prints are a fair representation of the Chico lifestyle. “I just like his style,” Lehor said. “He captures the city of Chico well.” Early Years Early was 7 years old when he first tried to learn how to draw hands, he said. He and his friends were supposed to walk to an art student’s house after school for lessons, but they didn’t know how to get there. “We just looked for the water towers because I knew if we could find those, then we could find her house,” Early said. They succeeded in finding the house, but Early failed at being able to draw hands well, he said.

However, it was his hands and those water towers that brought him success in graphic design 25 years later. Early Serigraphs Early graduated from Chico State in 1994 majoring in graphic design, he said. Four years later, he landed a job at Enloe Medical Center as its graphic artist , making brochures, newsletters, taking photographs and designing the hospital’s first website. “I was the whole art department for Enloe,” Early said. During that time, he began to miss screen printing, so he built a printing press in his garage and designed three serigraph prints for fun – the first being the water towers on Orient and Third streets, he said. He gave prints to friends and tried selling them at the Chico Certified Farmers’ Market and the Chico Museum. As soon as Jana Strong, owner of Chico Paper Co., saw Early’s water tower print, she was hooked, she said. Without hesitation, she began buying and

rapidly selling series of his prints at her store. “His pieces have a huge demand and he became successful just doing what he loves,” Strong said. Early’s original handmade serigraph prints, made with bold colors and simple illustrative designs, capture locals’ attention because of the connection they feel with Chico, he said. People like Chico and there wasn’t much art available that depicted local landmarks. It’s all about place, Early said. When someone looks at his art, the hope is that they’ll feel like they’re in that place. Early’s art has been hanging in the windows of Chico Paper Co. for 10 years now, Strong said. Not only are the serigraphs valuable because of the small number available of each, but also because thousands of alumni have a lifetime connection to the area and see that in Early’s art. Sarah Brown can be reached at sbrown@theorion.com


E ATT U F EF A UR RE SE S

always online >> theorion.com

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 13, 2010 |

D5

ChicoChatter BULLETIN BOARD

This is your space to share thoughts, opinions, rants and raves and what life in Chico is about.

t and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just had a huge tes s over atâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; th at th really excited home ing go Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m at with and th this weekend.â&#x20AC;? Tanessa Vavva junior | recreation

Students, staďŹ&#x20AC; and community members are welcome to submit posts to featureseditor@theorion. com, Facebook or Twitter. Include your contact information. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Midterm over lapping causes a lot of stress and lack of sl eep. It sucks.â&#x20AC;?

#ChicoChatter

Patrick Potv

senior | busines

in

s management

â&#x20AC;&#x153;My eye has been twitch ing for the past week becau se of lack of sleep and stress.â&#x20AC;?

CATALYST: Raising awareness continued from D1

Kristine Steb bins senior | nursing

me want â&#x20AC;&#x153;Midterms make s.â&#x20AC;? tte Taco Bell and cigare Nicole White

freshmen | criminal just

ice

midted from nd s u a h x ta â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m e unders I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give to e terms. v a hers h c .â&#x20AC;? a te n y wh at o ce ll to you a m e h t mbila ca Bra lture Angeli gricu freshme

THE ORION â&#x20AC;˘ KENNEDY COKER

NOT A LAUGHING MATTER One of the more than 15 postcards Catalyst has received as of Friday.

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Modeled after PostSecret. com, Catalystâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign is meant to encourage people in the community to speak out anonymously, Heck said. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of prevention and community education. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are encouraging people to not only talk about stopping violence, but to send positive messages about their relationships as well,â&#x20AC;? she said. Catalyst has received more than 15 finished postcards as of Friday, said Lindsey

Hensher, the community education program coordinator for Catalyst. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They make my day when they come in,â&#x20AC;? Hensher said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very thoughtful.â&#x20AC;? Some of the postcards have said things such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;I helped her move out,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here to talk to you,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;To shallow men, stop hurtingâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t laugh about violence,â&#x20AC;? Hensher said. Women ages 16 to 24 experience the highest per capita rates of intimate violence â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one in 50 women of that age

group are victims, according to the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. Jennifer Christian, a senior psychology major and volunteer at Safe Place and Catalyst, put out a collection box and new postcards for students to pick up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great way for the students at Chico State to see the prevalence of domestic violence in our community,â&#x20AC;? she said. Amanda Jacobs can be reached at ajacobs@theorion.com

Domestic violence among college students

Postcards distributed at

1. Sixty percent of acquaintance rapes on college campuses occur in casual or steady dating relationships. 2. More than 13 percent of college women report they have been stalked. Of these, 42 percent were stalked by a boyfriend or exboyfriend. -The National Center for Victims of Crimes, Campus

â&#x20AC;˘ Has Beans CoďŹ&#x20AC;ee & Tea Co. - 501 Main St. â&#x20AC;˘ Cafe Flo - 365 E. Sixth St. â&#x20AC;˘ Beatnikâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CoďŹ&#x20AC;ee House & Breakfast Joint - 1387 E. Eighth St. â&#x20AC;˘ Cafe Culture - 931 W. Fifth St. â&#x20AC;˘Chico Peace and Justice Center - 526 Broadway St. â&#x20AC;˘ Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center - Bell Memorial Union Room 002 â&#x20AC;˘ Safe Place - Siskiyou Hall Room 115

Dating Violence Facts Sheets

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D6 |

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 13, 2010

F E AT U R E S

always online >> theorion.com We Also Accept:

Turn Your

All Metals CRV/Recyclables Car Batteries Iron/Tin Appliances

into

Located at 878 E 20th Street 530.343.7166 Mon-Fri: 8am-12pm, 1pm-4pm Sat: 8am-12pm Sun: closed

*NOTE: Call ahead for appliances Directly across from Sierra Nevada Brewery Also located in Oroville & Durham

Marie Callendar’s Restaurant & Bakery

1920 E. 20th St. 530.343.8800

$6.99 All You Can Eat Salad Bar with two drink purchases

HAPPY HOUR from 4–7 p.m. & 9 p.m. to closing Monday to Saturday All draft beer, wine and cocktails $2 OFF Show your school I.D. & get any pie for $6.99

(excluding fresh fruit and cheesecake)

Don’t forget Marie’s for breakfast every day of the week! (7–11 a.m.)

$4.99 BREAKFAST Present this coupon and enjoy any one breakfast for $4.99 (excluding Sunday Brunch buffet)

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HAPPY HOUR

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from 3–6 p.m.& 9 p.m. to closing

from 2–6 p.m. & 9 p.m. to closing

7 days a week

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Ladies Night every Thursday with great drink specials!

$2.99 Domestic Drafts $2.99 Tall Sierra Nevada $1 OFF all Well drinks $1 OFF our famous Roadhouse Tea 1/2 OFF all appetizers

Wednesday Night is Industry Night!

Show your school I.D. for 15% off your bill!

DRINK SPECIALS $3 Domestic Brewtus $4 Micro Brewtus $3 House Wines $3 House Margaritas $3 Well Drinks HALF OFF ALL APPETIZERS

Issue 8  

The Orion newspaper, issue 8.